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Sample records for abnormal cytokine secretion

  1. Interactive Cytokine Regulation of Synoviocyte Lubricant Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Blewis, Megan E.; Lao, Brian J.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Bugbee, William D.; Firestein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine regulation of synovial fluid (SF) lubricants, hyaluronan (HA), and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is important in health, injury, and disease of synovial joints, and may also provide powerful regulation of lubricant secretion in bioreactors for articulating tissues. This study assessed lubricant secretion rates by human synoviocytes and the molecular weight (MW) of secreted lubricants in response to interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-17, IL-32, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), applied individually and in all combinations. Lubricant secretion rates were assessed using ELISA and binding assays, and lubricant MW was assessed using gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. HA secretion rates were increased ∼40-fold by IL-1β, and increased synergistically to ∼80-fold by the combination of IL-1β + TGF-β1 or TNF-α + IL-17. PRG4 secretion rates were increased ∼80-fold by TGF-β1, and this effect was counterbalanced by IL-1β and TNF-α. HA MW was predominantly <1 MDa for controls and individual cytokine stimulation, but was concentrated at >3 MDa after stimulation by IL-1β + TGF-β1 + TNF-α to resemble the distribution in human SF. PRG4 MW was unaffected by cytokines and similar to that in human SF. These results contribute to an understanding of the relationship between SF cytokine and lubricant content in health, injury, and disease, and provide approaches for using cytokines to modulate lubricant secretion rates and MW to help achieve desired lubricant composition of fluid in bioreactors. PMID:19908966

  2. Expression of Secreted Cytokine and Chemokine Inhibitors by Ectromelia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Vincent P.; Alcami, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    The production of secreted proteins that bind cytokines and block their activity has been well characterized as an immune evasion strategy of the orthopoxviruses vaccinia virus (VV) and cowpox virus (CPV). However, very limited information is available on the expression of similar cytokine inhibitors by ectromelia virus (EV), a virulent natural mouse pathogen that causes mousepox. We have characterized the expression and binding properties of three major secreted immunomodulatory activities in 12 EV strains and isolates. Eleven of the 12 EVs expressed a soluble, secreted 35-kDa viral chemokine binding protein with properties similar to those of homologous proteins from VV and CPV. All of the EVs expressed soluble, secreted receptors that bound to mouse, human, and rat tumor necrosis factor alpha. We also detected the expression of a soluble, secreted interleukin-1β (IL-1β) receptor (vIL-1βR) by all of the EVs. EV differed from VV and CPV in that binding of human 125I-IL-1β to the EV vIL-1βR could not be detected. Nevertheless, the EV vIL-1βR prevented the interaction of human and mouse IL-1β with cellular receptors. There are significant differences in amino acid sequence between the EV vIL-1βR and its VV and CPV homologs which may account for the results of the binding studies. The conservation of these activities in EV suggests evolutionary pressure to maintain them in a natural poxvirus infection. Mousepox represents a useful model for the study of poxvirus pathogenesis and immune evasion. These findings will facilitate future study of the role of EV immunomodulatory factors in the pathogenesis of mousepox. PMID:10954546

  3. Mechanisms of abnormal lamellar body secretion and the dysfunctional skin barrier in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Wakefield, Joan

    2014-01-01

    We review here how diverse inherited and acquired abnormalities in epidermal structural and enzymatic proteins converge to produce defective permeability barrier function and antimicrobial defense in AD. Although best known are mutations in filaggrin (FLG), mutations in other member of the fused S-100 family of proteins (i.e., hornerin [hrn] and filaggrin 2 [flg-2]); the cornified envelope precursor (e.g., SPRR3); mattrin, encoded by Tmem79, which regulates the assembly of lamellar bodies; SPINK5, which encodes the serine protease inhibitor, LEKTI1; and the fatty acid transporter, FATP4, have all been linked to AD. Yet, these abnormalities often only predispose to AD; additional acquired stressors that further compromise barrier function; e.g., psychological stress, a low ambient humidity, or high pH surfactants, often are required to trigger disease. Th2 cytokines can also compromise barrier function by downregulating expression of multiple epidermal structural proteins, lipid synthetic enzymes and antimicrobial peptides. All of these inherited and acquired abnormalities converge on the lamellar body secretory system, producing abnormalities in lipid composition, secretion and/or extracellular lamellar membrane organization, as well as in antimicrobial defense. Finally, we briefly review therapeutic options that address this new pathogenic paradigm. PMID:25131691

  4. Regulation of Neutrophil Degranulation and Cytokine Secretion: A Novel Model Approach Based on Linear Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Naegelen, Isabelle; Beaume, Nicolas; Plançon, Sébastien; Schenten, Véronique; Tschirhart, Eric J.; Bréchard, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils participate in the maintenance of host integrity by releasing various cytotoxic proteins during degranulation. Due to recent advances, a major role has been attributed to neutrophil-derived cytokine secretion in the initiation, exacerbation, and resolution of inflammatory responses. Because the release of neutrophil-derived products orchestrates the action of other immune cells at the infection site and, thus, can contribute to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases, we aimed to investigate in more detail the spatiotemporal regulation of neutrophil-mediated release mechanisms of proinflammatory mediators. Purified human neutrophils were stimulated for different time points with lipopolysaccharide. Cells and supernatants were analyzed by flow cytometry techniques and used to establish secretion profiles of granules and cytokines. To analyze the link between cytokine release and degranulation time series, we propose an original strategy based on linear fitting, which may be used as a guideline, to (i) define the relationship of granule proteins and cytokines secreted to the inflammatory site and (ii) investigate the spatial regulation of neutrophil cytokine release. The model approach presented here aims to predict the correlation between neutrophil-derived cytokine secretion and degranulation and may easily be extrapolated to investigate the relationship between other types of time series of functional processes. PMID:26579547

  5. Cytokine release syndrome after blinatumomab treatment related to abnormal macrophage activation and ameliorated with cytokine-directed therapy.

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Rheingold, Susan R; Maude, Shannon L; Zugmaier, Gerhard; Barrett, David M; Seif, Alix E; Nichols, Kim E; Suppa, Erica K; Kalos, Michael; Berg, Robert A; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Aplenc, Richard; Gore, Lia; Grupp, Stephan A

    2013-06-27

    Blinatumomab is a CD19/CD3-bispecific T-cell receptor-engaging (BiTE) antibody with efficacy in refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Some patients treated with blinatumomab and other T cell-activating therapies develop cytokine release syndrome (CRS). We hypothesized that patients with more severe toxicity may experience abnormal macrophage activation triggered by the release of cytokines by T-cell receptor-activated cytotoxic T cells engaged by BiTE antibodies and leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). We prospectively monitored a patient during blinatumomab treatment and observed that he developed HLH. He became ill 36 hours into the infusion with fever, respiratory failure, and circulatory collapse. He developed hyperferritinemia, cytopenias, hypofibrinogenemia, and a cytokine profile diagnostic for HLH. The HLH continued to progress after discontinuation of blinatumomab; however, he had rapid improvement after IL-6 receptor-directed therapy with tocilizumab. Patients treated with T cell-activating therapies, including blinatumomab, should be monitored for HLH, and cytokine-directed therapy may be considered in cases of life-threatening CRS. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00103285. PMID:23678006

  6. A Secreted MIF Cytokine Enables Aphid Feeding and Represses Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Naessens, Elodie; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giordanengo, Philippe; Baron, Olga Lucia; Minet-Kebdani, Naïma; Keller, Harald; Coustau, Christine

    2015-07-20

    Aphids attack virtually all plant species and cause serious crop damages in agriculture. Despite their dramatic impact on food production, little is known about the molecular processes that allow aphids to exploit their host plants. To date, few aphid salivary proteins have been identified that are essential for aphid feeding, and their nature and function remain largely unknown. Here, we show that a macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is secreted in aphid saliva. In vertebrates, MIFs are important pro-inflammatory cytokines regulating immune responses. MIF proteins are also secreted by parasites of vertebrates, including nematodes, ticks, and protozoa, and participate in the modulation of host immune responses. The finding that a plant parasite secretes a MIF protein prompted us to question the role of the cytokine in the plant-aphid interaction. We show here that expression of MIF genes is crucial for aphid survival, fecundity, and feeding on a host plant. The ectopic expression of aphid MIFs in leaf tissues inhibits major plant immune responses, such as the expression of defense-related genes, callose deposition, and hypersensitive cell death. Functional complementation analyses in vivo allowed demonstrating that MIF1 is the member of the MIF protein family that allows aphids to exploit their host plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cytokine that is secreted by a parasite to modulate plant immune responses. Our findings suggest a so-far unsuspected conservation of infection strategies among parasites of animal and plant species. PMID:26119751

  7. Modulation of mast cell adhesion, proliferation, and cytokine secretion on electrospun bioresorbable vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Garg, K; Ryan, J J; Bowlin, G L

    2011-06-15

    Mast cells synthesize several potent angiogenic factors and can also stimulate fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. An understanding of how they participate in wound healing and angiogenesis is important to further our knowledge about in situ vascular prosthetic regeneration. The adhesion, proliferation, and cytokine secretion of bone marrow-derived murine mast cells (BMMC) on electrospun polydioxanone, polycaprolactone, and silk scaffolds, as well as tissue culture plastic, has been investigated in the presence or absence of IL-3, stem cell factor, IgE and IgE with a crosslinking antigen, dinitrophenol-conjugated albumin (DNP). It was previously believed that only activated BMMCs exhibit adhesion and cytokine secretion. However, this study shows nonactivated BMMC adhesion to electrospun scaffolds. Silk scaffold was not found to be conducive for mast cell adhesion and cytokine secretion. Activation by IgE and DNP significantly enhanced mast cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, and secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and IL-13. This indicates that mast cells might play a role in the process of biomaterial integration into the host tissue, regeneration, and possibly angiogenesis. PMID:21472976

  8. Impact of fexofenadine, osthole and histamine on peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Karolina Kordulewska, Natalia; Kostyra, Elżbieta; Matysiewicz, Michał; Cieślińska, Anna; Jarmołowska, Beata

    2015-08-15

    This paper compares results of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) incubation with fexofenadine (FXF) and osthole. FXF is a third-generation antihistamine drug and osthole is assumed a natural antihistamine alternative. To our best knowledge, this is the first comparative study on FXF, osthole and histamine cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity in PBMC in vitro cultures using cell proliferation ELISA BrdU. The cultures were treated 12, 42, 48 and 72h with FXF and osthole at 150, 300 and 450ng/ml concentrations and histamine at 50, 100 and 200ng/ml. Our study results confirm that FXF, osthole and histamine exert no cytotoxic effect on PBMCs and that IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α cytokine secretion following osthole cell stimulation was similar to that by FXF stimulation.This confirms our hypothesis that osthole is a natural histamine antagonist, and can therefore be beneficially applied in antihistamine treatment. PMID:26048308

  9. Cytokine secretion and NK cell activity in human ADAM17 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chavkin, Maor; Schmiedel, Dominik; Wong, Eitan; Werner, Marion; Yaacov, Barak; Averbuch, Diana; Molho-Pessach, Vered; Stepensky, Polina; Kaynan, Noa; Bar-On, Yotam; Seidel, Einat; Yamin, Rachel; Sagi, Irit; Elpeleg, Orly; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies provide insights into gene function in humans. Here we describe a patient with a very rare genetic deficiency of ADAM17. We show that the patient's PBMCs had impaired cytokine secretion in response to LPS stimulation, correlating with the clinical picture of severe bacteremia from which the patient suffered. ADAM17 was shown to cleave CD16, a major NK killer receptor. Functional analysis of patient's NK cells demonstrated that his NK cells express normal levels of activating receptors and maintain high surface levels of CD16 following mAb stimulation. Activation of individual NK cell receptors showed that the patient's NK cells are more potent when activated directly by CD16, albeit no difference was observed in Antibody Depedent Cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays. Our data suggest that ADAM17 inhibitors currently considered for clinical use to boost CD16 activity should be cautiously applied, as they might have severe side effects resulting from impaired cytokine secretion. PMID:26683521

  10. A polysaccharide carrier for immunostimulatory CpG DNAs to enhance cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Mizu, Masami; Koumoto, Kazuya; Anada, Takahisa; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Numata, Munenori; Shinkai, Seiji; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2004-07-14

    A beta-(1 --> 3)-d-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) forms a stoichiometric complex with some polynucleotides. This communication describes our attempt to apply the SPG complex to deliver CpG DNA to endosomes to enhance cytokine secretion. To increase cellular uptake, we introduced spermine, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid tripeptide, octaarginine, or cholesterol to the SPG side chain. The chemically modified SPG showed essentially no cytotoxicity. When CpG DNA complex made therefrom was exposed to macrophages, dramatic enhancement in the cytokine secretion was observed. It increased 5-10 times from the naked dose and 100 times from the background. This performance promises that SPG can be an excellent carrier for CpG DNA. PMID:15237982

  11. Increased Th2 cytokine secretion, eosinophilic airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness in neurturin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Michel, Tatiana; Thérésine, Maud; Poli, Aurélie; Domingues, Olivia; Ammerlaan, Wim; Brons, Nicolaas H C; Hentges, François; Zimmer, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor have been described to be involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. Neurturin (NTN), another neurotrophin from the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family, was shown to be produced by human immune cells: monocytes, B cells, and T cells. Furthermore, it was previously described that the secretion of inflammatory cytokines was dramatically stimulated in NTN knockout (NTN(-/-)) mice. NTN is structurally similar to TGF-β, a protective cytokine in airway inflammation. This study investigates the implication of NTN in a model of allergic airway inflammation using NTN(-/-) mice. The bronchial inflammatory response of OVA-sensitized NTN(-/-) mice was compared with wild-type mice. Airway inflammation, Th2 cytokines, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) were examined. NTN(-/-) mice showed an increase of OVA-specific serum IgE and a pronounced worsening of inflammatory features. Eosinophil number and IL-4 and IL-5 concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were increased. In parallel, Th2 cytokine secretion of lung draining lymph node cells was also augmented when stimulated by OVA in vitro. Furthermore, AHR was markedly enhanced in NTN(-/-) mice after sensitization and challenge when compared with wild-type mice. Administration of NTN before challenge with OVA partially rescues the phenotype of NTN(-/-) mice. These findings provide evidence for a dampening role of NTN on allergic inflammation and AHR in a murine model of asthma. PMID:21508262

  12. Lipocalin 2 expression and secretion is highly regulated by metabolic stress, cytokines, and nutrients in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Foncea, Rocio; Deis, Jessica A; Guo, Hong; Bernlohr, David A; Chen, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) has been recently characterized as a new adipokine having a role in innate immunity and energy metabolism. Nonetheless, the metabolic regulation of Lcn2 production in adipocytes has not been comprehensively studied. To better understand the Lcn2 biology, we investigated the regulation of Lcn2 expression in adipose tissue in response to metabolic stress in mice as well as the control of Lcn2 expression and secretion by cytokines and nutrients in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our results showed that the mRNA expression of Lcn2 was upregulated in white and brown adipose tissues as well as liver during fasting and cold stress in mice. Among pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6, IL-1β showed most profound effect on Lcn2 expression and secretion in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Insulin stimulated Lcn2 expression and secretion in a dose-dependent manner; this insulin effect was significantly abolished in the presence of low concentration of glucose. Moreover, insulin-stimulated Lcn2 expression and secretion was also attenuated when glucose was replaced by 3-O-methyl-d-glucose or by blocking NFκB pathway activation. Additionally, we showed that palmitate and oleate induced Lcn2 expression and secretion more significantly than EPA, while phytanic acid reduced Lcn2 production. Our results demonstrated that Lcn2 production in adipocytes is highly responsive to metabolic stress, cytokines, and nutrient signals, suggesting an important role of Lcn2 in adipocyte metabolism and inflammation. PMID:24818605

  13. DNA methylation differentially regulates cytokine secretion in gingival epithelia in response to bacterial challenges.

    PubMed

    Drury, Jeanie L; Chung, Whasun Oh

    2015-03-01

    Epigenetic modifications are changes in gene expression without altering DNA sequence. We previously reported that bacteria-specific innate immune responses are regulated by epigenetic modifications. Our hypothesis is that DNA methylation affects gingival cytokine secretion in response to bacterial stimulation. Gingival epithelial cells (GECs) were treated with DNMT-1 inhibitors prior to Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) or Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) exposure. Protein secretion was assessed using ELISA. Gene expression was quantified using qRT-PCR. The ability of bacteria to invade inhibitor pretreated GECs was assessed utilizing flow cytometry. Changes were compared to unstimulated GECs. GEC upregulation of IL-6 and CXCL1 by Pg or Fn stimulation was significantly diminished by inhibitor pretreatment. Pg stimulated IL-1α secretion and inhibitor pretreatment significantly enhanced this upregulation, while Fn alone or with inhibitor pretreatment had no effect on IL-1α expression. GEC upregulation of human beta-definsin-2 in response to Pg and Fn exposure was enhanced following the inhibitor pretreatment. GEC susceptibility to bacterial invasion was unaltered. These results suggest that DNA methylation differentially affects gingival cytokine secretion in response to Pg or Fn. Our data provide basis for better understanding of how epigenetic modifications, brought on by exposure to oral bacteria, will subsequently affect host susceptibility to oral diseases. PMID:25722484

  14. TREK-1 Regulates Cytokine Secretion from Cultured Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Independently of Cytoskeletal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Roan, Esra; Teng, Bin; Waters, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Background TREK-1 deficient alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) secrete less IL-6, more MCP-1, and contain less F-actin. Whether these alterations in cytokine secretion and F-actin content are related remains unknown. We now hypothesized that cytokine secretion from TREK-1-deficient AECs was regulated by cytoskeletal rearrangements. Methods We determined F-actin and α-tubulin contents of control, TREK-1-deficient and TREK-1-overexpressing human A549 cells by confocal microscopy and western blotting, and measured IL-6 and MCP-1 levels using real-time PCR and ELISA. Results Cytochalasin D decreased the F-actin content of control cells. Jasplakinolide increased the F-actin content of TREK-1 deficient cells, similar to the effect of TREK-1 overexpression in control cells. Treatment of control and TREK-1 deficient cells with TNF-α, a strong stimulus for IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion, had no effect on F-actin structures. The combination of TNF-α+cytochalasin D or TNF-α+jasplakinolide had no additional effect on the F-actin content or architecture when compared to cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide alone. Although TREK-1 deficient AECs contained less F-actin at baseline, quantified biochemically, they contained more α-tubulin. Exposure to nocodazole disrupted α-tubulin filaments in control and TREK-1 deficient cells, but left the overall amount of α-tubulin unchanged. Although TNF-α had no effect on the F-actin or α-tubulin contents, it increased IL-6 and MCP-1 production and secretion from control and TREK-1 deficient cells. IL-6 and MCP-1 secretions from control and TREK-1 deficient cells after TNF-α+jasplakinolide or TNF-α+nocodazole treatment was similar to the effect of TNF-α alone. Interestingly, cytochalasin D decreased TNF-α-induced IL-6 but not MCP-1 secretion from control but not TREK-1 deficient cells. Conclusion Although cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide and nocodazole altered the F-actin and α-tubulin structures of control and TREK-1 deficient AEC, the

  15. Vesicular Trafficking and Signaling for Cytokine and Chemokine Secretion in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Ulrich; Madera-Salcedo, Iris Karina; Danelli, Luca; Claver, Julien; Tiwari, Neeraj; Sánchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Ramírez-Valadez, Karla Alina; Macias-Silva, Marina; González-Espinosa, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation mast cells (MCs) secrete numerous inflammatory compounds stored in their cytoplasmic secretory granules by a process called anaphylactic degranulation, which is responsible for type I hypersensitivity responses. Prestored mediators include histamine and MC proteases but also some cytokines and growth factors making them available within minutes for a maximal biological effect. Degranulation is followed by the de novo synthesis of lipid mediators such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes as well as a vast array of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, which are responsible for late phase inflammatory responses. While lipid mediators diffuse freely out of the cell through lipid bilayers, both anaphylactic degranulation and secretion of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors depends on highly regulated vesicular trafficking steps that occur along the secretory pathway starting with the translocation of proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. Vesicular trafficking in MCs also intersects with endocytic routes, notably to form specialized cytoplasmic granules called secretory lysosomes. Some of the mediators like histamine reach granules via specific vesicular monoamine transporters directly from the cytoplasm. In this review, we try to summarize the available data on granule biogenesis and signaling events that coordinate the complex steps that lead to the release of the inflammatory mediators from the various vesicular carriers in MCs. PMID:25295038

  16. High Cytokine Levels in Tonsillitis Secretions Regardless of Presence of Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Skovbjerg, Susann; Roos, Kristian; Olofsson, Sigvard; Lindh, Magnus; Ljung, Annika; Hynsjö, Lars; Holm, Stig E; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E

    2015-09-01

    Acute pharyngotonsillitis denotes tonsillar inflammation caused by bacteria or viruses. Here, we investigated if beta-hemolytic streptococci (β-HS) tonsillitis would differ in inflammatory mediator response from tonsillitis of other causes. Tonsillar secretions were obtained from 36 acute pharyngotonsillitis patients and 16 controls. Bacteria were cultured quantitatively and 18 different viruses were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cytokine and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Almost half of the patients' tonsillar secretions yielded high counts of β-HS, and most samples contained viruses, irrespective of whether β-HS were present or not. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was the most common virus (patients 62% and controls 13%). Compared to controls, patients' secretions had higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and PGE2, while few samples contained IL-12, IL-10, or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). The presence of β-HS in tonsillitis secretions could not be distinguished by any of the measured mediators, while the presence of EBV DNA tended to be associated with enhanced levels of IL-1β and IL-8. The results suggest a common inflammatory response in acute pharyngotonsillitis, regardless of causative agent. The suggested correlation between intense inflammation and the presence of EBV DNA in tonsillitis secretions may be due to reactivation of the virus and/or the EBV-containing B cells. PMID:26060912

  17. Viability, Apoptosis, Proliferation, Activation, and Cytokine Secretion of Human Keratoconus Keratocytes after Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Stachon, Tanja; Wang, Jiong; Seitz, Berthold; Szentmáry, Nóra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of cross-linking (CXL) on viability, apoptosis, proliferation, activation, and cytokine secretion of human keratoconus (KC) keratocytes, in vitro. Methods. Primary KC keratocytes were cultured in DMEM/Ham's F12 medium supplemented with 10% FCS and underwent UVA illumination (370 nm, 2 J/cm2) during exposure to 0.1% riboflavin and 20% Dextran in PBS. Twenty-four hours after CXL, viability was assessed using Alamar blue assay; apoptosis using APO-DIRECT Kit; proliferation using ELISA-BrdU kit; and CD34 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression using flow cytometry. Five and 24 hours after CXL, FGFb, HGF, TGFβ1, VEGF, KGF, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion was measured using enzyme-linked-immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). Results. Following CXL, cell viability and proliferation decreased (P < 0.05; P = 0.009), the percentage of apoptotic keratocytes increased (P < 0.05) significantly, and CD34 and α-SMA expression remained unchanged (P > 0.06). Five hours after CXL, FGFb secretion increased significantly (P = 0.037); however no other cytokine secretion differed significantly from controls after 5 or 24 hours (P > 0.12). Conclusions. Cross-linking decreases viability, triggers apoptosis, and inhibits proliferation, without an impact on multipotent hematopoietic stem cell transformation and myofibroblastic transformation of KC keratocytes. CXL triggers FGFb secretion of KC keratocytes transiently (5 hours), normalizing after 24 hours. PMID:25699261

  18. Yeast Modulation of Human Dendritic Cell Cytokine Secretion: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ida M.; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  19. Yeast modulation of human dendritic cell cytokine secretion: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  20. Type III secretion needle proteins induce cell signaling and cytokine secretion via Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Danielle L; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S; Nilles, Matthew L

    2014-06-01

    Pathogens are recognized by hosts by use of various receptors, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and Nod-like receptor (NLR) families. Ligands for these varied receptors, including bacterial products, are identified by the immune system, resulting in development of innate immune responses. Only a couple of components from type III secretion (T3S) systems are known to be recognized by TLR or NLR family members. Known T3S components that are detected by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are (i) flagellin, detected by TLR5 and NLRC4 (Ipaf); and (ii) T3S rod proteins (PrgJ and homologs) and needle proteins (PrgI and homologs), detected by NAIP and the NLRC4 inflammasome. In this report, we characterize the induction of proinflammatory responses through TLRs by the Yersinia pestis T3S needle protein, YscF, the Salmonella enterica needle proteins PrgI and SsaG, and the Shigella needle protein, MxiH. More specifically, we determine that the proinflammatory responses occur through TLR2 and -4. These data support the hypothesis that T3S needles have an unrecognized role in bacterial pathogenesis by modulating immune responses. PMID:24643544

  1. The effects of Saccharum officinarium (sugar cane) molasses on cytokine secretion by human blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Rahiman, Farzana; Pool, Edmund John

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of sugar cane molasses on the immune system, using cytokines as biomarkers. Whole blood cultures, stimulated in vitro with endotoxin or PHA, were incubated with various concentrations of molasses. No cell death occurred in whole blood cultures incubated with molasses samples. The addition of molasses (800 microg/mL) to unstimulated whole blood cultures resulted in increased levels of the biomarker of inflammation, Interleukin-6 (P < 0.001) and also the biomarker of humoral immunity, Interleukin-10 (P < 0.001). Molasses addition (800 microg/mL) to unstimulated whole blood cultures has no effect on the cell mediated immunity biomarker, Interferon gamma secretion. Molasses has no effect on Interleukin-6, Interleukin-10 and Interferon gamma secretion in stimulated whole blood cultures. Immunostimulation by molasses requires further investigation as it may have potential health impacts. PMID:20391026

  2. The relationship between some endometrial secretion cytokines and in vitro fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Rahiminejad, Mohammad Ehsan; Moaddab, Amirhossein; Ebrahimi, Mehrnoosh; Rabiee, Soghra; Zamani, Alireza; Ezzati, Mohammad; Abdollah Shamshirsaz, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endometrial secretion analysis is a non-invasive and promising method in evaluation of endometrial receptivity. Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between the success rate of IVF procedures and some endometrial secretion cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10), and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP). Materials and Methods: In a prospective cohort study, 50 women selected for IVF met the study inclusion criteria. All the patients underwent endometrial secretion aspiration prior to embryo transfer. The level of IL-1β, TNF-α, IP-10 and MCP were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method using special standard kits. To detect successful implantation and pregnancy patients underwent serum human chorionic gonadotropin measurements and ultrasound evaluation. Results: Five samples were excluded. Nine women (20%) had successful clinical pregnancies, which resulted in live birth. Other 36 women (80%) were classified as failed pregnancy. Comparison of cytokine levels showed lower concentrations of TNF-α, IP-10, and MCP in the group with successful clinical pregnancy compared to the group with failed pregnancy (p=0.007, 0.005 and 0.001, respectively). However, no significant difference was revealed in IL-1β levels between two groups (p=0.614). Conclusion: The current study suggested that lower concentrations of TNF-α, IP-10, and MCP in endometrial secretions might be associated with improved endometrial receptivity and IVF outcome. Regarding IL-1β, no statistically significant differences were seen between the groups with and without successful pregnancy. PMID:26568760

  3. Resolvins Decrease Oxidative Stress Mediated Macrophage and Epithelial Cell Interaction through Decreased Cytokine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Ruan; Phillips, Oluwakemi; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Fukumoto, Itsuko; Tamarapu Parthasarathy, Prasanna; Mandry, Maria; Cho, Young; Lockey, Richard; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation is a key hallmark of ALI and is mediated through ungoverned cytokine signaling. One such cytokine, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) has been demonstrated to be the most bioactive cytokine in ALI patients. Macrophages are the key players responsible for IL-1β secretion into the alveolar space. Following the binding of IL-1β to its receptor, “activated” alveolar epithelial cells show enhanced barrier dysfunction, adhesion molecule expression, cytokine secretion, and leukocyte attachment. More importantly, it is an important communication molecule between the macrophage and alveolar epithelium. While the molecular determinants of this inflammatory event have been well documented, endogenous resolution processes that decrease IL-1β secretion and resolve alveolar epithelial cell activation and tissue inflammation have not been well characterized. Lipid mediator Aspirin-Triggered Resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) has demonstrated potent pro-resolutionary effects in vivo models of lung injury; however, the contribution of the alveoli to the protective benefits of this molecule has not been well documented. In this study, we demonstrate that AT-RvD1 treatment lead to a significant decrease in oxidant induced macrophage IL-1β secretion and production, IL-1β-mediated cytokine secretion, adhesion molecule expression, leukocyte adhesion and inflammatory signaling. Methods THP-1 macrophages were treated with hydrogen peroxide and extracellular ATP in the presence or absence of AT-RvD1 (1000–0.1 nM). A549 alveolar-like epithelial cells were treated with IL-1β (10 ng/mL) in the presence or absence of AT-RvD1 (0.1 μM). Following treatment, cell lysate and cell culture supernatants were collected for Western blot, qPCR and ELISA analysis of pro-inflammatory molecules. Functional consequences of IL-1β induced alveolar epithelial cell and macrophage activation were also measured following treatment with IL-1β ± AT-RvD1. Results Results demonstrate that

  4. Cripto-1 modulates macrophage cytokine secretion and phagocytic activity via NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-mei; Bao, Yong-Li; Yu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-meng; Song, Zhen-Bo

    2016-02-01

    Cripto-1 is an oncogenic protein belonging to the epidermal growth factor–Cripto-1/FRL-1/Cryptic family. It has important roles in tumor formation and metastasis, but its effects on the immune system are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Cripto-1 overexpression on macrophage activities and examined the underlying mechanisms. A cell line stably overexpressing Cripto-1 was developed. The culture supernatant from this cell line was collected and used to condition macrophages (RAW264.7, THP-1, and primary mouse macrophages) for various times. Exposure to this supernatant significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and of three pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, and IL-1β), but did not affect the expression of transforming growth factor-β, another anti-inflammatory cytokine. Exposure to this supernatant also enhanced macrophage phagocytosis of chicken erythrocytes and yeast cells. Similar effects were observed in macrophages stimulated with purified Cripto-1 protein. Mechanistic experiments revealed that Cripto-1 activated nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling by inducing IκB kinase phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation. Pretreatment with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a specific NF-κB inhibitor, inhibited Cripto-1-induced cytokine secretion and phagocytosis of macrophages. Taken together, our present findings suggest that Cripto-1 enhances macrophage phagocytic activity and upregulates the production of anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines via the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26476731

  5. Optineurin deficiency in mice contributes to impaired cytokine secretion and neutrophil recruitment in bacteria-driven colitis.

    PubMed

    Chew, Thean S; O'Shea, Nuala R; Sewell, Gavin W; Oehlers, Stefan H; Mulvey, Claire M; Crosier, Philip S; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka; Bloom, Stuart L; Smith, Andrew M; Segal, Anthony W

    2015-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance at sites of acute inflammation as a result of impaired secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages. To investigate the impaired cytokine secretion and confirm our previous findings, we performed transcriptomic analysis in macrophages and identified a subgroup of individuals with CD who had low expression of the autophagy receptor optineurin (OPTN). We then clarified the role of OPTN deficiency in: macrophage cytokine secretion; mouse models of bacteria-driven colitis and peritonitis; and zebrafish Salmonella infection. OPTN-deficient bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with heat-killed Escherichia coli secreted less proinflammatory TNFα and IL6 cytokines despite similar gene transcription, which normalised with lysosomal and autophagy inhibitors, suggesting that TNFα is mis-trafficked to lysosomes via bafilomycin-A-dependent pathways in the absence of OPTN. OPTN-deficient mice were more susceptible to Citrobacter colitis and E. coli peritonitis, and showed reduced levels of proinflammatory TNFα in serum, diminished neutrophil recruitment to sites of acute inflammation and greater mortality, compared with wild-type mice. Optn-knockdown zebrafish infected with Salmonella also had higher mortality. OPTN plays a role in acute inflammation and neutrophil recruitment, potentially via defective macrophage proinflammatory cytokine secretion, which suggests that diminished OPTN expression in humans might increase the risk of developing CD. PMID:26044960

  6. Optineurin deficiency in mice contributes to impaired cytokine secretion and neutrophil recruitment in bacteria-driven colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Thean S.; O'Shea, Nuala R.; Sewell, Gavin W.; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Mulvey, Claire M.; Crosier, Philip S.; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka; Bloom, Stuart L.; Smith, Andrew M.; Segal, Anthony W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance at sites of acute inflammation as a result of impaired secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages. To investigate the impaired cytokine secretion and confirm our previous findings, we performed transcriptomic analysis in macrophages and identified a subgroup of individuals with CD who had low expression of the autophagy receptor optineurin (OPTN). We then clarified the role of OPTN deficiency in: macrophage cytokine secretion; mouse models of bacteria-driven colitis and peritonitis; and zebrafish Salmonella infection. OPTN-deficient bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with heat-killed Escherichia coli secreted less proinflammatory TNFα and IL6 cytokines despite similar gene transcription, which normalised with lysosomal and autophagy inhibitors, suggesting that TNFα is mis-trafficked to lysosomes via bafilomycin-A-dependent pathways in the absence of OPTN. OPTN-deficient mice were more susceptible to Citrobacter colitis and E. coli peritonitis, and showed reduced levels of proinflammatory TNFα in serum, diminished neutrophil recruitment to sites of acute inflammation and greater mortality, compared with wild-type mice. Optn-knockdown zebrafish infected with Salmonella also had higher mortality. OPTN plays a role in acute inflammation and neutrophil recruitment, potentially via defective macrophage proinflammatory cytokine secretion, which suggests that diminished OPTN expression in humans might increase the risk of developing CD. PMID:26044960

  7. Effect of nutrient starvation on proliferation and cytokine secretion of peripheral blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    OTA, YOSHIKO; ISHIHARA, SOICHIRO; OTANI, KENSUKE; YASUDA, KOJI; NISHIKAWA, TAKESHI; TANAKA, TOSHIAKI; TANAKA, JUNICHIRO; KIYOMATSU, TOMOMICHI; KAWAI, KAZUSHIGE; HATA, KEISUKE; NOZAWA, HIROAKI; KAZAMA, SHINSUKE; YAMAGUCHI, HIRONORI; SUNAMI, EIJI; KITAYAMA, JOJI; WATANABE, TOSHIAKI

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cancer cells are exposed to nutrient deprivation. Numerous previous studies have demonstrated how nutrient deprivation affects cancer cells; however, immune cells exposed to the identical conditions have not been completely examined. Furthermore, T-helper 2 lymphocyte predominance in certain neoplastic diseases has been reported; however, the mechanism remains unclear. The present study aimed to confirm whether nutrient deprivation affected proliferation and cytokine secretion of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). The proliferation of PBLs from healthy donors, cultured in a medium containing various glucose levels, was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) assay. The expression levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-γ among CD4(+) T cells, cultured with or without glucose and activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin, were examined using an intracellular cytokine staining method. The proliferation of PBLs cultured in a medium containing <100 mg/dl glucose of the standard blood sugar (BS) level was significantly reduced compared with the proliferation observed in a medium containing a standard BS level or higher. PBLs cultured in a glucose-free medium contained a significantly higher percentage of IL-4-positive and a lower percentage of IFN-γ-positive CD4(+) T cells compared with those cultured in a high-glucose medium. Nutrient deprivation suppressed the proliferation of PBLs, fostered the secretion of IL-4 and reduced secretion of IFN-γ. It is therefore possible that glucose-deficient microenvironments in local cancer tissues cause a partial immunodeficiency, which is advantageous to cancer growth. PMID:27073674

  8. Proteins and endotoxin in house dust mite extracts modulate cytokine secretion and gene expression by dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Jananie; Morgan, Marjorie S; Arlian, Larry G

    2013-11-01

    House dust mite extracts used for diagnostic tests and immunotherapy contain bioreactive molecules including proteins and endotoxin. These extracts can influence the cytokine secretion and adhesion molecule expression by cells in the skin and lung airways. The aim of this study was to determine the role of proteins and endotoxin in mite extracts in modulating gene expression and cytokine secretion by human dermal fibroblasts. Cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts were stimulated with whole mite extracts, mite extracts boiled to denature proteins, or mite extracts treated with polymyxin B to inactivate lipopolysaccharide. Gene expression and secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were determined after 6 h of stimulation. Whole Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus and Euroglyphus maynei extracts induced dose-dependent IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. In addition, D. farinae and E. maynei induced secretion of MCP-1. Dermatophagoides farinae and E. maynei also induced parallel cytokine gene expression. Cells stimulated with boiled D. farinae extract showed moderate to marked reductions in IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. In contrast, boiled D. pteronyssinus and E. maynei extracts induced equal or greater cytokine secretions than untreated extracts. The stimulating properties were reduced for all three extracts following treatment with polymyxin B. Our data suggest that both endotoxin and proteins in mite extracts modulate the secretion of cytokines by dermal fibroblasts. The biological activities of D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and E. maynei extracts are not equivalent. There appears to be a lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in some mite extracts. PMID:23640713

  9. Subfractions of enamel matrix derivative differentially influence cytokine secretion from human oral fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Oscar; Brookes, Steven J; Thiede, Bernd; Heijl, Lars; Lyngstadaas, Staale P

    2015-01-01

    Enamel matrix derivative is used to promote periodontal regeneration during the corrective phase of the treatment of periodontal defects. Our main goal was to analyze the bioactivity of different molecular weight fractions of enamel matrix derivative. Enamel matrix derivative, a complex mixture of proteins, was separated into 13 fractions using size-exclusion chromatography and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–tandem mass spectrometry. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were treated with either enamel matrix derivative or the different fractions. Proliferation and cytokine secretion to the cell culture medium were measured and compared to untreated cells. The liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the most abundant peptides were amelogenin and leucine-rich amelogenin peptide related. The fractions containing proteins above 20 kDa induced an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 secretion, whereas lower molecular weight fractions enhanced proliferation and secretion of interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and reduced interleukin-4 release. The various molecular components in the enamel matrix derivative formulation might contribute to reported effects on tissue regeneration through their influence on vascularization, the immune response, and chemotaxis. PMID:26090085

  10. Subfractions of enamel matrix derivative differentially influence cytokine secretion from human oral fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Villa, Oscar; Brookes, Steven J; Thiede, Bernd; Heijl, Lars; Lyngstadaas, Staale P; Reseland, Janne E

    2015-01-01

    Enamel matrix derivative is used to promote periodontal regeneration during the corrective phase of the treatment of periodontal defects. Our main goal was to analyze the bioactivity of different molecular weight fractions of enamel matrix derivative. Enamel matrix derivative, a complex mixture of proteins, was separated into 13 fractions using size-exclusion chromatography and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were treated with either enamel matrix derivative or the different fractions. Proliferation and cytokine secretion to the cell culture medium were measured and compared to untreated cells. The liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the most abundant peptides were amelogenin and leucine-rich amelogenin peptide related. The fractions containing proteins above 20 kDa induced an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 secretion, whereas lower molecular weight fractions enhanced proliferation and secretion of interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and reduced interleukin-4 release. The various molecular components in the enamel matrix derivative formulation might contribute to reported effects on tissue regeneration through their influence on vascularization, the immune response, and chemotaxis. PMID:26090085

  11. Abnormal gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors in the lymphocytes of depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Ren, Xinguo; Zhang, Hui; Bhaumik, Runa; Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2016-06-30

    Abnormalities of protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines and their soluble receptors have been reported in plasma of depressed patients. In this study, we examined the role of cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors in major depressive disorder (MDD). We determined the protein and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and mRNA expression of their membrane-bound receptors in the lymphocytes from 31 hospitalized MDD patients and 30 non-hospitalized normal control (NC) subjects. The subjects were diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. Protein levels of cytokines were determined by ELISA, and mRNA levels in lymphocytes were determined by the qPCR method. We found that the mean mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, their receptors, TNFR1, TNFR2, IL-1R1 and the antagonist IL-1RA were significantly increased in the lymphocytes of MDD patients compared with NC. No significant differences in the lymphocyte mRNA levels of IL-1R2, IL-6R, and Gp130 were observed between MDD patients and NC. These studies suggest abnormal gene expression of these cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors in the lymphocytes of MDD patients, and that their mRNA expression levels in the lymphocytes could be a useful biomarker for depression. PMID:27138824

  12. Nanoelectronic detection of triggered secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines using CMOS compatible silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Pui, Tze-Sian; Agarwal, Ajay; Ye, Feng; Huang, Yinxi; Chen, Peng

    2011-01-15

    Nanotechnology, such as nanoelectronic biosensors, is bringing new opportunities and tools to the studies of cell biology, clinical applications, and drug discovery. In this study, crystalline silicon nanowire based field-effect transistors fabricated using top-down approach were employed to parallelly detect pro-inflammatory cytokines in the complex biological fluids (cell culture medium and blood samples) with high specificity and femtomolar sensitivity. Using this technique, the dynamic secretion of TNF-alpha and IL6 was revealed during the immune response of macrophages and rats to the stimulation of bacteria endotoxin. This technique could provide a unique platform to examine the profile of complex immune responses for fundamental studies and diagnosis. PMID:20977978

  13. Rod-shaped and substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles stimulating type 1 and 2 cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiupeng; Li, Xia; Ito, Atsuo; Watanabe, Yohei; Sogo, Yu; Hirose, Motohiro; Ohno, Tadao; Tsuji, Noriko M

    2016-03-01

    A Th1 immune response is required for modern vaccines as the most commonly used alum adjuvant has weak capacity for inducing Th1 immune response. Herein, rod-shaped hydroxyapatite (HA), magnesium-substituted HA (MgHA) and zinc-substituted HA (ZnHA) nanoparticles with irregular nanopores were synthesized and used as immunoadjuvants. Magnesium and zinc substitution in HA showed no influence on morphology, particle size, zeta potential and surface area of the nanoparticles. The rod-shaped MgHA and ZnHA nanoparticles promoted the cellular uptake of a molecular immunopotentiator, stimulated both type 1 and 2 cytokine secretion in vitro that relate to Th1 and Th2 immunity of bone marrow dentritic cells, respectively. The MgHA and ZnHA nanoparticles may be useful as immunoadjuvants for human. PMID:26700228

  14. Profiling of Cytokines Secreted by Conventional Aqueous Outflow Pathway Endothelial Cells Activated In Vitro and Ex Vivo With Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Jorge A.; Chau, Phuonglan; Wu, Jianfeng; Juster, Richard; Shifera, Amde Selassie; Geske, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To profile which cytokine genes are differentially expressed (DE) as up- or downregulated by cultured human trabecular meshwork (TMEs) and Schlemm's canal endothelial cells (SCEs) after three experimental treatments consisting of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) irradiation, exposure to media conditioned either by SLT-irradiated TMEs (TME-cm) or by SCEs (SCE-cm). Also, to profile which cytokines are upregulated ex vivo in SLT-irradiated human conventional aqueous outflow pathway (CAOP) tissues. Methods After each treatment, Affymetrix microarray assays were used to detect upregulated and downregulated genes for cytokines and their receptors in TMEs and SCEs. ELISA and protein antibody arrays were used to detect upregulated cytokines secreted in SLT-irradiated CAOP tissues ex vivo. Results The SLT irradiation upregulated numerous cytokine genes in TMEs, but only a few in SCEs. Exposure to TME- and SCE-cm induced SCEs to upregulate many more cytokine genes than TMEs. Selective laser trabeculoplasty irradiation and exposure to TME-cm downregulated several cytokine genes in TMEs but none in SCEs. Selective laser trabeculoplasty irradiation induced one upregulated and three downregulated cytokine-receptor genes in TMEs but none in SCEs. Exposure to TME-cm induced upregulation of one and downregulation of another receptor gene in TMEs, whereas two unique cytokine-receptor genes were upregulated in SCEs. Cytokine protein expression analysis showed that at least eight cytokines were upregulated in SLT-irradiated human CAOP tissues in situ/ex vivo. Conclusions This study has helped us identify a cytokine signaling pathway and to consider newly identified mechanisms regulating aqueous outflow that may lay the foundation for the future development of cytokine-based glaucoma therapies. PMID:26529044

  15. [Intestinal dysbacteriosis promotes intestinal intraepithelial T lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in mice].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xia; Luo, Shuang; Zheng, Yanyi; Wen, Ruyan; Deng, Xiangliang; Zhou, Lian

    2016-08-01

    Objective To study the effect of intestinal dysbacteriosis on mouse intestinal intraepithelial T lymphocytes (iIELs). Methods The intestinal dysbacteriosis was induced in mice by oral administration of ceftriaxone sodium. The iIELs were digested with ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and DL-dithiothreitol (DTT). The phenotype of iIELs and the proportions of subsets of T cells were detected by flow cytometry; the concentrations of cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ) in the intestine were examined by ELISA; the intestinal bacteria were analyzed with selective medium and PCR. Results Compared with the control group, intestinal commensal bacteria in mice were significantly reduced after the administration of ceftriaxone sodium, but fungi and yeasts increased. The proportions of T cell subgroups in ilELs changed, in which the proportion of TCR γδ(+)T cells significantly increased, and the activated CD3(+)T, CD8(+)T and TCR γδ(+)T cells increased. The concentrations of IL-2, IL-6 and IFN-γ were significantly raised in the intestine. Conclusion The dysbacteriosis results in the decrease of commensal bacteria, the increase of the fungus, the damage of microbial barrier, the more activated T cells in ilELs and the promotion of proinflammatory cytokine secretion in the gut. This is probably one of the reasons for inflammatory bowel disease caused by dysbacteriosis. PMID:27412931

  16. Histamine H3 receptor in primary mouse microglia inhibits chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomomitsu; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Matsuzawa, Takuro; Naganuma, Fumito; Nakamura, Tadaho; Miura, Yamato; Mohsen, Attayeb S; Harada, Ryuichi; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-01

    Histamine is a physiological amine which initiates a multitude of physiological responses by binding to four known G-protein coupled histamine receptor subtypes as follows: histamine H1 receptor (H1 R), H2 R, H3 R, and H4 R. Brain histamine elicits neuronal excitation and regulates a variety of physiological processes such as learning and memory, sleep-awake cycle and appetite regulation. Microglia, the resident macrophages in the brain, express histamine receptors; however, the effects of histamine on critical microglial functions such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion have not been examined in primary cells. We demonstrated that mouse primary microglia express H2 R, H3 R, histidine decarboxylase, a histamine synthase, and histamine N-methyltransferase, a histamine metabolizing enzyme. Both forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation and ATP-induced intracellular Ca(2+) transients were reduced by the H3 R agonist imetit but not the H2 R agonist amthamine. H3 R activation on two ubiquitous second messenger signalling pathways suggests that H3 R can regulate various microglial functions. In fact, histamine and imetit dose-dependently inhibited microglial chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine production. Furthermore, we confirmed that microglia produced histamine in the presence of LPS, suggesting that H3 R activation regulate microglial function by autocrine and/or paracrine signalling. In conclusion, we demonstrate the involvement of histamine in primary microglial functions, providing the novel insight into physiological roles of brain histamine. PMID:25754956

  17. Role of Chinese herbal medicinal ingredients in secretion of cytokines by PCV2-induced endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiyi; He, Kongwang; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    While T-lymphocytes are the major cell type responsible for host responses to a virus (including induction of inflammatory responses to aid in ultimate removal of virus), other cells, including macrophages, epithelial and dendritic cells also have key roles. Endothelial cells also play important roles in physiologic/pathologic processes, like inflammation, during viral infections. As endothelial cells can be activated to release various endogenous compounds, including some cytokines, ex vivo measures of cytokine formation by the cells can be used to indirectly assess any potential endothelial dysfunction in situ. The research presented here sought to investigate potential immunolomodulatory effects of five saponins on endothelial cells: Saikosaponins A (SSA) and D (SSD), Panax Notoginseng Saponin (PNS) and Notoginsenoside R1 (SR1) and Anemoside B4 (AB4). For this, cells (porcine iliac artery endothelial line) were challenged with a virus isolate PCV2-AH for 24 h and then treated with the test saponin (at 1, 5 or 10 μg/ml) for an additional 24 h at 37 °C. The culture supernatants were then collected and analyzed for interleukin (IL)-2, -4 and -10, as well as interferon (IFN)-γ by ELISA. The results revealed that PNS and SR1 inhibited the production of IL-4; PNS, SR1 and AB4 inhibited the secretion of IL-10; SSA, SSD and PNS up-regulated IL-2 expression; SSA and SSD increased the level of IFNγ. All these changes were significant. Taken together, the data suggested these saponins might potentially have a capacity to regulate immune responses in vivo via changes in production of these select cytokines by infected endothelial cells. Nevertheless, the impact of these agents on other key cell types involved in anti-viral responses, including T-lymphocytes, remains to be determined. PMID:25721049

  18. Abnormalities of plasma cytokines and spleen in senile APP/PS1/Tau transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Jiyoon; Lee, Michael Jisoo; Kim, YoungSoo

    2015-01-01

    The blood-based diagnosis has a potential to provide an alternative approach for easy diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with less invasiveness and low-cost. However, present blood-based AD diagnosis mainly focuses on measuring the plasma Aβ level because no other biomarkers are found to possess evident transport mechanisms to pass the blood-brain barrier. In order to avoid diagnosing non-demented individuals with Aβ abnormality, finding additional biomarkers to supplement plasma Aβ is essential. In this study, we introduce potential neurodegenerative biomarkers for blood-based diagnosis. We observed severe splenomegaly and structural destruction in the spleen with significantly decreased B lymphocytes in senile APPswe, PS1M146V and TauP301L transgenic mice. We also found that inflammatory cytokines associated with splenic dysfunction were altered in the plasma of these mice. These findings suggest potential involvement of the splenic dysfunction in AD and the importance of biomarker level alterations in the plasma as putative diagnostic targets for AD. PMID:26503550

  19. Selective suppression of cytokine secretion in whole blood cell cultures of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lahm, H.; Schindel, M.; Frikart, L.; Cerottini, J. P.; Yilmaz, A.; Givel, J. C.; Fischer, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the secretion of interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), IFN-gamma, interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-2 and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in whole blood cell cultures (WBCCs) of colorectal cancer patients upon mitogen stimulation. Whereas the values for IL-1beta and TNF-alpha remained virtually unchanged in comparison with healthy control subjects, WBCCs of colorectal cancer patients secreted significantly lower amounts of IFN-alpha (P < 0.005), IFN-gamma (P < 0.0001), IL-1alpha (P < 0.0001) and IL-2 (P < 0.05). This reduction correlated with the progression of the disease. The total leucocyte and monocyte population were almost identical in both groups. In contrast, a dramatic depletion of lymphocytes was observed in colorectal cancer patients, which affected both lymphocyte counts (P < 0.0005) and their distribution (P < 0.0001). Our results suggest a selective suppression of cytokines in colorectal cancer patients that is related to tumour burden. Several mechanisms might account for this phenomenon, one of which might be lymphocyte depletion. PMID:9792144

  20. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates inflammatory cytokine secretion in smooth muscle cells induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Zhang, Xiao Jie; Cao, Li Juan; Liu, Xin He; Liu, Zhu Hui; Wang, Xiao Qun; Chen, Qiu Jin; Lu, Lin; Shen, Wei Feng; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-regulated secretion of inflammatory cytokines in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is regarded as an important step in the progression of atherosclerosis; however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in oxLDL-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in SMCs both in vivo and in vitro. We found that the levels of TLR4, interleukin 1-β (IL1-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression were increased in the SMCs of atherosclerotic plaques in patients with femoral artery stenosis. In cultured primary arterial SMCs from wild type mice, oxLDL caused dose- and time-dependent increase in the expression levels of TLR4 and cytokines. These effects were significantly weakened in arterial SMCs derived from TLR4 knockout mice (TLR4-/-). Moreover, the secretion of inflammatory cytokines was blocked by TLR4-specific antibodies in primary SMCs. Ox-LDL induced activation of p38 and NFκB was also inhibited in TLR4-/- primary SMCs or when treated with TLR4-specific antibodies. These results demonstrated that TLR4 is a crucial mediator in oxLDL-induced inflammatory cytokine expression and secretion, and p38 and NFκB activation. PMID:24755612

  1. Vitamin D Regulates Cytokine Patterns Secreted by Dendritic Cells to Promote Differentiation of IL-22-Producing T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Andrea; Fabri, Mario

    2015-01-01

    One central mechanism, by which vitamin D regulates human immune responses, is the direct modulation of dendritic cells (DCs). However, the effect of vitamin D on several key DC functions, such as the secretion of central inflammatory cytokines, remains controversial. Moreover, whether vitamin D treatment of DCs regulates their ability to promote differentiation of IL-17-/IL-22-producing T cell subsets, such as Th17 and Th22 cell, is not known. Here, we report that vitamin D treatment during differentiation of monocytes into DCs markedly enhanced their ability to secrete TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-23. Cytokines secreted by vitamin D-treated DC were significantly more potent in driving differentiation of IL-22-producing T cells, but not IL-17-producing T cells, as compared to secreted cytokines of not-vitamin D-treated DCs. Finally, we found that the differentiation of IL-22-producing T cells mediated by supernatants of vitamin D-treated DCs was dependent on TNF-α IL-6 and IL-23. In summary, our study suggests a novel role of vitamin D in regulating DC-mediated immune responses in humans. PMID:26107738

  2. Role of 5 Saponins in Secretion of Cytokines by PRRSV-induced Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Mao, A; Tan, Y; Zhao, Y; He, K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the research presented here was to investigate the immunoloregulatory effects of 5 saponins: Saikosaponins A (SSA) and D (SSD) from Bupleurum chinese DC (Umbelliferae), Panax Notoginseng Saponin (PNS) and Notoginsenoside R1 from Panax notoginseng (Araliaceae) (SR1), and Anemoside B4 from Pulsatilla chinensis Regel (Ranunculaceae) (AB4). To achieve this, endothelial cells were challenged with 10(5) TCID50/mL PRRSV for 24 h then treated respectively with 5 saponins at 3 concentrations (1, 5 and 10 μg/mL). The cells were incubated at 37°C in a cell incubator for 24 h. The supernatants were collected and analyzed the levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10, IL-2, and γ-interferon (IFN-γ) by ELISA kits. The results revealed that PNS and SR1 inhibited the production of IL-4; PNS, SR1 and SSD inhibited the secretion of IL-10; SSA, SSD and AB4 up-regulated IL-2 expression; SSA and SSD increased the level of IFN-γ. All these changes were significant. Taken together, the data suggested that these 5 saponins might effectively regulate immune responses via changes in the levels of these select cytokines. PMID:27144658

  3. Areca nut exposure increases secretion of tumor-promoting cytokines in gingival fibroblasts that trigger DNA damage in oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Illeperuma, Rasika P; Kim, Do Kyeong; Park, Young Jin; Son, Hwa Kyung; Kim, Jue Young; Kim, Jinmi; Lee, Doo Young; Kim, Ki-Yeol; Jung, Da-Woon; Tilakaratne, Wanninayake M; Kim, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and fibroblasts has been an emerging hot issue in understanding carcinogenesis. As oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is an inflammatory fibrotic disease that can potentially transform into squamous cell carcinoma, OSF has been considered to be an appropriate model for studying the role of fibroblasts during early stage carcinogenesis. In this sense, this study aims at investigating whether areca nut (AN)-exposed fibroblasts cause DNA damage of epithelial cells. For this study, immortalized hNOF (hTERT-hNOF) was used. We found that the levels of GRO-α, IL-6 and IL-8 increased in AN-exposed fibroblasts. Cytokine secretion was reduced by antioxidants in AN-exposed fibroblasts. Increase in DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and 8-oxoG FITC-conjugate was observed in immortalized human oral keratinocytes (IHOK) after the treatment of cytokines or a conditioned medium derived from AN-exposed fibroblasts. Cytokine expression and DNA damage were also detected in OSF tissues. The DNA damage was reduced by neutralizing cytokines or antioxidant treatment. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage response, triggered by cytokines, were abolished when NADPH oxidase (NOX) 1 and 4 were silenced in IHOK, indicating that cytokine-triggered DNA damage was caused by ROS generation through NOX1 and NOX4. Taken together, this study provided strong evidence that blocking ROS generation might be a rewarding approach for cancer prevention and intervention in OSF. PMID:26076896

  4. Rotavirus Infects Human Biliary Epithelial Cells and Stimulates Secretion of Cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 via MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Maria Grazia; Patton, John T.; Anders, Robert A.; Yolken, Robert H.; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is an infantile inflammatory cholangiopathy of unknown etiology although epidemiologic studies and animal models utilizing rotavirus (RV) have suggested a role for viral infection. Proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines have been detected in infants with BA. The purpose of our study was to investigate the susceptibility of human cholangiocytes (H69 cells) to infection with RRV and to determine if this infection resulted in cytokine secretion. Infection of H69 cells by RRV was noncytolytic and resulted in a time-dependent increase in the release of both infectious virions and cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 into the supernate. The greatest difference in cytokine supernatant levels between infected and mock-infected cells was noted at 24 hours postinfection (h p.i.) for IL-8, 556 ± 111 versus 77 ± 68 pg/mL (p < 0.0001), and at 48 h p.i. for IL-6, 459 ± 64 versus 67 ± 2 pg/mL (p < 0.0001). Production of both cytokines following RRV infection was significantly reduced by pretreating the H69 cells with inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Conclusion. RRV can infect human cholangiocytes resulting in the production of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines via the MAPK pathway. RRV-infected H69 cells could be a useful model system for investigating the viral hypothesis of BA. PMID:26247025

  5. Eosinophils Reduce Chronic Inflammation in Adipose Tissue by Secreting Th2 Cytokines and Promoting M2 Macrophages Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Peng; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Manna; Li, Hong; Qian, Chunhua; Sheng, Chunjun; Qu, Shen; Bu, Le

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is now recognized as a low-grade, chronic inflammatory disease that is linked to a myriad of disorders including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and liver diseases. Recently it is found that eosinophils accelerate alternative activation macrophage (AAM) polarization by secreting Th2 type cytokines such as interleukin-4 and interleukin-13, thereby reducing metainflammation in adipose tissue. In this review, we focused on the role of eosinophils in regulating metabolic homeostasis and obesity. PMID:26688684

  6. 1, 25(OH)2D3 Inhibits Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development Through Reducing Secretion of Inflammatory Cytokines from Immunocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian; Ma, Zhenhua; Ma, Qingyong; Wu, Zheng; Fan, Ping; Zhou, Xiaojie; Chen, Lulu; Zhou, Shuang; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun; Wu, Erxi

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have indicated that low vitamin D activity is not only associated with an increased cancer risk and a more aggressive tumor growth, but also connected with an aggravated liver damage caused by chronic inflammation. Meanwhile, increasing evidence has demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 (the most biologically active metabolite of vitamin D) can inhibit inflammatory response in some chronic inflammatory associated cancer, which is considered to have the anti-tumor potency. However, the interaction between 1,25(OH)2D3 and inflammation during hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) initiation and progression is not yet clear. Here, we report an anti-tumorigenesis effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 via decreasing inflammatory cytokine secretion in HCC and hypothesize the possible underlying mechanism. Firstly, we show that the enhanced tumor growth is associated with elevated inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and TNF-α in 1α(OH)ase gene-knockout mice. Secondly, 1,25(OH)2D3 can inhibit vitamin D receptor (VDR) shRNA interfered tumor cell growth through decreasing inflammatory cytokine secretion in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using p27kip1 gene knock-out mouse model, we demonstrate that the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 in inhibiting immune cell related inflammatory cytokine secretion, exerts in a p27kip1 gene dependent way. Collectively, 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits HCC development through up-regulating the expression of p27kip1 in immune cell and reducing inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:23992309

  7. Changes in cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages after oral administration of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Broug-Holub, E; Persoons, J H; Schornagel, K; Kraal, G

    1995-08-01

    Oral administration of the bacterial immunomodulator Broncho-Vaxom (OM-85), a lysate of eight bacteria strains commonly causing respiratory disease, has been shown to enhance the host defence of the respiratory tract. In this study we examined the effect of orally administered (in vivo) OM-85 on stimulus-induced cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The results show that alveolar macrophages isolated from OM-85-treated rats secreted significantly more nitric oxide, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-1 beta upon in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), whereas, in contrast, LPS-induced IL-6 secretion was significantly lower. The observed effects of in vivo OM-85 treatment on stimulus-induced cytokine secretion in vitro are not due to a direct effect of OM-85 on the cells, because in vitro incubation of alveolar macrophages with OM-85 did not result in altered activity, nor did direct intratracheal instillation of OM-85 in the lungs of rats result in altered alveolar macrophage activity in vitro. It is hypothesized that oral administration of OM-85 leads to priming of alveolar macrophages in such a way that immune responses are non-specifically enhanced upon stimulation. The therapeutic action of OM-85 may therefore result from an enhanced clearance of infectious bacteria from the respiratory tract due to increased alveolar macrophage activity. PMID:7648713

  8. Changes in cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages after oral administration of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Broug-Holub, E; Persoons, J H; Schornagel, K; Kraal, G

    1995-01-01

    Oral administration of the bacterial immunomodulator Broncho-Vaxom (OM-85), a lysate of eight bacteria strains commonly causing respiratory disease, has been shown to enhance the host defence of the respiratory tract. In this study we examined the effect of orally administered (in vivo) OM-85 on stimulus-induced cytokine and nitric oxide secretion by rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The results show that alveolar macrophages isolated from OM-85-treated rats secreted significantly more nitric oxide, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-1 beta upon in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), whereas, in contrast, LPS-induced IL-6 secretion was significantly lower. The observed effects of in vivo OM-85 treatment on stimulus-induced cytokine secretion in vitro are not due to a direct effect of OM-85 on the cells, because in vitro incubation of alveolar macrophages with OM-85 did not result in altered activity, nor did direct intratracheal instillation of OM-85 in the lungs of rats result in altered alveolar macrophage activity in vitro. It is hypothesized that oral administration of OM-85 leads to priming of alveolar macrophages in such a way that immune responses are non-specifically enhanced upon stimulation. The therapeutic action of OM-85 may therefore result from an enhanced clearance of infectious bacteria from the respiratory tract due to increased alveolar macrophage activity. PMID:7648713

  9. Inflammatory cytokines regulate secretion of VEGF and chemokines by human conjunctival fibroblasts: Role in dysfunctional tear syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; William, Abitha; Cherukuri, Aswini; Samuel, William; Hooks, John J; Detrick, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Ocular surface inflammation is one of the primary mechanisms associated with dysfunctional tear syndrome (DTS), also known as dry eye disease. DTS, more prevalent in older populations, causes ocular discomfort and visual disturbance due to dryness on the surface layer in the eye. We used human conjunctival fibroblast cultures (HCJVF) to investigate the effects of inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β (ITI) on the secretions of VEGF and chemokines. Our results demonstrate the elevated secretion of angiogenic VEGF molecules by ITI without affecting anti-angiogenic molecules, PEDF, endostatin, thrombospondin and sVEGF-R1. The secretion of interferon-γ inducible chemokines, CXCL9, -10, -11 by HCJVF were significantly enhanced by ITI. Our in vitro study supports previously reported observations of elevated VEGF and chemokines in tear fluids of DTS patients, reiterating the role of inflammatory reactions in DTS. PMID:26615568

  10. Areca nut exposure increases secretion of tumor‐promoting cytokines in gingival fibroblasts that trigger DNA damage in oral keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Illeperuma, Rasika P.; Kim, Do Kyeong; Park, Young Jin; Son, Hwa Kyung; Kim, Jue Young; Kim, Jinmi; Lee, Doo Young; Kim, Ki‐Yeol; Jung, Da‐Woon; Tilakaratne, Wanninayake M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and fibroblasts has been an emerging hot issue in understanding carcinogenesis. As oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is an inflammatory fibrotic disease that can potentially transform into squamous cell carcinoma, OSF has been considered to be an appropriate model for studying the role of fibroblasts during early stage carcinogenesis. In this sense, this study aims at investigating whether areca nut (AN)‐exposed fibroblasts cause DNA damage of epithelial cells. For this study, immortalized hNOF (hTERT‐hNOF) was used. We found that the levels of GRO‐α, IL‐6 and IL‐8 increased in AN‐exposed fibroblasts. Cytokine secretion was reduced by antioxidants in AN‐exposed fibroblasts. Increase in DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and 8‐oxoG FITC‐conjugate was observed in immortalized human oral keratinocytes (IHOK) after the treatment of cytokines or a conditioned medium derived from AN‐exposed fibroblasts. Cytokine expression and DNA damage were also detected in OSF tissues. The DNA damage was reduced by neutralizing cytokines or antioxidant treatment. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage response, triggered by cytokines, were abolished when NADPH oxidase (NOX) 1 and 4 were silenced in IHOK, indicating that cytokine‐triggered DNA damage was caused by ROS generation through NOX1 and NOX4. Taken together, this study provided strong evidence that blocking ROS generation might be a rewarding approach for cancer prevention and intervention in OSF. PMID:26076896

  11. Cytokine expression and secretion by skeletal muscle cells: regulatory mechanisms and exercise effects.

    PubMed

    Peake, Jonathan M; Della Gatta, Paul; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Nieman, David C

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are important mediators of various aspects of health and disease, including appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. Over the past decade or so, considerable attention has focused on the potential for regular exercise to counteract a range of disease states by modulating cytokine production. Exercise stimulates moderate to large increases in the circulating concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL- 10, IL-1 receptor antagonist, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and smaller increases in tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-1β, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, IL-12p35/p40 and IL-15. Although many of these cytokines are also expressed in skeletal muscle, not all are released from skeletal muscle into the circulation during exercise. Conversely, some cytokines that are present in the circulation are not expressed in skeletal muscle after exercise. The reasons for these discrepant cytokine responses to exercise are unclear. In this review, we address these uncertainties by summarizing the capacity of skeletal muscle cells to produce cytokines, analyzing other potential cellular sources of circulating cytokines during exercise, and discussing the soluble factors and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cytokine synthesis (e.g., RNA-binding proteins, microRNAs, suppressor of cytokine signaling proteins, soluble receptors). PMID:25826432

  12. Brucella outer membrane protein Omp25 induces microglial cells in vitro to secrete inflammatory cytokines and inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiao-Li; Liu, Ai-Cui; Ma, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Yan-Bai; Hou, Yu-Ting; Wang, Zhen-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Omp25 protein, an outer membrane protein of Brucella, can cause damage to the central nervous system. As one type of macrophage, microglial cells play a role in immune surveillance and immune protection in the central nervous system; therefore, they are major targets of bacterial attack. The present study examined BV2 mouse microglial cells that were stimulated with different concentrations of Omp25 recombinant protein, and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by the BV2 cells as well as their level of apoptosis were observed. The objective of the study was to preliminarily illustrate the possible mechanism that Omp25 uses to damage the central nervous system. Mouse BV2 microglial cells were incubated with different concentrations of Omp25 for 24 h, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and HMGB1 (high mobility group box-1 protein); reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of TLR4 (Toll-like receptor 4) mRNA; Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) double staining was used to detect apoptosis in the BV2 cells. After the BV2 cells were stimulated with different concentrations of Omp25, the levels of IL-6, TNF-α and HMGB1 was increased, and the difference was statistically significant compared with the control group (P<0.05). The secretion of TNF-α and HMGB1 showed a trend toward an initial increase followed by a decrease. The expression level of TLR4 mRNA was increased. Omp25 protein can inhibit apoptosis in BV2 cells. The outer membrane protein Omp25 of Brucella promotes microglial cells to secrete inflammatory cytokines and inhibit apoptosis. TLR4 may be involved in the immune response of the central nervous system to Brucella infection. PMID:26770344

  13. Brucella outer membrane protein Omp25 induces microglial cells in vitro to secrete inflammatory cytokines and inhibit apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiao-Li; Liu, Ai-Cui; Ma, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Yan-Bai; Hou, Yu-Ting; Wang, Zhen-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Omp25 protein, an outer membrane protein of Brucella, can cause damage to the central nervous system. As one type of macrophage, microglial cells play a role in immune surveillance and immune protection in the central nervous system; therefore, they are major targets of bacterial attack. The present study examined BV2 mouse microglial cells that were stimulated with different concentrations of Omp25 recombinant protein, and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by the BV2 cells as well as their level of apoptosis were observed. The objective of the study was to preliminarily illustrate the possible mechanism that Omp25 uses to damage the central nervous system. Mouse BV2 microglial cells were incubated with different concentrations of Omp25 for 24 h, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and HMGB1 (high mobility group box-1 protein); reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of TLR4 (Toll-like receptor 4) mRNA; Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) double staining was used to detect apoptosis in the BV2 cells. After the BV2 cells were stimulated with different concentrations of Omp25, the levels of IL-6, TNF-α and HMGB1 was increased, and the difference was statistically significant compared with the control group (P<0.05). The secretion of TNF-α and HMGB1 showed a trend toward an initial increase followed by a decrease. The expression level of TLR4 mRNA was increased. Omp25 protein can inhibit apoptosis in BV2 cells. The outer membrane protein Omp25 of Brucella promotes microglial cells to secrete inflammatory cytokines and inhibit apoptosis. TLR4 may be involved in the immune response of the central nervous system to Brucella infection. PMID:26770344

  14. The Use of Glass Substrates with Bi-Functional Silanes for Designing Micropatterned Cell-Secreted Cytokine Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jeong Hyun; Chen, Li-Jung; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Schweikert, Emile A.; Revzin, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    It is often desirable to sequester cells in specific locations on the surface and to integrate sensing elements next to the cells. In the present study, surfaces were fabricated so as to position cytokine sensing domains inside non-fouling poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwells. Our aim was to increase sensitivity of micropatterned cytokine immunoassays through covalent attachment of biorecognition molecules. To achieve this, glass substrates were functionalized with a binary mixture of acrylate- and thiol-terminated methoxysilanes. During subsequent hydrogel photopatterning step acrylate moieties served to anchor hydrogel microwells to glass substrates. Importantly, glass attachment sites within the microwells contained thiol groups that could be activated with a hetero-bifunctional cross-linker for covalent immobilization of proteins. After incubation with fluorescently-labeled avidin, microwells fabricated on a mixed acryl/thiol silane layer emitted ~6 times more fluorescence compared to microwells fabricated on an acryl silane alone. This result highlighted the advantages of covalent attachment of avidin inside the microwells. To create cytokine immunoassays, micropatterned surfaces were incubated with biotinylated IFN-γ or TNF-α antibodies (Abs). Micropatterned immunoassays prepared in this manner were sensitive down to 1 ng/ml or 60 pM IFN-γ. To further prove utility of this bionterface design, macrophages were seeded into 30 µm diameter microwells fabricated on either bi-functional (acryl/thiol) or monofunctional silane layers. Both types of microwells were coated with avidin and biotin-anti-TNF-α prior to cell seeding. Short mitogenic activation followed by immunostaining for TNF-α revealed that microwells created on bi-functional silane layer had 3 times higher signal due to macrophage-secreted TNF-α compared to microwells fabricated on mono-functional silane. The rational design of cytokine-sensing surfaces described here will be leveraged

  15. A single peptide-major histocompatibility complex ligand triggers digital cytokine secretion in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Brameshuber, Mario; Zeng, Xun; Xie, Jianming; Li, Qi-jing; Chien, Yueh-hsiu; Valitutti, Salvatore; Davis, Mark M

    2013-11-14

    We have developed a single-molecule imaging technique that uses quantum-dot-labeled peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligands to study CD4(+) T cell functional sensitivity. We found that naive T cells, T cell blasts, and memory T cells could all be triggered by a single pMHC to secrete tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) cytokines with a rate of ∼1,000, ∼10,000, and ∼10,000 molecules/min, respectively, and that additional pMHCs did not augment secretion, indicating a digital response pattern. We also found that a single pMHC localized to the immunological synapse induced the slow formation of a long-lasting T cell receptor (TCR) cluster, consistent with a serial engagement mechanism. These data show that scaling up CD4(+) T cell cytokine responses involves increasingly efficient T cell recruitment rather than greater cytokine production per cell. PMID:24120362

  16. House dust mite extracts activate cultured human dermal endothelial cells to express adhesion molecules and secrete cytokines.

    PubMed

    Arlian, Larry G; Elder, B Laurel; Morgan, Marjorie S

    2009-05-01

    The human skin contacts molecules from house dust mites that are ubiquitous in many environments. These mite-derived molecules may penetrate the skin epidermis and dermis and contact microvascular endothelial cells and influence their function. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of normal human dermal microvascular endothelial cells to extracts of the dust mites, Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and Euroglyphus maynei with and without endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide). Endothelial cells were stimulated with mite extracts and the expression of surface molecules and the secretion of cytokines were measured in the absence and presence of polymyxin B to bind endotoxin. All three mite extracts stimulated endothelial cells to express intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin and to secrete interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), and granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Euroglyphus maynei-induced expression of all the cell surface molecules was not inhibited when the endotoxin activity in the mite extract was inhibited. In contrast, endothelial cells challenged with D. farinae or D. pteronyssinus extract depleted of endotoxin activity expressed only constitutive levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. D. farinae and E. maynei extracts depleted of endotoxin activity still induced secretion of IL-8 and MCP-1 but at reduced levels. Only constitutive amounts of IL-6, G-CSF, and GM-CSF were secreted in response to any of the endotoxin-depleted mite extracts. Extracts of D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and E. maynei contain both endotoxins and other molecules that can stimulate expression of cell adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors and the secretion of cytokines by normal human microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:19496432

  17. In vitro morphology, viability and cytokine secretion of uterine telocyte-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chi; Jiang, Xiao-Juan; Su, Lei; Shen, Zong-Ji; Yang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Telocytes (TCs), a distinct interstitial cell population, have been identified in the uterus, oviduct and placenta, with multiple proposed potential biological functions. Their unique structure allows them to form intercellular junctions with various immunocytes, both in normal and diseased tissues, suggesting a potential functional relationship with the local immune response. It has been hypothesized that through direct heterocellular junctions or indirect paracrine effects, TCs influence the activity of local immunocytes that are involved in the inflammatory process and in immune-mediated reproductive abnormalities. However, no reliable cytological evidence for this hypothesis is currently available. In this study, we cultured primary murine uterine TCs and collected TC conditioned media (TCM). Mouse peritoneal macrophages (pMACs) were co-cultured for 48 hrs with TCM or with DMEM/F12 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as negative and positive controls, respectively. Normal uterine TCs with a typical structure and a CD-34-positive/vimentin-positive/c-kit-negative immunophenotype were observed during culture. Morphologically, TCM-treated pMACs displayed an obvious activation/immunoresponse, in contrast to over-stimulation and cell death after LPS treatment and no sign of activation in the presence of DMEM/F12. Accordingly, a cell counting kit 8 (CCK-8) assay indicated significant activation of pMACs by TCM and LPS compared to DMEM/F12, thus supporting the marked morphological differences among these groups of cells. Furthermore, within a panel of macrophage-derived cytokines/enzymes, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and inducible nitric oxide synthase were significantly elevated in TCM-treated pMACs; tumour necrosis factor α, IL1-R1, and IL-10 were slightly, but significantly, up-regulated; and no changes were observed for transforming growth factor-β1, IL-1β, IL-23α and IL-18. Our results indicate that TCs are not simply innocent bystanders but are rather functional players in

  18. Corticosteroid-Induced MKP-1 Represses Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion by Enhancing Activity of Tristetraprolin (TTP) in ASM Cells.

    PubMed

    Prabhala, Pavan; Bunge, Kristin; Ge, Qi; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-10-01

    Exaggerated cytokine secretion drives pathogenesis of a number of chronic inflammatory diseases, including asthma. Anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapies, including corticosteroids, are front-line therapies and although they have proven clinical utility, the molecular mechanisms responsible for their actions are not fully understood. The corticosteroid-inducible gene, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase 1 (MKP-1, DUSP1) has emerged as a key molecule responsible for the repressive effects of steroids. MKP-1 is known to deactivate p38 MAPK phosphorylation and can control the expression and activity of the mRNA destabilizing protein-tristetraprolin (TTP). But whether corticosteroid-induced MKP-1 acts via p38 MAPK-mediated modulation of TTP function in a pivotal airway cell type, airway smooth muscle (ASM), was unknown. While pretreatment of ASM cells with the corticosteroid dexamethasone (preventative protocol) is known to reduce ASM synthetic function in vitro, the impact of adding dexamethasone after stimulation (therapeutic protocol) had not been explored. Whether dexamethasone modulates TTP in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner in this cell type was also unknown. We address this herein and utilize an in vitro model of asthmatic inflammation where ASM cells were stimulated with the pro-asthmatic cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and the impact of adding dexamethasone 1 h after stimulation assessed. IL-6 mRNA expression and protein secretion was significantly repressed by dexamethasone acting in a temporally distinct manner to increase MKP-1, deactivate p38 MAPK, and modulate TTP phosphorylation status. In this way, dexamethasone-induced MKP-1 acts via p38 MAPK to switch on the mRNA destabilizing function of TTP to repress pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from ASM cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2153-2158, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26825339

  19. Influence of cytokines on Dmt1 iron transporter and ferritin expression in insulin-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Lortz, S; Schröter, S; Stückemann, V; Mehmeti, I; Lenzen, S

    2014-06-01

    Free intracellular ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) is essential for the generation of the extremely toxic hydroxyl radicals, which contribute to β-cell destruction by cytokines. Therefore the expression of the different divalent metal transporter 1 (Dmt1) isoforms and ferritin (Ft) subunits, responsible for iron import and chelation, was analyzed under pro-inflammatory conditions (IL1β alone or together with TNFα+IFNγ). The Dmt1 isoforms (1A/1B and +IRE/-IRE) and the total Dmt1 expression in insulin-producing cells (RINm5F and INS-1E), in primary rat islets and, for comparison, in the neuroendocrine PC12 cell line were quantified by qRT-PCR. In addition, the expression of the light (L-Ft) and heavy Ft (H-Ft) subunits and the mitochondrial Ft isoform (Mtft) in insulin-producing cells under control conditions and after cytokine treatment was estimated. The 1B isoform was the predominant Dmt1 mRNA in all insulin-producing cells, accounting for almost 100% of the 1A/1B isoform expression. For the IRE variants, +IRE expression was higher than -IRE expression. Pro-inflammatory cytokines accelerated the expression of Dmt1 isoforms significantly with an overall 2.5- to 3-fold increase in the total Dmt1 expression. In contrast, the expression of the iron-buffering ferritin subunits L- and H-Ft was unaffected by IL1β and only slightly induced by the cytokine mixture. Mtft expression was also not increased. Dmt1 expression was significantly elevated through pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas Ft expression was marginally increased. This imbalance between the increased iron transport capacity and the almost unaffected iron storage capacity can foster cytokine-mediated formation of hydroxyl radicals and thus pro-inflammatory cytokine toxicity through elevated free iron concentrations. PMID:24850829

  20. Inflammation conditions mature dendritic cells to retain the capacity to present new antigens but with altered cytokine secretion function.

    PubMed

    Vega-Ramos, Javier; Roquilly, Antoine; Zhan, Yifan; Young, Louise J; Mintern, Justine D; Villadangos, Jose A

    2014-10-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are directly activated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and undergo maturation. Mature DCs express high levels of MHC class II molecules ("signal 1"), upregulate T cell costimulatory receptors ("signal 2"), and secrete "signal 3" cytokines (e.g., IL-12). Mature DCs efficiently present Ags linked to the activating PAMP and prime naive T cells. However, mature DCs downregulate MHC II synthesis, which prevents them from presenting newly encountered Ags. DCs can also be indirectly activated by inflammatory mediators released during infection (e.g., IFN). Indirectly activated DCs mature but do not present pathogen Ags (as they have not encountered the pathogen) and do not provide signal 3. Therefore, although they are probably generated in large numbers upon infection or vaccination, indirectly activated DCs are considered to play little or no role in T cell immunity. In this article, we show that indirectly activated DCs retain their capacity to present Ags encountered after maturation in vivo. They can also respond to PAMPs, but the previous encounter of inflammatory signals alters their cytokine (signal 3) secretion pattern. This implies that the immune response elicited by a PAMP is more complex than predicted by the examination of the immunogenic features of directly activated DCs, and that underlying inflammatory processes can skew the immune response against pathogens. Our observations have important implications for the design of vaccines and for the understanding of the interactions between simultaneous infections, or of infection in the context of ongoing sterile inflammation. PMID:25200952

  1. Association of downregulated HDAC 2 with the impaired mitochondrial function and cytokine secretion in the monocytes/macrophages from gestational diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xin; Yu, Hongna; Jia, Bei; Yu, Xiaoyan; Cui, Qing; Liu, Zhifen; Sun, Chengming; Chu, Yongli

    2016-06-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases in later life, yet with underlying mechanisms unclear. The present study was to explore the association of upregulated histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC 2) with the impaired mitochondrial function and the cytokine secretion in the monocytes/macrophages from GDM patients. In this study, we examined the mitochondrial function, proinflamatory cytokine secretion and the HDAC 2 level in the serum or in the monocytes/macrophages from GDM patients, investigated the influence by HDAC 2 inhibitor, AR-42 (N-hydroxy-4-[[(2S)-3-methyl-2-phenylbutanoyl]amino]benzamide), on the mitochondrial function and cytokine secretion in the isolated GDM monocytes/macrophages. Results demonstrated an increased mitochondria size, mitochondrial superoxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an undermined mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) in the GDM monocytes/macrophages. And the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 were also markedly higher in the GDM pregnancies, while the expression and activity of HDAC 2 was downregulated. Moreover, AR-42-mediated HDAC 2 inhibition in vitro contributed to the impaired mitochondrial function and the proinflamatory cytokine secretion. In conclusion, this study suggests an association of the impaired mitochondrial function and the promoted proinflamatory cytokine secretion with the reduced HDAC 2 activity in GDM. These findings may present HDAC 2 as a target for GDM treatment. PMID:26936353

  2. IRF5 Risk Polymorphisms Contribute to Inter-Individual Variance in Pattern-Recognition Receptor-Mediated Cytokine Secretion in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hedl, Matija; Abraham, Clara

    2012-01-01

    Monocyte-derived cells display highly variable cytokine secretion upon pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) stimulation across individuals; such variability likely affects inter-individual inflammatory/autoimmune disease susceptibility. To define mechanisms for this heterogeneity, we examined pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-induced monocyte-derived-cell cytokine secretion from a large cohort healthy individuals. Although cytokine secretion ranged widely among individuals, the magnitude of cytokine induction after individual Nod2 and TLR2 stimulation (a cohort of 86 individuals) or stimulation of multiple TLRs (a cohort of 77 individuals), either alone or in combination with Nod2, was consistent intra-individually across these stimuli. Nod2 and TLRs signal through interferon-regulatory-factor-5 (IRF5) and common IRF5 polymorphisms confer risk for autoimmunity. We find that cells from rs2004640 IRF5 risk-associated allele carriers secrete increased cytokines upon individual or synergistic PRR stimulation in a gene dose- and ligand dose-dependent manner in both monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages. IRF5 expression knockdown in IRF5-risk-allele carrier cells significantly decreases PRR-induced cytokines. Moreover, we find that IRF5 knockdown profoundly decreases Nod2-mediated MAPK and NF-κB pathway activation, whereas the PI3K and mTOR pathways are not impaired. Finally, the IRF5 rs2004640 polymorphism is a major determinant of the variance (r2=0.53) in Nod2-induced cytokine secretion by monocyte-derived cells from different individuals. We therefore show a profound contribution of a single gene to the variance in inter-individual PRR-induced cytokines. The hyper-responsiveness of IRF5 disease-associated polymorphisms to a wide spectrum of microbial triggers has broad implications on global immunological responses, host defenses against pathogens and inflammatory/autoimmune disease susceptibility. PMID:22544929

  3. Distinct TLR-mediated cytokine production and immunoglobulin secretion in human newborn naïve B cells.

    PubMed

    Pettengill, Matthew A; van Haren, Simon D; Li, Ning; Dowling, David J; Bergelson, Ilana; Jans, Jop; Ferwerda, Gerben; Levy, Ofer

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal innate immunity is distinct from that of adults, which may contribute to increased susceptibility to infection and limit vaccine responses. B cells play critical roles in protection from infection and detect PAMPs via TLRs, that, when co-activated with CD40, can drive B-cell proliferation and Ab production. We characterized the expression of TLRs in circulating B cells from newborns and adults, and evaluated TLR- and CD40-mediated naïve B-cell class-switch recombination (CSR) and cytokine production. Gene expression levels of most TLRs was similar between newborn and adult B cells, except that newborn naïve B cells expressed more TLR9 than adult naïve B cells. Neonatal naïve B cells demonstrated impaired TLR2- and TLR7- but enhanced TLR9-mediated cytokine production. Significantly fewer newborn naïve B cells underwent CSR to produce IgG, an impairment also noted with IL-21 stimulation. Additionally, co-stimulation via CD40 and TLRs induced greater cytokine production in adult B cells. Thus, while newborn naïve B cells demonstrate adult-level expression of TLRs and CD40, the responses to stimulation of these receptors are distinct. Relatively high expression of TLR9 and impaired CD40-mediated Ig secretion contributes to distinct innate and adaptive immunity of human newborns and may inform novel approaches to early-life immunization. PMID:27252169

  4. Human esophageal myofibroblasts secrete proinflammatory cytokines in response to acid and Toll-like receptor 4 ligands.

    PubMed

    Gargus, Matthew; Niu, Chao; Vallone, John G; Binkley, Jana; Rubin, Deborah C; Shaker, Anisa

    2015-06-01

    The pathophysiology of esophageal injury, repair, and inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux-disease (GERD) is complex. Whereas most studies have focused on the epithelial response to GERD injury, we are interested in the stromal response. We hypothesized that subepithelial esophageal myofibroblasts in GERD secrete proinflammatory cytokines in response to injurious agents encountered via epithelial barrier breaches or through dilated epithelial intercellular spaces. We determined the percentage of myofibroblasts [-smooth muscle actin (-SMA)+vimentin+CD31-] in the subepithelial GERD and normal esophageal stroma by immunomorphologic analysis. We performed -SMA coimmunostaining with IL-6 and p65. We established and characterized primary cultures of -SMA+vimentin+CD31-CD45- human esophageal myofibroblasts (HuEso MFs). We modeled GERD by treatment with pH 4.5-acidified media and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands, LPS and high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and determined myofibroblast cytokine secretion in response to GERD injury. We demonstrate that spindle-shaped cell myofibroblasts are located near the basement membrane of stratified squamous epithelium in normal esophagus. We identify an increase in subepithelial myofibroblasts and activation of proinflammatory pathways in patients with GERD. Primary cultures of stromal cells obtained from normal esophagus retain myofibroblast morphology and express the acid receptor transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) and TLR4. HuEso MFs stimulated with acid and TLR4 agonists LPS and HMGB1 increase IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via TRPV1 and NF-B activation. Our work implicates a role for human subepithelial stromal cells in the pathogenesis of GERD-related esophageal injury. Findings of this study can be extended to the investigation of epithelial-stromal interactions in inflammatory esophageal mucosal disorders. PMID:25882613

  5. Human esophageal myofibroblasts secrete proinflammatory cytokines in response to acid and Toll-like receptor 4 ligands

    PubMed Central

    Gargus, Matthew; Niu, Chao; Vallone, John G.; Binkley, Jana; Rubin, Deborah C.

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of esophageal injury, repair, and inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux-disease (GERD) is complex. Whereas most studies have focused on the epithelial response to GERD injury, we are interested in the stromal response. We hypothesized that subepithelial esophageal myofibroblasts in GERD secrete proinflammatory cytokines in response to injurious agents encountered via epithelial barrier breaches or through dilated epithelial intercellular spaces. We determined the percentage of myofibroblasts [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)+vimentin+CD31−] in the subepithelial GERD and normal esophageal stroma by immunomorphologic analysis. We performed α-SMA coimmunostaining with IL-6 and p65. We established and characterized primary cultures of α-SMA+vimentin+CD31−CD45− human esophageal myofibroblasts (HuEso MFs). We modeled GERD by treatment with pH 4.5-acidified media and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands, LPS and high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and determined myofibroblast cytokine secretion in response to GERD injury. We demonstrate that spindle-shaped cell myofibroblasts are located near the basement membrane of stratified squamous epithelium in normal esophagus. We identify an increase in subepithelial myofibroblasts and activation of proinflammatory pathways in patients with GERD. Primary cultures of stromal cells obtained from normal esophagus retain myofibroblast morphology and express the acid receptor transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) and TLR4. HuEso MFs stimulated with acid and TLR4 agonists LPS and HMGB1 increase IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via TRPV1 and NF-κB activation. Our work implicates a role for human subepithelial stromal cells in the pathogenesis of GERD-related esophageal injury. Findings of this study can be extended to the investigation of epithelial-stromal interactions in inflammatory esophageal mucosal disorders. PMID:25882613

  6. KIR2DL2 inhibitory pathway enhances Th17 cytokine secretion by NK cells in response to herpesvirus infection in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Roberta; Bortolotti, Daria; Fainardi, Enrico; Gentili, Valentina; Bolzani, Silvia; Baldi, Eleonora; Casetta, Ilaria; Granieri, Enrico; Rotola, Antonella; Furlan, Roberto; Di Luca, Dario

    2016-05-15

    We have previously demonstrated that multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with KIR2DL2 expression on Natural killer (NK) cells are more susceptible to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection. We explored cytokine expression by NK cells during HSV-1 infection in association with KIR2DL2 expression. MS KIR2DL2(+) NK cells failed to control HSV-1 infection and secreted high levels of Th17 cytokines, while MS KIR2DL2(-) NK cells released Th1 cytokines, mainly IFN-gamma. Our data showed, for the first time, a peculiar Th17 cytokine secretion by MS KIR2DL2(+) NK cells in the presence of HSV-1 infection, that could be implicated in MS pathogenesis. PMID:27138091

  7. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Primes Cytokine Secretion and Lytic Activity in Response to Native Bacterial Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Kevin M.; Dryden, Tricia D.; Bigley, Nancy J.; Fink, Pamela S.

    1998-01-01

    Superantigens stimulate T-lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production, but the effects of superantigen exposure on cell function within a complex, highly regulated immune response remain to be determined. In this study, we demonstrate that superantigen exposure significantly alters the murine host response to bacterial antigens in an in vitro coculture system. Two days after exposure to the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B, splenocytes cultured with Streptococcus mutans produced significantly greater amounts of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 than did sham-injected controls. The majority of IFN-γ production appeared to be CD8+ T-cell derived since depletion of this cell type dramatically reduced the levels of IFN-γ. To study host cell damage that may occur following superantigen exposure, we analyzed cytotoxicity to “bystander” fibroblast cells cultured with splenocytes in the presence of bacterial antigens. Prior host exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin B significantly enhanced fibroblast cytotoxicity in the presence of bacteria. Neutralization of IFN-γ decreased the amount of cytotoxicity observed. However, a greater reduction was evident when splenocyte-bacterium cocultures were separated from the bystander cell monolayer via a permeable membrane support. Increased cytotoxicity appears to be primarily dependent upon cell-cell contact. Collectively, these data indicate that overproduction of inflammatory cytokines may alter the activity of cytotoxic immune cells. Superantigen exposure exacerbates cytokine production and lytic cell activity when immune cells encounter bacteria in vitro and comparable activities could possibly occur in vivo. PMID:9784507

  8. Proprotein Convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) in the Rat Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line NR8383: Localization, Trafficking and Effects on Cytokine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Hugo; Refaie, Sarah; Gagnon, Sandra; Desjardins, Roxane; Salzet, Michel; Day, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The proprotein convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) is an important post-translational processing enzyme for the activation of precursor proteins within the regulated secretory pathway. Well characterized for its role in the neural and endocrine systems, we recently reported an unconventional role of PC1/3 as a modulator of the Toll-like receptor innate immune response. There are only a few reports that have studied PC1/3 expression in macrophages, and more investigation is needed to better characterize its function. These studies would greatly benefit from model cell lines. Our study aims to identify and characterize PC1/3 in a relevant model macrophage cell line and to determine the links between PC1/3 and innate immune cellular responses. We describe the rat alveolar cell line, NR8383, as expressing PC1/3 and the most common Toll-like receptors. In NR8383 cells, PC1/3 is localized at the Trans-Golgi network and traffics to lysosome related vesicles upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Moreover, we report the co-localization of PC1/3 and Toll-like receptor 4 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Down regulation of PC1/3 by shRNA produce a similar phenotype in NR8383 to what we previously reported in isolated peritoneal macrophages. PC1/3 shRNA induced changes in the cellular organization and expression of the specific trafficking regulator RAB GTPase. As a consequence, NR8383 down-regulated for PC1/3, present an abnormal cytokine secretion profile. We conclude that the NR8383 cell line represents a good model to study PC1/3 in macrophages and we present PC1/3 as an important regulator of vesicle trafficking and secretion in macrophages. PMID:23637853

  9. Sea cucumber (Codonopsis pilosula) oligopeptides: immunomodulatory effects based on stimulating Th cells, cytokine secretion and antibody production.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Xia; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Bin; Chen, Qi-He; Liu, Rui; Ren, Jin-Wei; Wang, Jun-Bo; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immunomodulating activity of small molecule oligopeptides from sea cucumber (Codonopsis pilosula) (SOP) in mice. Seven assays were performed to determine the immunomodulatory effects, including splenic lymphocyte proliferation and delayed-type hypersensitivity assays (cell-mediated immunity), IgM antibody response of spleen to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and serum hemolysin level assays (humoral immunity), the carbon clearance assay and the phagocytic capacity of peritoneal cavity phagocytes assay (macrophage phagocytosis), and the NK cell activity assay. Spleen T lymphocyte subpopulations, multiplex sandwich immunoassays of serum cytokine and immunoglobulin levels and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for small intestinal secretory immunoglobulin were performed to study the mechanism by which SOP affects the immune system. We found that SOP could improve immune functions in mice, which may be due to the enhancement of the functions of cell-mediated immunity, humoral immunity, macrophage phagocytosis and NK cell activity. From the cellular and molecular assays, we postulated that the immunomodulatory effects are most likely attributed to the stimulation of Th cells, cytokine secretion and antibody production. PMID:26838796

  10. Mice Survival and Plasmatic Cytokine Secretion in a "Two Hit" Model of Sepsis Depend on Intratracheal Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Bacterial Load.

    PubMed

    Restagno, Damien; Venet, Fabienne; Paquet, Christian; Freyburger, Ludovic; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Monneret, Guillaume; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Louzier, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by pro- and anti-inflammatory responses following infection. While inflammation is responsible for widespread organ damage, anti-inflammatory mediators lead to immunoparalysis increasing susceptibility to secondary infections (nosocomial pneumonia). We aimed to investigate the impact of bacterial load on survival and cytokine release in a two-hit murine (C57BL/6J) model of CLP followed by P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Plasmatic TNFα, IL-6, IL-10, sTNFr I and II were quantified until 13 days. At D5, splenocytes were processed for immunological assays or mice were intratracheally instilled with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.106, 2.107 and 108 CFU) to evaluate survival and cytokines production. TNFα, sTNFrs, IL-6 and IL-10 increased 2h post CLP. TNFα and sTNFrs declined respectively one and two days later. In CLP mice, IL-6 and IL-10 remained high for the whole experiment, as compared to Sham. At D5, for CLP mice, whereas total T cells population (CD3+) decreased, Treg fraction (CD4+/CD25+) increased. In parallel, T cells proliferation and LPS-stimulated splenocytes ability to release TNFα decreased. At D13, survival was 100% after 5.106 CFU, 50% for CLP mice after 2.107 CFU and 0% for CLP and Sham after 108 CFU. After instillation, IL-10 and IL-6 increased and appeared to be dose and time dependent. Pseudomonas was detected in all CLP and Sham's lungs; in spleen and liver only in CLP at 2.107 CFU, and in CLP and Sham at 108 CFU. We demonstrated that post-CLP immunosuppression followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung instillation increases mortality reactivates cytokines secretion and is associated with systemic dissemination in septic mice depending on bacterial load. PMID:27574993

  11. Airway epithelium interactions with aeroallergens: role of secreted cytokines and chemokines in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Vivek D; Vliagoftis, Harissios

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the first line of defense against the constituents of the inhaled air, which include allergens, pathogens, pollutants, and toxic compounds. The epithelium not only prevents the penetration of these foreign substances into the interstitium, but also senses their presence and informs the organism's immune system of the impending assault. The epithelium accomplishes the latter through the release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that recruit and activate innate immune cells at the site of assault. These epithelial responses aim to eliminate the inhaled foreign substances and minimize their detrimental effects to the organism. Quite frequently, however, the innate immune responses of the epithelium to inhaled substances lead to chronic and high level release of pro-inflammatory mediators that may mediate the lung pathology seen in asthma. The interactions of airway epithelial cells with allergens will be discussed with particular focus on interactions-mediated epithelial release of cytokines and chemokines and their role in the immune response. As pollutants are other major constituents of inhaled air, we will also discuss how pollutants may alter the responses of airway epithelial cells to allergens. PMID:25883597

  12. Airway Epithelium Interactions with Aeroallergens: Role of Secreted Cytokines and Chemokines in Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Vivek D.; Vliagoftis, Harissios

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the first line of defense against the constituents of the inhaled air, which include allergens, pathogens, pollutants, and toxic compounds. The epithelium not only prevents the penetration of these foreign substances into the interstitium, but also senses their presence and informs the organism’s immune system of the impending assault. The epithelium accomplishes the latter through the release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that recruit and activate innate immune cells at the site of assault. These epithelial responses aim to eliminate the inhaled foreign substances and minimize their detrimental effects to the organism. Quite frequently, however, the innate immune responses of the epithelium to inhaled substances lead to chronic and high level release of pro-inflammatory mediators that may mediate the lung pathology seen in asthma. The interactions of airway epithelial cells with allergens will be discussed with particular focus on interactions-mediated epithelial release of cytokines and chemokines and their role in the immune response. As pollutants are other major constituents of inhaled air, we will also discuss how pollutants may alter the responses of airway epithelial cells to allergens. PMID:25883597

  13. An integrated microfluidic platform for in situ cellular cytokine secretion immunophenotyping†

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Nien-Tsu; Chen, Weiqiang; Oh, Bo-Ram; Cornell, Timothy T.; Shanley, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, quantitative detection of cell-secreted biomarker proteins with a low sample volume holds great promise to advance cellular immunophenotyping techniques for personalized diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Here we achieved such an assay with the THP-1 human acute moncytic leukemia cell line (a model for human monocyte) using a highly integrated microfluidic platform incorporating a no-wash bead-based chemiluminescence immunodetection scheme. Our microfluidic device allowed us to stimulate cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is an endotoxin causing septic shock due to severely pronounced immune response of the human body, under a well-controlled on-chip environment. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secreted from stimulated THP-1 cells was subsequently measured within the device with no flushing process required. Our study achieved high-sensitivity cellular immunophenotyping with 20-fold fewer cells than current cell-stimulation assay. The total assay time was also 7 times shorter than that of a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our strategy of monitoring immune cell functions in situ using a microfluidic platform could impact future medical treatments of acute infectious diseases and immune disorders by enabling a rapid, sample-efficient cellular immunophenotyping analysis. PMID:22892681

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of phenolic extracts from strawberry and mulberry fruits on cytokine secretion profiles using mouse primary splenocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chieh-Jung; Lin, Jin-Yuarn

    2013-06-01

    This study isolated phenolic-rich extracts from strawberry (ES) and mulberry (EM) fruit juice using 70% ethanol, analyzed the individual phenolics including four flavonoid components using HPLC and assessed their cytokine secretion regulatory activities using murine primary splenocytes and peritoneal macrophages. The results showed that EM was rich in p-coumaric acid (20798±719μg/g dry weight), rutin (1992±26μg/g dry weight) and quercetin (81±5μg/g dry weight), but ES was relatively rich in p-coumaric acid (7475±1219μg/g dry weight), morin (101±68μg/g dry weight) and quercetin (72±42μg/g dry weight). ES and EM administration significantly decreased splenocytes' (IFN-γ+IL-2+IL-12)/IL-10 (Th1/Th2) cytokine secretion ratios in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and TNF-α/IL-10 (pro-/anti-inflammatory) cytokine secretion ratios in the presence of LPS in dose-dependent manners. Our results suggest that ES and EM that are rich in p-coumaric acid, rutin, morin or quercetin, may have strong immunomodulatory effects on splenocytes, via decreasing Th1/Th2 and pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion ratios. PMID:23590821

  15. Modulation of Cytokine Gene Expression and Secretion During the Periparturient Period in Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modulation of cytokine gene expression and secretion during the periparturient period in dairy cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Technical abstract Johne’s disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is estimated to infect more t...

  16. Cytokine-activated human endothelial cells synthesize and secrete a monocyte chemoattractant, MCP-1/JE.

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, B. J.; Yoshimura, T.; Leonard, E. J.; Pober, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    We have demonstrated inducible expression of the mRNA encoding the monocyte chemoattractant MCP-1, the human homolog of the JE gene, in endothelial cells within 3 hours of treatment with IL-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor. IFN-gamma also induced expression of this mRNA after 24 hours, but to a lesser extent. MCP-1/JE protein steadily accumulated in the medium of endothelial cells during a 48-hour exposure to IL-1 beta. Medium conditioned by IL-1 beta-treated endothelial cells contained monocyte chemoattractant activity that was immunoadsorbed by anti-MCP-1 antibodies. These results suggest that endothelial cells secrete a monocyte chemoattractant, MCP-1/JE, in response to inflammatory mediators, and thus may contribute to the accumulation of monocytes at sites of inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2113354

  17. Berberine regulates proliferation, collagen synthesis and cytokine secretion of cardiac fibroblasts via AMPK-mTOR-p70S6K signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Fen; Chen, Manhua; Yu, Bo; Yang, Yang; Xu, Guizhong; Gui, Feng; Liu, Zhenxing; Bai, Xiangyan; Chen, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The traditional Chinese medicinal berberine has long been used to treat cardiovascular diseases; however, the mechanism underlying its effects remains unclear. Here, this study would to investigate the effects of berberine on proliferation, collagen synthesis and cytokine secretion of cardiac fibroblasts. Methods: We assessed proliferation, collagen synthesis and cytokine secretion in cardiac fibroblasts subjected to angiotensin II (Ang II) subsequent to the consumption of berberine or a control treatment. And then we detected the role of AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway in berberine treatment of cardiac fibroblasts. Results: In the present study, the cellular behaviors of cardiac fibroblasts induced by Ang II were significantly activated including proliferation, transformation into myofibroblasts and collagen synthesis. Additionally, the ability of cytokine secretion was enhanced obviously. It was demonstrated that treatment of cardiac fibroblasts with berberine resulted in deceased proliferation, and attenuated fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression and collagen synthesis. And the protein secretion of TGFβ1 was inhibited; however, the protein secretion of IL-10 was increased in cardiac fibroblasts with berberine treatment. Mechanistically, the phosphorylation level of AMPK was increased; and the phosphorylation levels of mTOR and p70S6K were decreased in berberine treatment group. Conclusion: These results illustrated that the protective effects of berberine on cellular behaviors of cardiac fibroblasts were at least in part due to activate AMPK signaling pathway and downregulate mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Berberine might become a new strategy for treating cardiac fibrosis in the future. PMID:26722438

  18. Secretion of Unconjugated Androgens and Estrogens by the Normal and Abnormal Human Testis before and after Human Chorionic Gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R. L.; Kelch, R. P.; Jenner, M. R.; Kaplan, S. L.; Grumbach, M. M.

    1974-01-01

    The secretion of androgens and estrogens by normal and abnormal testes was compared by determining the concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione (Δ4A), testosterone (T), estrone (E1), and 17β-estradiol (E2) in peripheral and spermatic venous plasma samples from 14 normal men and 5 men with unilateral testicular atrophy. Four normal men and one patient with unilateral atrophy of the testis were given human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) before surgery. Plasma estrogens were determined by radioimmunoassay; plasma androgens were measured by the double-isotope dilution derivative technique. Peripheral concentrations of these steroids before and after HCG were similar in both the normal men and the patients with unilateral testicular atrophy. In normal men, the mean ±SE spermatic venous concentrations were DHEA, 73.1±11.7 ng/ml; Δ4A, 30.7±7.9 ng/ml; T, 751±114 ng/ml; E1, 306±55 pg/ml; and E2, 1298±216 pg/ml. Three of four subjects with unilateral testicular atrophy had greatly diminished spermatic venous levels of androgens and estrogens. HCG treatment increased the testicular secretion of DHEA and T fivefold, Δ4A threefold, E1 sixfold, and E2 eightfold in normal men. In the single subject with an atrophic testis who received HCG, the spermatic venous concentrations of androgens and estrogens were much less than in normal men similarly treated. We conclude that: (a) E1 is secreted by the human testis, but testicular secretion of E1 accounts for less than 5% of E1 production in normal men; (b) HCG stimulation produces increases in spermatic venous estrogens equal to or greater than the changes in androgens, including testosterone; and (c) strikingly decreased secretion of androgen and estrogen by unilateral atrophic human tests cannot be appreciated by analyses of peripheral steroid concentrations. PMID:4271572

  19. The Histone Demethylase Jumonji Coordinates Cellular Senescence Including Secretion of Neural Stem Cell-attracting Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Perrigue, Patrick M.; Silva, Michael E.; Warden, Charles D.; Feng, Nathan L.; Reid, Michael A.; Mota, Daniel J.; Joseph, Lauren P.; Tian, Yangzi Isabel; Glackin, Carlotta A.; Gutova, Margarita; Najbauer, Joseph; Aboody, Karen S.; Barish, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Jumonji domain-containing protein 3 (JMJD3/KDM6B) demethylates lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me3), a repressive epigenetic mark controlling chromatin organization and cellular senescence. To better understand the functional consequences of JMJD3 its expression was investigated in brain tumor cells. Querying patient expression profile databases confirmed JMJD3 over-expression in high-grade glioma. Immunochemical staining of two glioma cell lines, U251 and U87, indicated intrinsic differences in JMJD3 expression levels that were reflected in changes in cell phenotype and variations associated with cellular senescence, including senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity and the senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Over-expressing wild type JMJD3 (JMJD3wt) activated SASP-associated genes, enhanced SA-βgal activity, and induced nuclear blebbing. Conversely, over-expression of a catalytically inactive dominant negative mutant JMJD3 (JMJD3mut) increased proliferation. In addition, a large number of transcripts were identified by RNA-seq as altered in JMJD3 over-expressing cells, including cancer- and inflammation-related transcripts as defined by IPA analysis. These results suggest that expression of the SASP in the context of cancer undermines normal tissue homeostasis and contributes to tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These studies are therapeutically relevant because inflammatory cytokines have been linked to homing of neural stem cells and other stem cells to tumor loci. PMID:25652587

  20. IM-133N modulates cytokine secretion by RAW264.7 and THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Varma, R Sandeep; Guruprasad, Kanive P; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Kumar, L M Sharath; Babu, U Venkanna; Patki, S Pralhad

    2016-01-01

    An indigenous herbal extract IM-133N containing extracts of Prosopis glandulosa Torr and Symplocos racemosa Roxb were evaluated for potential immunomodulatory effects using RAW264.7 and THP-1 cells. The incubation of the cells for 24 h with IM-133N over a dose range 0-125 µg/ml did not cause cytotoxicity that exceeded 10%. The results indicated that non-cytotoxic doses of IM-133N effectively up-regulated iNOS, TNFα, IL-6, IL-10, IL-8 and IFNγ gene expression in both the RAW264.7 and THP-1 cells. The results also indicated IM-133N elicited dose-related increases in nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production by RAW264.7 or THP-1 cells. These results demonstrated that IM-133N could stimulate NO and induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by monocytes/macrophages. As clinical studies have shown IM-133N to be an effective immunomodulator without any adverse effects, the results of the present study provide further support for the potential use of this agent as an immunostimulant or as an immunotherapy adjuvant. PMID:25975427

  1. GLYCEMIC REGULATION AND INSULIN SECRETION ARE ABNORMAL IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS PIGS DESPITE SPARING OF ISLET CELL MASS

    PubMed Central

    Uc, Aliye; Olivier, Alicia K.; Griffin, Michelle A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Yao, Jianrong; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Buchanan, Katherine M.; Vanegas Calderón, Oriana G.; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Rector, Michael V.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Taft, Peter J.; Gansemer, Nick D.; Ludwig, Paula S.; Hornick, Emma E.; Stoltz, David A.; Ode, Katie L.; Welsh, Michael J.; Engelhardt, John F.; Norris, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a common and significant comorbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF). The pathogenesis of CF-related diabetes (CFRD) is incompletely understood. Because exocrine pancreatic disease is similar between humans and pigs with CF, the CF pig model has the potential to contribute significantly to the understanding of CFRD pathogenesis. We determined the structure of the endocrine pancreas in fetal, newborn and older CF and non-CF pigs and assessed endocrine pancreas function by intravenous glucose tolerance test (IV-GTT). In fetal pigs, pancreatic insulin and glucagon density was similar between CF and non-CF. In newborn and older pigs, the insulin and glucagon density was unchanged between CF and non-CF per total pancreatic area, but increased per remnant lobular tissue in CF reflecting exocrine pancreatic loss. Although fasting glucose levels were not different between CF and non-CF newborns, CF newborns demonstrated impaired glucose tolerance and increased glucose area under the curve during IV-GTT. Second phase insulin secretion responsiveness was impaired in CF newborn pigs and significantly lower than that observed in non-CF newborns. Older CF pigs had elevated random blood glucose levels compared to non-CF. In summary, glycemic abnormalities and insulin secretion defects were present in newborn CF pigs and spontaneous hyperglycemia developed over time. Functional changes in CF pig pancreas were not associated with a decline in islet cell mass. Our results suggest that functional islet abnormalities, independent of structural islet loss, contribute to the early pathogenesis of CFRD. PMID:25142104

  2. Rhaphidophora korthalsii modulates peripheral blood natural killer cell proliferation, cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhaphidophora korthalsii (Araceae) is a root-climber plant which has been widely used in Chinese traditional medicine for cancer and skin disease treatment. Previous reports have recorded its immunomodulatory effects on mice splenocyte and human peripheral blood. This study investigated the potential immunostimulatory effect of Rhaphidophora korthalsii on human PBMC enriched NK cell. Methods PBMC was exposed to various concentrations of R. korthalsii extract and the T and NK cell population in the control and extract treated PBMC were identified by immunophenotyping. Intracellular perforin and granzyme B expressions were detected by flow cytometry and extra-cellular Granzyme B, IFN-γ and TNF-α production in the isolated NK cells were determined by ELISA. The cytotoxicity of effector NK cell towards target K562 cell was assessed by CytoTox 96 assay. Results Rhaphidophora korthalsii methanol extract significantly increased PBMC NK cell population and intracellular perforin and granzyme B expressions. Moreover, the extract also enhanced the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α which subsequently enhanced the cytotoxicity of NK cell against the NK sensitive target K562 cell line. NK cell enriched with extract treated PBMC showed better activation than NK cell directly treated with the extract. Conclusion Our findings indicated a potential IL-2 free immunotherapy through direct and indirect R. korthalsii stimulation on NK cell activation. PMID:23800124

  3. [Lipopolysaccharide promotes the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells by modulating the survive and cytokine secretion of dendritic cells].

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Lu, Lisha; Wang, Weiqiang; Xue, Ting; Yu, Juan; Sun, Zhina; Zhao, Chunxiao; Liao, Fang

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the mechanism modulating the function of dendritic cells (DCs) and promoting the T cell response by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods Splenic DCs were purified with anti-CD11c immunomagnetic beads. After DCs were stimulated with LPS, the expressions of co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 on the DCs were detected by flow cytometry. The protein levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-12p70 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the culture supernatant were measured by ELISA. The apoptotic levels of DCs which were labeled with annexinV-FITC/PI were determined by flow cytometry. The phosphorylation level of nuclear factor κB P65 (NF-κB P65) was assessed by phos-flow. The mRNA levels of variable genes in microarray were determined by real-time PCR. The proliferation of CD4(+) T cells which were co-cultured with OVA323-329-treated DCs was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results The purity of DCs reached over 93% after isolation. LPS up-regulated the expressions of CD80 and CD86 and enhanced DCs-mediated proliferation of CD4(+) T cells. In addition, LPS increased the protein levels of IL-12p40, TNF-α and IL-6, and inhibited the apoptosis of DCs through the NF-κB signaling pathway. Conclusion LPS could enhance DC-mediated proliferation of CD4(+) T cells by modulating the DCs survival and cytokine secretion. PMID:27609566

  4. High Systemic Levels of the Cytokine-Inducing HMGB1 Isoform Secreted in Severe Macrophage Activation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Palmblad, Karin; Schierbeck, Hanna; Sundberg, Erik; Horne, Anna-Carin; Harris, Helena Erlandsson; Henter, Jan-Inge; Antoine, Daniel J; Andersson, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of systemic inflammation. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein extensively leaked extracellularly during necrotic cell death or actively secreted by natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages and additional cells during infection or sterile injury. Extracellular HMGB1 orchestrates key events in inflammation as a prototypic alarmin. The redox states of its three cysteines render the molecule mutually exclusive functions: fully reduced “all-thiol HMGB1” exerts chemotactic activity; “disulfide HMGB1” has cytokine-inducing, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated effects—while terminally oxidized “sulfonyl HMGB1” lacks inflammatory activity. This study examines the kinetic pattern of systemic HMGB1 isoform expression during therapy in four children with severe MAS. Three of the four patients with underlying systemic rheumatic diseases were treated with biologics and two suffered from triggering herpes virus infections at the onset of MAS. All patients required intensive care unit therapy due to life-threatening illness. Tandem mass-spectrometric analysis revealed dramatically increased systemic levels of the cytokine-inducing HMGB1 isoform during early MAS. Disease control coincided with supplementary etoposide therapy initiated to boost apoptotic cell death, when systemic HMGB1 levels drastically declined and the molecule emerged mainly in its oxidized, noninflammatory isoform. Systemic interferon (IFN)-γ and ferritin peaked concomitantly with HMGB1, whereas interleukin (IL)-18 and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 levels developed differently. In conclusion, this work provides new insights in HMGB1 biology, suggesting that the molecule is not merely a biomarker of inflammation, but most likely also contributes to the pathogenesis of MAS. These observations encourage further studies of disulfide HMGB1 antagonists to improve outcome of MAS. PMID:25247290

  5. Spiralin, a mycoplasmal membrane lipoprotein, induces T-cell-independent B-cell blastogenesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, C; Wróblewski, H; Le Henaff, M; Montagnier, L; Blanchard, A

    1997-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are bacteria which can cause respiratory, arthritic, and urogenital diseases. During the early phase of infection, mycoplasmas usually induce an inflammatory response and a humoral response preferentially directed against their membrane-bound, surface-exposed lipoproteins. In this report, we describe the effects on immune cells of spiralin, a well-characterized mycoplasmal lipoprotein. Purified spiralin stimulated the in vitro proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and murine splenocytes. The stimulation pathway was probably different from that followed by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide because the effect of spiralin was not abolished by polymyxin B. Comparison of the effects of whole, native spiralin with those induced by proteinase K-digested spiralin or by the C-terminal half of spiralin (peptide p[13.5]T) revealed that the first half of the protein, which contains the lipoylated N terminus, is responsible for the mitogenic activity. In contrast to whole spiralin, proteinase K-digested spiralin did not trigger murine B-cell differentiation and immunoglobulin G and M secretion. Stimulation of human or murine immune cells led to early secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (human tumor necrosis factor alpha and murine interleukin 1 or 6). Spiralin induced the T-cell-independent blastogenesis of murine B cells but did not stimulate T cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that spiralin possesses potent immunostimulating activity, similar to that reported for lipoproteins of pathogenic gracilicutes (gram-negative eubacteria; e.g., Borrelia burgdorferi OspA and E. coli Braun lipoprotein), and are consistent with the fact that lipoproteins are major antigens during mycoplasma infections. PMID:9317043

  6. High IFN-γ Release and Impaired Capacity of Multi-Cytokine Secretion in IGRA Supernatants Are Associated with Active Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Pisoni, Amandine; Bendriss, Sophie; Marin, Grégory; Peries, Marianne; Bolloré, Karine; Terru, Dominique; Godreuil, Sylvain; Bourdin, Arnaud; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection regardless of the active (ATB) or latent (LTBI) forms of tuberculosis (TB). In this study, Mtb-specific T cell response against region of deletion 1 (RD1) antigens were explored by a microbead multiplex assay performed in T-SPOT TB assay (T-SPOT) supernatants from 35 patients with ATB and 115 patients with LTBI. T-SPOT is positive when over 7 IFN-γ secreting cells (SC)/250 000 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are enumerated. However, over 100 IFN-γ SC /250 000 PBMC were more frequently observed in the ATB group compared to the LTBI group. By contrast, lower cytokine concentrations and lower cytokine productions relative to IFN-γ secretion were observed for IL 4, IL-12, TNF-α, GM-CSF, Eotaxin and IFN-α when compared to LTBI. Thus, high IFN-γ release and low cytokine secretions in relation with IFN-γ production appeared as signatures of ATB, corroborating that multicytokine Mtb-specific response against RD1 antigens reflects host capacity to contain TB reactivation. In this way, testing cytokine profile in IGRA supernatants would be helpful to improve ATB screening strategy including immunologic tests. PMID:27603919

  7. IL-35 Decelerates the Inflammatory Process by Regulating Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion and M1/M2 Macrophage Ratio in Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Lin, Yi; Li, Chunlei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Cheng, Lin; Dai, Lei; Wang, Youcui; Wang, Fangfang; Shi, Gang; Li, Yiming; Yang, Qianmei; Cui, Xueliang; Liu, Yi; Wang, Huiling; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Yang; Xiang, Rong; Li, Jiong; Yu, Dechao; Wei, Yuquan; Deng, Hongxin

    2016-09-15

    IL-35 downregulates Th17 cell development and suppresses certain types of autoimmune inflammation such as collagen-induced arthritis and experimental autoimmune uveitis. Psoriasis is thought to be initiated by abnormal interactions between cutaneous keratinocytes and systemic immune cells. However, the role of IL-35 in psoriasis remains unclear. In this study, we assessed IL-35 in three well-known psoriasis models: a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), a keratin 14 (K14)-vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A)-transgenic (Tg) mouse model, and an imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model. First, we found that IL-35 suppressed the expression of IL-6, CXCL8, and S100A7, which are highly upregulated by a mixture of five proinflammatory cytokines in HaCaT. Second, a plasmid coding for the human IL-35 sequence coated with cationic liposomes showed potent immunosuppressive effects on K14-VEGF-A-Tg and imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse models. In the K14-VEGF-A-Tg model, our results showed that several types of proinflammatory cytokines were significantly reduced, whereas IL-10 was remarkably induced by IL-35. Compared with pcDNA3.1, there was a small number of CD4(+)IL-17(+) T cells and a large number of CD4(+)IL-10(+) and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells in the IL-35 group. Most importantly, we found that IL-35 decreased the total number of macrophages and ratio of M1/M2 macrophages, which has not been reported previously. In addition, compared with dexamethasone, IL-35 showed long-term therapeutic efficacy. In summary, our results strongly indicate that IL-35 plays a potent immunosuppressive role in psoriasis. Thus, IL-35 has potential for development as a new therapeutic strategy for patients with chronic psoriasis and other cutaneous inflammatory diseases. PMID:27527600

  8. Cytokine/Chemokine Secretion and Proteomic Identification of Upregulated Annexin A1 from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Cocultured with the Liver Fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Hongsrichan, Nuttanan; Intuyod, Kitti; Pinlaor, Porntip; Khoontawad, Jarinya; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the cytokine/chemokine secretions and alteration of protein expression from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cocultured with adult liver flukes (Opisthorchis viverrini) for 6 to 24 h. PBMC-derived proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and the cytokines/chemokines in the supernatant were assessed using a cytokine array. Exposure to O. viverrini induced increases in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, costimulating protein, adhesion molecules, and chemotactic chemokines relative to untreated controls. In contrast, secretion of the CD40 ligand, interleukin 16, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β decreased. Proteomic analysis revealed that expression of 48 proteins was significantly altered in PBMCs stimulated with O. viverrini. Annexin A1 (ANXA1) was selected for further study, and immunoblotting showed upregulation of ANXA1 expression in PBMCs after 12 and 24 h coculture with liver flukes. In an in vivo study, transcription and translation of ANXA1 significantly increased in livers of hamsters infected with O. viverrini at 21 days and from 3 months onwards compared to normal controls. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed that ANXA1 was present not only in the cytoplasm of inflammatory cells but also in the cytoplasm of cholangiocytes, which are in close contact with the parasite and its excretory/secretory products in the biliary system. Expression of ANXA1 increased with time concomitant with bile duct enlargement, bile duct formation, and epithelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, several cytokines/chemokines secreted by PBMCs and upregulation of ANXA1 in PBMCs and biliary epithelial cells might have a role in host defense against O. viverrini infection and tissue resolution of inflammation. PMID:24614660

  9. Comparative analysis of lymphocyte activation marker expression and cytokine secretion profile in stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures: an in vitro model to monitor cellular immune function.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Manjula; Eirikis, Edward; Davis, Cuc; Davis, Hugh M; Prabhakar, Uma

    2004-10-01

    Activation of lymphocytes is a complex, yet finely regulated cascade of events that results in the expression of cytokine receptors, production and secretion of cytokines and expression of several cell surface molecules that eventually lead to divergent immune responses. Assessing the qualitative and quantitative nature of lymphocyte function following immunotherapy provides valuable information about the immune responses mediated by a therapeutic agent. To facilitate evaluation of the immunomodulatory activity of therapeutic agents, we have established a platform of in vitro immunoassays with normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with several polyclonal activators that are known to exhibit different modes of action. We evaluated the kinetics of cell surface marker expression and cytokine release from PBMCs stimulated in parallel with various activating agents over a time course. These stimulating agents induced early (CD69 and CD71) and late (CD25 and HLA-DR) activation markers to varying antigen densities, indicated different cytokine profiles, and showed differential inhibition with dexamethasone (DEX), an inhibitor of early signaling events. Based on the association or correlation of the kinetics of activation marker expression and secreted cytokines, the results of our study indicate the appropriate time points for the simultaneous measurement of both these activation products. This study defines the kinetics for both measures of T cell activation and provides a comprehensive review with various polyclonal activators that can serve as a reference for monitoring lymphocyte function in clinical study samples. PMID:15541283

  10. Effect of Endometrial Injury on Secretion of Endometrial Cytokines and IVF Outcomes in Women with Unexplained Subfertility

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Han, Junyan; Jia, Chanwei; Ma, Yanmin; Lan, Yonglian; Li, Ying; Wang, Shuyu

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of endometrial injury (EI) on in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes in women with unexplained subfertility and explore the relationship between EI and endometrial inflammatory cytokines, 66 women with unexplained subfertility undergoing IVF treatment were recruited. 38 patients in the EI group underwent EI in the mid-luteal phase of the cycle and 28 patients in the non-EI (NEI) group. According to the pregnancy outcome, the NEI and EI groups were divided into NEI-nonpregnant (NEI-NP), NEI-pregnant (NEI-P), EI-NP, and EI-P. All patients underwent aspiration of endometrial secretions immediately before embryo transfer. The concentrations of ten mediators were measured using Milliplex Magnetic Bead assay. The clinical pregnancy was significantly higher in the EI than in the NEI group. The concentrations of interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, IL-12 (p70), IL-13, interferon- (IFN-) γ, monocyte chemotactic protein- (MCP-) 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were significantly higher in the EI than the NEI group. The expression of IFN-γ and VEGF in the EI-P was significantly increased compared to the EI-NP group. These findings suggest that, in women with unexplained subfertility, endometrial injury might be a potential method to improve clinical pregnancy rates by promoting the expression of IFN-γ and VEGF. PMID:26586929

  11. Glycaemic regulation and insulin secretion are abnormal in cystic fibrosis pigs despite sparing of islet cell mass.

    PubMed

    Uc, Aliye; Olivier, Alicia K; Griffin, Michelle A; Meyerholz, David K; Yao, Jianrong; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Buchanan, Katherine M; Vanegas Calderón, Oriana G; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Reznikov, Leah R; Hoegger, Mark J; Rector, Michael V; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Taft, Peter J; Gansemer, Nick D; Ludwig, Paula S; Hornick, Emma E; Stoltz, David A; Ode, Katie L; Welsh, Michael J; Engelhardt, John F; Norris, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a common and significant co-morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF). The pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD) is incompletely understood. Because exocrine pancreatic disease is similar between humans and pigs with CF, the CF pig model has the potential to contribute significantly to the understanding of CFRD pathogenesis. We determined the structure of the endocrine pancreas in fetal, newborn and older CF and non-CF pigs and assessed endocrine pancreas function by intravenous glucose tolerance test (IV-GTT). In fetal pigs, pancreatic insulin and glucagon density was similar between CF and non-CF. In newborn and older pigs, the insulin and glucagon density was unchanged between CF and non-CF per total pancreatic area, but increased per remnant lobular tissue in CF reflecting exocrine pancreatic loss. Although fasting glucose levels were not different between CF and non-CF newborns, CF newborns demonstrated impaired glucose tolerance and increased glucose area under the curve during IV-GTT. Second phase insulin secretion responsiveness was impaired in CF newborn pigs and significantly lower than that observed in non-CF newborns. Older CF pigs had elevated random blood glucose levels compared with non-CF. In summary, glycaemic abnormalities and insulin secretion defects were present in newborn CF pigs and spontaneous hyperglycaemia developed over time. Functional changes in CF pig pancreas were not associated with a decline in islet cell mass. Our results suggest that functional islet abnormalities, independent of structural islet loss, contribute to the early pathogenesis of CFRD. PMID:25142104

  12. The Contraceptive Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Impairs Mycobacterial Control and Inhibits Cytokine Secretion in Mice Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kleynhans, Léanie; Du Plessis, Nelita; Allie, Nasiema; Jacobs, Muazzam; Kidd, Martin; van Helden, Paul D.; Walzl, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), with progestin as the single active compound, possesses selective glucocorticoid activity and can alter the expression of glucocorticoid receptor-regulated genes. We therefore propose that pharmacological doses of DMPA used for endocrine therapy could have significant immune modulatory effects and impact on susceptibility to, as well as clinical manifestation and outcome of, infectious diseases. We investigated the effect of contraceptive doses of DMPA in two different murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis models. Multiplex bead array analysis revealed that DMPA altered serum cytokine levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and interleukin 10 (IL-10) in C57BL/6 mice and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in BALB/c mice. DMPA also suppressed antigen-specific production of TNF-α, G-CSF, IL-10, and IL-6 and induced the production of IP-10 in C57BL/6 mice. In BALB/c mice, DMPA altered the antigen-specific secretion of IFN-γ, IL-17, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1). Furthermore, we show that C57BL/6 mice treated with doses of DMPA, which result in serum concentrations similar to those observed in contraceptive users, have a significantly higher bacterial load in their lungs. Our data show for the first time that DMPA impacts tuberculosis (TB) disease severity in a mouse model and that the effects of this contraceptive are not confined to infections of the genital tract. This could have major implications for the contraceptive policies not only in developing countries like South Africa but also worldwide. PMID:23381991

  13. Profiles of cytokines secreted by isolated human endometrial cells under the influence of chorionic gonadotropin during the window of embryo implantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have indicated that human pre-implantation embryo-derived chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) may influence the implantation process by its action on human endometrial epithelial and stromal cells. Despite reports indicating that hCG acts on these cells to affect the production of several cytokines and growth factors (e.g., MIF, IGF-I, VEGF, LIF, IL-11, GMCSF, CXL10 and FGF2), our understanding of the integral influence of hCG on paracrine interactions between endometrial stromal and epithelial cells during implantation is very limited. Methods In the present study, we examined the profile of 48 cytokines in the conditioned media of primary cell cultures of human implantation stage endometrium. Endometrial epithelial cells (group 1; n = 20), stromal cells (group 2; n = 20), and epithelial plus stromal cells (group 3; n = 20) obtained from mid-secretory stage endometrial samples (n = 60) were grown on collagen and exposed to different doses (0, 1, 10 and 100 IU/ml) of rhCG for 24 h in vitro. Immunochemical and qRT-PCR methods were used to determine cytokine profiles. Enrichment and process networks analyses were implemented using a list of cytokines showing differential secretion in response to hCG. Results Under basal conditions, endometrial epithelial and stromal cells exhibited cell type-specific profiles of secreted cytokines. Administration of hCG (100 IU) resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) different cytokine secretion profiles indicative of macropinocytic transport (HGF, MCSF) in epithelial cells, signal transduction (CCL4, FGF2, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-17, VEGF) in stromal cells, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (FGF2, HGF, IL-1b, TNF) in mixed cells. Overall, the administration of hCG affected cytokines involved in the immune response, chemotaxis, inflammatory changes, proliferation, cell adhesion and apoptosis. Conclusions CG can influence the function of the endometrium during blastocyst implantation via its

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of 27 selected terpenoid compounds tested through modulating Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion profiles using murine primary splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chi-Mei; Lin, Jin-Yuarn

    2013-11-15

    This study investigated 27 selected terpenoid compounds, including 8 monoterpenoids, 7 sesqui-terpenoids, 3 di-terpenoids, 8 tri-terpenoids, and 1 tetra-terpenoid, for their Th1/Th2 immunomodulatory potential using mouse primary splenocytes. Changes in Th1 cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ, and Th2 cytokines, including IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10, secreted by terpenoid-treated splenocytes were measured using the ELISA method. The results showed that triptolide, a diterpenoid, was most cytotoxic, reflecting an IC50 value of 46nM. Eucalyptol, limonene, linalool, thymol, parthenolide, andrographolide, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, lupeol, ursolic acid and β-sitosterol showed a strong Th2-inclination and anti-inflammation potential in vitro. In addition, (-)-trans-caryophyllene, oridonin, triptolide, diosgenin, betulinic acid, escin, and β-sitosterol treatments significantly inhibited both IL-2 (Th1) and IL-10 (Th2) cytokine production at the same time, suggesting that these terpenoid compounds have an anti-inflammation potential through the inhibition of T-cell immune responses. Diosgenin treatments significantly increased IFN-γ secretion levels using mouse splenocytes, suggesting that diosgenin may be useful in treating a viral infection through the stimulation of IFN-γ production. Menthone, farnesol and oridonin treatments did not markedly increase IL-10/IL-2 (Th2/Th1) cytokine secretion ratios, suggesting that menthone, farnesol and oridonin may have a relative Th1-inclination property, compared to the other selected terpenoid compounds. The relative Th1-inclination property of menthone, farnesol and oridonin may be applied to improve Th2-skewed allergic diseases. PMID:23790892

  15. Bacterial siderophores that evade or overwhelm lipocalin 2 induce hypoxia inducible factor 1α and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in cultured respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Holden, Victoria I; Lenio, Steven; Kuick, Rork; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Shah, Yatrik M; Bachman, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Iron is essential for many cellular processes and is required by bacteria for replication. To acquire iron from the host, pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria secrete siderophores, including enterobactin (Ent). However, Ent is bound by the host protein lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), preventing bacterial reuptake of aferric or ferric Ent. Furthermore, the combination of Ent and Lcn2 (Ent+Lcn2) leads to enhanced secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to that induced by either stimulus alone. Modified or structurally distinct siderophores, including yersiniabactin (Ybt) and glycosylated Ent (GlyEnt, or salmochelin), deliver iron to bacteria despite the presence of Lcn2. We hypothesized that the robust immune response to Ent and Lcn2 requires iron chelation rather than the Ent+Lcn2 complex itself and also can be stimulated by Lcn2-evasive siderophores. To test this hypothesis, cultured respiratory epithelial cells were stimulated with combinations of purified siderophores and Lcn2 and analyzed by gene expression microarrays, quantitative PCR, and cytokine immunoassays. Ent caused HIF-1α protein stabilization, induced the expression of genes regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), and repressed genes involved in cell cycle and DNA replication, whereas Lcn2 induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation by excess Ent or Ybt significantly increased Lcn2-induced secretion of IL-8, IL-6, and CCL20. Stabilization of HIF-1α was sufficient to enhance Lcn2-induced IL-6 secretion. These data indicate that respiratory epithelial cells can respond to bacterial siderophores that evade or overwhelm Lcn2 binding by increasing proinflammatory cytokine production. PMID:24980968

  16. The Endogenous Cell-Fate Factor Dachshund restrains Prostate Epithelial Cell Migration via Repression of Cytokine Secretion via a CXCL Signaling Module

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Wu, Kongming; Jiao, Xuanmao; Wang, Liping; Ju, Xiaoming; Wang, Min; Di Sante, Gabriele; Xu, Shaohua; Wang, Qiong; Li, Kevin; Sun, Xin; Xu, Congwen; Li, Zhiping; Casimiro, Mathew C.; Ertel, Adam; Addya, Sankar; McCue, Peter; Lisanti, Michael P.; Wang, Chenguang; Davis, Richard J.; Mardon, Graeme; Pestell, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading form of cancer death in men. In a subset of PCa patients increased chemokine signaling IL-8 and IL-6 correlates with androgen therapy-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). IL-8 and IL-6 are produced by prostate epithelial cells and promote PCa cell invasion, however the mechanisms restraining prostate epithelial cell cytokine secretion are poorly understood. Herein the cell-fate determinant factor DACH1 inhibited androgen therapy-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) tumor growth in mice. Using Dach1fl/fl/Probasin-Cre bi-transgenic mice, we show IL-8 and IL-6 secretion was altered ~1000 fold by endogenous Dach1. Endogenous Dach1 is shown to serve as a key endogenous restraint to prostate epithelial cell growth and restrains migration via CXCL signaling. DACH1 inhibited expression, transcription and secretion of the CXCL genes (IL-8, IL-6) by binding to their promoter regulatory regions in chromatin. DACH1 is thus a newly defined determinant of benign and malignant prostate epithelium cellular growth, migration and cytokine abundance in vivo. PMID:25769723

  17. Significant upregulation of cytokine secretion from T helper type 9 and 17 cells in a NC/Nga mouse model of ambient chemical exposure-induced respiratory allergy.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Risako; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Watanabe, Yuko; Kurosawa, Yoshimi; Kosaka, Tadashi; Harada, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that ambient chemical exposure is closely associated with respiratory allergies. We attempted to develop an original protocol for detecting ambient chemical exposure-induced respiratory allergy in different strains of mice. In the process of comparing allergic potency of these mice, we observed that NC/Nga mice showed significant upregulation of respiratory allergic symptoms as well as specific type of cytokine secretions. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying these phenomena in NC/Nga mice in comparison with BALB/c mice. For the model of respiratory allergy, female BALB/c and NC/Nga mice were sensitized and challenged with trimellitic anhydride. Clinical observation, IgE and immunocyte counts, and cytokine profile in the serum, lymph nodes, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were recorded. We also monitored the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung. We found that worsening of respiratory status was noted only in NC/Nga mice, whereas Th2 reactions were significantly increased in BALB/c mice compared with NC/Nga mice. In contrast, the levels of Th9 and Th17-derived cytokines in NC/Nga mice were significantly higher than those in BALB/c mice. Thus, Th9 and Th17 may be involved in the aggravation of respiratory allergic symptoms induced by ambient chemicals. PMID:27095298

  18. MicroRNA-206 regulates the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and MMP9 expression by targeting TIMP3 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected THP-1 human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiangdong; Zeng, Lihong; Liu, Zhi; Ke, Xue; Lei, Lin; Li, Guobao

    2016-08-19

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease that is characterized by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb)-triggered immune system impairment and lung tissue damage shows limited treatment options. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulators of gene expression that play critical roles in many human diseases, and can be up- or downregulated by M.tb infection in macrophage. Recently, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) 3 has been found to play roles in regulating macrophage inflammation. Here, we found that TIMP3 expression was regulated by miR-206 in M.tb-infected THP-1 human macrophages. In THP-1 cells infected with M.tb, the miR-206 level was significantly upregulated and the expression of TIMP3 was markedly decreased when the secretion of inflammatory cytokines was increased. Inhibition of miR-206 markedly suppressed inflammatory cytokine secretion and upregulated the expression of TIMP3. In contrast, the upregulation of miR-206 promoted the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 levels and inhibited TIMP3 levels. Using a dual-luciferase reporter assay, a direct interaction between miR-206 and the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of TIMP3 was confirmed. SiTIMP3, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for TIMP3, significantly attenuated the suppressive effects of miR-206-inhibitor on inflammatory cytokine secretion and MMP9 expression. Our data suggest that miR-206 may function as an inflammatory regulator and drive the expression of MMP9 in M.tb-infected THP-1 cells by targeting TIMP3, indicating that miR-206 is a potential therapeutic target for patients with TB. PMID:27291149

  19. The Effect of Solar Irradiated Vibrio cholerae on the Secretion of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines by the JAWS II Dendritic Cell Line In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ssemakalu, Cornelius Cano; Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice; Motaung, Keolebogile Shirley; Pillay, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The use of solar irradiation to sterilize water prior to its consumption has resulted in the reduction of water related illnesses in waterborne disease endemic communities worldwide. Currently, research on solar water disinfection (SODIS) has been directed towards understanding the underlying mechanisms through which solar irradiation inactivates the culturability of microorganisms in water, enhancement of the disinfection process, and the health impact of SODIS water consumption. However, the immunological consequences of SODIS water consumption have not been explored. In this study, we investigated the effect that solar irradiated V. cholerae may have had on the secretion of cytokines and chemokines by the JAWS II dendritic cell line in vitro. The JAWS II dendritic cell line was stimulated with the different strains of V. cholerae that had been: (i) prepared in PBS, (ii) inactivated through a combination of heat and chemical, (iii) solar irradiated, and (iv) non-solar irradiated, in bottled water. As controls, LPS (1 μg/ml) and CTB (1 μg/ml) were used as stimulants. After 48 hours of stimulation the tissue culture media from each treatment was qualitatively and quantitatively analysed for the presence of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-15, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MIP-2, RANTES, TNF-α, IL-23 and IL-27. Results showed that solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae induced dendritic cells to secrete significant (p<0.05) levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in comparison to the unstimulated dendritic cells. Furthermore, the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by the dendritic cells in response to solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae was not as high as observed in treatments involving non-solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae or LPS. Our results suggest that solar irradiated microorganisms are capable of inducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This novel finding is key towards understanding the

  20. Mushroom acidic glycosphingolipid induction of cytokine secretion from murine T cells and proliferation of NK1.1 {alpha}/{beta} TCR-double positive cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Hirofumi; Itonori, Saki; Sugita, Mutsumi; Nakamura, Kimihide; Ohba, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Akemi; Kushi, Yasunori

    2008-08-29

    Interferon (IFN)-{gamma} and interleukin (IL)-4 regulate many types of immune responses. Here we report that acidic glycosphingolipids (AGLs) of Hypsizigus marmoreus and Pleurotus eryngii induced secretion of IFN- {gamma} and IL-4 from T cells in a CD11c-positive cell-dependent manner similar to that of {alpha}-galactosylceramide ({alpha}-GalCer) and isoglobotriaosylceramide (iGb3), although activated T cells by AGLs showed less secretion of cytokine than those activated by {alpha}-GalCer. In addition, stimulation of these mushroom AGLs induced proliferation of NK1.1 {alpha}/{beta} TCR-double positive cells in splenocytes. Administration of a mixture of {alpha}-GalCer and AGLs affected the stimulation of {alpha}-GalCer and generally induced a subtle Th1 bias for splenocytes but induced an extreme Th2 bias for thymocytes. These results suggested that edible mushroom AGLs contribute to immunomodulation.

  1. Resveratrol inhibits enterovirus 71 replication and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in rhabdosarcoma cells through blocking IKKs/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Yuanyuan; Gu, Zhiwen; Wang, Yuyue; Shi, Mei; Ji, Yun; Sun, Jing; Xu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Lirong; Jiang, Jingtin; Shi, Weifeng

    2015-01-01

    Polydatin and resveratrol, as major active components in Polygonum cuspidatum, have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions. However, the effect and mechanism of polydatin and resveratrol on enterovirus 71 (EV71) have not been reported. In this study, resveratrol revealed strong antiviral activity on EV71, while polydatin had weak effect. Neither polydatin nor resveratrol exhibited influence on viral attachment. Resveratrol could effectively inhibit the synthesis of EV71/VP1 and the phosphorylation of IKKα, IKKβ, IKKγ, IKBα, NF-κB p50 and NF-κB p65, respectively. Meanwhile, the remarkably increased secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α in EV71-infected rhabdosarcoma (RD) cells could be blocked by resveratrol. These results demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited EV71 replication and cytokine secretion in EV71-infected RD cells through blocking IKKs/NF-κB signaling pathway. Thus, resveratrol may have potent antiviral effect on EV71 infection. PMID:25692777

  2. Resveratrol Inhibits Enterovirus 71 Replication and Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion in Rhabdosarcoma Cells through Blocking IKKs/NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Li, Yuanyuan; Gu, Zhiwen; Wang, Yuyue; Shi, Mei; Ji, Yun; Sun, Jing; Xu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Lirong; Jiang, Jingtin; Shi, Weifeng

    2015-01-01

    Polydatin and resveratrol, as major active components in Polygonum cuspidatum, have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions. However, the effect and mechanism of polydatin and resveratrol on enterovirus 71 (EV71) have not been reported. In this study, resveratrol revealed strong antiviral activity on EV71, while polydatin had weak effect. Neither polydatin nor resveratrol exhibited influence on viral attachment. Resveratrol could effectively inhibit the synthesis of EV71/VP1 and the phosphorylation of IKKα, IKKβ, IKKγ, IKBα, NF-κB p50 and NF-κB p65, respectively. Meanwhile, the remarkably increased secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α in EV71-infected rhabdosarcoma (RD) cells could be blocked by resveratrol. These results demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited EV71 replication and cytokine secretion in EV71-infected RD cells through blocking IKKs/NF-κB signaling pathway. Thus, resveratrol may have potent antiviral effect on EV71 infection. PMID:25692777

  3. A heteroglycan from the cyanobacterium Nostoc commune modulates LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine secretion by THP-1 monocytes through phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Astridur; Thorlacius, Gudny Ella; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Olafsdottir, Elin Soffia; Vikingsson, Arnor; Freysdottir, Jona; Hardardottir, Ingibjorg

    2014-09-25

    Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) have been consumed as food and used in folk medicine since ancient times to alleviate a variety of diseases. Cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc have been shown to produce complex exopolysaccharides with antioxidant and antiviral activity. Furthermore, Nostoc sp. are common in cyanolichen symbiosis and lichen polysaccharides are known to have immunomodulating effects. Nc-5-s is a heteroglycan isolated from free-living colonies of Nostoc commune and its structure has been characterized in detail. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Nc-5-s on the inflammatory response of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 monocytes and how the effects are mediated. THP-1 monocytes primed with interferon-γ and stimulated with LPS in the presence of Nc-5-s secreted less of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 and more of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 than THP-1 monocytes stimulated without Nc-5-s. In contrast, Nc-5-s increased LPS-induced secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-8. Nc-5-s decreased LPS-induced phosphorylation of the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and Akt kinase, but did not affect phosphorylation of the p38 kinase, activation of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway, nor DNA binding of c-fos. These results show that Nc-5-s has anti-inflammatory effects on IL-6 and IL-10 secretion by THP-1 monocytes, but its effects are pro-inflammatory when it comes to TNF-α and IL-8. Furthermore, they show that the effects of Nc-5-s may be mediated through the ERK1/2 pathway and/or the Akt/phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway and their downstream effectors. The ability of Nc-5-s to decrease IL-6 secretion, increase IL-10 secretion and moderate ERK1/2 activation indicates a potential for its development as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:24877713

  4. A Human Anti-M2 Antibody Mediates Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity (ADCC) and Cytokine Secretion by Resting and Cytokine-Preactivated Natural Killer (NK) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Simhadri, Venkateswara R.; Dimitrova, Milena; Mariano, John L.; Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Zhong, Weimin; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Eichelberger, Maryna C.; Borrego, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved matrix protein 2 (M2) is a good candidate for the development of a broadly protective influenza vaccine that induces long-lasting immunity. In animal models, natural killer (NK) cells have been proposed to play an important role in the protection provided by M2-based vaccines through a mechanism of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We investigated the ability of the human anti-M2 Ab1-10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to activate human NK cells. They mediated ADCC against M2-expressing cells in the presence of Ab1-10 mAb. Furthermore, NK cell pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine secretion is also enhanced when Ab1-10 mAb is present. We also generated cytokine-preactivated NK cells and showed that they still displayed increased effector functions in the presence of Ab1-10 mAb. Thus, our study has demonstrated that human resting and cytokine-preactivated NK cells may have a very important role in the protection provided by anti-M2 Abs. PMID:25915748

  5. Randomized Cross-Sectional Study to Compare HIV-1 Specific Antibody and Cytokine Concentrations in Female Genital Secretions Obtained by Menstrual Cup and Cervicovaginal Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Archary, Derseree; Liebenberg, Lenine J.; Werner, Lise; Tulsi, Sahil; Majola, Nelisile; Naicker, Nivashnee; Dlamini, Sarah; Hope, Thomas J.; Samsunder, Natasha; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Morris, Lynn; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Garrett, Nigel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Optimizing methods for genital specimen collection to accurately characterize mucosal immune responses is a priority for the HIV prevention field. The menstrual cup (MC) has been proposed as an alternative to other methods including cervicovaginal lavage (CVL), but no study has yet formally compared these two methods. Methods Forty HIV-infected, antiretroviral therapy-naïve women from the CAPRISA 002 acute HIV infection cohort study were randomized to have genital fluid collected using the MC with subsequent CVL, or by CVL alone. Qualitative data, which assessed levels of comfort and acceptability of MC using a 5-point Likert scale, was collected. Luminex multiplex assays were used to measure HIV-specific IgG against multiple gene products and 48 cytokines. Results The majority (94%) of participants indicated that insertion, wearing and removal of the MC was comfortable. Nineteen MCs with 18 matching, subsequent CVLs and 20 randomized CVLs were available for analysis. Mucosal IgG responses against four HIV-antigens were detected in 99% of MCs compared to only 80% of randomized CVLs (p = 0.029). Higher specific antibody activity and total antibodies were observed in MCs compared to CVL (all p<0.001). In MCs, 42/48 (88%) cytokines were in the detectable range in all participants compared to 27/48 (54%) in CVL (p<0.001). Concentrations of 22/41 cytokines (53.7%) were significantly higher in fluid collected by MC. Both total IgG (r = 0.63; p = 0.005) and cytokine concentrations (r = 0.90; p<0.001) correlated strongly between MC and corresponding post-MC CVL. Conclusions MC sampling improves the detection of mucosal cytokines and antibodies, particularly those present at low concentrations. MC may therefore represent an ideal tool to assess immunological parameters in genital secretions, without interfering with concurrent collection of conventional CVL samples. PMID:26147923

  6. Differential regulation of mast cell degranulation versus cytokine secretion by the actin regulatory proteins Coronin1a and Coronin1b

    PubMed Central

    Föger, Niko; Jenckel, André; Orinska, Zane; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Chan, Andrew C.; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Mast cell (MC) activation via aggregation of the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) causes degranulation and release of proinflammatory mediators in a process that involves the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, the regulatory pathways and the molecular links between cytoskeletal changes and MC function are incompletely understood. In this study, we provide genetic evidence for a critical role of the actin-regulatory proteins Coronin1a (Coro1a) and Coro1b on exocytic pathways in MCs: Coro1a−/− bone marrow–derived MCs exhibit increased FcεRI-mediated degranulation of secretory lysosomes but significantly reduced secretion of cytokines. Hyperdegranulation of Coro1a−/− MCs is further augmented by the additional loss of Coro1b. In vivo, Coro1a−/−Coro1b−/− mice displayed enhanced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Functional reconstitution assays revealed that the inhibitory effect of Coro1a on MC degranulation strictly correlates with cortical localization of Coro1a, requires its filamentous actin–binding activity, and is regulated by phosphorylation of Ser2 of Coro1a. Thus, coronin proteins, and in turn the actin cytoskeleton, exhibit a functional dichotomy as differential regulators of degranulation versus cytokine secretion in MC biology. PMID:21844203

  7. Effect of low-energy laser irradiation on cytokine secretion from skeletal muscle cells: involvement of calcium in the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Fidi; Adamek, Mariusz; Brodie, C.; Shainberg, Asher

    1997-12-01

    Low energy laser irradiation has an effect on Nerve Growth Factor and anti mitotic factors release from rat and mouse skeletal muscle cultures. It was found that there is a transient elevation of intracellular calcium in the myotubes immediately after irradiation. Calcium changes were detected by dynamic video imaging systems and with a photometric system. Pre incubation of the myotubes with photosensitizers enhance the elevation of both cytosolic calcium and cytokines release from the cells after Helium/Neon irradiation with energy of 3-10 J/cm2. These findings can lead to an hypothesis that transient changes in calcium can accelerate cytokines release from the myotubes.

  8. RP105 Engages Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase p110δ To Facilitate the Trafficking and Secretion of Cytokines in Macrophages during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Hsiung; Micaroni, Massimo; Puyskens, Andreas; Schultz, Thomas E; Yeo, Jeremy Changyu; Stanley, Amanda C; Lucas, Megan; Kurihara, Jade; Dobos, Karen M; Stow, Jennifer L; Blumenthal, Antje

    2015-10-15

    Cytokines are key regulators of adequate immune responses to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrate that the p110δ catalytic subunit of PI3K acts as a downstream effector of the TLR family member RP105 (CD180) in promoting mycobacteria-induced cytokine production by macrophages. Our data show that the significantly reduced release of TNF and IL-6 by RP105(-/-) macrophages during mycobacterial infection was not accompanied by diminished mRNA or protein expression. Mycobacteria induced comparable activation of NF-κB and p38 MAPK signaling in wild-type (WT) and RP105(-/-) macrophages. In contrast, mycobacteria-induced phosphorylation of Akt was abrogated in RP105(-/-) macrophages. The p110δ-specific inhibitor, Cal-101, and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of p110δ diminished mycobacteria-induced TNF secretion by WT but not RP105(-/-) macrophages. Such interference with p110δ activity led to reduced surface-expressed TNF in WT but not RP105(-/-) macrophages, while leaving TNF mRNA and protein expression unaffected. Activity of Bruton's tyrosine kinase was required for RP105-mediated activation of Akt phosphorylation and TNF release by mycobacteria-infected macrophages. These data unveil a novel innate immune signaling axis that orchestrates key cytokine responses of macrophages and provide molecular insight into the functions of RP105 as an innate immune receptor for mycobacteria. PMID:26371254

  9. Lack of correlation between membrane CD30 expression and cytokine secretion pattern in allergen-primed naive cord blood T-cell lines and clones.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Piattoni, S; Falini, B; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1997-04-01

    Various surface molecules are expressed by activated T cells. Among them, the CD30 antigen has been proposed as a reproducible marker that identifies a subset of differentiated and/or activated T lymphocytes that produce T helper (Th)-2-type cytokines, i.e. interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5. However, because CD30 has mainly been detected on established T-cell clones, it is still unclear whether a priming allergen and/or cytokine can induce its membrane expression on naive T cells, perhaps in parallel with the up-regulation of other relevant activation markers, such as CD25, HLA-DR and L-selectin. It is also unknown whether proper allergen stimulation affects the cytokine secretion pattern by CD30+ T-cell clones derived from antigen-unprimed (naive) T lymphocytes. More information on these questions was sought by adopting a model that used cord blood as a source of virgin T cells and exposing them to native cypress allergen or cytokine (IL-2 or IL-4) stimulation, as well as to conventional polyclonal activators such as PHA or anti-CD3. Peripheral blood MC from four adult cypress-sensitive patients was also assayed and used as controls for all culture experiments. Freshly isolated cord and adult T cells did not express the CD30 antigen on their membrane. Many of the stimulating agents tested were able to up-regulate the expression of CD30. However, despite high expression of this molecule, cloned allergen-specific cord CD4+ T lymphocytes were unable to produce IFN-gamma and/or IL-4. In contrast, they retained the capability to produce IL-2. Thus, expression of the CD30 antigen on virgin T cells does not correlate with a polarized model of T helper (Th)-1 or Th-2 cytokine-producing cells, suggesting that these types of lymphokine-secreting lymphocytes are not a paradigmatic example of T-cell subpopulations that display stable phenotypical features. PMID:9105430

  10. Echinacea extracts modulate the pattern of chemokine and cytokine secretion in rhinovirus-infected and uninfected epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Arnason, J T; Burt, A; Hudson, J B

    2006-02-01

    Extracts of Echinacea purpurea are among the most widely used herbal medicines throughout Europe and North America for the prevention or treatment of common cold, coughs, bronchitis and other upper respiratory infections. Popular preparations include expressed juice from the aerial parts of the plant (which contain polysaccharides) and alcoholic tinctures from roots (containing caffeic acid derivatives and alkylamides). Since immune modulation has been reported for similar extracts, cytokine antibody arrays were used to investigate the changes in the pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines released from a cultured line of human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to Rhinovirus 14 and two different chemically characterized Echinacea extracts. Virus infection stimulated the release of at least 31 cytokine-related molecules, including several important chemokines known to attract inflammatory cells. Most of these effects were reversed by simultaneous exposure to either of the two Echinacea extracts, although the patterns of response were different for the two extracts. These results could explain the antiinflammatory properties of Echinacea extracts. Furthermore, a number of these cytokines were stimulated by the same Echinacea preparations in uninfected cells. These observations therefore provide support for the alleged beneficial uses of Echinacea extracts. PMID:16444669

  11. Alveolar Epithelial Cell-Derived Prostaglandin E2 Serves as a Request Signal for Macrophage Secretion of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 during Innate Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Speth, Jennifer M; Bourdonnay, Emilie; Penke, Loka Raghu Kumar; Mancuso, Peter; Moore, Bethany B; Weinberg, Jason B; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2016-06-15

    Preservation of gas exchange mandates that the pulmonary alveolar surface restrain unnecessarily harmful inflammatory responses to the many challenges to which it is exposed. These responses reflect the cross-talk between alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and resident alveolar macrophages (AMs). We recently determined that AMs can secrete suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins within microparticles. Uptake of these SOCS-containing vesicles by epithelial cells inhibits cytokine-induced STAT activation. However, the ability of epithelial cells to direct AM release of SOCS-containing vesicles in response to inflammatory insults has not been studied. In this study, we report that SOCS3 protein was elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of both virus- and bacteria-infected mice, as well as in an in vivo LPS model of acute inflammation. In vitro studies revealed that AEC-conditioned medium (AEC-CM) enhanced AM SOCS3 secretion above basal levels. Increased amounts of PGE2 were present in AEC-CM after LPS challenge, and both pharmacologic inhibition of PGE2 synthesis in AECs and neutralization of PGE2 in AEC-CM implicated this prostanoid as the major AEC-derived factor mediating enhanced AM SOCS3 secretion. Moreover, pharmacologic blockade of PGE2 synthesis or genetic deletion of a PGE2 synthase similarly attenuated the increase in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid SOCS3 noted in lungs of mice challenged with LPS in vivo. These results demonstrate a novel tunable form of cross-talk in which AECs use PGE2 as a signal to request SOCS3 from AMs to dampen their endogenous inflammatory responses during infection. PMID:27183597

  12. Histoplasma capsulatum-Induced Cytokine Secretion in Lung Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Host Integrins, Src-Family Kinase Activation, and Membrane Raft Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Maza, Paloma K; Suzuki, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus that causes histoplasmosis, a human systemic mycosis with worldwide distribution. In the present work, we demonstrate that H. capsulatum yeasts are able to induce cytokine secretion by the human lung epithelial cell line A549 in integrin- and Src-family kinase (SFK)-dependent manners. This conclusion is supported by small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed to α3 and α5 integrins, and PP2, an inhibitor of SFK activation. siRNA and PP2 reduced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in H. capsulatum-infected A549 cell cultures. In addition, α3 and α5 integrins from A549 cells were capable of associating with H. capsulatum yeasts, and this fungus promotes recruitment of these integrins and SFKs to A549 cell membrane rafts. Corroborating this finding, membrane raft disruption with the cholesterol-chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced the levels of integrins and SFKs in these cell membrane domains. Finally, pretreatment of A549 cells with the cholesterol-binding compound, and also a membrane raft disruptor, filipin, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-8 levels in A549-H.capsulatum cultures. Taken together, these results indicate that H. capsulatum yeasts induce secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 in human lung epithelial cells by interacting with α3 and α5 integrins, recruiting these integrins to membrane rafts, and promoting SFK activation. PMID:27148251

  13. Histoplasma capsulatum-Induced Cytokine Secretion in Lung Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Host Integrins, Src-Family Kinase Activation, and Membrane Raft Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Maza, Paloma K.; Suzuki, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus that causes histoplasmosis, a human systemic mycosis with worldwide distribution. In the present work, we demonstrate that H. capsulatum yeasts are able to induce cytokine secretion by the human lung epithelial cell line A549 in integrin- and Src-family kinase (SFK)-dependent manners. This conclusion is supported by small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed to α3 and α5 integrins, and PP2, an inhibitor of SFK activation. siRNA and PP2 reduced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in H. capsulatum-infected A549 cell cultures. In addition, α3 and α5 integrins from A549 cells were capable of associating with H. capsulatum yeasts, and this fungus promotes recruitment of these integrins and SFKs to A549 cell membrane rafts. Corroborating this finding, membrane raft disruption with the cholesterol-chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced the levels of integrins and SFKs in these cell membrane domains. Finally, pretreatment of A549 cells with the cholesterol-binding compound, and also a membrane raft disruptor, filipin, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-8 levels in A549-H.capsulatum cultures. Taken together, these results indicate that H. capsulatum yeasts induce secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 in human lung epithelial cells by interacting with α3 and α5 integrins, recruiting these integrins to membrane rafts, and promoting SFK activation. PMID:27148251

  14. Leishmania mexicana: promastigotes and amastigotes secrete protein phosphatases and this correlates with the production of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Escalona-Montaño, A R; Ortiz-Lozano, D M; Rojas-Bernabé, A; Wilkins-Rodriguez, A A; Torres-Guerrero, H; Mondragón-Flores, R; Mondragón-Gonzalez, R; Becker, I; Gutiérrez-Kobeh, L; Aguirre-Garcia, M M

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatase activity of Leishmania spp. has been shown to deregulate the signalling pathways of the host cell. We here show that Leishmania mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes secrete proteins with phosphatase activity to the culture medium, which was higher in the Promastigote Secretion Medium (PSM) as compared with the Amastigote Secretion Medium (ASM) and was not due to cell lysis, since parasite viability was not affected by the secretion process. The biochemical characterization showed that the phosphatase activity present in PSM was higher in dephosphorylating the peptide END (pY) INASL as compared with the peptide RRA (pT)VA. In contrast, the phosphatase activity in ASM showed little dephosphorylating capacity for both peptides. Inhibition assays demonstrated that the phosphatase activity of both PSM and ASM was sensible only to protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitors. An antibody against a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) of Leishmania major cross-reacted with a 44·9 kDa molecule in different cellular fractions of L. mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes, however, in PSM and ASM, the antibody recognized a protein about 70 kDa. By electron microscopy, the PP2C was localized in the flagellar pocket of amastigotes. PSM and ASM induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1β, IL-12p70 and IL-10 in human macrophages. PMID:27220404

  15. Niacin Modulates Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Secretion. A Potential Mechanism Involved in its Anti-atherosclerotic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Lipszyc, Pedro Saul; Cremaschi, Graciela Alicia; Zubilete, María Zorrilla; Bertolino, Maria Laura Aón; Capani, Francisco; Genaro, Ana Maria; Wald, Miriam Ruth

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes the assignment of a critical role to cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage and to pro-inflammatory cytokines. Niacin is known to improve lipid metabolism and to produce beneficial modification of cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of this work was to investigate if Niacin is able to modulate pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages in a murine model of atherosclerosis. For this purpose C57Bl/6J mice fed with atherogenic diet (AGD) or with conventional chow diet were used. The AGD group showed an increase in body weight and in total plasma cholesterol, with no differences in triglyceride or HDL levels. Lesions in arterial walls were observed. The characterization of Niacin receptor showed an increase in the receptor number of macrophages from the AGD group. Macrophages from control and AGD animals treated in vitro with an inflammatory stimulus showed elevated levels of IL-6, IL-1 and TNF-α, that were even higher in macrophages from AGD mice. Niacin was able to decrease the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in stimulated macrophages. Similar effect of Niacin was observed in an in vivo model of inflammation. These results show an attenuating inflammatory mechanism for this therapeutic agent and would point out its potential action in plaque stabilization and in the prevention of atherosclerosis progression. Furthermore, the present results provide the basis for future studies on the potential contribution of Niacin to anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:24155799

  16. Ceftiofur impairs pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion through the inhibition of the activation of NF-{kappa}B and MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Ci Xinxin; Song Yu; Zeng Fanqin; Zhang Xuemei; Li Hongyu; Wang Xinrui; Cui Junqing Deng Xuming

    2008-07-18

    Ceftiofur is a new broad-spectrum, third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic for veterinary use. Immunopharmacological studies can provide new information on the immunomodulatory activities of some drugs, including their effect on cytokine productions. For this reason, we investigated the effect of ceftiofur on cytokine productions in vitro. We found that ceftiofur can downregulate tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), but did not affect interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. We further investigated signal transduction mechanisms to determine how ceftiofur affects. RAW 264.7 cells were pretreated with 1, 5, or 10 mg/L of ceftiofur 1 h prior to treatment with 1 mg/L of LPS. Thirty minutes later, cells were harvested and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation was measured by Western blot. Alternatively, cells were fixed and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activation was measured using immunocytochemical analysis. Signal transduction studies showed that ceftiofur significantly inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation protein expression. Ceftiofur also inhibited p65-NF-{kappa}B translocation into the nucleus. Therefore, ceftiofur may inhibit LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by blocking NF-{kappa}B and MAPKs signaling in RAW264.7 cells.

  17. Acute exposure to air pollution particulate matter aggravates experimental myocardial infarction in mice by potentiating cytokine secretion from lung macrophages.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Timoteo; Wolf, Dennis; Michel, Nathaly Anto; Mauler, Maximilian; Dufner, Bianca; Hoppe, Natalie; Beckert, Jessica; Jäckel, Markus; Magnani, Natalia; Duerschmied, Daniel; Tasat, Deborah; Alvarez, Silvia; Reinöhl, Jochen; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin; Idzko, Marco; Bode, Christoph; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Evelson, Pablo; Zirlik, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Clinical, but not experimental evidence has suggested that air pollution particulate matter (PM) aggravates myocardial infarction (MI). Here, we aimed to describe mechanisms and consequences of PM exposure in an experimental model of MI. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with a PM surrogate (Residual Oil Fly Ash, ROFA) by intranasal installation before MI was induced by permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Histological analysis of the myocardium 7 days after MI demonstrated an increase in infarct area and enhanced inflammatory cell recruitment in ROFA-exposed mice. Mechanistically, ROFA exposure increased the levels of the circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, activated myeloid and endothelial cells, and enhanced leukocyte recruitment to the peritoneal cavity and the vascular endothelium. Notably, these effects on endothelial cells and circulating leukocytes could be reversed by neutralizing anti-TNF-α treatment. We identified alveolar macrophages as the primary source of elevated cytokine production after PM exposure. Accordingly, in vivo depletion of alveolar macrophages by intranasal clodronate attenuated inflammation and cell recruitment to infarcted tissue of ROFA-exposed mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate that exposure to environmental PM induces the release of inflammatory cytokines from alveolar macrophages which directly worsens the course of MI in mice. These findings uncover a novel link between air pollution PM exposure and inflammatory pathways, highlighting the importance of environmental factors in cardiovascular disease. PMID:27240856

  18. Sasa borealis leaves extract improves insulin resistance by modulating inflammatory cytokine secretion in high fat diet-induced obese C57/BL6J mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung-Hwa; Lim, Hyeon-Sook; Heo, Young-Ran

    2010-04-01

    Obesity is considered a mild inflammatory state, and the secretion of inflammation-related cytokines rises as adipose tissue expands. Inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interlukin 6 (IL-6) and monocyte-chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), are modulated by adipose tissue and known to play an important role in insulin resistance which is the common characteristics of obesity related disorders. In this study we analyzed the effects of Sasa borealis leaves extract on inflammatory cytokines and insulin resistance in diet induced obese C57/BL6J mice. The obese state was induced by a high fat diet for 20 weeks and then the mice were divided into two groups; obese control group (OBC, n = 7) and experimental group (OB-SBE, n = 7). The OBC group was fed a high fat diet and the OB-SBE group was fed a high fat diet containing 5% Sasa borealis leaves extract (SBE) for 12 weeks. We also used mice fed a standard diet as a normal control (NC, n = 7). The body weight and adipose tissue weight in the OB group were significantly higher than those in the NC group. The effects of the high fat diet were reduced by SBE treatments, and the body weight and adipose tissue deposition in the OB-SBE group were significantly decreased compared to the OBC group. The OBC group showed higher serum glucose and insulin levels which resulted in a significant increase of incremental area under the curve (IAUC) and HOMA-IR than the NC group. Also, serum leptin, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in the OBC group than in the NC group. In contrast, the OB-SBE group showed a reversal in the metabolic defects, including a decrease in glucose, insulin, IAUC, HOMA-IR, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and leptin levels. These results suggest that BSE can suppress increased weight gain and/or fat deposition induced by a high fat diet and theses effects are accompanied by modulation of the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-alpha and IL-6 secretion resulting in improved insulin

  19. Sasa borealis leaves extract improves insulin resistance by modulating inflammatory cytokine secretion in high fat diet-induced obese C57/BL6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung-Hwa; Lim, Hyeon-Sook

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is considered a mild inflammatory state, and the secretion of inflammation-related cytokines rises as adipose tissue expands. Inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interlukin 6 (IL-6) and monocyte-chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), are modulated by adipose tissue and known to play an important role in insulin resistance which is the common characteristics of obesity related disorders. In this study we analyzed the effects of Sasa borealis leaves extract on inflammatory cytokines and insulin resistance in diet induced obese C57/BL6J mice. The obese state was induced by a high fat diet for 20 weeks and then the mice were divided into two groups; obese control group (OBC, n = 7) and experimental group (OB-SBE, n = 7). The OBC group was fed a high fat diet and the OB-SBE group was fed a high fat diet containing 5% Sasa borealis leaves extract (SBE) for 12 weeks. We also used mice fed a standard diet as a normal control (NC, n = 7). The body weight and adipose tissue weight in the OB group were significantly higher than those in the NC group. The effects of the high fat diet were reduced by SBE treatments, and the body weight and adipose tissue deposition in the OB-SBE group were significantly decreased compared to the OBC group. The OBC group showed higher serum glucose and insulin levels which resulted in a significant increase of incremental area under the curve (IAUC) and HOMA-IR than the NC group. Also, serum leptin, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in the OBC group than in the NC group. In contrast, the OB-SBE group showed a reversal in the metabolic defects, including a decrease in glucose, insulin, IAUC, HOMA-IR, TNF-α, IL-6 and leptin levels. These results suggest that BSE can suppress increased weight gain and/or fat deposition induced by a high fat diet and theses effects are accompanied by modulation of the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6 secretion resulting in improved insulin resistance. PMID

  20. Histamine induces NF-κB controlled cytokine secretion by orbital fibroblasts via histamine receptor type-1.

    PubMed

    Virakul, Sita; Phetsuksiri, Tanachaporn; van Holten-Neelen, Conny; Schrijver, Benjamin; van Steensel, Leendert; Dalm, Virgil A S H; Paridaens, Dion; van den Bosch, Willem A; van Hagen, P Martin; Dik, Willem A

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells and their products are likely to be involved in regulating orbital fibroblast activity in Graves' Ophthalmopathy (GO). Histamine is abundantly present in granules of mast cells and is released upon mast cell activation. However, the effect of histamine on orbital fibroblasts has not been examined so far. Orbital tissues from GO patients and controls were analyzed for the presence of mast cells using toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemical detection of CD117 (stem cell factor receptor). Orbital fibroblasts were cultured from GO patients and healthy controls, stimulated with histamine and cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, CCL2, CCL5, CCL7, CXCL10 and CXCL11) were measured in culture supernatants. Also hyaluronan levels were measured in culture supernatants and hyaluronan synthase (HAS) and hyaluronidase (HYAL) gene expression levels were determined. In addition, histamine receptor subtype gene expression levels were examined as well as the effect of the histamine receptor-1 (HRH1) antagonist loratadine and NF-κB inhibitor SC-514 on histamine-induced cytokine production. Mast cell numbers were increased in GO orbital tissues. Histamine stimulated the production of IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2 by orbital fibroblasts, while it had no effect on the production of CCL5, CCL7, CXCL10, CXCL11 and hyaluronan. Orbital fibroblasts expressed HRH1 and loratadine and SC-514 both blocked histamine-induced IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2 production by orbital fibroblasts. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that histamine can induce the production of NF-κB controlled-cytokines by orbital fibroblasts, which supports a role for mast cells in GO. PMID:27170049

  1. CD45-mediated signaling pathway is involved in Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL)-induced proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion in human PBMC

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Radha; Eligar, Sachin M.; Kumar, Natesh; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Inamdar, Shashikala R.; Swamy, Bale M.; Shastry, Padma

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL, a potent mitogenic and complex N-glycan specific lectin binds to CD45 on PBMC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL triggers CD45-mediated signaling involved in activation of p38MAPK and STAT-5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of CD45 PTPase signaling blocks RBL-induced ZAP70 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL-CD45 mediated signaling is crucial for RBL-induced immunodulatory activities. -- Abstract: We earlier reported the mitogenic and immunostimulatory activities of Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), purified from phytopathogenic fungus R. bataticola in human PBMC. The lectin demonstrates specificity towards glycoproteins containing complex N-glycans. Since CD45-protein tyrosine phosphatase that abundantly expresses N-glycans is important in T-cell signaling, the study aimed to investigate the involvement of CD45 in the immunomodulatory activities of RBL. Flowcytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that RBL exhibited binding to PBMC and colocalized with CD45. The binding was comparable in cells expressing different CD45 isoforms-RA, -RB and -RO. CD45 blocking antibody reduced the binding and proliferation of PBMC induced by RBL. CD45-PTPase inhibitor dephostatin inhibited RBL-induced proliferation, expression of CD25 and pZAP-70. RBL-induced secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines were significantly inhibited in presence of dephostatin. Also, dephostatin blocked phosphorylation of p38MAPK and STAT-5 that was crucial for the biological functions of RBL. The study demonstrates the involvement of CD45-mediated signaling in RBL-induced PBMC proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through activation of p38MAPK and STAT-5.

  2. Recombinant HCV core protein and the secretion of associated cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ) in immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Torbati, Elham; Ghassab, Romina Karimzadeh; Davachi, Navid Dadashpour

    2013-12-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of acute and chronic hepatitis which is a disorder with a high worldwide prevalence. HCV core protein was considered as immunogenic counterpart of the HCV vaccine and it is an ideal candidate for HCV vaccine. Since cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-Gamma are responsible for the prevention of viral infection, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of HCV core protein as a vaccine. Ten BALB/c mice were immunized with HCV core protein and after 42 days the splenocytes were isolated and the IL-6 and INF-gamma secretion were measured using ELISpot technique, at the same time TNF-alpha was determined by ELISA in the sera. The MTT assay was done to assess the viability of the cultured splenocytes. For evaluating the humoral immune response against the recombinant HCV core protein the DOT Blot test was used. Data was compared using one-way ANOVA test and significant results were considered at p < 0.05. In the present study the IL-6, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha levels were dramatically higher in the immunized mice compared to the control group (respectively, 22.9 +/- 1.26; 18.53 +/- 3.87; 53.96 +/- 4.54 and p < 0.05). The immunized mice with recombinant HCV core protein showed higher amount of IL-6, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha in the current study. Since the level of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma is high in patients with acute HCV infection, thus a vaccine which could stimulate the secretion of these cytokines in advance may have a preventive role. PMID:24517026

  3. Polyandric acid A, a clerodane diterpenoid from the Australian medicinal plant Dodonaea polyandra, attenuates pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Bradley S; Luo, Xianling; Costabile, Maurizio; Caughey, Gillian E; Wang, Jiping; Claudie, David J; McKinnon, Ross A; Semple, Susan J

    2014-01-24

    Dodonaea polyandra is a medicinal plant used traditionally by the Kuuku I'yu (Northern Kaanju) indigenous people of Cape York Peninsula, Australia. The most potent of the diterpenoids previously identified from this plant, polyandric acid A (1), has been examined for inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and other inflammatory mediators using well-established acute and chronic mouse ear edema models and in vitro cellular models. Topical application of 1 significantly inhibited interleukin-1β production in mouse ear tissue in an acute model. In a chronic skin inflammation model, a marked reduction in ear thickness, associated with significant reduction in myeloperoxidase accumulation, was observed. Treatment of primary neonatal human keratinocytes with 1 followed by activation with phorbol ester/ionomycin showed a significant reduction in IL-6 secretion. The present study provides evidence that the anti-inflammatory properties of 1 are due to inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with skin inflammation and may be useful in applications for skin inflammatory conditions including psoriasis and dermatitis. PMID:24400858

  4. TARM1 is a novel LRC-encoded ITAM receptor that co-stimulates pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Radjabova, Valeria; Mastroeni, Piero; Skjødt, Karsten; Zaccone, Paola; de Bono, Bernard; Goodall, Jane C; Chilvers, Edwin R; Juss, Jatinder K; Jones, Des C; Trowsdale, John; Barrow, Alexander David

    2015-01-01

    We identified a novel, evolutionarily conserved receptor encoded within the human Leukocyte Receptor Complex (LRC) and syntenic region of mouse chromosome 7, named T cell-interacting, activating receptor on myeloid cells-1 (TARM1). The transmembrane region of TARM1 contained a conserved arginine residue, consistent with association with a signaling adaptor. TARM1 associated with the ITAM adaptor Fc receptor common γ chain but not with DAP10 or DAP12. In healthy mice, TARM1 is constitutively expressed on the cell-surface of mature and immature CD11b+ Gr-1+ neutrophils within the bone marrow. Following intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment or systemic bacterial challenge TARM1 expression was upregulated by neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes and TARM1+ cells were rapidly recruited to sites of inflammation. TARM1 expression was also upregulated by bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells following stimulation with TLR agonists in vitro. Ligation of TARM1 receptor in the presence of TLR ligands, such as LPS, enhanced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages and primary mouse neutrophils, whereas TARM1 stimulation alone had no effect. Finally, an immobilized TARM1-Fc fusion protein suppressed CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation in vitro. These results suggest that a putative T cell ligand can interact with TARM1 receptor resulting in bi-directional signaling, raising the T cell activation threshold whilst co-stimulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages and neutrophils. PMID:26311901

  5. Mice Survival and Plasmatic Cytokine Secretion in a “Two Hit” Model of Sepsis Depend on Intratracheal Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Bacterial Load

    PubMed Central

    Restagno, Damien; Venet, Fabienne; Paquet, Christian; Freyburger, Ludovic; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Monneret, Guillaume; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Louzier, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by pro- and anti-inflammatory responses following infection. While inflammation is responsible for widespread organ damage, anti-inflammatory mediators lead to immunoparalysis increasing susceptibility to secondary infections (nosocomial pneumonia). We aimed to investigate the impact of bacterial load on survival and cytokine release in a two-hit murine (C57BL/6J) model of CLP followed by P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Plasmatic TNFα, IL-6, IL-10, sTNFr I and II were quantified until 13 days. At D5, splenocytes were processed for immunological assays or mice were intratracheally instilled with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.106, 2.107 and 108 CFU) to evaluate survival and cytokines production. TNFα, sTNFrs, IL-6 and IL-10 increased 2h post CLP. TNFα and sTNFrs declined respectively one and two days later. In CLP mice, IL-6 and IL-10 remained high for the whole experiment, as compared to Sham. At D5, for CLP mice, whereas total T cells population (CD3+) decreased, Treg fraction (CD4+/CD25+) increased. In parallel, T cells proliferation and LPS-stimulated splenocytes ability to release TNFα decreased. At D13, survival was 100% after 5.106 CFU, 50% for CLP mice after 2.107 CFU and 0% for CLP and Sham after 108 CFU. After instillation, IL-10 and IL-6 increased and appeared to be dose and time dependent. Pseudomonas was detected in all CLP and Sham’s lungs; in spleen and liver only in CLP at 2.107 CFU, and in CLP and Sham at 108 CFU. We demonstrated that post-CLP immunosuppression followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung instillation increases mortality reactivates cytokines secretion and is associated with systemic dissemination in septic mice depending on bacterial load. PMID:27574993

  6. Myrrh and artesunate modulate some Th1 and Th2 cytokines secretion in Schistosoma mansoni infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaziz, Mohamed M.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of artesunate and myrrh on S. mansoni infection and the levels of some Th1 and Th2 cytokines were evaluated in the present study. Six weeks after infection, a group of mice was treated with 4 mg/kg of artesunate and other group was treated with 10 mg/kg of myrrh for 3 successive days. Worm burden was reduced with a percentage of 53.7% and 58.78% after treatment with myrrh and artesunate respectively as well as the levels of IgG antibodies were significantly reduced compared with infected group. No obvious changes were observed in the level of interferon γ after treatment. After treatment with artesunate, interleukin 2 (IL-2) level was significantly decreased, while no significant difference was observed in myrrh-treated group compared with the infected group. On the other hand, the level of IL-10 was not significantly decreased after treatment with artesunate, but it was significantly increased after treatment with myrrh. However, IL-12 levels were significantly decreased after treatment with artesunate. The results demonstrated that, artesunate or myrrh treatment could give a level of protection against S. mansoni infection and modulate the levels of some Th1 and Th2 cytokines in mice infected with S. mansoni. PMID:27536198

  7. Synergistic Cytotoxic Effects of Ganoderma lucidum and Bacillus Calmette Guérin on Premalignant Urothelial HUC-PC Cells and Its Regulation on Proinflammatory Cytokine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, John Wai-man; Gohel, Mayur-Danny I.; Ng, Chi-fai

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is conventionally used as an adjuvant immunotherapy to reduce the recurrence of bladder cancer. To address the issues of efficacy and safety, an ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum (GLe) was evaluated for its interaction with BCG. In a model of premalignant human uroepithelial cells (HUC-PC), GLe exerted immediate cytotoxic effects while BCG showed a delayed response, given that both were immunological active in inducing the secretion of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Synergistic cytotoxic effects were observed when cells were either coincubated with both drugs or firstly preincubated with GLe. Synergism between GLe and BCG was demonstrated to achieve a complete cytostasis in 24 hours, and such effects were progressed in the subsequent 5 days. However, the pretreatment of GLe resulted in suppression of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 secretions without affecting the cytotoxicity. Given that numerous proinflammatory cytokines are associated with the high side effects toll of BCG, results herein suggested the potential implications of GL to supplement the BCG immunotherapy in bladder cancer, for better efficacy and reducing side effects. PMID:22969822

  8. Identification of cytokine-induced modulation of microRNA expression and secretion as measured by a novel microRNA specific qPCR assay.

    PubMed

    Benes, Vladimir; Collier, Paul; Kordes, Claus; Stolte, Jens; Rausch, Tobias; Muckentaler, Martina U; Häussinger, Dieter; Castoldi, Mirco

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs are an abundant class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression post-transcriptionally. Importantly, microRNA activity participates in the regulation of cellular processes and is a potentially valuable source of biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Here we introduce miQPCR, an innovative method to quantify microRNAs expression by using Real-Time PCR. miQPCR exploits T4 RNA ligase activities to extend uniformly microRNAs' 3'-ends by addition of a linker-adapter. The adapter is then used as 'anchor' to prime cDNA synthesis and throughout qPCR to amplify specifically target amplicons. miQPCR is an open, adaptable and cost-effective procedure, which offers the following advantages; i) universal elongation and reverse transcription of all microRNAs; ii) Tm-adjustment of microRNA-specific primers; iii) high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating among closely related sequences and; iv) suitable for the analysis of cellular and cell-free circulating microRNAs. Analysis of cellular and cell-free circulating microRNAs secreted by rat primary hepatocytes stimulated with cytokines and growth factors identifies for the first time a widespread modulation of both microRNAs expression and secretion. Altogether, our findings suggest that the pleiotropic activity of humoral factors on microRNAs may extensively affect liver function in response to injury and regeneration. PMID:26108880

  9. Identification of cytokine-induced modulation of microRNA expression and secretion as measured by a novel microRNA specific qPCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Benes, Vladimir; Collier, Paul; Kordes, Claus; Stolte, Jens; Rausch, Tobias; Muckentaler, Martina U.; Häussinger, Dieter; Castoldi, Mirco

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs are an abundant class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression post-transcriptionally. Importantly, microRNA activity participates in the regulation of cellular processes and is a potentially valuable source of biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Here we introduce miQPCR, an innovative method to quantify microRNAs expression by using Real-Time PCR. miQPCR exploits T4 RNA ligase activities to extend uniformly microRNAs’ 3′-ends by addition of a linker-adapter. The adapter is then used as ‘anchor’ to prime cDNA synthesis and throughout qPCR to amplify specifically target amplicons. miQPCR is an open, adaptable and cost-effective procedure, which offers the following advantages; i) universal elongation and reverse transcription of all microRNAs; ii) Tm-adjustment of microRNA-specific primers; iii) high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating among closely related sequences and; iv) suitable for the analysis of cellular and cell-free circulating microRNAs. Analysis of cellular and cell-free circulating microRNAs secreted by rat primary hepatocytes stimulated with cytokines and growth factors identifies for the first time a widespread modulation of both microRNAs expression and secretion. Altogether, our findings suggest that the pleiotropic activity of humoral factors on microRNAs may extensively affect liver function in response to injury and regeneration. PMID:26108880

  10. A polysaccharide fraction from Achillea millefolium increases cytokine secretion and reduces activation of Akt, ERK and NF-κB in THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Freysdottir, Jona; Logadottir, Oddny T; Omarsdottir, Sesselja S; Vikingsson, Arnor; Hardardottir, Ingibjorg

    2016-06-01

    Achillea millefolium has been used in traditional medicine for a number of ailments, including skin inflammation and wounds. A polysaccharide fraction (Am-25-d) isolated from aqueous extract from A. millefolium had an average molecular weight of 270kDa and a monosaccharide composition of GalA, Gal, Ara, Xyl, Rha in molar ratio of 28:26:23:9:7. THP-1 cells primed with IFN-γ and stimulated with LPS in the presence of Am-25-d secreted more IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-23 and TNF-α than THP-1 cells stimulated in the absence of Am-25-d. However, when added to unstimulated cells Am-25-d did not increase secretion of the cytokines examined. Stimulating THP-1 monocytes in the presence of Am-25-d led to decreased nuclear concentrations of NF-κB and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt kinases compared with that when the cells were stimulated without Am-25-d. These findings indicate that Am-25-d isolated from A. millefolium has immunoenhancing properties that may be mediated via the Akt pathway. PMID:27083352

  11. Cytokine secreted by S100A9 via TLR4 in monocytes delays neutrophil apoptosis by inhibition of caspase 9/3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Na Rae; Park, Beom Seok; Kim, Seong Yeol; Gu, Ayoung; Kim, Da Hye; Lee, Ji-Sook; Kim, In Sik

    2016-10-01

    Dysregulation of neutrophil apoptosis causes pathogenesis and aggravation of allergy. S100A9 exists as one of the proteins in the neutrophils, triggering inflammatory responses by activating the immune cells. In this study, we investigated whether S100A9 affects constitutive neutrophil apoptosis by activating the monocytes in normal and allergic subjects. Supernatant from human monocytic THP-1 cells after treatment with S100A9 suppressed normal neutrophil apoptosis by inhibiting the activations of caspase 9 and caspase 3. S100A9 upregulated the release of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-8 in THP-1 cells. An increase in cytokine was suppressed by CLI-095, a Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 inhibitor, PP2, a Src inhibitor, rottlerin, a PKCδ inhibitor, MAP kinase inhibitors, including PD98059, SB202190, and SP600125, and BAY-11-7085, an NF-κB inhibitor. Src, PKCδ, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK were phosphorylated by S100A9. The phosphorylation of Src and PKCδ was suppressed by CLI-095, and the activation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK was inhibited by CLI-095, PP2, and rottlerin. S100A9 induced NF-κB activity, and the activation was suppressed by CLI-095, PP2, rottlerin, and MAPK kinase inhibitors. In normal and allergic subjects, supernatant from normal and allergic monocytes after stimulation with S100A9 suppressed normal and allergic neutrophil apoptosis, respectively; MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-8 in the supernatant was increased by S100A9. The cytokine secretion induced by S100A9 is related to TLR4, Src, PKCδ, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK, and NF-κB. Taken together, S100A9 induces anti-apoptotic effect on normal and allergic neutrophils by increasing cytokine secretion of monocytes. These findings may help us to better understand neutrophil apoptosis regulated by S100A9 and pathogenesis of allergic diseases. PMID:27459393

  12. 1,25(OH)2D3 Deficiency Induces Colon Inflammation via Secretion of Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Chen, Lulu; Zhi, Chunchun; Shen, Ming; Sun, Weiwei; Miao, Dengshun; Yuan, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D[1,25(OH)2D3] insufficiency appears to be associated with aging and colon cancer while underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. Inflammatory bowel disease is one of the risk factors for colon cancer. In this study, we investigated whether 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency has an impact on the colon of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase knockout [Cyp27b1(-/-)] mice fed on a rescue diet (high calcium, phosphate, and lactose) from weaning to 10 months of age. We found that 1,25(OH)2D3 deficient mice displayed significant colon inflammation phenotypes including shortened colon length, thinned and disordered mucosal structure, and inflammatory cell infiltration. DNA damage, cellular senescence and the production of senescence-associated inflammatory cytokines were also increased significantly in the colon of Cyp27b1(-/-)mice. Furthermore, the levels of ROS in the colon were increased significantly, whereas the expression levels of antioxidative genes were down-regulated dramatically in the colon of Cyp27b1(-/-)mice. Taken together, our results demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency could induce colon inflammation, which may result from increased oxidative stress and DNA damage, subsequently, induced cell senescence and overproduction of senescence-associated secretory factors. Therefore, our findings suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 may play an important role in preventing the development and progression of colon inflammation and colon cancer. PMID:26790152

  13. A heparin-binding growth factor secreted from breast cancer cells homologous to a developmentally regulated cytokine.

    PubMed

    Wellstein, A; Fang, W J; Khatri, A; Lu, Y; Swain, S S; Dickson, R B; Sasse, J; Riegel, A T; Lippman, M E

    1992-02-01

    We report purification of an 18-kDa heparin-binding growth factor secreted from human cancer cells which is homologous to a developmentally regulated, neurotrophic factor, heparin-binding growth-associated molecule/pleiotrophin (HB-GAM/PTN; Merenmies, J., and Rauvala, H. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 16721-16724; Li, Y. S., Milner, P. G., Chauhan, A. K., Watson, M. A., Hoffman, R. M., Kodner, C. M., Milbrandt, J., and Deuel, T. F. (1990) Science 250, 1690-1694). We have purified the protein from tissue culture supernatants of human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB 231) and have used soft agar cloning of an epithelial cell line (SW-13) to detect its growth stimulating activity. A 32,000-fold purification was achieved by isoelectric focusing, heparin affinity chromatography, and reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography. The molecular mass of the protein was confirmed by gel filtration chromatography in the presence of detergent and bioassay of the fractions. The N-terminal sequence was homologous to HB-GAM/PTN, and polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA sequencing confirmed that the respective transcript was present in the cancer cells. We conclude that HB-GAM/PTN can function as a tumor growth factor in addition to its role during neuronal development. PMID:1733956

  14. Commensal bacteria can enter colonic epithelial cells and induce proinflammatory cytokine secretion: a possible pathogenic mechanism of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Sato, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Sumio; Tajiri, Hisao; Okayasu, Isao

    2009-05-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2)- and IL-10-knockout mice develop spontaneous colitis under conventional but not germ-free conditions, suggesting that commensal bacteria play an important role in the pathogenesis of colitis. However, interactions between commensal bacteria and colonic epithelial cells have not been fully investigated. We therefore assessed the ability of various commensal bacteria and probiotics to adhere to and invade colonic epithelial cells. Effects of the bacteria on production of proinflammatory cytokines were also measured. Commensal bacteria, including mucosal organisms isolated from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, such as Fusobacterium varium, reported as a possible pathogen in UC, Bacteroides vulgatus, Escherichia coli and Clostridium clostridioforme, as well as their type strains and probiotics, were assessed for their ability to adhere to and invade colonic epithelial cells using two cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our experiments employed co-incubation, a combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy and recovery of bacteria from infected-cell lysates. F. varium and several other commensal bacteria, but not probiotics, adhered to colonic epithelial cells and invaded their cytoplasm. ELISA and real-time PCR revealed that the host cells, particularly those invaded by F. varium, showed significant increases in IL-8 and TNF-alpha concentrations in supernatants, with elevation of IL-8, TNF-alpha, MCP-1 and IL-6 mRNAs. Furthermore, IL-8 and TNF-alpha expression and nuclear phosphorylated NF-kappaB p65 expression could be immunohistochemically confirmed in inflamed epithelium with cryptitis or crypt abscess in UC patients. Certain commensal bacteria can invade colonic epithelial cells, activating early intracellular signalling systems to trigger host inflammatory reactions. PMID:19369513

  15. 1,25(OH)2D3 Deficiency Induces Colon Inflammation via Secretion of Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Chunchun; Shen, Ming; Sun, Weiwei; Miao, Dengshun; Yuan, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D[1,25(OH)2D3] insufficiency appears to be associated with aging and colon cancer while underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. Inflammatory bowel disease is one of the risk factors for colon cancer. In this study, we investigated whether 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency has an impact on the colon of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase knockout [Cyp27b1−/−] mice fed on a rescue diet (high calcium, phosphate, and lactose) from weaning to 10 months of age. We found that 1,25(OH)2D3 deficient mice displayed significant colon inflammation phenotypes including shortened colon length, thinned and disordered mucosal structure, and inflammatory cell infiltration. DNA damage, cellular senescence and the production of senescence-associated inflammatory cytokines were also increased significantly in the colon of Cyp27b1−/−mice. Furthermore, the levels of ROS in the colon were increased significantly, whereas the expression levels of antioxidative genes were down-regulated dramatically in the colon of Cyp27b1−/−mice. Taken together, our results demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency could induce colon inflammation, which may result from increased oxidative stress and DNA damage, subsequently, induced cell senescence and overproduction of senescence-associated secretory factors. Therefore, our findings suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 may play an important role in preventing the development and progression of colon inflammation and colon cancer. PMID:26790152

  16. Therapeutic effect of an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein 60 by suppressing of inflammatory cytokines secretion in two animal models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, N; Barberá, A; Domínguez, M C; Torres, A M; Hernandez, M V; Hernandez, I; Gil, R; Ancizar, J; Garay, H; Reyes, O; Altruda, F; Silengo, L; Padrón, G

    2012-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease mediated by T cells. Productive engagement of T cell receptors by major histocompatibility complex-peptide leads to proliferation, differentiation and the definition of effector functions. Altered peptide ligands (APL) generated by amino acid substitutions in the antigenic peptide have diverse effects on T cell response. We predicted a novel T cell epitope from human heat-shock protein 60, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Three APLs were designed from this epitope and it was demonstrated that these peptides induce the activation of T cells through their ability to modify cell cycle phase's distribution of CD4+T cells from RA patients. Also, IL-17, TNF-α and IL-10 levels were determined in PBMC from these patients. Unlike the wild-type peptide and the other two APLs, APL2 increased the IL-10 level and suppressed IL-17 secretion in these assays. Therapeutic effect of this APL in adjuvant arthritis (AA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models was also evaluated. Clinical score, histopathology, inflammatory and regulatory cytokine concentration were monitored in the animals. APL2 efficiently inhibited the progression of AA and CIA with a significant reduction of the clinical and histopathologic score. Therapeutic effect of APL2 on CIA was similar to that obtained with MTX; the standard treatment for RA. This effect was associated with a decrease of TNF-α and IL-17 levels. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of APL2 is mediated in part by down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and support the potential use of APL2 as a therapeutic drug in RA patients. PMID:22686732

  17. Rhesus macaque θ-defensin RTD-1 inhibits proinflammatory cytokine secretion and gene expression by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Tongaonkar, Prasad; Trinh, Katie K; Schaal, Justin B; Tran, Dat; Gulko, Percio S; Ouellette, André J; Selsted, Michael E

    2015-12-01

    θ-Defensins are pleiotropic, macrocyclic peptides that are expressed uniquely in Old World monkeys. The peptides are potent, broad-spectrum microbicides that also modulate inflammatory responses in vitro and in animal models of viral infection and polymicrobial sepsis. θ-Defensins suppress proinflammatory cytokine secretion by leukocytes stimulated with diverse Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Studies were performed to delineate anti-inflammatory mechanisms of rhesus θ-defensin 1 (RTD-1), the most abundant θ-defensin isoform in macaque granulocytes. RTD-1 reduced the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-8 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human blood monocytes and THP-1 macrophages, and this was accompanied by inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Peptide inhibition of NF-κB activation occurred following stimulation of extracellular (TLRs 1/2 and 4) and intracellular (TLR9) receptors. Although RTD-1 did not inhibit MAPK in unstimulated cells, it induced phosphorylation of Akt in otherwise untreated monocytes and THP-1 cells. In the latter, this occurred within 10 min of RTD-1 treatment and produced a sustained elevation of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) for at least 4 h. pAkt is a negative regulator of MAPK and NF-κB activation. RTD-1 inhibited IκBα degradation and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and stimulated Akt phosphorylation in LPS-treated human primary monocytes and THP-1 macrophages. Specific inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) blocked RTD-1-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and reversed the suppression of NF-κB activation by the peptide. These studies indicate that the anti-inflammatory properties of θ-defensins are mediated by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and suppression of proinflammatory signals in immune-stimulated cells. PMID:26269197

  18. Expression of NLRC4 in children with septicaemia and mechanisms of NLRC4 in in vitro cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guoji; Chen, Jing; Tian, Jianmei; Ge, Lingqing; Xing, Aixia; Tang, Guangming

    2016-07-01

    Septicaemia, a systemic bacterial infection, frequently leads to morbidity and mortality in children. The NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) is involved in the control of infections. The aim of the present study was to detect the expression of NLRC4 in the blood samples of children with septicaemia, in addition to investigating the importance of NLRC4 in cytokine production, and the signaling pathways that regulate NLRC4 expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. It was determined that when compared with the control, the mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRC4 were significantly increased in the blood samples of children with septicaemia, as demonstrated by the reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The results from the western blotting indicated that treatment with LPS induced NLRC4 expression in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner in RAW264.7 cells. A knockdown of NLRC4 by siRNA transfection enhanced the effect of LPS on interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑18 production, as determined by enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. Inhibitors of extracellular regulated protein kinases, c‑Jun N‑terminal kinases and p38 were used in the present study to block the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, and it was determined that LPS‑induced NLRC4 expression was reversed by the suppression of the MAPK signaling pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the expression of NLRC4 in children with septicaemia. Furthermore, a novel molecular mechanism for NLRC4 regulation in LPS‑induced RAW264.7 macrophage cells has been elucidated. The data in the present study supports the hypothesis that LPS activates the MAPK pathway in macrophages, thus resulting in the upregulation of NLRC4; however, NLRC4 inhibits IL‑1β and IL‑18 production, contributing to the anti-inflammatory response. PMID:27175981

  19. Cytokines and fever.

    PubMed

    Conti, Bruno; Tabarean, Iustin; Andrei, Cristina; Bartfai, Tamas

    2004-05-01

    Cytokines are highly inducible, secreted proteins mediating intercellular communication in the nervous and immune system. Fever is the multiphasic response of elevation and decline of the body core temperature regulated by central thermoregulatory mechanisms localized in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. The discovery that several proinflammatory cytokines act as endogenous pyrogens and that other cytokines can act as antipyretic agents provided a link between the immune and the central nervous systems and stimulated the study of the central actions of cytokines. The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) as well as the antiinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) have been most investigated for their pyrogenic or antipyretic action. The experimental evidence demonstrating the role of these secreted proteins in modulating the fever response is as follows: 1) association between cytokine levels in serum and CSF and fever; 2) finding of the presence of cytokine receptors on various cell types in the brain and demonstration of the effects of pharmacological application of cytokines and of their neutralizing antibodies on the fever response; 3) fever studies on cytokine- and cytokine receptor- transgenic models. Studies on the peripheral and the central action of cytokines demonstrated that peripheral cytokines can communicate with the brain in several ways including stimulation of afferent neuronal pathways and induction of the synthesis of a non cytokine pyrogen, i.e. PGE2, in endothelial cells in the periphery and in the brain. Cytokines synthesized in the periphery may act by crossing the blood brain barrier and acting directly via neuronal cytokine receptors. The mechanisms that ultimately mediate the central action of cytokines and of LPS on the temperature-sensitive neurons in the preoptic hypothalamic region involved in

  20. Synergistic Effect of Bolus Exposure to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on Bleomycin-Induced Secretion of Pro-Fibrotic Cytokines without Lasting Fibrotic Changes in Murine Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenting; Ichihara, Gaku; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Suzuki, Yuka; Chang, Jie; Kato, Masashi; D’Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N.; Gabazza, Esteban C.; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are widely used in various products, and the safety evaluation of this manufactured material is important. The present study investigated the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of pulmonary exposure to ZnO nanoparticles in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by constant subcutaneous infusion of bleomycin (BLM). Female C57BL/6Jcl mice were divided into BLM-treated and non-treated groups. In each treatment group, 0, 10, 20 or 30 µg of ZnO nanoparticles were delivered into the lungs through pharyngeal aspiration. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the lungs were sampled at Day 10 or 14 after administration. Pulmonary exposure by a single bolus of ZnO nanoparticles resulted in severe, but transient inflammatory infiltration and thickening of the alveolar septa in the lungs, along with the increase of total and differential cell counts in BLAF. The BALF level of interleukin (IL)-1β and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was increased at Day 10 and 14, respectively. At Day 10, the synergistic effect of BLM and ZnO exposure was detected on IL-1β and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in BALF. The present study demonstrated the synergistic effect of pulmonary exposure to ZnO nanoparticles and subcutaneous infusion of BLM on the secretion of pro-fibrotic cytokines in the lungs. PMID:25561223

  1. Abnormal secretion of reproductive hormones and antioxidant status involved in quinestrol-induced reproductive toxicity in adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Wang, Hongwei; Zhang, Jiliang; Zhou, Bianhua; Si, Lifang; Wei, Lan; Li, Xiang

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of quinestrol, a synthetic oestrogen homologue with reproductive toxicity, on the secretion of reproductive hormones and antioxidant status in adult male rat. Our results showed that quinestrol exposure significantly decreased the weight of the testis, epididymides, seminal vesicle, and prostate, as well as the sperm counts in the cauda epididymis of rats. Quinestrol significantly reduced the size of seminiferous tubules and the total number of spermatogenic cells. Serum testosterone, follitropin, and lutropin were also significantly reduced in a dose-related manner after quinestrol exposure. Meanwhile, the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and total antioxide capacity significantly decreased, whereas the malondialdehyde and nitric oxide concentrations significantly increased in the testes. These findings revealed that endocrine disorders of reproductive hormones and oxidative stress may be involved in reproductive toxicity induced by quinestrol in adult male rats. PMID:24183492

  2. Abnormal Histone Methylation is Responsible for Increased VEGF165a Secretion from Airway Smooth Muscle Cells in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Rachel L.; John, Alison E.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Knox, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), a key angiogenic molecule, is aberrantly expressed in several diseases including asthma where it contributes to bronchial vascular remodelling and chronic inflammation. Asthmatic human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells hypersecrete VEGF but the mechanism is unclear. Here we defined the mechanism in HASM cells from non-asthmatic (NA) and asthmatic (A) patients. We found that asthmatic cells lacked a repression complex at the VEGF promoter which was present in non-asthmatic cells. Recruitment of G9A, trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) and a resultant decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) at the VEGF promoter was critical to repression of VEGF secretion in non-asthmatic cells. At the asthmatic promoter H3K9me3 was absent due to failed recruitment of G9a; RNA pol II binding, in association with TAF1, was increased, H3K4me3 was present and Sp1 binding was exaggerated and sustained. In contrast DNA methylation and histone acetylation were similar in A and NA cells. This is the first study to show that airway cells in asthma have altered epigenetic regulation of remodelling gene(s). Histone methylation at genes such as VEGF may be an important new therapeutic target. PMID:22689881

  3. Expression of the calcium sensing receptor in human peripheral blood T lymphocyte and its contribution to cytokine secretion through MAPKs or NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Sun, Mingrui; Yin, Xin; Wu, Chunli; Wu, Qiuyue; Feng, Shanli; Li, Hong; Luan, Ying; Wen, Jie; Yan, Lixin; Zhao, Binhui; Xu, Changqing; Sun, Yihua

    2013-04-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has been reported to play an important role in many tissues and organs. However, studies about the expression and function of CaSR in T lymphocytes are still not very lucid. In this study, we investigated the above-mentioned issues using RT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining, Western blotting, and the ELISA techniques. We found that the CaSR protein was expressed, and mainly located in the membrane in the normal human peripheral blood T lymphocytes. GdCl(3) (an agonist of CaSR) increased the dose-dependency of the CaSR expression, which was abolished by NPS2390 (an inhibitor of CaSR). GdCl(3) and Ca(2+) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 (one subgroup of MAPKs) and P65 (subunit of NF-κB),but, they had no significant effects on the JNK and P38 subgroups of MAPKs. Meantime, GdCl(3) and Ca(2+) stimulated both the IL-6 and TNF-β releases and their mRNA expressions. However, these effects of GdCl(3) and Ca(2+) were inhibited by NPS2390, U0126 (MAPKs pathway inhibitor) or Bay-11-7082 (NF-κB pathway inhibitor). These results suggested that CaSR was functionally expressed in the T cells, and the activated CaSR contributed to the cytokine secretion through the partial MAPK and NF-κB pathways. PMID:23103379

  4. Cetuximab Reconstitutes Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretions and Tumor-Infiltrating Capabilities of sMICA-Inhibited NK Cells in HNSCC Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Klöss, Stephan; Chambron, Nicole; Gardlowski, Tanja; Weil, Sandra; Koch, Joachim; Esser, Ruth; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Morgan, Michael A; Arseniev, Lubomir; Seitz, Oliver; Köhl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive factors, such as soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related peptide A (sMICA) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), are involved in tumor immune escape mechanisms (TIEMs) exhibited by head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) and may represent opportunities for therapeutic intervention. In order to overcome TIEMs, we investigated the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), cytokine release and retargeted tumor infiltration of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells expressing Fcγ receptor IIIa (FcγRIIIa, CD16a) in the presence of cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (HER1) monoclonal antibody (mAb). Compared to healthy controls, relapsed HNSCC patients (n = 5), not currently in treatment revealed decreased levels of circulating regulatory NK cell subsets in relation to increased cytotoxic NK cell subpopulations. Elevated sMICA and TGF-β1 plasma levels correlated with diminished TNFα and IFN-γ release and decreased NKG2D (natural killer group 2 member D)-dependent killing of HNSCC cells by NK cells. Incubation of IL-2-activated patient NK cells with patient plasma containing elevated sMICA or sMICA analogs (shed MICA and recombinant MICA) significantly impaired NKG2D-mediated killing by down-regulation of NKG2D surface expression. Of note, CD16 surface expression levels, pro-apoptotic and activation markers, and viability of patient and healthy donor NK cell subpopulations were not affected by this treatment. Accordingly, cetuximab restored killing activity of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells against cetuximab-coated primary HNSCC cells via ADCC in a dose-dependent manner. Rapid reconstitution of anti-tumor recognition and enhanced tumor infiltration of treated NK cells was monitored by 24 h co-incubation of HNSCC tumor spheroids with cetuximab (1 μg/ml) and was characterized by increased IFN-γ and TNFα secretion. This data show that the impaired NK cell-dependent tumor

  5. Cetuximab Reconstitutes Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretions and Tumor-Infiltrating Capabilities of sMICA-Inhibited NK Cells in HNSCC Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Klöss, Stephan; Chambron, Nicole; Gardlowski, Tanja; Weil, Sandra; Koch, Joachim; Esser, Ruth; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Morgan, Michael A.; Arseniev, Lubomir; Seitz, Oliver; Köhl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive factors, such as soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related peptide A (sMICA) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), are involved in tumor immune escape mechanisms (TIEMs) exhibited by head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) and may represent opportunities for therapeutic intervention. In order to overcome TIEMs, we investigated the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), cytokine release and retargeted tumor infiltration of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells expressing Fcγ receptor IIIa (FcγRIIIa, CD16a) in the presence of cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (HER1) monoclonal antibody (mAb). Compared to healthy controls, relapsed HNSCC patients (n = 5), not currently in treatment revealed decreased levels of circulating regulatory NK cell subsets in relation to increased cytotoxic NK cell subpopulations. Elevated sMICA and TGF-β1 plasma levels correlated with diminished TNFα and IFN-γ release and decreased NKG2D (natural killer group 2 member D)-dependent killing of HNSCC cells by NK cells. Incubation of IL-2-activated patient NK cells with patient plasma containing elevated sMICA or sMICA analogs (shed MICA and recombinant MICA) significantly impaired NKG2D-mediated killing by down-regulation of NKG2D surface expression. Of note, CD16 surface expression levels, pro-apoptotic and activation markers, and viability of patient and healthy donor NK cell subpopulations were not affected by this treatment. Accordingly, cetuximab restored killing activity of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells against cetuximab-coated primary HNSCC cells via ADCC in a dose-dependent manner. Rapid reconstitution of anti-tumor recognition and enhanced tumor infiltration of treated NK cells was monitored by 24 h co-incubation of HNSCC tumor spheroids with cetuximab (1 μg/ml) and was characterized by increased IFN-γ and TNFα secretion. This data show that the impaired NK cell-dependent tumor

  6. Irradiation of mechanically-injured human arterial endothelial cells leads to increased gene expression and secretion of inflammatory and growth promoting cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wondergem, J; Wedekind, L E; Bart, C I; Chin, A; van der Laarse, A; Beekhuizen, H

    2004-07-01

    induced a 2.3 +/- 0.3-fold increase (P < 0.05) in Fas surface expression only. In conclusion, irradiation of mechanically-injured human EC leads to increased gene expression and protein secretion of inflammatory and growth promoting cytokines. PMID:15186947

  7. Cholangiocarcinoma-derived exosomes inhibit the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer cells by down-regulating the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α and perforin*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiong-huang; Xiang, Jian-yang; Ding, Guo-ping; Cao, Li-ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study is to observe the impact of cholangiocarcinoma-derived exosomes on the antitumor activities of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells and then demonstrate the appropriate mechanism. Methods: Tumor-derived exosomes (TEXs), which are derived from RBE cells (human cholangiocarcinoma line), were collected by ultracentrifugation. CIK cells induced from peripheral blood were stimulated by TEXs. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was performed to determine the phenotypes of TEX-CIK and N-CIK (normal CIK) cells. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and perforin in the culture medium supernatant were examined by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. A CCK-8 kit was used to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of the CIK cells to the RBE cell line. Results: The concentrations of TNF-α and perforin of the group TEX-CIK were 138.61 pg/ml and 2.41 ng/ml, respectively, lower than those of the group N-CIK 194.08 pg/ml (P<0.01) and 3.39 ng/ml (P<0.05). The killing rate of the group TEX-CIK was 33.35%, lower than that of the group N-CIK (47.35% (P<0.01)). The population of CD3+, CD8+, NK (CD56+), and CD3+CD56+ cells decreased in the TEX-CIK group ((63.2±6.8)%, (2.5±1.0)%, (0.53±0.49)%, (0.45±0.42)%) compared with the N-CIK group ((90.3±7.3)%, (65.7±3.3)%, (4.2±1.2)%, (15.2±2.7)%), P<0.01. Conclusions: Our results suggest that RBE cells-derived exosomes inhibit the antitumor activity of CIK cells by down-regulating the population of CD3+, CD8+, NK (CD56+), and CD3+CD56+ cells and the secretion of TNF-α and perforin. TEX may play an important role in cholangiocarcinoma immune escape. PMID:27381730

  8. Inhibition of Viability, Proliferation, Cytokines Secretion, Surface Antigen Expression, and Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Seven-Day Exposure to 0.5 T Static Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Deng, Jixian; Freed, Darren H.; Arora, Rakesh C.; Tian, Ganghong

    2016-01-01

    After seven-day exposure to 0.5-Tesla Static Magnetic Field (SMF), Adipose-derived Stem Cells (ASCs) and those labeled by superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were examined for viability by methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay, proliferation by cell counting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, DNA integrity by single cell gel electrophoresis, surface antigen by flow cytometry analysis, and the expression of cytokines and genetic markers by reverse transcription-PCR and underwent adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assessed by quantifying related specific genes expression. The SMF slightly reduced cell viability and proliferation and inhibited the expression of CD49d, CD54, and CD73 but did not damage DNA integrity. The SMF slightly downregulated the expression of cytokines including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 (TGF-β1), genetic markers comprising Stem Cell Antigen-1 (Sca1), Octamer-4 (Oct-4), ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1 (ABCB1), adipogenic marker genes containing Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPAR-γ), and osteogenic marker genes including Secreted Phosphor-protein 1 (SPP1) and Osterix (OSX). Exposure to 0.5 T SMF for seven days inhibited viability, proliferation, surface antigen expression, cytokine secretion, stem cell genetic marker expression, and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation but did not affect the DNA integrity in ASCs with or without SPIO labeling. PMID:26880984

  9. Inhibition of Viability, Proliferation, Cytokines Secretion, Surface Antigen Expression, and Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Seven-Day Exposure to 0.5 T Static Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Deng, Jixian; Freed, Darren H; Arora, Rakesh C; Tian, Ganghong

    2016-01-01

    After seven-day exposure to 0.5-Tesla Static Magnetic Field (SMF), Adipose-derived Stem Cells (ASCs) and those labeled by superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were examined for viability by methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay, proliferation by cell counting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, DNA integrity by single cell gel electrophoresis, surface antigen by flow cytometry analysis, and the expression of cytokines and genetic markers by reverse transcription-PCR and underwent adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assessed by quantifying related specific genes expression. The SMF slightly reduced cell viability and proliferation and inhibited the expression of CD49d, CD54, and CD73 but did not damage DNA integrity. The SMF slightly downregulated the expression of cytokines including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 (TGF-β1), genetic markers comprising Stem Cell Antigen-1 (Sca1), Octamer-4 (Oct-4), ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1 (ABCB1), adipogenic marker genes containing Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPAR-γ), and osteogenic marker genes including Secreted Phosphor-protein 1 (SPP1) and Osterix (OSX). Exposure to 0.5 T SMF for seven days inhibited viability, proliferation, surface antigen expression, cytokine secretion, stem cell genetic marker expression, and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation but did not affect the DNA integrity in ASCs with or without SPIO labeling. PMID:26880984

  10. Emodin‑8‑O‑glucuronic acid, from the traditional Chinese medicine qinghuobaiduyin, affects the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in LPS‑stimulated raw 264.7 cells via HSP70.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; He, Quanyong; Zhu, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Qinghuobaiduyin (QHBDY) is a traditional Chinese medicine, which has an opsonization effect on the immune system. However, which chemical compound in QHBDY underlies the therapeutic effect remains to be elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of emodin‑8‑O‑glucuronic acid, a chemical compound isolated from QHBDY, on the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑stimulated Raw 264.7 cells. The compound was isolated from QHBDY and identified as emodin‑8‑O‑glucuronic acid using liquid chromatography‑mass spectrometryn. The results obtained from an ELISA assay showed that emodin‑8‑O‑glucuronic acid inhibited the elevated expression levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑10 in the LPS‑stimulated Raw 264.7 cells, which occurred in a dose‑dependent manner. In addition, emodin‑8‑O‑glucuronic acid induced the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in the LPS‑stimulated Raw 264.7 cells, as demonstrated using western blot analysis. The effect of emodin‑8‑O‑glucuronic acid on the secretion of TNF‑α, IL‑1β and IL‑10 was attenuated by the knockdown of HSP70. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that emodin‑8‑O‑glucuronic acid effectively suppressed LPS‑induced inflammatory cytokine secretion, and this effect was attained by the increased expression of HSP70. PMID:27430303

  11. Macrophages clear refrigerator storage-damaged RBCs and subsequently secrete cytokines in vivo, but not in vitro, in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Wojczyk, Boguslaw S.; Kim, Nina; Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; Francis, Richard O.; Zimring, James C.; Hod, Eldad A.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In mice, refrigerator-stored red blood cells (RBCs) are cleared by extravascular hemolysis and induce cytokine production. To enhance understanding of this phenomenon, we sought to model it in vitro. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Ingestion of refrigerator-stored murine RBCs and subsequent cytokine production were studied using J774A.1 mouse macrophage cells and primary murine splenic macrophages. Wild-type and Ccl2-GFP-reporter mice were used for RBC clearance in vivo. RESULTS Although J774A.1 cells and primary macrophages preferentially ingested refrigerator-stored RBCs in vitro, as compared to freshly-isolated RBCs, neither produced increased cytokines following erythrophagocytosis. In contrast, phagocytosis of refrigerator-stored RBCs in vivo induced increases in circulating monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and correspondingly increased mRNA levels in mouse spleen and liver. In the spleen, these were predominantly expressed by CD11b+ cells. Using Ccl2-GFP-reporter mice, the predominant splenic population responsible for MCP-1 mRNA production were tissue-resident macrophages (i.e., CD45+, CD11b+, F4/80+, Ly6c+, CD11clow cells). CONCLUSION J774A.1 cells and primary macrophages selectively ingested refrigerator-stored RBCs by phagocytosis. Although cytokine expression was not enhanced, this approach could be used to identify the relevant receptor-ligand combination(s). In contrast, cytokine levels increased following phagocytosis of refrigerator-stored RBCs in vivo. These were primarily cleared in the liver and spleen, which demonstrated increased MCP-1 and KC mRNA expression. Finally, in mouse spleen, tissue-resident macrophages were predominantly involved in MCP-1 mRNA production. The differences between cytokine production in vitro and in vivo are not yet well understood. PMID:25041478

  12. MicroRNA-146a-5p Negatively Regulates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion and Cell Activation in Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Human Hepatic Stellate Cells through Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhan; Zeng, Zhaochong; Shen, Xiaoyun; Wu, Zhifeng; Dong, Yinying; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway is demonstrated to be involved in the hepatic fibrosis. MicroRNA (miR)-146a-5p is a key regulator of the innate immune response. The functional significance of miR-146a-5p during the LPS/TLR4 mediated hepatic fibrosis process remains unclear. In this study, we found that TLR4 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were up-regulated and miR-146a-5p was down-regulated in human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) line LX2 after LPS stimulation. Overexpression of miR-146a-5p inhibited LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion through down-regulating the expression levels of TLR-4, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), TNF receptor associated factor-6 (TRAF6) and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Knockdown of IRAK1 and TRAF6 also suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting NF-κB phosphorylation. In addition, miR-146a-5p mimic blocked LPS induced TRAF6 dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Smad2 activation as well as α-SMA production. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-146a-5p suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and cell activation of HSC through inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB and TLR4/TRAF6/JNK pathway. PMID:27399683

  13. MicroRNA-146a-5p Negatively Regulates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion and Cell Activation in Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Human Hepatic Stellate Cells through Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhan; Zeng, Zhaochong; Shen, Xiaoyun; Wu, Zhifeng; Dong, Yinying; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway is demonstrated to be involved in the hepatic fibrosis. MicroRNA (miR)-146a-5p is a key regulator of the innate immune response. The functional significance of miR-146a-5p during the LPS/TLR4 mediated hepatic fibrosis process remains unclear. In this study, we found that TLR4 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were up-regulated and miR-146a-5p was down-regulated in human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) line LX2 after LPS stimulation. Overexpression of miR-146a-5p inhibited LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion through down-regulating the expression levels of TLR-4, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), TNF receptor associated factor-6 (TRAF6) and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Knockdown of IRAK1 and TRAF6 also suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting NF-κB phosphorylation. In addition, miR-146a-5p mimic blocked LPS induced TRAF6 dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Smad2 activation as well as α-SMA production. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-146a-5p suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and cell activation of HSC through inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB and TLR4/TRAF6/JNK pathway. PMID:27399683

  14. The Effects of Isoproterenol and Propranolol on Cytokine Profile Secretion by Cultured Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes Derived from Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seyedi, Shahram; Andalib, Alireza; Rezaei, Abbas; Hosseini, Seyed Mohsen; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Vafai, Mohamad; Behboo, Roubik; Tabatabaei, Seyed Abbas; Shahabi, Shahram

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Anti-tumor immunity and cytokine profiles have important roles in the development of cancer. Norepinephrine (NE) release due to sympathetic activation leads to a Th2 deviation via the beta-2 adrenergic receptor Beta-2 adrenergic receptor (β-2AR) and could increase cancer progression. This study intends to determine the effects of isoproterenol (ISO; beta-agonist) and propranolol (PRO; beta-antagonist) on the production of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17. Cytokine levels have been examined in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The β-2AR expression on lymphocyte subsets was also assessed. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, TILs were isolated from fresh CRC tissue and patient PBMCs were obtained just prior to surgery. The cells were cultured in medium for 72 hours. Concomitantly, cells were stimulated with 10 µg/ml phytohemagglutinin (PHA) alone or in the presence of either 1 µmol/L of PRO or 1 µmol/L ISO. The concentration of cytokines in the supernatants was measured by ELISA. Three-color flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of β-2AR on the lymphocyte subsets. Statistical analyses were performed via paired or independent t-test. Results: Levels of IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-17 were elevated after PHA-stimulation of PBMCs and TILs. However, the elevation of IFN-γ and IL-17 production by TILs in response to PHA was significantly lower than PBMCs. In the presence of ISO, the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio reduced in all groups, but this reduction was very low in TILs. Interestingly, the effects of PRO on cytokine production were, at least partially, comparable to those of ISO. Depressed levels of β-2AR expression were demonstrated on CD4+IFN-γ+ and CD4+IL-17+ lymphocytes in patients' PBMCs and TILs. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated the effects of ISO and PRO on cytokine production by TILs and determined β-2AR expression on these cells. ISO failed

  15. Whole inactivated virus influenza vaccine is superior to subunit vaccine in inducing immune responses and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by DCs

    PubMed Central

    Geeraedts, Felix; Bungener, Laura; Pool, Judith; Ter Veer, Wouter; Wilschut, Jan; Huckriede, Anke

    2008-01-01

    Background  For protection against (re‐)infection by influenza virus not only the magnitude of the immune response but also its quality in terms of antibody subclass and T helper profile is important. Information about the type of immune response elicited by vaccination is therefore urgently needed. Objectives  The aim of the study was to evaluate in detail the immune response elicited by three current influenza vaccine formulations and to shed light on vaccine characteristics which determine this response. Methods  Mice were immunized with whole inactivated virus (WIV), virosomes (VS) or subunit vaccine (SU). Following subsequent infection with live virus, serum antibody titers and Th cell responses were measured. The effects of the vaccines on cytokine production by conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were investigated in vitro. Results and conclusions  In Balb/c mice (Th2 prone) as well as in C57Bl/6 mice (Th1 prone), WIV induced consistently higher hemagglutination‐inhibition titers and virus‐neutralizing antibody titers than VS or SU. In contrast to VS and SU, WIV stimulated the production of the antibody subclasses IgG2a (Balb/c) and IgG2c (C57BL/6), considered to be particularly important for viral clearance, and activation of IFN‐γ‐producing T cells. Similar to live virus, WIV stimulated the production of proinflammatory cytokines by conventional dendritic cells and IFN‐α by plasmacytoid cells, while VS and SU had little effect on cytokine synthesis by either cell type. We conclude that vaccination with WIV in contrast to VS or SU results in the desired Th1 response presumably by induction of type I interferon and other proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:19453471

  16. CD38 Ligation in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Myeloma Patients Induces Release of Protumorigenic IL-6 and Impaired Secretion of IFNγ Cytokines and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Giorgio; Di Girolamo, Marco; Recine, Umberto; Palazzo, Raffaella; Urbani, Francesca; Horenstein, Alberto L.; Malavasi, Fabio; Ausiello, Clara Maria

    2013-01-01

    CD38, a surface receptor that controls signals in immunocompetent cells, is densely expressed by cells of multiple myeloma (MM). The immune system of MM patients appears as functionally impaired, with qualitative and quantitative defects in T cell immune responses. This work answers the issue whether CD38 plays a role in the impairment of T lymphocyte response. To this aim, we analyzed the signals implemented by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) ligation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from MM patients and compared to benign monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). PBMC from MM both failed to proliferate and secrete IFNγ induced by CD38 ligation while it retained the ability to respond to TCR/CD3. The impaired CD38-dependent proliferative response likely reflects an arrest in the progression of cell cycle, as indicated by the reduced expression of PCNA. CD38 signaling showed an enhanced ability to induce IL-6 secretion. PBMC from MM patients displays a deregulated response possibly due to defects of CD38 activation pathways and CD38 may be functionally involved in the progression of this pathology via the secretion of high levels of IL-6 that protects neoplastic cells from apoptosis. PMID:24489445

  17. Type I and II Diabetic Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Respond In Vitro to Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allograft Treatment by Increasing Proliferation, Migration, and Altering Cytokine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Massee, Michelle; Chinn, Kathryn; Lim, Jeremy J.; Godwin, Lisa; Young, Conan S.; Koob, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Human amniotic membranes have been shown to be effective for healing diabetic foot ulcers clinically and to regulate stem cell activity in vitro and in vivo; however, diabetic stem cells may be impaired as a sequela of the disease. In this study, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM) allografts (EpiFix®; MiMedx Group) were evaluated for their ability to regulate diabetic stem cells in vitro. Approach: Human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) from normal, type I diabetic, and type II diabetic donors were treated with soluble extracts of dHACM and evaluated for proliferation after 3 days by DNA assay, chemotactic migration after 1 day by transwell assay, cytokine secretion after 3 days by multiplex ELISA, and gene expression after 5 days by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Results: Although diabetic ADSCs demonstrated decreased responses compared to normal ADSCs, dHACM treatment stimulated diabetic ADSCs to proliferate after 3 days and enhanced migration over 24 h, similar to normal ADSCs. dHACM-treated diabetic ADSCs modulated secretion of soluble signals, including regulators of inflammation, angiogenesis, and healing. All ADSCs evaluated also responded to dHACM treatment with altered expression of immunomodulatory genes, including interleukins (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1RA. Innovation: This is the first reported case demonstrating that diabetic ADSCs respond to novel amniotic membrane therapies, specifically treatment with dHACM. Conclusion: dHACM stimulated diabetic ADSCs to migrate, proliferate, and alter cytokine expression suggesting that, despite their diabetic origin, ADSCs may respond to dHACM to accelerate diabetic wound healing. PMID:26862462

  18. CD46 activation regulates miR-150-mediated control of GLUT1 expression and cytokine secretion in human CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    King, Ben C.; Esguerra, Jonathan L. S.; Golec, Ewelina; Eliasson, Lena; Kemper, Claudia; Blom, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    CD46 is a cell surface complement inhibitor widely expressed in human tissues, in contrast to mice, where expression is limited to the testes. In humans, it has been identified as an important T cell costimulatory receptor, and patients deficient in CD46 or its endogenous ligands are unable to mount effective Th1 T cell responses. Stimulation of human CD4+ T cells with CD3 and CD46 also leads to the differentiation of a ‘switched’ Th1 population, which shuts down IFN-γ secretion and upregulates IL-10, and is believed to be important for negative feedback regulation of the Th1 response. We show here that CD46 costimulation leads to amplified microRNA expression changes in human CD4+ T cells, with associated increases in activation more potent than that mediated by the ‘classic’ costimulator CD28. Blockade of cell-surface CD46 inhibited CD28-mediated costimulation, identifying autocrine CD46 signaling as downstream of CD28. We also identify a downregulation of microRNA-150 in CD46-costimulated T cells, and identify the glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) encoding transcript SLC2A1 as a target of microRNA-150 regulation, connecting microRNA-150 with modulation of glucose uptake. We also investigated microRNA expression profiles of CD46-induced ‘switched’ IL-10-secreting Th1 T cells and found increased expression of microRNA-150, compared to IFN-γ-secreting Th1 cells. Knockdown of microRNA-150 led to a reduction in IL-10 but not IFN-γ. CD46 therefore controls both Th1 activation and regulation via a miRNA-150-dependent mechanism. PMID:26746193

  19. CD46 Activation Regulates miR-150-Mediated Control of GLUT1 Expression and Cytokine Secretion in Human CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    King, Ben C; Esguerra, Jonathan L S; Golec, Ewelina; Eliasson, Lena; Kemper, Claudia; Blom, Anna M

    2016-02-15

    CD46 is a cell surface complement inhibitor widely expressed in human tissues, in contrast to mice, where expression is limited to the testes. In humans, it has been identified as an important T cell costimulatory receptor, and patients deficient in CD46 or its endogenous ligands are unable to mount effective Th1 T cell responses. Stimulation of human CD4(+) T cells with CD3 and CD46 also leads to the differentiation of a "switched" Th1 population, which shuts down IFN-γ secretion and upregulates IL-10 and is thought to be important for negative feedback regulation of the Th1 response. In the present study, we show that CD46 costimulation leads to amplified microRNA (miR) expression changes in human CD4(+) T cells, with associated increases in activation more potent than those mediated by the "classic" costimulator CD28. Blockade of cell surface CD46 inhibited CD28-mediated costimulation, identifying autocrine CD46 signaling as downstream of CD28. We also identify a downregulation of miR-150 in CD46-costimulated T cells and identify the glucose transporter 1 encoding transcript SLC2A1 as a target of miR-150 regulation, connecting miR-150 with modulation of glucose uptake. We also investigated microRNA expression profiles of CD46-induced switched IL-10-secreting Th1 T cells and found increased expression of miR-150, compared with IFN-γ-secreting Th1 cells. Knockdown of miR-150 led to a reduction in IL-10 but not IFN-γ. CD46 therefore controls both Th1 activation and regulation via a miR-150-dependent mechanism. PMID:26746193

  20. Cytokines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Pozzilli, P; Thorpe, R

    1994-01-01

    Although the immunopathology of most autoimmune diseases has been well defined, the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown of self-tolerance and which lead to the development of systemic and organ-specific autoaggression are still unclear. Evidence has accumulated which supports a role for a disregulated production of cytokines by leucocytes and possibly other cells in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of cytokine effects in the regulation of the immune response, it is difficult to determine whether abnormalities in the patterns of cytokine production are primary or secondary to the pathological process. Confusion is also caused by the fact that the biological activities of cytokines are multiple and often overlapping, and consequently it is difficult to focus on a unique effect of any one cytokine. Characterization of the potential and actual involvement of cytokines is important not only for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune conditions, but particularly because of the implications for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the diseases. PMID:8149655

  1. Tumor suppression in mice lacking GABARAP, an Atg8/LC3 family member implicated in autophagy, is associated with alterations in cytokine secretion and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Salah, F S; Ebbinghaus, M; Muley, V Y; Zhou, Z; Al-Saadi, K R D; Pacyna-Gengelbach, M; O'Sullivan, G A; Betz, H; König, R; Wang, Z-Q; Bräuer, R; Petersen, I

    2016-01-01

    GABARAP belongs to an evolutionary highly conserved gene family that has a fundamental role in autophagy. There is ample evidence for a crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis as well as the immune response. However, the molecular details for these interactions are not fully characterized. Here, we report that the ablation of murine GABARAP, a member of the Atg8/LC3 family that is central to autophagosome formation, suppresses the incidence of tumor formation mediated by the carcinogen DMBA and results in an enhancement of the immune response through increased secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2 and IFN-γ from stimulated macrophages and lymphocytes. In contrast, TGF-β1 was significantly reduced in the serum of these knockout mice. Further, DMBA treatment of these GABARAP knockout mice reduced the cellularity of the spleen and the growth of mammary glands through the induction of apoptosis. Gene expression profiling of mammary glands revealed significantly elevated levels of Xaf1, an apoptotic inducer and tumor-suppressor gene, in knockout mice. Furthermore, DMBA treatment triggered the upregulation of pro-apoptotic (Bid, Apaf1, Bax), cell death (Tnfrsf10b, Ripk1) and cell cycle inhibitor (Cdkn1a, Cdkn2c) genes in the mammary glands. Finally, tumor growth of B16 melanoma cells after subcutaneous inoculation was inhibited in GABARAP-deficient mice. Together, these data provide strong evidence for the involvement of GABARAP in tumorigenesis in vivo by delaying cell death and its associated immune-related response. PMID:27124579

  2. Tumor suppression in mice lacking GABARAP, an Atg8/LC3 family member implicated in autophagy, is associated with alterations in cytokine secretion and cell death.

    PubMed

    Salah, F S; Ebbinghaus, M; Muley, V Y; Zhou, Z; Al-Saadi, K R D; Pacyna-Gengelbach, M; O'Sullivan, G A; Betz, H; König, R; Wang, Z-Q; Bräuer, R; Petersen, I

    2016-01-01

    GABARAP belongs to an evolutionary highly conserved gene family that has a fundamental role in autophagy. There is ample evidence for a crosstalk between autophagy and apoptosis as well as the immune response. However, the molecular details for these interactions are not fully characterized. Here, we report that the ablation of murine GABARAP, a member of the Atg8/LC3 family that is central to autophagosome formation, suppresses the incidence of tumor formation mediated by the carcinogen DMBA and results in an enhancement of the immune response through increased secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2 and IFN-γ from stimulated macrophages and lymphocytes. In contrast, TGF-β1 was significantly reduced in the serum of these knockout mice. Further, DMBA treatment of these GABARAP knockout mice reduced the cellularity of the spleen and the growth of mammary glands through the induction of apoptosis. Gene expression profiling of mammary glands revealed significantly elevated levels of Xaf1, an apoptotic inducer and tumor-suppressor gene, in knockout mice. Furthermore, DMBA treatment triggered the upregulation of pro-apoptotic (Bid, Apaf1, Bax), cell death (Tnfrsf10b, Ripk1) and cell cycle inhibitor (Cdkn1a, Cdkn2c) genes in the mammary glands. Finally, tumor growth of B16 melanoma cells after subcutaneous inoculation was inhibited in GABARAP-deficient mice. Together, these data provide strong evidence for the involvement of GABARAP in tumorigenesis in vivo by delaying cell death and its associated immune-related response. PMID:27124579

  3. Uptake efficiency of surface modified gold nanoparticles does not correlate with functional changes and cytokine secretion in human dendritic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fytianos, Kleanthis; Rodriguez-Lorenzo, Laura; Clift, Martin J D; Blank, Fabian; Vanhecke, Dimitri; von Garnier, Christophe; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Engineering nanoparticles (NPs) for immune modulation require a thorough understanding of their interaction(s) with cells. Gold NPs (AuNPs) were coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or a mixture of both with either positive or negative surface charge to investigate uptake and cell response in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy were used to confirm the presence of Au inside MDDCs. Cell viability, (pro-)inflammatory responses, MDDC phenotype, activation markers, antigen uptake and processing were analyzed. Cell death was only observed for PVA-NH2 AuNPs at the highest concentration. MDDCs internalize AuNPs, however, surface modification influenced uptake. Though limited uptake was observed for PEG-COOH AuNPs, a significant tumor necrosis factor-alpha release was induced. In contrast, (PEG+PVA)-NH2 and PVA-NH2 AuNPs were internalized to a higher extent and caused interleukin-1beta secretion. None of the AuNPs caused changes in MDDC phenotype, activation or immunological properties. From the clinical editor: This team of authors investigated the influence of gold nano-particles with different surface modifications on immunological properties in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. AuNPs triggered responses in these cells that has to be further investigated in terms of development of novel vaccine carriers. PMID:25555350

  4. Dectin-1-mediated Signaling Leads to Characteristic Gene Expressions and Cytokine Secretion via Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) in Rat Mast Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yukihiro; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Honjoh, Chisato; Takeuchi, Kenji; Yamauchi, Shota; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Sada, Kiyonao

    2014-01-01

    Dectin-1 recognizes β-glucan and plays important roles for the antifungal immunity through the activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in dendritic cells or macrophages. Recently, expression of Dectin-1 was also identified in human and mouse mast cells, although its physiological roles were largely unknown. In this report, rat mast cell line RBL-2H3 was analyzed to investigate the molecular mechanism of Dectin-1-mediated activation and responses of mast cells. Treatment of cells with Dectin-1-specific agonist curdlan induced tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins and the interaction of Dectin-1 with the Src homology 2 domain of Syk. These responses depended on tyrosine phosphorylation of the hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in the cytoplasmic tail of Dectin-1, whereas they were independent of the γ-subunit of high-affinity IgE receptor. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses showed that Dectin-1-mediated signaling stimulated gene expression of transcription factor Nfkbiz and inflammatory cytokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-3, IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The response was abrogated by pretreatment with Syk inhibitor R406. These results suggest that Syk is critical for Dectin-1-mediated activation of mast cells, although the signaling differs from that triggered by FcϵRI activation. In addition, these gene expressions induced by curdlan stimulation were specifically observed in mast cells, suggesting that Dectin-1-mediated signaling of mast cells offers new insight into the antifungal immunity. PMID:25246527

  5. Simultaneous Exposure to Escherichia coli Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Enterotoxins Increases Fluid Secretion and Alters Cyclic Nucleotide and Cytokine Production by Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Read, Lisa T.; Hahn, Rachel W.; Thompson, Carli C.; Bauer, David L.; Norton, Elizabeth B.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a significant cause of diarrheal disease and death, especially in children in developing countries. ETEC causes disease by colonizing the small intestine and producing heat-labile toxin (LT), heat-stable toxin (ST), or both LT and ST (LT+ST). The majority of ETEC strains produce both ST and LT. Despite the prevalence of LT+ST-producing organisms, few studies have examined the physiologic or immunologic consequences of simultaneous exposure to these two potent enterotoxins. In the current report, we demonstrate that when LT and ST are both present, they increase water movement into the intestinal lumen over and above the levels observed with either toxin alone. As expected, cultured intestinal epithelial cells increased their expression of intracellular cyclic GMP (cGMP) when treated with ST and their expression of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) when treated with LT. When both toxins were present, cGMP levels but not cAMP levels were synergistically elevated compared with the levels of expression caused by the corresponding single-toxin treatment. Our data also demonstrate that the levels of inflammatory cytokines produced by intestinal epithelial cells in response to LT are significantly reduced in animals exposed to both enterotoxins. These findings suggest that there may be complex differences between the epithelial cell intoxication and, potentially, secretory outcomes induced by ETEC strains expressing LT+ST compared with strains that express LT or ST only. Our results also reveal a novel mechanism wherein ST production may reduce the hosts' ability to mount an effective innate or adaptive immune response to infecting organisms. PMID:25287923

  6. Effect of a four-week exercise program on the secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-6 cytokines in elite Taekwondo athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine how a 4-week exercise program affects the serum levels of certain cytokines in Taekwondo athletes. The study involved 10 elite male Taekwondo athletes (mean age, 20.67±0.24 years; mean weight, 65.45±1.69 kg) who were studying at the Physical Education and Sports High School of Selçuk University (Konya, Turkey) in June 2014. The subjects were involved in a Taekwondo exercise program on every weekday for 4 weeks. The subjects were also engaged in an exercise to exhaustion session twice; once before starting the 4-week exercise program and once upon completion of the program. Blood samples were collected from the subjects in four rounds: During rest, upon fatigue, and before and after the 4-week exercise program. These samples were analyzed to establish the serum levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-6 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test kits. Pre- and post-exercise program, the IFN-γ and TNF-α levels did not show any significant difference. When compared with the pre-exercise levels, serum IL-2 levels of the subjects were found to be elevated after the 4-week exercise program. The highest serum IL-6 values were established after the subjects were exercised to fatigue before the exercise program was initiated (P<0.05). The 4-week exercise program resulted in a decrease in IL-6 levels (P<0.05). The findings of the study indicate that a 4-week exercise program did not result in significant changes in IFN-γ and TNF-α levels, but led to an increase in IL-2 levels. The notable finding of the present study is that a 4-week exercise program reduces cellular immune functions and, thus, the levels of IL-6, which negatively influences performance. PMID:27588179

  7. Abnormality of circadian rhythm of serum melatonin and other biochemical parameters in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Fatima, Ghizal; Das, Siddhartha Kumar; Verma, Nar Singh

    2011-04-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a complex chronic condition causing widespread pain and variety of other symptoms. It produces pain in the soft tissues located around joints throughout the body. FMS has unknown etiology and its pathophysiology is not fully understood. However, abnormality in circadian rhythm of hormonal profiles and cytokines has been observed in this disorder. Moreover, there are reports of deficiency of serotonin, melatonin, cortisol and cytokines in FMS patients, which are fully regulated by circadian rhythm. Melatonin, the primary hormone of the pineal gland regulates the body's circadian rhythm and normally its levels begin to rise in the mid-to-late evening, remain high for most of the night, and then decrease in the early morning. FMS patients have lower melatonin secretion during the hours of darkness than the healthy subjects. This may contribute to impaired sleep at night, fatigue during the day and changed pain perception. Studies have shown blunting of normal diurnal cortisol rhythm, with elevated evening serum cortisol level in patients with FMS. Thus, due to perturbed level of cortisol secretion several symptoms of FMS may occur. Moreover, disturbed cytokine levels have also been reported in FMS patients. Therefore, circadian rhythm can be an important factor in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of FMS. This article explores the circadian pattern of abnormalities in FMS patients, as this may help in better understanding the role of variation in symptoms of FMS and its possible relationship with circadian variations of melatonin, cortisol, cytokines and serotonin levels. PMID:21682138

  8. Tumor-induced senescent T cells promote the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors by human monocytes/macrophages through a mechanism that involves Tim-3 and CD40L

    PubMed Central

    Ramello, M C; Tosello Boari, J; Canale, F P; Mena, H A; Negrotto, S; Gastman, B; Gruppi, A; Acosta Rodríguez, E V; Montes, C L

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors are infiltrated by immune cells where macrophages and senescent T cells are highly represented. Within the tumor microenvironment, a cross-talk between the infiltrating cells may occur conditioning the characteristic of the in situ immune response. Our previous work showed that tumors induce senescence of T cells, which are powerful suppressors of lympho-proliferation. In this study, we report that Tumor-Induced Senescent (TIS)-T cells may also modulate monocyte activation. To gain insight into this interaction, CD4+ or CD8+TIS-T or control-T cells were co-incubated with autologous monocytes under inflammatory conditions. After co-culture with CD4+ or CD8+TIS-T cells, CD14+ monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) exhibit a higher expression of CD16+ cells and a reduced expression of CD206. These Mo/Ma produce nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; however, TIS-T cells do not modify phagocyte capacity of Mo/Ma. TIS-T modulated-Mo/Ma show a higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1β and IL-6) and angiogenic factors (MMP-9, VEGF-A and IL-8) and a lower IL-10 and IP-10 secretion than monocytes co-cultured with controls. The mediator(s) present in the supernatant of TIS-T cell/monocyte-macrophage co-cultures promote(s) tubulogenesis and tumor-cell survival. Monocyte-modulation induced by TIS-T cells requires cell-to-cell contact. Although CD4+ shows different behavior from CD8+TIS-T cells, blocking mAbs against T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin protein 3 and CD40 ligand reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors production, indicating that these molecules are involved in monocyte/macrophage modulation by TIS-T cells. Our results revealed a novel role for TIS-T cells in human monocyte/macrophage modulation, which may have deleterious consequences for tumor progression. This modulation should be considered to best tailor the immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:25375372

  9. Evolution of Cytokine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; Sertori, Robert; Ward, Alister C

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines represent essential mediators of cell-cell communication with particularly important roles within the immune system. These secreted factors are produced in response to developmental and/or environmental cues and act via cognate cytokine receptors on target cells, stimulating specific intracellular signaling pathways to facilitate appropriate cellular responses. This review describes the evolution of cytokine receptor signaling, focusing on the class I and class II receptor families and the downstream JAK-STAT pathway along with its key negative regulators. Individual components generated over a long evolutionary time frame coalesced to form an archetypal signaling pathway in bilateria that was expanded extensively during early vertebrate evolution to establish a substantial "core" signaling network, which has subsequently undergone limited diversification within discrete lineages. The evolution of cytokine receptor signaling parallels that of the immune system, particularly the emergence of adaptive immunity, which has likely been a major evolutionary driver. PMID:27317733

  10. Cytokines in immunity and allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Louis C; Allan, James S; Madsen, Joren C

    2002-01-01

    Cytokines are highly potent regulatory molecules that are secreted by a variety of cells into the local microenvironment. These chemical messengers participate in the activation and regulation of immune function by a variety of mechanisms, including the stimulation and inhibition of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Cytokines also may have chemotactic activity. Six cytokine receptor families have been described, on the basis of their conserved structural features. Many cytokines are classified as proinflammatory cytokines, which promote both innate and adaptive immune responses. Solid-organ transplantation presents several unique challenges to the immune system, and cytokines play an important role in both antigen-dependent and antigen-independent immune recognition. The selective blockade of cytokine-mediated immune responses is a cornerstone of modern immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:12678428

  11. Assessing the presence of abnormal regulation of cortisol secretion by membrane hormone receptors: in vivo and in vitro studies in patients with functioning and non-functioning adrenal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Dall'Asta, C; Ballarè, E; Mantovani, G; Ambrosi, B; Spada, A; Barbetta, L; Colombo, P; Travaglini, P; Loli, P; Beck-Peccoz, P

    2004-08-01

    Regulation of cortisol secretion by aberrant hormone receptors may play a role in the pathogenesis of ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome. In this study, the topic was evaluated by combining in vivo and in vitro approaches. Cortisol responses to various stimuli (standard meal, GnRH + TRH, cisapride, vasopressin, glucagon) were assessed in 6 patients with clinical or subclinical adrenal Cushing's syndrome, and non-functioning adrenal adenoma in two cases. Abnormal responses were observed in three patients with Cushing's syndrome; one patient showed a gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP)-dependent cortisol rise after meal, together with responses after GnRH and cisapride; the second patient showed an LH-dependent cortisol response to GnRH, and in the third cortisol rose after cisapride. The pattern of receptor expression performed by RT-PCR showed that while GIP-R was only expressed in tumor from the responsive patient, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 4 receptor and LH-R were also present in normal adrenal tissues and tissues from non-responsive patients. Interestingly, an activating mutation of Gsalpha gene was identified in one of these tumors. Therefore, cortisol responses to agents operating via Gs protein coupled receptors (in one case associated with Gsalpha mutation) were found in Cushing's patients, while these responses were absent in the others. The finding of receptor expression in normal and non-responsive tumors suggests that different mechanisms are probably involved in inducing in vivo cortisol responses. PMID:15326569

  12. Cytokine-induced killer cell therapy-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: rare but noteworthy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yong; Gao, Quanli; Lin, Jizhen; Zhang, Qinxian; Xu, Benling; Song, Yongping

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a diminished platelet count, an autoimmune condition with antibodies against platelets and an increased tendency to bleed. The association between ITP and solid tumors is uncommon. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy is a well tolerated and promising cancer treatment with minimal toxicity. For the first time, CIK cell therapy was reported to be followed by ITP. The mechanism through which CIK induces ITP remains unclear. Imbalanced ratio of Th cells, decreased numbers or impaired function of Treg cells and excessive secretion of cytokines inducing abnormal activation of B cells may be among the possible reasons. Therefore, a better understanding of this rare condition will require further investigation of these cases. PMID:27485074

  13. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Cytokine Reduction in the Treatment of Joint Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Martel-Pelletier, J.; Otterness, I. G.; Pelletier, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The destruction of joints caused by rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis is characterized by an imbalance of enzyme catalysed cartilage breakdown and regeneration. A complex cytokine network perpetuates joint conditions by direct regulation of metalloproteases, by indirect recruitment of cells that secrete degradative enzymes, and by inhibition of reparative processes. The destructive action of cytokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α can be modulated at multiple points associated either with cytokine production or with cytokine action. Potential agents for cytokine reduction include selective anti-cytokine antibodies, anticytokine receptor antibodies, cytokine receptor antagonist proteins, and soluble and chimeric cytokine receptor molecules. Pharmacologic regulation of IL-1 and TNFα remain primary targets for treatment of arthritis, and results of early clinical trials are promising. However, the results of long-term clinical trials will be required to support the value of anti-cytokine therapy in treatment of arthritis. PMID:18472950

  15. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  16. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  17. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  18. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  19. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  20. Current status and challenges of cytokine pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Zídek, Z; Anzenbacher, P; Kmoníčková, E

    2009-01-01

    The major concern of pharmacology about cytokines has originated from plentiful data showing association between gross changes in their production and pathophysiological processes. Despite the enigmatic role of cytokines in diseases, a number of them have become a subject of cytokine and anti-cytokine immunotherapies. Production of cytokines can be influenced by many endogenous and exogenous stimuli including drugs. Cells of the immune system, such as macrophages and lymphocytes, are richly endowed with receptors for the mediators of physiological functions, such as biogenic amines, adenosine, prostanoids, steroids, etc. Drugs, agonists or antagonists of these receptors can directly or indirectly up- and down-regulate secretion of cytokines and expression of cytokine receptors. Vice versa, cytokines interfere with drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics through the interactions with cytochrome P450 and multiple drug resistance proteins. The aim of the review is to encourage more intensive studies in these fields of cytokine pharmacology. It also outlines major areas of searching promising candidates for immunotherapeutic interventions. PMID:19371342

  1. Role of adipose secreted factors and kisspeptin in the metabolic control of gonadotropin secretion and puberty

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors secreted by adipose tissue continue to be discovered. Evidence indicates a strong link between neural influences and adipocyte expression and secretion of a wide array of cytokines, neurotrophic factors, growth factors, binding proteins, and neuropeptides. These “adipokines” are linked to im...

  2. Three-Dimensional Gradients of Cytokine Signaling between T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thurley, Kevin; Gerecht, Daniel; Friedmann, Elfriede; Höfer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune responses are regulated by diffusible mediators, the cytokines, which act at sub-nanomolar concentrations. The spatial range of cytokine communication is a crucial, yet poorly understood, functional property. Both containment of cytokine action in narrow junctions between immune cells (immunological synapses) and global signaling throughout entire lymph nodes have been proposed, but the conditions under which they might occur are not clear. Here we analyze spatially three-dimensional reaction-diffusion models for the dynamics of cytokine signaling at two successive scales: in immunological synapses and in dense multicellular environments. For realistic parameter values, we observe local spatial gradients, with the cytokine concentration around secreting cells decaying sharply across only a few cell diameters. Focusing on the well-characterized T-cell cytokine interleukin-2, we show how cytokine secretion and competitive uptake determine this signaling range. Uptake is shaped locally by the geometry of the immunological synapse. However, even for narrow synapses, which favor intrasynaptic cytokine consumption, escape fluxes into the extrasynaptic space are expected to be substantial (≥20% of secretion). Hence paracrine signaling will generally extend beyond the synapse but can be limited to cellular microenvironments through uptake by target cells or strong competitors, such as regulatory T cells. By contrast, long-range cytokine signaling requires a high density of cytokine producers or weak consumption (e.g., by sparsely distributed target cells). Thus in a physiological setting, cytokine gradients between cells, and not bulk-phase concentrations, are crucial for cell-to-cell communication, emphasizing the need for spatially resolved data on cytokine signaling. PMID:25923703

  3. PD-1 Expression and Cytokine Secretion Profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Subsets; Potential Correlates of Containment in HIV-TB Co-Infection.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Katrina M; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S; Kapembwa, Moses S; Kon, Onn M; Sampson, Robert D; Taylor, Graham P; Lalvani, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    HIV co-infection is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB) providing a powerful model in which to dissect out defective, protective and dysfunctional Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific immune responses. To identify the changes induced by HIV co-infection we compared MTB-specific CD4+ responses in subjects with active TB and latent TB infection (LTBI), with and without HIV co-infection. CD4+ T-cell subsets producing interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and expressing CD279 (PD-1) were measured using polychromatic flow-cytometry. HIV-TB co-infection was consistently and independently associated with a reduced frequency of CD4+ IFN-γ and IL-2-dual secreting T-cells and the proportion correlated inversely with HIV viral load (VL). The impact of HIV co-infection on this key MTB-specific T-cell subset identifies them as a potential correlate of mycobacterial immune containment. The percentage of MTB-specific IFN-γ-secreting T-cell subsets that expressed PD-1 was increased in active TB with HIV co-infection and correlated with VL. This identifies a novel correlate of dysregulated immunity to MTB, which may in part explain the paucity of inflammatory response in the face of mycobacterial dissemination that characterizes active TB with HIV co-infection. PMID:26756579

  4. PD-1 Expression and Cytokine Secretion Profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Subsets; Potential Correlates of Containment in HIV-TB Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    HIV co-infection is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB) providing a powerful model in which to dissect out defective, protective and dysfunctional Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific immune responses. To identify the changes induced by HIV co-infection we compared MTB-specific CD4+ responses in subjects with active TB and latent TB infection (LTBI), with and without HIV co-infection. CD4+ T-cell subsets producing interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and expressing CD279 (PD-1) were measured using polychromatic flow-cytometry. HIV-TB co-infection was consistently and independently associated with a reduced frequency of CD4+ IFN-γ and IL-2-dual secreting T-cells and the proportion correlated inversely with HIV viral load (VL). The impact of HIV co-infection on this key MTB-specific T-cell subset identifies them as a potential correlate of mycobacterial immune containment. The percentage of MTB-specific IFN-γ-secreting T-cell subsets that expressed PD-1 was increased in active TB with HIV co-infection and correlated with VL. This identifies a novel correlate of dysregulated immunity to MTB, which may in part explain the paucity of inflammatory response in the face of mycobacterial dissemination that characterizes active TB with HIV co-infection. PMID:26756579

  5. In vitro beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) secretion by normal and leukaemic B-cells: effects of recombinant cytokines and evidence for a differential response to the combined stimulus of phorbol ester and calcium ionophore.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R. A.; Drexler, H. G.; Gignac, S. M.; Child, J. A.; Scott, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the increasing therapeutic use of immunoregulatory agents and the potential effects on cellular function, we examined the modulation of in vitro beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) production rates by 'normal' tonsil and leukaemic B-cells in response to a number of these agents. Tonsil B-cells responded to phorbol ester (TPA) by an increased beta 2m production rate, which was further enhanced by the combined stimuli of TPA plus the calcium ionophore A23187. In marked contrast, however, lymphocytes from a majority (8/11) of B-cell malignancies showed a suppression of the TPA-induced beta 2m production rate in response to the combined TPA/A23187 stimulus. These different responses of 'normal' and malignant B-cells were not apparent when IgM production rates were examined. The recombinant cytokines IL-1, IL-2, IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma and TNF also enhanced beta 2m production rates of both normal and leukaemic B-cells, but to a considerably lesser extent than did TPA. Bryostatin-1 increased beta 2m production to a level intermediate between that obtained by TPA and the cytokines. It is suggested that beta 2m production rates may correspond to the degree of B-cell differentiation, and/or to the degree of cellular 'activation'. The results further indicate that the in vitro measurement of beta 2m production provides a different index of the cellular response than that obtained by the conventional measurement of IgM production. PMID:2110813

  6. Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells suppress proliferation of PHA-activated lymphocytes in vitro by inducing CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RA(+) regulatory T cell production and modulating cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongna; Sun, Jinhua; Li, Yan; Duan, Wei-Ming; Bi, Jianzhong; Qu, Tingyu

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidate cells for therapeutic application in autoimmune diseases due to their immunomodulatory properties. Unused human umbilical cords (UC) offer an abundant and noninvasive source of MSCs without ethical issues and are emerging as a valuable alternative to bone marrow tissue for producing MSCs. We thus investigated the immunomodulation effect of umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs) on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), T cells in particular, in a co-culture system. We found that UC-MSCs efficiently suppressed the proliferation of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMCs (p<0.01). Kinetic analysis revealed that UC-MSCs primarily inhibited the division of generation 3 (G3) and 4 (G4) of PBMCs. In addition, UC-MSCs augmented the expression of CD127(+) and CD45RA(+) but reduced the expression of CD25(+) in PBMCs stimulated by PHA (p<0.05). Furthermore, UC-MSCs inhibited PHA-resulted increase in the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low/-) Tregs significantly (p<0.01) but augmented PHA-resulted increase in the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RA(+) Tregs to about three times in PBMCs. The levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines, PEG2, TGF-β, and IL-10 were greatly up-regulated, accompanied by a significant down-regulation of pro-inflammatory IFN-γ in the co-culture (p<0.01). Our results showed that UC-MSCs are able to suppress mitogen-induced PBMC activation and proliferation in vitro by altering T lymphocyte phenotypes, increasing the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RA(+) Tregs, and modulating the associated cytokine production. Further studies are warranted to investigate the therapeutic potential of UC-MSCs in immunologically-diseased conditions. PMID:26774852

  7. Single-Cell Cytokine Profiling to Investigate Cellular Functional Diversity in Hematopoietic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan J; Kwak, Minsuk; Fan, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell analysis of cytokine production is increasingly recognized as an important method to understand the inflammatory microenvironment and hematopoietic disease state. Certain cytokines are critical to the regulation of lineage specification, and the aberrant production of these cytokines can contribute to lineage reprogramming. Here, we describe of a platform combining subnanoliter microchambers and a high-density antibody barcode array for the study of single-cell cytokine secretions in hematopoietic cancer cell populations. PMID:27581152

  8. Lipidomic profiling in Crohn's disease: Abnormalities in phosphatidylinositols, with preservation of ceramide, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine composition

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Gavin W.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Han, Xianlin; Koster, Grielof; Bielawski, Jacek; Goss, Victoria; Smith, Philip J.; Rahman, Farooq Z.; Vega, Roser; Bloom, Stuart L.; Walker, Ann P.; Postle, Anthony D.; Segal, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition largely affecting the terminal ileum and large bowel. A contributing cause is the failure of an adequate acute inflammatory response as a result of impaired secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages. This defective secretion arises from aberrant vesicle trafficking, misdirecting the cytokines to lysosomal degradation. Aberrant intestinal permeability is also well-established in Crohn's disease. Both the disordered vesicle trafficking and increased bowel permeability could result from abnormal lipid composition. We thus measured the sphingo- and phospholipid composition of macrophages, using mass spectrometry and stable isotope labelling approaches. Stimulation of macrophages with heat-killed Escherichia coli resulted in three main changes; a significant reduction in the amount of individual ceramide species, an altered composition of phosphatidylcholine, and an increased rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis in macrophages. These changes were observed in macrophages from both healthy control individuals and patients with Crohn's disease. The only difference detected between control and Crohn's disease macrophages was a reduced proportion of newly-synthesised phosphatidylinositol 16:0/18:1 over a defined time period. Shotgun lipidomics analysis of macroscopically non-inflamed ileal biopsies showed a significant decrease in this same lipid species with overall preservation of sphingolipid, phospholipid and cholesterol composition. PMID:22728312

  9. Increased circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and imbalanced regulatory T-cell cytokines production in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Juliana Cristina; Azor, Mayce Helena; Nojima, Viviane Yoshimi; Lourenço, Francinelson Duarte; Prearo, Erica; Maruta, Celina Wakisaka; Rivitti, Evandro Ararigbóia; da Silva Duarte, Alberto José; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2008-10-01

    The immunologic characterization of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), mainly regarding cytokine profile needs more investigation. We examined circulating inflammatory cytokine levels, T-cell induced secretion, and cytokine mRNA expression in patients with CIU subjected to the intradermal autologous serum skin test (ASST). Increased levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-12p70, and IL-6 have been observed in most of patients with CIU, together with an enhancement of IL-2 secretion following T-cell stimulation. Highlighting the inflammatory profile in CIU found in ASST positive, is the enhanced B-cell proliferative responsiveness and increased IL-17 secretion levels. ASST-positive patients also exhibited impaired IL-4 secretion associated with increased IL-10 production. Altered cytokine expression in patients with ASST-negative, was the down-modulation of spontaneous IL-10 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our findings support the concept of immunologic dysregulation in CIU, revealing a systemic inflammatory profile associated with disturbed cytokine production by T cells, mainly related to IL-17 and IL-10 production. PMID:18586117

  10. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  11. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  12. Dual-color ELISPOT assay for analyzing cytokine balance.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishida, Mikio

    2005-01-01

    A dual-color enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay enabled us to analyze three kinds of cytokine-secreting cells simultaneously. T helper (Th) cells can be subdivided into at least two distinct functional subsets based on their cytokine secretion profiles. The first type of clones (Th1) produces interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 or IL-5. The second type of clones (Th2) produces IL-4 and IL-5 but not IL-2 or IFN-gamma. Furthermore, the presence of the third type (Th0) cell, which is a precursor of Th1 or Th2 cells, has been demonstrated to produce both Th1- and Th2-type cytokines. The dual-color ELISPOT assay is developed to differentiate these three subtypes of Th cells in an identical well. In the system, the red spots corresponding to IL-2-secreting cells (Th1) were developed with horseradish peroxidase and amino-ethyl-carbazole/H2O2. The light blue spots corresponding to IL-4-secreting cells (Th2) were developed with alkaline phosphatase and Vector blue (chromogenic substrate for alkaline phosphatase). The mixed colored (indigo) spots corresponding to both kinds of cytokine-secreting cells (Th0 cells) were developed with both chromogenic substrates. With this system, we could detect the IL-2- and/or IL-4-secreting cells simultaneously in a murine spleen cell or human peripheral mononuclear cell preparation. PMID:15937358

  13. Constitutive secretion of chemokines by cultured human trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Shifera, Amde Selassie; Trivedi, Sheetal; Chau, Phuonglan; Bonnemaison, Lucia H; Iguchi, Rumiko; Alvarado, Jorge A

    2010-07-01

    Trabecular meshwork endothelial (TME) cells secrete a number of factors, such as enzymes and cytokines, which modulate the functions of the cells and the extracellular matrix of the conventional aqueous outflow pathway. TME cells usually secrete these factors in response to stimuli such as mechanical stretching, laser irradiation and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Here, we report that cultured human TME cells isolated from two non-glaucomatous individuals secrete significant quantities of the chemotactic cytokines IL8, CXCL6 and MCP1 in the absence of any stimulation. The secretion of these chemokines was augmented by treatment with the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFalpha and IL1beta. By way of comparison, there was little or very low production of the three chemokines by human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cells in the absence of stimulation. Our findings provide support to our recent observations that monocytes, presumably under the influence of chemotactic signals, circulate through the trabecular meshwork in the normal state and also that cytokines regulate the permeability of Schlemm's canal endothelial cells. In addition, the fact that normal TME cells constitutively secrete chemotactic cytokines strengthens the notion that cytokines play a key role in the homeostasis of the outflow of the aqueous humor and, possibly, in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. PMID:20403352

  14. Secret Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridolfi, Kerry

    1997-01-01

    Argues that children are as deep as the ocean, with secret places inside of them waiting to be opened. Notes that it is powerful for students to learn they can make sense of the world through words, and describes inviting them into poetry as they read poetry, create poetry packets, and write and revise poems. (SR)

  15. [Abnormality in bone metabolism after burn].

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Xie, W G

    2016-08-20

    Burn causes bone metabolic abnormality in most cases, including the changes in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, bone mass loss, and bone absorption, which results in decreased bone mineral density. These changes are sustainable for many years after burn and even cause growth retardation in burned children. The mechanisms of bone metabolic abnormality after burn include the increasing glucocorticoids due to stress response, a variety of cytokines and inflammatory medium due to inflammatory response, vitamin D deficiency, hypoparathyroidism, and bone loss due to long-term lying in bed. This article reviews the pathogenesis and regularity of bone metabolic abnormality after burn, the relationship between bone metabolic abnormality and burn area/depth, and the treatment of bone metabolic abnormality, etc. and discusses the research directions in the future. PMID:27562160

  16. Role of macrophage secretions on rat polycystic ovary: its effect on apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Florencia; Motta, Alicia; Acosta, Mariano; Mohamed, Fabian; Oliveros, Liliana; Forneris, Myriam

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome is the most common endocrine disorder among women of reproductive age. Little is known about its etiology, although the evidence suggests an intrinsic ovarian abnormality in which endocrine, metabolic, neural and immune factors would be involved. In this work, the effects of macrophage (MO) secretion on ovarian apoptosis in a polycystic ovary syndrome rat model (PCO rat) induced by estradiol valerate are studied. Spleen MO secretions were used to stimulate ovaries and ovarian interstitial and granulosa cells from both PCO and control rats. Ovarian hormones and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured by RIA; ovarian mRNA levels of Bax, Bcl2 and NFkB by RT-PCR; and ovarian inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by western blot. The number of apoptotic cells was evaluated by TUNEL. In the PCO ovary, the MO secretions from PCO rats increased the Bax and NFkB mRNA expressions and increased TUNEL staining in both granulosa and theca cells. In addition, the PCO MO secretions produced a decrease of nitric oxide release, iNOS protein level and PGE2 content in the PCO ovary, and it also induced an increase of androstenedione production by PCO interstitial cells, in comparison with control MO secretions. Considering these results and knowing that testosterone stimulates tumour necrosis factor-α production by PCO MO modifying ovarian response by increasing androstenedione, it is reasonable to suggest that the increase of androgens stimulated in ovarian cells by PCO MO secretions could in turn stimulate the cytokine production from MO, thus maintaining an apoptotic vicious cycle in the PCO ovary. PMID:26264225

  17. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Cai, Xianbin; Hayashi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases. PMID:26549942

  18. Aberrant cytokine production by non-malignant cells in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative tumors and response to JAK inhibitor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Belver, Laura; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Kleppe, Kwak, and collegues use detailed cytokine profiling analyses to investigate the role of aberrant pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Their analyses implicate constitutive activation of STAT3 in both malignant and non-malignant bone marrow cell populations as a driver of aberrant cytokine secretion and as a cellular target mediating the therapeutic activity of ruxolitinib. PMID:25749974

  19. [The role of monocytes/macrophages and their cytokines in the development of immunosuppression after severe injury].

    PubMed

    Jedynak, Monika; Siemiatkowski, Andrzej

    2002-09-01

    Despite new generations of antibiotics and great improvement in the fields of rescue and modern intensive care medicine, sepsis remains one of the most frequent causes of complications and death in severely injured patients. Shock, bacterial colonization, invasive methods of treatment and immune mechanisms are reported to be responsible for the increased susceptibility of patients to sepsis after trauma. Posttraumatic immune abnormalities consist of two mechanistic entities: inappropriately hyperactive inflammatory processes and profound depression of cell-mediated immune function. Monocytes/macrophages carry out the fundamental protective functions of ingesting and killing invading microorganisms. Macrophages play a central role in the immune response by presenting antigens to lymphocytes, modulating T cell functions and by secreting a large number of inflammatory mediators. Macrophage-derived cytokines play key roles in the amplification of both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Depression of macrophage function appears to have serious deleterious effects in critically injured patients and has been associated with increased mortality. Phagocytosis, oxidative burst activity and cytokine secretion are impaired in macrophages early after traumatic injury. However, a widely accepted clinical treatment for post-injury immunosuppression does not currently exist. As our understanding of the pathogenesis of injury-induced immunosuppression progresses, our treatment approaches will likely improve. PMID:12474579

  20. Cytokines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sylvia; Margolin, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Cytokines are molecular messengers that allow the cells of the immune system to communicate with one another to generate a coordinated, robust, but self-limited response to a target antigen. The growing interest over the past two decades in harnessing the immune system to eradicate cancer has been accompanied by heightened efforts to characterize cytokines and exploit their vast signaling networks to develop cancer treatments. The goal of this paper is to review the major cytokines involved in cancer immunotherapy and discuss their basic biology and clinical applications. The paper will also describe new cytokines in pre-clinical development, combinations of biological agents, novel delivery mechanisms, and potential directions for future investigation using cytokines. PMID:24213115

  1. Antiresistin RNA Oligonucleotide Ameliorates Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice through Attenuating Proinflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Jin, Xing Liang; Lao, Weiguo; Kim, Jane; Xiao, Linda; Qu, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether inhibition of resistin by a synthetic antiresistin RNA (oligonucleotide) oligo ameliorates metabolic and histological abnormalities in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) induced by high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. The antiresistin RNA oligo and a scrambled control oligo (25 mg/kg of body weight) were i.p. injected to HFD mice. Serum metabolic parameters and hepatic enzymes were measured after 4-week treatment. The treatment significantly reduced epididymal fat and attenuated the elevated serum resistin, cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin with an improved glucose tolerance test. Antiresistin RNA oligo also normalized serum AST and ALT levels with improved pathohistology of NAFLD. Immunoblotting and qRT-PCR revealed that decreased protein and mRNA expression of resistin in fat and liver tissues of the treated mice were associated with reduction of adipose TNF-α and IL-6 expression and secretion into circulation. mRNA and protein expression of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) were also significantly decreased in the treated mice. Our results suggest that resistin may exacerbate NAFLD in metabolic syndrome through upregulating inflammatory cytokines and hepatic PEPCK and SREBP-1c. Antiresistin RNA oligo ameliorated metabolic abnormalities and histopathology of NAFLD through attenuating proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:25922835

  2. Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Sabina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to the involvement of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SZ). Abnormalities affecting several ECM components, including Reelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), have been described in subjects with this disease. Solid evidence supports the involvement of Reelin, an ECM glycoprotein involved in corticogenesis, synaptic functions and glutamate NMDA receptor regulation, expressed prevalently in distinct populations of GABAergic neurons, which secrete it into the ECM. Marked changes of Reelin expression in SZ have typically been reported in association with GABA-related abnormalities in subjects with SZ and bipolar disorder. Recent findings from our group point to substantial abnormalities affecting CSPGs, a main ECM component, in the amygdala and entorhinal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder. Striking increases of glial cells expressing CSPGs were accompanied by reductions of perineuronal nets, CSPG- and Reelin-enriched ECM aggregates enveloping distinct neuronal populations. CSPGs developmental and adult functions, including neuronal migration, axon guidance, synaptic and neurotransmission regulation are highly relevant to the pathophysiology of SZ. Together with reports of anomalies affecting several other ECM components, these findings point to the ECM as a key component of the pathology of SZ. We propose that ECM abnormalities may contribute to several aspects of the pathophysiology of this disease, including disrupted connectivity and neuronal migration, synaptic anomalies and altered GABAergic, glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. PMID:21856318

  3. Cytokine inhibition in the treatment of COPD.

    PubMed

    Caramori, Gaetano; Adcock, Ian M; Di Stefano, Antonino; Chung, Kian Fan

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines play an important part in many pathobiological processes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including the chronic inflammatory process, emphysema, and altered innate immune response. Proinflammatory cytokines of potential importance include tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, IL-32, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and growth factors such as transforming growth factor-β. The current objectives of COPD treatment are to reduce symptoms, and to prevent and reduce the number of exacerbations. While current treatments achieve these goals to a certain extent, preventing the decline in lung function is not currently achievable. In addition, reversal of corticosteroid insensitivity and control of the fibrotic process while reducing the emphysematous process could also be controlled by specific cytokines. The abnormal pathobiological process of COPD may contribute to these fundamental characteristics of COPD, and therefore targeting cytokines involved may be a fruitful endeavor. Although there has been much work that has implicated various cytokines as potentially playing an important role in COPD, there have been very few studies that have examined the effect of specific cytokine blockade in COPD. The two largest studies that have been reported in the literature involve the use of blocking antibody to TNFα and CXCL8 (IL-8), and neither has provided benefit. Blocking the actions of CXCL8 through its CXCR2 receptor blockade was not successful either. Studies of antibodies against IL-17, IL-18, IL-1β, and TSLP are currently either being undertaken or planned. There is a need to carefully phenotype COPD and discover good biomarkers of drug efficacy for each specific target. Specific groups of COPD patients should be targeted with specific anticytokine therapy if there is evidence of high expression of that cytokine and there are features of the clinical expression of COPD that will respond

  4. Whole genome expression profiling and screening for differentially expressed cytokine genes in human bone marrow endothelial cells treated with humoral inhibitors in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Sun, Wang; Wang, Xianqi; Jia, Xu; Ma, Biao; Chang, Yu; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2013-11-01

    Bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs) are important components of the hematopoietic microenvironment in bone marrow, and they can secrete several types of cytokines to regulate the functions of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. To date, it is unknown whether BMECs undergo functional changes and lead to hematopoietic abnormalities in cases of liver cirrhosis (LC). In the present study, whole genome microarray analysis was carried out to detect differentially expressed genes in human BMECs treated for 48 h with medium supplemented with 20% pooled sera from 26 patients with LC or 10 healthy volunteers as the control group. A total of 1,106 upregulated genes and 766 downregulated genes were identified. In Gene Ontology analysis, the most significant categories of genes were revealed. A large number of the upregulated genes were involved in processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, apoptosis and cellular response to stimuli and the downregulated genes were involved in the negative regulation of secretion, angiogenesis, blood vessel development and cell growth. Pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes were either cell adhesion molecules or parts of the apoptotic signaling pathway and the downregulated genes were involved in the Wnt signaling pathway and MAPK signaling pathway. These were the pathways with the highest enrichment scores. The results of apoptosis assays revealed that the humoral inhibitors in the sera of patients with LC induced the apoptosis of BMECs, which confirmed the accuracy of bioinformatic analysis. Moreover, we screened and verified 21 differentially expressed cytokine genes [transforming growth factor (TGF)B1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)B, TNF receptor superfamily, member 11b (TNFRSF11B), TNF (ligand) superfamily, member 13b (TNFSF13B), interleukin (IL)1A, IL6, IL11, IL17C, IL24, family with sequence similarity 3, member B (FAM3B), Fas ligand (FASLG), matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)3, MMP15, vitronectin (VTN), insulin-like growth factor

  5. [Cytokines and osteogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Makoto; Ozono, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Many cytokines associate with proliferation, differentiation and activation of osteoblasts which have an important role in osteogenesis. TGF-β, BMP, IGF, FGF, Hedgehog, Notch, IL and WNT signaling pathways and their inhibitors have been revealed to correlate to osteogenesis, and those gene mutations have been shown to cause various bone disorders. It has been suggested that there are common pathways or crosstalk in these cytokine signaling each other, but mechanism of their complicated regulation on osteogenesis has been unclear. It was expected that the knowledge about these cytokines will apply to clinical therapies of bone diseases. PMID:24870835

  6. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a cytokine/chemokine-mediated disorder?

    PubMed

    Garabedian, Lara; Struyf, Sofie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Sozzani, Silvano; Van Damme, Jo; Laureys, Geneviève

    2011-09-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation and/or proliferation of cells with a Langerhans cell phenotype. Although no clear cause of LCH has been identified, it has been postulated that LCH might be the consequence of an immune dysregulation, causing Langerhans cells to migrate to and accumulate at various sites. Production of cytokines and chemokines is a central feature of immune regulation. Cytokines are abundantly present within LCH lesions. We review here the potential role of cytokines and chemokines in the pathogenesis of LCH. The type, distribution, and number of different cytokines released within lesions can provide clues to the possible aetiology of LCH and, ultimately, might offer therapeutic possibilities using recombinant cytokines or antagonists for this disorder. PMID:22001902

  7. [Immunostimulating drugs and cytokines].

    PubMed

    Lehners, Nicola; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Raab, Marc S

    2011-11-01

    Cytokines are essential regulators of hematopoesis and the immune system. Genetic engineering of recombinant cytokines has facilitated their implementation in many clinical areas. In the field of oncology the granulopoetic human growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF are of particular importance. They can be applied to prevent chemotherapy induced neutropenia. Furthermore, they allow for mobilization of hematopoetic stem cells in order to obtain peripheral blood stem cell transplants. Another class of cytokines, the interferons, possess immunomodulating, antiproliferative, and antiviral properties. While the significance of interferon alfa as an antitumor agent is dwindling, it still plays a very important role in the therapy of chronic hepatitis b and c. Interferon beta is successfully used to treat multiple sclerosis. Among the heterogenous group of interleukines in particular interleukin 2 has reached clinical practice as an immunostimulating agent in the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Many other cytokines have yet to undergo clinical trials. PMID:22045528

  8. Amphiregulin-a Th2 cytokine enhancing resistance to nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intestinal nematode infections remain a major health threat to humans despite improved sanitation. Protection is mainly mediated by Type 2-biased immune responses, characterized by Th2 lymphocytes and other cells secreting a set of cytokines including Interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13. I...

  9. Uroepithelial cells are part of a mucosal cytokine network.

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, S; Agace, W; Svensson, M; Sjögren, A C; Ceska, M; Svanborg, C

    1994-01-01

    This study compared the cytokine production of uroepithelial cell lines in response to gram-negative bacteria and inflammatory cytokines. Human kidney (A498) and bladder (J82) epithelial cell lines were stimulated with either Escherichia coli Hu734, interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Supernatant samples were removed, and the RNA was extracted from cells at 0, 2, 6, and 24 h. The secreted cytokine levels were determined by bioassay or immunoassay; mRNA was examined by reverse transcription-PCR. The two cell lines secreted IL-6 and IL-8 constitutively. IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA were constitutively produced in both cell lines; IL-1 beta mRNA was detected in J82 cells. IL-1 alpha induced significantly higher levels of IL-6 secretion than did E. coli Hu734 or TNF-alpha. IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha induced significantly higher levels of IL-8 secretion than did E. coli Hu734. Secreted IL-1 beta was not detected; IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha were not detected above the levels used for stimulation. IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8 mRNAs were detected in both cell lines after exposure to the stimulants. TNF-alpha mRNA was occasionally detected in the J82 cell line after TNF-alpha stimulation. Cytokine (IL-6 and IL-8) and control (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase [G3PDH] and beta-actin) mRNA concentrations were quantitated with internal PCR standards. Cytokine mRNA levels relative to beta-actin mRNA levels were the highest in E. coli-stimulated cells. In comparison, the cytokine mRNA levels relative to G3PDH mRNA levels were the highest in IL-1 alpha-stimulated cells. beta-Actin mRNA levels decreased after bacterial stimulation but not after cytokine stimulation, while G3PDH mRNA levels increased in response to all of the stimulants tested. These results suggested that E. coli Hu734 lowered the beta-actin mRNA levels in uroepithelial cells, thus distorting the IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels relative to this control. In summary, E. coli IL

  10. Cytokines, phagocytes, and pentoxifylline.

    PubMed

    Mandell, G L

    1995-01-01

    Phagocytic cells, such as polymorphonuclear neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, are essential for defense against infection caused by a variety of microorganisms. The mechanisms used by these cells to destroy microbes comprise a potent oxidative armamentarium including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hypochlorous acid. In addition, granule contents such as proteolytic enzymes, lysozyme, lactoferrin, and myeloperoxidase are released into the phagosome to destroy ingested microorganisms. Inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6, enhance the phagocytic and microbicidal activity of the cells and increase their stickiness. It has been demonstrated in a variety of animal and clinical studies that activated phagocytes can damage the host they are designed to protect, using the mechanisms described above. Alkylxanthines, including pentoxifylline, are potent inhibitors of this inflammatory damage by two major actions: (a) reduction of the production of inflammatory cytokines (especially TNF) by phagocytes stimulated with a variety of microbial products (e.g., endotoxin); and (b) reversal of the effect of these cytokines on phagocytes. Thus, pentoxifylline counteracts the following effects of inflammatory cytokines on phagocytes: increased adherence, shape change resulting in larger size and rigidity, increased oxidative burst, priming for an enhanced oxidative burst, increased degranulation, and decreased chemotactic movement. In addition, these activities synergize with the normal anti-inflammatory mediator adenosine. Alkylxanthines have the potential to be effective therapy for conditions in which inflammatory cytokines and phagocytes cause damage, including the sepsis syndrome, ARDS, AIDS, and arthritis. PMID:8699856

  11. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  12. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  13. Altered cytokine network in gestational diabetes mellitus affects maternal insulin and placental-fetal development.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Lauren; Belkacemi, Louiza

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by an altered inflammatory profile, compared to the non-pregnant state with an adequate balance between pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines needed for normal development. Cytokines are small secreted proteins expressed mainly in immunocompetent cells in the reproductive system. From early developmental stages onward, the secretory activity of placenta cells clearly contributes to increase local as well as systemic levels of cytokines. The placental production of cytokines may affect mother and fetus independently. In turn because of this unique position at the maternal fetal interface, the placenta is also exposed to the regulatory influence of cytokines from maternal and fetal circulations, and hence, may be affected by changes in any of these. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an overall alteration of the cytokine network. This review discusses the changes that occur in cytokines post GDM and their negative effects on maternal insulin and placental-fetal development. PMID:27230834

  14. RNAi Screen Reveals Potentially Novel Roles of Cytokines in Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yejing; Waldemer, Rachel J.; Nalluri, Ramakrishna; Nuzzi, Paul D.; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are cell-secreted signaling molecules that modulate various cellular functions, with the best-characterized roles in immune responses. The expression of numerous cytokines in skeletal muscle tissues and muscle cells has been reported, but their function in skeletal myogenesis, the formation of skeletal muscle, has been largely underexplored. To systematically examine the potential roles of cytokines in skeletal myogenesis, we undertook an RNAi screen of 134 mouse cytokine genes for their involvement in the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. Our results have uncovered 29 cytokines as strong candidates for novel myogenic regulators, potentially conferring positive and negative regulation at distinct stages of myogenesis. These candidates represent a diverse collection of cytokine families, including interleukins, TNF-related factors, and chemokines. Our findings suggest the fundamental importance of cytokines in the cell-autonomous regulation of myoblast differentiation, and may facilitate future identification of novel therapeutic targets for improving muscle regeneration and growth in health and diseases. PMID:23844157

  15. Divergent T-Cell Cytokine Patterns in Inflammatory Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. K.; Seipelt, E.; Sieper, J.

    1994-08-01

    A major immunoregulatory mechanism in inflammatory infections and allergic diseases is the control of the balance of cytokines secreted by Th1/Th2 subsets of T helper (Th) cells. This might also be true in autoimmune diseases; a Th2 pattern that prevents an effective immune response in infections with intracellular bacteria may favor immunosuppression in autoimmune diseases. The pattern of cytokine expression was compared in the synovial tissue from patients with a typical autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and with a disorder with similar synovial pathology but driven by persisting exogenous antigen, reactive arthritis. We screened 12 rheumatoid and 9 reactive arthritis synovial tissues by PCR and in situ hybridization for their expression of T-cell cytokines. The cytokine pattern differs significantly between the two diseases; rheumatoid arthritis samples express a Th1-like pattern whereas in reactive arthritis interferon γ expression is accompanied by that of interleukin 4. Studying the expression of cytokines by in situ hybridization confirmed the results found by PCR; they also show an extremely low frequency of cytokine-transcribing cells. In a double-staining experiment, it was demonstrated that interleukin 4 is made by CD4 cells. These experiments favor the possibility of therapeutic intervention in inflammatory rheumatic diseases by means of inhibitory cytokines.

  16. Cytokines and antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ludmila; Pawelec, Graham

    2003-06-01

    Currently, the notion of immunosurveillance against tumors is enjoying something of a renaissance. Even if we still refuse to accept that tumors arising in the normal host are unable to trigger an immune response because of the lack of initiation ("danger") signals, there is no doubt that the immune system can be manipulated experimentally and by implication therapeutically to exert anti-tumor effects. For this activity to be successful, the appropriate cytokine milieu has to be provided, making cytokine manipulation central to immunotherapy. On the other hand, the major hurdle currently preventing successful immunotherapy is the ability of tumors to evolve resistant variants under the pressure of immune selection. Here, too, the cytokine milieu plays an essential role. The purpose of this brief review is to consider the current status of the application of cytokines in facilitating antitumor immunity, as well their role in inhibiting responses to tumors. Clearly, encouraging the former but preventing the latter will be the key to the effective clinical application of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:12779349

  17. Th1/Th2 cytokine expression in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y L; Zhang, F Q; Hao, F Q

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), an important complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), is not well understood. T helper cell balance (Th1/Th2) is involved in various autoimmune diseases; however, its role in DR is not understood. This study explores changes in Th1 and Th2 cytokine expression during DR. Blood samples were collected from 25 healthy volunteers (normal control group), 35 patients with type 2 DM (T2DM group) without DR, and 30 cases of T2DM patients with DR (DR group). Real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of IL-2 and TNF-α, secreted from Th1 cells, and of IL-4 and IL-10, secreted from Th2 cells. We used ELISA to detect cytokine expression in serum to analyze the correlation between Th1 and Th2 cytokines. IL-2 and TNF-αmRNA and protein expression levels in the T2DM and DR groups were significantly higher than in the normal control group (P < 0.05). Compared with the T2DM group, the DR group had higher IL-2 and TNF-αlevels (P < 0.05). IL-4 and IL-10 levels were lower in the DR group compared with the normal and T2DM groups (P < 0.05), while T2DM showed no difference compared with the normal control (P > 0.05). IL-2 and TNF-αwere negatively correlated with IL-4 and IL-10 in the DR group, respectively. We found that Th1 cytokine secretion was higher and Th2 cytokines secretion was lower during DR, leading to a Th1/ Th2 imbalance, suggesting that Th1/Th2 imbalance is a side effect for DR occurrence and development. PMID:27525838

  18. The Dysregulation of Cytokine Networks in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Apostolidis, Sokratis A.; Lieberman, Linda A.; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Crispín, José C.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease associated with chronic immune activation and tissue damage. Organ damage in SLE results from the deposition of immune complexes and the infiltration of activated T cells into susceptible organs. Cytokines are intimately involved in every step of the SLE pathogenesis. Defective immune regulation and uncontrolled lymphocyte activation, as well as increased antigen presenting cell maturation are all influenced by cytokines. Moreover, expansion of local immune responses as well as tissue infiltration by pathogenic cells is instigated by cytokines. In this review, we describe the main cytokine abnormalities reported in SLE and discuss the mechanisms that drive their aberrant production as well as the pathogenic pathways that their presence promotes. PMID:21877904

  19. Insulin and Glucagon Secretion In Vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, Arun S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-duration space flight is associated with many physiological abnormalities in astronauts. In particular, altered regulation of the hormones insulin and glucagon may contribute to metabolic disturbances such as increased blood sugar levels, which if persistently elevated result in toxic effects. These changes are also observed in the highly prevalent disease diabetes, which affects 16 million Americans and consumes over $100 billion in annual healthcare costs. By mimicking the microgravity environment of space in the research laboratory using a NASA-developed bioreactor, one can study the physiology of insulin and glucagon secretion and determine if there are alterations in these cellular processes. The original specific objectives of the project included: (1) growing ('cell culture') of pancreatic islet beta and alpha cells that secrete insulin and glucagon respectively, in the NASA bioreactor; (2) examination of the effects of microgravity on insulin and glucagon secretion; and (3) study of molecular mechanisms of insulin and glucagon secretion if altered by microgravity.

  20. 384-Well Multiplexed Luminex Cytokine Assays for Lead Optimization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huaping; Panemangalore, Reshma; Yarde, Melissa; Zhang, Litao; Cvijic, Mary Ellen

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines serve as a major mechanism of communication between immune cells and are the functional molecules at the end of immune pathways. Abnormalities in cytokines are involved in a wide variety of diseases, including chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. Cytokines are not only direct targets of therapeutics but also important biomarkers for assessing drug efficacy and safety. Traditionally, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were most popular for identifying and quantifying cytokines. However, ELISA is expensive, labor intensive, and low throughput. Here, we report the development of a miniaturized Luminex (Austin, TX) assay platform to establish a panel of high-throughput, multiplexed assays for measuring cytokines in human whole blood. The miniaturized 384-well Luminex assay uses <25% of the assay reagents compared with the 96-well assay. The development and validation of the 384-well Luminex cytokine assays enabled high-throughput screening of compounds in primary cells using cytokines as physiologically relevant readouts. Furthermore, this miniaturized multiplexed technology platform allows for high-throughput biomarker profiling of biofluids from animal studies and patient samples for translational research. PMID:27095819

  1. Chronic fatigue syndrome and circulating cytokines: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Blundell, S; Ray, K K; Buckland, M; White, P D

    2015-11-01

    There has been much interest in the role of the immune system in the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), as CFS may develop following an infection and cytokines are known to induce acute sickness behaviour, with similar symptoms to CFS. Using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses) guidelines, a search was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, Embase and PsycINFO, for CFS related-terms in combination with cytokine-related terms. Cases had to meet established criteria for CFS and be compared with healthy controls. Papers retrieved were assessed for both inclusionary criteria and quality. 38 papers met the inclusionary criteria. The quality of the studies varied. 77 serum or plasma cytokines were measured without immune stimulation. Cases of CFS had significantly elevated concentrations of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) in five out of eight (63%) studies. No other cytokines were present in abnormal concentrations in the majority of studies, although insufficient data were available for some cytokines. Following physical exercise there were no differences in circulating cytokine levels between cases and controls and exercise made no difference to already elevated TGF-β concentrations. The finding of elevated TGF-β concentration, at biologically relevant levels, needs further exploration, but circulating cytokines do not seem to explain the core characteristic of post-exertional fatigue. PMID:26148446

  2. Cytokines in Acute Chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Anuradha; Ghorpade, Ravi P.; Chopra, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute chikungunya (CHIKV) is predominantly an acute onset of excruciatingly painful, self-limiting musculoskeletal (MSK) arbovirus illness and this was further reported by us during the 2006 Indian epidemic [Chopra et al. Epidemiol Infect 2012]. Selected serum cytokines profile in subjects within one month of onset of illness is being presented. Methods Out of 509 clinical CHIKV cases (43% population) identified during a rural population survey, 225 subjects consented blood investigations. 132 examined within 30 days of febrile onset are the study cohort. Anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies tested by immunochromatography and indirect immunofluorescence respectively. Interferons (IFN)-α, -β and -γ, Interferon Gamma-Induced Protein-10 (CXCL-10/IP-10), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin–4 (IL-4) and Interleukin–10 (IL-10) performed by ELISA. Samples collected from neighboring community a year prior to the epidemic used as healthy controls. Results Seropositivity for anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG was 65% and 52% respectively. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-1β showed intense response in early acute phase. Cytokines (particularly TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) was maximum in extended symptomatic phase and remained elevated in recovered subjects. Higher (p<0.05) IFN and IL-4 seen in patients seropositive for anti-CHIKV IgG. Elderly cases (≥65 years) showed elevated cytokines (except IFN) and anti-CHIKV antibodies near similar to younger subjects. Significant correlations (p<0.05) found between cytokines and clinical features (fatigue, low back ache, myalgia) and anti-CHIKV antibodies. Conclusion An intense cytokine milieu was evident in the early and immediate persistent symptomatic phase and in recovered subjects. Early persistent IgM and lower IgG to anti-CHKV and intense Th2 cytokine phenotype seem to be

  3. Cytokine production in peripheral blood cells of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer: elevated Th2/Th9 cytokine production before and reduced Th2 cytokine production after radioactive iodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Simonovic, Snezana Zivancevic; Mihaljevic, Olgica; Majstorovic, Ivana; Djurdjevic, Predrag; Kostic, Irena; Djordjevic, Olivera Milosevic; Teodorovic, Ljiljana Mijatovic

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the regulation of cells of the immune system and also have been implicated in the pathogenesis of malignant diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine profiles in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) before and 7 days after radioactive iodine (131-I) therapy. Cytokine levels were determined in supernatants obtained from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated whole blood cultures of 13 patients with DTC and 13 control subjects. The concentrations of selected cytokines: Th1-interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α); Th2-interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 5 (IL-5), interleukin 13 (IL-13) and interleukin 10 (IL-10); Th9-interleukin-9 (IL-9); and Th17-interleukin 17 (IL-17A) were measured using multiplex cytokine detection systems for Human Th1/Th2/Th9/Th17/Th22. We have shown that peripheral blood cells of DTC patients produce significantly higher concentrations of Th2/Th9 cytokines (IL-5, IL-13 and IL-9) than control subjects. The 131-I therapy led to reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Despite this, the calculated cytokine ratios (Th1/Th2) in DTC patients before and 7 days after 131-I therapy were not different from those in healthy subjects. DTC patients have significantly higher concentrations of Th2/Th9 cytokines (IL-5, IL-13 and IL-9) than control subjects. There is no influence of hypothyroidism or stage of disease on cytokine production in DTC patients before 131-I therapy. The radioactive 131-I therapy leads to reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Additional studies are needed to determine the significance of these findings. PMID:25297452

  4. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  5. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  6. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  7. Rapid Detection of Neutrophil Oxidative Burst Capacity is Predictive of Whole Blood Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Philip J.; Schaub, Leasha J.; Dallelucca, Jurandir J.; Pusateri, Anthony E.; Sheppard, Forest R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Maladaptive immune responses, particularly cytokine and chemokine-driven, are a significant contributor to the deleterious inflammation present in many types of injury and infection. Widely available applications to rapidly assess individual inflammatory capacity could permit identification of patients at risk for exacerbated immune responses and guide therapy. Here we evaluate neutrophil oxidative burst (NOX) capacity measured by plate reader to immuno-type Rhesus Macaques as an acute strategy to rapidly detect inflammatory capacity and predict maladaptive immune responses as assayed by cytokine array. Methods Whole blood was collected from anesthetized Rhesus Macaques (n = 25) and analyzed for plasma cytokine secretion (23-plex Luminex assay) and NOX capacity. For cytokine secretion, paired samples were either unstimulated or ex-vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated (100μg/mL/24h). NOX capacity was measured in dihydrorhodamine-123 loaded samples following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin treatment. Pearson’s test was utilized to correlate NOX capacity with cytokine secretion, p<0.05 considered significant. Results LPS stimulation induced secretion of the inflammatory molecules G-CSF, IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12/23(p40), IL-18, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNFα. Although values were variable, several cytokines correlated with NOX capacity, p-values≤0.0001. Specifically, IL-1β (r = 0.66), IL-6 (r = 0.74), the Th1-polarizing cytokine IL-12/23(p40) (r = 0.78), and TNFα (r = 0.76) were strongly associated with NOX. Conclusion NOX capacity correlated with Th1-polarizing cytokine secretion, indicating its ability to rapidly predict inflammatory responses. These data suggest that NOX capacity may quickly identify patients at risk for maladaptive immune responses and who may benefit from immuno-modulatory therapies. Future studies will assess the in-vivo predictive value of NOX in animal models of immune-mediated pathologies. PMID

  8. A Possible Change Process of Inflammatory Cytokines in the Prolonged Chronic Stress and Its Ultimate Implications for Health

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Rui; Hou, Gonglin; Li, Dan; Yuan, Ti-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Sustained stress triggers series of changes in the brain and the body. At the early stage of stress, the activated hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) axis can upregulate the levels of glucocorticoid (GCs) and catecholamines (CAs), respectively, and then they in turn inhibit the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines directly or indirectly while promoting the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines. At the prolonged stage, the sustained activated HPA demonstrates cortisol-resistance. At the same time, the inflammation related transcription pathway, such as nuclear-factor kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling, may be inhibited. Additionally, the inflammatory cytokines mediate a negative feedback regulation on themselves. Collectively, these regulations may increase the proinflammatory cytokines while decreasing the anti-inflammatory cytokines. This may further activate NF-κB and increase the proinflammation cytokines, which in turn reduce the inflammatory responses, contributing to various diseases. PMID:24995360

  9. Cytokine Therapies in Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Azodi, Shila; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of glycoproteins that coordinate physiological functions. Cytokine deregulation is observed in many neurological diseases. This article reviews current research focused on human clinical trials of cytokine and anticytokine therapies in the treatment of several neurological disease including stroke, neuromuscular diseases, neuroinfectious diseases, demyelinating diseases, and neurobehavioral diseases. This research suggests that cytokine therapy applications may play an important role in offering new strategies for disease modulation and treatment. Further, this research provides insights into the causal link between cytokine deregulation and neurological diseases. PMID:27388288

  10. Cytokines (interleukin-9, IL-17, IL-22, IL-25 and IL-33) and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Rahim; Sherkat, Roya; Hakemi, Mazdak Ganjalikhani; Eskandari, Nahid; Yazdani, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a reversible airway obstruction that is characterized by constriction of airway smooth muscle, hyper secretion of mucus, edema and airway hyper responsiveness (AHR), mucus secretion and thickening of the basement membrane underlying the airway epithelium. During the process of airway inflammation, complex interactions of innate and adaptive immune cells as well as structural cells and their cytokines have many important roles. It was believed that airway inflammation is orchestrated by allergen specific T helper (Th) 2 cells, which recruit and accumulate in the lungs and produce a range of different effector cytokines. However, more recent studies have revealed the potential collaboration of other helper T cells and their cytokines in this process. Th17 cell may have a role in severe asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Interleukin (IL)-9-producing subset called Th9 cell, Th22 cells which primarily secrete IL-22, IL-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α and Th25 cells via producing IL-25 are believed to be important for initiating allergic reactions and developing airway inflammation. Cytokines are important in asthma and play a critical role in orchestrating the allergic inflammatory response, although the precise role of each cytokine remains to be determined. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the possible roles of newly identified helper T cells derived cytokines (IL-9, 17, 22, 25 and IL-33) in asthma. The potential therapeutic applications emerging from the roles of these cytokines will be discussed as well. PMID:24949298

  11. Suppression of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Functionalized Fullerene-Exposed Dermal Keratinocytes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gao, Jun; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Iyer, Rashi

    2010-01-01

    Initial experiments using differentially functionalized fullerenes, CD-, hexa-, and tris-, suggested a properties dependent effect on cytotoxic and proliferative responses in human skin keratinocytes. In the present study we investigated the cytokine secretion profile of dermal epithelial cells exposed to functionalized fullerenes. Keratinocyte-derived cytokines affect homing and trafficking of normal and malignant epidermal immune as well as nonimmune cells in vivo. These cytokines are critical for regulating activation, proliferation, and differentiation of epidermal cells. Our results indicate that tris- (size range <100 nm) significantly reduces inflammatory cytokine release in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In contrast CD- demonstrated a relatively pro-inflammatorymore » cytokine response, while hexa- did not significantly perturb cytokine responses. Physical and chemical characterizations of these engineered nanomaterials suggest that the disparate biological responses observed may potentially be a function of the aggregation properties of these fullerenes.« less

  12. Interleukin 12 (IL-12) family cytokines: Role in immune pathogenesis and treatment of CNS autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; He, Chang; Nair, Lekha; Yeung, Justine; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2015-10-01

    Cytokines play crucial roles in coordinating the activities of innate and adaptive immune systems. In response to pathogen recognition, innate immune cells secrete cytokines that inform the adaptive immune system about the nature of the pathogen and instruct naïve T cells to differentiate into the appropriate T cell subtypes required to clear the infection. These include Interleukins, Interferons and other immune-regulatory cytokines that exhibit remarkable functional redundancy and pleiotropic effects. The focus of this review, however, is on the enigmatic Interleukin 12 (IL-12) family of cytokines. This family of cytokines plays crucial roles in shaping immune responses during antigen presentation and influence cell-fate decisions of differentiating naïve T cells. They also play essential roles in regulating functions of a variety of effector cells, making IL-12 family cytokines important therapeutic targets or agents in a number of inflammatory diseases, such as the CNS autoimmune diseases, uveitis and multiple sclerosis. PMID:25796985

  13. Flavonoids as Cytokine Modulators: A Possible Therapy for Inflammation-Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Leyva-López, Nayely; Gutierrez-Grijalva, Erick P; Ambriz-Perez, Dulce L; Heredia, J Basilio

    2016-01-01

    High levels of cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6, are associated with chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and cancer; therefore cytokine inhibition might be an important target for the treatment of these diseases. Most drugs used to alleviate some inflammation-related symptoms act by inhibiting cyclooxygenases activity or by blocking cytokine receptors. Nevertheless, these drugs have secondary effects when used on a long-term basis. It has been mentioned that flavonoids, namely quercetin, apigenin and luteolin, reduce cytokine expression and secretion. In this regard, flavonoids may have therapeutical potential in the treatment of inflammation-related diseases as cytokine modulators. This review is focused on current research about the effect of flavonoids on cytokine modulation and the description of the way these compounds exert their effect. PMID:27294919

  14. Flavonoids as Cytokine Modulators: A Possible Therapy for Inflammation-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-López, Nayely; Gutierrez-Grijalva, Erick P.; Ambriz-Perez, Dulce L.; Heredia, J. Basilio

    2016-01-01

    High levels of cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6, are associated with chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and cancer; therefore cytokine inhibition might be an important target for the treatment of these diseases. Most drugs used to alleviate some inflammation-related symptoms act by inhibiting cyclooxygenases activity or by blocking cytokine receptors. Nevertheless, these drugs have secondary effects when used on a long-term basis. It has been mentioned that flavonoids, namely quercetin, apigenin and luteolin, reduce cytokine expression and secretion. In this regard, flavonoids may have therapeutical potential in the treatment of inflammation-related diseases as cytokine modulators. This review is focused on current research about the effect of flavonoids on cytokine modulation and the description of the way these compounds exert their effect. PMID:27294919

  15. The Role of Cytokines and Chemokines in Filovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Sandra L.; Goff, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola- and marburgviruses are highly pathogenic filoviruses and causative agents of viral hemorrhagic fever. Filovirus disease is characterized by a dysregulated immune response, severe organ damage, and coagulation abnormalities. This includes modulation of cytokines, signaling mediators that regulate various components of the immune system as well as other biological processes. Here we examine the role of cytokines in filovirus infection, with an emphasis on understanding how these molecules affect development of the antiviral immune response and influence pathology. These proteins may present targets for immune modulation by therapeutic agents and vaccines in an effort to boost the natural immune response to infection and/or reduce immunopathology. PMID:26512687

  16. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    PubMed

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    Airway clearance techniques are indicated for specific diseases that have known clearance abnormalities (Table 2). Murray and others have commented that such techniques are required only for patients with a daily sputum production of greater than 30 mL. The authors have observed that patients with diseases known to cause clearance abnormalities can have sputum clearance with some techniques, such as positive expiratory pressure, autogenic drainage, and active cycle of breathing techniques, when PDPV has not been effective. Hasani et al has shown that use of the forced exhalatory technique in patients with nonproductive cough still resulted in movement of secretions proximally from all regions of the lung in patients with airway obstruction. It is therefore reasonable to consider airway clearance techniques for any patient who has a disease known to alter mucous clearance, including CF, dyskinetic cilia syndromes, and bronchiectasis from any cause. Patients with atelectasis from mucous plugs and hypersecretory states, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, patients with pain secondary to surgical procedures, and patients with neuromuscular disease, weak cough, and abnormal patency of the airway may also benefit from the application of airway clearance techniques. Infants and children up to 3 years of age with airway clearance problems need to be treated with PDPV. Manual percussion with hands alone or a flexible face mask or cup and small mechanical vibrator/percussors, such as the ultrasonic devices, can be used. The intrapulmonary percussive ventilator shows growing promise in this area. The high-frequency oscillator is not supplied with vests of appropriate sizes for tiny babies and has not been studied in this group. Young patients with neuromuscular disease may require assisted ventilation and airway oscillations can be applied. CPAP alone has been shown to improve achievable flow rates that will increase air-liquid interactions for patients with these diseases

  17. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  18. MicroRNA-Regulated Proinflammatory Cytokines in Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jingjing; Kou, Xianjuan; Yang, Yi; Chen, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia has been defined as the aging-related disease with the declined mass, strength, and function of skeletal muscle, which is the major cause of frailty and falls in elders. The activation of inflammatory signal pathways due to diseases and aging is suggested to reveal the critical impact on sarcopenia. Several proinflammatory cytokines, especially interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), play crucial roles in modulation of inflammatory signaling pathway during the aging-related loss of skeletal muscle. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as the important regulators for the mass and functional maintenance of skeletal muscle through regulating gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In this paper, we have systematically discussed regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs for the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines during sarcopenia, which will provide some novel targets and therapeutic strategies for controlling aging-related atrophy of skeletal muscle and corresponding chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27382188

  19. Cytokines in cancer drug resistance: Cues to new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Valerie Sloane; Huang, Ren-Yu; Chen, Li-Pai; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Fu, Liwu; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2016-04-01

    The development of oncoprotein-targeted anticancer drugs is an invaluable weapon in the war against cancer. However, cancers do not give up without a fight. They may develop multiple mechanisms of drug resistance, including apoptosis inhibition, drug expulsion, and increased proliferation that reduce the effectiveness of the drug. The collective work of researchers has highlighted the role of cytokines in the mechanisms of cancer drug resistance, as well as in cancer cell progression. Furthermore, recent studies have described how specific cytokines secreted by cancer stromal cells confer resistance to chemotherapeutic treatments. In order to gain a better understanding of mechanism of cancer drug resistance and a prediction of treatment outcome, it is imperative that correlations are established between global cytokine profiles and cancer drug resistance. Here we discuss the recent discoveries in this field of research and discuss their implications for the future development of effective anti-cancer medicines. PMID:26993403

  20. Cigarette smoking decreases bioactive interleukin-6 secretion by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soliman, D M; Twigg, H L

    1992-10-01

    Studies suggest smokers have decreased alveolar macrophage (AM) accessory cell (AC) function and a reduced incidence of immune-mediated lung diseases such as sarcoidosis. Impaired AM secretion of cytokines important in T-cell immune responses could explain this observation. We investigated production and secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in smokers and nonsmokers. Lipopolysaccharide-induced AM IL-1 secretion in smokers was significantly reduced compared with nonsmoker AM. However, intracellular IL-1 in smoker AM was higher than in nonsmokers, suggesting that reduced IL-1 secretion was due to impaired release rather than reduced production. Smoker AM secreted significantly less bioactive IL-6 measured in a bioassay compared with nonsmoker AM. Intracellular IL-6 was virtually undetectable in both groups. In some smokers IL-6 production determined by immunoprecipitation was reduced. However, as a group antigenic IL-6 secretion determined by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay was similar in smokers and nonsmokers, suggesting that smoker AM may cosecrete an inhibitor of IL-6 bioactivity. Indeed, AM supernatants from smokers inhibited B9 proliferation in response to maximal recombinant IL-6 stimulation, whereas supernatants from nonsmokers did not. We conclude that AM from smokers secrete less cytokines important in T-cell proliferation than AM from nonsmokers and suggest that for IL-6 this impairment is related to both decreased production of antigenic protein as well as cosecretion of an IL-6 inhibitor. PMID:1415725

  1. TLR signals posttranscriptionally regulate the cytokine trafficking mediator sortilin

    PubMed Central

    Yabe-Wada, Toshiki; Matsuba, Shintaro; Takeda, Kazuya; Sato, Tetsuya; Suyama, Mikita; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Takai, Toshiyuki; Shi, Haifeng; Philpott, Caroline C.; Nakamura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of cytokines is crucial for controlling the appropriate balance of inflammation. Here we report that the sorting receptor sortilin plays a key role in cytokine production. We observed interactions of sortilin with multiple cytokines including IFN-α, and sortilin depletion in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) led to a reduction of IFN-α secretion, suggesting a pivotal role of sortilin in the exocytic trafficking of IFN-α in pDCs. Moreover, sortilin mRNA was degraded posttranscriptionally upon stimulation with various TLR ligands. Poly-rC-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) recognized the C-rich element (CRE) in the 3′ UTR of sortilin mRNA, and depletion of PCBP1 enhanced the degradation of sortilin transcripts, suggesting that PCBP1 can act as a trans-acting factor to stabilize sortilin transcripts. The nucleotide-binding ability of PCBP1 was impaired by zinc ions and alterations of intracellular zinc affect sortilin expression. PCBP1 may therefore control the stability of sortilin transcripts by sensing intracellular zinc levels. Collectively, our findings provide insights into the posttranslational regulation of cytokine production through the posttranscriptional control of sortilin expression by TLR signals. PMID:27220277

  2. TLR signals posttranscriptionally regulate the cytokine trafficking mediator sortilin.

    PubMed

    Yabe-Wada, Toshiki; Matsuba, Shintaro; Takeda, Kazuya; Sato, Tetsuya; Suyama, Mikita; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Takai, Toshiyuki; Shi, Haifeng; Philpott, Caroline C; Nakamura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of cytokines is crucial for controlling the appropriate balance of inflammation. Here we report that the sorting receptor sortilin plays a key role in cytokine production. We observed interactions of sortilin with multiple cytokines including IFN-α, and sortilin depletion in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) led to a reduction of IFN-α secretion, suggesting a pivotal role of sortilin in the exocytic trafficking of IFN-α in pDCs. Moreover, sortilin mRNA was degraded posttranscriptionally upon stimulation with various TLR ligands. Poly-rC-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) recognized the C-rich element (CRE) in the 3' UTR of sortilin mRNA, and depletion of PCBP1 enhanced the degradation of sortilin transcripts, suggesting that PCBP1 can act as a trans-acting factor to stabilize sortilin transcripts. The nucleotide-binding ability of PCBP1 was impaired by zinc ions and alterations of intracellular zinc affect sortilin expression. PCBP1 may therefore control the stability of sortilin transcripts by sensing intracellular zinc levels. Collectively, our findings provide insights into the posttranslational regulation of cytokine production through the posttranscriptional control of sortilin expression by TLR signals. PMID:27220277

  3. The Centrosome Undergoes Plk1-Independent Interphase Maturation during Inflammation and Mediates Cytokine Release.

    PubMed

    Vertii, Anastassiia; Ivshina, Maria; Zimmerman, Wendy; Hehnly, Heidi; Kant, Shashi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-05-23

    Cytokine production is a necessary event in the immune response during inflammation and is associated with mortality during sepsis, autoimmune disorders, cancer, and diabetes. Stress-activated MAP kinase signaling cascades that mediate cytokine synthesis are well established. However, the downstream fate of cytokines before they are secreted remains elusive. We report that pro-inflammatory stimuli lead to recruitment of pericentriolar material, specifically pericentrin and γ-tubulin, to the centrosome. This is accompanied by enhanced microtubule nucleation and enrichment of the recycling endosome component FIP3, all of which are hallmarks of centrosome maturation during mitosis. Intriguingly, centrosome maturation occurs during interphase in an MLK-dependent manner, independent of the classic mitotic kinase, Plk1. Centrosome disruption by chemical prevention of centriole assembly or genetic ablation of pericentrin attenuated interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and MCP1 secretion, suggesting that the centrosome is critical for cytokine production. Our results reveal a function of the centrosome in innate immunity. PMID:27219065

  4. Macrophage cytokine response to particles and lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A U; Barnes, F H; Charlebois, S J; Smith, R A

    2000-03-15

    Several investigators have suggested that biologic molecules adsorbed onto particles may play a key role in determining macrophage response. Adsorbed endotoxins (bacterial debris) may be of particular importance since they are widely present exogenously and endogenously and adhere strongly to many materials. Murine-transformed peritoneal macrophages (IC-21) were used in this in vitro study. Secretions of IL-1 beta, TNF alpha, and IL-6 were used as a measure of macrophage response to micron-range particles of high-density polyethylene and Co-Cr-Mo alloy, with and without adsorbed lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin. Little cytokine secretion was measured in response to particles (and to polypropylene experimental chambers) cleaned with ethanol and saline and not exposed to LPS. The lack of macrophage response to cleaned particles has been reported by others and may help reconcile conflicting reports in the literature. Cytokine secretion levels were high in all cases if the chambers (with or without particles) were exposed to LPS (and rinsed to minimize nonbound LPS). Secretion patterns were different with particles present and for polymer versus metal particles. Overall, these results suggest that (1) adsorbed molecules on material surfaces strongly affect macrophage response and (2) particle surface chemistry and microstructure affect the concentration and configuration of adsorbed molecules, further influencing particle interaction with macrophage surface receptors. PMID:10602080

  5. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  6. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  7. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  8. Preserved ex vivo inflammatory status and cytokine responses in naturally long-lived mice

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Lorena; Lord, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    Preserved immune cell function has been reported in mice that achieve extreme longevity. Since cytokines are major modulators of immune responses, we aimed to determine the levels of 21 cytokines secreted ex vivo by peritoneal leukocytes cultured under basal- and mitogen- (conconavalin A (ConA) and LPS) stimulated conditions in middle-aged (44 ± 4 weeks), old (69 ± 4 weeks), very old (92 ± 4 weeks), and extreme long-lived (125 ± 4 weeks) ICR (CD1) female mice. The secretion of cytokines was measured by multiplex luminometry. Increased basal levels of proinflammatory IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12 (p70), IFN-γ, and TNF-α were seen in the old and very old animals, accompanied by decreased IL-10. In contrast, the extreme long-lived mice maintained the overall cytokine profile of middle-aged mice, though the basal secretion of IL-2, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13, and IL-12 (p40) was raised. Under LPS- and/or ConA-stimulated conditions, leukocytes from old and very old animals showed a significantly impaired response with respect to secretion of Th1 cytokines IL-3, IL-12p70, IFN-γ, and TNF-α; Th2 cytokines IL-6, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13; and the regulatory cytokines IL-2, IL-5, and IL-17. Extreme long-lived mice preserved the middle-aged-like cytokine profile, with the most striking effect seen for the IL-2 response to ConA, which was minimal in the old and very old mice but increased with respect to the middle-aged level in extreme long-lived mice. Chemokine responses in regard to KC, MCP-1, MIP1β, and RANTES were more variable, though similar secretion of LPS-induced KC and MCP-1 and ConA-induced MCP-1, MIP-1β, and RANTES was found in long-lived and middle-aged mice. Thus, extreme long-lived animals showed only a minimal inflammatory profile, much lower than the old and very old groups and also lower than the middle-aged, which is likely mediated by the increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. This was coupled to a robust response to immune stimuli

  9. Combinatorial Cytokine Code Generates Anti-Viral State in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Boris M.; Marjanovic, Nada; Nudelman, German; Moran, Thomas M.; Sealfon, Stuart C.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological function of the immune system and the response to therapeutic immunomodulators may be sensitive to combinatorial cytokine micro-environments that shape the responses of specific immune cells. Previous work shows that paracrine cytokines released by virus-infected human dendritic cells (DC) can dictate the maturation state of naïve DCs. To understand the effects of paracrine signaling, we systematically studied the effects of combinations cytokines in this complex mixture in generating an anti-viral state. After naïve DCs were exposed to either IFNβ or to paracrine signaling released by DCs infected by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), microarray analysis revealed a large number of genes that were differently regulated by the DC-secreted paracrine signaling. In order to identify the cytokine mechanisms involved, we identified 20 cytokines secreted by NDV infected DCs for which the corresponding receptor gene is expressed in naïve DCs. By exposing cells to all combinations of 19 cytokines (leave-one-out studies), we identified five cytokines (IFNβ, TNFα, IL-1β, TNFSF15, and IL28) as candidates for regulating DC maturation markers. Subsequent experiments identified IFNβ, TNFα, and IL1β as the major contributors to this anti-viral state. This finding was supported by infection studies in vitro, by T-cell activation studies and by in vivo infection studies in mouse. Combination of cytokines can cause response states in DCs that differ from those achieved by the individual cytokines alone. These results suggest that the cytokine microenvironment may act via a combinatorial code to direct the response state of specific immune cells. Further elucidation of this code may provide insight into responses to infection and neoplasia as well as guide the development of combinatorial cytokine immunomodulation for infectious, autoimmune, and immunosurveillance-related diseases. PMID:24616721

  10. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  11. Central Mechanisms of Abnormal Sympathoexcitation in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Takuya; Hirooka, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    It has been recognized that the sympathetic nervous system is abnormally activated in chronic heart failure, and leads to further worsening chronic heart failure. In the treatment of chronic heart failure many clinical studies have already suggested that the inhibition of the abnormal sympathetic hyperactivity by beta blockers is beneficial. It has been classically considered that abnormal sympathetic hyperactivity in chronic heart failure is caused by the enhancement of excitatory inputs including changes in peripheral baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes and chemical mediators that control sympathetic outflow. Recently, the abnormalities in the central regulation of sympathetic nerve activity mediated by brain renin angiotensin system-oxidative stress axis and/or proinflammatory cytokines have been focused. Central renin angiotensin system, proinflammatory cytokines, and the interaction between them have been determined as the target of the sympathoinhibitory treatment in experimental animal models with chronic heart failure. In conclusion, we must recognize that chronic heart failure is a syndrome with an abnormal sympathoexcitation, which is caused by the abnormalities in the central regulation of sympathetic nerve activity. PMID:22919539

  12. Cytokines and therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Hacker, U; Endres, S

    1997-12-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides - short strands of synthetic nucleic acids - encompass antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides. Antisense oligonucleotides are designed to bind to target RNA by complementary base pairing and to inhibit translation of the target protein. Antisense oligonucleotides enable specific inhibition of cytokine synthesis. In contrast, aptamer oligonucleotides are able to bind directly to specific proteins. This binding depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide. Aptamer oligonucleotides with CpG motifs can exert strong immunostimulatory effects. Both kinds of therapeutic oligonucleotides - antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides - provide promising tools to modulate immunological functions. Recently, therapeutic oligonucleotides have moved towards clinical application. An antisense oligonucleotide directed against the proinflammatory intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is currently being tested in clinical trials for therapy of inflammatory disease. Immunostimulatory aptamer oligonucleotides are in preclinical development for immunotherapy. In the present review we summarize the application of therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate immunological functions. We include technological aspects as well as current therapeutic concepts and clinical studies. PMID:9740353

  13. Effects of cytokines on potassium channels in renal tubular epithelia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Komagiri, You; Kubokawa, Manabu

    2012-02-01

    Renal tubular potassium (K(+)) channels play important roles in the formation of cell-negative potential, K(+) recycling, K(+) secretion, and cell volume regulation. In addition to these physiological roles, it was reported that changes in the activity of renal tubular K(+) channels were involved in exacerbation of renal cell injury during ischemia and endotoxemia. Because ischemia and endotoxemia stimulate production of cytokines in immune cells and renal tubular cells, it is possible that cytokines would affect K(+) channel activity. Although the regulatory mechanisms of renal tubular K(+) channels have extensively been studied, little information is available about the effects of cytokines on these K(+) channels. The first report was that tumor necrosis factor acutely stimulated the single channel activity of the 70 pS K(+) channel in the rat thick ascending limb through activation of tyrosine phosphatase. Recently, it was also reported that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) modulated the activity of the 40 pS K(+) channel in cultured human proximal tubule cells. IFN-γ exhibited a delayed suppression and an acute stimulation of K(+) channel activity, whereas IL-1β acutely suppressed the channel activity. Furthermore, these cytokines suppressed gene expression of the renal outer medullary potassium channel. The renal tubular K(+) channels are functionally coupled to the coexisting transporters. Therefore, the effects of cytokines on renal tubular transporter activity should also be taken into account, when interpreting their effects on K(+) channel activity. PMID:22042037

  14. Monocyte Subpopulations from Pre-Eclamptic Patients Are Abnormally Skewed and Exhibit Exaggerated Responses to Toll-Like Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Al-ofi, Ebtisam

    2012-01-01

    The leading cause of pregnancy-associated mortality and morbidity is pre-eclampsia (PE). Although information regarding the etiology of this disease is scant, its pathophysiology is characterized by abnormal placentation, endothelial dysfunction as well as an exaggerated inflammatory response. Clinical evidence also indicates that the abundance of many immune cells at the feto-maternal interface and in the circulation of PE patients is abnormal, when compared with normal pregnant (NP) controls. In addition, the phenotype and function of some of these cells is altered. To further characterize the systemic effects of PE on circulating cells, we analyzed monocytic subpopulations in NP and PE patients by flow cytometry. We found that non-classical CD14lowCD16+ monocytes are significantly increased in women with PE and they display irregular expression of several chemokine receptors and antigen presentation molecules. The most striking phenotypic difference among the cell surface molecules was the marked upregulation of TLR4 expression, where both CD14highCD16+ and CD14lowCD16+ monocytes demonstrated higher levels than their NP counterparts. Stimulation of PE monocytes with TLR ligands resulted in profound secretion of various cytokines in comparison with NP controls. These data suggest that PE monocytes are hyper-responsive to TLR ligands and this may contribute to exacerbation of the disease. PMID:22848746

  15. Monocyte subpopulations from pre-eclamptic patients are abnormally skewed and exhibit exaggerated responses to Toll-like receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Al-ofi, Ebtisam; Coffelt, Seth B; Anumba, Dilly O

    2012-01-01

    The leading cause of pregnancy-associated mortality and morbidity is pre-eclampsia (PE). Although information regarding the etiology of this disease is scant, its pathophysiology is characterized by abnormal placentation, endothelial dysfunction as well as an exaggerated inflammatory response. Clinical evidence also indicates that the abundance of many immune cells at the feto-maternal interface and in the circulation of PE patients is abnormal, when compared with normal pregnant (NP) controls. In addition, the phenotype and function of some of these cells is altered. To further characterize the systemic effects of PE on circulating cells, we analyzed monocytic subpopulations in NP and PE patients by flow cytometry. We found that non-classical CD14(low)CD16(+) monocytes are significantly increased in women with PE and they display irregular expression of several chemokine receptors and antigen presentation molecules. The most striking phenotypic difference among the cell surface molecules was the marked upregulation of TLR4 expression, where both CD14(high)CD16(+) and CD14(low)CD16(+) monocytes demonstrated higher levels than their NP counterparts. Stimulation of PE monocytes with TLR ligands resulted in profound secretion of various cytokines in comparison with NP controls. These data suggest that PE monocytes are hyper-responsive to TLR ligands and this may contribute to exacerbation of the disease. PMID:22848746

  16. Hepatotoxicants induce cytokine imbalance in response to innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shima; Deguchi, Jiro; Nishio, Naoki; Nomura, Naruaki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, attention has been paid to innate immune systems as mechanisms to initiate or promote drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Kupffer cells are hepatic resident macrophages and might be involved in the pathogenesis of DILI by release of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, reactive oxygen species, and/or nitric oxides. The purpose of this study was to investigate alterations in mediator levels induced by hepatotoxic compounds in isolated Kupffer cells and discuss the relation between balance of each cytokine or chemokine and potential of innate immune-mediated DILI. Primary cultured rat Kupffer cells were treated with hepatotoxic (acetaminophen, troglitazone, trovafloxacin) or non-hepatotoxic (pioglitazone, levofloxacin) compounds with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After 24 hr treatment, cell supernatants were collected and various levels of mediators released by Kupffer cells were examined. Although hepatotoxicants had no effect on the LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secretion, they enhanced the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and suppressed the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) induced by LPS. These cytokine shifts were not associated with switching the phenotypes of M1 and M2 macrophages in Kupffer cells. In conclusion, the present study suggested that the levels of some specific cytokines are affected by DILI-related drugs with LPS stimulation, and imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, induced by the up-regulation of IL-1β and the down-regulation of IL-6 or IL-10, plays a key role in innate immune-mediated DILI. PMID:25972199

  17. Curcumin regulates airway epithelial cell cytokine responses to the pollutant cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Rennolds, Jessica; Malireddy, Smitha; Hassan, Fatemat; Tridandapani, Susheela; Parinandi, Narasimham; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium induces secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by two distinct pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium increases NAPDH oxidase activity leading to Erk activation and IL-8 secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin prevents cadmium-induced secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 by airway cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin could be use to suppress lung inflammation due to cadmium inhalation. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal present in the environment and its inhalation can lead to pulmonary disease such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These lung diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial cells to cadmium promotes a polarized apical secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, two pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokines known to play an important role in pulmonary inflammation. We also determined that two distinct pathways controlled secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines by human airway epithelial cells as cadmium-induced IL-6 secretion occurs via an NF-{kappa}B dependent pathway, whereas IL-8 secretion involves the Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Interestingly, the natural antioxidant curcumin could prevent both cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, curcumin could be used to prevent airway inflammation due to cadmium inhalation.

  18. Regulation of effector and memory CD8(+) T cell function by inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Valbon, Stefanie F; Condotta, Stephanie A; Richer, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Cells communicate with each other through the production and secretion of cytokines, which are integral to the host response to infection. Once recognized by specific cytokine receptors expressed on the cell surface, these exogenous signals direct the biological function of a cell in order to adapt to their microenvironment. CD8(+) T cells are critical immune cells that play an important role in the control and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Current findings have demonstrated that cytokines influence all aspects of the CD8(+) T cell response to infection or immunization. The cytokine milieu induced at the time of activation impacts the overall magnitude and function of the effector CD8(+) T cell response and the generation of functional memory CD8(+) T cells. This review will focus on the impact of inflammatory cytokines on different aspects of CD8(+) T cell biology. PMID:26688544

  19. The SNARE Machinery in Mast Cell Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Lorentz, Axel; Baumann, Anja; Vitte, Joana; Blank, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators – stored in granules – as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNARE) proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, secretory carrier membrane proteins, complexins, or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion. PMID:22679448

  20. Authentication Without Secrets

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Lyndon G.; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-11-01

    This work examines a new approach to authentication, which is the most fundamental security primitive that underpins all cyber security protections. Current Internet authentication techniques require the protection of one or more secret keys along with the integrity protection of the algorithms/computations designed to prove possession of the secret without actually revealing it. Protecting a secret requires physical barriers or encryption with yet another secret key. The reason to strive for "Authentication without Secret Keys" is that protecting secrets (even small ones only kept in a small corner of a component or device) is much harder than protecting the integrity of information that is not secret. Promising methods are examined for authentication of components, data, programs, network transactions, and/or individuals. The successful development of authentication without secret keys will enable far more tractable system security engineering for high exposure, high consequence systems by eliminating the need for brittle protection mechanisms to protect secret keys (such as are now protected in smart cards, etc.). This paper is a re-release of SAND2009-7032 with new figures numerous edits.

  1. Tubular Secretion in CKD.

    PubMed

    Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M; Laha, Thomas; Hoofnagle, Andrew; Newitt, Rick; Sirich, Tammy L; Meyer, Timothy W; Thummel, Ken E; Yanez, N David; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Weiss, Noel S; Kestenbaum, Bryan R

    2016-07-01

    Renal function generally is assessed by measurement of GFR and urinary albumin excretion. Other intrinsic kidney functions, such as proximal tubular secretion, typically are not quantified. Tubular secretion of solutes is more efficient than glomerular filtration and a major mechanism for renal drug elimination, suggesting important clinical consequences of secretion dysfunction. Measuring tubular secretion as an independent marker of kidney function may provide insight into kidney disease etiology and improve prediction of adverse outcomes. We estimated secretion function by measuring secreted solute (hippurate, cinnamoylglycine, p-cresol sulfate, and indoxyl sulfate) clearance using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assays of serum and timed urine samples in a prospective cohort study of 298 patients with kidney disease. We estimated GFR by mean clearance of creatinine and urea from the same samples and evaluated associations of renal secretion with participant characteristics, mortality, and CKD progression to dialysis. Tubular secretion rate modestly correlated with eGFR and associated with some participant characteristics, notably fractional excretion of electrolytes. Low clearance of hippurate or p-cresol sulfate associated with greater risk of death independent of eGFR (hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 4.7; hazard ratio, 2.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 6.1, respectively). Hazards models also suggested an association between low cinnamoylglycine clearance and risk of dialysis, but statistical analyses did not exclude the null hypothesis. Therefore, estimates of proximal tubular secretion function correlate with glomerular filtration, but substantial variability in net secretion remains. The observed associations of net secretion with mortality and progression of CKD require confirmation. PMID:26614381

  2. The Function of Fish Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    What is known about the biological activity of fish cytokines is reviewed. Most of the functional studies performed to date have been in teleost fish, and have focused on the induced effects of cytokine recombinant proteins, or have used loss- and gain-of-function experiments in zebrafish. Such studies begin to tell us about the role of these molecules in the regulation of fish immune responses and whether they are similar or divergent to the well-characterised functions of mammalian cytokines. This knowledge will aid our ability to determine and modulate the pathways leading to protective immunity, to improve fish health in aquaculture. PMID:27231948

  3. The Function of Fish Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    What is known about the biological activity of fish cytokines is reviewed. Most of the functional studies performed to date have been in teleost fish, and have focused on the induced effects of cytokine recombinant proteins, or have used loss- and gain-of-function experiments in zebrafish. Such studies begin to tell us about the role of these molecules in the regulation of fish immune responses and whether they are similar or divergent to the well-characterised functions of mammalian cytokines. This knowledge will aid our ability to determine and modulate the pathways leading to protective immunity, to improve fish health in aquaculture. PMID:27231948

  4. Interferon γ-Induced Nuclear Interleukin-33 Potentiates the Release of Esophageal Epithelial Derived Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jing; Oshima, Tadayuki; Wu, Liping; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Background Esophageal epithelial cells are an initiating cell type in esophageal inflammation, playing an essential role in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A new tissue-derived cytokine, interleukin-33 (IL-33), has been shown to be upregulated in esophageal epithelial cell nuclei in GERD, taking part in mucosal inflammation. Here, inflammatory cytokines secreted by esophageal epithelial cells, and their regulation by IL-33, were investigated. Methods In an in vitro stratified squamous epithelial model, IL-33 expression was examined using quantitative RT-PCR, western blot, ELISA, and immunofluorescence. Epithelial cell secreted inflammatory cytokines were examined using multiplex flow immunoassay. IL-33 was knocked down with small interfering RNA (siRNA) in normal human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). Pharmacological inhibitors and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) siRNA were used to explore the signaling pathways. Results Interferon (IFN)γ treatment upregulated nuclear IL-33 in HEECs. Furthermore, HEECs can produce various inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in response to IFNγ. Nuclear, but not exogenous IL-33, amplified IFN induction of these cytokines. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and janus protein tyrosine kinases (JAK)/STAT1 were the common signaling pathways of IFNγ-mediated induction of IL-33 and other cytokines. Conclusions Esophageal epithelial cells can actively participate in GERD pathogenesis through the production of various cytokines, and epithelial-derived IL-33 might play a central role in the production of these cytokines. PMID:26986625

  5. Secrets to success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2014-02-01

    A new national study reveals what it takes for physician practices to stay financially viable. Several Texas practices, among those rated as "better performers," share their secrets to success. One of those secrets, a physician says, is "hiring good people and getting out of their way." PMID:24500918

  6. Platelet secretion: From haemostasis to wound healing and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Golebiewska, Ewelina M.; Poole, Alastair W.

    2015-01-01

    Upon activation, platelets secrete more than 300 active substances from their intracellular granules. Platelet dense granule components, such as ADP and polyphosphates, contribute to haemostasis and coagulation, but also play a role in cancer metastasis. α-Granules contain multiple cytokines, mitogens, pro- and anti-inflammatory factors and other bioactive molecules that are essential regulators in the complex microenvironment of the growing thrombus but also contribute to a number of disease processes. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretion and the genetic regulation of granule biogenesis still remains incomplete. In this review we summarise our current understanding of the roles of platelet secretion in health and disease, and discuss some of the hypotheses that may explain how platelets may control the release of its many secreted components in a context-specific manner, to allow platelets to play multiple roles in health and disease. PMID:25468720

  7. MTMR3 risk allele enhances innate receptor-induced signaling and cytokines by decreasing autophagy and increasing caspase-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Amit; Hedl, Matija; Abraham, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by dysregulated host:microbial interactions and cytokine production. Host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical in regulating these interactions. Multiple genetic loci are associated with IBD, but altered functions for most, including in the rs713875 MTMR3/HORMAD2/LIF/OSM region, are unknown. We identified a previously undefined role for myotubularin-related protein 3 (MTMR3) in amplifying PRR-induced cytokine secretion in human macrophages and defined MTMR3-initiated mechanisms contributing to this amplification. MTMR3 decreased PRR-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and autophagy levels, thereby increasing PRR-induced caspase-1 activation, autocrine IL-1β secretion, NFκB signaling, and, ultimately, overall cytokine secretion. This MTMR3-mediated regulation required the N-terminal pleckstrin homology-GRAM domain and Cys413 within the phosphatase domain of MTMR3. In MTMR3-deficient macrophages, reducing the enhanced autophagy or restoring NFκB signaling rescued PRR-induced cytokines. Macrophages from rs713875 CC IBD risk carriers demonstrated increased MTMR3 expression and, in turn, decreased PRR-induced PtdIns3P and autophagy and increased PRR-induced caspase-1 activation, signaling, and cytokine secretion. Thus, the rs713875 IBD risk polymorphism increases MTMR3 expression, which modulates PRR-induced outcomes, ultimately leading to enhanced PRR-induced cytokines. PMID:26240347

  8. IL25 elicits a multipotent progenitor cell population that promotes TH2 cytokine responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4+ T helper 2 (TH2) cells secrete interleukin (IL)4, IL5 and IL13, and are required for immunity to gastrointestinal helminth infections. However, TH2 cells also promote chronic inflammation associated with asthma and allergic disorders. The non-haematopoietic-cell-derived cytokines thymic stromal...

  9. Macrophage secretion heterogeneity in engineered microenvironments revealed using a microwell platform.

    PubMed

    McWhorter, Frances Y; Smith, Tim D; Luu, Thuy U; Rahim, Maha K; Haun, Jered B; Liu, Wendy F

    2016-07-11

    Secreted proteins play a major role in orchestrating the response of cell populations. However, a quantitative understanding of the dynamic changes in protein secretion in response to microenvironmental cues at the single cell level remains elusive. Measurements taken using traditional molecular techniques typically require bulk cultures, and therefore cannot capture the diversity within cell populations. Recent advances in chip-based technologies have shown that single cell measurements can provide important insights into the temporal dynamics of cellular activation and function, but these tools have had limited control of the adhesive cellular microenvironment. Here, we created a single cell cytokine detection platform that allows for controlled physical and adhesive microenvironment. We validated the platform by examining cytokine secretion of macrophages exposed to varying dosages of soluble stimulation and on different adhesive substrates. We also used the platform to demonstrate that cell shape affects single macrophage cytokine secretion. Together, these results show the ability of the microwell system to detect secreted cytokines from individual macrophages in controlled adhesive environments. This technique may be broadly applied to detect secreted products from any adherent cell type. PMID:27291691

  10. Proinflammatory cytokines, aging, and age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Martin; Balardy, Laurent; Moulis, Guillaume; Gaudin, Clement; Peyrot, Caroline; Vellas, Bruno; Cesari, Matteo; Nourhashemi, Fati

    2013-12-01

    Inflammation is a physiological process that repairs tissues in response to endogenous or exogenous aggressions. Nevertheless, a chronic state of inflammation may have detrimental consequences. Aging is associated with increased levels of circulating cytokines and proinflammatory markers. Aged-related changes in the immune system, known as immunosenescence, and increased secretion of cytokines by adipose tissue, represent the major causes of chronic inflammation. This phenomenon is known as "inflamm-aging." High levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and C-reactive protein are associated in the older subject with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. In particular, cohort studies have indicated TNF-α and IL-6 levels as markers of frailty. The low-grade inflammation characterizing the aging process notably concurs at the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying sarcopenia. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines (through a variety of mechanisms, such as platelet activation and endothelial activation) may play a major role in the risk of cardiovascular events. Dysregulation of the inflammatory pathway may also affect the central nervous system and be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders (eg, Alzheimer disease).The aim of the present review was to summarize different targets of the activity of proinflammatory cytokines implicated in the risk of pathological aging. PMID:23792036

  11. Characterization of Adsorbents for Cytokine Removal from Blood in an In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, Franz; Hartmann, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Cytokines are basic targets that have to be removed effectively in order to improve the patient's health status in treating severe inflammation, sepsis, and septic shock. Although there are different adsorbents commercially available, the success of their clinical use is limited. Here, we tested different adsorbents for their effective removal of cytokines from plasma and the resulting effect on endothelial cell activation. Methods. The three polystyrene divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) based adsorbents Amberchrom CG161c and CG300m and a clinically approved haemoperfusion adsorbent (HAC) were studied with regard to cytokine removal in human blood. To induce cytokine release from leucocytes, human blood cells were stimulated with 1 ng/ml LPS for 4 hours. Plasma was separated and adsorption experiments in a dynamic model were performed. The effect of cytokine removal on endothelial cell activation was evaluated using a HUVEC-based cell culture model. The beneficial outcome was assessed by measuring ICAM-1, E-selectin, and secreted cytokines IL-8 and IL-6. Additionally the threshold concentration for HUVEC activation by TNF-α and IL-1β was determined using this cell culture model. Results. CG161c showed promising results in removing the investigated cytokines. Due to its pore size the adsorbent efficiently removed the key factor TNF-α, outperforming the commercially available adsorbents. The CG161c treatment reduced cytokine secretion and expression of cell adhesion molecules by HUVEC which underlines the importance of effective removal of TNF-α in inflammatory diseases. Conclusion. These results confirm the hypothesis that cytokine removal from the blood should approach physiological levels in order to reduce endothelial cell activation. PMID:26770992

  12. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  13. Influence of cytokine and cytokine receptor gene polymorphisms on the degree of liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Sara Tatiana; Silva, Giovanni Faria; de Moraes, Camila Fernanda Verdichio; Grotto, Rejane Maria Tomasini; de Moura Campos Pardini, Maria Inês; Bicalho, Maria da Graça; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis may be the result of repetitive injury to hepatocytes caused by HCV infection and the immune response to it. Cytokines regulate the inflammatory response to injury and modulate hepatic fibrogenesis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in cytokine genes may influence the cytokine expression and secretion that may contribute to hepatic fibrogenesis in HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine the genotype of 22 SNPs found in the genes of 13 cytokines/cytokine receptors to assess the influence of polymorphic variants on the stage of liver damage in Brazilian patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1 only. 141 unrelated patients were grouped according to their stage of fibrosis: absence of fibrosis or patients in the initial stages of fibrosis (F0-F2, n = 84), patients with advanced stages of fibrosis or cirrhosis (F3-F4, n = 57), without cirrhosis (F0-F3, n = 103), and with cirrhosis (F4, n = 38). The comparison of frequencies in each sub-sample was performed by 2 × 2 contingency tables using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Stepwise logistic regression was also used to assess independent associations between cirrhosis or fibrosis with polymorphic variants. The TNFA-308G:A genotype conferred increased risk of fibrosis and cirrhosis. The TNFA-238G:G genotype was associated with protection from cirrhosis. The IL10-819C:T genotype conferred protection from fibrosis and the IL1B-511C:T genotype conferred increased risk of cirrhosis. Some of these genotypes showed results on the borderline of statistical significance in the bivariate analysis. We conclude that gene variants of cytokines/receptors may influence liver damage in patients chronically infected by HCV genotype 1. PMID:27200267

  14. Influence of cytokine and cytokine receptor gene polymorphisms on the degree of liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Sara Tatiana; Silva, Giovanni Faria; de Moraes, Camila Fernanda Verdichio; Grotto, Rejane Maria Tomasini; de Moura Campos Pardini, Maria Inês; Bicalho, Maria da Graça; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic fibrosis may be the result of repetitive injury to hepatocytes caused by HCV infection and the immune response to it. Cytokines regulate the inflammatory response to injury and modulate hepatic fibrogenesis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in cytokine genes may influence the cytokine expression and secretion that may contribute to hepatic fibrogenesis in HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine the genotype of 22 SNPs found in the genes of 13 cytokines/cytokine receptors to assess the influence of polymorphic variants on the stage of liver damage in Brazilian patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1 only. 141 unrelated patients were grouped according to their stage of fibrosis: absence of fibrosis or patients in the initial stages of fibrosis (F0-F2, n = 84), patients with advanced stages of fibrosis or cirrhosis (F3-F4, n = 57), without cirrhosis (F0-F3, n = 103), and with cirrhosis (F4, n = 38). The comparison of frequencies in each sub-sample was performed by 2 × 2 contingency tables using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Stepwise logistic regression was also used to assess independent associations between cirrhosis or fibrosis with polymorphic variants. The TNFA-308G:A genotype conferred increased risk of fibrosis and cirrhosis. The TNFA-238G:G genotype was associated with protection from cirrhosis. The IL10-819C:T genotype conferred protection from fibrosis and the IL1B-511C:T genotype conferred increased risk of cirrhosis. Some of these genotypes showed results on the borderline of statistical significance in the bivariate analysis. We conclude that gene variants of cytokines/receptors may influence liver damage in patients chronically infected by HCV genotype 1. PMID:27200267

  15. Novel cancer vaccines prepared by anchoring cytokines to tumor cells avoiding gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizard, Philippe; Gross, David-Alexandre; Chenal, Alexandre; Beaumelle, Bruno; Kosmatopoulos, Konstadinos; Gillet, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Cytokines have a strong potential for triggering anticancer immunity if released in the tumor microenvironment. Successful vaccines have been engineered using tumor cells genetically modified to secrete the cytokines. Unfortunately, this approach remains difficult and hazardous to perform in the clinic. We describe a new way of combining cytokines with tumor cells to prepare anticancer vaccines. This consists in anchoring recombinant cytokines to the membrane of killed tumor cells. Attachment is mediated by a fragment of diphtheria toxin (T) genetically connected to the cytokine. It is triggered by an acid pH pulse. The method was applied to IL-2, a potent anti-tumor cytokine. IL-2 anchored to the surface of tumor cells by the T anchor retained its IL-2 activity and remained exposed several days. Interestingly, vaccination of mice with these modified tumor cells induced a protective anti-tumor immunity mediated by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This procedure presents several advantages as compared to the conventional approaches based on the transfection of tumor cells with cytokine genes. It does not require the culture of tumor cells from the patients and eliminates the safety problems connected with viral vectors while allowing the control of the amount of cytokines delivered with the vaccine.

  16. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  17. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  18. Proinflammatory cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors are altered in the lymphocytes of schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N.; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S.; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities of protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines and their soluble receptors have been reported in the plasma/serum of schizophrenia (SZ) patients. To examine if SZ is also associated with the abnormal gene expression of cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors, we studied mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and their receptors in lymphocytes of SZ patients and normal control (NC) subjects. We determined the protein and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and mRNA expression of their receptors in lymphocytes from 30 SZ patients and 30 drug-free NC subjects. The subjects were diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. Protein levels of cytokines were determined by ELISA, and mRNA levels in lymphocytes were determined by the qPCR method. We found that the mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1R1, TNFR1, and TNFR2, but not IL-1β, IL-1R2, IL-1RA, IL-6R, or GP130 were significantly increased in lymphocytes of SZ patients compared with NC subjects. We also found that the protein expression of IL-6 and TNF-α, but not IL-1β, was also significantly increased in SZ patients compared with NC subjects. These studies suggest that in addition to the reported abnormalities of proinflammatory cytokines and their soluble receptors in the plasma of SZ patients, an abnormal gene expression of these cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors may be involved in the pathogenesis of SZ. PMID:25749018

  19. Omega-3 fatty acids modulate neonatal cytokine response to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Michael M; Lin, Hong; Foley, Elizabeth; Tsang, Valerie; Rhee, Eunice; Perlman, Jeffrey; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal immune response is characterized by an uncompensated pro-inflammatory response that can lead to inflammation-related morbidity and increased susceptibility to infection. We investigated the effects of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) pre-treatment on cytokine secretion to low-concentration endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) in THP-1 monocytes and neonatal cord blood (CB) from healthy full-term infants. Pre-treatment of THP-1 cells, with either n-3 PUFA at 25 or 100 μM significantly reduced IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 secretion while DHA, but not EPA, reduced TNF-α response to LPS. DHA inhibition was stronger compared to EPA and effective at the low concentration. The same concentrations of n-3 PUFAs inhibited IL-12 but not IL-10 cytokine response in whole CB from 9 infants pre-treated for 24 h. To assess clinical relevance for acute response to LPS, the effects of low-concentration DHA at 25 μM or 12.5 μM were assessed before and after LPS exposure of isolated CB mononuclear cells from 20 infants for 1 h. When added before or after LPS, physiologic DHA treatment produced significant concentration-dependent inhibition of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-8 secretion. The results demonstrate prophylactic and therapeutic modulation of neonatal cytokine response to LPS and provide proof-of-concept that low-concentration administration of n-3 PUFA could attenuate or resolve neonatal inflammatory response. PMID:26812855

  20. Influence of Phthalates on Cytokine Production in Monocytes and Macrophages: A Systematic Review of Experimental Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Juliana Frohnert; Bendtzen, Klaus; Boas, Malene; Frederiksen, Hanne; Nielsen, Claus H.; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Background Phthalates are a group of endocrine disrupting chemicals suspected to influence the immune system. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise the present knowledge on the influence of phthalates on monocyte and macrophage production and secretion of cytokines, an influence which could affect both pro- and anti-inflammatory abilities of these cells. Strategy and Results A systematic search was performed in Medline, Embase and Toxline in June 2013, last updated 3rd of August 2014. Criteria used to select studies were described and published beforehand online on Prospero (http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/NIHR_PROSPERO, registration number CRD42013004236). In vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies investigating the influence of phthalates on cytokine mRNA expression and cytokine secretion in animals and humans were included. A total of 11 reports, containing 12 studies, were found eligible for inclusion. In these, a total of four different phthalate diesters, six primary metabolites (phthalate monoesters) and seven different cytokines were investigated. Though all studies varied greatly in study design and species sources, four out of five studies that investigated di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate found an increased tumour necrosis factor-α secretion/production from monocytes or macrophages. A summary of cytokine measurements was not possible since few studies were comparable in study design and due to insufficient reporting of raw data for most of the included studies. Conclusion Results from this review have suggested that at least one phthalate (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) has the ability to enhance tumour necrosis factor-α production/secretion from monocytes/macrophages in vitro, but also observed ex vivo. Influence of other phthalates on other cytokines has only been investigated in few studies. Thus, in vitro studies on primary human monocytes/macrophages as well as more in vivo studies are needed to confirm or dispute these findings. PMID:25811352

  1. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  2. Titanium surface hydrophilicity modulates the human macrophage inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Increased titanium surface hydrophilicity has been shown to accelerate dental implant osseointegration. Macrophages are important in the early inflammatory response to surgical implant placement and influence the subsequent healing response. This study investigated the modulatory effect of a hydrophilic titanium surface on the inflammatory cytokine expression profile in a human macrophage cell line (THP-1). Genes for 84 cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors were analyzed following exposure to (1) polished (SMO), (2) micro-rough sand blasted, acid etched (SLA), and (3) hydrophilic-modified SLA (modSLA) titanium surfaces for 1 and 3 days. By day 3, the SLA surface elicited a pro-inflammatory response compared to the SMO surface with statistically significant up-regulation of 16 genes [Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) Interleukin (IL)-1β, Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)-1, 2, 3, 4, 18, 19, and 20, Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)-1, 5, 8 and 12, Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor (CCR)-7, Lymphotoxin-beta (LTB), and Leukotriene B4 receptor (LTB4R)]. This effect was countered by the modSLA surface, which down-regulated the expression of 10 genes (TNF, IL-1α and β, CCL-1, 3, 19 and 20, CXCL-1 and 8, and IL-1 receptor type 1), while two were up-regulated (osteopontin and CCR5) compared to the SLA surface. These cytokine gene expression changes were confirmed by decreased levels of corresponding protein secretion in response to modSLA compared to SLA. These results show that a hydrophilic titanium surface can modulate human macrophage pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and protein secretion. An attenuated pro-inflammatory response may be an important molecular mechanism for faster and/or improved wound healing. PMID:23595995

  3. Differentiating Asthma Phenotypes in Young Adults through Polyclonal Cytokine Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zoratti, Edward; Havstad, Suzanne; Wegienka, Ganesa; Nicholas, Charlotte; Bobbitt, Kevin R.; Woodcroft, Kimberley J.; Ownby, Dennis R.; Johnson, Christine Cole

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent research has emphasized the need to better discriminate asthma phenotypes and consider underlying mechanistic endotypes in epidemiological and clinical studies. While allergic asthma and non-allergic asthma are frequently combined into one disease category in observational research and clinical trials, few studies have investigated the extent to which these two separate phenotypes are associated with distinct cytokine immunological profiles in a representative young adult population. Objective To investigate the cytokine production-based endotypes underlying the clinical phenotypes of allergic and non-allergic asthma among a population-based birth cohort evaluated as young adults. Methods Subjects included 18–21 year-old members (n=540) of a suburban Detroit birth cohort study, the Childhood Allergy Study. PMA-stimulated whole blood IL4, IL5, IL10, IL12, IL13, IL17A, IL17F, IL22 and IFNγ secretory responses were analyzed for associations comparing participants with allergic versus non-allergic asthma phenotypes to those without asthma. Results Th2-polarized responses, measured as higher mean IL5 and IL13 secretion and lower ratios of IFNγ and IL12 to three Th2 cytokines IL4, IL5, or IL13, were observed only in allergic asthmatics. Non-allergic asthma was associated with Th1-polarized responses including higher adjusted IFNγ secretion compared to both allergic asthmatics and surprisingly, to those without asthma [OR=2.5 (1.2–5.1), p<0.01]. Conclusions As expected, young adults with a history of an allergic asthma phenotype exhibit a Th2-polarized cytokine response after polyclonal stimulation. However, Th1-polarization was observed in subjects with a history of non-allergic asthma. Allergic and non-allergic asthma are associated with etiologically distinct immune endotypes underscoring the importance of discriminating these endotypes in research analyses and clinical management. PMID:24801891

  4. Secret quality of love.

    PubMed

    Strachan-Hall, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    Many of us can recite three Donabedian dimensions of the quality of care of structure, process and outcome. Recently, I was introduced to another of Avedis Donabedian's quotes about the 'secret quality of love'. PMID:27581908

  5. Six secrets of champagne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard

    2015-12-01

    Popping open a bottle of champagne is one of life's great delights, but how much do you really know about the science behind this greatest of wines? Gérard Liger-Belair reveals his six favourite champagne secrets.

  6. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  7. Efficient quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huawang; Dai, Yuewei

    2016-05-01

    An efficient quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the dealer generates some single particles and then uses the operations of quantum-controlled-not and Hadamard gate to encode a determinate secret into these particles. The participants get their shadows by performing the single-particle measurements on their particles, and even the dealer cannot know their shadows. Compared to the existing schemes, our scheme is more practical within the present technologies.

  8. Diphenylarsinic Acid Induced Activation of Cultured Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes: Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Upregulation of Transcription Factors, and Release of Brain-Active Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Mami; Kojima, Mikiya; Asai, Ryota; Kanehira, Tomoko; Sakaguchi, Fumika; Takahata, Kazuaki; Arakaki, Rina; Aoyama, Yohei; Yoshida, Hikari; Yoshida, Kenji; Yukawa, Kazunori; Tashiro, Tomoko; Hirano, Seishiro

    2016-03-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was detected as the primary compound responsible for the arsenic poisoning that occurred in Kamisu, Ibaraki, Japan, where people using water from a well that was contaminated with a high level of arsenic developed neurological (mostly cerebellar) symptoms and dysregulation of regional cerebral blood flow. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of DPAA-induced cerebellar symptoms, we focused on astrocytes, which have a brain-protective function. Incubation with 10 µM DPAA for 96 h promoted cell proliferation, increased the expression of antioxidative stress proteins (heme oxygenase-1 and heat shock protein 70), and induced the release of cytokines (MCP-1, adrenomedullin, FGF2, CXCL1, and IL-6). Furthermore, DPAA overpoweringly increased the phosphorylation of three major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and SAPK/JNK), which indicated MAPK activation, and subsequently induced expression and/or phosphorylation of transcription factors (Nrf2, CREB, c-Jun, and c-Fos) in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes. Structure-activity relationship analyses of DPAA and other related pentavalent organic arsenicals revealed that DPAA at 10 µM activated astrocytes most effective among organic arsenicals tested at the same dose. These results suggest that in a cerebellum exposed to DPAA, abnormal activation of the MAPK-transcription factor pathway and irregular secretion of these neuroactive, glioactive, and/or vasoactive cytokines in astrocytes can be the direct/indirect cause of functional abnormalities in surrounding neurons, glial cells, and vascular cells: This in turn might lead to the onset of cerebellar symptoms and disruption of cerebral blood flow. PMID:26645585

  9. Leptin–cytokine crosstalk in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Gale; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben Rene

    2013-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence suggesting a positive correlation between leptin levels, obesity, post-menopause and breast cancer incidence, our current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in these relationships is still incomplete. Since the cloning of leptin in 1994 and its receptor (OB-R) 1 year later by Friedman’s laboratory (Zhang et al., 1994) and Tartaglia et al. (Tartaglia et al., 1995), respectively, more than 22,000 papers related to leptin functions in several biological systems have been published (Pubmed, 2012). The ob gene product, leptin, is an important circulating signal for the regulation of body weight. Additionally, leptin plays critical roles in the regulation of glucose homeostasis, reproduction, growth and the immune response. Supporting evidence for leptin roles in cancer has been shown in more than 1000 published papers, with almost 300 papers related to breast cancer (Pubmed, 2012). Specific leptin-induced signaling pathways are involved in the increased levels of inflammatory, mitogenic and pro-angiogenic factors in breast cancer. In obesity, a mild inflammatory condition, deregulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and adipokines such as IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and leptin from adipose tissue, inflammatory and cancer cells could contribute to the onset and progression of cancer. We used an in silico software program, Pathway Studio 9, and found 4587 references citing these various interactions. Functional crosstalk between leptin, IL-1 and Notch signaling (NILCO) found in breast cancer cells could represent the integration of developmental, proinflammatory and pro-angiogenic signals critical for leptin-induced breast cancer cell proliferation/migration, tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). Remarkably, the inhibition of leptin signaling via leptin peptide receptor antagonists (LPrAs) significantly reduced the establishment and growth of syngeneic, xenograft and carcinogen-induced breast cancer and, simultaneously

  10. Opioid control of gonadotrophin secretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Genazzani, A R; Genazzani, A D; Volpogni, C; Pianazzi, F; Li, G A; Surico, N; Petraglia, F

    1993-11-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-axis (HPA) is constantly under the modulatory effect of many substances, such as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and steroid hormones. Recently, the involvement of endogenous opioid peptides (EOP) in the control of the neuroendocrine mechanism modulating gonadotrophin secretion has been supported by several authors. It has been demonstrated that acute morphine administration decreases luteinizing hormone (LH) plasma levels and this is due to an inhibitory modulation on gonadotrophin releasing hormone discharge from the hypothalamic neurons. EOP are usually increased by stressful situations. In stress-induced amenorrhoea, the presence of low LH plasma levels and an abnormal LH pulsatile secretion has been related to an increased opioid activity, thus supporting the integrative role of opioids between hormonal and neuronal afferences of brain. PMID:8276950

  11. Glucose and acute exercise influence factors secreted by circulating angiogenic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Sarah; Guhanarayan, Gayatri; Burgess, Rachel

    2016-02-01

    Circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) influence vascular repair through the secretion of proangiogenic factors and cytokines. While CAC are deficient in patients with diabetes and exercise has a beneficial effect on CACs, the impact of these factors on paracrine secretion from CAC is unknown. We aimed to determine whether the in vitro secretion of selected cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) from CAC is influenced by hyperglycemia and acute exercise. Colony-forming unit CAC (CFU-CAC) were cultured from young active men (n = 9, 24 ± 2 years) at rest and after exercise under normal (5 mmol/L) and elevated (15 mmol/L) glucose. Preliminary relative multiplex cytokine analysis revealed that CAC conditioned culture media contained three of six measured cytokines: transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGFβ1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Single quantitative cytokine analysis was used to determine the concentration of each cytokine from the four conditions. NO was measured via Griess assay. There was a significant effect of CAC exposure to in vivo exercise on in vitro TGFβ1 secretion (P = 0.024) that was independent of glucose concentration. There was no effect of glucose or acute exercise on TNFα or MCP-1 concentration (both P > 0.05). The concentration of NO from CFU-CAC cultured in elevated glucose was lower following acute exercise (P = 0.002) suggesting that exercise did not maintain NO secretion under hyperglycemic conditions. Our results identify paracrine signaling factors that may be responsible for the proangiogenic function of CFU-CAC and an influence of acute exercise and elevated glucose on CFU-CAC soluble factor secretion. PMID:26847726

  12. Fermented soybeans, Chungkookjang, prevent hippocampal cell death and β-cell apoptosis by decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokines in gerbils with transient artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunmin; Kim, Da Sol; Kang, Sunna; Moon, Bo Reum

    2016-02-01

    Since Chungkookjang, a short-term fermented soybean, is known to improve glucose metabolism and antioxidant activity, it may prevent the neurological symptoms and glucose disturbance induced by artery occlusion. We investigated the protective effects and mechanisms of traditional (TFC) and standardized Chungkookjang fermented with Bacillus licheniformis (BLFC) against ischemia/reperfusion damage in the hippocampal CA1 region and against hyperglycemia after transient cerebral ischemia in gerbils. Gerbils were subjected to either an occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries for 8 min to render them ischemic or a sham operation. Ischemic gerbils were fed either a 40% fat diet containing 10% of either cooked soybean (CSB), TFC, or BLFC for 28 days. Neuronal cell death and cytokine expression in the hippocampus, neurological deficit, serum cytokine levels, and glucose metabolism were measured. TFC and BLFC contained more isoflavonoid aglycones than CSB. Artery occlusion increased the expressions of IL-1β and TNF-α as well as cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region and induced severe neurological symptoms. CSB, TFC, and BLFC prevented the neuronal cell death and the symptoms such as dropped eyelid, bristling hair, reduced muscle tone and flexor reflex, and abnormal posture and walking patterns, and suppressed cytokine expressions. CSB was less effective than TFC and BLFC. Artery occlusion induced glucose intolerance due to decreased insulin secretion and β-cell mass. TFC and BLFC prevented the impairment of glucose metabolism by artery occlusion. Especially TFC and BLFC increased β-cell proliferation and suppressed the β-cell apoptosis by suppressing TNF-α and IL-1β which in turn decreased cleaved caspase-3 that caused apoptosis. In conclusion, TFC and BLFC may prevent and alleviate neuronal cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region and neurological symptoms and poststroke hyperglycemia in gerbils with artery occlusion. This might be associated with

  13. Use of cytokines in infection.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Naoko; Xing, Zhou

    2004-11-01

    Infectious disease remains an ever-growing health concern worldwide due to increasing antibiotic-resistant microbial strains, immune-compromised populations, international traffic and globalisation, and bioterrorism. There exists an urgent need to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. In addition to classic antibiotic therapeutics, immune-modulatory molecules such as cytokines or their inhibitors represent a promising form of antimicrobial therapeutics or immune adjuvant used for the purpose of vaccination. These molecules, in the form of either recombinant protein or transgene, exert their antimicrobial effect by enhancing infectious agent-specific immune activation or memory development, or by dampening undesired inflammatory and immune responses resulting from infection and host defence mechanisms. In the last two decades, a number of cytokine therapy-based experimental and clinical trials have been conducted, and some of these efforts have led to the routine clinical use of cytokines. For instance, although IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis C with great success, many other cytokines are yet to be fully evaluated for their antimicrobial potential. This review discusses the biology and therapeutic potential of selected immune modulatory cytokines and their inhibitors, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IFN-gamma, IL-12 and TNF. PMID:15571481

  14. Altered serum cytokine signature in common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hel, Zdenek; Huijbregts, Richard P. H.; Xu, Jun; Nechvatalova, Jana; Vlkova, Marcela; Litzman, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most frequent form of primary symptomatic hypogammaglobulinemia. CVID patients display a number of abnormalities in lymphocyte subpopulations including chronic T-cell activation and decreased numbers of circulating CD4+ T cells and NK cells. We and others have recently shown that CVID is associated with increased concentration of soluble CD14 (sCD14) and other factors indicating limited microbial translocation. Methods To address the mechanisms of chronic immune activation in CVID, we performed a detailed analysis of cytokine serum levels in 36 patients with CVID, 52 patients with selective IgA deficiency (IgAD), and 56 healthy volunteers. Results We show that CVID is associated with elevated serum levels of CXCL-10/IP-10, IL-1R antagonist, TNF-α, IL-10, IL-12( p40), CCL-2/MCP-1, G-CSF, and CCL-11/eotaxin. The detected cytokine signature is consistent with an ongoing activation of cells of myeloid lineage. In contrast, the levels of cytokines typically produced by CD4+ T helper cells of Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2), Th2 (IL-9, IL-13), and Th17 (IL-17) subtypes were suppressed in CVID patients compared to healthy donors. Conclusions Presented data suggest that the altered cytokine profile observed in patients with CVID may be attributed to the activation of monocyte-macrophage and granulocyte lineages, possibly driven by the translocation of bacterial components across the gastrointestinal or respiratory tracts mucosal barrier. PMID:25246148

  15. Are cytokines associated with neuropsychiatric syndromes in humans?

    PubMed

    Hickie, I; Lloyd, A

    1995-08-01

    Traditional aetiological models in neuropsychiatry have placed little emphasis on the abnormal behavioural responses (decreased psychomotor activity, anorexia, weight loss, decreased social exploration and sexual behaviour, impaired cognitive function and increased somnolence) that are common to both psychiatric syndromes, notably depression, and the illness behaviour of sick animals. In recent years, the possible role of cytokines, as mediators of not only the immunological and metabolic responses to infection and inflammation but also a co-ordinated behavioural response, has been described. Further, a range of possible mechanisms for these effects has been postulated, notably involving corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and prostaglandins of the E series (PgE) with the central nervous system (CNS). Here we outline a series of human clinical conditions where neuropsychiatric syndromes co-occur with a host response to infection or inflammation. These may be characterized by cytokine production (e.g. acute, recurrent and chronic viral illness, systemic autoimmune diseases and chronic fatigue syndrome). Other clinical situations characterized by exposure to or in vivo production of cytokines (e.g. treatment of chronic infections and malignancies, progression and/or recurrence of malignancies) are also discussed. We postulate that the stereotyped behavioural repertoire observed is mediated by cytokine-dependent mechanisms within the CNS. Systematic studies of the behavioural responses of such patient groups are suggested, noting specifically correlations between the time course and severity of immune and neuroendocrine and behavioural responses and dose-response effects. PMID:8847162

  16. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  18. Cytokines in Machado Joseph Disease/Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3.

    PubMed

    da Silva Carvalho, Gerson; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Torrez, Vitor Rocco; Brochier, Andressa Wigner; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise; Russo, Aline; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur; D'Avila, Rui; Donis, Karina Carvalho; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Camey, Suzi; Portela, Luis Valmor; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the serum concentrations of a broad spectrum of cytokines in symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers of Machado Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) CAG expansions. Molecularly confirmed carriers and controls were studied. Age at onset, disease duration, and clinical scales Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), Neurological Examination Score for Spinocerebellar Ataxias (NESSCA), SCA Functional Index (SCAFI), and Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (CCFS) were obtained from the symptomatic carriers. Serum was obtained from all individuals and a cytokine panel "consisted of" eotaxin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP)-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-a, MIP-b, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was analyzed. In a subgroup of symptomatic carriers, the cytokine panel was repeated after 360 days. Cytokine distribution among groups was studied by discriminant analysis; changes in serum levels after 360 days were studied by generalized estimation equation. Sixty-six symptomatic carriers, 13 asymptomatic carriers, and 43 controls were studied. No differences in cytokine patterns were found between controls and carriers of the CAG expansions or between controls and symptomatic carriers only. In contrast, eotaxin concentrations were significantly higher in asymptomatic than in symptomatic carriers or in controls (p = 0.001, ANCOVA). Eotaxin did not correlate with age, disease duration, CAG expansion, NESSCA score, and SARA score. Among symptomatic carriers, eotaxin dropped after 360 days (p = 0.039, GEE). SCA3/MJD patients presented a benign pattern of

  19. Intranasal coadministration of Cholera toxin with amoeba lysates modulates the secretion of IgA and IgG antibodies, production of cytokines and expression of pIgR in the nasal cavity of mice in the model of Naegleria fowleri meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Yepez, Maricela; Campos-Rodriguez, Rafael; Lopez-Reyes, Israel; Bonilla-Lemus, Patricia; Rodriguez-Cortes, Antonio Yahve; Contis-Montes de Oca, Arturo; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Miliar-Garcia, Angel; Rojas-Hernandez, Saul

    2014-11-01

    The nasal mucosa is the first contact with antigens to induce IgA response. The role of this site has rarely been studied. We have shown than intranasal administration with Naegleria fowleri lysates plus Cholera toxin (CT) increased the protection (survival up to 100%) against N. fowleri infection in mice and apparently antibodies IgA and IgG together with polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells avoid the attachment of N. fowleri to apical side of the nasal epithelium. We also observed that nasal immunization resulted in the induction of antigen-specific IgG subclasses (IgG1 and IgG2a) in nasal washes at days 3 and 9 after the challenge and IgA and IgG in the nasal cavity, compared to healthy and infected mice. We found that immunization with both treatments, N. fowleri lysates plus CT or CT alone, increased the expression of the genes for alpha chain, its receptor (pIgR), and it also increased the expression of the corresponding proteins evidenced by the ∼65 and ∼74kDa bands, respectively. Since the production of pIgR, IgA and IgG antibodies, is up-regulated by some factors, we analyzed the expression of genes for IL-10, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β by using RT-PCR of nasal passages. Immunization resulted in an increased expression of IL-10, IL-6, and IFN-γ cytokines. We also aimed to examine the possible influences of immunization and challenge on the production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β). We observed that the stimulus of immunization inhibits the production of TNF-α compared to the infected group where the infection without immunization causes an increase in it. Thus, it is possible that the coexistence of selected cytokines produced by our immunization model may provide a highly effective immunological environment for the production of IgA, IgG and pIgR as well as a strong activation of the PMN in mucosal effector tissue such as nasal passages. PMID:24731967

  20. Intracellular staining and detection of cytokines by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Freer, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    The detection of cytokines inside cells producing them has made a tremendous impact on the way immune reactivity is measured. Intracellular cytokine staining is the only immunological technique allowing determination of antigen-specific T cell function and phenotype at the same time; for this reason, it is one of the most popular methods to measure antigenicity in the evaluation of vaccine efficacy and in the study of infectious diseases. It is a flow cytometric technique based on staining of intracellular cytokines and cell markers (surface or cytoplasmic) with fluorescent antibodies after short term culture of stimulated immune cells in the presence of a protein secretion inhibitor, followed by fixation and permeabilization. Most experiments involve detection of five to ten different colors but many more can be detected by modern flow cytometers. Here, we discuss our experience using a standard protocol for intracellular cytokine staining. PMID:24908309

  1. Cytokines and persistent viral infections.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C and B or Epstein-Barr virus often cause chronic viral infections in humans. Persistence of these viruses in the host is associated with a dramatic loss of T-cell immune response due to functional T-cell exhaustion. Developing efficient immunotherapeutic approaches to prevent viral persistence and/or to restore a highly functional T-cell mediated immunity remains a major challenge. During the last two decades, numerous studies aimed to identify relevant host-derived factors that could be modulated to achieve this goal. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the role of cytokines in preventing or facilitating viral persistence. We concentrate on the impact of multiple relevant cytokines in T-cell dependent immune response to chronic viral infection and the potential for using cytokines as therapeutic agents in mice and humans. PMID:26907634

  2. Bronchial secretion concentrations of tobramycin.

    PubMed

    Alexander, M R; Schoell, J; Hicklin, G; Kasik, J E; Coleman, D

    1982-02-01

    The mean concentrations of tobramycin in bronchial secretions from patients with pneumonia were almost two times greater than secretions from patients free of lung infection. Mean tobramycin bronchial secretion to serum concentration ratios also were higher when obtained from infected lungs (0.66 versus 0.17) These data suggest that lung infection enhances the concentrations of tobramycin in bronchial secretions. PMID:7065524

  3. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  4. Genetic abnormalities associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Takafumi; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs with high frequency in childhood and is associated with high mortality in adults. Recent technical advances in next-generation sequencing have shed light on genetic abnormalities in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as the precursor to ALL pathogenesis. Based on these genetic abnormalities, ALL is now being reclassified into newly identified subtypes. Philadelphia chromosome-like B-lineage ALL is one of the new high-risk subtypes characterized by genetic alterations that activate various signaling pathways, including those involving cytokine receptors, tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic modifiers. Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL is essentially heterogeneous; however, deletion mutations in the IKZF1 gene encoding the transcription factor IKAROS underlie many cases as a key factor inducing aggressive phenotypes and poor treatment responses. Whole-genome sequencing studies of ALL patients and ethnically matched controls also identified inherited genetic variations in lymphoid neoplasm-related genes, which are likely to increase ALL susceptibility. These findings are directly relevant to clinical hematology, and further studies on this aspect could contribute to accurate diagnosis, effective monitoring of residual disease, and patient-oriented therapies. PMID:26991355

  5. Cytokine levels in groups of patients with different duration of chronic secretory otitis.

    PubMed

    Matković, Svjetlana; Vojvodić, Danilo; Baljosevic, Ivan

    2007-11-01

    Chronic secretory otitis relates to the permanent presence of secretion in the middle ear for more than 3 months. The reason why applied therapy is often ineffective is that, for now, etiopathogenic molecular mechanisms responsible for the cause and the course of the secretory process in the mucus of the middle ear have not been precisely defined. Cytokines are the key mediators in middle ear inflammation with secretory otitis and regulating different inflammation states can add to the cause of the molecular processes that lead to hystopathological changes in mucus and submucus characteristically for the chronic state of secretory otitis. The aim of our work was to define the pro-inflammatory, immunoregulatory and allergy-associated cytokine levels in middle ear secretion samples of diseased children and to compare the defined values with the secretory process continuance in groups of patients who were diseased for more or less than 3 months. According to the results that have showed higher concentration of all ten examined cytokines in the secretion samples of the children who had secretory otitis for a longer time, it can be concluded that the disturbance expression regulation of the pro-inflammatory TNFalpha, TNFbeta, IL1beta, IFNgamma, IL-6 and IL-8, as well as immunoregulatory IL-2 and IL-10, and allergy associated cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 relating to the hyper production can add to the conversion of the inflammatory process to the chronic state, which has been maintained for longer than 3 months. PMID:17643258

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polymorphisms Associated with Cytokine Responses in Smallpox Vaccine Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Haralambieva, Iana H.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The role that genetics plays in response to infection or disease is becoming increasingly clear as we learn more about immunogenetics and host-pathogen interactions. Here we report a genome-wide analysis of the effects of host genetic variation on cytokine responses to vaccinia virus stimulation in smallpox vaccine recipients. Our data show that vaccinia stimulation of immune individuals results in secretion of inflammatory and Th1 cytokines. We identified multiple SNPs significantly associated with variations in cytokine secretion. These SNPs are found in genes with known immune function, as well as in genes encoding for proteins involved in signal transduction, cytoskeleton, membrane channels and ion transport, as well as others with no previously identified connection to immune responses. The large number of significant SNP associations implies that cytokine secretion in response to vaccinia virus is a complex process controlled by multiple genes and gene families. Follow-up studies to replicate these findings and then pursue mechanistic studies will provide a greater understanding of how genetic variation influences vaccine responses. PMID:22610502

  7. Cytokine production in patients with papillary thyroid cancer and associated autoimmune Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zivancevic-Simonovic, Snezana; Mihaljevic, Olgica; Majstorovic, Ivana; Popovic, Suzana; Markovic, Slavica; Milosevic-Djordjevic, Olivera; Jovanovic, Zorica; Mijatovic-Teodorovic, Ljiljana; Mihajlovic, Dusan; Colic, Miodrag

    2015-08-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is the most frequent thyroid autoimmune disease, while papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common endocrine malignancies. A few patients with HT also develop PTC. The aim of this study was to analyze cytokine profiles in patients with PTC accompanied with autoimmune HT in comparison with those in patients with PTC alone or HT alone and healthy subjects. Cytokine levels were determined in supernatants obtained from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated whole blood cultures in vitro. The concentrations of selected cytokines: Th1-interferon gamma (IFN-γ); Th2-interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 5 (IL-5), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interleukin 13 (IL-13); Th9-interleukin 9 (IL-9); and Th17-interleukin 17 (IL-17A) were measured using multiplex cytokine detection systems for human Th1/Th2/Th9/Th17/Th22. We found that PTC patients with HT produced significantly higher concentrations of IL-4, IL-6, IL-9, IL-13 and IFN-γ than PTC patients without HT. In conclusion, autoimmune HT affects the cytokine profile of patients with PTC by stimulating secretion of Th1/Th2/Th9 types of cytokines. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratios in PTC patients with associated autoimmune HT indicate a marked shift toward Th2 immunity. PMID:25971541

  8. Fueling type III secretion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems are complex nanomachines that export proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm across the cell envelope in a single step. They are at the core of the machinery used to assemble the bacterial flagellum, and the needle complex many Gram-negative pathogens use to inject effector proteins into host cells and cause disease. Several models have been put forward to explain how this export is energized, and the mechanism has been the subject of considerable debate. Here we present an overview of these models and discuss their relative merits. Recent evidence suggests that the proton motive force is the primary energy source for type III secretion, although contribution from refolding of secreted proteins has not been ruled out. The mechanism, by which the proton motive force is converted to protein export, remains enigmatic. PMID:25701111

  9. Ovarian tumors secreting insulin.

    PubMed

    Battocchio, Marialberta; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Chiarelli, Silvia; Trento, Mariangela; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Pasquali, Claudio; De Carlo, Eugenio; Dassie, Francesca; Mioni, Roberto; Rebellato, Andrea; Fallo, Francesco; Degli Uberti, Ettore; Martini, Chiara; Vettor, Roberto; Maffei, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    Combined ovarian germ cell and neuroendocrine tumors are rare. Only few cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion have been hypothesized in the literature. An ovarian tumor was diagnosed in a 76-year-old woman, referred to our department for recurrent hypoglycemia with hyperinsulinism. In vivo tests, in particular fasting test, rapid calcium infusion test, and Octreotide test were performed. Ectopic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia was demonstrated in vivo and hypoglycemia disappeared after hysteroadnexectomy. Histological exam revealed an ovarian germ cell tumor with neuroendocrine and Yolk sac differentiation, while immunostaining showed insulin positivity in neuroendocrine cells. A cell culture was obtained by tumoral cells, testing Everolimus, and Pasireotide. Insulin was detected in cell culture medium and Everolimus and Pasireotide demonstrated their potentiality in reducing insulin secretion, more than controlling cell viability. Nine cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion reported in literature have been reviewed. These data confirm the ovarian tissue potentiality to induce hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic syndrome after neoplastic transformation. PMID:25896552

  10. TLR-mediated secretion of endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yoshikuni; Ogawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Takahiro J; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Macrophages play an important role in host defense under several immunological, inflammatory, and/or infectious conditions. In our previous work, we demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) was secreted from macrophages in response to LPS and IFN-γ, and it enhanced their phagocytic activity. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism of LPS/IFN-γ-induced ERAP1 secretion. LPS/IFN-γ-induced secretion of the enzyme from the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was suppressed by polymyxin B. Several agonists of TLRs, such as Pam3CSK4, FSL-1, and ODN1826, induced its secretion. In contrast, neutralizing Abs to IFN-β and TNF-α receptor type 1 suppressed its secretion. Using murine peritoneal macrophages derived from TNF-α and type 1 IFNR knockout mice, we confirmed the involvement of these two cytokines in ERAP1 secretion. In addition, secretion of ERAP1 from both RAW264.7 cells and murine peritoneal macrophages was induced by A23187 and thapsigargin and inhibited by BAPTA-AM and the calmodulin inhibitor W7. These results suggest that LPS/IFN-γ-induced secretion of ERAP1 is mediated by TLRs via induction of intermediate cytokines such as IFN-β and TNF-α, which in turn lead to enhanced cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and calmodulin activation. PMID:24688025

  11. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

  12. Mechanisms of Normal and Abnormal Endometrial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of coagulation, is enhanced in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. Progesterone also augments a second HESC hemostatic factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In contrast, progestins inhibit HESC matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, 3 and 9 expression to stabilize endometrial stromal and vascular extracellular matrix. Through these mechanisms decidualized endometrium is rendered both hemostatic and resistant to excess trophoblast invasion in the mid-luteal phase and throughout gestation to prevent hemorrhage and accreta. In non-fertile cycles, progesterone withdrawal results in decreased HESC TF and PAI-expression and increased MMP activity and inflammatory cytokine production promoting the controlled hemorrhage of menstruation and related tissue sloughing. In contrast to these well ordered biochemical processes, unpredictable endometrial bleeding associated with anovulation reflects absence of progestational effects on TF, PAI-1 and MMP activity as well as unrestrained angiogenesis rendering the endometrium non-hemostatic, proteolytic and highly vascular. Abnormal bleeding associated with long-term progestin-only contraceptives results not from impaired hemostasis but from unrestrained angiogenesis leading to large fragile endometrial vessels. This abnormal angiogenesis reflects progestational inhibition of endometrial blood flow promoting local hypoxia and generation of reactive oxygen species that increase production of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in HESCs and Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in endometrial endothelial cells while decreasing HESC expression of angiostatic, Ang-1. The resulting vessel fragility promotes bleeding. Aberrant angiogenesis also underlies abnormal bleeding associated with myomas and endometrial polyps however there are gaps in our understanding of this pathology. PMID:21499503

  13. Multiparty quantum secret sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhanjun; Li Yong; Man Zhongxiao

    2005-04-01

    Based on a quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol [Phys. Rev. A 69 052319 (2004)], we propose a (n,n)-threshold scheme of multiparty quantum secret sharing of classical messages (QSSCM) using only single photons. We take advantage of this multiparty QSSCM scheme to establish a scheme of multiparty secret sharing of quantum information (SSQI), in which only all quantum information receivers collaborate can the original qubit be reconstructed. A general idea is also proposed for constructing multiparty SSQI schemes from any QSSCM scheme.

  14. Mitotic Asynchrony Induces Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Secretion from Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, Sarah E.; Benton, Angela S.; Watson, Alan M.; Kureshi, Suraiya; Reeves, Erica M. K.; Damsker, Jesse; Wang, Zuyi; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Anderson, Julia; Williams, Aaron M.; Lee, Amber J. Y.; Hayes, Kathleen; Rose, Mary C.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    We recently proposed that mitotic asynchrony in repairing tissue may underlie chronic inflammation and fibrosis, where immune cell infiltration is secondary to proinflammatory cross-talk among asynchronously repairing adjacent tissues. Building on our previous finding that mitotic asynchrony is associated with proinflammatory/fibrotic cytokine secretion (e.g., transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1), here we provide evidence supporting cause-and-effect. Under normal conditions, primary airway epithelial basal cell populations undergo mitosis synchronously and do not secrete proinflammatory or profibrotic cytokines. However, when pairs of nonasthmatic cultures were mitotically synchronized at 12 hours off-set and then combined, the mixed cell populations secreted elevated levels of TGF-β1. This shows that mitotic asynchrony is not only associated with but is also causative of TGF-β1 secretion. The secreted cytokines and other mediators from asthmatic cells were not the cause of asynchronous regeneration; synchronously mitotic nonasthmatic epithelia exposed to conditioned media from asthmatic cells did not show changes in mitotic synchrony. We also tested if resynchronization of regenerating asthmatic airway epithelia reduces TGF-β1 secretion and found that pulse-dosed dexamethasone, simvastatin, and aphidicolin were all effective. We therefore propose a new model for chronic inflammatory and fibrotic conditions where an underlying factor is mitotic asynchrony. PMID:24669775

  15. Cytokine-mediated β-cell damage in PARP-1-deficient islets

    PubMed Central

    Meares, Gordon P.; Hughes, Katherine J.; Hansen, Polly A.; Corbett, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) is an abundant nuclear protein that is activated by DNA damage; once active, it modifies nuclear proteins through attachment of poly(ADP)-ribose units derived from β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). In mice, the deletion of PARP-1 attenuates tissue injury in a number of animal models of human disease, including streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Also, inflammatory cell signaling and inflammatory gene expression are attenuated in macrophages isolated from endotoxin-treated PARP-1-deficient mice. In this study, the effects of PARP-1 deletion on cytokine-mediated β-cell damage and macrophage activation were evaluated. There are no defects in inflammatory mediator signaling or inflammatory gene expression in macrophages and islets isolated from PARP-1-deficient mice. While PARP-1 deficiency protects islets against cytokine-induced islet cell death as measured by biochemical assays of membrane polarization, the genetic absence of PARP-1 does not effect cytokine-induced inhibition of insulin secretion or cytokine-induced DNA damage in islets. While PARP-1 deficiency appears to provide protection from cell death, it fails to provide protection against the inhibitory actions of cytokines on insulin secretion or the damaging actions on islet DNA integrity. PMID:22535743

  16. Plasma Cytokine Profiles in Long-Term Strenuous Exercise.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hilde G; Øktedalen, Olav; Opstad, Per-Kristian; Lyberg, Torstein

    2016-01-01

    The open window theory indicates altered immunity 3 to 72 hours after exercise. The J-curve describes the risk of illness in response to exercise. The aim of this study was to examine the secretion of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines before and after long-term strenuous exercise. Fourteen marathon and 16 half-marathon runners and 10 military cadets participating in a military ranger-training course were recruited to this study. Within-subject design was used measuring levels of plasma cytokines before, during, and after exercise. Plasma cytokines were measured using Luminex multiplex technology and ELISA. Comparing pre/post plasma levels both the marathon- and the half-marathon runners showed heavily increased levels of IL-6, IL-10, and IL-8 (P < 0.001). LPS stimulation among the half-marathon runners decreased the postrace levels of IL-6, IL-1b, and TNFα by 45%, 24%, and 43%, respectively (P < 0.01). During the ranger training course the spontaneous and LPS-stimulated levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1b, and TNFα changed in a similar fashion as in the half-marathon runners although the fluctuations were smaller. Our study supports the open window and the J-curve theory; the immune system is more activated and the subjects are more threatened to infectious pathogens after intensive physical activity and in the period after exercise. PMID:27239554

  17. Crosstalk between cartilage and bone: when bone cytokines matter.

    PubMed

    Funck-Brentano, Thomas; Cohen-Solal, Martine

    2011-04-01

    The cartilage damage which characterizes osteoarthritis is often accompanied by bone lesions. Joint integrity results from the balance in the physiological interactions between bone and cartilage. Several local factors regulate the physiological remodeling of cartilage, the disequilibrium of these leading to a higher cartilage catabolism. Several cytokines secreted by bone cells can induce chondrocyte differentiation, which suggests their role in the dialogue between both cells. Accumulative in vivo evidence shows that increased bone resorption occurs at an early stage in the development of osteoarthritis and that blocking bone-resorbing cytokines prevents cartilage damage, confirming the role of bone factors in the crosstalk of both tissues. Recently, molecules of the Wnt pathway have emerged as key regulators of bone and cartilage. Activation of Wnt/βcatenin induces an imbalance in cartilage homeostasis, and agonists/antagonists of Wnt are potential candidates for this interaction. This review will summarize what is known about the contribution of bone cytokines to the physiological remodeling of cartilage and in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. PMID:21596615

  18. Cytokine production by cell cultures from bronchial subepithelial myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Howarth, P H; Roche, W R

    1996-09-01

    Myofibroblasts have been previously described beneath the bronchial epithelium and were found to increase in number proportional to the accumulation of extracellular matrix in the bronchial lamina reticularis in asthma. The aim of this study was to assess further the contribution of these structural cells to allergic inflammation in the bronchial mucosa through their cytokine expression. Cell cultures were established from the lamina reticularis of human bronchial biopsies from asthmatic and non-asthmatic subjects. Cytokine secretion was measured by ELISA in supernatants of cultures with or without tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The mRNA levels for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the cultures were examined by ribonuclease protection assays (RPAs). Bronchial myofibroblasts grown from bronchial biopsies were capable of producing GM-CSF, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and stem cell factor (SCF) constitutively. The GM-CSF production by myofibroblasts was significantly increased in response to TNF-alpha simulation with a corresponding increase in GM-CSF mRNA expression. The enhancement of GM-CSF production by TNF-alpha in myofibroblasts was blocked by the inhibition of RNA synthesis. Prednisolone abolished the GM-CSF production. This study provides evidence for the role of bronchial myofibroblasts in the regulation of inflammatory cell recruitment and activation by interaction in the cytokine network in the bronchial mucosa. PMID:8943823

  19. Plasma Cytokine Profiles in Long-Term Strenuous Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Hilde G.; Øktedalen, Olav; Opstad, Per-Kristian; Lyberg, Torstein

    2016-01-01

    The open window theory indicates altered immunity 3 to 72 hours after exercise. The J-curve describes the risk of illness in response to exercise. The aim of this study was to examine the secretion of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines before and after long-term strenuous exercise. Fourteen marathon and 16 half-marathon runners and 10 military cadets participating in a military ranger-training course were recruited to this study. Within-subject design was used measuring levels of plasma cytokines before, during, and after exercise. Plasma cytokines were measured using Luminex multiplex technology and ELISA. Comparing pre/post plasma levels both the marathon- and the half-marathon runners showed heavily increased levels of IL-6, IL-10, and IL-8 (P < 0.001). LPS stimulation among the half-marathon runners decreased the postrace levels of IL-6, IL-1b, and TNFα by 45%, 24%, and 43%, respectively (P < 0.01). During the ranger training course the spontaneous and LPS-stimulated levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1b, and TNFα changed in a similar fashion as in the half-marathon runners although the fluctuations were smaller. Our study supports the open window and the J-curve theory; the immune system is more activated and the subjects are more threatened to infectious pathogens after intensive physical activity and in the period after exercise. PMID:27239554

  20. Xuebijing injection alleviates cytokine-induced inflammatory liver injury in CLP-induced septic rats through induction of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ailin; Li, Jing; Bao, Yuhua; Yuan, Dingshan; Huang, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines and liver injury are associated with the pathogenesis of sepsis. Xuebijing injection, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been used in the treatment of sepsis and can contribute to the improvement of patients' health. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet clearly illuminated. In the present study, a septic rat model with liver injury was established by the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) method. Histological alterations to the liver, activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), levels of inflammatory cytokine secretion and the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) in the CLP model rats with and without Xuebijing treatment were determined. The results showed that Xuebijing injection ameliorated the pathological changes in liver tissues caused by sepsis, and reduced the sepsis-induced elevation in serum ALT and AST levels. Furthermore, Xuebijing injection markedly downregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin (IL)-6, and upregulated the expression of IL-10. More importantly, SOCS1 expression levels at the protein and mRNA levels were further increased by Xuebijing. These findings demonstrate that Xuebijing injection can significantly alleviate liver injury in CLP-induced septic rats via the regulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion and the promotion of SOCS1 expression. The protective effects of Xuebijing injection suggest its therapeutic potential in the treatment of CLP-induced liver injury. PMID:27602076

  1. Secrets of Successful Homeschooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Parents who homeschool gifted children often find the daily practice of home education very different from what they had imagined. Gifted children are complex in both personality and learning styles. Parents who say that homeschooling works well for their gifted children have learned from others or discovered on their own several secrets that make…

  2. Salivary Gland Secretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, H. L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes materials and procedures for an experiment utilizing a live dog to demonstrate: (1) physiology of the salivary gland; (2) parasympathetic control of the salivary gland; (3) influence of varying salivary flow rates on sodium and potassium ions, osmolarity and pH; and (4) salivary secretion as an active process. (DS)

  3. Trade-Secret Dispute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    1994-01-01

    A Michigan court has ruled that a Wayne State University (Michigan) chemistry professor appropriated a trade secret from a Massachusetts chemist for whom he was consulting and incorporated it into his own patent application, violating a written agreement. The university contends its pursuit of the patent was not improper. (MSE)

  4. US weapons secrets revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.S.; Arkin, W.M.

    1993-03-01

    Extraordinary details have only recently been revealed about the struggle over the control of early U.S. nuclear weapons and their initial deployments abroad. The information comes from a newly declassified top secret report, part of a larger study, The History of the Strategic Arms Competition, 1945-1972, commissioned by Defense Secretary James R. Schlisinger in summer 1974.

  5. Physiology of bile secretion

    PubMed Central

    Esteller, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment, in different situations, results in the syndrome of cholestasis. The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed. Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation. The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bile-duct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts. The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed. In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled, cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves. A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included. The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology. PMID:18837079

  6. Phosphate depletion impairs leucine-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Oh, H Y; Fadda, G Z; Smogorzewski, M; Liou, H H; Massry, S G

    1994-11-01

    Phosphate depletion (PD) in vivo causes a sundry of abnormalities in pancreatic islets including a rise in cytosolic calcium, low ATP content, reduced Ca2+ ATPase and Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, and impaired insulin secretion in response to glucose or potassium. L-Leucine is a strong secretagogue that triggers insulin secretion by deamination to alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) and the subsequent metabolism of the latter to ATP and by the activation of glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), which acts on glutamate to generate alpha-ketoglutarate, the metabolism of which results in ATP production. The generation of ATP triggers events that lead to insulin secretion. It is not known whether PD impairs leucine-induced insulin secretion, and the cellular derangements that are involved in such an abnormality are not defined. These issues were studied in PD rats and in pair-weighed normal animals as controls. D-Leucine uptake by islets from PD rats is normal, but both leucine- and KIC-induced insulin secretions are impaired and the activity of branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase, which facilitates the metabolism of KIC, is reduced. Both leucine and 2-aminobicyclo (2-2-1) haptene failed to stimulate GLDH and to augment the generation of alpha-ketoglutarate in the islets of PD rats. Also, the concentration of basal alpha-ketoglutarate was significantly higher in the islets of PD rats, suggesting that its metabolism is impaired. In addition, the activity of glutaminase is significantly reduced, an abnormality that would result in decreased production of glutamate, the substrate for GLDH. The data show that PD impairs leucine-induced insulin secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7873737

  7. Overview of cytokines and nitric oxide involvement in immuno-pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Soufli, Imene; Toumi, Ryma; Rafa, Hayet; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are complex disorders with undetermined etiology. Several hypotheses suggest that IBDs result from an abnormal immune response against endogenous flora and luminal antigens in genetically susceptible individuals. The dysfunction of the mucosal immune response is implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. The balance between pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and IL-17A], anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13), and immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factors β) is disturbed. Moreover, evidence from animal and clinical studies demonstrate a positive correlation between an increased concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the severity of the disease. Interestingly, proinflammatory cytokines are involved in the up-regulation of inducible oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in IBD. However, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines are responsible for the negative regulation of iNOS. A positive correlation between NO production and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, IL-12, and interferon-γ) were reported in patients with IBD. This review focuses on the role of cytokines in intestinal inflammation and their relationship with NO in IBD. PMID:27602236

  8. Overview of cytokines and nitric oxide involvement in immuno-pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Soufli, Imene; Toumi, Ryma; Rafa, Hayet; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are complex disorders with undetermined etiology. Several hypotheses suggest that IBDs result from an abnormal immune response against endogenous flora and luminal antigens in genetically susceptible individuals. The dysfunction of the mucosal immune response is implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. The balance between pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and IL-17A], anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13), and immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factors β) is disturbed. Moreover, evidence from animal and clinical studies demonstrate a positive correlation between an increased concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the severity of the disease. Interestingly, proinflammatory cytokines are involved in the up-regulation of inducible oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in IBD. However, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines are responsible for the negative regulation of iNOS. A positive correlation between NO production and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, IL-12, and interferon-γ) were reported in patients with IBD. This review focuses on the role of cytokines in intestinal inflammation and their relationship with NO in IBD. PMID:27602236

  9. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  10. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  11. Cytokine Signature in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Izabella Rodrigues; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Luan Vieira; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Barros, Thais Lins Souza; Gelape, Cláudio Léo; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease with high mortality rate. Cytokines participate in its pathogenesis and may contribute to early diagnosis improving the outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile in IE. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured by cytometric bead array (CBA) at diagnosis in 81 IE patients, and compared with 34 healthy subjects and 30 patients with non-IE infections, matched to the IE patients by age and gender. Mean age of the IE patients was 47±17 years (range, 15–80 years), and 40 (50%) were male. The IE patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α as compared to the healthy individuals. The median levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 were higher in the IE than in the non-IE infections group. TNF-α and IL-12 levels were higher in staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. There was a higher proportion of both low IL-10 producers and high producers of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 in the staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. This study reinforces a relationship between the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, IL-12 and TNF-α, and the pathogenesis of IE. A lower production of IL-10 and impairment in cytokine network may reflect the severity of IE and may be useful for risk stratification. PMID:26225421

  12. Cytokine Signature in Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Izabella Rodrigues; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Luan Vieira; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Barros, Thais Lins Souza; Gelape, Cláudio Léo; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease with high mortality rate. Cytokines participate in its pathogenesis and may contribute to early diagnosis improving the outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine profile in IE. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured by cytometric bead array (CBA) at diagnosis in 81 IE patients, and compared with 34 healthy subjects and 30 patients with non-IE infections, matched to the IE patients by age and gender. Mean age of the IE patients was 47±17 years (range, 15-80 years), and 40 (50%) were male. The IE patients had significantly higher serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α as compared to the healthy individuals. The median levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 were higher in the IE than in the non-IE infections group. TNF-α and IL-12 levels were higher in staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. There was a higher proportion of both low IL-10 producers and high producers of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 in the staphylococcal IE than in the non-staphylococcal IE subgroup. This study reinforces a relationship between the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, IL-12 and TNF-α, and the pathogenesis of IE. A lower production of IL-10 and impairment in cytokine network may reflect the severity of IE and may be useful for risk stratification. PMID:26225421

  13. Hypothalamic neuronal responses to cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, M.

    1990-01-01

    Fever has been extensively studied in the past few decades. The hypothesis that hypothalamic thermosensitive neurons play a major role in both normal thermoregulation and in fever production and lysis has particularly helped to advance our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the response to pyrogens. Furthermore, new data in the study of host defense responses induced by pyrogenic cytokines such as interleukin 1, interferon alpha 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6 have demonstrated that those factors have multiple, yet coordinated, regulatory activities in the central nervous system, so that our understanding of the role of the brain in the activity of these agents requires a new perspective and dimension. Thus, recent evidence from our laboratory indicates that blood-borne cytokines may be detected in the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis and transduced there into neuronal signals. Such signals may then affect distinct, but partially overlapping, sets of neuronal systems in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, mediating directly and/or indirectly the array of various host defense responses characteristic of infection that are thought to be induced by blood-borne cytokines. PMID:2205055

  14. Neutrophil Elastase Modulates Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Benabid, Rym; Wartelle, Julien; Malleret, Laurette; Guyot, Nicolas; Gangloff, Sophie; Lebargy, François; Belaaouaj, Azzaq

    2012-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that following bacterial infection, the massive recruitment and activation of the phagocytes, neutrophils, is accompanied with the extracellular release of active neutrophil elastase (NE), a potent serine protease. Using NE-deficient mice in a clinically relevant model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia, we provide compelling in vivo evidence that the absence of NE was associated with decreased protein and transcript levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MIP-2, and IL-6 in the lungs, coinciding with increased mortality of mutant mice to infection. The implication of NE in the induction of cytokine expression involved at least in part Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). These findings were further confirmed following exposure of cultured macrophages to purified NE. Together, our data suggest strongly for the first time that NE not only plays a direct antibacterial role as it has been previously reported, but released active enzyme can also modulate cytokine expression, which contributes to host protection against P. aeruginosa. In light of our findings, the long held view that considers NE as a prime suspect in P. aeruginosa-associated diseases will need to be carefully reassessed. Also, therapeutic strategies aiming at NE inhibition should take into account the physiologic roles of the enzyme. PMID:22927440

  15. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  16. Low Level Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Decrease Connexin36 Gap Junction Coupling in Mouse and Human Islets through Nitric Oxide-mediated Protein Kinase Cδ.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, Nikki L; Walter, Rachelle L; Hemmati, Alireza; Westacott, Matthew J; Benninger, Richard K P

    2016-02-12

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the decline in islet function during the development of diabetes. Cytokines can disrupt insulin secretion and calcium dynamics; however, the mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood. Connexin36 gap junctions coordinate glucose-induced calcium oscillations and pulsatile insulin secretion across the islet. Loss of gap junction coupling disrupts these dynamics, similar to that observed during the development of diabetes. This study investigates the mechanisms by which pro-inflammatory cytokines mediate gap junction coupling. Specifically, as cytokine-induced NO can activate PKCδ, we aimed to understand the role of PKCδ in modulating cytokine-induced changes in gap junction coupling. Isolated mouse and human islets were treated with varying levels of a cytokine mixture containing TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ. Islet dysfunction was measured by insulin secretion, calcium dynamics, and gap junction coupling. Modulators of PKCδ and NO were applied to determine their respective roles in modulating gap junction coupling. High levels of cytokines caused cell death and decreased insulin secretion. Low levels of cytokine treatment disrupted calcium dynamics and decreased gap junction coupling, in the absence of disruptions to insulin secretion. Decreases in gap junction coupling were dependent on NO-regulated PKCδ, and altered membrane organization of connexin36. This study defines several mechanisms underlying the disruption to gap junction coupling under conditions associated with the development of diabetes. These mechanisms will allow for greater understanding of islet dysfunction and suggest ways to ameliorate this dysfunction during the development of diabetes. PMID:26668311

  17. Neonatal and Adult AMphi Upregulate Cytokine Gene Transcription Via p38 MAPK Signaling in Response to RSV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of bronchiolitis in premature and newborn infants. Alveolar macrophages (AMphi) are important innate cytokine-secreting cells in the lung, with critical roles in pathogen clearance and antigen presentation. As the neonatal AMphi response is not co...

  18. In vitro cow's milk protein-specific inflammatory and regulatory cytokine responses in preterm infants with necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Adel E; Chuang, Shu-Ling; Hayes, Peter; Fell, John M E

    2011-02-01

    Enteral feeding with cow's milk formula is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and sepsis. Dietary antigen sensitization may play a role in promoting and/or sustaining inflammation in both conditions. Aiming at investigating cow's milk protein (CMP)-specific cytokine responses in preterm infants with NEC and sepsis, 14 babies with NEC, 14 matched healthy controls, and 10 septic controls were recruited. Unstimulated and stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) secreting IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β1 were counted by the single-cell enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay. During the acute phase of NEC, patients showed a general pattern of a high level of cytokine secretion both when unstimulated and stimulated by mitogen [phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)] and CMPs: beta-lactoglobulin (β-lg) and casein. These responses were more marked to β-lg for IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 than TGF-β1. Cytokine responses in sepsis were lower than in NEC (lowest in healthy controls, with a minimal TGF-β1 response). At term, lower frequencies of cytokine-secreting cells were elicited than during the acute phase, except for TGF-β1 secreting cells, which increased at term (in response to PHA and CMPs) particularly following not only NEC but also sepsis. PMID:20975616

  19. Temporal pattern and effect of sex on lipopolysaccharide-induced stress hormone and cytokine response in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temporal pattern and gender effect on immune and stress hormone responses to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was assessed using a pig model. Secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta and IL-6 increased (P < 0.05) in a time-depend...

  20. Temporal pattern and effect of sex on lipopolysaccharide-induced stress hormone and cytokine response in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temporal pattern and gender effect of immune and stress hormone responses to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge were assessed using a pig model. Secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 increased in a time-dependent manner f...

  1. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner. PMID:22419949

  2. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  3. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  4. Cell secretion: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jeremic, A

    2008-01-01

    This past decade has witnessed the publication of a flurry of scientific papers and reports on the subject of cell secretion, following discovery of a permanent plasma membrane structure termed ‘porosome’ and its determination as the universal secretory machinery in cells. This discovery has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process, demonstrating that membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the porosome base to release their contents to the cell exterior. The regulated release of intravesicular contents during cell secretion is governed by dilation of the porosome opening to the outside, and the extent of vesicle swelling. In agreement, a great number of articles have been written and studies performed, which are briefly discussed in this article. PMID:18363838

  5. Proactive quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huawang; Dai, Yuewei

    2015-11-01

    A proactive quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the participants can update their key shares periodically. In an updating period, one participant randomly generates the EPR pairs, and the other participants update their key shares and perform the corresponding unitary operations on the particles of the EPR pairs. Then, the participant who generated the EPR pairs performs the Bell-state measurement and updates his key share according to the result of the Bell-state measurement. After an updating period, each participant can change his key share, but the secret is changeless, and the old key shares will be useless even if they have been stolen by the attacker. The proactive property of our scheme is very useful to resist the mobile attacker.

  6. Generalized quantum secret sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Srikanth, R.

    2005-01-01

    We explore a generalization of quantum secret sharing (QSS) in which classical shares play a complementary role to quantum shares, exploring further consequences of an idea first studied by Nascimento, Mueller-Quade, and Imai [Phys. Rev. A 64, 042311 (2001)]. We examine three ways, termed inflation, compression, and twin thresholding, by which the proportion of classical shares can be augmented. This has the important application that it reduces quantum (information processing) players by replacing them with their classical counterparts, thereby making quantum secret sharing considerably easier and less expensive to implement in a practical setting. In compression, a QSS scheme is turned into an equivalent scheme with fewer quantum players, compensated for by suitable classical shares. In inflation, a QSS scheme is enlarged by adding only classical shares and players. In a twin-threshold scheme, we invoke two separate thresholds for classical and quantum shares based on the idea of information dilution.

  7. Secret Key Crypto Implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, Guido Marco; Melzani, Filippo

    This chapter presents the algorithm selected in 2001 as the Advanced Encryption Standard. This algorithm is the base for implementing security and privacy based on symmetric key solutions in almost all new applications. Secret key algorithms are used in combination with modes of operation to provide different security properties. The most used modes of operation are presented in this chapter. Finally an overview of the different techniques of software and hardware implementations is given.

  8. Bile Formation and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile is a unique and vital aqueous secretion of the liver that is formed by the hepatocyte and modified down stream by absorptive and secretory properties of the bile duct epithelium. Approximately 5% of bile consists of organic and inorganic solutes of considerable complexity. The bile-secretory unit consists of a canalicular network which is formed by the apical membrane of adjacent hepatocytes and sealed by tight junctions. The bile canaliculi (~1 μm in diameter) conduct the flow of bile countercurrent to the direction of portal blood flow and connect with the canal of Hering and bile ducts which progressively increase in diameter and complexity prior to the entry of bile into the gallbladder, common bile duct, and intestine. Canalicular bile secretion is determined by both bile salt-dependent and independent transport systems which are localized at the apical membrane of the hepatocyte and largely consist of a series of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport proteins that function as export pumps for bile salts and other organic solutes. These transporters create osmotic gradients within the bile canalicular lumen that provide the driving force for movement of fluid into the lumen via aquaporins. Species vary with respect to the relative amounts of bile salt-dependent and independent canalicular flow and cholangiocyte secretion which is highly regulated by hormones, second messengers, and signal transduction pathways. Most determinants of bile secretion are now characterized at the molecular level in animal models and in man. Genetic mutations serve to illuminate many of their functions. PMID:23897680

  9. [How to test at once six cytokines in samples as small as 25 microl?].

    PubMed

    Pinna, G; Reimund, J-M; Muller, C D

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory and regulatory or anti-inflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-1beta, -6, -8, -10 and -12) regulate both the humoral and cellular immune responses. Cytokines have diverse peripheral and central functions. They are critical mediators of protective host responses, including defense against microbial invasion and tumorigenesis. However, the production of specific proinflammatory cytokines must be tightly regulated and compartmentalized to prevent the overexpression of these molecules that can end in chronic inflammation and tissue injury. Many diseases like autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, arteriosclerosis, Crohn's disease), neurodegenerative disease (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease), tumor invasion and metastasis correlate with a deregulation in cytokine action. Thus, cytokines network provides an attractive and intensely competitive area of potential targets for therapeutic intervention. To monitor such secretion patterns in presence of putative drugs obtained by high throughput screening (HTS) some new techniques recently appeared on the market. We here compared results obtained by CBA (BD Cytometric Bead Array) to IC50 values obtained by classical sandwich Elisa. The complexity and cost of this new method is largely compensated by simultaneous testing of 6 cytokines in only 25 micro L of cell supernatant. PMID:15047492

  10. Immunoglobulin A1 Protease, an Exoenzyme of Pathogenic Neisseriae, Is a Potent Inducer of Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Dirk R.; Düx, Frank; Wölk, Uwe; Tsirpouchtsidis, Anastasios; Haas, Gaby; Meyer, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    A characteristic of human pathogenic Neisseriae is the production and secretion of an immunoglobulin (Ig)A1-specific serine protease (IgA1 protease) that cleaves preferentially human IgA1 and other target proteins. Here we show a novel function for native IgA1 protease, i.e., the induction of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The capacity of IgA1 protease to elicit such cytokine responses in monocytes was enhanced in the presence of T lymphocytes. IgA1 protease did not induce the regulatory cytokine IL-10, which was, however, found in response to lipopolysaccharide and phytohemagglutinin. The immunomodulatory effects caused by IgA1 protease require a native form of the enzyme, and denaturation abolished cytokine induction. However, the proteolytic activity is not required for the cytokine induction by IgA1 protease. Our results indicate that IgA1 protease exhibits important immunostimulatory properties and may contribute substantially to the pathogenesis of neisserial infections by inducing large amounts of TNF-α and other proinflammatory cytokines. In particular, IgA1 protease may represent a key virulence determinant of bacterial meningitis. PMID:10523603

  11. TAM receptor-dependent regulation of SOCS3 and MAPKs contributes to pro-inflammatory cytokine downregulation following chronic NOD2 stimulation of human macrophages1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shasha; Hedl, Matija; Abraham, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Microbial-induced cytokine regulation is critical to intestinal immune homeostasis. Acute stimulation of NOD2, the Crohn’s disease-associated sensor of bacterial peptidoglycan, induces cytokines. However, cytokines are attenuated after chronic NOD2 and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) stimulation of macrophages; similar attenuation is observed in intestinal macrophages. The role of Tyro3, Axl and Mer (TAM) receptors in regulating chronic PRR stimulation and NOD2-induced outcomes has not been examined. Moreover, TAM receptors have been relatively less investigated in human macrophages. Whereas TAM receptors did not downregulate acute NOD2-induced cytokines in primary human macrophages, they were essential for downregulating signaling and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion after chronic NOD2 and TLR4 stimulation. Axl and Mer were similarly required in mice for cytokine downregulation after chronic NOD2 stimulation in vivo and in intestinal tissues. Consistently, TAM expression was increased in human intestinal myeloid-derived cells. Chronic NOD2 stimulation led to IL-10- and TGFβ-dependent TAM upregulation in human macrophages, which in turn, upregulated SOCS3 expression. Restoring SOCS3 expression under TAM knockdown conditions restored chronic NOD2-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine downregulation. In contrast to the upregulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, attenuated IL-10 secretion was maintained in TAM-deficient macrophages upon chronic NOD2 stimulation. The level of MAPK activation in TAM-deficient macrophages after chronic NOD2 stimulation was insufficient to upregulate IL-10 secretion; however, full restoration of MAPK activation under these conditions restored c-Fos, c-Jun, MAFK and PU.1 binding to the IL-10 promoter and IL-10 secretion. Therefore, TAM receptors are critical for downregulating pro-inflammatory cytokines under the chronic NOD2 stimulation conditions observed in the intestinal environment. PMID:25567680

  12. Perilla frutescens extract ameliorates DSS-induced colitis by suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and inducing anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Urushima, Hayato; Nishimura, Junichi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Ito, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects have been reported in Perilla frutescens leaf extract (PE), which is a plant of the genus belonging to the Lamiaceae family. We examined the effect of PE on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Preliminarily, PE was safely administered for 7 wk without any adverse effects. In the preventive protocol, mice were fed 1.5% DSS solution dissolved in distilled water (control group) or 0.54% PE solution (PE group) ad libitum for 7 days. In the therapeutic protocol, distilled water or 0.54% PE solution was given for 10 days just after administration of 1.5% DSS for 5 days. PE intake significantly improved body weight loss. The serum cytokine profile demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-17A, and IL-10 were significantly lower in the PE group than in the control group. In the therapeutic protocol, mice in the PE group showed significantly higher body weight and lower histological colitis scores compared with mice in the control group on day 15. The serum cytokine profile demonstrated that TGF-β was significantly higher in the PE group than in the control group. In distal colon mRNA expression, TNF-α, and IL-17A were significantly downregulated. In vitro analyses of biologically active ingredients, such as luteolin, apigenin, and rosmarinic acid, in PE were performed. Luteolin suppressed production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17A. Apigenin also suppressed secretion of IL-17A and increased the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Rosmarinic acid increased the regulatory T cell population. We conclude that PE might be useful in treatment and prevention of DSS-induced colitis. PMID:25359539

  13. Sequential cytokine dynamics in chronic rejection of rat renal allografts: roles for cytokines RANTES and MCP-1.

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, K C; Azuma, H; Tilney, N L

    1995-01-01

    Chronic rejection, the most important cause of long-term graft failure, is thought to result from both alloantigen-dependent and -independent factors. To examine these influences, cytokine dynamics were assessed by semiquantitative competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR and by immunohistology in an established rat model of chronic rejection lf renal allografts. Isograft controls develop morphologic and immunohistologic changes that are similar to renal allograft changes, although quantitatively less intense and at a delayed speed; these are thought to occur secondary to antigen-independent events. Sequential cytokine expression was determined throughout the process. During an early reversible allograft rejection episode, both T-cell associated [interleukin (IL) 2, IL-2 receptor, IL-4, and interferon gamma] and macrophage (IL-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6) products were up-regulated despite transient immunosuppression. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) peaked at 2 weeks; intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) was maximally expressed at 6 weeks. Macrophage products such as monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) increased dramatically (to 10 times), presaging intense peak macrophage infiltration at 16 weeks. In contrast, in isografts, ICAM-1 peaked at 24 weeks. MCP-1 was maximally expressed at 52 weeks, commensurate with a progressive increase in infiltrating macrophages. Cytokine expression in the spleen of allograft and isograft recipients was insignificant. We conclude that chronic rejection of kidney allografts in rats is predominantly a local macrophage-dependent event with intense up-regulation of macrophage products such as MCP-1, IL-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The cytokine expression in isografts emphasizes the contribution of antigen-independent events. The dynamics of RANTES expression between early and late phases of chronic rejection suggest a key role in mediating the events of the

  14. Effects of Risperidone on Cytokine Profile in Drug-Naïve First-Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Cristiano; Ota, Vanessa Kiyomi; Gouvea, Eduardo S.; Rizzo, Lucas B.; Spindola, Leticia M. N.; Honda, Pedro H. S.; Cordeiro, Quirino; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca; Gadelha, Ary; Maes, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is robust evidence that schizophrenia is characterized by immune-inflammatory abnormalities, including variations on cytokine levels. The results of previous studies, however, are heterogeneous due to several confounding factors, such as the effects of antipsychotic drugs. Therefore, research on drug-naïve first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients is essential to elucidate the role of immune processes in that disorder. Methods: The aim of this study is to compare cytokine levels (IL-2, IL-10, IL-4, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17) in drug-naïve FEP patients both before and after treatment with risperidone for 10 weeks, and to investigate possible associations between cytokine levels and clinical responses to treatment and presence of depressive symptoms. It this study, we included 55 drug-naïve FEP patients who had repeated measurements of cytokine levels and 57 healthy controls. Results: We found that FEP patients had significantly higher IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α levels than healthy controls. After risperidone treatment, these three cytokines and additionally IL-4 decreased significantly. No significant difference was found between the post-treatment cytokine levels in FEP patients and in healthy controls, suggesting that these alterations in cytokine profiles are a state marker of FEP. No significant association was found between risperidone-induced changes in cytokines and the clinical response to treatment or the presence of depression. There was a significant inverse association between the risperidone-induced changes in IL-10 and the negative symptoms. Conclusions: In conclusion, our results show a specific cytokine profile in FEP patients (monocytic and regulatory T-cell activation) and suggest immunoregulatory effects of risperidone treatment, characterized by suppressant effects on monocytic, Th2, and T-regulatory functions. PMID:25522386

  15. Effects of aldosterone on insulin sensitivity and secretion

    PubMed Central

    Luther, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Conn originally reported an increased risk of diabetes in patients with hyperaldosteronism in the 1950’s, although the mechanism remains unclear. Aldosterone-induced hypokalemia was initially described to impair glucose tolerance by impairing insulin secretion. Correction of hypokalemia by potassium supplementation only partially restored insulin secretion and glucose tolerance, however. Aldosterone also impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated pancreatic islets via reactive oxygen species in a mineralocorticoid receptor-independent manner. Aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation also impairs insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and skeletal muscle. Aldosterone may produce insulin resistance secondarily by altering potassium, increasing inflammatory cytokines, and reducing beneficial adipokines such as adiponectin. Renin-angiotensin system antagonists reduce circulating aldosterone concentrations and also the risk of type 2 diabetes in clinical trials. These data suggest that primary and secondary hyperaldosteronism may contribute to worsening glucose tolerance by impairing insulin sensitivity or insulin secretion in humans. Future studies should define the effects of MR antagonists and aldosterone on insulin secretion and sensitivity in humans. PMID:25194457

  16. Gingiva Equivalents Secrete Negligible Amounts of Key Chemokines Involved in Langerhans Cell Migration Compared to Skin Equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Kosten, Ilona J.; Buskermolen, Jeroen K.; Spiekstra, Sander W.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Gibbs, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Both oral mucosa and skin have the capacity to maintain immune homeostasis or regulate immune responses upon environmental assault. Whereas much is known about key innate immune events in skin, little is known about oral mucosa. Comparative studies are limited due to the scarce supply of oral mucosa for ex vivo studies. Therefore, we used organotypic tissue equivalents (reconstructed epithelium on fibroblast-populated collagen hydrogel) to study cross talk between cells. Oral mucosa and skin equivalents were compared regarding secretion of cytokines and chemokines involved in LC migration and general inflammation. Basal secretion, representative of homeostasis, and also secretion after stimulation with TNFα, an allergen (cinnamaldehyde), or an irritant (SDS) were assessed. We found that proinflammatory IL-18 and chemokines CCL2, CCL20, and CXCL12, all involved in LC migration, were predominantly secreted by skin as compared to gingiva. Furthermore, CCL27 was predominantly secreted by skin whereas CCL28 was predominantly secreted by gingiva. In contrast, general inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and CXCL8 were secreted similarly by skin and gingiva. These results indicate that the cytokines and chemokines triggering innate immunity and LC migration are different in skin and gingiva. This differential regulation should be figured into novel therapy or vaccination strategies in the context of skin versus mucosa. PMID:26539556

  17. URI in athletes: are mucosal immunity and cytokine responses key risk factors?

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Bishop, Nicolette C

    2013-07-01

    Infection incidence among athletes is highest during periods of intensified training and competition and after strenuous long-distance events. Which aspects of depressed immune function are responsible for this increased infection risk are not known, but our hypothesis is that lower salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) secretion and a higher antiinflammatory cytokine response to antigen exposure are key determinants of infection risk. PMID:23792489

  18. Effect of surgical menopause and estrogen replacement on cytokine release from human blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, R; Brown, C; Puscheck, E; Friedrich, E; Slatopolsky, E; Maggio, D; McCracken, R; Avioli, L V

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether mononuclear cell secretory products contribute to the changes in bone turnover that characterize the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis, we evaluated the effects of oophorectomy and subsequent estrogen replacement on the spontaneous secretion of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and on the phytohemagglutinin A-induced secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In 15 healthy premenopausal women who underwent oophorectomy, increases in GM-CSF activity were observed as early as 1 week after surgery, whereas elevations in IL-1 and TNF-alpha and in hydroxyproline/creatinine and calcium/creatinine ratios, two urinary indices of bone resorption, were detectable 2 weeks after the surgical procedure. Six of the oophorectomized women received no estrogen therapy after surgery and in these subjects hydroxyproline/creatinine and calcium/creatinine ratios plateaued 6 weeks postoperatively, and all three cytokines reached the highest levels 8 weeks after oophorectomy, when the study ended. In the remaining 9 women, who were started on estrogen replacement therapy 4 weeks after oophorectomy, decreases in the indices of bone resorption paralleled decreases in the secretion of the cytokines, with lower levels detected after 2 weeks of therapy. In the women who did not receive estrogen therapy, circulating osteocalcin, a marker of bone formation, increased beyond preoperative levels 8 weeks after oophorectomy, whereas in the estrogen-treated subjects osteocalcin remained unchanged in the entire study period. In 9 female controls who underwent simple hysterectomy, cytokine release and biochemical indices of bone turnover did not change after surgery. These data indicate that changes in estrogen status in vivo are associated with the secretion of mononuclear cell immune factors in vitro and suggest that alterations in the local production of bone

  19. Fibrillin abnormalities and prognosis in Marfan syndrome and related disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, T.; Furthmayr, H.; Francke, U.; Gasner, C.

    1995-08-28

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a multisystem autosomal-dominant disorder, is characterized by mutations of the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene and by abnormal patterns of synthesis, secretion, and matrix deposition of the fibrillin protein. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of fibrillin protein abnormalities in the diagnosis of MFS, we studied dermal fibroblasts from 57 patients with classical MFS, 15 with equivocal MFS, 8 with single-organ manifestations, and 16 with other connective tissue disorders including homocystinuria and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Abnormal fibrillin metabolism was identified in 70 samples that were classified into four different groups based on quantitation of fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition. Significant correlations were found for phenotypic features including arachnodactyly, striae distensae, cardiovascular manifestations, and fibrillin groups II and IV, which included 70% of the MFS patients. In addition, these two groups were associated with shortened {open_quotes}event-free{close_quotes} survival and more severe cardiovascular complications than groups I and III. The latter included most of the equivocal MFS/single manifestation patients with fibrillin abnormalities. Our results indicate that fibrillin defects at the protein level per se are not specific for MFS, but that the drastically reduced fibrillin deposition, caused by a dominant-negative effect of abnormal fibrillin molecules in individuals defined as groups II and IV, is of prognostic and possibly diagnostic significance. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Serotonin stimulates secretion of exosomes from microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Glebov, Konstantin; Löchner, Marie; Jabs, Ronald; Lau, Thorsten; Merkel, Olaf; Schloss, Patrick; Steinhäuser, Christian; Walter, Jochen

    2015-04-01

    Microglia are resident immune cells in the brain and exert important functions in the regulation of inflammatory processes during infection or cellular damage. Upon activation, microglia undergo complex morphological and functional transitions, including increased motility, phagocytosis and cytokine secretion. Recent findings indicate that exosomes, small vesicles that derive from fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane, are involved in secretion of certain cytokines. The presence of specific receptors on the surface of microglia suggests communication with neurons by neurotransmitters. Here, we demonstrate expression of serotonin receptors, including 5-HT2a,b and 5-HT4 in microglial cells and their functional involvement in the modulation of exosome release by serotonin. Our data demonstrate the involvement of cAMP and Ca(2+) dependent signaling pathways in the regulation of exosome secretion. Co-culture of microglia with embryonic stem cell-derived serotonergic neurons further demonstrated functional signaling between neurons and microglia. Together, these data provide evidence for neurotransmitter-dependent signaling pathways in microglial cells that regulate exosome release. PMID:25451814

  1. Protective Effects of Quetiapine on Metabolic and Inflammatory Abnormalities in Schizophrenic Patients during Exacerbated Stage.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Chen; Ko, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Sheng-Chiang; Liu, Yia-Ping

    2016-04-30

    Inflammation has been considered important in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Increasing evidence reveals that patients with schizophrenia have abnormal expression of cytokines, which are related to development of metabolic abnormalities. Metabolic abnormality has become a critical issue, though its longitudinal relationship with the disorder, such as the antipsychotics influence, is unclear. We aimed to investigate whether abnormalities of metabolic parameters and cytokine levels in acute exacerbated schizophrenic patients existed, and whether intervention of antipsychotic could help. The present study analyzed peripheral cytokines and metabolic/hemodynamic parameters in healthy controls and acute exacerbated schizophrenic patients hospitalized for three weeks under the unique treatment of quetiapine, a well-known second-generation antipsychotic. Our results showed that patients with schizophrenia were predisposed to metabolic abnormalities in acute exacerbation, including body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). The patients were also prone to dysglycemia, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) levels, and higher blood pressure with concomitant of elevation of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6 and IL-10 in which IL-6 was associated with BMI. After quetiapine treatment, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 remained higher than the controls, but IL-10 was significantly decreased in follow-up comparison. Glycemic-related indexes, HDL-c and IL-10 levels were significantly changed by variance analysis. Results of the present study imply that acute exacerbated schizophrenic patients with metabolism abnormalities may involve disruption of expression of cytokines, and that quetiapine may have therapeutic effects. Nonetheless, metabolism parameters of patients undergoing treatment with quetiapine should be closely monitored. PMID:27080462

  2. Polarised interleukin 8 secretion by HT 29/19A cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, K M; Jansen, J; Bijlsma, P B; Ceska, M; Tytgat, G N; Laboisse, C L; van Deventer, S J

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin 8 is a neutrophil chemotactic and stimulating cytokine induced by various inflammatory stimuli, including tumour necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and endotoxin. The ability of HT 29/19A enterocytes to synthesise interleukin 8 was studied. The results show that interleukin 1 is an important stimulus for interleukin 8 synthesis and secretion by HT 29/19A cells, being more potent than tumour necrosis factor. The tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 1 induced interleukin 8 secretion by HT 29/19A cells was seen to be polarised according to the direction of stimulation. These results support the concept that mucosal cells (enterocytes) may play an important part in initiating mucosal inflammation. Furthermore, it is proposed that HT 29/19A cells constitute a tool to study stimulus directed polarised cytokine secretion. Images Figure 3 PMID:8150343

  3. Secretion of biologically active human interleukin 22 (IL-22) by Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Loera-Arias, María J; Villatoro-Hernández, Julio; Parga-Castillo, Miguel A; Salcido-Montenegro, Alejandro; Barboza-Quintana, Oralia; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo E; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila

    2014-12-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) participates in the modulation of innate immunity and inflammation. This cytokine has important therapeutic potential, such as with ulcerative colitis, liver and lung injury, and infection, in different animal models. We generated a Lactococcus lactis strain that secretes human IL-22 under the regulation of the nisin-inducible promoter. Identification and secretion of this cytokine was demonstrated using western blots of culture supernatants from IL-22-expressing bacteria. The recombinant IL-22 protein produced by L. lactis was biologically active as determined by its ability to induce IL-10 secretion when co-cultured with a colon epithelial cell line in vitro. We consider this novel strain a promising live vaccine for various therapeutic applications. PMID:25214209

  4. Noc-king out exocrine and endocrine secretion.

    PubMed

    Cheviet, Séverine; Waselle, Laurent; Regazzi, Romano

    2004-10-01

    The Rab GTPase effector Noc2 was brought into the limelight by a recent publication that demonstrated its requirements at different stages of regulated exocytosis. Noc2 knockout resulted in distinct abnormalities in endocrine and exocrine cells, ranging from the accumulation of secretory granules of increased size to impairments in the regulated release of their secretory products. Explanations for these defects are beginning to emerge and they promise to reveal some of the most jealously kept secrets of regulated exocytosis. PMID:15450973

  5. Effects of cytokines and infections on brain neurochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Adrian J.

    2007-01-01

    Administration of cytokines to animals can elicit many effects on the brain, particularly neuroendocrine and behavioral effects. Cytokine administration also alters neurotransmission, which may underlie these effects. The most well studied effect is the activation of the hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis, especially that by interleukin-1 (IL-1). Peripheral and central administration of IL-1 also induces norepinephrine (NE) release in the brain, most markedly in the hypothalamus. Small changes in brain dopamine (DA) are occasionally observed, but these effects are not regionally selective. IL-1 also increases brain concentrations of tryptophan, and the metabolism of serotonin (5-HT) throughout the brain in a regionally nonselective manner. Increases of tryptophan and 5-HT, but not NE, are also elicited by IL-6, which also activates the HPA axis, although it is much less potent in these respects than IL-1. IL-2 has modest effects on DA, NE and 5-HT. Like IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) activates the HPA axis, but affects NE and tryptophan only at high doses. The interferons (IFN’s) induce fever and HPA axis activation in man, but such effects are weak or absent in rodents. The reported effects of IFN’s on brain catecholamines and serotonin have been very varied. However, interferon-γ, and to a lesser extent, interferon-α, have profound effects on the catabolism of tryptophan, effectively reducing its concentration in plasma, and may thus limit brain 5-HT synthesis. Administration of endotoxin (LPS) elicits responses similar to those of IL-1. Bacterial and viral infections induce HPA activation, and also increase brain NE and 5-HT metabolism and brain tryptophan. Typically, there is also behavioral depression. These effects are strikingly similar to those of IL-1, suggesting that IL-1 secretion, which accompanies many infections, may mediate these responses. Studies with IL-1 antagonists, support this possibility, although in most cases

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  7. Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling in Sickness and in Health of Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Cheng; Driver, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are a family of eight proteins that negatively regulate Janus kinase and signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling in cells that utilize this pathway to respond to extracellular stimuli. SOCS are best known for attenuating cytokine signaling in the immune system. However, they are also expressed in many other cell types, including pancreatic β-cells, where there is considerable interest in harnessing SOCS molecules to prevent cytokine-mediated apoptosis during diabetes and allogeneic transplantation. Apart from their potential as therapeutic targets, SOCS molecules play a central role for regulating important functions in β-cells, including growth, glucose sensing, and insulin secretion. This review will discuss SOCS proteins as central regulators for diverse cellular processes important for normal β-cell function as well as their protective anti-apoptotic effects during β-cell stress. PMID:27242781

  8. Are the Adaptogenic Effects of Omega 3 Fatty Acids Mediated via Inhibition of Proinflammatory Cytokines?

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Joanne; Brooks, Lyndon; Myers, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    The study was undertaken to estimate the size of the impact of n-3 fatty acids in psychological stress and the extent to which it is mediated via proinflammatory cytokines. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to analyze data from 194 healthy Australians. Biomarkers used were erythrocyte polyunsaturated fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA)), ex-vivo stimulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukins (IL-1 and IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)). Stress was measured with the perceived stress scale (PSS-10), found to comprise three factors: Coping (items 4, 7, 5), Overwhelm (2, 10, 6 and 8), and Emotional (1, 9 and 3). This modeling demonstrated that the effects of DHA on coping are largely direct effects (0.26, t = 2.05) and were not significantly mediated via the suppression of proinflammatory cytokines. Future modeling should explore whether adding EPA to the model would increase the significance of the mediation pathways. PMID:22007258

  9. Viruses, cytokines, antigens, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Gianani, R; Sarvetnick, N

    1996-01-01

    To explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, we hypothesize that following an infection the immune response spreads to tissue-specific autoantigens in genetically predisposed individuals eventually determining progression to disease. Molecular mimicry between viral and self antigens could, in some instances, initiate autoimmunity. Local elicitation of inflammatory cytokines following infection probably plays a pivotal role in determining loss of functional tolerance to self autoantigens and the destructive activation of autoreactive cells. We also describe the potential role of interleukin 10, a powerful B-cell activator, in increasing the efficiency of epitope recognition, that could well be crucial to the progression toward disease. PMID:8637859

  10. Cytokine profiles in axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Madej, Marta; Nowak, Beata; Sokolik, Renata; Chlebicki, Arkadiusz; Korman, Lucyna; Woytala, Patryk; Lubiński, Łukasz; Wiland, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Current studies concentrate on the cytokine network and its role in the pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis (SpA). In this study, we analyzed whether the serum cytokine profile (interleukins: IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33) correlates with demographic data, clinical manifestations, disease activity and treatment outcome in a group of patients with axial spondyloarthritis. Material and methods Forty-nine patients with an established diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (aSpA) and 19 healthy volunteers as controls were enrolled in the study. Clinical evaluation included patient's medical history, 44 joint count, back pain intensity and global disease activity in the preceding week (VAS), the duration of morning stiffness and blood tests. Disease activity was assessed using BASDAI and ASDAS-CRP. Serum concentration of IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33 was determined. Results In patients with aSpA, elevated serum concentration of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 was detected. In the aSpA group we detected higher values of serum concentration of IL-23 and IL-33 in the subgroup with anterior uveitis (83.1 ±184.0 pg/ml vs. 14.0 ±17.1 pg/ml, p < 0.0001 and 45.5 ±71.9 pg/ml vs. 18.4 ±14.3 pg/ml, p < 0.0001, respectively). Additionally, in the subgroup with peripheral arthritis, elevation of serum concentration of IL-12 (249.3 ±246.9 pg/ml vs. 99.9 ±105.9 pg/ml, p = 0.0001) was detected. Patients with preradiological SpA had higher serum concentration of IL-17 than patients with established diagnosis of AS (6.37 ±8.50 pg/ml vs. 2.04 ±2.98 pg/ml, p = 0.0295). No differences in serum concentration of analyzed cytokines were found between the subgroup with low to moderate disease activity and the subgroup with high to very high disease activity. Conclusions We report that in aSpA patients, compared to controls, elevated serum concentrations of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 were observed. Some cytokines may predispose to a more

  11. Granzymes regulate proinflammatory cytokine responses.

    PubMed

    Wensink, Annette C; Hack, C Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2015-01-15

    Granzymes (Grs) are serine proteases mainly produced by cytotoxic lymphocytes and are traditionally considered to cause apoptosis in tumor cells and virally infected cells. However, the cytotoxicity of several Grs is currently being debated, and additional, predominantly extracellular, functions of Grs in inflammation are emerging. Extracellular soluble Grs are elevated in the circulation of patients with autoimmune diseases and infections. Additionally, Grs are expressed by several types of immune cells other than cytotoxic lymphocytes. Recent research has revealed novel immunomodulatory functions of Grs. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview on the role of Grs in inflammation, highlighting their role in cytokine induction and processing. PMID:25556251

  12. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  13. Cytokine production in BALB/c mice immunized with radiation attenuated third stage larvae of the filarial nematode, Brugia pahangi

    SciTech Connect

    Bancroft, A.J.; Devaney, E. ); Grencis, R.K.; Else, K.J. )

    1993-02-15

    BALB/c mice immunized with radiation-attenuated third stage larvae of the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi are strongly immune to challenge infection. Investigation of the profile of cytokines secreted by spleen cells from immune mice stimulated in vitro with either parasite Ag or with Con A revealed high levels of IL-5 and IL-9 and moderate levels of IL-4. In contrast, secretion of IFN-[gamma] by spleen cells from immune animals was negligible. Spleen cells from control mice secreted low levels of all cytokines assayed. Levels of parasite-specific IgE were significantly elevated in immune animals and a peripheral blood eosinophilia was observed, which exhibited a biphasic distribution. Our results are consistent with the preferential expansion of Th2 cells in immune animals and provide the basis for dissecting the means by which radiation-attenuated larvae of filarial nematodes stimulate immunity. 5l refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Clinical implication of perioperative inflammatory cytokine alteration.

    PubMed

    Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Cytokines are key modulators of inflammatory responses, and play an important role in the defense and repair mechanisms following trauma. After traumatic injury, an immuno-inflammatory response is initiated immediately, and cytokines rapidly appear and function as a regulator of immunity. In pathologic conditions, imbalanced cytokines may provide systemic inflammatory responses or immunosuppression. Expression of perioperative cytokines vary by different intensities of surgical trauma and types of anesthesia and anesthetic agents. Inflammatory cytokines play important roles in postoperative organ dysfunction including central nervous system, cardiovascular, lung, liver, and kidney injury. Inhibition of cytokines could protect against traumatic injury in some circumstances, therefore cytokine inhibitors or antagonists might have the potential for reducing postoperative tissue/organ dysfunction. Cytokines are also involved in wound healing and post-traumatic pain. Application of cytokines for the improvement of surgical wound healing has been reported. Anesthesia-related immune response adjustment might reduce perioperative morbidity because it reduces proinflammatory cytokine expression; however, the overall effects of anesthetics on postoperative immune-inflammatory responses needs to be further investigated. PMID:25837846

  15. Cytoplasmic and nuclear cytokine receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Mertani, H C; Morel, G; Lobie, P E

    1999-01-01

    Much of our understanding on how hormones and cytokines transmit their message into the cell is based on the receptor activation at the plasma membrane. Many experimental in vitro models have established the paradigm for cytokine action based upon such activation of their cell surface receptor. The signaling from the plasma membrane activated cytokine receptor is driven to the nucleus by a rapid ricochet of protein phosphorylation, ultimately integrated as a differentiative, proliferative, or transcriptional message. The Janus kinase (JAK)--signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) pathway that was first thought to be cytokine receptor specific now appears to be activated by other noncytokine receptors. Also, evidence is accumulating showing that cytokines modulate the signal transduction machinery of the tyrosine kinase receptors and that of the heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein-coupled receptors. Thus cytokine receptor signaling has become much more complex than originally hypothesized, challenging the established model of specificity of the action of a given cytokine. This review is focused on another level of complexity emerging within cytokine receptor superfamily signaling. Over the past 10 years, data from different laboratories have shown that cytokines and their receptors localize to intracellular compartments including the nucleus, and, in some cases, biological responses have been correlated with this unexpected location, raising the possibility that cytokines act as their own messenger through inter-actions with nuclear proteins. Thus, the interplay between cytokine receptor engagement and cellular signaling turns out to be more dynamic than originally suspected. The mechanisms and regulations of intracellular translocation of the cytokines, their receptors, and their signaling proteins are discussed in the context that such compartmentalization provides some of the specificity of the responses mediated by each

  16. Superantigen influence in conjunction with cytokine polymorphism potentiates autoimmunity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Dar, Sajad Ahmad; Janahi, Essam Mohammed Ahmed; Haque, Shafiul; Akhter, Naseem; Jawed, Arshad; Wahid, Mohd; Ramachandran, Vishnampettai Ganapathysubramanian; Bhattacharya, Sambit Nath; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Das, Shukla

    2016-08-01

    Risk posed by microbial superantigens in triggering or exacerbating SLE in genetically predisposed individuals, thereby altering the response to its treatment strategies, has not been studied. Using streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin B as prototype superantigens, we have demonstrated that they profoundly affect the magnitude of polyclonal T cell response, particularly CD4(+) T cells and expression of CD45RA and CD45RO, and cytokine secretion in vitro in SLE patient PBMCs. Also, reduced proportions of FoxP3 expressing CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells were detected in SLE as compared to healthy control PBMCs. Furthermore, polymorphism in IL-10 and TGF-β showed significant association with SLE in our study population. These results indicate that accumulation of superantigen-reactive T cells and cytokine polymorphism may cause disease exacerbation, relapse, or therapeutic resistance in SLE patients. Attempts to contain colonizing and/or superantigen-producing microbial agents in SLE patients in addition to careful monitoring of their therapy may be worthwhile in decreasing disease severity or preventing frequent relapses. The study suggests that superantigen interference in conjunction with cytokine polymorphism may play a role in immune dysregulation, thereby contributing to autoimmunity in SLE. Therefore, changes in T cell phenotypes and cytokine secretion might be good indicators of therapeutic efficacy in these patients. PMID:26676360

  17. IL-12 enhances the natural killer cell cytokine response to Ab-coated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Robin; Dierksheide, Julie; Hu, Yan; Carson, William E

    2002-10-01

    The anti-tumor activity of recombinant mAb's directed against tumor cell growth receptors has generally been considered to result from direct antiproliferative effects, the induction of apoptosis, or possibly Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated against tumor targets. However, it remains unclear to what degree these mechanisms actually aid in the clearance of Ab-coated tumor cells in vivo. We show here that NK cells secrete a distinct profile of potent immunostimulatory cytokines in response to dual stimulation with Ab-coated tumor cells and IL-12. This response could not be duplicated by costimulation with other ILs and was significantly enhanced in the presence of monocytes. Cytokine production was dependent upon synergistic signals mediated by the activating receptor for the Fc portion of IgG (FcgammaRIII) and the IL-12 receptor expressed on NK cells. Coadministration of Ab-coated tumor cells and IL-12 to BALB/c mice resulted in enhanced circulating levels of NK cell-derived cytokines with the capacity to augment anti-tumor immunity. These findings suggest that, in addition to mediating cellular cytotoxicity and apoptosis, the anti-tumor activity of mAb's might also result from activation of a potent cytokine secretion program within immune effectors capable of recognizing mAb-coated targets. PMID:12370276

  18. Revealing cytokine-induced changes in the extracellular matrix with secondary ion mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Adam J; Ratner, Buddy D; Buttery, Lee DK; Alexander, Morgan R

    2015-01-01

    Cell-secreted matrices (CSMs), where extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by monolayer cell cultures are decellularized, have been increasingly used to produce surfaces that may be reseeded with cells. Such surfaces are useful to help us understand cell-ECM interactions in a microenvironment closer to the in vivo situation than synthetic substrates with adsorbed proteins. We describe the production of CSMs from mouse primary osteoblasts (mPObs) exposed to cytokine challenge during matrix secretion, mimicking in vivo inflammatory environments. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) data revealed that CSMs with cytokine challenge at day 7 or day 12 of culture can be chemically distinguished from one another and from untreated CSM using multivariate analysis. Comparison of the differences with reference spectra from adsorbed protein mixtures points towards cytokine challenge resulting in a decrease in collagen content. This is supported by immunocytochemical and histological staining, demonstrating a 44% loss of collagen mass and a 32% loss in collagen I coverage. CSM surfaces demonstrate greater cell adhesion than adsorbed ECM proteins. When mPObs were reseeded onto cytokine-challenged CSMs they exhibited reduced adhesion and elongated morphology compared to untreated CSMs. Such changes may direct subsequent cell fate and function and provide insights into pathological responses at sites of inflammation. PMID:25523877

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum cytokine profiles in narcolepsy with cataplexy: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jaussent, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Cristol, Jean Paul; Blain, Hubert; Dupuy, Anne-Marie

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide strong support that narcolepsy-cataplexy is an immune-mediated disease. Only few serum cytokine studies with controversial results were performed in narcolepsy and none in the cerebrospinal fluid. We measured a panel of 12 cytokines by a proteomic approach in the serum of 35 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 156 healthy controls, and in the cerebrospinal fluid of 34 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 17 non-narcoleptic patients; and analyzed the effect of age, duration and severity of disease on the cytokine levels. After multiple adjustments we reported lower serum IL-2, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and EGF levels, and a tendency for higher IL-4 level in narcolepsy compared to controls. Significant differences were only found for IL-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, being higher in narcolepsy. Positive correlations were found in serum between IL-4, daytime sleepiness, and cataplexy frequency. The expression of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, VEGF, EGF, IL2, IL-1β, IFN-γ) in either serum or CSF was negatively correlated with disease severity and duration. No correlation was found for any specific cytokine in 18 of the patients with narcolepsy with peripheral and central samples collected the same day. Significant decreased pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine profiles were found at peripheral and central levels in narcolepsy, together with a T helper 2/Th1 serum cytokine secretion imbalance. To conclude, we showed some evidence for alterations in the cytokine profile in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to controls at peripheral and central levels, with the potential role of IL-4 and significant Th1/2 imbalance in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. PMID:24394344

  20. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Yakabi, Koji; Kawashima, Junichi; Kato, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-induced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion. PMID:19009648

  1. Bioanalytical Chemistry of Cytokines-A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stenken, Julie A.; Poschenrieder, Andreas J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are bioactive proteins produced by many different cells of the immune system. Due to their role in different inflammatory disease states and maintaining homeostasis, there is enormous clinical interest in the quantitation of cytokines. The typical standard methods for quantitation of cytokines are immunoassay-based techniques including enzyme-linked immusorbent assays (ELISA) and bead-based immunoassays read by either standard or modified flow cytometers. A review of recent developments in analytical methods for measurements of cytokine proteins is provided. This review briefly covers cytokine biology and the analysis challenges associated with measurement of these biomarker proteins for understanding both health and disease. New techniques applied to immunoassay-based assays are presented along with the uses of aptamers, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry, optical resonator-based methods. Methods used for elucidating the release of cytokines from single cells as well as in vivo collection methods are described. PMID:25467452

  2. Analysis of intracellular cytokines using flowcytometry.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sunil K

    2002-01-01

    Characterization of T-cell clones and identification of functional subsets of the helper T-cells with polarized cytokine production is based on testing of cytokine expression. Several methods have been developed that allow cytokine expression to be measured like ELISA, RT-PCR, ELISPOT, ISH and flowcytometry. Among all these methods, monitoring of cytokine production using flowcytometric analysis has its own advantages and disadvantages. Multi-parametric characterization of cytokine production on single cell basis, without long-term culture and cloning along with high throughput of samples is main feature attached to flowcytometric analysis. The interpretation may be difficult at times due to change in the phenotype of the cells. Cells with similar surface phenotype but synthesizing different cytokines and having different functional characteristics can be analyzed with this technique. PMID:12815288

  3. Leptin regulates gallbladder genes related to absorption and secretion.

    PubMed

    Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Lu, Debao; Basile, David P; Graewin, Shannon J; Al-Azzawi, Hayder; Kiely, James M; Mathur, Abhishek; Yancey, Kyle; Pitt, Henry A

    2007-07-01

    Dysregulation of gallbladder ion and water absorption and/or secretion has been linked to cholesterol crystal and gallstone formation. We have recently demonstrated that obese, leptin-deficient (Lep(ob)) mice have enlarged gallbladder volumes and decreased gallbladder contractility and that leptin administration to these mice normalizes gallbladder function. However, the effect of leptin on gallbladder absorption/secretion is not known. Therefore, we sought to determine whether leptin would alter the expression of genes involved in water and ion transport across the gallbladder epithelium. Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays representing 39,000 transcripts were used to compare gallbladder gene-expression profiles from 12-wk-old control saline-treated Lep(ob) and from leptin-treated Lep(ob) female mice. Leptin administration to Lep(ob) mice decreased gallbladder volume, bile sodium concentration, and pH. Leptin repletion upregulated the expression of aquaporin 1 water channel by 1.3-fold and downregulated aquaporin 4 by 2.3-fold. A number of genes involved in sodium transport were also influenced by leptin replacement. Epithelial sodium channel-alpha and sodium hydrogen exchangers 1 and 3 were moderately downregulated by 2.0-, 1.6-, and 1.3-fold, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase-IV, which plays a role in the acidification of bile, was upregulated 3.7-fold. In addition, a number of inflammatory cytokines that are known to influence gallbladder epithelial cell absorption and secretion were upregulated. Thus leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine involved with satiety and energy balance, influences gallbladder bile volume, sodium, and pH as well as multiple inflammatory cytokine genes and genes related to water, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate transport. PMID:17463181

  4. Cytokine-Modulating Strategies and Newer Cytokine Targets for Arthritis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Dudics, Steven; Acharya, Bodhraj; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are the key mediators of inflammation in the course of autoimmune arthritis and other immune-mediated diseases. Uncontrolled production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-17 can promote autoimmune pathology, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokines including IL-4, IL-10, and IL-27 can help control inflammation and tissue damage. The pro-inflammatory cytokines are the prime targets of the strategies to control rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For example, the neutralization of TNFα, either by engineered anti-cytokine antibodies or by soluble cytokine receptors as decoys, has proven successful in the treatment of RA. The activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines can also be downregulated either by using specific siRNA to inhibit the expression of a particular cytokine or by using small molecule inhibitors of cytokine signaling. Furthermore, the use of anti-inflammatory cytokines or cytokine antagonists delivered via gene therapy has proven to be an effective approach to regulate autoimmunity. Unexpectedly, under certain conditions, TNFα, IFN-γ, and few other cytokines can display anti-inflammatory activities. Increasing awareness of this phenomenon might help develop appropriate regimens to harness or avoid this effect. Furthermore, the relatively newer cytokines such as IL-32, IL-34 and IL-35 are being investigated for their potential role in the pathogenesis and treatment of arthritis. PMID:25561237

  5. Secretion Without Golgi

    PubMed Central

    Prudovsky, Igor; Tarantini, Francesca; Landriscina, Matteo; Neivandt, David; Sold, Raffaella; Kirov, Aleksandr; Small, Deena; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2008-01-01

    A growing number of proteins devoid of signal peptides have been demonstrated to be released through the non-classical pathways independent of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. Among them are two potent proangiogenic cytokines FGF1 and IL1α. Stress-induced transmembrane translocation of these proteins requires the assembly of copper-dependent multiprotein release complexes. It involves the interaction of exported proteins with the acidic phospholipids of the inner leaflet of the cell membrane and membrane destabilization. Not only stress, but also thrombin treatment and inhibition of Notch signaling stimulate the export of FGF1. Non-classical release of FGF1 and IL1α presents a promising target for treatment of cardiovascular, oncologic, and inflammatory disorders. PMID:17786931

  6. A High-Dimensional Atlas of Human T Cell Diversity Reveals Tissue-Specific Trafficking and Cytokine Signatures.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael Thomas; Ong, David Eng Hui; Lim, Frances Sheau Huei; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; McGovern, Naomi; Narayanan, Sriram; Ho, Wen Qi; Cerny, Daniela; Tan, Henry Kun Kiaang; Anicete, Rosslyn; Tan, Bien Keem; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon; Chan, Chung Yip; Cheow, Peng Chung; Lee, Ser Yee; Takano, Angela; Tan, Eng-Huat; Tam, John Kit Chung; Tan, Ern Yu; Chan, Jerry Kok Yen; Fink, Katja; Bertoletti, Antonio; Ginhoux, Florent; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria Alicia; Newell, Evan William

    2016-08-16

    Depending on the tissue microenvironment, T cells can differentiate into highly diverse subsets expressing unique trafficking receptors and cytokines. Studies of human lymphocytes have primarily focused on a limited number of parameters in blood, representing an incomplete view of the human immune system. Here, we have utilized mass cytometry to simultaneously analyze T cell trafficking and functional markers across eight different human tissues, including blood, lymphoid, and non-lymphoid tissues. These data have revealed that combinatorial expression of trafficking receptors and cytokines better defines tissue specificity. Notably, we identified numerous T helper cell subsets with overlapping cytokine expression, but only specific cytokine combinations are secreted regardless of tissue type. This indicates that T cell lineages defined in mouse models cannot be clearly distinguished in humans. Overall, our data uncover a plethora of tissue immune signatures and provide a systemic map of how T cell phenotypes are altered throughout the human body. PMID:27521270

  7. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to further explore the effects of space flight on cytokines and cytokine-directed immunological function.

  8. Effect of space flight on cytokine production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    Space flight has been shown to alter many immunological responses. Among those affected are the production of cytokines, Cytokines are the messengers of the immune system that facilitate communication among cells that allow the interaction among cells leading to the development of immune responses. Included among the cytokines are the interferons, interleukins, and colony stimulating factors. Cytokines also facilitate communication between the immune system and other body systems, such as the neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal systems. Some cytokines also have direct protective effects on the host, such as interferon, which can inhibit the replication of viruses. Studies in both humans and animals indicate that models of space flight as well as actual space flight alter the production and action of cytokines. Included among these changes are altered interferon production, altered responsiveness of bone marrow cells to granulocyte/monocyte-colony stimulating factor, but no alteration in the production of interleukin-3. This suggests that there are selective effects of space flight on immune responses, i.e. not all cytokines are affected in the same fashion by space flight. Tissue culture studies also suggest that there may be direct effects of space flight on the cells responsible for cytokine production and action. The results of the above study indicate that the effects of space flight on cytokines may be a fundamental mechanism by which space flight not only affects immune responses, but also other biological systems of the human.

  9. Protecting Trade Secrets in Canada.

    PubMed

    Courage, Noel; Calzavara, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Patents in the life sciences industries are a key form of intellectual property (IP), particularly for products such as brand-name drugs and medical devices. However, trade secrets can also be a useful tool for many types of innovations. In appropriate cases, trade secrets can offer long-term protection of IP for a lower financial cost than patenting. This type of protection must be approached with caution as there is little room for error when protecting a trade secret. Strong agreements and scrupulous security can help to protect the secret. Once a trade secret is disclosed to the public, it cannot be restored as the owner's property; however, if the information is kept from the public domain, the owner can have a property right of unlimited duration in the information. In some situations patents and trade secrets may be used cooperatively to protect innovation, particularly for manufacturing processes. PMID:25986591

  10. Modeling the Intra- and Extracellular Cytokine Signaling Pathway under Heat Stroke in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Maria; Grosman, Benyamin; Yuraszeck, Theresa M.; Helwig, Bryan G.; Leon, Lisa R.; Doyle III, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    Heat stroke (HS) is a life-threatening illness induced by prolonged exposure to a hot environment that causes central nervous system abnormalities and severe hyperthermia. Current data suggest that the pathophysiological responses to heat stroke may not only be due to the immediate effects of heat exposure per se but also the result of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The observation that pro- (e.g., IL-1) and anti-inflammatory (e.g., IL-10) cytokines are elevated concomitantly during recovery suggests a complex network of interactions involved in the manifestation of heat-induced SIRS. In this study, we measured a set of circulating cytokine/soluble cytokine receptor proteins and liver cytokine and receptor mRNA accumulation in wild-type and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor knockout mice to assess the effect of neutralization of TNF signaling on the SIRS following HS. Using a systems approach, we developed a computational model describing dynamic changes (intra- and extracellular events) in the cytokine signaling pathways in response to HS that was fitted to novel genomic (liver mRNA accumulation) and proteomic (circulating cytokines and receptors) data using global optimization. The model allows integration of relevant biological knowledge and formulation of new hypotheses regarding the molecular mechanisms behind the complex etiology of HS that may serve as future therapeutic targets. Moreover, using our unique modeling framework, we explored cytokine signaling pathways with three in silico experiments (e.g. by simulating different heat insult scenarios and responses in cytokine knockout strains in silico). PMID:24039931

  11. Phototherapy-treated apoptotic tumor cells induce pro-inflammatory cytokines production in macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Wei, Yanchun; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that as a mitochondria-targeting cancer phototherapy, high fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) induces mitochondrial superoxide anion burst, resulting in oxidative damage to tumor cells. In this study, we further explored the immunological effects of HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic tumor cells. When macrophages were co-incubated with apoptotic cells induced by HF-LPLI, we observed the increased levels of TNF-α secretion and NO production in macrophages. Further experiments showed that NF-κB was activated in macrophages after co-incubation with HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic cells, and inhibition of NF-κB activity by pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid (PDTC) reduced the elevated levels of TNF-α secretion and NO production. These data indicate that HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic tumor cells induce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, which may be helpful for better understanding the biological effects of cancer phototherapy.

  12. A Generic Mechanism for Enhanced Cytokine Signaling via Cytokine-Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Shulgin, Boris; Helmlinger, Gabriel; Kosinsky, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement or inhibition of cytokine signaling and corresponding immune cells responses are critical factors in various disease treatments. Cytokine signaling may be inhibited by cytokine-neutralizing antibodies (CNAs), which prevents further activation of cytokine receptors. However, CNAs may result in enhanced—instead of inhibitory—cytokine signaling (an “agonistic effect”) in various in vitro and in vivo experiments. This may lead to lack of efficacy or adverse events for cytokine-inhibiting based medicines. Alternatively, cytokine-antibody complexes may produce stronger signaling vs. cytokine alone, thereby increasing the efficacy of stimulating cytokine-based drugs, at equal or lower cytokine doses. In this paper, the effect of cytokine signaling enhancement by a CNA was studied in a generic mathematical model of interleukin-4 (IL-4) driven T-cell proliferation. The occurrence of the agonistic effect depends upon the antibody-to-cytokine binding affinity and initial concentrations of antibody and cytokine. Model predictions were in agreement with experimental studies. When the cytokine receptor consists of multiple subunits with substantially differing affinities (e.g., IL-4 case), the choice of the receptor chain to be blocked by the antibody is critical, for the agonistic effect to appear. We propose a generic mechanism for the effect: initially, binding of the CNA to the cytokine reduces free cytokine concentration; yet, cytokine molecules bound within the cytokine-CNA complex—and released later and over time—are “rescued” from earlier clearance via cellular internalization. Hence, although free cytokine-dependent signalling may be less potent initially, it will also be more sustained over time; and given non-linear dynamics, it will lead ultimately to larger cellular effector responses, vs. the same amount of free cytokine in the absence of CNA. We suggest that the proposed mechanism is a generic property of {cytokine, CNA, receptor

  13. Salmonella-secreted Virulence Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Heffron, Fred; Niemann, George; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-05-01

    In this short review we discuss secreted virulence factors of Salmonella, which directly affect Salmonella interaction with its host. Salmonella secretes protein to subvert host defenses but also, as discussed, to reduce virulence thereby permitting the bacteria to persist longer and more successfully disperse. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is the best known and well studied of the mechanisms that enable secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm. Other secretion systems include outer membrane vesicles, which are present in all Gram-negative bacteria examined to date, two-partner secretion, and type VI secretion will also be addressed. Excellent reviews of Salmonella secreted effectors have focused on themes such as actin rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, ubiquitination, and the activities of the virulence factors themselves. This short review is based on S. Typhimurium infection of mice because it is a model of typhoid like disease in humans. We have organized effectors in terms of events that happen during the infection cycle and how secreted effectors may be involved.

  14. Expansible quantum secret sharing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Xu, Sheng-Wei; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-08-01

    In the practical applications, member expansion is a usual demand during the development of a secret sharing network. However, there are few consideration and discussion on network expansibility in the existing quantum secret sharing schemes. We propose an expansible quantum secret sharing scheme with relatively simple and economical quantum resources and show how to split and reconstruct the quantum secret among an expansible user group in our scheme. Its trait, no requirement of any agent's assistant during the process of member expansion, can help to prevent potential menaces of insider cheating. We also give a discussion on the security of this scheme from three aspects.

  15. Notch signaling enhances FcεRI-mediated cytokine production by mast cells through direct and indirect mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Yagita, Hideo; Hara, Mutsuko; Motomura, Yasutaka; Kubo, Masato; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki

    2015-05-01

    Th2-type cytokines and TNF-α secreted by activated mast cells upon cross-linking of FcεRI contribute to the development and maintenance of Th2 immunity to parasites and allergens. We have previously shown that cytokine secretion by mouse mast cells is enhanced by signaling through Notch receptors. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which Notch signaling enhances mast cell cytokine production induced by FcεRI cross-linking. FcεRI-mediated production of cytokines, particularly IL-4, was significantly enhanced in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells by priming with Notch ligands. Western blot analysis showed that Notch signaling augmented and prolonged FcεRI-mediated phosphorylation of MAPKs, mainly JNK and p38 MAPK, through suppression of the expression of SHIP-1, a master negative regulator of FcεRI signaling, resulting in the enhanced production of multiple cytokines. The enhancing effect of Notch ligand priming on multiple cytokine production was abolished by knockdown of Notch2, but not Notch1, and FcεRI-mediated production of multiple cytokines was enhanced by retroviral transduction with the intracellular domain of Notch2. However, only IL-4 production was enhanced by both Notch1 and Notch2. The enhancing effect of Notch signaling on IL-4 production was lost in bone marrow-derived mast cells from mice lacking conserved noncoding sequence 2, which is located at the distal 3' element of the Il4 gene locus and contains Notch effector RBP-J binding sites. These results indicate that Notch2 signaling indirectly enhances the FcεRI-mediated production of multiple cytokines, and both Notch1 and Notch2 signaling directly enhances IL-4 production through the noncoding sequence 2 enhancer of the Il4 gene. PMID:25821223

  16. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  17. Interleukin-6, a mental cytokine.

    PubMed

    Spooren, Anneleen; Kolmus, Krzysztof; Laureys, Guy; Clinckers, Ralph; De Keyser, Jacques; Haegeman, Guy; Gerlo, Sarah

    2011-06-24

    Almost a quarter of a century ago, interleukin-6 (IL-6) was discovered as an inflammatory cytokine involved in B cell differentiation. Today, IL-6 is recognized to be a highly versatile cytokine, with pleiotropic actions not only in immune cells, but also in other cell types, such as cells of the central nervous system (CNS). The first evidence implicating IL-6 in brain-related processes originated from its dysregulated expression in several neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In addition, IL-6 was shown to be involved in multiple physiological CNS processes such as neuron homeostasis, astrogliogenesis and neuronal differentiation. The molecular mechanisms underlying IL-6 functions in the brain have only recently started to emerge. In this review, an overview of the latest discoveries concerning the actions of IL-6 in the nervous system is provided. The central position of IL-6 in the neuroinflammatory reaction pattern, and more specifically, the role of IL-6 in specific neurodegenerative processes, which accompany Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and excitotoxicity, are discussed. It is evident that IL-6 has a dichotomic action in the CNS, displaying neurotrophic properties on the one hand, and detrimental actions on the other. This is in agreement with its central role in neuroinflammation, which evolved as a beneficial process, aimed at maintaining tissue homeostasis, but which can become malignant when exaggerated. In this perspective, it is not surprising that 'well-meant' actions of IL-6 are often causing harm instead of leading to recovery. PMID:21238488

  18. HMGB1: The Central Cytokine for All Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guanqiao; Liang, Xiaoyan; Lotze, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a leaderless cytokine, like the IL-1 and FGF family members, that has primary roles within the nucleus and the cytosol. Within the nucleus, it serves as another guardian of the genome, protecting it from oxidant injury and promoting access to transcriptional complexes such as nuclear hormone/nuclear hormone receptors and p53/p73 complexes. Within the cytosol it promotes autophagy and recruitment of the myddosome to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 vesicular compartments. Outside of the cell, it can either bind to specific receptors itself, or with high affinity to DNA, nucleosomes, IL-1β, lipopolysaccharide, and lipoteichoic acid to mediate responses in specific physiological or pathological conditions. Currently identified receptors include TLR2, TLR4, the receptor for advanced glycation end products, CD24-Siglec G/10, chemokine CXC receptor 4, and TIM-3. In terms of its effects or functions within lymphoid cells, HMGB1 is principally secreted from mature dendritic cells (DCs) to promote T-cell and B-cell reactivity and expansion and from activated natural killer cells to promote DC maturation during the afferent immune response. Some studies suggest that its primary role in the setting of chronic inflammation is to promote immunosuppression. As such, HMGB1 is a central cytokine for all lymphoid cells playing a role complementary to its better studied role in myeloid cells. PMID:23519706

  19. [The role of cytokines in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Ishida, N; Yoshida, T

    1987-05-01

    A variety of normal tissue or malignant cells can produce and/or release various biologically active substances (hormone-like mediators) now collectively called cytokines. Because immunological and non-immunological responses of malignant cells were modified by many of them, some cytokines have been employed as so-called Biological Response Modifiers (BRM) in the treatment of cancers in animals and humans. This overview discussed a few of the difficulties, probably inherent in cytokine therapy, that have already been encountered in early clinical trials as well as some of those that can be anticipated in future work. These include unexpected and undesirable reactions due to the systemic administration in relatively large amounts of a cytokine that is, under physiological conditions, supposed to act as a paracrine and/or autocrine among cells located within a limited distance. Even a pure recombinant preparation of a cytokine is now known to affect multiple target cells if they are accessible to it. Furthermore, this kind of therapy may sometimes be little more than a shot in the dark, since the physiological balance (homeostasis) among many of the cytokines present or produced in a host receiving a large quantity of exogenous cytokines is not well understood. Making the situation still more complicated, many types of tumor cells are known to release some of these cytokines spontaneously. Many challenging problems remain to be solved before we can confidently prescribe a cocktail of cytokines precisely suitable for a given patient according to the individual's in vivo cytokine profile. Nevertheless, in spite of all these reservations, cytokine therapy has been too frequently beneficial to be allowed to be discouraged. "Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety". PMID:3034167

  20. Prostaglandin E2 in tick saliva regulates macrophage cell migration and cytokine profile

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ticks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites that suppress the host’s immune and inflammatory responses by secreting immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory molecules in their saliva. In previous studies we have shown that tick salivary gland extract (SGE) and saliva from Dermacentor variabilis have distinct effects on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated IC-21 macrophage and NIH3T3-L1 fibroblast migration. Since tick saliva contains a high concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent modulator of inflammation, we used a PGE2 receptor antagonist to evaluate the role of PGE2 in the different migratory responses induced by saliva and its impact on macrophage cytokine profile. Methods Adult ticks were fed on female New Zealand white rabbits for 5-8 days. Female ticks were stimulated with dopamine/theophylline to induce salivation and saliva was pooled. Competitive enzyme immunoassays (EIA) were used to measure saliva PGE2 content and the changes in macrophage intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. The effects of tick saliva on macrophage and fibroblast migration were assessed in the absence and presence of the PGE2 receptor antagonist, AH 6809, using blind well chamber assays. A cytokine antibody array was used to examine the effects of tick saliva on macrophage cytokine secretion. Statistical significance was determined by one-way ANOVA; Student Newman-Kuels post-test was used for multiple comparisons. Results The saliva-induced increase in PDGF-stimulated macrophage migration was reversed by AH 6809. The inhibition of PDGF-stimulated fibroblast migration by saliva was also antagonist-sensitive. Tick saliva induced macrophages to secrete copious amounts of PGE2, and conditioned medium from these cells caused an AH 6809-sensitive inhibition of stimulated fibroblast migration, showing that macrophages can regulate fibroblast activity. We show that tick saliva decreased the secretion of the pro

  1. Preterm infants have deficient monocyte and lymphocyte cytokine responses to group B streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Currie, Andrew J; Curtis, Samantha; Strunk, Tobias; Riley, Karen; Liyanage, Khemanganee; Prescott, Susan; Doherty, Dorota; Simmer, Karen; Richmond, Peter; Burgner, David

    2011-04-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is an important cause of early- and late-onset sepsis in the newborn. Preterm infants have markedly increased susceptibility and worse outcomes, but their immunological responses to GBS are poorly defined. We compared mononuclear cell and whole-blood cytokine responses to heat-killed GBS (HKGBS) of preterm infants (gestational age [GA], 26 to 33 weeks), term infants, and healthy adults. We investigated the kinetics and cell source of induced cytokines and quantified HKGBS phagocytosis. HKGBS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion was significantly impaired in preterm infants compared to that in term infants and adults. These cytokines were predominantly monocytic in origin, and production was intrinsically linked to HKGBS phagocytosis. Very preterm infants (GA, <30 weeks) had fewer cytokine-producing monocytes, but nonopsonic phagocytosis ability was comparable to that for term infants and adults. Exogenous complement supplementation increased phagocytosis in all groups, as well as the proportion of preterm monocytes producing IL-6, but for very preterm infants, responses were still deficient. Similar defective preterm monocyte responses were observed in fresh whole cord blood stimulated with live GBS. Lymphocyte-associated cytokines were significantly deficient for both preterm and term infants compared to levels for adults. These findings indicate that a subset of preterm monocytes do not respond to GBS, a defect compounded by generalized weaker lymphocyte responses in newborns. Together these deficient responses may increase the susceptibility of preterm infants to GBS infection. PMID:21300777

  2. Preterm Infants Have Deficient Monocyte and Lymphocyte Cytokine Responses to Group B Streptococcus▿

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Andrew J.; Curtis, Samantha; Strunk, Tobias; Riley, Karen; Liyanage, Khemanganee; Prescott, Susan; Doherty, Dorota; Simmer, Karen; Richmond, Peter; Burgner, David

    2011-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is an important cause of early- and late-onset sepsis in the newborn. Preterm infants have markedly increased susceptibility and worse outcomes, but their immunological responses to GBS are poorly defined. We compared mononuclear cell and whole-blood cytokine responses to heat-killed GBS (HKGBS) of preterm infants (gestational age [GA], 26 to 33 weeks), term infants, and healthy adults. We investigated the kinetics and cell source of induced cytokines and quantified HKGBS phagocytosis. HKGBS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion was significantly impaired in preterm infants compared to that in term infants and adults. These cytokines were predominantly monocytic in origin, and production was intrinsically linked to HKGBS phagocytosis. Very preterm infants (GA, <30 weeks) had fewer cytokine-producing monocytes, but nonopsonic phagocytosis ability was comparable to that for term infants and adults. Exogenous complement supplementation increased phagocytosis in all groups, as well as the proportion of preterm monocytes producing IL-6, but for very preterm infants, responses were still deficient. Similar defective preterm monocyte responses were observed in fresh whole cord blood stimulated with live GBS. Lymphocyte-associated cytokines were significantly deficient for both preterm and term infants compared to levels for adults. These findings indicate that a subset of preterm monocytes do not respond to GBS, a defect compounded by generalized weaker lymphocyte responses in newborns. Together these deficient responses may increase the susceptibility of preterm infants to GBS infection. PMID:21300777

  3. Inflammaging and Anti-Inflammaging: The Role of Cytokines in Extreme Longevity.

    PubMed

    Minciullo, Paola Lucia; Catalano, Antonino; Mandraffino, Giuseppe; Casciaro, Marco; Crucitti, Andrea; Maltese, Giuseppe; Morabito, Nunziata; Lasco, Antonino; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Basile, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Longevity and aging are two sides of the same coin, as they both derive from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Aging is a complex, dynamic biological process characterized by continuous remodeling. One of the most recent theories on aging focuses on immune response, and takes into consideration the activation of subclinical, chronic low-grade inflammation which occurs with aging, named "inflammaging". Long-lived people, especially centenarians, seem to cope with chronic subclinical inflammation through an anti-inflammatory response, called therefore "anti-inflammaging". In the present review, we have focused our attention on the contrast between inflammaging and anti-inflammaging systems, by evaluating the role of cytokines and their impact on extreme longevity. Cytokines are the expression of a network involving genes, polymorphisms and environment, and are involved both in inflammation and anti-inflammation. We have described the role of IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, IL-22, IL-23, TNF-α, IFN-γ as pro-inflammatory cytokines, of IL-1Ra, IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β1 as anti-inflammatory cytokines, and of lipoxin A4 and heat shock proteins as mediators of cytokines. We believe that if inflammaging is a key to understand aging, anti-inflammaging may be one of the secrets of longevity. PMID:26658771

  4. Cytokine responses in camels (Camelus bactrianus) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Odbileg, Raadan; Purevtseren, Byambaa; Gantsetseg, Dorj; Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Buyannemekh, Tumurjav; Galmandakh, Zagd; Erdenebaatar, Janchivdorj; Konnai, Satoru; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we determined the levels of cytokines produced by camel (Camelus bactrianus) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to live attenuated Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S19 vaccine. Seven camels were vaccinated with commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine, and their cytokine responses were determined using a real-time PCR assay. Cytokine responses to B. abortus S19 were examined at 6 hr, 48 hr and 1, 2 and 3 weeks post-vaccination. Serological tests were performed to further confirm these immune responses. The results revealed that IFN-gamma and IL-6 were upregulated during the first week post-vaccination. Low level expressions of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNFalpha and IL-10 and no expression of IL-2 and IL-4 were observed compared with the control camels. The findings showed that B. abortus stimulates cell-mediated immunity by directly activating camel Th1 cells to secrete IFN-gamma. This quantification of cytokine expression in camels is essential for understanding of Camelidae disease development and protective immune responses. This is the first report of in vivo camel cytokine quantification after vaccination. PMID:18319583

  5. Impact of antidepressants on cytokine production of depressed patients in vitro.

    PubMed

    Munzer, Alexander; Sack, Ulrich; Mergl, Roland; Schönherr, Jeremias; Petersein, Charlotte; Bartsch, Stefanie; Kirkby, Kenneth C; Bauer, Katrin; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2013-11-01

    The interplay between immune and nervous systems plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of depression. In depressive episodes, patients show increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. There is limited information on the effect of antidepressant drugs on cytokines, most studies report on a limited sample of cytokines and none have reported effects on IL-22. We systematically investigated the effect of three antidepressant drugs, citalopram, escitalopram and mirtazapine, on secretion of cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22 and TNF-α in a whole blood assay in vitro, using murine anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3, and 5C3 monoclonal antibody against CD40, to stimulate T and B cells respectively. Citalopram increased production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-22. Mirtazapine increased IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-22. Escitalopram decreased IL-17 levels. The influence of antidepressants on IL-2 and IL-4 levels was not significant for all three drugs. Compared to escitalopram, citalopram led to higher levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-22; and mirtazapine to higher levels of IL-1β, IL-17, IL-22 and TNF-α. Mirtazapine and citalopram increased IL-22 production. The differing profile of cytokine production may relate to differences in therapeutic effects, risk of relapse and side effects. PMID:24257035

  6. EMD in periodontal regenerative surgery modulates cytokine profiles: A randomised controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Oscar; Wohlfahrt, Johan C.; Koldsland, Odd Carsten; Brookes, Steven J.; Lyngstadaas, Staale P.; Aass, Anne M.; Reseland, Janne E.

    2016-01-01

    The enamel matrix derivative (EMD) contains hundreds of peptides in different levels of proteolytic processing that may provide a range of biological effects of importance in wound healing. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of EMD and its fractions on the cytokine profiles from human gingival fibroblasts in vitro and in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in a randomized controlled split-mouth clinical study (n = 12). Levels of cytokines in cell culture medium and in GCF were measured by Luminex over a 2-week period. In the clinical study, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were increased, whereas the levels of transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) were reduced. The in vitro study showed that EMD and its high and low molecular weight fractions reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines compared to untreated cells. EMD had an effect on levels of cytokines related to fibroplasia, angiogenesis, inflammation and chemotaxis both in vitro and in vivo, however, the anti-inflammatory effect induced by EMD observed in the in vitro study could not be confirmed clinically. PMID:26976446

  7. Interleukin-6 amplifies glucagon secretion: coordinated control via the brain and pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Tammy M.; Otero, Yolanda F.; Elliott, Amicia D.; Locke, Alicia D.; Malabanan, Carlo M.; Coldren, Anastasia G.; Brissova, Marcela; Piston, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate glucagon secretion contributes to hyperglycemia in inflammatory disease. Previous work implicates the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in glucagon secretion. IL-6-KO mice have a blunted glucagon response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that is restored by intravenous replacement of IL-6. Given that IL-6 has previously been demonstrated to have a transcriptional (i.e., slow) effect on glucagon secretion from islets, we hypothesized that the rapid increase in glucagon following LPS occurred by a faster mechanism, such as by action within the brain. Using chronically catheterized conscious mice, we have demonstrated that central IL-6 stimulates glucagon secretion uniquely in the presence of an accompanying stressor (hypoglycemia or LPS). Contrary to our hypothesis, however, we found that IL-6 amplifies glucagon secretion in two ways; IL-6 not only stimulates glucagon secretion via the brain but also by direct action on islets. Interestingly, IL-6 augments glucagon secretion from both sites only in the presence of an accompanying stressor (such as epinephrine). Given that both adrenergic tone and plasma IL-6 are elevated in multiple inflammatory diseases, the interactions of the IL-6 and catecholaminergic signaling pathways in regulating GCG secretion may contribute to our present understanding of these diseases. PMID:25205821

  8. Compartmentalized Cytokine Responses in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Kersten, Brigit; Pistiki, Aikaterini; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Favorable treatment outcomes with TNF blockade led us to explore cytokine responses in hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Methods Blood monocytes of 120 patients and 24 healthy volunteers were subtyped by flow cytometry. Isolated blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated for cytokine production; this was repeated in 13 severe patients during treatment with etanercept. Cytokines in pus were measured. Results CD14brightCD16dim inflammatory monocytes and patrolling monocytes were increased in Hurley III patients. Cytokine production by stimulated PBMCs was low compared to controls but the cytokine gene copies did not differ, indicating post-translational inhibition. The low production of IL-17 was restored, when cells were incubated with adalimumab. In pus, high concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected. Based on the patterns, six different cytokine profiles were discerned, which are potentially relevant for the choice of treatment. Clinical improvement with etanercept was predicted by increased production of IL-1β and IL-17 by PBMCs at week 8. Conclusions Findings indicate compartmentalized cytokine expression in HS; high in pus but suppressed in PBMCs. This is modulated through blockade of TNF. PMID:26091259

  9. Cytokine Regulation of Metastasis and Tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Brummer, G; Acevedo, D; Cheng, N

    2016-01-01

    The human body combats infection and promotes wound healing through the remarkable process of inflammation. Inflammation is characterized by the recruitment of stromal cell activity including recruitment of immune cells and induction of angiogenesis. These cellular processes are regulated by a class of soluble molecules called cytokines. Based on function, cell target, and structure, cytokines are subdivided into several classes including: interleukins, chemokines, and lymphokines. While cytokines regulate normal physiological processes, chronic deregulation of cytokine expression and activity contributes to cancer in many ways. Gene polymorphisms of all types of cytokines are associated with risk of disease development. Deregulation RNA and protein expression of interleukins, chemokines, and lymphokines have been detected in many solid tumors and hematopoetic malignancies, correlating with poor patient prognosis. The current body of literature suggests that in some tumor types, interleukins and chemokines work against the human body by signaling to cancer cells and remodeling the local microenvironment to support the growth, survival, and invasion of primary tumors and enhance metastatic colonization. Some lymphokines are downregulated to suppress tumor progression by enhancing cytotoxic T cell activity and inhibiting tumor cell survival. In this review, we will describe the structure/function of several cytokine families and review our current understanding on the roles and mechanisms of cytokines in tumor progression. In addition, we will also discuss strategies for exploiting the expression and activity of cytokines in therapeutic intervention. PMID:27613135

  10. Molecular abnormalities in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Susan Ann

    2008-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is one of the few solid tumors for which the underlying molecular genetic abnormality has been described: rearrangement of the EWS gene on chromosome 22q12 with an ETS gene family member. These translocations define the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) and provide a valuable tool for their accurate and unequivocal diagnosis. They also represent ideal targets for the development of tumor-specific therapeutics. Although secondary abnormalities occur in over 80% of primary ESFT the clinical utility of these is currently unclear. However, abnormalities in genes that regulate the G(1)/S checkpoint are frequently described and may be important in predicting outcome and response. Increased understanding of the molecular events that arise in ESFT and their role in the development and maintenance of the malignant phenotype will inform the improved stratification of patients for therapy and identify targets and pathways for the design of more effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:18925858

  11. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  12. Interactions between Autophagy and Inhibitory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tian-tian; Li, Wei-Min; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a degradative pathway that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Most early studies of autophagy focused on its involvement in age-associated degeneration and nutrient deprivation. However, the immunological functions of autophagy have become more widely studied in recent years. Autophagy has been shown to be an intrinsic cellular defense mechanism in the innate and adaptive immune responses. Cytokines belong to a broad and loose category of proteins and are crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. Inhibitory cytokines have evolved to permit tolerance to self while also contributing to the eradication of invading pathogens. Interactions between inhibitory cytokines and autophagy have recently been reported, revealing a novel mechanism by which autophagy controls the immune response. In this review, we discuss interactions between autophagy and the regulatory cytokines IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, and IL-27. We also mention possible interactions between two newly discovered cytokines, IL-35 and IL-37, and autophagy. PMID:27313501

  13. Cytokine Expression and Accelerated Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, C.C.; Khoo, E.; Tran, J.; Chartres, I.; Liu, Y.; Thant, L.M.; Khabensky, I.; Gart, L.P.; Cisneros, G.; Alikhani, M.

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that inhibiting the expression of certain cytokines decreases the rate of tooth movement. Here, we hypothesized that stimulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines, through small perforations of cortical bone, increases the rate of bone remodeling and tooth movement. Forty-eight rats were divided into 4 groups: 50-cN force applied to the maxillary first molar (O), force application plus soft tissue flap (OF), force application plus flap plus 3 small perforations of the cortical plate (OFP), and a control group (C). From the 92 cytokines studied, the expression of 37 cytokines increased significantly in all experimental groups, with 21 cytokines showing the highest levels in the OFP group. After 28 days, micro-computed tomography, light and fluorescent microscopy, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated higher numbers of osteoclasts and bone remodeling activity in the OFP group, accompanied by generalized osteoporosity and increased rate of tooth movement. PMID:20639508

  14. Study Guide: Seven Simple Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterfield, Nancy; Breaux, Annette; Whitaker, Todd

    2007-01-01

    This study guide has been developed to accompany the "Seven Simple Secrets" book written by Dr. Todd Whitaker and Annette Breaux. "Seven Simple Secrets" focuses on those attributes that have been found to help teachers be their absolute best in their daily challenges of teaching and improving student learning. The study guide is divided into the…

  15. Platelet storage pool deficiency associated with inherited abnormalities of the inner ear in the mouse pigment mutants muted and mocha.

    PubMed

    Swank, R T; Reddington, M; Howlett, O; Novak, E K

    1991-10-15

    Several inherited human syndromes have combined platelet, auditory, and/or pigment abnormalities. In the mouse the pallid pigment mutant has abnormalities of the otoliths of the inner ear together with a bleeding abnormality caused by platelet storage pool deficiency (SPD). To determine if this association is common, two other mouse pigment mutants, muted and mocha, which are known to have inner ear abnormalities, were examined for hematologic abnormalities. Both mutants had prolonged bleeding times accompanied by abnormalities of dense granules as determined by whole mount electron microscopy of platelets and by labeling platelets with mepacrine. When mutant platelets were treated with collagen, there was minimal secretion of adenosine triphosphate and aggregation was reduced. Lysosomal enzyme secretion in response to thrombin treatment was partially reduced in muted platelets and markedly reduced in mocha platelets. Similar reductions in constitutive lysosomal enzyme secretion from kidney proximal tubule cells were noted in the two mutants. These studies show that several mutations that cause pigment dilution and platelet SPD are associated with abnormalities of the inner ear. Also, these mutants, like previously described mouse pigment mutants, are models for human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and provide additional examples of single genes that simultaneously affect melanosomes, lysosomes, and platelet dense granules. PMID:1912584

  16. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed. PMID:27503817

  17. Ultrasonographic assessment of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    England, G C

    1998-07-01

    Ultrasonographic imaging is widely used in small animal practice for the diagnosis of pregnancy and the determination of fetal number. Ultrasonography can also be used to monitor abnormal pregnancies, for example, conceptuses that are poorly developed for their gestational age (and therefore are likely to fail), and pregnancies in which there is embryonic resorption or fetal abortion. An ultrasound examination may reveal fetal abnormalities and therefore alter the management of the pregnant bitch or queen prior to parturition. There are, however, a number of ultrasonographic features of normal pregnancies that may mimic disease, and these must be recognized. PMID:9698618

  18. Alginate microsphere compositions dictate different mechanisms of complement activation with consequences for cytokine release and leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Ørning, Pontus; Hoem, Kine Samset; Coron, Abba Elizabeth; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Rokstad, Anne Mari

    2016-05-10

    The inflammatory potential of 12 types of alginate-based microspheres was assessed in a human whole blood model. The inflammatory potential could be categorized from low to high based on the four main alginate microsphere types; alginate microbeads, liquefied core poly-l-ornithine (PLO)-containing microcapsules, liquefied core poly-l-lysine (PLL)-containing microcapsules, and solid core PLL-containing microcapsules. No complement or inflammatory cytokine activation was detected for the Ca/Ba alginate microbeads. Liquefied core PLO- and PLL-containing microcapsules induced significant fluid phase complement activation (TCC), but with low complement surface deposition (anti-C3c), and a low proinflammatory cytokine secretion, with exception of an elevated MCP-1(CCL2) secretion. The solid core PLL-containing microcapsules generated lower TCC but a marked complement surface deposition and significant induction of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1)β, TNF, IL-6, the chemokines IL-8 (CXCL8), and MIP-1α (CCL3) and MCP-1(CCL2). Inhibition with compstatin (C3 inhibitor) completely abolished complement surface deposition, leukocyte adhesion and the proinflammatory cytokines. The C5 inhibitions partly lead to a reduction of the proinflammatory cytokines. The leukocyte adhesion was abolished by inhibitory antibodies against CD18 and partly reduced by CD11b, but not by CD11c. Anti-CD18 significantly reduced the (IL-1)β, TNF, IL-6 and MIP-1α and anti-CD11b significantly reduced the IL-6 and VEGF secretion. MCP-1 was strongly activated by anti-CD18 and anti-CD11b. In conclusion the initial proinflammatory cytokine responses are driven by the microspheres potential to trigger complement C3 (C3b/iC3b) deposition, leukocyte activation and binding through complement receptor CR3 (CD11b/CD18). MCP-1 is one exception dependent on the fluid phase complement activation mediated through CR3. PMID:26993426

  19. Soluble cytokine receptors in biological therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Crespo, Fabian A; Sun, Xichun

    2002-08-01

    Due to their fundamental involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases, cytokines constitute key targets for biotherapeutic approaches. The discovery that soluble forms of cytokine receptors are involved in the endogenous regulation of cytokine activity has prompted substantial interest in their potential application as immunotherapeutic agents. As such, soluble cytokine receptors have many advantages, including specificity, low immunogenicity and high affinity. Potential disadvantages, such as low avidity and short in vivo half-lifes, have been addressed by the use of genetically-designed receptors, hybrid proteins or chemical modifications. The ability of many soluble cytokine receptors to inhibit the binding and biological activity of their ligands makes them very specific cytokine antagonists. Several pharmaceutical companies have generated a number of therapeutic agents based on soluble cytokine receptors and many of them are undergoing clinical trials. The most advanced in terms of clinical development is etanercept (Enbrel, Immunex), a fusion protein between soluble TNF receptor Type II and the Fc region of human IgG1. This TNF-alpha; antagonist was the first soluble cytokine receptor to receive approval for use in humans. In general, most agents based on soluble cytokine receptors have been safe, well-tolerated and have shown only minor side effects in the majority of patients. Soluble cytokine receptors constitute a new generation of therapeutic agents with tremendous potential for applications in a wide variety of human diseases. Two current areas of research are the identification of their most promising applications and characterisation of their long-term effects. PMID:12171504

  20. Protein secretion in Bacillus species.

    PubMed Central

    Simonen, M; Palva, I

    1993-01-01

    Bacilli secrete numerous proteins into the environment. Many of the secretory proteins, their export signals, and their processing steps during secretion have been characterized in detail. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms of protein secretion have been relatively poorly characterized. However, several components of the protein secretion machinery have been identified and cloned recently, which is likely to lead to rapid expansion of the knowledge of the protein secretion mechanism in Bacillus species. Comparison of the presently known export components of Bacillus species with those of Escherichia coli suggests that the mechanism of protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane is conserved among gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria differences are found in steps preceding and following the translocation process. Many of the secretory proteins of bacilli are produced industrially, but several problems have been encountered in the production of Bacillus heterologous secretory proteins. In the final section we discuss these problems and point out some possibilities to overcome them. PMID:8464403

  1. T-cell immunity and cytokine production in cosmonauts after long-duration space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morukov, B.; Rykova, M.; Antropova, E.; Berendeeva, T.; Ponomaryov, S.; Larina, I.

    2011-04-01

    Long-duration spaceflight effects on T-cell immunity and cytokine production were studied in 12 Russian cosmonauts flown onto the International Space Station. Specific assays were performed before launch and after landing and included analysis of peripheral leukocyte distribution, analysis of T-cell phenotype, expression of activation markers, apoptosis, proliferation of T cells in response to a mitogen, concentrations of cytokines in supernatants of cell cultures. Statistically significant increase was observed in leukocytes', lymphocytes', monocytes' and granulocytes' total number, increase in percentage and absolutely number of CD3 +CD4 +-cells, CD4 +CD45RA +-cells and CD4 +CD45RA +/CD4 +CD45RО + ratio, CD4 +CD25 +Bright regulatory cells ( p<0,05) in peripheral blood after landing. T-lymphocytes' capacity to present CD69 and CD25 on its own surfaces was increased for the majority of crewmembers. Analysis of T-cell response to PHA-stimulation in vitro revealed there were some trends toward reduced proliferation of stimulated T-lymphocytes. There was an apparent post flight decrease in secreted IFN-g for the majority of crewmembers and in most instances there was elevation in secreted IL-10. It revealed depression of IFN-g/IL-10 ratio after flight. Correlation analysis according to Spearman's rank correlation test established significant positive correlations ( p<0.05) between cytokine production and T-cell activation (CD25+, CD38+) and negative correlation ( p<0.05) between cytokine production and number of bulk memory CD4+T-cells (CD45RO+). Thus, these results suggest that T-cell dysfunction can be conditioned by cytokine dysbalance and could lead to development of disease after long-duration space flights.

  2. The third dimension of ELISPOTs: quantifying antibody secretion from individual plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Bromage, Erin; Stephens, Rebecca; Hassoun, Lama

    2009-07-31

    The enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) is a technique widely used to enumerate the number of immune cells secreting a specific protein, such as antibodies or cytokines. A limitation with the ELISPOT assay is that it can only be used to detect a single protein of interest. Recently, the ELISPOT technique has been modified to use fluorophores allowing multiple secreted proteins to be detected simultaneously. This technique has greatly enhanced the ability to identify cells secreting multiple proteins, but has not been used to its fullest potential. We wished to accurately quantify the expression of antigen-specific antibody from a single plasma cell and to determine whether plasma cells recovered from different locations had different secretion rates. To achieve this we analyzed fluorospot images quantitatively using Mira MX 7 UL Astronomy software, and coupled this data with a quantitative ELISA to determine secretion rates from individual cells. Using this technique we were able to determine that plasma cells recovered from the peripheral blood secreted the most antibody (1.667 ng/cell/12 h) while splenic antibody secreting cells the least (0.399 ng/cell/12 h). We were able to quantify a 150 fold difference in antibody secretion between cells, with most plasma cells divided into two groups, low secretors (<0.1 ng/cell) or high secretors (>2 ng/cell). We believe this technique will be particularly useful for examining the secretion ratio of two proteins secreted from an individual cell, allowing us to determine if secretion is fixed or variable. PMID:19465022

  3. Resistin as an Intrahepatic Cytokine

    PubMed Central

    Bertolani, Cristiana; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Failli, Paola; Bataller, Ramon; Aleffi, Sara; DeFranco, Raffaella; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Romagnani, Paola; Milani, Stefano; Ginés, Pere; Colmenero, Jordi; Parola, Maurizio; Gelmini, Stefania; Tarquini, Roberto; Laffi, Giacomo; Pinzani, Massimo; Marra, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance accelerate the progression of fibrosis during chronic liver disease. Resistin antagonizes insulin action in rodents, but its role in humans is still controversial. The aims of this study were to investigate resistin expression in human liver and to evaluate whether resistin may affect the biology of activated human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), key modulators of hepatic fibrogenesis. Resistin gene expression was low in normal human liver but was increased in conditions of severe fibrosis. Up-regulation of resistin during chronic liver damage was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In a group of patients with alcoholic hepatitis, resistin expression correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, suggesting a possible action on HSCs. Exposure of cultured HSCs to recombinant resistin resulted in increased expression of the proinflammatory chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-8, through activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Resistin induced a rapid increase in intracellular calcium concentration, mainly through calcium release from intracellular inositol triphosphate-sensitive pools. The intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM blocked resistin-induced NF-κB activation and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression. In conclusion, this study shows a role for resistin as an intrahepatic cytokine exerting proinflammatory actions in HSCs, via a Ca2+/NF-κB-dependent pathway and suggests involvement of this adipokine in the pathophysiology of liver fibrosis. PMID:17148667

  4. Extracellular factors and immunosuppressive drugs influencing insulin secretion of murine islets

    PubMed Central

    Auer, V J; Janas, E; Ninichuk, V; Eppler, E; Weiss, T S; Kirchner, S; Otto, A M; Stangl, M J

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 60% of transplanted islets undergo apoptosis within the first week post-transplantation into the liver attributed to poor engraftment, immune rejection and toxicity of immunosuppressive drugs. Understanding how extracellular matrix (ECM) components, immunosuppressive drugs and proinflammatory cytokines affect insulin secretion will contribute to an improved clinical outcome of islet transplantations. In this study, functional activity of isolated murine islets was measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and by electrophysiological measurements using patch-clamp. Cultivating islets with soluble fibronectin or laminin, as opposed to with coated laminin, markedly increased GSIS. Addition of cyclosporin A reduced GSIS and suppressed glucose-induced spike activity. Tacrolimus affected neither GSIS nor spike activity, indicating a different mechanism. To evaluate the influence of proinflammatory cytokines, islets were incubated with interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α or with supernatants from cultured Kupffer cells, the main mediators of inflammation in the hepatic sinusoids. IL-1β exerted a bimodal effect on insulin secretion, stimulating below 2 ng/ml and suppressing above 10 ng/ml. Soluble laminin in combination with a stimulatory IL-1β concentration further increased insulin secretion by 20% compared to IL-1β alone, while with high IL-1β concentrations soluble laminin slightly attenuated GSIS inhibition. TNF-α alone did not affect GSIS, but with stimulatory IL-1β concentrations completely abolished it. Similarly, supernatants derived from Kupffer cells exerted a bimodal effect on GSIS. Our data suggest that improved insulin secretion of transplanted islets could be achieved by including soluble laminin and low IL-1β concentrations in the islet cultivation medium, and by a simultaneous inhibition of cytokine secretion from Kupffer cells. PMID:23039895

  5. Extracellular factors and immunosuppressive drugs influencing insulin secretion of murine islets.

    PubMed

    Auer, V J; Janas, E; Ninichuk, V; Eppler, E; Weiss, T S; Kirchner, S; Otto, A M; Stangl, M J

    2012-11-01

    Approximately 60% of transplanted islets undergo apoptosis within the first week post-transplantation into the liver attributed to poor engraftment, immune rejection and toxicity of immunosuppressive drugs. Understanding how extracellular matrix (ECM) components, immunosuppressive drugs and proinflammatory cytokines affect insulin secretion will contribute to an improved clinical outcome of islet transplantations. In this study, functional activity of isolated murine islets was measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and by electrophysiological measurements using patch-clamp. Cultivating islets with soluble fibronectin or laminin, as opposed to with coated laminin, markedly increased GSIS. Addition of cyclosporin A reduced GSIS and suppressed glucose-induced spike activity. Tacrolimus affected neither GSIS nor spike activity, indicating a different mechanism. To evaluate the influence of proinflammatory cytokines, islets were incubated with interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α or with supernatants from cultured Kupffer cells, the main mediators of inflammation in the hepatic sinusoids. IL-1β exerted a bimodal effect on insulin secretion, stimulating below 2 ng/ml and suppressing above 10 ng/ml. Soluble laminin in combination with a stimulatory IL-1β concentration further increased insulin secretion by 20% compared to IL-1β alone, while with high IL-1β concentrations soluble laminin slightly attenuated GSIS inhibition. TNF-α alone did not affect GSIS, but with stimulatory IL-1β concentrations completely abolished it. Similarly, supernatants derived from Kupffer cells exerted a bimodal effect on GSIS. Our data suggest that improved insulin secretion of transplanted islets could be achieved by including soluble laminin and low IL-1β concentrations in the islet cultivation medium, and by a simultaneous inhibition of cytokine secretion from Kupffer cells. PMID:23039895

  6. Side effects of cytokines approved for therapy.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2014-11-01

    Cytokines, currently known to be more than 130 in number, are small MW (<30 kDa) key signaling proteins that modulate cellular activities in immunity, infection, inflammation and malignancy. Key to understanding their function is recognition of their pleiotropism and often overlapping and functional redundancies. Classified here into 9 main families, most of the 20 approved cytokine preparations (18 different cytokines; 3 pegylated), all in recombinant human (rh) form, are grouped in the hematopoietic growth factor, interferon, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) families. In the hematopoietin family, approved cytokines are aldesleukin (rhIL-2), oprelvekin (rhIL-11), filgrastim and tbo-filgrastim (rhG-CSF), sargramostim (rhGM-CSF), metreleptin (rh-leptin) and the rh-erythropoietins, epoetin and darbepoietin alfa. Anakinra, a recombinant receptor antagonist for IL-1, is in the IL-1 family; recombinant interferons alfa-1, alfa-2, beta-1 and gamma-1 make up the interferon family; palifermin (rhKGF) and becaplermin (rhPDGF) are in the PDGF family; and rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-7 represent the TGFβ family. The main physicochemical features, FDA-approved indications, modes of action and side effects of these approved cytokines are presented. Underlying each adverse events profile is their pleiotropism, potency and capacity to release other cytokines producing cytokine 'cocktails'. Side effects, some serious, occur despite cytokines being endogenous proteins, and this therefore demands caution in attempts to introduce individual members into the clinic. This caution is reflected in the relatively small number of cytokines currently approved by regulatory agencies and by the fact that 14 of the FDA-approved preparations carry warnings, with 10 being black box warnings. PMID:25270293

  7. Angiogenic cytokines are antibody targets during graft-versus-leukemia reactions

    PubMed Central

    Piesche, Matthias; Ho, Vincent T.; Kim, Haesook; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nehil, Michael; Yaghi, Nasser; Kolodin, Dmitriy; Weiser, Jeremy; Altevogt, Peter; Kiefel, Helena; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Cutler, Corey; Koreth, John; Canning, Christine; Ritz, Jerome; Soiffer, Robert J.; Dranoff, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) reaction is an important example of immune-mediated tumor destruction. A coordinated humoral and cellular response accomplishes leukemia cell killing, but the specific targets remain largely uncharacterized. To learn more about the antigens that elicit antibodies during GVL reactions, we analyzed advanced myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients who received an autologous, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) secreting tumor cell vaccine early after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Experimental Design A combination of tumor-derived cDNA expression library screening, protein microarrays, and antigen-specific ELISAs were employed to characterize sera obtained longitudinally from 15 AML/MDS patients who were vaccinated early after allogeneic HSCT. Results A broad, therapy-induced antibody response was uncovered, which primarily targeted intracellular proteins that function in growth, transcription/translation, metabolism, and homeostasis. Unexpectedly, antibodies were also elicited against eight secreted angiogenic cytokines that play critical roles in leukemogenesis. Antibodies to the angiogenic cytokines were evident early after therapy, and in some patients manifested a diversification in reactivity over time. Patients that developed antibodies to multiple angiogenic cytokines showed prolonged remission and survival. Conclusions These results reveal a potent humoral response during GVL reactions induced with vaccination early after allogeneic HSCT and raise the possibility that antibodies, in conjunction with NK cells and T lymphocytes, may contribute to immune-mediated control of myeloid leukemias. PMID:25538258

  8. Cytokine-Defined B Cell Responses as Therapeutic Targets in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Healy, Luke M.; Muirhead, Gillian; Prat, Alexandre; Gommerman, Jennifer L.; Bar-Or, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Important antibody-independent pathogenic roles of B cells are emerging in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). The contrasting results of different treatments targeting B cells in patients (in spite of predictions of therapeutic benefits from animal models) call for a better understanding of the multiple roles that distinct human B cell responses likely play in MS. In recent years, both murine and human B cells have been identified with distinct functional properties related to their expression of particular cytokines. These have included regulatory (Breg) B cells (secreting interleukin (IL)-10 or IL-35) and pro-inflammatory B cells (secreting tumor necrosis factor α, LTα, IL-6, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Better understanding of human cytokine-defined B cell responses is necessary in both health and diseases, such as MS. Investigation of their surface phenotype, distinct functions, and the mechanisms of regulation (both cell intrinsic and cell extrinsic) may help develop effective treatments that are more selective and safe. In this review, we focus on mechanisms by which cytokine-defined B cells contribute to the peripheral immune cascades that are thought to underlie MS relapses, and the impact of B cell-directed therapies on these mechanisms. PMID:26779181

  9. Secret key generation via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Evans, P. G.; Lawrie, B.; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, W.; Williams, B. P.; Qi, B.; Grice, W. P.

    2015-05-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over ~6km of telecom. fiber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N - 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and significantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  10. Secret Key Generation via a Modified Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Smith IV, Amos M; Evans, Philip G; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Legre, Matthieu; Lougovski, Pavel; Ray, William R; Williams, Brian P; Qi, Bing; Grice, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over 6km of telecom. ber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N > 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and signicantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  11. Cytokine medicines in clinical practice: current issues.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Theresa; Moots, Robert J; Goodacre, John

    2005-10-21

    Cytokine medicines have been licensed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis since 2000. The rheumatology community has accrued a large amount of experience in the use of these medications. This experience has led to the development of guidelines for their use that include ongoing vigilance for long term adverse events and efficacy using the Biologics Register. Delivery of these expensive therapies has prompted extensive system developments within rheumatology. The cytokine medicines have provided important tools to probe the pathogenesis of rheumatoid and other inflammatory diseases. Further cytokine medicines, in various stages of development, are on the horizon and continue to stimulate excitement within this fast expanding field. PMID:16188452

  12. Increased Lipocalin-2 Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Psoriasis by Modulating Neutrophil Chemotaxis and Cytokine Secretion.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shuai; Cao, Tianyu; Jin, Liang; Li, Bing; Fang, Hui; Zhang, Jieyu; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Jinhong; Wang, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Psoriasis is characterized by resistance to infections, which is regulated by antimicrobial proteins. Whether antimicrobial proteins play a pathogenic role in psoriasis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the role of lipocalin-2 (Lcn2), an antimicrobial protein, in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Our results showed that Lcn2 was highly expressed in the lesional skin of psoriatic patients. The neutralization of Lcn2 alleviated epidermal hyperplasia, inflammation, and especially neutrophil infiltration in an imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like murine model. In vitro, Lcn2 stimulated human neutrophils to produce vital proinflammatory mediators, such as IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-1α via a specific receptor, 24p3R, on neutrophils, which consequently activated the downstream extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Moreover, Lcn2-induced neutrophil chemotaxis was concentration dependent and mediated by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 and p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both keratinocytes and neutrophils were the sources of Lcn2 in the lesional skin of psoriatic patients. Taken together, these results suggest that Lcn2 is involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis by modulating neutrophil function, and that it could serve as a potential target for treating psoriasis. PMID:26979478

  13. a-Tocopherol counteracts ritonavir-induced inflammatory cytokines secretion in THP-1/macrophage cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment with protease inhibitor (PI) drugs of HIV-infected individuals has significantly increased their life span. However, one of the side effects of PI drugs is the development of premature atherosclerosis, whose molecular pathogenesis remains unclear. Earlier, we have reported that a-tocophero...

  14. Cytokine Secretion in Periparturient dairy cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne's disease, cause by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), has a devastating impact on the dairy industry. Cows typically are infected as neonates, and stressors, such as parturition, may induce the transition from the subclinical to a more clinical stage of disease. The objective ...

  15. Crosstalk between monocytes and myometrial smooth muscle in culture generates synergistic pro-inflammatory cytokine production and enhances myocyte contraction, with effects opposed by progesterone

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, S.P.; Hutchinson, J.L.; Dorward, D.A.; Rossi, A.G.; Norman, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Both term and preterm parturition are characterized by an influx of macrophages and neutrophils into the myometrium and cervix, with co-incident increased peripheral blood monocyte activation. Infection and inflammation are strongly implicated in the pathology of preterm labour (PTL), with progesterone considered a promising candidate for its prevention or treatment. In this study, we investigated the effect of monocytes on myometrial smooth muscle cell inflammatory cytokine production both alone and in response to LPS, a TLR4 agonist used to trigger PTL in vivo. We also investigated the effect of monocytes on myocyte contraction. Monocytes, isolated from peripheral blood samples from term pregnant women, were cultured alone, or co-cultured with PHM1-41 myometrial smooth muscle cells, for 24 h. In a third set of experiments, PHM1-41 myocytes were cultured for 24 h in isolation. Cytokine secretion was determined by ELISA or multiplex assays. Co-culture of monocytes and myocytes led to synergistic secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1, with the secretion being further enhanced by LPS (100 ng/ml). The synergistic secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 from co-cultures was mediated in part by direct cell–cell contact, and by TNF. Conditioned media from co-cultures stimulated contraction of PHM1-41 myocytes, and the effect was inhibited by progesterone. Both progesterone and IL-10 inhibited LPS-stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 secretion from co-cultures, while progesterone also inhibited chemokine secretion. These data suggest that monocytes infiltrating the myometrium at labour participate in crosstalk that potentiates pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, an effect that is enhanced by LPS, and can augment myocyte contraction. These effects are all partially inhibited by progesterone. PMID:26002969

  16. Crosstalk between monocytes and myometrial smooth muscle in culture generates synergistic pro-inflammatory cytokine production and enhances myocyte contraction, with effects opposed by progesterone.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, S P; Hutchinson, J L; Dorward, D A; Rossi, A G; Norman, J E

    2015-08-01

    Both term and preterm parturition are characterized by an influx of macrophages and neutrophils into the myometrium and cervix, with co-incident increased peripheral blood monocyte activation. Infection and inflammation are strongly implicated in the pathology of preterm labour (PTL), with progesterone considered a promising candidate for its prevention or treatment. In this study, we investigated the effect of monocytes on myometrial smooth muscle cell inflammatory cytokine production both alone and in response to LPS, a TLR4 agonist used to trigger PTL in vivo. We also investigated the effect of monocytes on myocyte contraction. Monocytes, isolated from peripheral blood samples from term pregnant women, were cultured alone, or co-cultured with PHM1-41 myometrial smooth muscle cells, for 24 h. In a third set of experiments, PHM1-41 myocytes were cultured for 24 h in isolation. Cytokine secretion was determined by ELISA or multiplex assays. Co-culture of monocytes and myocytes led to synergistic secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1, with the secretion being further enhanced by LPS (100 ng/ml). The synergistic secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 from co-cultures was mediated in part by direct cell-cell contact, and by TNF. Conditioned media from co-cultures stimulated contraction of PHM1-41 myocytes, and the effect was inhibited by progesterone. Both progesterone and IL-10 inhibited LPS-stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 secretion from co-cultures, while progesterone also inhibited chemokine secretion. These data suggest that monocytes infiltrating the myometrium at labour participate in crosstalk that potentiates pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, an effect that is enhanced by LPS, and can augment myocyte contraction. These effects are all partially inhibited by progesterone. PMID:26002969

  17. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Alaiwa, Mahmoud Abou; Ernst, Sarah E.; Karp, Philip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Allen, Patrick D.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Stoltz, David A.; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H+ secretion by the nongastric H+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H+; consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  18. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice.

    PubMed

    Shah, Viral S; Meyerholz, David K; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud; Ernst, Sarah E; Karp, Philip H; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L; Heilmann, Kristopher P; Leidinger, Mariah R; Allen, Patrick D; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Stoltz, David A; Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-01-29

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H(+) secretion by the nongastric H(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H(+); consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  19. Regulation of autoimmune arthritis by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eugene Y.; Chi, Howard H.; Bouziane, Mohammed; Gaur, Amitabh; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of T cell-mediated diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has typically been explained in the context of the Th1-Th2 paradigm: the initiation/propagation by pro-inflammatory cytokines, and downregulation by Th2 cytokines. However, in our study based on the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model of RA, we observed that Lewis (LEW) (RT.1l) rats at the recovery phase of AA showed the highest level of IFN-γ in recall response to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65), whereas AA-resistant Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) (RT.1l) rats secreted high levels of IFN-γ much earlier following disease induction. However, no significant secretion of IL-10 or TGF-β was observed in either strain. Furthermore, pre-treatment of LEW rats with a peptide of self (rat) hsp65 (R465), which induced T cells secreting predominantly IFN-γ, afforded protection against AA and decreased IL-17 expression by the arthritogenic epitope-restimulated T cells. These results provide a novel perspective on the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis. PMID:18276192

  20. Cytokines profile and peripheral blood mononuclear cells morphology in Rett and autistic patients.

    PubMed

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Franco; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Montagner, Giulia; Waldon, PhiAnh; Hayek, Joussef; Gambari, Roberto; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A potential role for immune dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been well established. However, immunological features of Rett syndrome (RTT), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder closely related to autism, have not been well addressed yet. By using multiplex Luminex technology, a panel of 27 cytokines and chemokines was evaluated in serum from 10 RTT patients with confirmed diagnosis of MECP2 mutation (typical RTT), 12 children affected by classic autistic disorder and 8 control subjects. The cytokine/chemokine gene expression was assessed by real time PCR on mRNA of isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Moreover, ultrastructural analysis of PBMCs was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Significantly higher serum levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-9, IL-13 were detected in RTT compared to control subjects, and IL-15 shows a trend toward the upregulation in RTT. In addition, IL-1β and VEGF were the only down-regulated cytokines in autistic patients with respect to RTT. No difference in cytokine/chemokine profile between autistic and control groups was detected. These data were also confirmed by ELISA real time PCR. At the ultrastructural level, the most severe morphological abnormalities were observed in mitochondria of both RTT and autistic PBMCs. In conclusion, our study shows a deregulated cytokine/chemokine profile together with morphologically altered immune cells in RTT. Such abnormalities were not quite as evident in autistic subjects. These findings indicate a possible role of immune dysfunction in RTT making the clinical features of this pathology related also to the immunology aspects, suggesting, therefore, novel possible therapeutic interventions for this disorder. PMID:26471937

  1. MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION SYNDROME AND CYTOKINE DIRECTED THERAPIES

    PubMed Central

    Grom, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is an episode of overwhelming inflammation that occurs most commonly in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is characterized by expansion and activation of T lymphocytes and hemophagocytic macrophages, and bears great similarity to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). This disorder has substantial morbidity and mortality, and there is frequently a delay in recognition and initiation of treatment. Here, we will review what is known about the pathogenesis of MAS and in particular its similarities to HLH. The development of MAS is characterized by a cytokine storm, with the elaboration of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. We will examine the evidence for various cytokines in the initiation and pathogenesis of MAS, and discuss how new biologic therapies may alter the risk of MAS. Finally we will review current treatment options for MAS, and examine how cytokine-directed therapy could serve as novel treatment modalities. PMID:24974063

  2. Cytokines in the perinatal period - Part I.

    PubMed

    Chau, A; Markley, J C; Juang, J; Tsen, L C

    2016-05-01

    Successful pregnancy requires a state of immune homeostasis. Maternal tolerance of the genetically distinct fetoplacental unit is in part mediated by maternal and fetal pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines; these cytokines have also been implicated in different pregnancy-related pathologic states. This two-part series seeks to provide anesthesiologists with an overview on selected perinatal cytokines in an effort to identify opportunities for research and improvements in clinical care. In part one, we review basic and pregnancy-related elements of the immune system, with an emphasis on the role of cytokines. From this foundation, we offer a perspective of a unique phenomenon witnessed within obstetric anesthesia - maternal temperature elevation associated with labor epidural analgesia. PMID:26970932

  3. Changes in proinflammatory cytokine activity after menopause.

    PubMed

    Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Köditz, Roland; Pfohl, Martin; Schatz, Helmut

    2002-02-01

    There is now a large body of evidence suggesting that the decline in ovarian function with menopause is associated with spontaneous increases in proinflammatory cytokines. The cytokines that have obtained the most attention are IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-alpha. The exact mechanisms by which estrogen interferes with cytokine activity are still incompletely known but may potentially include interactions of the ER with other transcription factors, modulation of nitric oxide activity, antioxidative effects, plasma membrane actions, and changes in immune cell function. Experimental and clinical studies strongly support a link between the increased state of proinflammatory cytokine activity and postmenopausal bone loss. Preliminary evidence suggests that these changes also might be relevant to vascular homeostasis and the development of atherosclerosis. Better knowledge of the mechanisms and the time course of these interactions may open new avenues for the prevention and treatment of some of the most prevalent and important disorders in postmenopausal women. PMID:11844745

  4. Differential Expression of Cytokine Transcripts in Neonatal and Adult Ovine Alveolar Macrophages in Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus or Toll-Like Receptor Ligation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections are common in children less than 2 years of age and can be particularly severe in neonates and premature infants. Alveolar macrophages (AMphis) secrete cytokines or chemokines that participate in induction of the innate response to RSV and which may cont...

  5. Secret Public Key Protocols Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoon Wei; Paterson, Kenneth G.

    Password-based protocols are important and popular means of providing human-to-machine authentication. The concept of secret public keys was proposed more than a decade ago as a means of securing password-based authentication protocols against off-line password guessing attacks, but was later found vulnerable to various attacks. In this paper, we revisit the concept and introduce the notion of identity-based secret public keys. Our new identity-based approach allows secret public keys to be constructed in a very natural way using arbitrary random strings, eliminating the structure found in, for example, RSA or ElGamal keys. We examine identity-based secret public key protocols and give informal security analyses, indicating that they are secure against off-line password guessing and other attacks.

  6. GLIAL ABNORMALITIES IN MOOD DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J.; Carlezon, William A.; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glial cells may be important in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and may be possible targets for the development of new treatments. In this chapter, we will review the evidence for glial abnormalities in mood disorders. We will discuss glial cell biology and evidence from postmortem studies of mood disorders. This is not carry out a comprehensive review; rather we selectively discuss existing evidence in building an argument for the role of glial cells in mood disorders. PMID:25377605

  7. Involvement of de novo ceramide synthesis in pro-inflammatory adipokine secretion and adipocyte-macrophage interaction.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoji; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Fujiya, Atsushi; Seino, Yusuke; Shang, Qing-Long; Suzuki, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Oiso, Yutaka

    2014-12-01

    Interaction between adipocytes and macrophages has been suggested to play a central role in the pathogenesis of obesity. Ceramide, a sphingolipid de novo synthesized from palmitate, is known to stimulate pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from multiple types of cells. To clarify whether de novo synthesized ceramide contributes to cytokine dysregulation in adipocytes and macrophages, we observed cytokine secretion in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes (L1) and RAW264.7 macrophages (RAW) cultured alone or co-cultured under the suppression of de novo ceramide synthesis. Palmitate enhanced ceramide accumulation and stimulated the expression and secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in L1. The suppression of serine-palmitoyl transferase, a rate-limiting enzyme of de novo ceramide synthesis, by myriocin or siRNA attenuated those palmitate-induced alterations, and a ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1 showed similar results. In contrast, the inhibitor of sphingosine kinase or a membrane-permeable ceramide analogue augmented the cytokine secretion. Myriocin effects on the palmitate-induced changes were not abrogated by toll-like receptor-4 blockade. Although palmitate stimulated RAW to secrete tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), it did not significantly increase ceramide content, and neither myriocin nor fumonisin B1 attenuated the TNF-α hypersecretion. The co-culture of L1 with RAW markedly augmented IL-6 and MCP-1 levels in media. Myriocin or fumonisin B1 significantly lowered these cytokine levels and suppressed the gene expression of TNF-α and MCP-1 in RAW and of IL-6 and MCP-1 in L1. In conclusion, de novo synthesized ceramide partially mediates the palmitate effects on pro-inflammatory adipokines and is possibly involved in the interaction with macrophages. PMID:25283329

  8. Cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus, London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Anisur

    2003-01-01

    The meeting consisted of 11 talks that illustrated the complexity of the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying systemic lupus erythematosus and aimed to identify ways in which cytokine modulation might affect those mechanisms. The evidence relating to the involvement of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10 and BLyS in this disease was discussed in particular detail. A final discussion explored the possible ways in which cytokine modulation might lead to new methods of treating systemic lupus erythematosus in the future. PMID:12823845

  9. Soypeptide lunasin in cytokine immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua-Chen; Lewis, David; Tung, Chun-Yu; Han, Ling; Henriquez, Sarah M P; Voiles, Larry; Lupov, Ivan P; Pelloso, David; Sinn, Anthony L; Pollok, Karen E; de Lumen, Ben O; Li, Fang; Blum, Janice S; Srivastava, Shivani; Robertson, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    Immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance anti-tumor immunity and are part of the therapeutic armamentarium for cancer treatment. We have previously reported that post-transplant lymphoma patients have an acquired deficiency of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4, which results in defective IFNγ production during clinical immunotherapy. With the goal of further improving cytokine-based immunotherapy, we examined the effects of a soybean peptide called lunasin that synergistically works with cytokines on natural killer (NK) cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors and post-transplant lymphoma patients were stimulated with or without lunasin in the presence of IL-12 or IL-2. NK activation was evaluated, and its tumoricidal activity was assessed using in vitro and in vivo tumor models. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was performed to evaluate the histone modification of gene loci that are regulated by lunasin and cytokine. Adding lunasin to IL-12- or IL-2-stimulated NK cells demonstrated synergistic effects in the induction of IFNG and GZMB involved in cytotoxicity. The combination of lunasin and cytokines (IL-12 plus IL-2) was capable of restoring IFNγ production by NK cells from post-transplant lymphoma patients. In addition, NK cells stimulated with lunasin plus cytokines displayed higher tumoricidal activity than those stimulated with cytokines alone using in vitro and in vivo tumor models. The underlying mechanism responsible for the effects of lunasin on NK cells is likely due to epigenetic modulation on target gene loci. Lunasin represents a different class of immune modulating agent that may augment the therapeutic responses mediated by cytokine-based immunotherapy. PMID:24363024

  10. Anti cytokine therapy in chronic inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Charlotte; Davies, Ruth; Choy, Ernest

    2016-10-01

    This is a review looking at anti cytokine therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PSA) and Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). The review explores the similarities and differences in the clinical features, as well as treatments and cytokines involved in the development and propagation of the disease. Particular attention is paid to TNFα inhibitors IL-1ra, IL-6 and JAK kinase Inhibitors, anti IL23 and IL-12 and the new developments with anti-IL-17. PMID:27497159

  11. Impaired cytokine responses in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Haverkamp, M H; van de Vosse, E; Goldbach-Mansky, R; Holland, S M

    2014-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is characterized by dysregulated inflammation with excessive interleukin (IL)-1β activation and secretion. Neonatal-onset multi-system inflammatory disease (NOMID) is the most severe form. We explored cytokine responses in 32 CAPS patients before and after IL-1β blocking therapy. We measured cytokines produced by activated peripheral blood monuclear cells (PBMCs) from treated and untreated CAPS patients after stimulation for 48 h with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), PHA plus IL-12, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or LPS plus interferon (IFN)-γ. We measured IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in the supernatants. PBMCs from three untreated CAPS patients were cultured in the presence of the IL-1β blocker Anakinra. Fifty healthy individuals served as controls. CAPS patients had high spontaneous production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF and IFN-γ by unstimulated cells. However, stimulation indexes (SIs, ratio of stimulated to unstimulated production) of these cytokines to PHA and LPS were low in NOMID patients compared to controls. Unstimulated IL-10 and IL-12p70 production was normal, but up-regulation after PHA and LPS was also low. LPS plus IFN-γ inadequately up-regulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF and IL-10 in CAPS patients. In-vitro but not in-vivo treatment with Anakinra improved SIs by lowering spontaneous cytokine production. However, in-vitro treatment did not improve the low stimulated cytokine levels. Activating mutations in NLRP3 in CAPS are correlated with poor SIs to PHA, LPS and IFN-γ. The impairment in stimulated cytokine responses in spite of IL-1β blocking therapy suggests a broader intrinsic defect in CAPS patients, which is not corrected by targeting IL-1β. PMID:24773462

  12. Production of MMP-9 and inflammatory cytokines by Trypanosoma cruzi-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    de Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; da Silva, Wellington Seguins; de Castro Côrtes, Luzia Monteiro; da Silva Vasconcelos Sousa, Periela; de Araujo Soares, Renata Oliveira; Alves, Carlos Roberto

    2014-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a large family of Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) dependent endopeptidases implicated in tissue remodeling and chronic inflammation. MMPs also play key roles in the activation of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines produced by many cell types, including lymphocytes, granulocytes, and, in particular, activated macrophages. Their synthesis and secretion appear to be important in a number of physiological processes, including the inflammatory process. Here, we investigated the interaction between human and mouse macrophages with T. cruzi Colombian and Y strains to characterize MMP-9 and cytokine production in this system. Supernatants and total extract of T. cruzi infected human and mouse macrophages were obtained and used to assess MMP-9 profile and inflammatory cytokines. The presence of metalloproteinase activity was determined by zymography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting assays. The effect of cytokines on MMP-9 production in human macrophages was verified by previous incubation of cytokines on these cells in culture, and analyzed by zymography. We detected an increase in MMP-9 production in the culture supernatants of T. cruzi infected human and mouse macrophages. The addition of IL-1β or TNF-α to human macrophage cultures increased MMP-9 production. In contrast, MMP-9 production was down-modulated when human macrophage cultures were treated with IFN-γ or IL-4 before infection. Human macrophages infected with T. cruzi Y or Colombian strains produced increased levels of MMP-9, which was related to the production of cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. PMID:25448360

  13. Multiplex Immunoassay of Plasma Cytokine Levels in Men with Alcoholism and the Relationship to Psychiatric Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Manzardo, Ann M.; Poje, Albert B.; Penick, Elizabeth C.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol use alters adaptive immunity and cytokine activity influencing immunological and hormone responses, inflammation, and wound healing. Brain cytokine disturbances may impact neurological function, mood, cognition and traits related to alcoholism including impulsiveness. We examined the relationship between plasma cytokine levels and self-rated psychiatric symptoms in 40 adult males (mean age 51 ± 6 years; range 33–58 years) with current alcohol dependence and 30 control males (mean age 48 ± 6 years; range 40–58 years) with no history of alcoholism using multiplex sandwich immunoassays with the Luminex magnetic-bead based platform. Log-transformed cytokine levels were analyzed for their relationship with the Symptom Checklist-90R (SCL-90R), Barratt Impulsivity Scales (BIS) and Alcoholism Severity Scale (ASS). Inflammatory cytokines (interferon γ-induced protein-10 (IP-10); monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1); regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)) were significantly elevated in alcoholism compared to controls while bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cytokines and chemokines (granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF); soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L); growth-related oncogene (GRO)) were significantly reduced. GRO and RANTES levels were positively correlated with BIS scales; and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels were positively correlated with SCL-90R scale scores (p < 0.05). Elevated inflammatory mediators in alcoholism may influence brain function leading to increased impulsiveness and/or phobia. The novel association between RANTES and GRO and impulsivity phenotype in alcoholism should be further investigated in alcoholism and psychiatric conditions with core impulsivity and anxiety phenotypes lending support for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27043532

  14. Multiplex Immunoassay of Plasma Cytokine Levels in Men with Alcoholism and the Relationship to Psychiatric Assessments.

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Ann M; Poje, Albert B; Penick, Elizabeth C; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol use alters adaptive immunity and cytokine activity influencing immunological and hormone responses, inflammation, and wound healing. Brain cytokine disturbances may impact neurological function, mood, cognition and traits related to alcoholism including impulsiveness. We examined the relationship between plasma cytokine levels and self-rated psychiatric symptoms in 40 adult males (mean age 51 ± 6 years; range 33-58 years) with current alcohol dependence and 30 control males (mean age 48 ± 6 years; range 40-58 years) with no history of alcoholism using multiplex sandwich immunoassays with the Luminex magnetic-bead based platform. Log-transformed cytokine levels were analyzed for their relationship with the Symptom Checklist-90R (SCL-90R), Barratt Impulsivity Scales (BIS) and Alcoholism Severity Scale (ASS). Inflammatory cytokines (interferon γ-induced protein-10 (IP-10); monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1); regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)) were significantly elevated in alcoholism compared to controls while bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cytokines and chemokines (granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF); soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L); growth-related oncogene (GRO)) were significantly reduced. GRO and RANTES levels were positively correlated with BIS scales; and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels were positively correlated with SCL-90R scale scores (p < 0.05). Elevated inflammatory mediators in alcoholism may influence brain function leading to increased impulsiveness and/or phobia. The novel association between RANTES and GRO and impulsivity phenotype in alcoholism should be further investigated in alcoholism and psychiatric conditions with core impulsivity and anxiety phenotypes lending support for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27043532

  15. Th1, Th2, and Th17 Cytokine Involvement in Thyroid Associated Ophthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Li, Zhangfang; Li, Wenting; Ge, Ying; Xie, Min; Lv, Meng; Fan, Yanfei; Chen, Zhi; Zhao, Defu; Han, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    To determine serum cytokine profiles in Graves' disease (GD) patients with or without active and inactive thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), we recruited 65 subjects: 10 GD only (without TAO), 25 GD + active TAO, 20 GD + TAO, and 10 healthy controls. Liquid chip assay was used to measure serum Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines including IFN-γ (interferon-gamma), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-alpha), IL-1α (interleukin-1 alpha), IL-1Ra (IL-1 receptor antagonist), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-17 and two chemokines: RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) and IP-10 (IFN-γ-induced protein 10). Serum levels of TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) receptor autoantibodies (TRAb) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with healthy controls, TAO patients showed significantly elevated serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, and IP-10. Comparing active and inactive TAO, serum Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α were elevated in active TAO, while serum Th2 cytokine IL-4 was elevated in inactive TAO. Serum Th17 cytokine IL-17 was elevated in GD but reduced in both active and inactive TAO. A positive correlation was found between TRAb and IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6. Taken together, serum Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and chemokines reflect TAO disease activity and may be implicated in TAO pathogenesis. PMID:26089587

  16. Information theoretic approach to complex biological network reconstruction: application to cytokine release in RAW 264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput methods for biological measurements generate vast amounts of quantitative data, which necessitate the development of advanced approaches to data analysis to help understand the underlying mechanisms and networks. Reconstruction of biological networks from measured data of different components is a significant challenge in systems biology. Results We use an information theoretic approach to reconstruct phosphoprotein-cytokine networks in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Cytokines are secreted upon activation of a wide range of regulatory signals transduced by the phosphoprotein network. Identifying these components can help identify regulatory modules responsible for the inflammatory phenotype. The information theoretic approach is based on estimation of mutual information of interactions by using kernel density estimators. Mutual information provides a measure of statistical dependencies between interacting components. Using the topology of the network derived, we develop a data-driven parsimonious input–output model of the phosphoprotein-cytokine network. Conclusions We demonstrate the applicability of our information theoretic approach to reconstruction of biological networks. For the phosphoprotein-cytokine network, this approach not only captures most of the known signaling components involved in cytokine release but also predicts new signaling components involved in the release of cytokines. The results of this study are important for gaining a clear understanding of macrophage activation during the inflammation process. PMID:24964861

  17. Glibenclamide reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production by neutrophils of diabetes patients in response to bacterial infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Rinchai, Darawan; Utispan, Kusumawadee; Suwannasaen, Duangchan; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Ato, Manabu; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for melioidosis, which is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. Our previous study has shown that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from diabetic subjects exhibited decreased functions in response to B. pseudomallei. Here we investigated the mechanisms regulating cytokine secretion of PMNs from diabetic patients which might contribute to patient susceptibility to bacterial infections. Purified PMNs from diabetic patients who had been treated with glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker for anti-diabetes therapy), showed reduction of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 secretion when exposed to B. pseudomallei. Additionally, reduction of these pro-inflammatory cytokines occurred when PMNs from diabetic patients were treated in vitro with glibenclamide. These findings suggest that glibenclamide might be responsible for the increased susceptibility of diabetic patients, with poor glycemic control, to bacterial infections as a result of its effect on reducing IL-1β production by PMNs.

  18. Brain sites mediating corticosteroid feedback inhibition of stimulated ACTH secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, L.

    1989-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the brain mediates stress-induced and circadian increases in ACTH secretion and that corticosteroid concentrations which normalize basal plasma ACTH are insufficient to normalize ACTH responses to circadian or stressful stimuli in adrenalectomized rats. To identify brain sites mediating corticosteroid inhibition of stimulated ACTH secretion, two approaches were used. The first compared brain ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose uptake in rats with differential ACTH responses to stress. Relative to sham-adrenalectomized (SHAM) rats, adrenalectomized rats replaced with low, constant corticosterone levels via a subcutaneous corticosterone pellet (B-PELLET) exhibited elevated and prolonged ACTH responses to a variety of stimuli. Adrenalectomized rate given a circadian corticosterone rhythm via corticosterone in their drinking water exhibited elevated ACTH levels immediately after stress, but unlike B-PELLET rats, terminated stress induced ACTH secretion normally relative to SHAMS. Therefore, the abnormal ACTH responses to stress in B-PELLET rats were due to the lack of both circadian variations and stress-induced increases in corticosterone. Hypoxia was selected as a standardized stimulus for correlating brain ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose uptake with ACTH secretion. In intact rats, increases in plasma ACTH and decreases in arterial PO{sub 2} correlated with the severity of hypoxia at arterial PCO{sub 2} below 60 mm Hg. Hypoxia PELLET vs. SHAM rats. However, in preliminary experiments, although hypoxia increased brain 2-deoxyglucose uptake in most brain regions, plasma ACTH correlated poorly with 2-deoxyglucose uptake at 12% and 10% O{sub 2}.

  19. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  20. Nonlinear Secret Image Sharing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2⁡m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  1. Elevated peripheral cytokines characterize a subgroup of people with schizophrenia displaying poor verbal fluency and reduced Broca's area volume

    PubMed Central

    Fillman, S G; Weickert, T W; Lenroot, R K; Catts, S V; Bruggemann, J M; Catts, V S; Weickert, C S

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on schizophrenia have detected elevated cytokines in both brain and blood, suggesting neuroinflammation may contribute to the pathophysiology in some cases. We aimed to determine the extent to which elevated peripheral cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) expression: (1) characterizes a subgroup of people with schizophrenia and (2) shows a relationship to cognition, brain volume and/or symptoms. Forty-three outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and matched healthy controls were assessed for peripheral cytokine mRNAs (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-18), intelligence quotient, memory and verbal fluency, symptom severity and cortical brain volumes integral to language (that is, Broca's and Wernicke's areas). IL-1β mRNA levels were 28% increased in schizophrenia compared with controls (t(82)=2.64, P<0.01). Using a two-step clustering procedure, we identified a subgroup of people displaying relatively elevated cytokine mRNA levels (17/43 people with schizophrenia and 9/42 controls). Individuals with schizophrenia in the elevated cytokine subgroup performed significantly worse than the low-cytokine subgroup on verbal fluency (F(1,40)=15.7, P<0.001). There was a 17% volume reduction of the left pars opercularis (POp) (Broca's area) in patients with elevated cytokines compared with patients with lower cytokines (F(1,29)=9.41, P=0.005). Negative linear relationships between IL-1β mRNA levels and both verbal fluency and left POp volume were found in schizophrenia. This study is among the first to link blood biomarkers of inflammation with both cognitive deficits and brain volume reductions in people with schizophrenia, supporting that those with elevated cytokines represent a neurobiologically meaningful subgroup. These findings raise the possibility that targeted anti-inflammatory treatments may ameliorate cognitive and brain morphological abnormalities in some people with schizophrenia. PMID:26194183

  2. Elevated peripheral cytokines characterize a subgroup of people with schizophrenia displaying poor verbal fluency and reduced Broca's area volume.

    PubMed

    Fillman, S G; Weickert, T W; Lenroot, R K; Catts, S V; Bruggemann, J M; Catts, V S; Weickert, C S

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies on schizophrenia have detected elevated cytokines in both brain and blood, suggesting neuroinflammation may contribute to the pathophysiology in some cases. We aimed to determine the extent to which elevated peripheral cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) expression: (1) characterizes a subgroup of people with schizophrenia and (2) shows a relationship to cognition, brain volume and/or symptoms. Forty-three outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and matched healthy controls were assessed for peripheral cytokine mRNAs (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-18), intelligence quotient, memory and verbal fluency, symptom severity and cortical brain volumes integral to language (that is, Broca's and Wernicke's areas). IL-1β mRNA levels were 28% increased in schizophrenia compared with controls (t(82)=2.64, P<0.01). Using a two-step clustering procedure, we identified a subgroup of people displaying relatively elevated cytokine mRNA levels (17/43 people with schizophrenia and 9/42 controls). Individuals with schizophrenia in the elevated cytokine subgroup performed significantly worse than the low-cytokine subgroup on verbal fluency (F(1,40)=15.7, P<0.001). There was a 17% volume reduction of the left pars opercularis (POp) (Broca's area) in patients with elevated cytokines compared with patients with lower cytokines (F(1,29)=9.41, P=0.005). Negative linear relationships between IL-1β mRNA levels and both verbal fluency and left POp volume were found in schizophrenia. This study is among the first to link blood biomarkers of inflammation with both cognitive deficits and brain volume reductions in people with schizophrenia, supporting that those with elevated cytokines represent a neurobiologically meaningful subgroup. These findings raise the possibility that targeted anti-inflammatory treatments may ameliorate cognitive and brain morphological abnormalities in some people with schizophrenia. PMID:26194183

  3. Tributyltin alters secretion of interleukin 1 beta from human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shyretha; Whalen, Margaret

    2015-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) has been used as a biocide in industrial applications such as wood preservation, antifouling paint and antifungal agents. Owing to its many uses, it contaminates the environment and has been found in human blood samples. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that promotes cell growth, tissue repair and immune response regulation. Produced predominately by both monocytes and macrophages, IL-1β appears to increase the invasiveness of certain tumors. This study shows that TBT modifies the secretion of IL-1β from increasingly reconstituted preparations of human immune cells. IL-1β secretion was examined after 24-, 48-h or 6-day exposures to TBT in highly enriched human natural killer (NK) cells, monocyte-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MD-PBMCs), PBMCs, granulocytes and a preparation combining both PBMCs and granulocytes (PBMCs+granulocytes). TBT altered IL-1β secretion from all of the cell preparations. The 200 nM concentration of TBT normally blocked the secretion of IL-1β, whereas lower concentrations (usually 5-50 nM) elevated secretion of IL-1β. Examination of the signaling pathway(s) responsible for the elevated secretion of IL-1β was carried out in MD-PBMCs. Pathways examined were IL-1β processing (Caspase-1), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). Results indicated that MAPK pathways (p44/42 and p38) appear to be the targets of TBT that lead to increased IL-1β secretion from immune cells. These results from human immune cells show IL-1β dysregulation by TBT is occurring ex vivo. Thus, the potential for in vivo effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine levels may possibly be a consequence of TBT exposures. PMID:25382723

  4. IL-6 and its circadian secretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Vgontzas, A N; Bixler, E O; Lin, H-M; Prolo, P; Trakada, G; Chrousos, G P

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine produced by numerous types of immune and nonimmune cells and is involved in many pathophysiologic mechanisms in humans. Many studies suggest that IL-6 is a putative 'sleep factor' and its circadian secretion correlates with sleep/sleepiness. IL-6 is elevated in disorders of excessive daytime sleepiness such as narcolepsy and obstructive sleep apnea. It correlates positively with body mass index and may be a mediator of sleepiness in obesity. Also the secretion of this cytokine is stimulated by total acute or partial short-term sleep loss reflecting the increased sleepiness experienced by sleep-deprived individuals. Studies that evaluated the 24-hour secretory pattern of IL-6 in healthy young adults suggest that IL-6 is secreted in a biphasic circadian pattern with two nadirs at about 08.00 and 21.00, and two zeniths at about 19.00 and 05.00 h. In contrast, following sleep deprivation or in disorders of sleep disturbance, e.g., insomnia, IL-6 peaks during the day and, based on the level of stress system activity, i.e., cortisol secretion, contributes to either sleepiness and deep sleep (low cortisol) or feelings of tiredness and fatigue and poor sleep (high cortisol). In order to address concerns about the potential impact of differences of IL-6 levels between the beginning and the end of the 24-hour blood-drawing experiment, we proceeded with a cosinor analysis of 'detrended' data in young and old healthy individuals. This new analysis did not affect the biphasic circadian pattern of IL-6 secretion in young adults, while it augmented the flattened circadian pattern in old individuals in whom the difference was greater. Finally, IL-6 appears to be somnogenic in rats and exhibits a diurnal rhythm that follows the sleep/wake cycle in these animals. We conclude that IL-6 is a mediator of sleepiness and its circadian pattern reflects the homeostatic drive for sleep. PMID:15905620

  5. Direct Write Protein Patterns for Multiplexed Cytokine Detection from Live Cells Using Electron Beam Lithography.

    PubMed

    Lau, Uland Y; Saxer, Sina S; Lee, Juneyoung; Bat, Erhan; Maynard, Heather D

    2016-01-26

    Simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers, such as extracellular signaling molecules, is a critical aspect in disease profiling and diagnostics. Precise positioning of antibodies on surfaces, especially at the micro- and nanoscale, is important for the improvement of assays, biosensors, and diagnostics on the molecular level, and therefore, the pursuit of device miniaturization for parallel, fast, low-volume assays is a continuing challenge. Here, we describe a multiplexed cytokine immunoassay utilizing electron beam lithography and a trehalose glycopolymer as a resist for the direct writing of antibodies on silicon substrates, allowing for micro- and nanoscale precision of protein immobilization. Specifically, anti-interleukin 6 (IL-6) and antitumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antibodies were directly patterned. Retention of the specific binding properties of the patterned antibodies was shown by the capture of secreted cytokines from stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. A sandwich immunoassay was employed using gold nanoparticles and enhancement with silver for the detection and visualization of bound cytokines to the patterns by localized surface plasmon resonance detected with dark-field microscopy. Multiplexing with both IL-6 and TNFα on a single chip was also successfully demonstrated with high specificity and in relevant cell culture conditions and at different times after cell stimulation. The direct fabrication of capture antibody patterns for cytokine detection described here could be useful for biosensing applications. PMID:26679368

  6. In vivo Cytokine Gene Transfer by Gene Gun Reduces Tumor Growth in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenn H.; Burkholder, Joseph K.; Sun, Jian; Culp, Jerilyn; Turner, Joel; Lu, Xing G.; Pugh, Thomas D.; Ershler, William B.; Yang, Ning-Sun

    1995-03-01

    Implantation of tumor cells modified by in vitro cytokine gene transfer has been shown by many investigators to result in potent in vivo antitumor activities in mice. Here we describe an approach to tumor immunotherapy utilizing direct transfection of cytokine genes into tumorbearing animals by particle-mediated gene transfer. In vivo transfection of the human interleukin 6 gene into the tumor site reduced methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma growth, and a combination of murine tumor necrosis factor α and interferon γ genes inhibited growth of a renal carcinoma tumor model (Renca). In addition, treatment with murine interleukin 2 and interferon γ genes prolonged the survival of Renca tumor-bearing mice and resulted in tumor eradication in 25% of the test animals. Transgene expression was demonstrated in treated tissues by ELISA and immunohistochemical analysis. Significant serum levels of interleukin 6 and interferon γ were detected, demonstrating effective secretion of transgenic proteins from treated skin into the bloodstream. This in vivo cytokine gene therapy approach provides a system for evaluating the antitumor properties of various cytokines in different tumor models and has potential utility for human cancer gene therapy.

  7. Role of Cytokines in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pain and Disc-content

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving. M

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is the major contributor to back/neck and radicular pain. It is characterized by an elevation in levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1 α/β, IL-6 and IL-17 secreted by the disc cells themselves; these cytokines promote matrix degradation, chemokine production and changes in cell phenotype. The resulting imbalance between catabolic and anabolic responses leads to degeneration, as well as herniation and radicular pain. Release of chemokines from degenerating discs promote infiltration and activation of T and B cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and mast cells further amplifying the inflammatory cascade. Immunocyte migration into the disc is accompanied by the appearance of microvasculature and nerve fibers arising from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). In this inflammatory milieu, neurogenic factors in particular nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) generated by disc and immune cells induce expression of pain associated cation channels in DRGs. Depolarization of these channels is likely to promote discogenic and radicular pain and reinforce the cytokine-mediated degenerative cascade. Taken together, the enhanced understanding of the contribution of cytokines and immune cells to catabolic and nociceptive processes provide new targets for treating symptomatic disc disease. PMID:24166242

  8. Detecting Secreted Analytes from Immune Cells: An Overview of Technologies.

    PubMed

    Pike, Kelly A; Hui, Caitlyn; Krawczyk, Connie M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is largely shaped by secreted factors and infiltrating immune cells and the nature of this environment can profoundly influence tumor growth and progression. As such, there is an increasing need to identify and quantify secreted factors by tumor cells, tumor-associated cells, and infiltrating immune cells. To meet this need, the dynamic range of immunoassays such as ELISAs and ELISpots have been improved and the scope of reagents commercially available has been expanded. In addition, new bead-based and membrane-based screening arrays have been developed to allow for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes in one sample. Similarly, the optimization of intracellular staining for flow cytometry now allows for the quantitation of multiple cytokines from either a purified cell population or a complex mixed cell suspension. Herein, we review the rapidly evolving technologies that are currently available to detect secreted analytes. Emphasis is placed on discussing the advantages and disadvantages of these assays and their applications. PMID:27581018

  9. METEORIN-LIKE is a cytokine associated with barrier tissues and alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ushach, Irina; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Martinez, Cynthia; Hevezi, Peter A.; Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Vazquez, Monica I.; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are involved in many functions of the immune system including initiating, amplifying and resolving immune responses. Through bioinformatics analyses of a comprehensive database of gene expression (BIGE: Body Index of Gene Expression) we observed that a small secreted protein encoded by a poorly characterized gene called meteorin-like (METRNL), is highly expressed in mucosal tissues, skin and activated macrophages. Further studies indicate that Metrnl is produced by Alternatively Activated Macrophages (AAM) and M-CSF cultured bone marrow macrophages (M2-like macrophages). In the skin, METRNL is expressed by resting fibroblasts and IFNγ-treated keratinocytes. A screen of human skin-associated diseases showed significant over-expression of METRNL in psoriasis, prurigo nodularis, actinic keratosis and atopic dermatitis. METRNL is also up-regulated in synovial membranes of human rheumatoid arthritis. Taken together, these results indicate that Metrnl represents a novel cytokine, which is likely involved in both innate and acquired immune responses. PMID:25486603

  10. Cytokine Signaling and Hematopoietic Homeostasis Are Disrupted in Lnk-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez, Laura; Cheng, Alec M.; Fleming, Heather E.; Furlonger, Caren; Vesely, Shirly; Bernstein, Alan; Paige, Christopher J.; Pawson, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The adaptor protein Lnk, and the closely related proteins APS and SH2B, form a subfamily of SH2 domain-containing proteins implicated in growth factor, cytokine, and immunoreceptor signaling. To elucidate the physiological function of Lnk, we derived Lnk-deficient mice. Lnk−/− mice are viable, but display marked changes in the hematopoietic compartment, including splenomegaly and abnormal lymphoid and myeloid homeostasis. The in vitro proliferative capacity and absolute numbers of hematopoietic progenitors from Lnk−/− mice are greatly increased, in part due to hypersensitivity to several cytokines. Moreover, an increased synergy between stem cell factor and either interleukin (IL)-3 or IL-7 was observed in Lnk−/− cells. Furthermore, Lnk inactivation causes abnormal modulation of IL-3 and stem cell factor–mediated signaling pathways. Consistent with these results, we also show that Lnk is highly expressed in multipotent cells and committed precursors in the erythroid, megakaryocyte, and myeloid lineages. These data implicate Lnk as playing an important role in hematopoiesis and in the regulation of growth factor and cytokine receptor–mediated signaling. PMID:12070287

  11. Changes in Production of Cytokines by C57Bl/6J Mouse Spleen during Aggression Provoked by Social Stress.

    PubMed

    Idova, G V; Markova, E V; Gevorgyan, M M; Alperina, E L; Zhukova, E N

    2016-03-01

    The effect of aggressive behavior shaped under social stress of various durations on the production of proinflammatory cytokines by splenic cells was examined on C57BL/6J mice. Aggressive mice were characterized by enhanced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ (released by T helper type 1 cells) and reduced secretion of TNF-α, whose major producers are monocytes and macrophages. Elevation of IL-2 and IFN-γ in aggressive mice resulted from enhancement of spontaneous and Con A-stimulated production, the most pronounced effect was demonstrated by the with a longer period (20 days) of victories. In contrast, spontaneous production of TNF-α was similar in control and aggressive mice, although LPS-stimulated production of this cytokine decreased after 10- and 20-day stress. The possible mechanisms of the changes in cytokine production are discussed. PMID:27021091

  12. From the regulatory functions of B cells to the identification of cytokine-producing plasma cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Dang, Van Duc; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Ries, Stefanie; Shen, Ping; Fillatreau, Simon

    2014-06-01

    B lymphocytes have a unique role as antibody-producing cells. Antibodies are key mediators of humoral immunity against infections, and are thought to account for the protection afforded by successful vaccines. B cells can also secrete cytokines and subsequently regulate immune responses mediated by T and innate cells. Remarkably, recent studies identified plasma blasts/plasma cells as the main types of activated B cells producing the cytokines interleukin (IL)-10, IL-35, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-17, and GM-CSF in various contexts in mice. Here, we discuss these observations, which suggest the existence of various subsets of plasma blast/plasma cells distinguishable through their cytokine expression pattern. PMID:24637161

  13. Propolis Ethanol Extract Stimulates Cytokine and Chemokine Production through NF-κB Activation in C2C12 Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Washio, Kohei; Kobayashi, Mao; Saito, Natsuko; Amagasa, Misato; Kitamura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Myoblast activation is a triggering event for muscle remodeling. We assessed the stimulatory effects of propolis, a beehive product, on myoblasts. After an 8 h treatment with 100 μg/mL of Brazilian propolis ethanol extract, expression of various chemokines, including CCL-2 and CCL-5, and cytokines, such as IL-6, increased. This propolis-induced cytokine production appears to depend on NF-κB activation, because the IKK inhibitor BMS-345541 repressed mRNA levels of CCL-2 by ~66%, CCL-5 by ~81%, and IL-6 by ~69% after propolis treatment. Supernatant from propolis-conditioned C2C12 cells upregulated RAW264 macrophage migration. The supernatant also stimulated RAW264 cells to produce angiogenic factors, including VEGF-A and MMP-12. Brazilian green propolis therefore causes myoblasts to secrete cytokines and chemokines, which might contribute to tissue remodeling of skeletal muscle. PMID:26604971

  14. The physiology of salivary secretion.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Gordon B

    2016-02-01

    Saliva in the mouth is a biofluid produced mainly by three pairs of major salivary glands--the submandibular, parotid and sublingual glands--along with secretions from many minor submucosal salivary glands. Salivary gland secretion is a nerve-mediated reflex and the volume of saliva secreted is dependent on the intensity and type of taste and on chemosensory, masticatory or tactile stimulation. Long periods of low (resting or unstimulated) flow are broken by short periods of high flow, which is stimulated by taste and mastication. The nerve-mediated salivary reflex is modulated by nerve signals from other centers in the central nervous system, which is most obvious as hyposalivation at times of anxiety. An example of other neurohormonal influences on the salivary reflex is the circadian rhythm, which affects salivary flow and ionic composition. Cholinergic parasympathetic and adrenergic sympathetic autonomic nerves evoke salivary secretion, signaling through muscarinic M3 and adrenoceptors on salivary acinar cells and leading to secretion of fluid and salivary proteins. Saliva gland acinar cells are chloride and sodium secreting, and the isotonic fluid produced is rendered hypotonic by salivary gland duct cells as it flows to the mouth. The major proteins present in saliva are secreted by salivary glands, creating viscoelasticity and enabling the coating of oral surfaces with saliva. Salivary films are essential for maintaining oral health and regulating the oral microbiome. Saliva in the mouth contains a range of validated and potential disease biomarkers derived from epithelial cells, neutrophils, the microbiome, gingival crevicular fluid and serum. For example, cortisol levels are used in the assessment of stress, matrix metalloproteinases-8 and -9 appear to be promising markers of caries and periodontal disease, and a panel of mRNA and proteins has been proposed as a marker of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms by which components enter

  15. Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF)-4 regulates the expression of a subset of Th2 cytokines 1

    PubMed Central

    Ahyi, Ayele-Nati N.; Chang, Hua-Chen; Dent, Alexander L.; Nutt, Stephen L.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Th2 cells can be subdivided into subpopulations depending on the level of a cytokine and the subsets of cytokines they produce. We have recently identified the ETS family transcription factor PU.1 as regulating heterogeneity in Th2 populations. To define additional factors that might contribute to Th2 heterogeneity, we examined the PU.1 interacting protein IFN-regulatory factor (IRF)-4. When Th2 cells are separated based on levels of IL-10 secretion, IRF4 expression segregates into the subset of Th2 cells expressing high levels of IL-10. Infection of total Th2 cells, and IL-10 non-secreting cells, with retrovirus expressing IRF4, resulted in increased IL-4 and IL-10 expression, no change in IL-5 or IL-13 production and decreased Il9 transcription. Transfection of an IRF4-specific siRNA into Th2 cells decreases IL-10 production. IRF4 directly binds the Il10 gene as evidenced by ChIP assay, and regulates Il10 control elements in a reporter assay. IRF4 interacts with PU.1, and in PU.1-deficient T cells there was an increase in IRF4 binding to the Il10 gene, and in the ability of IRF4 to induce IL-10 production compared to wild type cells and Il10 promoter activity in a reporter assay. Further heterogeneity of IRF4 expression was observed in Th2 cells analyzed for expression of multiple Th2 cytokines. Thus, IRF4 promotes the expression of a subset of Th2 cytokines and contributes to Th2 heterogeneity. PMID:19592658

  16. Diverse Cytokine Profile from Mesenteric Lymph Node Cells of Cull Cows Severely Affected with Johne's Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Dairu; Subharat, Supatsak; Wedlock, D. Neil; Luo, Dongwen; de Lisle, Geoffrey W.; Buddle, Bryce M.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease, is able to dampen or distort immune responses at the mucosal sites and coexist with a massive infiltration of immune cells in the gastrointestinal tract. Knowledge of the mechanism by which M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis subverts the immune response at the mucosal level in cattle is important for the development of improved disease control strategies, including new vaccines and diagnostic tests. In this study, 38 cull cows from herds infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were divided into four groups, based on M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis culture from gut tissues and histopathological lesion scores. Cytokine gene expression and secretion from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis sonicate-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cultures of the animals were compared. Antigen stimulation of MLN cells from the severely lesioned group resulted in significant upregulation of the mRNA expression of five cytokines, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-13, IL-17A, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which have a diverse range of functions, while there was no significant upregulation of these cytokines by the other groups. There were major differences between the responses of the PBMC and MLN cultures, with higher levels of secreted IFN-γ released from the MLN cultures and, conversely, higher levels of IL-10 released from the PBMC cultures. The upregulation of all five cytokines from cells at the site of infection in the se