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Sample records for abnormal dendritic spine

  1. Dendritic Arborization and Spine Dynamics Are Abnormal in the Mouse Model of MECP2 Duplication Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Minghui; Ash, Ryan T.; Baker, Steven A.; Suter, Bernhard; Ferguson, Andrew; Park, Jiyoung; Rudy, Jessica; Torsky, Sergey P.; Chao, Hsiao-Tuan; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2013-01-01

    MECP2 duplication syndrome is a childhood neurological disorder characterized by intellectual disability, autism, motor abnormalities, and epilepsy. The disorder is caused by duplications spanning the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2), a protein involved in the modulation of chromatin and gene expression. MeCP2 is thought to play a role in maintaining the structural integrity of neuronal circuits. Loss of MeCP2 function causes Rett syndrome and results in abnormal dendritic spine morphology and decreased pyramidal dendritic arbor complexity and spine density. The consequences of MeCP2 overexpression on dendritic pathophysiology remain unclear. We used in vivo two-photon microscopy to characterize layer 5 pyramidal neuron spine turnover and dendritic arborization as a function of age in transgenic mice expressing the human MECP2 gene at twice the normal levels of MeCP2 (Tg1; Collins et al., 2004). We found that spine density in terminal dendritic branches is initially higher in young Tg1 mice but falls below control levels after postnatal week 12, approximately correlating with the onset of behavioral symptoms. Spontaneous spine turnover rates remain high in older Tg1 animals compared with controls, reflecting the persistence of an immature state. Both spine gain and loss rates are higher, with a net bias in favor of spine elimination. Apical dendritic arbors in both simple- and complex-tufted layer 5 Tg1 pyramidal neurons have more branches of higher order, indicating that MeCP2 overexpression induces dendritic overgrowth. P70S6K was hyperphosphorylated in Tg1 somatosensory cortex, suggesting that elevated mTOR signaling may underlie the observed increase in spine turnover and dendritic growth. PMID:24336718

  2. Abnormal intrinsic dynamics of dendritic spines in a fragile X syndrome mouse model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Akira; Takehara, Hiroaki; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Noguchi, Jun; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Shirai, Fukutoshi; Yagishita, Sho; Akagi, Takanori; Ichiki, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo

    2016-05-25

    Dendritic spine generation and elimination play an important role in learning and memory, the dynamics of which have been examined within the neocortex in vivo. Spine turnover has also been detected in the absence of specific learning tasks, and is frequently exaggerated in animal models of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study aimed to examine whether the baseline rate of spine turnover was activity-dependent. This was achieved using a microfluidic brain interface and open-dura surgery, with the goal of abolishing neuronal Ca(2+) signaling in the visual cortex of wild-type mice and rodent models of fragile X syndrome (Fmr1 knockout [KO]). In wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, the majority of baseline turnover was found to be activity-independent. Accordingly, the application of matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitors selectively restored the abnormal spine dynamics observed in Fmr1 KO mice, without affecting the intrinsic dynamics of spine turnover in wild-type mice. Such findings indicate that the baseline turnover of dendritic spines is mediated by activity-independent intrinsic dynamics. Furthermore, these results suggest that the targeting of abnormal intrinsic dynamics might pose a novel therapy for ASD.

  3. Risperidone and aripiprazole alleviate prenatal valproic acid-induced abnormalities in behaviors and dendritic spine density in mice.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuta; Ago, Yukio; Taruta, Atsuki; Hasebe, Shigeru; Kawase, Haruki; Tanabe, Wataru; Tsukada, Shinji; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Toshio; Takuma, Kazuhiro

    2017-11-01

    Rodents exposed prenatally to valproic acid (VPA) exhibit autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-like behavioral abnormalities. We recently found that prenatal VPA exposure causes hypofunction of the prefrontal dopaminergic system in mice. This suggests that the dopaminergic system may be a potential pharmacological target for treatment of behavioral abnormalities in ASD patients. In the present study, we examined the effects of antipsychotic drugs, which affect the dopaminergic system, on the social interaction deficits, recognition memory impairment, and reduction in dendritic spine density in the VPA mouse model of ASD. Both acute and chronic administrations of the atypical antipsychotic drugs risperidone and aripiprazole increased prefrontal dopamine (DA) release, while the typical antipsychotic drug haloperidol did not. Chronic risperidone and aripiprazole, but not haloperidol, increased the expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex, although they all increased c-Fos expression in the striatum. Chronic, but not acute, administrations of risperidone and aripiprazole improved the VPA-induced social interaction deficits and recognition memory impairment, as well as the reduction in dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. In contrast, chronic administration of haloperidol did not ameliorate VPA-induced abnormalities in behaviors and dendritic spine density. These findings indicate that chronic risperidone and aripiprazole treatments improve VPA-induced abnormalities in behaviors and prefrontal dendritic spine density, which may be mediated by repeated elevation of extracellular DA in the prefrontal cortex. Our results also imply that loss of prefrontal dendritic spines may be involved in the abnormal behaviors in the VPA mouse model of ASD.

  4. Fragile X-like behaviors and abnormal cortical dendritic spines in cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 2-mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Kihoon; Chen, Hogmei; Gennarino, Vincenzo A; Richman, Ronald; Lu, Hui-Chen; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-04-01

    Silencing of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene and loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) cause fragile X syndrome (FXS), a genetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability and autistic behaviors. FMRP is an mRNA-binding protein regulating neuronal translation of target mRNAs. Abnormalities in actin-rich dendritic spines are major neuronal features in FXS, but the molecular mechanism and identity of FMRP targets mediating this phenotype remain largely unknown. Cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 2 (Cyfip2) was identified as an interactor of FMRP, and its mRNA is a highly ranked FMRP target in mouse brain. Importantly, Cyfip2 is a component of WAVE regulatory complex, a key regulator of actin cytoskeleton, suggesting that Cyfip2 could be implicated in the dendritic spine phenotype of FXS. Here, we generated and characterized Cyfip2-mutant (Cyfip2(+/-)) mice. We found that Cyfip2(+/-) mice exhibited behavioral phenotypes similar to Fmr1-null (Fmr1(-/y)) mice, an animal model of FXS. Synaptic plasticity and dendritic spines were normal in Cyfip2(+/-) hippocampus. However, dendritic spines were altered in Cyfip2(+/-) cortex, and the dendritic spine phenotype of Fmr1(-/y) cortex was aggravated in Fmr1(-/y); Cyfip2(+/-) double-mutant mice. In addition to the spine changes at basal state, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-induced dendritic spine regulation was impaired in both Fmr1(-/y) and Cyfip2(+/-) cortical neurons. Mechanistically, mGluR activation induced mRNA translation-dependent increase of Cyfip2 in wild-type cortical neurons, but not in Fmr1(-/y) or Cyfip2(+/-) neurons. These results suggest that misregulation of Cyfip2 function and its mGluR-induced expression contribute to the neurobehavioral phenotypes of FXS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Electrical Advantages of Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Gulledge, Allan T.; Carnevale, Nicholas T.; Stuart, Greg J.

    2012-01-01

    Many neurons receive excitatory glutamatergic input almost exclusively onto dendritic spines. In the absence of spines, the amplitudes and kinetics of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) at the site of synaptic input are highly variable and depend on dendritic location. We hypothesized that dendritic spines standardize the local geometry at the site of synaptic input, thereby reducing location-dependent variability of local EPSP properties. We tested this hypothesis using computational models of simplified and morphologically realistic spiny neurons that allow direct comparison of EPSPs generated on spine heads with EPSPs generated on dendritic shafts at the same dendritic locations. In all morphologies tested, spines greatly reduced location-dependent variability of local EPSP amplitude and kinetics, while having minimal impact on EPSPs measured at the soma. Spine-dependent standardization of local EPSP properties persisted across a range of physiologically relevant spine neck resistances, and in models with variable neck resistances. By reducing the variability of local EPSPs, spines standardized synaptic activation of NMDA receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels. Furthermore, spines enhanced activation of NMDA receptors and facilitated the generation of NMDA spikes and axonal action potentials in response to synaptic input. Finally, we show that dynamic regulation of spine neck geometry can preserve local EPSP properties following plasticity-driven changes in synaptic strength, but is inefficient in modifying the amplitude of EPSPs in other cellular compartments. These observations suggest that one function of dendritic spines is to standardize local EPSP properties throughout the dendritic tree, thereby allowing neurons to use similar voltage-sensitive postsynaptic mechanisms at all dendritic locations. PMID:22532875

  6. Dendritic Spine Pathology in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Glausier, Jill R.; Lewis, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder whose clinical features include impairments in perception, cognition and motivation. These impairments reflect alterations in neuronal circuitry within and across multiple brain regions that are due, at least in part, to deficits in dendritic spines, the site of most excitatory synaptic connections. Dendritic spine alterations have been identified in multiple brain regions in schizophrenia, but are best characterized in layer 3 of the neocortex, where pyramidal cell spine density is lower. These spine deficits appear to arise during development, and thus are likely the result of disturbances in the molecular mechanisms that underlie spine formation, pruning, and/or maintenance. Each of these mechanisms may provide insight into novel therapeutic targets for preventing or repairing the alterations in neural circuitry that mediate the debilitating symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:22546337

  7. Hippocampal mutant APP and amyloid beta-induced cognitive decline, dendritic spine loss, defective autophagy, mitophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Manczak, Maria; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Yin, Xiangling; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2018-04-15

    The purpose of our study was to determine the toxic effects of hippocampal mutant APP and amyloid beta (Aβ) in 12-month-old APP transgenic mice. Using rotarod and Morris water maze tests, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, Golgi-cox staining and transmission electron microscopy, we assessed cognitive behavior, protein levels of synaptic, autophagy, mitophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis, dendritic protein MAP2 and quantified dendritic spines and mitochondrial number and length in 12-month-old APP mice that express Swedish mutation. Mitochondrial function was assessed by measuring the levels of hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation, cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial ATP. Morris water maze and rotarod tests revealed that hippocampal learning and memory and motor learning and coordination were impaired in APP mice relative to wild-type (WT) mice. Increased levels of mitochondrial fission proteins, Drp1 and Fis1 and decreased levels of fusion (Mfn1, Mfn2 and Opa1) biogenesis (PGC1α, NRF1, NRF2 and TFAM), autophagy (ATG5 and LC3BI, LC3BII), mitophagy (PINK1 and TERT), synaptic (synaptophysin and PSD95) and dendritic (MAP2) proteins were found in 12-month-old APP mice relative to age-matched non-transgenic WT mice. Golgi-cox staining analysis revealed that dendritic spines are significantly reduced. Transmission electron microscopy revealed significantly increased mitochondrial numbers and reduced mitochondrial length in APP mice. These findings suggest that hippocampal accumulation of mutant APP and Aβ is responsible for abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and defective biogenesis, reduced MAP2, autophagy, mitophagy and synaptic proteins and reduced dendritic spines and hippocampal-based learning and memory impairments, and mitochondrial structural and functional changes in 12-month-old APP mice.

  8. Intravital imaging of dendritic spine plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sau Wan Lai, Cora

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic part of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Recent works have suggested that the structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines have been associated with information coding and memories. Advances in imaging and labeling techniques enable the study of dendritic spine dynamics in vivo. This perspective focuses on intravital imaging studies of dendritic spine plasticity in the neocortex. I will introduce imaging tools for studying spine dynamics and will further review current findings on spine structure and function under various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:28243511

  9. Dysregulation of synaptic proteins, dendritic spine abnormalities and pathological plasticity of synapses as experience-dependent mediators of cognitive and psychiatric symptoms in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Nithianantharajah, J; Hannan, A J

    2013-10-22

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant tandem repeat expansion disorder involving cognitive, psychiatric and motor symptoms. The expanded trinucleotide (CAG) repeat leads to an extended polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein and a subsequent cascade of molecular and cellular pathogenesis. One of the key features of neuropathology, which has been shown to precede the eventual loss of neurons in the cerebral cortex, striatum and other areas, are changes to synapses, including the dendritic protrusions known as spines. In this review we will focus on synapse and spine pathology in HD, including molecular and experience-dependent aspects of pathogenesis. Dendritic spine pathology has been found in both the human HD brain at post mortem as well as various transgenic and knock-in animal models. These changes may help explain the symptoms in HD, and synaptopathy within the cerebral cortex may be particularly important in mediating the psychiatric and cognitive manifestations of this disease. The earliest stages of synaptic dysfunction in HD, as assayed in various mouse models, appears to involve changes in synaptic proteins and associated physiological abnormalities such as synaptic plasticity deficits. In mouse models, synaptic and cortical plasticity deficits have been directly correlated with the onset of cognitive deficits, implying a causal link. Furthermore, following the discovery that environmental enrichment can delay onset of affective, cognitive and motor deficits in HD transgenic mice, specific synaptic molecules shown to be dysregulated by the polyglutamine-induced toxicity were also found to be beneficially modulated by environmental stimulation. This identifies potential molecular targets for future therapeutic developments to treat this devastating disease. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dendritic spine dysgenesis contributes to hyperreflexia after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bandaru, Samira P.; Liu, Shujun; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperreflexia and spasticity are chronic complications in spinal cord injury (SCI), with limited options for safe and effective treatment. A central mechanism in spasticity is hyperexcitability of the spinal stretch reflex, which presents symptomatically as a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes and exaggerated tendon jerks. In this study we tested the hypothesis that dendritic spine remodeling within motor reflex pathways in the spinal cord contributes to H-reflex dysfunction indicative of spasticity after contusion SCI. Six weeks after SCI in adult Sprague-Dawley rats, we observed changes in dendritic spine morphology on α-motor neurons below the level of injury, including increased density, altered spine shape, and redistribution along dendritic branches. These abnormal spine morphologies accompanied the loss of H-reflex rate-dependent depression (RDD) and increased ratio of H-reflex to M-wave responses (H/M ratio). Above the level of injury, spine density decreased compared with below-injury spine profiles and spine distributions were similar to those for uninjured controls. As expected, there was no H-reflex hyperexcitability above the level of injury in forelimb H-reflex testing. Treatment with NSC23766, a Rac1-specific inhibitor, decreased the presence of abnormal dendritic spine profiles below the level of injury, restored RDD of the H-reflex, and decreased H/M ratios in SCI animals. These findings provide evidence for a novel mechanistic relationship between abnormal dendritic spine remodeling in the spinal cord motor system and reflex dysfunction in SCI. PMID:25505110

  11. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Autism Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Mary; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The activity-dependent structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines has led to the long-standing belief that these neuronal compartments are the subcellular sites of learning and memory. Of relevance to human health, central neurons in several neuropsychiatric illnesses, including autism related disorders, have atypical numbers and morphologies of dendritic spines. These so-called dendritic spine dysgeneses found in individuals with autism related disorders are consistently replicated in experimental mouse models. Dendritic spine dysgenesis reflects the underlying synaptopathology that drives clinically relevant behavioral deficits in experimental mouse models, providing a platform for testing new therapeutic approaches. By examining molecular signaling pathways, synaptic deficits, and spine dysgenesis in experimental mouse models of autism related disorders we find strong evidence for mTOR to be a critical point of convergence and promising therapeutic target. PMID:25578949

  12. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in autism related disorders.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2015-08-05

    The activity-dependent structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines has led to the long-standing belief that these neuronal compartments are the subcellular sites of learning and memory. Of relevance to human health, central neurons in several neuropsychiatric illnesses, including autism related disorders, have atypical numbers and morphologies of dendritic spines. These so-called dendritic spine dysgeneses found in individuals with autism related disorders are consistently replicated in experimental mouse models. Dendritic spine dysgenesis reflects the underlying synaptopathology that drives clinically relevant behavioral deficits in experimental mouse models, providing a platform for testing new therapeutic approaches. By examining molecular signaling pathways, synaptic deficits, and spine dysgenesis in experimental mouse models of autism related disorders we find strong evidence for mTOR to be a critical point of convergence and promising therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of dendritic spine morphology in cultured CNS neurons.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Deepak P; Woolfrey, Kevin M; Penzes, Peter

    2011-07-13

    Dendritic spines are the sites of the majority of excitatory connections within the brain, and form the post-synaptic compartment of synapses. These structures are rich in actin and have been shown to be highly dynamic. In response to classical Hebbian plasticity as well as neuromodulatory signals, dendritic spines can change shape and number, which is thought to be critical for the refinement of neural circuits and the processing and storage of information within the brain. Within dendritic spines, a complex network of proteins link extracellular signals with the actin cyctoskeleton allowing for control of dendritic spine morphology and number. Neuropathological studies have demonstrated that a number of disease states, ranging from schizophrenia to autism spectrum disorders, display abnormal dendritic spine morphology or numbers. Moreover, recent genetic studies have identified mutations in numerous genes that encode synaptic proteins, leading to suggestions that these proteins may contribute to aberrant spine plasticity that, in part, underlie the pathophysiology of these disorders. In order to study the potential role of these proteins in controlling dendritic spine morphologies/number, the use of cultured cortical neurons offers several advantages. Firstly, this system allows for high-resolution imaging of dendritic spines in fixed cells as well as time-lapse imaging of live cells. Secondly, this in vitro system allows for easy manipulation of protein function by expression of mutant proteins, knockdown by shRNA constructs, or pharmacological treatments. These techniques allow researchers to begin to dissect the role of disease-associated proteins and to predict how mutations of these proteins may function in vivo.

  14. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Miller, Eric C.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Spines are small cytoplasmic extensions of dendrites that form the postsynaptic compartment of the majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Alterations in the numerical density, size, and shape of dendritic spines have been correlated with neuronal dysfunction in several neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability, including Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability that is caused by loss of function mutations in the transcriptional regulator methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that principal neurons in RTT individuals and Mecp2-based experimental models exhibit alterations in the number and morphology of dendritic spines. We also discuss the exciting possibility that signaling pathways downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is transcriptionally regulated by MeCP2, offer promising therapeutic options for modulating dendritic spine development and plasticity in RTT and other MECP2-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25309341

  15. Ultrastructure of Dendritic Spines: Correlation Between Synaptic and Spine Morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Jon I.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic spines are critical elements of cortical circuits, since they establish most excitatory synapses. Recent studies have reported correlations between morphological and functional parameters of spines. Specifically, the spine head volume is correlated with the area of the postsynaptic density (PSD), the number of postsynaptic receptors and the ready-releasable pool of transmitter, whereas the length of the spine neck is proportional to the degree of biochemical and electrical isolation of the spine from its parent dendrite. Therefore, the morphology of a spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. To better understand the natural variability of neocortical spine morphologies, we used a combination of gold-toned Golgi impregnations and serial thin-section electron microscopy and performed three-dimensional reconstructions of spines from layer 2/3 pyramidal cells from mouse visual cortex. We characterized the structure and synaptic features of 144 completed reconstructed spines, and analyzed their morphologies according to their positions. For all morphological parameters analyzed, spines exhibited a continuum of variability, without clearly distinguishable subtypes of spines or clear dependence of their morphologies on their distance to the soma. On average, the spine head volume was correlated strongly with PSD area and weakly with neck diameter, but not with neck length. The large morphological diversity suggests an equally large variability of synaptic strength and learning rules. PMID:18982124

  16. Mu-opioid receptors modulate the stability of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dezhi; Lin, Hang; Law, Ping Yee; Loh, Horace H.

    2005-01-01

    Opioids classically regulate the excitability of neurons by suppressing synaptic GABA release from inhibitory neurons. Here, we report a role for opioids in modulating excitatory synaptic transmission. By activating ubiquitously clustered μ-opioid receptor (MOR) in excitatory synapses, morphine caused collapse of preexisting dendritic spines and decreased synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors. Meanwhile, the opioid antagonist naloxone increased the density of spines. Chronic treatment with morphine decreased the density of dendritic spines even in the presence of Tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, indicating that the morphine's effect was not caused by altered activity in neural network through suppression of GABA release. The effect of morphine on dendritic spines was absent in transgenic mice lacking MORs and was blocked by CTOP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-ThrNH2), a μ-receptor antagonist. These data together with others suggest that endogenous opioids and/or constitutive activity of MORs participate in maintaining normal morphology and function of spines, challenging the classical model of opioids. Abnormal alteration of spines may occur in drug addiction when opioid receptors are overactivated by exogenous opiates. PMID:15659552

  17. Glucocorticoids are critical regulators of dendritic spine development and plasticity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liston, Conor; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are a family of hormones that coordinate diverse physiological processes in responding to stress. Prolonged glucocorticoid exposure over weeks has been linked to dendritic atrophy and spine loss in fixed tissue studies of adult brains, but it is unclear how glucocorticoids may affect the dynamic processes of dendritic spine formation and elimination in vivo. Furthermore, relatively few studies have examined the effects of stress and glucocorticoids on spines during the postnatal and adolescent period, which is characterized by rapid synaptogenesis followed by protracted synaptic pruning. To determine whether and to what extent glucocorticoids regulate dendritic spine development and plasticity, we used transcranial two-photon microscopy to track the formation and elimination of dendritic spines in vivo after treatment with glucocorticoids in developing and adult mice. Corticosterone, the principal murine glucocorticoid, had potent dose-dependent effects on dendritic spine dynamics, increasing spine turnover within several hours in the developing barrel cortex. The adult barrel cortex exhibited diminished baseline spine turnover rates, but these rates were also enhanced by corticosterone. Similar changes occurred in multiple cortical areas, suggesting a generalized effect. However, reducing endogenous glucocorticoid activity by dexamethasone suppression or corticosteroid receptor antagonists caused a substantial reduction in spine turnover rates, and the former was reversed by corticosterone replacement. Notably, we found that chronic glucocorticoid excess led to an abnormal loss of stable spines that were established early in life. Together, these findings establish a critical role for glucocorticoids in the development and maintenance of dendritic spines in the living cortex. PMID:21911374

  18. Random Positions of Dendritic Spines in Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. PMID:25057209

  19. Automated 4D analysis of dendritic spine morphology: applications to stimulus-induced spine remodeling and pharmacological rescue in a disease model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Uncovering the mechanisms that regulate dendritic spine morphology has been limited, in part, by the lack of efficient and unbiased methods for analyzing spines. Here, we describe an automated 3D spine morphometry method and its application to spine remodeling in live neurons and spine abnormalities in a disease model. We anticipate that this approach will advance studies of synapse structure and function in brain development, plasticity, and disease. PMID:21982080

  20. Dendritic spines linearize the summation of excitatory potentials

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.; Yuste, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    In mammalian cortex, most excitatory inputs occur on dendritic spines, avoiding dendritic shafts. Although spines biochemically isolate inputs, nonspiny neurons can also implement biochemical compartmentalization; so, it is possible that spines have an additional function. We have recently shown that the spine neck can filter membrane potentials going into and out of the spine. To investigate the potential function of this electrical filtering, we used two-photon uncaging of glutamate and compared the integration of electrical signals in spines vs. dendritic shafts from basal dendrites of mouse layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Uncaging potentials onto spines summed linearly, whereas potentials on dendritic shafts reduced each other's effect. Linear integration of spines was maintained regardless of the amplitude of the response, distance between spines (as close as <2 μm), distance of the spines to the soma, dendritic diameter, or spine neck length. Our findings indicate that spines serve as electrical isolators to prevent input interaction, and thus generate a linear arithmetic of excitatory inputs. Linear integration could be an essential feature of cortical and other spine-laden circuits. PMID:17132736

  1. Dendritic spines linearize the summation of excitatory potentials.

    PubMed

    Araya, Roberto; Eisenthal, Kenneth B; Yuste, Rafael

    2006-12-05

    In mammalian cortex, most excitatory inputs occur on dendritic spines, avoiding dendritic shafts. Although spines biochemically isolate inputs, nonspiny neurons can also implement biochemical compartmentalization; so, it is possible that spines have an additional function. We have recently shown that the spine neck can filter membrane potentials going into and out of the spine. To investigate the potential function of this electrical filtering, we used two-photon uncaging of glutamate and compared the integration of electrical signals in spines vs. dendritic shafts from basal dendrites of mouse layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Uncaging potentials onto spines summed linearly, whereas potentials on dendritic shafts reduced each other's effect. Linear integration of spines was maintained regardless of the amplitude of the response, distance between spines (as close as < 2 microm), distance of the spines to the soma, dendritic diameter, or spine neck length. Our findings indicate that spines serve as electrical isolators to prevent input interaction, and thus generate a linear arithmetic of excitatory inputs. Linear integration could be an essential feature of cortical and other spine-laden circuits.

  2. Astrocytes refine cortical connectivity at dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Risher, W Christopher; Patel, Sagar; Kim, Il Hwan; Uezu, Akiyoshi; Bhagat, Srishti; Wilton, Daniel K; Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Singh Alvarado, Jonnathan; Calhan, Osman Y; Silver, Debra L; Stevens, Beth; Calakos, Nicole; Soderling, Scott H; Eroglu, Cagla

    2014-01-01

    During cortical synaptic development, thalamic axons must establish synaptic connections despite the presence of the more abundant intracortical projections. How thalamocortical synapses are formed and maintained in this competitive environment is unknown. Here, we show that astrocyte-secreted protein hevin is required for normal thalamocortical synaptic connectivity in the mouse cortex. Absence of hevin results in a profound, long-lasting reduction in thalamocortical synapses accompanied by a transient increase in intracortical excitatory connections. Three-dimensional reconstructions of cortical neurons from serial section electron microscopy (ssEM) revealed that, during early postnatal development, dendritic spines often receive multiple excitatory inputs. Immuno-EM and confocal analyses revealed that majority of the spines with multiple excitatory contacts (SMECs) receive simultaneous thalamic and cortical inputs. Proportion of SMECs diminishes as the brain develops, but SMECs remain abundant in Hevin-null mice. These findings reveal that, through secretion of hevin, astrocytes control an important developmental synaptic refinement process at dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04047.001 PMID:25517933

  3. Statistical analysis of dendritic spine distributions in rat hippocampal cultures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dendritic spines serve as key computational structures in brain plasticity. Much remains to be learned about their spatial and temporal distribution among neurons. Our aim in this study was to perform exploratory analyses based on the population distributions of dendritic spines with regard to their morphological characteristics and period of growth in dissociated hippocampal neurons. We fit a log-linear model to the contingency table of spine features such as spine type and distance from the soma to first determine which features were important in modeling the spines, as well as the relationships between such features. A multinomial logistic regression was then used to predict the spine types using the features suggested by the log-linear model, along with neighboring spine information. Finally, an important variant of Ripley’s K-function applicable to linear networks was used to study the spatial distribution of spines along dendrites. Results Our study indicated that in the culture system, (i) dendritic spine densities were "completely spatially random", (ii) spine type and distance from the soma were independent quantities, and most importantly, (iii) spines had a tendency to cluster with other spines of the same type. Conclusions Although these results may vary with other systems, our primary contribution is the set of statistical tools for morphological modeling of spines which can be used to assess neuronal cultures following gene manipulation such as RNAi, and to study induced pluripotent stem cells differentiated to neurons. PMID:24088199

  4. A model of activity-dependent changes in dendritic spine density and spine structure.

    PubMed

    Crook, S M; Dur-E-Ahmad, M; Baer, S M

    2007-10-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the morphology and density of dendritic spines are regulated during synaptic plasticity. See, for instance, a review by Hayashi and Majewska [9]. In this work, we extend previous modeling studies [27] by combining a model for activity-dependent spine density with one for calcium-mediated spine stem restructuring. The model is based on the standard dimensionless cable equation, which represents the change in the membrane potential in a passive dendrite. Additional equations characterize the change in spine density along the dendrite, the current balance equation for an individual spine head, the change in calcium concentration in the spine head, and the dynamics of spine stem resistance. We use computational studies to investigate the changes in spine density and structure for differing synaptic inputs and demonstrate the effects of these changes on the input-output properties of the dendritic branch. Moderate amounts of high-frequency synaptic activation to dendritic spines result in an increase in spine stem resistance that is correlated with spine stem elongation. In addition, the spine density increases both inside and outside the input region. The model is formulated so that this long-term potentiation-inducing stimulus eventually leads to structural stability. In contrast, a prolonged low-frequency stimulation paradigm that would typically induce long-term depression results in a decrease in stem resistance (correlated with stem shortening) and an eventual decrease in spine density.

  5. Dendritic spine geometry can localize GTPase signaling in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Samuel A.; Raghavachari, Sridhar; Lew, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic terminals of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Learning and memory are associated with long-lasting structural remodeling of dendritic spines through an actin-mediated process regulated by the Rho-family GTPases RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42. These GTPases undergo sustained activation after synaptic stimulation, but whereas Rho activity can spread from the stimulated spine, Cdc42 activity remains localized to the stimulated spine. Because Cdc42 itself diffuses rapidly in and out of the spine, the basis for the retention of Cdc42 activity in the stimulated spine long after synaptic stimulation has ceased is unclear. Here we model the spread of Cdc42 activation at dendritic spines by means of reaction-diffusion equations solved on spine-like geometries. Excitable behavior arising from positive feedback in Cdc42 activation leads to spreading waves of Cdc42 activity. However, because of the very narrow neck of the dendritic spine, wave propagation is halted through a phenomenon we term geometrical wave-pinning. We show that this can account for the localization of Cdc42 activity in the stimulated spine, and, of interest, retention is enhanced by high diffusivity of Cdc42. Our findings are broadly applicable to other instances of signaling in extreme geometries, including filopodia and primary cilia. PMID:26337387

  6. Musical representation of dendritic spine distribution: a new exploratory tool.

    PubMed

    Toharia, Pablo; Morales, Juan; de Juan, Octavio; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions along the dendrites of many types of neurons in the central nervous system and represent the major target of excitatory synapses. For this reason, numerous anatomical, physiological and computational studies have focused on these structures. In the cerebral cortex the most abundant and characteristic neuronal type are pyramidal cells (about 85 % of all neurons) and their dendritic spines are the main postsynaptic target of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. Thus, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the cerebral cortex largely depends on the knowledge regarding synaptic inputs to dendritic spines of pyramidal cells. Much of the structural data on dendritic spines produced by modern neuroscience involves the quantitative analysis of image stacks from light and electron microscopy, using standard statistical and mathematical tools and software developed to this end. Here, we present a new method with musical feedback for exploring dendritic spine morphology and distribution patterns in pyramidal neurons. We demonstrate that audio analysis of spiny dendrites with apparently similar morphology may "sound" quite different, revealing anatomical substrates that are not apparent from simple visual inspection. These morphological/music translations may serve as a guide for further mathematical analysis of the design of the pyramidal neurons and of spiny dendrites in general.

  7. Random positions of dendritic spines in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-07-23

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410078-07$15.00/0.

  8. Input transformation by dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, most inputs received by a neuron are formed on the dendritic tree. In the neocortex, the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are covered by thousands of tiny protrusions known as dendritic spines, which are the major recipient sites for excitatory synaptic information in the brain. Their peculiar morphology, with a small head connected to the dendritic shaft by a slender neck, has inspired decades of theoretical and more recently experimental work in an attempt to understand how excitatory synaptic inputs are processed, stored and integrated in pyramidal neurons. Advances in electrophysiological, optical and genetic tools are now enabling us to unravel the biophysical and molecular mechanisms controlling spine function in health and disease. Here I highlight relevant findings, challenges and hypotheses on spine function, with an emphasis on the electrical properties of spines and on how these affect the storage and integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in pyramidal neurons. In an attempt to make sense of the published data, I propose that the raison d'etre for dendritic spines lies in their ability to undergo activity-dependent structural and molecular changes that can modify synaptic strength, and hence alter the gain of the linearly integrated sub-threshold depolarizations in pyramidal neuron dendrites before the generation of a dendritic spike. PMID:25520626

  9. Tau mislocalization to dendritic spines mediates synaptic dysfunction independently of neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Brian R.; Reed, Miranda N.; Su, Jianjun; Penrod, Rachel D.; Kotilinek, Linda A.; Grant, Marianne K.; Pitstick, Rose; Carlson, George A.; Lanier, Lorene M.; Yuan, Li-Lian; Ashe, Karen H.; Liao, Dezhi

    2010-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau accumulates in Alzheimer’s and other fatal dementias, which manifest when forebrain neurons die. Recent advances in understanding these disorders indicate that brain dysfunction precedes neurodegeneration, but the role of tau is unclear. Here, we show that early tau-related deficits develop not from the loss of synapses or neurons, but rather as a result of synaptic abnormalities caused by the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau within intact dendritic spines, where it disrupts synaptic function by impairing glutamate receptor trafficking or synaptic anchoring. Mutagenesis of 14 disease-associated serine and threonine amino acid residues to create pseudohyperphosphorylated tau caused tau mislocalization while creation of phosphorylation-deficient tau blocked the mis-targeting of tau to dendritic spines. Thus, tau phosphorylation plays a critical role in mediating tau mislocalization and subsequent synaptic impairment. These data establish that the locus of early synaptic malfunction caused by tau resides in dendritic spines. PMID:21172610

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 involvement in the structural plasticity of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Stawarski, Michal; Stefaniuk, Marzena; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the locus for excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain and thus play a major role in neuronal plasticity. The ability to alter synaptic connections includes volumetric changes in dendritic spines that are driven by scaffolds created by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we review the effects of the proteolytic activity of ECM proteases in physiological and pathological structural plasticity. We use matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) as an example of an ECM modifier that has recently emerged as a key molecule in regulating the morphology and dysmorphology of dendritic spines that underlie synaptic plasticity and neurological disorders, respectively. We summarize the influence of MMP-9 on the dynamic remodeling of the ECM via the cleavage of extracellular substrates. We discuss its role in the formation, modification, and maintenance of dendritic spines in learning and memory. Finally, we review research that implicates MMP-9 in aberrant synaptic plasticity and spine dysmorphology in neurological disorders, with a focus on morphological abnormalities of dendritic protrusions that are associated with epilepsy. PMID:25071472

  11. Delayed stabilization of dendritic spines in fragile X mice.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martín, Alberto; Crespo, Michelle; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos

    2010-06-09

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) causes mental impairment and autism through transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene, resulting in the loss of the RNA-binding protein fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Cortical pyramidal neurons in affected individuals and Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mice have an increased density of dendritic spines. The mutant mice also show defects in synaptic and experience-dependent circuit plasticity, which are known to be mediated in part by dendritic spine dynamics. We used in vivo time-lapse imaging with two-photon microscopy through cranial windows in male and female neonatal mice to test the hypothesis that dynamics of dendritic protrusions are altered in KO mice during early postnatal development. We find that layer 2/3 neurons from wild-type mice exhibit a rapid decrease in dendritic spine dynamics during the first 2 postnatal weeks, as immature filopodia are replaced by mushroom spines. In contrast, KO mice show a developmental delay in the downregulation of spine turnover and in the transition from immature to mature spine subtypes. Blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) signaling, which reverses some adult phenotypes of KO mice, accentuated this immature protrusion phenotype in KO mice. Thus, absence of FMRP delays spine stabilization and dysregulated mGluR signaling in FXS may partially normalize this early synaptic defect.

  12. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Hui; Li, Ming-Xing; Xu, Chang; Chen, Hui-Bin; An, Shu-Cheng; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS), chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), have been used to recapitulate depression-like behaviors in rodents and study the underlying mechanisms. In comparison with CRS, CUMS overcomes the stress habituation and has been widely used to model depression-like behaviors. CSDS is one of the most frequently used models for depression, but it is limited to the study of male mice. Generally, chronic stress causes dendritic atrophy and spine loss in the neurons of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Meanwhile, neurons of the amygdala and nucleus accumbens exhibit an increase in spine density. These alterations induced by chronic stress are often accompanied by depression-like behaviors. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This review summarizes our current understanding of the chronic stress-induced remodeling of dendritic spines in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens and also discusses the putative underlying mechanisms. PMID:26881133

  13. Primary Cilia and Dendritic Spines: Different but Similar Signaling Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Nechipurenko, Inna V.; Doroquez, David B.; Sengupta, Piali

    2013-01-01

    Primary non-motile cilia and dendritic spines are cellular compartments that are specialized to sense and transduce environmental cues and presynaptic signals, respectively. Despite their unique cellular roles, both compartments exhibit remarkable parallels in the general principles, as well as molecular mechanisms, by which their protein composition, membrane domain architecture, cellular interactions, and structural and functional plasticity are regulated. We compare and contrast the pathways required for the generation and function of cilia and dendritic spines, and suggest that insights from the study of one may inform investigations into the other of these critically important signaling structures. PMID:24048681

  14. Induction of dendritic spines by β2-containing nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Lozada, Adrian F; Wang, Xulong; Gounko, Natalia V; Massey, Kerri A; Duan, Jingjing; Liu, Zhaoping; Berg, Darwin K

    2012-06-13

    Glutamatergic synapses are located mostly on dendritic spines in the adult nervous system. The spines serve as postsynaptic compartments, containing components that mediate and control the synaptic signal. Early in development, when glutamatergic synapses are initially forming, waves of excitatory activity pass through many parts of the nervous system and are driven in part by a class of heteropentameric β2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (β2*-nAChRs). These β2*-nAChRs are widely distributed and, when activated, can depolarize the membrane and elevate intracellular calcium levels in neurons. We show here that β2*-nAChRs are essential for acquisition of normal numbers of dendritic spines during development. Mice constitutively lacking the β2-nAChR gene have fewer dendritic spines than do age-matched wild-type mice at all times examined. Activation of β2*-nAChRs by nicotine either in vivo or in organotypic slice culture quickly elevates the number of spines. RNA interference studies both in vivo and in organotypic culture demonstrate that the β2*-nAChRs act in a cell-autonomous manner to increase the number of spines. The increase depends on intracellular calcium and activation of calcium, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Absence of β2*-nAChRs in vivo causes a disproportionate number of glutamatergic synapses to be localized on dendritic shafts, rather than on spines as occurs in wild type. This shift in synapse location is found both in the hippocampus and cortex, indicating the breadth of the effect. Because spine synapses differ from shaft synapses in their signaling capabilities, the shift observed is likely to have significant consequences for network function.

  15. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine. PMID:26881098

  16. Activity-dependent trafficking of lysosomes in dendrites and dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Goo, Marisa S; Sancho, Laura; Slepak, Natalia; Boassa, Daniela; Deerinck, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Bloodgood, Brenda L; Patrick, Gentry N

    2017-08-07

    In neurons, lysosomes, which degrade membrane and cytoplasmic components, are thought to primarily reside in somatic and axonal compartments, but there is little understanding of their distribution and function in dendrites. Here, we used conventional and two-photon imaging and electron microscopy to show that lysosomes traffic bidirectionally in dendrites and are present in dendritic spines. We find that lysosome inhibition alters their mobility and also decreases dendritic spine number. Furthermore, perturbing microtubule and actin cytoskeletal dynamics has an inverse relationship on the distribution and motility of lysosomes in dendrites. We also find trafficking of lysosomes is correlated with synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptors. Strikingly, lysosomes traffic to dendritic spines in an activity-dependent manner and can be recruited to individual spines in response to local activation. These data indicate the position of lysosomes is regulated by synaptic activity and thus plays an instructive role in the turnover of synaptic membrane proteins. © 2017 Goo et al.

  17. Activity-dependent trafficking of lysosomes in dendrites and dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Laura; Slepak, Natalia; Boassa, Daniela; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2017-01-01

    In neurons, lysosomes, which degrade membrane and cytoplasmic components, are thought to primarily reside in somatic and axonal compartments, but there is little understanding of their distribution and function in dendrites. Here, we used conventional and two-photon imaging and electron microscopy to show that lysosomes traffic bidirectionally in dendrites and are present in dendritic spines. We find that lysosome inhibition alters their mobility and also decreases dendritic spine number. Furthermore, perturbing microtubule and actin cytoskeletal dynamics has an inverse relationship on the distribution and motility of lysosomes in dendrites. We also find trafficking of lysosomes is correlated with synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid–type glutamate receptors. Strikingly, lysosomes traffic to dendritic spines in an activity-dependent manner and can be recruited to individual spines in response to local activation. These data indicate the position of lysosomes is regulated by synaptic activity and thus plays an instructive role in the turnover of synaptic membrane proteins. PMID:28630145

  18. Stably maintained dendritic spines are associated with lifelong memories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Pan, Feng; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Changes in synaptic connections are considered essential for learning and memory formation1–6. However, it is unknown how neural circuits undergo continuous synaptic changes during learning while maintaining lifelong memories. Here we show, by following postsynaptic dendritic spines over time in the mouse cortex7–8, that learning and novel sensory experience lead to spine formation and elimination by a protracted process. The extent of spine remodelling correlates with behavioural improvement after learning, suggesting a crucial role of synaptic structural plasticity in memory formation and storage. Importantly, a small fraction of new spines induced by novel experience, together with most spines formed early during development and surviving experience-dependent elimination, are preserved throughout the entire life of an animal. These studies indicate that learning and daily sensory experience leave minute but permanent marks on cortical connections and suggest that lifelong memories are stored in largely stably connected synaptic networks. PMID:19946265

  19. Dendritic spine dynamics leading to spine elimination after repeated inductions of LTD

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Sho; Sakuragi, Shigeo; Tominaga-Yoshino, Keiko; Ogura, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Memory is fixed solidly by repetition. However, the cellular mechanism underlying this repetition-dependent memory consolidation/reconsolidation remains unclear. In our previous study using stable slice cultures of the rodent hippocampus, we found long-lasting synaptic enhancement/suppression coupled with synapse formation/elimination after repeated inductions of chemical LTP/LTD, respectively. We proposed these phenomena as useful model systems for analyzing repetition-dependent memory consolidation. Recently, we analyzed the dynamics of dendritic spines during development of the enhancement, and found that the spines increased in number following characteristic stochastic processes. The current study investigates spine dynamics during the development of the suppression. We found that the rate of spine retraction increased immediately leaving that of spine generation unaltered. Spine elimination occurred independent of the pre-existing spine density on the dendritic segment. In terms of elimination, mushroom-type spines were not necessarily more stable than stubby-type and thin-type spines. PMID:25573377

  20. PTEN knockdown alters dendritic spine/protrusion morphology, not density

    PubMed Central

    Haws, Michael E.; Jaramillo, Thomas C.; Espinosa-Becerra, Felipe; Widman, Allie; Stuber, Garret D.; Sparta, Dennis R.; Tye, Kay M.; Russo, Scott J.; Parada, Luis F.; Kaplitt, Michael; Bonci, Antonello; Powell, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders including autism. Previous studies report that PTEN knockdown in neurons in vivo leads to increased spine density and synaptic activity. To better characterize synaptic changes in neurons lacking PTEN, we examined the effects of shRNA knockdown of PTEN in basolateral amygdala neurons on synaptic spine density and morphology using fluorescent dye confocal imaging. Contrary to previous studies in dentate gyrus, we find that knockdown of PTEN in basolateral amygdala leads to a significant decrease in total spine density in distal dendrites. Curiously, this decreased spine density is associated with increased miniature excitatory post-synaptic current frequency and amplitude, suggesting an increase in number and function of mature spines. These seemingly contradictory findings were reconciled by spine morphology analysis demonstrating increased mushroom spine density and size with correspondingly decreased thin protrusion density at more distal segments. The same analysis of PTEN conditional deletion in dentate gyrus demonstrated that loss of PTEN does not significantly alter total density of dendritic protrusions in the dentate gyrus, but does decrease thin protrusion density and increases density of more mature mushroom spines. These findings suggest that, contrary to previous reports, PTEN knockdown may not induce de novo spinogenesis, but instead may increase synaptic activity by inducing morphological and functional maturation of spines. Furthermore, behavioral analysis of basolateral amygdala PTEN knockdown suggests that these changes limited only to the basolateral amygdala complex may not be sufficient to induce increased anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:24264880

  1. Structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines – root or result of behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Cassandra D.; Olive, M. Foster

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are multifunctional integrative units of the nervous system and are highly diverse and dynamic in nature. Both internal and external stimuli influence dendritic spine density and morphology on the order of minutes. It is clear that the structural plasticity of dendritic spines is related to changes in synaptic efficacy, learning and memory, and other cognitive processes. However, it is currently unclear whether structural changes in dendritic spines are primary instigators of changes in specific behaviors, a consequence of behavioral changes, or both. In this review, we first review the basic structure and function of dendritic spines in the brain, as well as laboratory methods to characterize and quantify morphological changes in dendritic spines. We then discuss the existing literature on the temporal and functional relationship between changes in dendritic spines in specific brain regions and changes in specific behaviors mediated by those regions. Although technological advancements have allowed us to better understand the functional relevance of structural changes in dendritic spines that are influenced by environmental stimuli, the role of spine dynamics as an underlying driver or consequence of behavior still remains elusive. We conclude that while it is likely that structural changes in dendritic spines are both instigators and results of behavioral changes, improved research tools and methods are needed to experimentally and directly manipulate spine dynamics in order to more empirically delineate the relationship between spine structure and behavior. PMID:27561549

  2. 3D morphology-based clustering and simulation of human pyramidal cell dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Luengo-Sanchez, Sergio; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2018-06-13

    The dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons are the targets of most excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex. They have a wide variety of morphologies, and their morphology appears to be critical from the functional point of view. To further characterize dendritic spine geometry, we used in this paper over 7,000 individually 3D reconstructed dendritic spines from human cortical pyramidal neurons to group dendritic spines using model-based clustering. This approach uncovered six separate groups of human dendritic spines. To better understand the differences between these groups, the discriminative characteristics of each group were identified as a set of rules. Model-based clustering was also useful for simulating accurate 3D virtual representations of spines that matched the morphological definitions of each cluster. This mathematical approach could provide a useful tool for theoretical predictions on the functional features of human pyramidal neurons based on the morphology of dendritic spines.

  3. The dendritic spine story: an intriguing process of discovery

    PubMed Central

    DeFelipe, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are key components of a variety of microcircuits and they represent the majority of postsynaptic targets of glutamatergic axon terminals in the brain. The present article will focus on the discovery of dendritic spines, which was possible thanks to the application of the Golgi technique to the study of the nervous system, and will also explore the early interpretation of these elements. This discovery represents an interesting chapter in the history of neuroscience as it shows us that progress in the study of the structure of the nervous system is based not only on the emergence of new techniques but also on our ability to exploit the methods already available and correctly interpret their microscopic images. PMID:25798090

  4. The dendritic spine story: an intriguing process of discovery.

    PubMed

    DeFelipe, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are key components of a variety of microcircuits and they represent the majority of postsynaptic targets of glutamatergic axon terminals in the brain. The present article will focus on the discovery of dendritic spines, which was possible thanks to the application of the Golgi technique to the study of the nervous system, and will also explore the early interpretation of these elements. This discovery represents an interesting chapter in the history of neuroscience as it shows us that progress in the study of the structure of the nervous system is based not only on the emergence of new techniques but also on our ability to exploit the methods already available and correctly interpret their microscopic images.

  5. Morphological analysis of dendrites and spines by hybridization of ridge detection with twin support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuihua; Chen, Mengmeng; Li, Yang; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Yudong; Du, Sidan; Wu, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are described as neuronal protrusions. The morphology of dendritic spines and dendrites has a strong relationship to its function, as well as playing an important role in understanding brain function. Quantitative analysis of dendrites and dendritic spines is essential to an understanding of the formation and function of the nervous system. However, highly efficient tools for the quantitative analysis of dendrites and dendritic spines are currently undeveloped. In this paper we propose a novel three-step cascaded algorithm-RTSVM- which is composed of ridge detection as the curvature structure identifier for backbone extraction, boundary location based on differences in density, the Hu moment as features and Twin Support Vector Machine (TSVM) classifiers for spine classification. Our data demonstrates that this newly developed algorithm has performed better than other available techniques used to detect accuracy and false alarm rates. This algorithm will be used effectively in neuroscience research.

  6. Dysbindin-1, WAVE2 and Abi-1 form a complex that regulates dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Morishita, R; Shinoda, T; Iwamoto, I; Sudo, K; Okamoto, K; Nagata, K

    2010-10-01

    Genetic variations in dysbindin-1 (dystrobrevin-binding protein-1) are one of the most commonly reported variations associated with schizophrenia. As schizophrenia could be regarded as a neurodevelopmental disorder resulting from abnormalities of synaptic connectivity, we attempted to clarify the function of dysbindin-1 in neuronal development. We examined the developmental change of dysbindin-1 in rat brain by western blotting and found that a 50 kDa isoform is highly expressed during the embryonic stage, whereas a 40 kDa one is detected at postnatal day 11 and increased thereafter. Immunofluorescent analyses revealed that dysbindin-1 is enriched at the spine-like structure of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We identified WAVE2, but not N-WASP, as a binding partner for dysbindin-1. We also found that Abi-1, a binding molecule for WAVE2 involved in spine morphogenesis, interacts with dysbindin-1. Although dysbindin-1, WAVE2 and Abi-1 form a ternary complex, dysbindin-1 promoted the binding of WAVE2 to Abi-1. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of dysbindin-1 led to the generation of abnormally elongated immature dendritic protrusions. The present results indicate possible functions of dysbindin-1 at the postsynapse in the regulation of dendritic spine morphogenesis through the interaction with WAVE2 and Abi-1.

  7. Maintenance of dendritic spine morphology by partitioning-defective 1b through regulation of microtubule growth.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kenji; Suzuki, Atsushi; Hirai, Syu-ichi; Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Ohno, Shigeo

    2011-08-24

    Dendritic spines are postsynaptic structures that receive excitatory synaptic input from presynaptic terminals. Actin and its regulatory proteins play a central role in morphogenesis of dendritic spines. In addition, recent studies have revealed that microtubules are indispensable for the maintenance of mature dendritic spine morphology by stochastically invading dendritic spines and regulating dendritic localization of p140Cap, which is required for actin reorganization. However, the regulatory mechanisms of microtubule dynamics remain poorly understood. Partitioning-defective 1b (PAR1b), a cell polarity-regulating serine/threonine protein kinase, is thought to regulate microtubule dynamics by inhibiting microtubule binding of microtubule-associated proteins. Results from the present study demonstrated that PAR1b participates in the maintenance of mature dendritic spine morphology in mouse hippocampal neurons. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed PAR1b localization in the dendrites, which was concentrated in dendritic spines of mature neurons. PAR1b knock-down cells exhibited decreased mushroom-like dendritic spines, as well as increased filopodia-like dendritic protrusions, with no effect on the number of protrusions. Live imaging of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins directly revealed decreases in distance and duration of microtubule growth following PAR1b knockdown in a neuroblastoma cell line and in dendrites of hippocampal neurons. In addition, reduced accumulation of GFP-p140Cap in dendritic protrusions was confirmed in PAR1b knock-down neurons. In conclusion, the present results suggested a novel function for PAR1b in the maintenance of mature dendritic spine morphology by regulating microtubule growth and the accumulation of p140Cap in dendritic spines.

  8. Traumatic brain injury causes an FK506-sensitive loss and an overgrowth of dendritic spines in rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Campbell, John N; Register, David; Churn, Severn B

    2012-01-20

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes both an acute loss of tissue and a progressive injury through reactive processes such as excitotoxicity and inflammation. These processes may worsen neural dysfunction by altering neuronal circuitry beyond the focally-damaged tissue. One means of circuit alteration may involve dendritic spines, micron-sized protuberances of dendritic membrane that support most of the excitatory synapses in the brain. This study used a modified Golgi-Cox technique to track changes in spine density on the proximal dendrites of principal cells in rat forebrain regions. Spine density was assessed at 1 h, 24 h, and 1 week after a lateral fluid percussion TBI of moderate severity. At 1 h after TBI, no changes in spine density were observed in any of the brain regions examined. By 24 h after TBI, however, spine density had decreased in ipsilateral neocortex in layer II and III and dorsal dentate gyrus (dDG). This apparent loss of spines was prevented by a single, post-injury administration of the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. These results, together with those of a companion study, indicate an FK506-sensitive mechanism of dendritic spine loss in the TBI model. Furthermore, by 1 week after TBI, spine density had increased substantially above control levels, bilaterally in CA1 and CA3 and ipsilaterally in dDG. The apparent overgrowth of spines in CA1 is of particular interest, as it may explain previous reports of abnormal and potentially epileptogenic activity in this brain region.

  9. Dendritic spine dynamics in synaptogenesis after repeated LTP inductions: Dependence on pre-existing spine density

    PubMed Central

    Oe, Yuki; Tominaga-Yoshino, Keiko; Hasegawa, Sho; Ogura, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Not only from our daily experience but from learning experiments in animals, we know that the establishment of long-lasting memory requires repeated practice. However, cellular backgrounds underlying this repetition-dependent consolidation of memory remain largely unclear. We reported previously using organotypic slice cultures of rodent hippocampus that the repeated inductions of LTP (long-term potentiation) lead to a slowly developing long-lasting synaptic enhancement accompanied by synaptogenesis distinct from LTP itself, and proposed this phenomenon as a model system suitable for the analysis of the repetition-dependent consolidation of memory. Here we examined the dynamics of individual dendritic spines after repeated LTP-inductions and found the existence of two phases in the spines' stochastic behavior that eventually lead to the increase in spine density. This spine dynamics occurred preferentially in the dendritic segments having low pre-existing spine density. Our results may provide clues for understanding the cellular bases underlying the repetition-dependent consolidation of memory. PMID:23739837

  10. Cux1 and Cux2 regulate dendritic branching, spine morphology and synapses of the upper layer neurons of the cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cubelos, Beatriz; Sebastián-Serrano, Alvaro; Beccari, Leonardo; Calcagnotto, Maria Elisa; Cisneros, Elsa; Kim, Seonhee; Dopazo, Ana; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Bovolenta, Paola; Walsh, Christopher A.; Nieto, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dendrite branching and spine formation determines the function of morphologically distinct and specialized neuronal subclasses. However, little is known about the programs instructing specific branching patterns in vertebrate neurons and whether such programs influence dendritic spines and synapses. Using knockout and knockdown studies combined with morphological, molecular and electrophysiological analysis we show that the homeobox Cux1 and Cux2 are intrinsic and complementary regulators of dendrite branching, spine development and synapse formation in layer II–III neurons of the cerebral cortex. Cux genes control the number and maturation of dendritic spines partly through direct regulation of the expression of Xlr3b and Xlr4b, chromatin remodeling genes previously implicated in cognitive defects. Accordingly, abnormal dendrites and synapses in Cux2−/− mice correlate with reduced synaptic function and defects in working memory. These demonstrate critical roles of Cux in dendritogenesis and highlight novel subclass-specific mechanisms of synapse regulation that contribute to the establishment of cognitive circuits. PMID:20510857

  11. Distinct Roles for Somatically and Dendritically Synthesized Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Morphogenesis of Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Orefice, Lauren L.; Waterhouse, Emily G.; Partridge, John G.; Lalchandani, Rupa R.; Vicini, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines undergo the processes of formation, maturation, and pruning during development. Molecular mechanisms controlling spine maturation and pruning remain largely unknown. The gene for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produces two pools of mRNA, with either a short or long 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR). Our previous results show that short 3′ UTR Bdnf mRNA is restricted to cell bodies, whereas long 3′ UTR Bdnf mRNA is also trafficked to dendrites for local translation. Mutant mice lacking long 3′ UTR Bdnf mRNA display normal spines at 3 weeks of age, but thinner and denser spines in adults compared to wild-type littermates. These observations suggest that BDNF translated from long 3′ UTR Bdnf mRNA, likely in dendrites, is required for spine maturation and pruning. In this study, using rat hippocampal neuronal cultures, we found that knocking down long 3′ UTR Bdnf mRNA blocked spine head enlargement and spine elimination, whereas overexpressing long 3′ UTR Bdnf mRNA had the opposite effect. The effect of long 3′ UTR Bdnf mRNA on spine head enlargement and spine elimination was diminished by a human single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs712442) in its 3′ UTR that inhibited dendritic localization of Bdnf mRNA. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of either Bdnf mRNA increased spine density at earlier time points. Spine morphological alterations were associated with corresponding changes in density, size, and function of synapses. These results indicate that somatically synthesized BDNF promotes spine formation, whereas dendritically synthesized BDNF is a key regulator of spine head growth and spine pruning. PMID:23843530

  12. Three-dimensional spatial modeling of spines along dendritic networks in human cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Larrañaga, Pedro; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; DeFelipe, Javier; Bielza, Concha

    2017-01-01

    We modeled spine distribution along the dendritic networks of pyramidal neurons in both basal and apical dendrites. To do this, we applied network spatial analysis because spines can only lie on the dendritic shaft. We expanded the existing 2D computational techniques for spatial analysis along networks to perform a 3D network spatial analysis. We analyzed five detailed reconstructions of adult human pyramidal neurons of the temporal cortex with a total of more than 32,000 spines. We confirmed that there is a spatial variation in spine density that is dependent on the distance to the cell body in all dendrites. Considering the dendritic arborizations of each pyramidal cell as a group of instances of the same observation (the neuron), we used replicated point patterns together with network spatial analysis for the first time to search for significant differences in the spine distribution of basal dendrites between different cells and between all the basal and apical dendrites. To do this, we used a recent variant of Ripley’s K function defined to work along networks. The results showed that there were no significant differences in spine distribution along basal arbors of the same neuron and along basal arbors of different pyramidal neurons. This suggests that dendritic spine distribution in basal dendritic arbors adheres to common rules. However, we did find significant differences in spine distribution along basal versus apical networks. Therefore, not only do apical and basal dendritic arborizations have distinct morphologies but they also obey different rules of spine distribution. Specifically, the results suggested that spines are more clustered along apical than in basal dendrites. Collectively, the results further highlighted that synaptic input information processing is different between these two dendritic domains. PMID:28662210

  13. Three-dimensional spatial modeling of spines along dendritic networks in human cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Larrañaga, Pedro; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; DeFelipe, Javier; Bielza, Concha

    2017-01-01

    We modeled spine distribution along the dendritic networks of pyramidal neurons in both basal and apical dendrites. To do this, we applied network spatial analysis because spines can only lie on the dendritic shaft. We expanded the existing 2D computational techniques for spatial analysis along networks to perform a 3D network spatial analysis. We analyzed five detailed reconstructions of adult human pyramidal neurons of the temporal cortex with a total of more than 32,000 spines. We confirmed that there is a spatial variation in spine density that is dependent on the distance to the cell body in all dendrites. Considering the dendritic arborizations of each pyramidal cell as a group of instances of the same observation (the neuron), we used replicated point patterns together with network spatial analysis for the first time to search for significant differences in the spine distribution of basal dendrites between different cells and between all the basal and apical dendrites. To do this, we used a recent variant of Ripley's K function defined to work along networks. The results showed that there were no significant differences in spine distribution along basal arbors of the same neuron and along basal arbors of different pyramidal neurons. This suggests that dendritic spine distribution in basal dendritic arbors adheres to common rules. However, we did find significant differences in spine distribution along basal versus apical networks. Therefore, not only do apical and basal dendritic arborizations have distinct morphologies but they also obey different rules of spine distribution. Specifically, the results suggested that spines are more clustered along apical than in basal dendrites. Collectively, the results further highlighted that synaptic input information processing is different between these two dendritic domains.

  14. The Rac-GAP alpha2-chimaerin regulates hippocampal dendrite and spine morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Chris M; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Beg, Asim A

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic spines are fine neuronal processes where spatially restricted input can induce activity-dependent changes in one spine, while leaving neighboring spines unmodified. Morphological spine plasticity is critical for synaptic transmission and is thought to underlie processes like learning and memory. Significantly, defects in dendritic spine stability and morphology are common pathogenic features found in several neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. The remodeling of spines relies on proteins that modulate the underlying cytoskeleton, which is primarily composed of filamentous (F)-actin. The Rho-GTPase Rac1 is a major regulator of F-actin and is essential for the development and plasticity of dendrites and spines. However, the key molecules and mechanisms that regulate Rac1-dependent pathways at spines and synapses are not well understood. We have identified the Rac1-GTPase activating protein, α2-chimaerin, as a critical negative regulator of Rac1 in hippocampal neurons. The loss of α2-chimaerin significantly increases the levels of active Rac1 and induces the formation of aberrant polymorphic dendritic spines. Further, disruption of α2-chimaerin signaling simplifies dendritic arbor complexity and increases the presence of dendritic spines that appear poly-innervated. Our data suggests that α2-chimaerin serves as a "brake" to constrain Rac1-dependent signaling to ensure that the mature morphology of spines is maintained in response to network activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. From Synaptic Transmission to Cognition: An Intermediary Role for Dendritic Spines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic spines are cytoplasmic protrusions that develop directly or indirectly from the filopodia of neurons. Dendritic spines mediate excitatory neurotransmission and they can isolate the electrical activity generated by synaptic impulses, enabling them to translate excitatory afferent information via several types of plastic changes, including…

  16. The ROR2 tyrosine kinase receptor regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Iván E; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-07-01

    Wnt signaling regulates synaptic development and function and contributes to the fine-tuning of the molecular and morphological differentiation of synapses. We have shown previously that Wnt5a activates non-canonical Wnt signaling to stimulate postsynaptic differentiation in excitatory hippocampal neurons promoting the clustering of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 and the development of dendritic spines. At least three different kinds of Wnt receptors have been associated with Wnt5a signaling: seven trans-membrane Frizzled receptors and the tyrosine kinase receptors Ryk and ROR2. We report here that ROR2 is distributed in the dendrites of hippocampal neurons in close proximity to synaptic contacts and it is contained in dendritic spine protrusions. We demonstrate that ROR2 is necessary to maintain dendritic spine number and morphological distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. ROR2 overexpression increased dendritic spine growth without affecting the density of dendritic spine protrusions in a form dependent on its extracellular Wnt binding cysteine rich domain (CRD) and kinase domain. Overexpression of dominant negative ROR2 lacking the extracellular CRD decreased spine density and the proportion of mushroom like spines, while ROR2 lacking the C-terminal and active kinase domains only affected spine morphology. Our results indicate a crucial role of the ROR2 in the formation and maturation of the postsynaptic dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Superresolving dendritic spine morphology with STED microscopy under holographic photostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lauterbach, Marcel Andreas; Guillon, Marc; Desnos, Claire; Khamsing, Dany; Jaffal, Zahra; Darchen, François; Emiliani, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Emerging all-optical methods provide unique possibilities for noninvasive studies of physiological processes at the cellular and subcellular scale. On the one hand, superresolution microscopy enables observation of living samples with nanometer resolution. On the other hand, light can be used to stimulate cells due to the advent of optogenetics and photolyzable neurotransmitters. To exploit the full potential of optical stimulation, light must be delivered to specific cells or even parts of cells such as dendritic spines. This can be achieved with computer generated holography (CGH), which shapes light to arbitrary patterns by phase-only modulation. We demonstrate here in detail how CGH can be incorporated into a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope for photostimulation of neurons and monitoring of nanoscale morphological changes. We implement an original optical system to allow simultaneous holographic photostimulation and superresolution STED imaging. We present how synapses can be clearly visualized in live cells using membrane stains either with lipophilic organic dyes or with fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the capabilities of this microscope to precisely monitor morphological changes of dendritic spines after stimulation. These all-optical methods for cell stimulation and monitoring are expected to spread to various fields of biological research in neuroscience and beyond. PMID:27413766

  18. The spread of Ras activity triggered by activation of a single dendritic spine.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Christopher D; Yasuda, Ryohei; Zhong, Haining; Svoboda, Karel

    2008-07-04

    In neurons, individual dendritic spines isolate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated calcium ion (Ca2+) accumulations from the dendrite and other spines. However, the extent to which spines compartmentalize signaling events downstream of Ca2+ influx is not known. We combined two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging with two-photon glutamate uncaging to image the activity of the small guanosine triphosphatase Ras after NMDA receptor activation at individual spines. Induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) triggered robust Ca2+-dependent Ras activation in single spines that decayed in approximately 5 minutes. Ras activity spread over approximately 10 micrometers of dendrite and invaded neighboring spines by diffusion. The spread of Ras-dependent signaling was necessary for the local regulation of the threshold for LTP induction. Thus, Ca2+-dependent synaptic signals can spread to couple multiple synapses on short stretches of dendrite.

  19. Chronic Ethanol During Adolescence Impacts Corticolimbic Dendritic Spines and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Jury, Nicholas J; Pollack, Gabrielle A; Ward, Meredith J; Bezek, Jessica L; Ng, Alexandra J; Pinard, Courtney R; Bergstrom, Hadley C; Holmes, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Risk for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in adulthood is linked to alcohol drinking during adolescence, but understanding of the neural and behavioral consequences of alcohol exposure during adolescence remains incomplete. Here, we examined the neurobehavioral impact of adolescent chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) vapor exposure in mice. C57BL/6J-background Thy1-EGFP mice were CIE-exposed during adolescence or adulthood and examined, as adults, for alterations in the density and morphology of dendritic spines in infralimbic (IL) cortex, prelimbic (PL) cortex, and basolateral amygdala (BLA). In parallel, adolescent- and adult-exposed C57BL/6J mice were tested as adults for 2-bottle EtOH drinking, sensitivity to EtOH intoxication (loss of righting reflex [LORR]), blood EtOH clearance, and measures of operant responding for food reward. CIE during adolescence decreased IL neuronal spine density and increased the head width of relatively wide-head IL and BLA spines, whereas CIE decreased head width of relatively narrow-head BLA spines. Adolescents had higher EtOH consumption prior to CIE than adults, while CIE during adulthood, but not adolescence, increased EtOH consumption relative to pre-CIE baseline. CIE produced a tolerance-like decrease in LORR sensitivity to EtOH challenge, irrespective of the age at which mice received CIE exposure. Mice exposed to CIE during adolescence, but not adulthood, required more sessions than AIR controls to reliably respond for food reward on a fixed-ratio (FR) 1, but not subsequent FR3, reinforcement schedule. On a progressive ratio reinforcement schedule, break point responding was higher in the adolescent- than the adult-exposed mice, regardless of CIE. Finally, footshock punishment markedly suppressed responding for reward in all groups. Exposure to CIE during adolescence altered dendritic spine density and morphology in IL and BLA neurons, in parallel with a limited set of behavioral alterations. Together, these data add to growing

  20. Chronic ethanol during adolescence impacts corticolimbic dendritic spines and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Jury, Nicholas J.; Pollack, Gabrielle A.; Ward, Meredith J.; Bezek, Jessica L.; Ng, Alexandra J.; Pinard, Courtney R.; Bergstrom, Hadley C.; Holmes, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Background Risk for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) is linked to alcohol drinking during adolescence, but understanding of the neural and behavioral consequences of alcohol exposure during adolescence remains incomplete. Here, we examined the neurobehavioral impact of adolescent chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) vapor exposure in mice. Methods C57BL/6J-background Thy1-EGFP mice were CIE-exposed during adolescence or adulthood and examined, as adults, for alterations in the density and morphology of dendritic spines in infralimbic cortex (IL), prelimbic cortex (PL) and basolateral amygdala (BLA). In parallel, adolescent- and adult-exposed C57BL/6J mice were tested as adults for two-bottle EtOH drinking, sensitivity to EtOH intoxication (loss of righting reflex, LORR), blood EtOH clearance, and measures of operant responding for food reward. Results CIE during adolescence decreased IL neuronal spine density and increased the head-width of relatively wide-head IL and BLA spines, whereas CIE decreased head-width of relatively narrow-head BLA spines. Adolescents had higher EtOH consumption prior to CIE than adults, while CIE during adulthood, but not adolescence, increased EtOH consumption relative to pre-CIE baseline. CIE produced a tolerance-like decrease in LORR sensitivity to EtOH challenge, irrespective of the age at which mice received CIE exposure. Mice exposed to CIE during adolescence, but not adulthood, required more sessions than AIR controls to reliably respond for food reward on a fixed-ratio (FR1), but not subsequent FR3, reinforcement schedule. On a progressive ratio reinforcement schedule, breakpoint responding was higher in the adolescent- than the adult-exposed mice, regardless of CIE. Finally, footshock-punishment markedly suppressed responding for reward in all groups. Conclusions Exposure to CIE during adolescence altered dendritic spine density and morphology in IL and BLA neurons, in parallel with a limited set of behavioral alterations. Together

  1. Cortical Regulation of Dopamine Depletion-Induced Dendritic Spine Loss in Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Neely, M. Diana; Schmidt, Dennis E.; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2007-01-01

    The proximate cause of Parkinson’s Disease is striatal dopamine depletion. Although no overt toxicity to striatal neurons has been reported in Parkinson’s Disease, one of the consequences of striatal dopamine loss is a decrease in the number of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Dendrites of these neurons receive cortical glutamatergic inputs onto the dendritic spine head and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra onto the spine neck. This synaptic arrangement suggests that dopamine gates corticostriatal glutamatergic drive onto spines. Using triple organotypic slice cultures comprised of ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and cortex, we examined the role of the cortex in dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in MSNs. The striatal dopamine innervation was lesioned by treatment of the cultures with the dopaminergic neurotoxin MPP+ or by removing the mesencephalon. Both MPP+ and mesencephalic ablation decreased MSN dendritic spine density. Analysis of spine morphology revealed that thin spines were preferentially lost after dopamine depletion. Removal of the cortex completely prevented dopamine depletion-induced spine loss. These data indicate that the dendritic remodeling of MSNs seen in parkinsonism occurs secondary to increases in corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, and suggest that modulation of cortical activity may be a useful therapeutic strategy in Parkinson’s Disease. PMID:17888581

  2. A dual role for the RhoGEF Ephexin5 in regulation of dendritic spine outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, AM; Lambert, JT; Parajuli, LK; Vivas, O; Park, DK; Stein, IS; Jahncke, JN; Greenberg, ME; Margolis, SS; Zito, K

    2017-01-01

    The outgrowth of new dendritic spines is closely linked to the formation of new synapses, and is thought to be a vital component of the experience-dependent circuit plasticity that supports learning. Here, we examined the role of the RhoGEF Ephexin5 in driving activity-dependent spine outgrowth. We found that reducing Ephexin5 levels increased spine outgrowth, and increasing Ephexin5 levels decreased spine outgrowth in a GEF-dependent manner, suggesting that Ephexin5 acts as an inhibitor of spine outgrowth. Notably, we found that increased neural activity led to a proteasome-dependent reduction in the levels of Ephexin5 in neuronal dendrites, which could facilitate the enhanced spine outgrowth observed following increased neural activity. Surprisingly, we also found that Ephexin5-GFP levels were elevated on the dendrite at sites of future new spines, prior to new spine outgrowth. Moreover, lowering neuronal Ephexin5 levels inhibited new spine outgrowth in response to both global increases in neural activity and local glutamatergic stimulation of the dendrite, suggesting that Ephexin5 is necessary for activity-dependent spine outgrowth. Our data support a model in which Ephexin5 serves a dual role in spinogenesis, acting both as a brake on overall spine outgrowth and as a necessary component in the site-specific formation of new spines. PMID:28185854

  3. A dual role for the RhoGEF Ephexin5 in regulation of dendritic spine outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, A M; Lambert, J T; Parajuli, L K; Vivas, O; Park, D K; Stein, I S; Jahncke, J N; Greenberg, M E; Margolis, S S; Zito, K

    2017-04-01

    The outgrowth of new dendritic spines is closely linked to the formation of new synapses, and is thought to be a vital component of the experience-dependent circuit plasticity that supports learning. Here, we examined the role of the RhoGEF Ephexin5 in driving activity-dependent spine outgrowth. We found that reducing Ephexin5 levels increased spine outgrowth, and increasing Ephexin5 levels decreased spine outgrowth in a GEF-dependent manner, suggesting that Ephexin5 acts as an inhibitor of spine outgrowth. Notably, we found that increased neural activity led to a proteasome-dependent reduction in the levels of Ephexin5 in neuronal dendrites, which could facilitate the enhanced spine outgrowth observed following increased neural activity. Surprisingly, we also found that Ephexin5-GFP levels were elevated on the dendrite at sites of future new spines, prior to new spine outgrowth. Moreover, lowering neuronal Ephexin5 levels inhibited new spine outgrowth in response to both global increases in neural activity and local glutamatergic stimulation of the dendrite, suggesting that Ephexin5 is necessary for activity-dependent spine outgrowth. Our data support a model in which Ephexin5 serves a dual role in spinogenesis, acting both as a brake on overall spine outgrowth and as a necessary component in the site-specific formation of new spines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dendritic spine instability and insensitivity to modulation by sensory experience in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Aldridge, Georgina M; Greenough, William T; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2010-10-12

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of mental retardation and is caused by transcriptional inactivation of the X-linked fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. FXS is associated with increased density and abnormal morphology of dendritic spines, the postsynaptic sites of the majority of excitatory synapses. To better understand how lack of the FMR1 gene function affects spine development and plasticity, we examined spine formation and elimination of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the whisker barrel cortex of Fmr1 KO mice with a transcranial two-photon imaging technique. We found that the rates of spine formation and elimination over days to weeks were significantly higher in both young and adult KO mice compared with littermate controls. The heightened spine turnover in KO mice was due to the existence of a larger pool of "short-lived" new spines in KO mice than in controls. Furthermore, we found that the formation of new spines and the elimination of existing ones were less sensitive to modulation by sensory experience in KO mice. These results indicate that the loss of Fmr1 gene function leads to ongoing overproduction of transient spines in the primary somatosensory cortex. The insensitivity of spine formation and elimination to sensory alterations in Fmr1 KO mice suggest that the developing synaptic circuits may not be properly tuned by sensory stimuli in FXS.

  5. Clustered Dynamics of Inhibitory Synapses and Dendritic Spines in the Adult Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jerry L.; Villa, Katherine L; Cha, Jae Won; So, Peter T.C.; Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Nedivi, Elly

    2012-01-01

    A key feature of the mammalian brain is its capacity to adapt in response to experience, in part by remodeling of synaptic connections between neurons. Excitatory synapse rearrangements have been monitored in vivo by observation of dendritic spine dynamics, but lack of a vital marker for inhibitory synapses has precluded their observation. Here, we simultaneously monitor in vivo inhibitory synapse and dendritic spine dynamics across the entire dendritic arbor of pyramidal neurons in the adult mammalian cortex using large volume high-resolution dual color two-photon microscopy. We find that inhibitory synapses on dendritic shafts and spines differ in their distribution across the arbor and in their remodeling kinetics during normal and altered sensory experience. Further, we find inhibitory synapse and dendritic spine remodeling to be spatially clustered, and that clustering is influenced by sensory input. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for local coordination of inhibitory and excitatory synaptic rearrangements. PMID:22542188

  6. Spines slow down dendritic chloride diffusion and affect short-term ionic plasticity of GABAergic inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Namrata; Tønnesen, Jan; Vlachos, Andreas; Kuner, Thomas; Deller, Thomas; Nägerl, U. Valentin; Santamaria, Fidel; Jedlicka, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Cl- plays a crucial role in neuronal function and synaptic inhibition. However, the impact of neuronal morphology on the diffusion and redistribution of intracellular Cl- is not well understood. The role of spines in Cl- diffusion along dendritic trees has not been addressed so far. Because measuring fast and spatially restricted Cl- changes within dendrites is not yet technically possible, we used computational approaches to predict the effects of spines on Cl- dynamics in morphologically complex dendrites. In all morphologies tested, including dendrites imaged by super-resolution STED microscopy in live brain tissue, spines slowed down longitudinal Cl- diffusion along dendrites. This effect was robust and could be observed in both deterministic as well as stochastic simulations. Cl- extrusion altered Cl- diffusion to a much lesser extent than the presence of spines. The spine-dependent slowing of Cl- diffusion affected the amount and spatial spread of changes in the GABA reversal potential thereby altering homosynaptic as well as heterosynaptic short-term ionic plasticity at GABAergic synapses in dendrites. Altogether, our results suggest a fundamental role of dendritic spines in shaping Cl- diffusion, which could be of relevance in the context of pathological conditions where spine densities and neural excitability are perturbed.

  7. Rapid time course of action potentials in spines and remote dendrites of mouse visual cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Holthoff, Knut; Zecevic, Dejan; Konnerth, Arthur

    2010-04-01

    Axonally initiated action potentials back-propagate into spiny dendrites of central mammalian neurons and thereby regulate plasticity at excitatory synapses on individual spines as well as linear and supralinear integration of synaptic inputs along dendritic branches. Thus, the electrical behaviour of individual dendritic spines and terminal dendritic branches is critical for the integrative function of nerve cells. The actual dynamics of action potentials in spines and terminal branches, however, are not entirely clear, mostly because electrode recording from such small structures is not feasible. Additionally, the available membrane potential imaging techniques are limited in their sensitivity and require substantial signal averaging for the detection of electrical events at the spatial scale of individual spines. We made a critical improvement in the voltage-sensitive dye imaging technique to achieve multisite recordings of backpropagating action potentials from individual dendritic spines at a high frame rate. With this approach, we obtained direct evidence that in layer 5 pyramidal neurons from the visual cortex of juvenile mice, the rapid time course of somatic action potentials is preserved throughout all cellular compartments, including dendritic spines and terminal branches of basal and apical dendrites. The rapid time course of the action potential in spines may be a critical determinant for the precise regulation of spike timing-dependent synaptic plasticity within a narrow time window.

  8. Age-Based Comparison of Human Dendritic Spine Structure Using Complete Three-Dimensional Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Robles, Victor; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons are targets of most excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the morphology of the dendritic spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. However, unfortunately, there are scant data available regarding the detailed morphology of these structures for the human cerebral cortex. In the present study, we analyzed over 8900 individual dendritic spines that were completely 3D reconstructed along the length of apical and basal dendrites of layer III pyramidal neurons in the cingulate cortex of 2 male humans (aged 40 and 85 years old), using intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in fixed tissue. We assembled a large, quantitative database, which revealed a major reduction in spine densities in the aged case. Specifically, small and short spines of basal dendrites and long spines of apical dendrites were lost, regardless of the distance from the soma. Given the age difference between the cases, our results suggest selective alterations in spines with aging in humans and indicate that the spine volume and length are regulated by different biological mechanisms. PMID:22710613

  9. Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto; Vogels, Tim P.; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Most excitatory inputs in the mammalian brain are made on dendritic spines, rather than on dendritic shafts. Spines compartmentalize calcium, and this biochemical isolation can underlie input-specific synaptic plasticity, providing a raison d’etre for spines. However, recent results indicate that the spine can experience a membrane potential different from that in the parent dendrite, as though the spine neck electrically isolated the spine. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging of mouse neocortical pyramidal neurons to analyze the correlation between the morphologies of spines activated under minimal synaptic stimulation and the excitatory postsynaptic potentials they generate. We find that excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitudes are inversely correlated with spine neck lengths. Furthermore, a spike timing-dependent plasticity protocol, in which two-photon glutamate uncaging over a spine is paired with postsynaptic spikes, produces rapid shrinkage of the spine neck and concomitant increases in the amplitude of the evoked spine potentials. Using numerical simulations, we explore the parameter regimes for the spine neck resistance and synaptic conductance changes necessary to explain our observations. Our data, directly correlating synaptic and morphological plasticity, imply that long-necked spines have small or negligible somatic voltage contributions, but that, upon synaptic stimulation paired with postsynaptic activity, they can shorten their necks and increase synaptic efficacy, thus changing the input/output gain of pyramidal neurons. PMID:24982196

  10. Changing views of Cajal's neuron: the case of the dendritic spine.

    PubMed

    Segal, Menahem

    2002-01-01

    Ever since dendritic spines were first described in detail by Santiago Ramón y Cajal, they were assumed to underlie the physical substrate of long term memory in the brain. Recent time-lapse imaging of dendritic spines in live tissue, using confocal microscopy, have revealed an amazingly plastic structure, which undergoes continuous changes in shape and size, not intuitively related to its assumed role in long term memory. Functionally, the spine is shown to be an independent cellular compartment, able to regulate calcium concentration independently of its parent dendrite. The shape of the spine is instrumental in regulating the link between the synapse and the parent dendrite such that longer spines have less impact on the dendrite than shorter ones. The spine can be formed, change its shape and disappear in response to afferent stimulation, in a dynamic fashion, indicating that spine morphology is an important vehicle for structuring synaptic interactions. While this role is crucial in the developing nervous system, large variations in spine densities in the adult brain indicate that tuning of synaptic impact may be a role of spines throughout the life of a neuron.

  11. Organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton during dendritic spine morphological remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chazeau, Anaël; Giannone, Grégory

    2016-08-01

    In the central nervous system, most excitatory post-synapses are small subcellular structures called dendritic spines. Their structure and morphological remodeling are tightly coupled to changes in synaptic transmission. The F-actin cytoskeleton is the main driving force of dendritic spine remodeling and sustains synaptic plasticity. It is therefore essential to understand how changes in synaptic transmission can regulate the organization and dynamics of actin binding proteins (ABPs). In this review, we will provide a detailed description of the organization and dynamics of F-actin and ABPs in dendritic spines and will discuss the current models explaining how the actin cytoskeleton sustains both structural and functional synaptic plasticity.

  12. Biophysical model of the role of actin remodeling on dendritic spine morphology

    PubMed Central

    Miermans, C. A.; Kusters, R. P. T.; Hoogenraad, C. C.; Storm, C.

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small membranous structures that protrude from the neuronal dendrite. Each spine contains a synaptic contact site that may connect its parent dendrite to the axons of neighboring neurons. Dendritic spines are markedly distinct in shape and size, and certain types of stimulation prompt spines to evolve, in fairly predictable fashion, from thin nascent morphologies to the mushroom-like shapes associated with mature spines. It is well established that the remodeling of spines is strongly dependent upon the actin cytoskeleton inside the spine. A general framework that details the precise role of actin in directing the transitions between the various spine shapes is lacking. We address this issue, and present a quantitative, model-based scenario for spine plasticity validated using realistic and physiologically relevant parameters. Our model points to a crucial role for the actin cytoskeleton. In the early stages of spine formation, the interplay between the elastic properties of the spine membrane and the protrusive forces generated in the actin cytoskeleton propels the incipient spine. In the maturation stage, actin remodeling in the form of the combined dynamics of branched and bundled actin is required to form mature, mushroom-like spines. Importantly, our model shows that constricting the spine-neck aids in the stabilization of mature spines, thus pointing to a role in stabilization and maintenance for additional factors such as ring-like F-actin structures. Taken together, our model provides unique insights into the fundamental role of actin remodeling and polymerization forces during spine formation and maturation. PMID:28158194

  13. Hippocampal dendritic spines modifications induced by perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Saraceno, G E; Castilla, R; Barreto, G E; Gonzalez, J; Kölliker-Frers, R A; Capani, F

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia (PA) affects the synaptic function and morphological organization. In previous works, we have shown neuronal and synaptic changes in rat neostriatum subjected to hypoxia leading to long-term ubi-protein accumulation. Since F-actin is highly concentrated in dendritic spines, modifications in its organization could be related with alterations induced by hypoxia in the central nervous system (CNS). In the present study, we investigate the effects of PA on the actin cytoskeleton of hippocampal postsynaptic densities (PSD) in 4-month-old rats. PSD showed an increment in their thickness and in the level of ubiquitination. Correlative fluorescence-electron microscopy photooxidation showed a decrease in the number of F-actin-stained spines in hippocampal excitatory synapses subjected to PA. Although western blot analysis also showed a slight decrease in β-actin in PSD in PA animals, the difference was not significant. Taken together, this data suggests that long-term actin cytoskeleton might have role in PSD alterations which would be a spread phenomenon induced by PA.

  14. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Modifications Induced by Perinatal Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Saraceno, G. E.; Castilla, R.; Barreto, G. E.; Gonzalez, J.; Kölliker-Frers, R. A.; Capani, F.

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia (PA) affects the synaptic function and morphological organization. In previous works, we have shown neuronal and synaptic changes in rat neostriatum subjected to hypoxia leading to long-term ubi-protein accumulation. Since F-actin is highly concentrated in dendritic spines, modifications in its organization could be related with alterations induced by hypoxia in the central nervous system (CNS). In the present study, we investigate the effects of PA on the actin cytoskeleton of hippocampal postsynaptic densities (PSD) in 4-month-old rats. PSD showed an increment in their thickness and in the level of ubiquitination. Correlative fluorescence-electron microscopy photooxidation showed a decrease in the number of F-actin-stained spines in hippocampal excitatory synapses subjected to PA. Although Western Blot analysis also showed a slight decrease in β-actin in PSD in PA animals, the difference was not significant. Taken together, this data suggests that long-term actin cytoskeleton might have role in PSD alterations which would be a spread phenomenon induced by PA. PMID:22645692

  15. Local pruning of dendrites and spines by caspase-3-dependent and proteasome-limited mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ertürk, Ali; Wang, Yuanyuan; Sheng, Morgan

    2014-01-29

    Synapse loss occurs normally during development and pathologically during neurodegenerative disease. Long-term depression, a proposed physiological correlate of synapse elimination, requires caspase-3 and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Here, we show that caspase-3 activity is essential--and can act locally within neurons--for regulation of spine density and dendrite morphology. By photostimulation of Mito-KillerRed, we induced caspase-3 activity in defined dendritic regions of cultured neurons. Within the photostimulated region, local elimination of dendritic spines and dendrite retraction occurred in a caspase-3-dependent manner without inducing cell death. However, pharmacological inhibition of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins or proteasome function led to neuronal death, suggesting that caspase activation is spatially restricted by these "molecular brakes" on apoptosis. Caspase-3 knock-out mice have increased spine density and altered miniature EPSCs, confirming a physiological involvement of caspase-3 in the regulation of spines in vivo.

  16. The ROCK Inhibitor Fasudil Prevents Chronic Restraint Stress-Induced Depressive-Like Behaviors and Dendritic Spine Loss in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    García-Rojo, Gonzalo; Fresno, Cristóbal; Vilches, Natalia; Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela; Mora, Sergio; Aguayo, Felipe; Pacheco, Aníbal; Parra-Fiedler, Nicolás; Parra, Claudio S.; Rojas, Paulina S.; Tejos, Macarena; Aliaga, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Dendritic arbor simplification and dendritic spine loss in the hippocampus, a limbic structure implicated in mood disorders, are assumed to contribute to symptoms of depression. These morphological changes imply modifications in dendritic cytoskeleton. Rho GTPases are regulators of actin dynamics through their effector Rho kinase. We have reported that chronic stress promotes depressive-like behaviors in rats along with dendritic spine loss in apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, changes associated with Rho kinase activation. The present study proposes that the Rho kinase inhibitor Fasudil may prevent the stress-induced behavior and dendritic spine loss. Methods: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with saline or Fasudil (i.p., 10 mg/kg) starting 4 days prior to and maintained during the restraint stress procedure (2.5 h/d for 14 days). Nonstressed control animals were injected with saline or Fasudil for 18 days. At 24 hours after treatment, forced swimming test, Golgi-staining, and immuno-western blot were performed. Results: Fasudil prevented stress-induced immobility observed in the forced swimming test. On the other hand, Fasudil-treated control animals showed behavioral patterns similar to those of saline-treated controls. Furthermore, we observed that stress induced an increase in the phosphorylation of MYPT1 in the hippocampus, an exclusive target of Rho kinase. This change was accompanied by dendritic spine loss of apical dendrites of pyramidal hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, increased pMYPT1 levels and spine loss were both prevented by Fasudil administration. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that Fasudil may prevent the development of abnormal behavior and spine loss induced by chronic stress by blocking Rho kinase activity. PMID:27927737

  17. The ROCK Inhibitor Fasudil Prevents Chronic Restraint Stress-Induced Depressive-Like Behaviors and Dendritic Spine Loss in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    García-Rojo, Gonzalo; Fresno, Cristóbal; Vilches, Natalia; Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela; Mora, Sergio; Aguayo, Felipe; Pacheco, Aníbal; Parra-Fiedler, Nicolás; Parra, Claudio S; Rojas, Paulina S; Tejos, Macarena; Aliaga, Esteban; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2017-04-01

    Dendritic arbor simplification and dendritic spine loss in the hippocampus, a limbic structure implicated in mood disorders, are assumed to contribute to symptoms of depression. These morphological changes imply modifications in dendritic cytoskeleton. Rho GTPases are regulators of actin dynamics through their effector Rho kinase. We have reported that chronic stress promotes depressive-like behaviors in rats along with dendritic spine loss in apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, changes associated with Rho kinase activation. The present study proposes that the Rho kinase inhibitor Fasudil may prevent the stress-induced behavior and dendritic spine loss. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with saline or Fasudil (i.p., 10 mg/kg) starting 4 days prior to and maintained during the restraint stress procedure (2.5 h/d for 14 days). Nonstressed control animals were injected with saline or Fasudil for 18 days. At 24 hours after treatment, forced swimming test, Golgi-staining, and immuno-western blot were performed. Fasudil prevented stress-induced immobility observed in the forced swimming test. On the other hand, Fasudil-treated control animals showed behavioral patterns similar to those of saline-treated controls. Furthermore, we observed that stress induced an increase in the phosphorylation of MYPT1 in the hippocampus, an exclusive target of Rho kinase. This change was accompanied by dendritic spine loss of apical dendrites of pyramidal hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, increased pMYPT1 levels and spine loss were both prevented by Fasudil administration. Our findings suggest that Fasudil may prevent the development of abnormal behavior and spine loss induced by chronic stress by blocking Rho kinase activity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  18. Methods of Dendritic Spine Detection: from Golgi to High Resolution Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, James J; Chen, Yuanxin; Li, Xuping; Xue, Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic spines, the bulbous protrusions that form the postsynaptic half of excitatory synapses, are one of the most prominent features of neurons and have been imaged and studied for over a century. In that time, changes in the number and morphology of dendritic spines have been correlated to the developmental process as well as the pathophysiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the sheer scale of synaptic connectivity in the brain, work to date has merely scratched the surface in the study of normal spine function and pathology. This review will highlight traditional approaches to the imaging of dendritic spines and newer approaches made possible by advances in microscopy, protein engineering, and image analysis. The review will also describe recent work that is leading researchers toward the possibility of a systematic and comprehensive study of spine anatomy throughout the brain. PMID:22522468

  19. Marginal Iodine Deficiency Affects Dendritic Spine Development by Disturbing the Function of Rac1 Signaling Pathway on Cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Min, Hui; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Ye; Shan, Zhongyan; Xi, Qi; Teng, Weiping; Chen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID)-induced thyroid hormone (TH) insufficient during development leads to impairments of brain function, such as learning and memory. Marginal ID has been defined as subtle insufficiency of TH, characterized as low thyroxine (T 4 ) levels, whether marginal ID potentially had adverse effects on the development of hippocampus and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, in the present study, we established Wistar rat models with ID diet during pregnancy and lactation. The effects of marginal ID on long-term potentiation (LTP) were investigated in the hippocampal CA1 region. To study the development of dendritic spines in pyramidal cells, Golgi-Cox staining was conducted on postnatal day (PN) 7, PN14, PN21, and PN28. The activation of Rac1 signaling pathway, which is essential for dendritic spine development by regulating actin cytoskeleton, was also investigated. Our results showed that marginal ID slightly reduced the field-excitatory postsynaptic potential (f-EPSP) slope and the population spike (PS) amplitude. Besides, the density of dendritic spines during the critical period of rat postnatal development was mildly decreased, and we found no significant change of spine morphology in marginal ID group. We also observed decreased activation of the Rac1 signaling pathway in pups subjected to maternal marginal ID. Our study may support the hypothesis that decreased T 4 induced by marginal ID results in slight impairments of LTP and leads to mild damage of dendritic spine development, which may be due to abnormal regulation of Rac1 signaling pathway on cytoskeleton.

  20. Mechanical coupling between transsynaptic N-cadherin adhesions and actin flow stabilizes dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Chazeau, Anaël; Garcia, Mikael; Czöndör, Katalin; Perrais, David; Tessier, Béatrice; Giannone, Grégory; Thoumine, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of neuronal dendritic spines is a critical indicator of synaptic function. It is regulated by several factors, including the intracellular actin/myosin cytoskeleton and transcellular N-cadherin adhesions. To examine the mechanical relationship between these molecular components, we performed quantitative live-imaging experiments in primary hippocampal neurons. We found that actin turnover and structural motility were lower in dendritic spines than in immature filopodia and increased upon expression of a nonadhesive N-cadherin mutant, resulting in an inverse relationship between spine motility and actin enrichment. Furthermore, the pharmacological stimulation of myosin II induced the rearward motion of actin structures in spines, showing that myosin II exerts tension on the actin network. Strikingly, the formation of stable, spine-like structures enriched in actin was induced at contacts between dendritic filopodia and N-cadherin–coated beads or micropatterns. Finally, computer simulations of actin dynamics mimicked various experimental conditions, pointing to the actin flow rate as an important parameter controlling actin enrichment in dendritic spines. Together these data demonstrate that a clutch-like mechanism between N-cadherin adhesions and the actin flow underlies the stabilization of dendritic filopodia into mature spines, a mechanism that may have important implications in synapse initiation, maturation, and plasticity in the developing brain. PMID:25568337

  1. Motor learning induces plastic changes in Purkinje cell dendritic spines in the rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, D; González-Ramírez, M M; Vázquez-Hernández, N; González-Burgos, I

    2017-12-14

    The paramedian lobule of the cerebellum is involved in learning to correctly perform motor skills through practice. Dendritic spines are dynamic structures that regulate excitatory synaptic stimulation. We studied plastic changes occurring in the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells from the paramedian lobule of rats during motor learning. Adult male rats were trained over a 6-day period using an acrobatic motor learning paradigm; the density and type of dendritic spines were determined every day during the study period using a modified version of the Golgi method. The learning curve reflected a considerable decrease in the number of errors made by rats as the training period progressed. We observed more dendritic spines on days 2 and 6, particularly more thin spines on days 1, 3, and 6, fewer mushroom spines on day 3, fewer stubby spines on day 1, and more thick spines on days 4 and 6. The initial stage of motor learning may be associated with fast processing of the underlying synaptic information combined with an apparent "silencing" of memory consolidation processes, based on the regulation of the neuronal excitability. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Opposite effects of fear conditioning and extinction on dendritic spine remodelling.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cora Sau Wan; Franke, Thomas F; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2012-02-19

    It is generally believed that fear extinction is a form of new learning that inhibits rather than erases previously acquired fear memories. Although this view has gained much support from behavioural and electrophysiological studies, the hypothesis that extinction causes the partial erasure of fear memories remains viable. Using transcranial two-photon microscopy, we investigated how neural circuits are modified by fear learning and extinction by examining the formation and elimination of postsynaptic dendritic spines of layer-V pyramidal neurons in the mouse frontal association cortex. Here we show that fear conditioning by pairing an auditory cue with a footshock increases the rate of spine elimination. By contrast, fear extinction by repeated presentation of the same auditory cue without a footshock increases the rate of spine formation. The degrees of spine remodelling induced by fear conditioning and extinction strongly correlate with the expression and extinction of conditioned fear responses, respectively. Notably, spine elimination and formation induced by fear conditioning and extinction occur on the same dendritic branches in a cue- and location-specific manner: cue-specific extinction causes formation of dendritic spines within a distance of two micrometres from spines that were eliminated after fear conditioning. Furthermore, reconditioning preferentially induces elimination of dendritic spines that were formed after extinction. Thus, within vastly complex neuronal networks, fear conditioning, extinction and reconditioning lead to opposing changes at the level of individual synapses. These findings also suggest that fear memory traces are partially erased after extinction.

  3. Oriented Markov random field based dendritic spine segmentation for fluorescence microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Zhou, Xiaobo; Miller, Eric L; Alvarez, Veronica A; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-10-01

    Dendritic spines have been shown to be closely related to various functional properties of the neuron. Usually dendritic spines are manually labeled to analyze their morphological changes, which is very time-consuming and susceptible to operator bias, even with the assistance of computers. To deal with these issues, several methods have been recently proposed to automatically detect and measure the dendritic spines with little human interaction. However, problems such as degraded detection performance for images with larger pixel size (e.g. 0.125 μm/pixel instead of 0.08 μm/pixel) still exist in these methods. Moreover, the shapes of detected spines are also distorted. For example, the "necks" of some spines are missed. Here we present an oriented Markov random field (OMRF) based algorithm which improves spine detection as well as their geometric characterization. We begin with the identification of a region of interest (ROI) containing all the dendrites and spines to be analyzed. For this purpose, we introduce an adaptive procedure for identifying the image background. Next, the OMRF model is discussed within a statistical framework and the segmentation is solved as a maximum a posteriori estimation (MAP) problem, whose optimal solution is found by a knowledge-guided iterative conditional mode (KICM) algorithm. Compared with the existing algorithms, the proposed algorithm not only provides a more accurate representation of the spine shape, but also improves the detection performance by more than 50% with regard to reducing both the misses and false detection.

  4. Impact of immersion oils and mounting media on the confocal imaging of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Brittni M.; Mermelstein, Paul G.; Meisel, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Structural plasticity, such as changes in dendritic spine morphology and density, reflect changes in synaptic connectivity and circuitry. Procedural variables used in different methods for labeling dendritic spines have been quantitatively evaluated for their impact on the ability to resolve individual spines in confocal microscopic analyses. In contrast, there have been discussions, though no quantitative analyses, of the potential effects of choosing specific mounting media and immersion oils on dendritic spine resolution. New Method Here we provide quantitative data measuring the impact of these variables on resolving dendritic spines in 3D confocal analyses. Medium spiny neurons from the rat striatum and nucleus accumbens are used as examples. Results Both choice of mounting media and immersion oil affected the visualization of dendritic spines, with choosing the appropriate immersion oil as being more imperative. These biologic data are supported by quantitative measures of the 3D diffraction pattern (i.e. point spread function) of a point source of light under the same mounting medium and immersion oil combinations. Comparison with Existing Method Although not a new method, this manuscript provides quantitative data demonstrating that different mounting media and immersion oils can impact the ability to resolve dendritic spines. These findings highlight the importance of reporting which mounting medium and immersion oil are used in preparations for confocal analyses, especially when comparing published results from different laboratories. Conclusion Collectively, these data suggest that choosing the appropriate immersion oil and mounting media is critical for obtaining the best resolution, and consequently more accurate measures of dendritic spine densities. PMID:25601477

  5. Impact of immersion oils and mounting media on the confocal imaging of dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Brittni M; Mermelstein, Paul G; Meisel, Robert L

    2015-03-15

    Structural plasticity, such as changes in dendritic spine morphology and density, reflect changes in synaptic connectivity and circuitry. Procedural variables used in different methods for labeling dendritic spines have been quantitatively evaluated for their impact on the ability to resolve individual spines in confocal microscopic analyses. In contrast, there have been discussions, though no quantitative analyses, of the potential effects of choosing specific mounting media and immersion oils on dendritic spine resolution. Here we provide quantitative data measuring the impact of these variables on resolving dendritic spines in 3D confocal analyses. Medium spiny neurons from the rat striatum and nucleus accumbens are used as examples. Both choice of mounting media and immersion oil affected the visualization of dendritic spines, with choosing the appropriate immersion oil as being more imperative. These biologic data are supported by quantitative measures of the 3D diffraction pattern (i.e. point spread function) of a point source of light under the same mounting medium and immersion oil combinations. Although not a new method, this manuscript provides quantitative data demonstrating that different mounting media and immersion oils can impact the ability to resolve dendritic spines. These findings highlight the importance of reporting which mounting medium and immersion oil are used in preparations for confocal analyses, especially when comparing published results from different laboratories. Collectively, these data suggest that choosing the appropriate immersion oil and mounting media is critical for obtaining the best resolution, and consequently more accurate measures of dendritic spine densities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders. PMID:26984393

  7. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-03-17

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders.

  8. Electrical and Ca2+ signaling in dendritic spines of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Travis A; Sun, Yujie; Khaliq, Zayd M

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the density and function of dendritic spines on midbrain dopamine neurons, or the relative contribution of spine and shaft synapses to excitability. Using Ca2+ imaging, glutamate uncaging, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and transgenic mice expressing labeled PSD-95, we comparatively analyzed electrical and Ca2+ signaling in spines and shaft synapses of dopamine neurons. Dendritic spines were present on dopaminergic neurons at low densities in live and fixed tissue. Uncaging-evoked potential amplitudes correlated inversely with spine length but positively with the presence of PSD-95. Spine Ca2+ signals were less sensitive to hyperpolarization than shaft synapses, suggesting amplification of spine head voltages. Lastly, activating spines during pacemaking, we observed an unexpected enhancement of spine Ca2+ midway throughout the spike cycle, likely involving recruitment of NMDA receptors and voltage-gated conductances. These results demonstrate functionality of spines in dopamine neurons and reveal a novel modulation of spine Ca2+ signaling during pacemaking. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13905.001 PMID:27163179

  9. Spine abnormalities depicted by magnetic resonance imaging in adolescent rowers.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Marvin; Soder, Ricardo Bernardi; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2011-02-01

    Most lesions of the spine of athletes, which often are detected incidentally, do not cause important symptoms or make the athletes discontinue their physical activities. To better understand the significance of these lesions, new imaging studies have been conducted with asymptomatic athletes in several sports, aiming to detect potentially deleterious and disabling abnormalities. To compare the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lumbar spine findings in a group of asymptomatic adolescent rowers and in a control group of adolescents matched according to age and sex who do not practice any regular physical activity. Cohort study (prevalence); Level of evidence, 3. Our study evaluated 44 asymptomatic adolescent boys distributed in 2 groups of 22 rowers and 22 control subjects. All the examinations were performed using a 0.35-T open-field MRI unit and evaluated by 2 experienced radiologists blinded to the study groups. Each MRI scan was analyzed for the presence of disc degeneration/desiccation, herniated or bulging disc, pars interarticularis stress reaction, and spondylolysis. The Student t test and the Fisher exact test were used for statistical analyses. Nine rowers (40.9%) had at least 1 abnormality detected by MRI in the lumbar spine, whereas only 2 participants (9.1%) in the control group had at least 1 MRI abnormality (P = .03). Seven disc changes (31.8%) and 6 pars abnormalities (27.3%) were found in the group of elite rowers. In the control group, 3 disc changes (13.6%) and no pars abnormalities were found in the MR scans. The comparison between groups showed statistically significant differences in stress reaction of the pars articularis. Disc disease and pars interarticularis stress reaction are prevalent abnormalities of the lumbar spine of high-performance rowers.

  10. Response learning stimulates dendritic spine growth on dorsal striatal medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Briones, Brandy A; Tang, Vincent D; Haye, Amanda E; Gould, Elizabeth

    2018-06-23

    Increases in the number and/or the size of dendritic spines, sites of excitatory synapses, have been linked to different types of learning as well as synaptic plasticity in several brain regions, including the hippocampus, sensory cortex, motor cortex, and cerebellum. By contrast, a previous study reported that training on a maze task requiring the dorsal striatum has no effect on medium spiny neuron dendritic spines in this area. These findings might suggest brain region-specific differences in levels of plasticity as well as different cellular processes underlying different types of learning. No previous studies have investigated whether dendritic spine density changes may be localized to specific subpopulations of medium spiny neurons, nor have they examined dendritic spines in rats trained on a dorsolateral striatum-dependent maze task in comparison to rats exposed to the same type of maze in the absence of training. To address these questions further, we labeled medium spiny neurons with the lipophilic dye DiI and stained for the protein product of immediate early gene zif 268, an indirect marker of neuronal activation, in both trained and untrained groups. We found a small but significant increase in dendritic spine density on medium spiny neurons of the dorsolateral striatum after short-term intensive training, along with robust increases in the density of spines with mushroom morphology coincident with reductions in the density of spines with thin morphology. However, these results were not associated with zif 268 expression. Our findings suggest that short-term intensive training on a dorsolateral striatum-dependent maze task induces rapid increases in dendritic spine density and maturation on medium spiny neurons of the dorsolateral striatum, an effect which may contribute to early acquisition of the learned response in maze training. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Photoaffinity Labeling Studies on a Promoter of Dendritic Spine Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibucao, Kevin Carlo Abril

    The small molecule BTA-EG4 has been shown to be a promoter of dendritic spine formation. The mechanism behind this phenomenon, however, is not well understood. The work in this dissertation is motivated by this gap in knowledge. The first part of this dissertation focuses on photoaffinity labeling studies to identify the cellular targets of BTA-EG4. Chapter 1 provides a summary of Alzheimer's disease, the rational design of BTA-EG 4, and methods to determine targets of small molecules. In Chapter 2, the synthesis of a BTA-EG4-based photoaffinity labeling probe and photodegradation studies are presented. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the probe photolyzes rapidly under UV light. In Chapter 3, photoaffinity labeling studies and subsequent protein identification experiments are reported. Competition experiments with the photoaffinity labeling probe and BTA-EG4 demonstrate that the probe labels a 55-kDa protein specifically. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed that the 55-kDa protein is the actin binding protein fascin 1. The second part of this dissertation focuses on the major protein identified from photoaffinity labeling studies, fascin 1. Chapter 4 provides a brief survey of the structure and function of fascin 1. In Chapter 5, characterizations of the interaction between BTA-EG4 and fascin 1 are reported. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms the physical binding between fascin 1 and BTA-EG6, a BTA-EG4 analog. Slow speed sedimentation assays reveal that BTA-EG4 does not affect the actin-bundling activity of fascin 1. However, GST pull-down experiments show that BTA-EG4 inhibits the binding of fascin 1 with the GTPase Rab35. In addition, this work demonstrates that BTA-EG4 may be mechanistically distinct from the known fascin inhibitor G2.

  12. Non-Ionotropic NMDA Receptor Signaling Drives Activity-Induced Dendritic Spine Shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ivar S; Gray, John A; Zito, Karen

    2015-09-02

    The elimination of dendritic spine synapses is a critical step in the refinement of neuronal circuits during development of the cerebral cortex. Several studies have shown that activity-induced shrinkage and retraction of dendritic spines depend on activation of the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR), which leads to influx of extracellular calcium ions and activation of calcium-dependent phosphatases that modify regulators of the spine cytoskeleton, suggesting that influx of extracellular calcium ions drives spine shrinkage. Intriguingly, a recent report revealed a novel non-ionotropic function of the NMDAR in the regulation of synaptic strength, which relies on glutamate binding but is independent of ion flux through the receptor (Nabavi et al., 2013). Here, we tested whether non-ionotropic NMDAR signaling could also play a role in driving structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging and time-lapse imaging of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, we show that low-frequency glutamatergic stimulation results in shrinkage of dendritic spines even in the presence of the NMDAR d-serine/glycine binding site antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7CK), which fully blocks NMDAR-mediated currents and Ca(2+) transients. Notably, application of 7CK or MK-801 also converts spine enlargement resulting from a high-frequency uncaging stimulus into spine shrinkage, demonstrating that strong Ca(2+) influx through the NMDAR normally overcomes a non-ionotropic shrinkage signal to drive spine growth. Our results support a model in which NMDAR signaling, independent of ion flux, drives structural shrinkage at spiny synapses. Dendritic spine elimination is vital for the refinement of neural circuits during development and has been linked to improvements in behavioral performance in the adult. Spine shrinkage and elimination have been widely accepted to depend on Ca(2+) influx through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in conjunction with long-term depression

  13. Transient effects of anesthetics on dendritic spines and filopodia in the living mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Chang, Paul C.; Bekker, Alex; Blanck, Thomas; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2013-01-01

    Background Anesthetics are widely used to induce unconsciousness, pain relief and immobility during surgery. It remains unclear whether the use of anesthetics has significant and long lasting effects on synapse development and plasticity in the brain. To address this question, we examined the formation and elimination of dendritic spines, postsynaptic sites of excitatory synapses, in the developing mouse cortex during and after anesthetics exposure. Methods Transgenic mice expressing yellow fluorescence protein in layer 5 pyramidal neurons were used in this study. Mice at 1 month of age underwent ketamine-xylazine and isoflurane anesthesia over a period of hours. The elimination and formation rates of dendritic spines and filopodia, the precursors of spines, were followed over hours to days in the primary somatosensory cortex using transcranial two-photon microscopy. 4–5 animals were examined under each experimental condition. Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test were used to analyze the data. Results Administration of either ketamine-xylazine or isoflurane rapidly altered dendritic filopodial dynamics but had no significant effects on spine dynamics. Ketamine-xylazine increased filopodial formation while isoflurane decreased filopodial elimination during 4 hours of anesthesia. Both effects were transient and disappeared within a day after the animals woke up. Conclusion Our studies suggest that exposure to anesthetics transiently affects the dynamics of dendritic filopodia but has no significant effect on dendritic spine development and plasticity in the cortex of 1-month-old mice. PMID:21768874

  14. Distance-dependent gradient in NMDAR-driven spine calcium signals along tapering dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Alison S.; Grillo, Federico; Jackson, Rachel E.; Rigby, Mark; Lowe, Andrew S.; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Fleck, Roland A.; Burrone, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Neurons receive a multitude of synaptic inputs along their dendritic arbor, but how this highly heterogeneous population of synaptic compartments is spatially organized remains unclear. By measuring N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR)-driven calcium responses in single spines, we provide a spatial map of synaptic calcium signals along dendritic arbors of hippocampal neurons and relate this to measures of synapse structure. We find that quantal NMDAR calcium signals increase in amplitude as they approach a thinning dendritic tip end. Based on a compartmental model of spine calcium dynamics, we propose that this biased distribution in calcium signals is governed by a gradual, distance-dependent decline in spine size, which we visualized using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. Our data describe a cell-autonomous feature of principal neurons, where tapering dendrites show an inverse distribution of spine size and NMDAR-driven calcium signals along dendritic trees, with important implications for synaptic plasticity rules and spine function. PMID:28209776

  15. Lynx1 Limits Dendritic Spine Turnover in the Adult Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sajo, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spine turnover becomes limited in the adult cerebral cortex. Identification of specific aspects of spine dynamics that can be unmasked in adulthood and its regulatory molecular mechanisms could provide novel therapeutic targets for inducing plasticity at both the functional and structural levels for robust recovery from brain disorders and injuries in adults. Lynx1, an endogenous inhibitor of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, was previously shown to increase its expression in adulthood and thus to limit functional ocular dominance plasticity in adult primary visual cortex (V1). However, the role of this “brake” on spine dynamics is not known. We examined the contribution of Lynx1 on dendritic spine turnover before and after monocular deprivation (MD) in adult V1 with chronic in vivo imaging using two-photon microscopy and determined the spine turnover rate of apical dendrites of layer 5 (L5) and L2/3 pyramidal neurons in adult V1 of Lynx1 knock-out (KO) mice. We found that the deletion of Lynx1 doubled the baseline spine turnover rate, suggesting that the spine dynamics in the adult cortex is actively limited by the presence of Lynx1. After MD, adult Lynx1-KO mice selectively exhibit higher rate of spine loss with no difference in gain rate in L5 neurons compared with control wild-type counterparts, revealing a key signature of spine dynamics associated with robust functional plasticity in adult V1. Overall, Lynx1 could be a promising therapeutic target to induce not only functional, but also structural plasticity at the level of spine dynamics in the adult brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dendritic spine turnover becomes limited in the adult cortex. In mouse visual cortex, a premier model of experience-dependent plasticity, we found that the deletion of Lynx1, a nicotinic “brake” for functional plasticity, doubled the baseline spine turnover in adulthood, suggesting that the spine dynamics in the adult cortex is actively limited by Lynx1. After

  16. Rat-strain dependent changes of dendritic and spine morphology in the hippocampus after cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Selvas, Abraham; Coria, Santiago M; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; DeFelipe, Javier; Ambrosio, Emilio; Miguéns, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    We previously showed that cocaine self-administration increases spine density in CA1 hippocampal neurons in Lewis (LEW) but not in Fischer 344 (F344) rats. Dendritic spine morphology is intimately related to its function. Thus, we conducted a 3D morphological analysis of CA1 dendrites and dendritic spines in these two strains of rats. Strain-specific differences were observed prior to cocaine self-administration: LEW rats had significantly larger dendritic diameters but lower spine density than the F344 strain. After cocaine self-administration, proximal dendritic volume, dendritic surface area and spine density were increased in LEW rats, where a higher percentage of larger spines were also observed. In addition, we found a strong positive correlation between dendritic volume and spine morphology, and a moderate correlation between dendritic volume and spine density in cocaine self-administered LEW rats, an effect that was not evident in any other condition. By contrast, after cocaine self-administration, F334 rats showed decreased spine head volumes. Our findings suggest that genetic differences could play a key role in the structural plasticity induced by cocaine in CA1 pyramidal neurons. These cocaine-induced alterations could be related to differences in the memory processing of drug reward cues that could potentially explain differential individual vulnerability to cocaine addiction. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Congenital abnormalities of the osseous spine: a radiological approach.

    PubMed

    Vanhoenacker, F M; De Schepper, A M; Parizel, P M

    2005-01-01

    The spine may act as a useful window to the diagnosis of many congenital malformations syndromes and skeletal dysplasias. However, radiological identification of these syndromes remains a difficult task, because there are so many syndromes and dysplasias to remember. Moreover, many spinal abnormalities are non-specific and there is much overlap between different genetic and congenital disorders. Consequently, many radiologists cringe when these topics are discussed. The purpose of this short review is to provide the general radiologist a workable primer for systematic analysis of spinal abnormalities encountered in genetic disorders, which may be helpful in (differential) diagnosis.

  18. Probing the Interplay between Dendritic Spine Morphology and Membrane-Bound Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Max; Kusters, Remy; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2017-11-21

    Dendritic spines are protrusions along neuronal dendrites that harbor the majority of excitatory postsynapses. Their distinct morphology, often featuring a bulbous head and small neck that connects to the dendritic shaft, has been shown to facilitate compartmentalization of electrical and cytoplasmic signaling stimuli elicited at the synapse. The extent to which spine morphology also forms a barrier for membrane-bound diffusion has remained unclear. Recent simulations suggested that especially the diameter of the spine neck plays a limiting role in this process. Here, we examine the connection between spine morphology and membrane-bound diffusion through a combination of photoconversion, live-cell superresolution experiments, and numerical simulations. Local photoconversion was used to obtain the timescale of diffusive equilibration in spines and followed by global sparse photoconversion to determine spine morphologies with nanoscopic resolution. These morphologies were subsequently used to assess the role of morphology on the diffusive equilibration. From the simulations, we could determine a robust relation between the equilibration timescale and a generalized shape factor calculated using both spine neck width and neck length, as well as spine head size. Experimentally, we found that diffusive equilibration was often slower, but rarely faster than predicted from the simulations, indicating that other biological confounders further reduce membrane-bound diffusion in these spines. This shape-dependent membrane-bound diffusion in mature spines may contribute to spine-specific compartmentalization of neurotransmitter receptors and signaling molecules and thereby support long-term plasticity of synaptic contacts. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Extracellular matrix control of dendritic spine and synapse structure and plasticity in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Aaron D.; Omar, Mitchell H.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the receptive contacts at most excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. Spines are dynamic in the developing brain, changing shape as they mature as well as appearing and disappearing as they make and break connections. Spines become much more stable in adulthood, and spine structure must be actively maintained to support established circuit function. At the same time, adult spines must retain some plasticity so their structure can be modified by activity and experience. As such, the regulation of spine stability and remodeling in the adult animal is critical for normal function, and disruption of these processes is associated with a variety of late onset diseases including schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. The extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of a meshwork of proteins and proteoglycans, is a critical regulator of spine and synapse stability and plasticity. While the role of ECM receptors in spine regulation has been extensively studied, considerably less research has focused directly on the role of specific ECM ligands. Here, we review the evidence for a role of several brain ECM ligands and remodeling proteases in the regulation of dendritic spine and synapse formation, plasticity, and stability in adults. PMID:25368556

  20. Travelling waves in a model of quasi-active dendrites with active spines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeeva, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Dendrites, the major components of neurons, have many different types of branching structures and are involved in receiving and integrating thousands of synaptic inputs from other neurons. Dendritic spines with excitable channels can be present in large densities on the dendrites of many cells. The recently proposed Spike-Diffuse-Spike (SDS) model that is described by a system of point hot-spots (with an integrate-and-fire process) embedded throughout a passive tree has been shown to provide a reasonable caricature of a dendritic tree with supra-threshold dynamics. Interestingly, real dendrites equipped with voltage-gated ion channels can exhibit not only supra-threshold responses, but also sub-threshold dynamics. This sub-threshold resonant-like oscillatory behaviour has already been shown to be adequately described by a quasi-active membrane. In this paper we introduce a mathematical model of a branched dendritic tree based upon a generalisation of the SDS model where the active spines are assumed to be distributed along a quasi-active dendritic structure. We demonstrate how solitary and periodic travelling wave solutions can be constructed for both continuous and discrete spine distributions. In both cases the speed of such waves is calculated as a function of system parameters. We also illustrate that the model can be naturally generalised to an arbitrary branched dendritic geometry whilst remaining computationally simple. The spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal activity are shown to be significantly influenced by the properties of the quasi-active membrane. Active (sub- and supra-threshold) properties of dendrites are known to vary considerably among cell types and animal species, and this theoretical framework can be used in studying the combined role of complex dendritic morphologies and active conductances in rich neuronal dynamics.

  1. Sleep promotes branch-specific formation of dendritic spines after learning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Lai, Cora Sau Wan; Cichon, Joseph; Ma, Lei; Li, Wei; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    How sleep helps learning and memory remains unknown. We report in mouse motor cortex that sleep after motor learning promotes the formation of postsynaptic dendritic spines on a subset of branches of individual layer V pyramidal neurons. New spines are formed on different sets of dendritic branches in response to different learning tasks and are protected from being eliminated when multiple tasks are learned. Neurons activated during learning of a motor task are reactivated during subsequent non-rapid eye movement sleep, and disrupting this neuronal reactivation prevents branch-specific spine formation. These findings indicate that sleep has a key role in promoting learning-dependent synapse formation and maintenance on selected dendritic branches, which contribute to memory storage. PMID:24904169

  2. Golgi-independent secretory trafficking through recycling endosomes in neuronal dendrites and spines

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Aaron B; Bourke, Ashley M; Hiester, Brian G; Hanus, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    Neurons face the challenge of regulating the abundance, distribution and repertoire of integral membrane proteins within their immense, architecturally complex dendritic arbors. While the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) supports dendritic translation, most dendrites lack the Golgi apparatus (GA), an essential organelle for conventional secretory trafficking. Thus, whether secretory cargo is locally trafficked in dendrites through a non-canonical pathway remains a fundamental question. Here we define the dendritic trafficking itinerary for key synaptic molecules in rat cortical neurons. Following ER exit, the AMPA-type glutamate receptor GluA1 and neuroligin 1 undergo spatially restricted entry into the dendritic secretory pathway and accumulate in recycling endosomes (REs) located in dendrites and spines before reaching the plasma membrane. Surprisingly, GluA1 surface delivery occurred even when GA function was disrupted. Thus, in addition to their canonical role in protein recycling, REs also mediate forward secretory trafficking in neuronal dendrites and spines through a specialized GA-independent trafficking network. PMID:28875935

  3. Control of Spine Maturation and Pruning through ProBDNF Synthesized and Released in Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Orefice, Lauren L.; Shih, Chien-Cheng; Xu, Haifei; Waterhouse, Emily G.; Xu, Baoji

    2015-01-01

    Excess synapses formed during early postnatal development are pruned over an extended period, while the remaining synapses mature. Synapse pruning is critical for activity-dependent refinement of neuronal connections and its dysregulation has been found in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders; however, the mechanism underlying synapse pruning remains largely unknown. As dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites for the vast majority of excitatory synapses, spine maturation and pruning are indicators for maturation and elimination of these synapses. Our previous studies have found that dendritically localized mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates spine maturation and pruning. Here we investigated the mechanism by which dendritic Bdnf mRNA, but not somatically restricted Bdnf mRNA, promotes spine maturation and pruning. We found that neuronal activity stimulates both translation of dendritic Bdnf mRNA and secretion of its translation product mainly as proBDNF. The secreted proBDNF promotes spine maturation and pruning, and its effect on spine pruning is in part mediated by the p75NTR receptor via RhoA activation. Furthermore, some proBDNF is extracellularly converted to mature BDNF and then promotes maturation of stimulated spines by activating Rac1 through the TrkB receptor. In contrast, translation of somatic Bdnf mRNA and the release of its translation product mainly as mature BDNF are independent of action potentials. These results not only reveal a biochemical pathway regulating synapse pruning, but also suggest that BDNF synthesized in the soma and dendrites is released through distinct secretory pathways. PMID:26705735

  4. Ovarian steroids increase PSD-95 expression and dendritic spines in the dorsal raphe of ovariectomized macaques.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Heidi M; Bethea, Cynthia L

    2013-12-01

    Estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) promote spinogenesis in several brain areas. Intracellular signaling cascades that promote spinogenesis involve RhoGTPases, glutamate signaling and synapse assembly. We found that in serotonin neurons, E ± P administration increases (a) gene and protein expression of RhoGTPases, (b) gene expression of glutamate receptors, and (c) gene expression of pivotal synapse assembly proteins. Therefore, in this study we determined whether structural changes in dendritic spines in the dorsal raphe follow the observed changes in gene and protein expression. Dendritic spines were examined with immunogold silver staining of a spine marker protein, postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) and with Golgi staining. In the PSD-95 study, adult Ovx monkeys received placebo, E, P, or E + P for 1 month (n = 3/group). Sections were immunostained for PSD-95 and the number of PSD-95-positive puncta was determined with stereology. E, P, and E + P treatment significantly increased the total number of PSD-95-positive puncta (ANOVA, P = 0.04). In the golgi study, adult Ovx monkeys received placebo, E or E + P for 1 month (n = 3-4) and the midbrain was golgi-stained. A total of 80 neurons were analyzed with Neurolucida software. There was a significant difference in spine density that depended on branch order (two-way ANOVA). E + P treatment significantly increased spine density in higher-order (3°-5°) dendritic branches relative to Ovx group (Bonferroni, P < 0.05). In summary, E + P leads to the elaboration of dendritic spines on dorsal raphe neurons. The ability of E to induce PSD-95, but not actual spines, suggests either a sampling or time lag issue. Increased spinogenesis on serotonin dendrites would facilitate excitatory glutamatergic input and, in turn, increase serotonin neurotransmission throughout the brain. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Structural and molecular remodeling of dendritic spine substructures during long-term potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Miquel; Castro, Jorge; Saneyoshi, Takeo; Matsuno, Hitomi; Sur, Mriganka; Hayashi, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Synapses store information by long-lasting modifications of their structure and molecular composition, but the precise chronology of these changes has not been studied at single synapse resolution in real time. Here we describe the spatiotemporal reorganization of postsynaptic substructures during long-term potentiation (LTP) at individual dendritic spines. Proteins translocated to the spine in four distinct patterns through three sequential phases. In the initial phase, the actin cytoskeleton was rapidly remodeled while active cofilin was massively transported to the spine. In the stabilization phase, cofilin formed a stable complex with F-actin, was persistently retained at the spine, and consolidated spine expansion. In contrast, the postsynaptic density (PSD) was independently remodeled, as PSD scaffolding proteins did not change their amount and localization until a late protein synthesis-dependent third phase. Our findings show how and when spine substructures are remodeled during LTP and explain why synaptic plasticity rules change over time. PMID:24742465

  6. Detection of Dendritic Spines Using Wavelet Packet Entropy and Fuzzy Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuihua; Li, Yang; Shao, Ying; Cattani, Carlo; Zhang, Yudong; Du, Sidan

    2017-01-01

    The morphology of dendritic spines is highly correlated with the neuron function. Therefore, it is of positive influence for the research of the dendritic spines. However, it is tried to manually label the spine types for statistical analysis. In this work, we proposed an approach based on the combination of wavelet contour analysis for the backbone detection, wavelet packet entropy, and fuzzy support vector machine for the spine classification. The experiments show that this approach is promising. The average detection accuracy of "MushRoom" achieves 97.3%, "Stubby" achieves 94.6%, and "Thin" achieves 97.2%. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Aluminum chloride induces neuroinflammation, loss of neuronal dendritic spine and cognition impairment in developing rat.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Haoran; Huang, Wanyue; Xu, Feibo; Zhuang, Cuicui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Li, Yanfei

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) is present in the daily life of humans, and the incidence of Al contamination increased in recent years. Long-term excessive Al intake induces neuroinflammation and cognition impairment. Neuroinflammation alter density of dendritic spine, which, in turn, influence cognition function. However, it is unknown whether increased neuroinflammation is associated with altered density of dendritic spine in Al-treated rats. In the present study, AlCl3 was orally administrated to rat at 50, 150 and 450 mg/kg for 90d. We examined the effects of AlCl3 on the cognition function, density of dendritic spine in hippocampus of CA1 and DG region and the mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, MHC II, CX3CL1 and BNDF in developing rat. These results showed exposure to AlCl3 lead to increased mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and MCH II, decreased mRNA levels of CX3CL1 and BDNF, decreased density of dendritic spine and impaired learning and memory in developing rat. Our results suggest AlCl3 can induce neuroinflammation that may result in loss of spine, and thereby leads to learning and memory deficits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sleep contributes to dendritic spine formation and elimination in the developing mouse somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is maximal during early postnatal life when rapid and extensive synapse remodeling occurs. It remains unknown whether and how sleep affects synapse development and plasticity. Using transcranial two-photon microscopy, we examined the formation and elimination of fluorescently-labeled dendritic spines and filopodia of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the barrel cortex of 3-week old mice during wakefulness and sleep. We observed high turnover of dendritic protrusions over 2 hours in both wake and sleep states. The formation rate of dendritic spines or filopodia over 2 hours was comparable between the two states. The elimination rate of dendritic spines or filopodia was lower during 2-hour wakefulness than during 2-hour sleep. Similar results were observed on dendritic protrusion dynamics over 12-hour light/dark cycle when mice spent more time asleep or awake. The substantial remodeling of dendritic protrusions during the sleep state supports the notion that sleep plays an important role in the development and plasticity of synaptic connections in the mouse cortex. PMID:22058046

  9. POST-PUBERTAL DECREASE IN HIPPOCAMPAL DENDRITIC SPINES OF FEMALE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Murat; Mapp, Oni M.; Janssen, William G.M.; Yin, Weiling; Morrison, John H.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal dendritic spine and synapse numbers in female rats vary across the estrous cycle and following experimental manipulation of hormone levels in adulthood. Based on behavioral studies demonstrating that learning patterns are altered following puberty, we hypothesized that dendritic spine number in rat hippocampal CA1 region would change post-pubertally. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into prepubertal (postnatal day (P) 22), peripubertal (P35) and post-pubertal (P49) groups, with the progression of puberty evaluated by vaginal opening, and estrous cyclicity subsequently assessed by daily vaginal smears. Spinophilin immunoreactivity in dendritic spines was used as an index of spinogenesis in area CA1 stratum radiatum (CA1sr) of hippocampus. First, electron microscopy analyses confirmed the presence of spinophilin specifically in dendritic spines of CA1sr, supporting spinophilin as a reliable marker of hippocampal spines in young female rats. Second, stereologic analysis was performed to assess the total number of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta (i.e. spines) and CA1sr volume in developing rats. Our results indicated that the number of spinophilin-immunoreactive spines in CA1sr was decreased 46% in the post-pubertal group compared to the two younger groups, whereas the volume of the hippocampus underwent an overall increase during this same developmental time frame. Third, to determine a potential role of estradiol in this process, an additional group of rats was ovariectomized (OVX) prepubertally at P22, then treated with estradiol or vehicle at P35, and spinophilin quantified as above in rats perfused on P49. No difference in spinophilin puncta number was found in OVX rats between the two hormone groups, suggesting that this developmental decrease is independent of peripheral estradiol. These changes in spine density coincident with puberty may be related to altered hippocampal plasticity and synaptic consolidation at this phase of maturity. PMID

  10. Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Dendritic Spine Density by PirB.

    PubMed

    Vidal, George S; Djurisic, Maja; Brown, Kiana; Sapp, Richard W; Shatz, Carla J

    2016-01-01

    Synapse density on cortical pyramidal neurons is modulated by experience. This process is highest during developmental critical periods, when mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are fully engaged. In mouse visual cortex, the critical period for ocular dominance (OD) plasticity coincides with the developmental pruning of synapses. At this time, mice lacking paired Ig-like receptor B (PirB) have excess numbers of dendritic spines on L5 neurons; these spines persist and are thought to underlie the juvenile-like OD plasticity observed in adulthood. Here we examine whether PirB is required specifically in excitatory neurons to exert its effect on dendritic spine and synapse density during the critical period. In mice with a conditional allele of PirB (PirB fl/fl ), PirB was deleted only from L2/3 cortical pyramidal neurons in vivo by timed in utero electroporation of Cre recombinase. Sparse mosaic expression of Cre produced neurons lacking PirB in a sea of wild-type neurons and glia. These neurons had significantly elevated dendritic spine density, as well as increased frequency of miniature EPSCs, suggesting that they receive a greater number of synaptic inputs relative to Cre - neighbors. The effect of cell-specific PirB deletion on dendritic spine density was not accompanied by changes in dendritic branching complexity or axonal bouton density. Together, results imply a neuron-specific, cell-autonomous action of PirB on synaptic density in L2/3 pyramidal cells of visual cortex. Moreover, they are consistent with the idea that PirB functions normally to corepress spine density and synaptic plasticity, thereby maintaining headroom for cells to encode ongoing experience-dependent structural change throughout life.

  11. Conditional self-discrimination enhances dendritic spine number and dendritic length at prefrontal cortex and hippocampal neurons of rats.

    PubMed

    Penagos-Corzo, Julio C; Bonilla, Andrea; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio; Flores, Gonzalo; Negrete-Díaz, José V

    2015-11-01

    We studied conditional self-discrimination (CSD) in rats and compared the neuronal cytoarchitecture of untrained animals and rats that were trained in self-discrimination. For this purpose, we used thirty 10-week-old male rats were randomized into three groups: one control group and two conditioning groups: a comparison group (associative learning) and an experimental group (self-discrimination). At the end of the conditioning process, the experimental group managed to discriminate their own state of thirst. After the conditioning process, dendritic morphological changes in the pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex and CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus were evaluated using Golgi-Cox stain method and then analyzed by the Sholl method. Differences were found in total dendritic length and spine density. Animals trained in self-discrimination showed an increase in the dendritic length and the number of dendritic spines of neurons of the prefrontal cortex and CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Our data suggest that conditional self-discrimination improves the connectivity of the prefrontal cortex and dorsal CA1, which has implications for memory and learning processes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Targeted intracellular voltage recordings from dendritic spines using quantum-dot-coated nanopipettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayant, Krishna; Hirtz, Jan J.; Plante, Ilan Jen-La; Tsai, David M.; de Boer, Wieteke D. A. M.; Semonche, Alexa; Peterka, Darcy S.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Sahin, Ozgur; Shepard, Kenneth L.; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    Dendritic spines are the primary site of excitatory synaptic input onto neurons, and are biochemically isolated from the parent dendritic shaft by their thin neck. However, due to the lack of direct electrical recordings from spines, the influence that the neck resistance has on synaptic transmission, and the extent to which spines compartmentalize voltage, specifically excitatory postsynaptic potentials, albeit critical, remains controversial. Here, we use quantum-dot-coated nanopipette electrodes (tip diameters ∼15-30 nm) to establish the first intracellular recordings from targeted spine heads under two-photon visualization. Using simultaneous somato-spine electrical recordings, we find that back propagating action potentials fully invade spines, that excitatory postsynaptic potentials are large in the spine head (mean 26 mV) but are strongly attenuated at the soma (0.5-1 mV) and that the estimated neck resistance (mean 420 MΩ) is large enough to generate significant voltage compartmentalization. Nanopipettes can thus be used to electrically probe biological nanostructures.

  13. Targeted intracellular voltage recordings from dendritic spines using quantum-dot-coated nanopipettes

    PubMed Central

    Jayant, Krishna; Hirtz, Jan J.; Plante, Ilan Jen-La; Tsai, David M.; De Boer, Wieteke D. A. M.; Semonche, Alexa; Peterka, Darcy S.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Sahin, Ozgur; Shepard, Kenneth L.; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the primary site of excitatory synaptic input onto neurons, and are biochemically isolated from the parent dendritic shaft by their thin neck. However, due to the lack of direct electrical recordings from spines, the influence that the neck resistance has on synaptic transmission, and the extent to which spines compartmentalize voltage, specifically excitatory postsynaptic potentials, albeit critical, remains controversial. Here, we use quantum-dot-coated nanopipette electrodes (tip diameters ~15–30 nm) to establish the first intracellular recordings from targeted spine heads under two-photon visualization. Using simultaneous somato-spine electrical recordings, we find that back propagating action potentials fully invade spines, that excitatory postsynaptic potentials are large in the spine head (mean 26 mV) but are strongly attenuated at the soma (0.5–1 mV) and that the estimated neck resistance (mean 420 MΩ) is large enough to generate significant voltage compartmentalization. Nanopipettes can thus be used to electrically probe biological nanostructures. PMID:27941898

  14. Targeted intracellular voltage recordings from dendritic spines using quantum-dot-coated nanopipettes.

    PubMed

    Jayant, Krishna; Hirtz, Jan J; Plante, Ilan Jen-La; Tsai, David M; De Boer, Wieteke D A M; Semonche, Alexa; Peterka, Darcy S; Owen, Jonathan S; Sahin, Ozgur; Shepard, Kenneth L; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    Dendritic spines are the primary site of excitatory synaptic input onto neurons, and are biochemically isolated from the parent dendritic shaft by their thin neck. However, due to the lack of direct electrical recordings from spines, the influence that the neck resistance has on synaptic transmission, and the extent to which spines compartmentalize voltage, specifically excitatory postsynaptic potentials, albeit critical, remains controversial. Here, we use quantum-dot-coated nanopipette electrodes (tip diameters ∼15-30 nm) to establish the first intracellular recordings from targeted spine heads under two-photon visualization. Using simultaneous somato-spine electrical recordings, we find that back propagating action potentials fully invade spines, that excitatory postsynaptic potentials are large in the spine head (mean 26 mV) but are strongly attenuated at the soma (0.5-1 mV) and that the estimated neck resistance (mean 420 MΩ) is large enough to generate significant voltage compartmentalization. Nanopipettes can thus be used to electrically probe biological nanostructures.

  15. Dendritic spine remodeling following early and late Rac1 inhibition after spinal cord injury: evidence for a pain biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peng; Hill, Myriam; Liu, Shujun; Chen, Lubin; Bangalore, Lakshmi; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a significant complication following spinal cord injury (SCI) with few effective treatments. Drug development for neuropathic pain often fails because preclinical studies do not always translate well to clinical conditions. Identification of biological characteristics predictive of disease state or drug responsiveness could facilitate more effective clinical translation. Emerging evidence indicates a strong correlation between dendritic spine dysgenesis and neuropathic pain. Because dendritic spines are located on dorsal horn neurons within the spinal cord nociceptive system, dendritic spine remodeling provides a unique opportunity to understand sensory dysfunction after SCI. In this study, we provide support for the postulate that dendritic spine profiles can serve as biomarkers for neuropathic pain. We show that dendritic spine profiles after SCI change to a dysgenic state that is characteristic of neuropathic pain in a Rac1-dependent manner. Suppression of the dysgenic state through inhibition of Rac1 activity is accompanied by attenuation of neuropathic pain. Both dendritic spine dysgenesis and neuropathic pain return when inhibition of Rac1 activity is lifted. These findings suggest the utility of dendritic spines as structural biomarkers for neuropathic pain. PMID:26936986

  16. [Anesthesia for surgery of degenerative and abnormal cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Béal, J L; Lopin, M C; Binnert, M

    1993-01-01

    A feature common to all congenital or inflammatory abnormalities of the cervical spine is an actual or potential reduction in the lumen of the spinal canal. The spinal cord and nerve roots are at risk. During intubation, and positioning the patient on the table, all untoward movements of the cervical spine may lead to spinal cord compression. Abnormalities of the cervical spine carry the risk of a difficult intubation. If there is much debate as to what constitutes optimum management of the airway, there is no evidence that any one method is the best. Recognizing the possible instability and intubating with care, are probably much more important in preserving neurological function than any particular mode of intubation. During maintenance of anaesthesia, the main goal is to preserve adequate spinal cord perfusion in order to prevent further damage. Spinal cord blood flow seems to be regulated by the same factors as cerebral blood flow. Hypercapnia increases cord blood flow while hypocapnia decreases it. Therefore, normocapnia or mild hypocapnia is recommended. Induced hypotension is frequently used to decrease blood loss. However, in patients with a marginally perfused spinal cord, the reduction in blood flow may cause ischaemia of the spinal cord and may therefore be relatively contraindicated. In addition to standard intraoperative monitoring, spinal cord monitoring is almost mandatory. Monitoring somatosensory evoked potentials is used routinely. However, the major limitation is that this technique only monitors dorsal column function; theoretically, motor paralysis can occur despite a lack of change in recorded signals. Neurogenic motor evoked potentials may now be used to monitor anterior spinal cord integrity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. The Role of Synaptopodin in Membrane Protein Diffusion in the Dendritic Spine Neck.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Dumoulin, Andréa; Renner, Marianne; Triller, Antoine; Specht, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic exchange of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses relies on their lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane. At synapses located on dendritic spines this process is limited by the geometry of the spine neck that restricts the passage of membrane proteins. Biochemical compartmentalisation of the spine is believed to underlie the input-specificity of excitatory synapses and to set the scale on which functional changes can occur. Synaptopodin is located predominantly in the neck of dendritic spines, and is thus ideally placed to regulate the exchange of synaptic membrane proteins. The central aim of our study was to assess whether the presence of synaptopodin influences the mobility of membrane proteins in the spine neck and to characterise whether this was due to direct molecular interactions or to spatial constraints that are related to the structural organisation of the neck. Using single particle tracking we have identified a specific effect of synaptopodin on the diffusion of metabotropic mGluR5 receptors in the spine neck. However, super-resolution STORM/PALM imaging showed that this was not due to direct interactions between the two proteins, but that the presence of synaptopodin is associated with an altered local organisation of the F-actin cytoskeleton, that in turn could restrict the diffusion of membrane proteins with large intracellular domains through the spine neck. This study contributes new data on the way in which the spine neck compartmentalises excitatory synapses. Our data complement models that consider the impact of the spine neck as a function of its shape, by showing that the internal organisation of the neck imposes additional physical barriers to membrane protein diffusion.

  18. The Role of Synaptopodin in Membrane Protein Diffusion in the Dendritic Spine Neck

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Dumoulin, Andréa; Renner, Marianne; Triller, Antoine; Specht, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic exchange of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses relies on their lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane. At synapses located on dendritic spines this process is limited by the geometry of the spine neck that restricts the passage of membrane proteins. Biochemical compartmentalisation of the spine is believed to underlie the input-specificity of excitatory synapses and to set the scale on which functional changes can occur. Synaptopodin is located predominantly in the neck of dendritic spines, and is thus ideally placed to regulate the exchange of synaptic membrane proteins. The central aim of our study was to assess whether the presence of synaptopodin influences the mobility of membrane proteins in the spine neck and to characterise whether this was due to direct molecular interactions or to spatial constraints that are related to the structural organisation of the neck. Using single particle tracking we have identified a specific effect of synaptopodin on the diffusion of metabotropic mGluR5 receptors in the spine neck. However, super-resolution STORM/PALM imaging showed that this was not due to direct interactions between the two proteins, but that the presence of synaptopodin is associated with an altered local organisation of the F-actin cytoskeleton, that in turn could restrict the diffusion of membrane proteins with large intracellular domains through the spine neck. This study contributes new data on the way in which the spine neck compartmentalises excitatory synapses. Our data complement models that consider the impact of the spine neck as a function of its shape, by showing that the internal organisation of the neck imposes additional physical barriers to membrane protein diffusion. PMID:26840625

  19. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gα(o) signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gα(o) subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation.

  20. The Gα o Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gα o signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gα o subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  1. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Links Extracellular Cues to Actin Cytoskeleton During Dendritic Spine Development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Amy KY

    2007-01-01

    Emerging evidence has indicated a regulatory role of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in synaptic plasticity as well as in higher brain functions, such as learning and memory. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the actions of Cdk5 at synapses remain unclear. Recent findings demonstrate that Cdk5 regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis through modulating actin dynamics. Ephexin1 and WAVE-1, two important regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, have both been recently identified as substrates for Cdk5. Importantly, phosphorylation of these proteins by Cdk5 leads to dendritic spine loss, revealing a potential mechanism by which Cdk5 regulates synapse remodeling. Furthermore, Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of ephexin1 is required for the ephrin-A1 mediated spine retraction, pointing to a critical role of Cdk5 in conveying signals from extracellular cues to actin cytoskeleton at synapses. Taken together, understanding the precise regulation of Cdk5 and its downstream targets at synapses would provide important insights into the multi-regulatory roles of Cdk5 in actin remodeling during dendritic spine development. PMID:19270534

  2. The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Dendritic Spines in the Maintenance of Long-Term Memory.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sreetama; Lamprecht, Raphael

    2018-01-01

    Evidence indicates that long-term memory formation involves alterations in synaptic efficacy produced by modifications in neural transmission and morphology. However, it is not clear how such alterations induced by learning, that encode memory, are maintained over long period of time to preserve long-term memory. This is especially intriguing as the half-life of most of the proteins that underlie such changes is usually in the range of hours to days and these proteins may change their location over time. In this review we describe studies that indicate the involvement of dendritic spines in memory formation and its maintenance. These studies show that learning leads to changes in the number and morphology of spines. Disruption in spines morphology or manipulations that lead to alteration in their number after consolidation are associated with impairment in memory maintenance. We further ask how changes in dendritic spines morphology, induced by learning and reputed to encode memory, are maintained to preserve long-term memory. We propose a mechanism, based on studies described in the review, whereby the actin cytoskeleton and its regulatory proteins involved in the initial alteration in spine morphology induced by learning are also essential for spine structural stabilization that maintains long-term memory. In this model glutamate receptors and other synaptic receptors activation during learning leads to the creation of new actin cytoskeletal scaffold leading to changes in spines morphology and memory formation. This new actin cytoskeletal scaffold is preserved beyond actin and its regulatory proteins turnover and dynamics by active stabilization of the level and activity of actin regulatory proteins within these memory spines.

  3. A novel function of the cell polarity-regulating kinase PAR-1/MARK in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kenji; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ohno, Shigeo

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic spines are postsynaptic structures that receive excitatory synaptic signals from presynaptic terminals in neurons. Because the morphology of spines has been considered to be a crucial factor for the efficiency of synaptic transmission, understanding the mechanisms regulating their morphology is important for neuroscience. Actin filaments and their regulatory proteins are known to actively maintain spine morphology; recent studies have also shown an essential role of microtubules (MTs). Live imaging of the plus-ends of MTs in mature neurons revealed that MTs stochastically enter spines and mediate accumulation of p140Cap, which regulates reorganization of actin filaments. However, the molecular mechanism by which MT dynamics is controlled has remained largely unknown. A cell polarity-regulating serine/threonine kinase, partitioning-defective 1 (PAR-1), phosphorylates classical MAPs and inhibits their binding to MTs. Because the interaction of MAPs with MTs can decrease MT dynamic instability, PAR-1 is supposed to activate MT dynamics through its MAP/MT affinity-regulating kinase (MARK) activity, although there is not yet any direct evidence for this. Here, we review recent findings on the localization of PAR-1b in the dendrites of mouse hippocampal neurons, and its novel function in the maintenance of mature spine morphology by regulating MT dynamics. PMID:22545177

  4. A novel function of the cell polarity-regulating kinase PAR-1/MARK in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kenji; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ohno, Shigeo

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic spines are postsynaptic structures that receive excitatory synaptic signals from presynaptic terminals in neurons. Because the morphology of spines has been considered to be a crucial factor for the efficiency of synaptic transmission, understanding the mechanisms regulating their morphology is important for neuroscience. Actin filaments and their regulatory proteins are known to actively maintain spine morphology; recent studies have also shown an essential role of microtubules (MTs). Live imaging of the plus-ends of MTs in mature neurons revealed that MTs stochastically enter spines and mediate accumulation of p140Cap, which regulates reorganization of actin filaments. However, the molecular mechanism by which MT dynamics is controlled has remained largely unknown. A cell polarity-regulating serine/threonine kinase, partitioning-defective 1 (PAR-1), phosphorylates classical MAPs and inhibits their binding to MTs. Because the interaction of MAPs with MTs can decrease MT dynamic instability, PAR-1 is supposed to activate MT dynamics through its MAP/MT affinity-regulating kinase (MARK) activity, although there is not yet any direct evidence for this. Here, we review recent findings on the localization of PAR-1b in the dendrites of mouse hippocampal neurons, and its novel function in the maintenance of mature spine morphology by regulating MT dynamics.

  5. Supersensitive Ras activation in dendrites and spines revealed by two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Ryohei; Harvey, Christopher D; Zhong, Haining; Sobczyk, Aleksander; van Aelst, Linda; Svoboda, Karel

    2006-02-01

    To understand the biochemical signals regulated by neural activity, it is necessary to measure protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activity in neuronal microcompartments such as axons, dendrites and their spines. We combined two-photon excitation laser scanning with fluorescence lifetime imaging to measure fluorescence resonance energy transfer at high resolutions in brain slices. We also developed sensitive fluorescent protein-based sensors for the activation of the small GTPase protein Ras with slow (FRas) and fast (FRas-F) kinetics. Using FRas-F, we found in CA1 hippocampal neurons that trains of back-propagating action potentials rapidly and reversibly activated Ras in dendrites and spines. The relationship between firing rate and Ras activation was highly nonlinear (Hill coefficient approximately 5). This steep dependence was caused by a highly cooperative interaction between calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and Ras activators. The Ras pathway therefore functions as a supersensitive threshold detector for neural activity and Ca(2+) concentration.

  6. Zinc and Copper Effects on Stability of Tubulin and Actin Networks in Dendrites and Spines of Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Laura; Roudeau, Stéphane; Carmona, Asuncion; Domart, Florelle; Petersen, Jennifer D; Bohic, Sylvain; Yang, Yang; Cloetens, Peter; Ortega, Richard

    2017-07-19

    Zinc and copper ions can modulate the activity of glutamate receptors. However, labile zinc and copper ions likely represent only the tip of the iceberg and other neuronal functions are suspected for these metals in their bound state. We performed synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging with 30 nm resolution to image total biometals in dendrites and spines from hippocampal neurons. We found that zinc is distributed all along the dendrites while copper is mainly pinpointed within the spines. In spines, zinc content is higher within the spine head while copper is higher within the spine neck. Such specific distributions suggested metal interactions with cytoskeleton proteins. Zinc supplementation induced the increase of β-tubulin content in dendrites. Copper supplementation impaired the β-tubulin and F-actin networks. Copper chelation resulted in the decrease of F-actin content in dendrites, drastically reducing the number of F-actin protrusions. These results indicate that zinc is involved in microtubule stability whereas copper is essential for actin-dependent stability of dendritic spines, although copper excess can impair the dendritic cytoskeleton.

  7. Nanoscale segregation of actin nucleation and elongation factors determines dendritic spine protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Chazeau, Anaël; Mehidi, Amine; Nair, Deepak; Gautier, Jérémie J; Leduc, Cécile; Chamma, Ingrid; Kage, Frieda; Kechkar, Adel; Thoumine, Olivier; Rottner, Klemens; Choquet, Daniel; Gautreau, Alexis; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Giannone, Grégory

    2014-01-01

    Actin dynamics drive morphological remodeling of neuronal dendritic spines and changes in synaptic transmission. Yet, the spatiotemporal coordination of actin regulators in spines is unknown. Using single protein tracking and super-resolution imaging, we revealed the nanoscale organization and dynamics of branched F-actin regulators in spines. Branched F-actin nucleation occurs at the PSD vicinity, while elongation occurs at the tip of finger-like protrusions. This spatial segregation differs from lamellipodia where both branched F-actin nucleation and elongation occur at protrusion tips. The PSD is a persistent confinement zone for IRSp53 and the WAVE complex, an activator of the Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, filament elongators like VASP and formin-like protein-2 move outwards from the PSD with protrusion tips. Accordingly, Arp2/3 complexes associated with F-actin are immobile and surround the PSD. Arp2/3 and Rac1 GTPase converge to the PSD, respectively, by cytosolic and free-diffusion on the membrane. Enhanced Rac1 activation and Shank3 over-expression, both associated with spine enlargement, induce delocalization of the WAVE complex from the PSD. Thus, the specific localization of branched F-actin regulators in spines might be reorganized during spine morphological remodeling often associated with synaptic plasticity. PMID:25293574

  8. BDNF-TrkB controls cocaine-induced dendritic spines in rodent nucleus accumbens dissociated from increases in addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ethan M; Wissman, Anne Marie; Chemplanikal, Joyce; Buzin, Nicole; Guzman, Daniel; Larson, Erin B; Neve, Rachael L; Nestler, Eric J; Cowan, Christopher W; Self, David W

    2017-08-29

    Chronic cocaine use is associated with prominent morphological changes in nucleus accumbens shell (NACsh) neurons, including increases in dendritic spine density along with enhanced motivation for cocaine, but a functional relationship between these morphological and behavioral phenomena has not been shown. Here we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) receptors in NACsh neurons is necessary for cocaine-induced dendritic spine formation by using either localized TrkB knockout or viral-mediated expression of a dominant negative, kinase-dead TrkB mutant. Interestingly, augmenting wild-type TrkB expression after chronic cocaine self-administration reverses the sustained increase in dendritic spine density, an effect mediated by TrkB signaling pathways that converge on extracellular regulated kinase. Loss of TrkB function after cocaine self-administration, however, leaves spine density intact but markedly enhances the motivation for cocaine, an effect mediated by specific loss of TrkB signaling through phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCγ1). Conversely, overexpression of PLCγ1 both reduces the motivation for cocaine and reverses dendritic spine density, suggesting a potential target for the treatment of addiction in chronic users. Together, these findings indicate that BDNF-TrkB signaling both mediates and reverses cocaine-induced increases in dendritic spine density in NACsh neurons, and these morphological changes are entirely dissociable from changes in addictive behavior.

  9. The influence of phospho-τ on dendritic spines of cortical pyramidal neurons in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Merino-Serrais, Paula; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rábano, Alberto; Avila, Jesús; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-06-01

    The dendritic spines on pyramidal cells represent the main postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses and they are fundamental structures in memory, learning and cognition. In the present study, we used intracellular injections of Lucifer yellow in fixed tissue to analyse over 19 500 dendritic spines that were completely reconstructed in three dimensions along the length of the basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the parahippocampal cortex and CA1 of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Following intracellular injection, sections were immunostained for anti-Lucifer yellow and with tau monoclonal antibodies AT8 and PHF-1, which recognize tau phosphorylated at Ser202/Thr205 and at Ser396/404, respectively. We observed that the diffuse accumulation of phospho-tau in a putative pre-tangle state did not induce changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons, whereas the presence of tau aggregates forming intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles was associated with progressive alteration of dendritic spines (loss of dendritic spines and changes in their morphology) and dendrite atrophy, depending on the degree of tangle development. Thus, the presence of phospho-tau in neurons does not necessarily mean that they suffer severe and irreversible effects as thought previously but rather, the characteristic cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease is likely to depend on the relative number of neurons that have well developed tangles.

  10. Reelin Regulates the Maturation of Dendritic Spines, Synaptogenesis and Glial Ensheathment of Newborn Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Masachs, Nuria; Exposito-Alonso, David; Martínez, Albert; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Fernaud, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Ulloa, Fausto; Comella, Joan X.; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The Reelin pathway is essential for both neural migration and for the development and maturation of synaptic connections. However, its role in adult synaptic formation and remodeling is still being investigated. Here, we investigated the impact of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway on the synaptogenesis of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the young-adult mouse hippocampus. We show that neither Reelin overexpression nor the inactivation of its intracellular adapter, Dab1, substantially alters dendritic spine numbers in these neurons. In contrast, 3D-electron microscopy (focused ion beam milling/scanning electron microscope) revealed that dysregulation of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway leads to both transient and permanent changes in the types and morphology of dendritic spines, mainly altering mushroom, filopodial, and branched GC spines. We also found that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls synaptic configuration of presynaptic boutons in the dentate gyrus, with its dysregulation leading to a substantial decrease in multi-synaptic bouton innervation. Lastly, we show that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls astroglial ensheathment of synapses. Thus, the Reelin pathway is a key regulator of adult-generated GC integration, by controlling dendritic spine types and shapes, their synaptic innervation patterns, and glial ensheathment. These findings may help to better understanding of hippocampal circuit alterations in neurological disorders in which the Reelin pathway is implicated. Significance Statement The extracellular protein Reelin has an important role in neurological diseases, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and psychiatric diseases, targeting hippocampal circuits. Here we address the role of Reelin in the development of synaptic contacts in adult-generated granule cells (GCs), a neuronal population that is crucial for learning and memory and implicated in neurological and psychiatric diseases. We found that the Reelin pathway controls the shapes, sizes, and types of dendritic

  11. Activity-Dependent Exocytosis of Lysosomes Regulates the Structural Plasticity of Dendritic Spines.

    PubMed

    Padamsey, Zahid; McGuinness, Lindsay; Bardo, Scott J; Reinhart, Marcia; Tong, Rudi; Hedegaard, Anne; Hart, Michael L; Emptage, Nigel J

    2017-01-04

    Lysosomes have traditionally been viewed as degradative organelles, although a growing body of evidence suggests that they can function as Ca 2+ stores. Here we examined the function of these stores in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We found that back-propagating action potentials (bpAPs) could elicit Ca 2+ release from lysosomes in the dendrites. This Ca 2+ release triggered the fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane, resulting in the release of Cathepsin B. Cathepsin B increased the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), an enzyme involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling and synaptic plasticity. Inhibition of either lysosomal Ca 2+ signaling or Cathepsin B release prevented the maintenance of dendritic spine growth induced by Hebbian activity. This impairment could be rescued by exogenous application of active MMP-9. Our findings suggest that activity-dependent exocytosis of Cathepsin B from lysosomes regulates the long-term structural plasticity of dendritic spines by triggering MMP-9 activation and ECM remodelling. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The short-time structural plasticity of dendritic spines is altered in a model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Landi, Silvia; Putignano, Elena; Boggio, Elena Maria; Giustetto, Maurizio; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Ratto, Gian Michele

    2011-01-01

    The maturation of excitatory transmission comes about through a developmental period in which dendritic spines are highly motile and their number, form and size are rapidly changing. Surprisingly, although these processes are crucial for the formation of cortical circuitry, little is known about possible alterations of these processes in brain disease. By means of acute in vivo 2-photon imaging we show that the dynamic properties of dendritic spines of layer V cortical neurons are deeply affected in a mouse model of Rett syndrome (RTT) at a time around P25 when the neuronal phenotype of the disease is still mild. Then, we show that 24h after a subcutaneous injection of IGF-1 spine dynamics is restored. Our study demonstrates that spine dynamics in RTT mice is severely impaired early during development and suggest that treatments for RTT should be started very early in order to reestablish a normal period of spine plasticity.

  13. Gelidium amansii promotes dendritic spine morphology and synaptogenesis, and modulates NMDA receptor-mediated postsynaptic current.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Md Abdul; Mohibbullah, Md; Hong, Yong-Ki; Nam, Joo Hyun; Moon, Il Soo

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are essential for the differentiation and maturation of developing neurons as well as providing survival support to the mature neurons. Moreover, therapeutically neurotrophic factors are promising to reconstruct partially damaged neuronal networks in neurodegenerative diseases. In the previous study, we reported that the ethanol extract of an edible marine alga, Gelidium amansii (GAE) had shown promising effects in the development and maturation of both axon and dendrites of hippocampal neurons. Here, we demonstrate that in primary culture of hippocampal neurons (1) GAE promotes a significant increase in the number of filopodia and dendritic spines; (2) promotes synaptogenesis; (3) enhances N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor recruitment; and (4) modulates NMDA-receptor-mediated postsynaptic current. Taken together these findings that GAE might be involved in both morphological and functional maturation of neurons suggest the possibility that GAE may constitute a promising candidate for novel compounds for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Centella asiatica attenuates Aβ – induced neurodegenerative spine loss and dendritic simplification

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Nora E; Zweig, Jonathan A; Murchison, Charles; Caruso, Maya; Matthews, Donald G; Kawamoto, Colleen; Harris, Christopher J; Quinn, Joseph F; Soumyanath, Amala

    2017-01-01

    The medicinal plant Centella asiatica has long been used to improve memory and cognitive function. We have previously shown that a water extract from the plant (CAW) is neuroprotective against the deleterious cognitive effects of amyloid-β (Aβ) exposure in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, and improves learning and memory in healthy aged mice as well. This study explores the physiological underpinnings of those effects by examining how CAW, as well as chemical compounds found within the extract, modulate synaptic health in Aβ-exposed neurons. Hippocampal neurons from amyloid precursor protein over-expressing Tg2576 mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates were used to investigate the effect of CAW and various compounds found within the extract on Aβ-induced dendritic simplification and synaptic loss. CAW enhanced arborization and spine densities in WT neurons and prevented the diminished outgrowth of dendrites and loss of spines caused by Aβ exposure in Tg2576 neurons. Triterpene compounds present in CAW were found to similarly improve arborization although they did not affect spine density. In contrast caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) compounds from CAW were able to modulate both of these endpoints, although there was specificity as to which CQAs mediated which effect. These data suggest that CAW, and several of the compounds found therein, can improve dendritic arborization and synaptic differentiation in the context of Aβ exposure which may underlie the cognitive improvement observed in response to the extract in vivo. Additionally, since CAW, and its constituent compounds, also improved these endpoints in WT neurons, these results may point to a broader therapeutic utility of the extract beyond Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:28279707

  15. A cellular mechanism for dendritic spine loss in the pilocarpine model of status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Jonathan E; Moore, Bryan J; Henderson, Scott C; Campbell, John N; Churn, Severn B

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies have documented a synaptic translocation of calcineurin (CaN) and increased CaN activity following status epilepticus (SE); however, the cellular effect of these changes in CaN in the pathology of SE remains to be elucidated. This study examined a CaN-dependent modification of the dendritic cytoskeleton. CaN has been shown to induce dephosphorylation of cofilin, an actin depolymerization factor. The ensuing actin depolymerization can lead to a number of physiological changes that are of interest in SE. SE was induced by pilocarpine injection, and seizure activity was monitored by video-EEG. Subcellular fractions were isolated by differential centrifugation. CaN activity was assayed using a paranitrophenol phosphate (pNPP) assay protocol. Cofilin phosphorylation was assessed using phosphocofilin-specific antibodies. Cofilin-actin binding was determined by coimmunoprecipitation, and actin polymerization was measured using a triton-solubilization protocol. Spines were visualized using a single-section rapid Golgi impregnation procedure. The immunoreactivity of phosphocofilin decreased significantly in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomal samples after SE. SE-induced cofilin dephosphorylation could be partially blocked by the preinjection of CaN inhibitors. Cofilin activation could be further demonstrated by increased actin-cofilin binding and a significant depolymerization of neuronal actin, both of which were also blocked by CaN inhibitors. Finally, we demonstrated a CaN-dependent loss of dendritic spines histologically. The data demonstrate a CaN-dependent, cellular mechanism through which prolonged seizure activity results in loss of dendritic spines via cofilin activation. Further research into this area may provide useful insights into the pathology of SE and epileptogenic mechanisms.

  16. A Cellular Mechanism for Dendritic Spine Loss in the Pilocarpine Model of Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Jonathan E.; Moore, Bryan J.; Henderson, Scott; Campbell, John N.; Churn, Severn B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have documented a synaptic translocation of calcineurin (CaN) and increased CaN activity following status epilepticus (SE), however the cellular effect of these changes in CaN in the pathology of SE remains to be elucidated. This study examined a CaN-dependent modification of the dendritic cytoskeleton. CaN has been shown to induce dephosphorylation of cofilin, an actin depolymerization factor. The ensuing actin depolymerization can lead to a number of physiological changes that are of interest in SE. Methods SE was induced by pilocarpine injection, and seizure activity was monitored by video-EEG. Subcellular fractions were isolated by differential centrifugation. CaN activity was assayed using a para-nitrophenol phosphate assay protocol. Cofilin phosphorylation was assessed using phosphocofilin-specific antibodies. Cofilin-actin binding was determined by co-immunoprecipitation, and actin polymerization was measured using a triton-solubilization protocol. Spines were visualized using a single-section rapid Golgi impregnation procedure. Results The immunoreactivity of phosphocofilin decreased significantly in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomal samples after SE. SE-induced cofilin dephosphorylation could be partially blocked by the pre-injection of CaN inhibitors. Cofilin activation could be further demonstrated by increased actin-cofilin binding and a significant depolymerization of neuronal actin, both of which were also blocked by CaN inhibitors. Finally, we demonstrated a CaN-dependent loss of dendritic spines histologically. Discussion The data demonstrate a CaN-dependent, cellular mechanism through which prolonged seizure activity results in loss of dendritic spines via cofilin activation. Further research into this area may provide useful insights into the pathology of SE and epileptogenic mechanisms. PMID:18479390

  17. Dendritic Spine Instability in a Mouse Model of CDKL5 Disorder Is Rescued by Insulin-like Growth Factor 1.

    PubMed

    Della Sala, Grazia; Putignano, Elena; Chelini, Gabriele; Melani, Riccardo; Calcagno, Eleonora; Michele Ratto, Gian; Amendola, Elena; Gross, Cornelius T; Giustetto, Maurizio; Pizzorusso, Tommaso

    2016-08-15

    CDKL5 (cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5) is mutated in many severe neurodevelopmental disorders, including atypical Rett syndrome. CDKL5 was shown to interact with synaptic proteins, but an in vivo analysis of the role of CDKL5 in dendritic spine dynamics and synaptic molecular organization is still lacking. In vivo two-photon microscopy of the somatosensory cortex of Cdkl5(-/y) mice was applied to monitor structural dynamics of dendritic spines. Synaptic function and plasticity were measured using electrophysiological recordings of excitatory postsynaptic currents and long-term potentiation in brain slices and assessing the expression of synaptic postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95). Finally, we studied the impact of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) treatment on CDKL5 null mice to restore the synaptic deficits. Adult mutant mice showed a significant reduction in spine density and PSD-95-positive synaptic puncta, a reduction of persistent spines, and impaired long-term potentiation. In juvenile mutants, short-term spine elimination, but not formation, was dramatically increased. Exogenous administration of IGF-1 rescued defective rpS6 phosphorylation, spine density, and PSD-95 expression. Endogenous cortical IGF-1 levels were unaffected by CDKL5 deletion. These data demonstrate that dendritic spine stabilization is strongly regulated by CDKL5. Moreover, our data suggest that IGF-1 treatment could be a promising candidate for clinical trials in CDKL5 patients. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fear extinction deficits following acute stress associate with increased spine density and dendritic retraction in basolateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Maroun, Mouna; Ioannides, Pericles J; Bergman, Krista L; Kavushansky, Alexandra; Holmes, Andrew; Wellman, Cara L

    2013-08-01

    Stress-sensitive psychopathologies such as post-traumatic stress disorder are characterized by deficits in fear extinction and dysfunction of corticolimbic circuits mediating extinction. Chronic stress facilitates fear conditioning, impairs extinction, and produces dendritic proliferation in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a critical site of plasticity for extinction. Acute stress impairs extinction, alters plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex-to-BLA circuit, and causes dendritic retraction in the medial prefrontal cortex. Here, we examined extinction learning and basolateral amygdala pyramidal neuron morphology in adult male rats following a single elevated platform stress. Acute stress impaired extinction acquisition and memory, and produced dendritic retraction and increased mushroom spine density in basolateral amygdala neurons in the right hemisphere. Unexpectedly, irrespective of stress, rats that underwent fear and extinction testing showed basolateral amygdala dendritic retraction and altered spine density relative to non-conditioned rats, particularly in the left hemisphere. Thus, extinction deficits produced by acute stress are associated with increased spine density and dendritic retraction in basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, the finding that conditioning and extinction as such was sufficient to alter basolateral amygdala morphology and spine density illustrates the sensitivity of basolateral amygdala morphology to behavioral manipulation. These findings may have implications for elucidating the role of the amygdala in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Fear extinction deficits following acute stress associate with increased spine density and dendritic retraction in basolateral amygdala neurons

    PubMed Central

    Maroun, Mouna; Ioannides, Pericles J.; Bergman, Krista L.; Kavushansky, Alexandra; Holmes, Andrew; Wellman, Cara L.

    2013-01-01

    Stress-sensitive psychopathologies such as post-traumatic stress disorder are characterized by deficits in fear extinction and dysfunction of corticolimbic circuits mediating extinction. Chronic stress facilitates fear conditioning, impairs extinction, and produces dendritic proliferation in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a critical site of plasticity for extinction. Acute stress impairs extinction, alters plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex-to-BLA circuit, and causes dendritic retraction in the medial prefrontal cortex. Here, we examined extinction learning and basolateral amygdala pyramidal neuron morphology in adult male rats following a single elevated platform stress. Acute stress impaired extinction acquisition and memory, and produced dendritic retraction and increased mushroom spine density in basolateral amygdala neurons in the right hemisphere. Unexpectedly, irrespective of stress, rats that underwent fear and extinction testing showed basolateral amygdala dendritic retraction and altered spine density relative to non-conditioned rats, particularly in the left hemisphere. Thus, extinction deficits produced by acute stress are associated with increased spine density and dendritic retraction in basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, the finding that conditioning and extinction as such was sufficient to alter basolateral amygdala morphology and spine density illustrates the sensitivity of basolateral amygdala morphology to behavioral manipulation. These findings may have implications for elucidating the role of the amygdala in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders. PMID:23714419

  20. The internal architecture of dendritic spines revealed by super-resolution imaging: What did we learn so far?

    SciTech Connect

    MacGillavry, Harold D., E-mail: h.d.macgillavry@uu.nl; Hoogenraad, Casper C., E-mail: c.hoogenraad@uu.nl

    2015-07-15

    The molecular architecture of dendritic spines defines the efficiency of signal transmission across excitatory synapses. It is therefore critical to understand the mechanisms that control the dynamic localization of the molecular constituents within spines. However, because of the small scale at which most processes within spines take place, conventional light microscopy techniques are not adequate to provide the necessary level of resolution. Recently, super-resolution imaging techniques have overcome the classical barrier imposed by the diffraction of light, and can now resolve the localization and dynamic behavior of proteins within small compartments with nanometer precision, revolutionizing the study of dendritic spinemore » architecture. Here, we highlight exciting new findings from recent super-resolution studies on neuronal spines, and discuss how these studies revealed important new insights into how protein complexes are assembled and how their dynamic behavior shapes the efficiency of synaptic transmission.« less

  1. Reproductive experience modified dendritic spines on cortical pyramidal neurons to enhance sensory perception and spatial learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeng-Rung; Lim, Seh Hong; Chung, Sin-Cun; Lee, Yee-Fun; Wang, Yueh-Jan; Tseng, Guo-Fang; Wang, Tsyr-Jiuan

    2017-01-27

    Behavioral adaptations during motherhood are aimed at increasing reproductive success. Alterations of hormones during motherhood could trigger brain morphological changes to underlie behavioral alterations. Here we investigated whether motherhood changes a rat's sensory perception and spatial memory in conjunction with cortical neuronal structural changes. Female rats of different statuses, including virgin, pregnant, lactating, and primiparous rats were studied. Behavioral test showed that the lactating rats were most sensitive to heat, while rats with motherhood and reproduction experience outperformed virgin rats in a water maze task. By intracellular dye injection and computer-assisted 3-dimensional reconstruction, the dendritic arbors and spines of the layer III and V pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex and CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons were revealed for closer analysis. The results showed that motherhood and reproductive experience increased dendritic spines but not arbors or the lengths of the layer III and V pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex and CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons. In addition, lactating rats had a higher incidence of spines than pregnant or primiparous rats. The increase of dendritic spines was coupled with increased expression of the glutamatergic postsynaptic marker protein (PSD-95), especially in lactating rats. On the basis of the present results, it is concluded that motherhood enhanced rat sensory perception and spatial memory and was accompanied by increases in dendritic spines on output neurons of the somatosensory cortex and CA1 hippocampus. The effect was sustained for at least 6 weeks after the weaning of the pups.

  2. IRSp53/BAIAP2 in dendritic spine development, NMDA receptor regulation, and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jaeseung; Park, Haram; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    IRSp53 (also known as BAIAP2) is a multi-domain scaffolding and adaptor protein that has been implicated in the regulation of membrane and actin dynamics at subcellular structures, including filopodia and lamellipodia. Accumulating evidence indicates that IRSp53 is an abundant component of the postsynaptic density at excitatory synapses and an important regulator of actin-rich dendritic spines. In addition, IRSp53 has been implicated in diverse psychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Mice lacking IRSp53 display enhanced NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor function accompanied by social and cognitive deficits, which are reversed by pharmacological suppression of NMDA receptor function. These results suggest the hypothesis that defective actin/membrane modulation in IRSp53-deficient dendritic spines may lead to social and cognitive deficits through NMDA receptor dysfunction. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanisms for localising calcineurin and CaMKII in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Penny, Christopher J; Gold, Matthew G

    2018-05-27

    Calcineurin and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) are both highly abundant in neurons, and both are activated by calmodulin at similar Ca 2+ concentrations in the test tube. However, they fulfill opposite functions in dendritic spines, with CaMKII activity driving long-term synaptic potentiation following large influxes of Ca 2+ through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs), and calcineurin responding to smaller influxes of Ca 2+ through the same receptors to induce long-term depression. In this review, we explore the notion that precise dynamic localisation of the two enzymes at different sites within dendritic spines is fundamental to this behavior. We describe the structural basis of calcineurin and CaMKII localisation by their interaction with proteins including AKAP79, densin-180, α-actinin, and NMDARs. We then consider how interactions with these proteins likely position calcineurin and CaMKII at different distances from Ca 2+ microdomains emanating from the mouths of NMDARs in order to drive the divergent responses. We also highlight shortcomings in our current understanding of synaptic localisation of these two important signalling enzymes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Cortical Regulation of Striatal Medium Spiny Neuron Dendritic Remodeling in Parkinsonism: Modulation of Glutamate Release Reverses Dopamine Depletion–Induced Dendritic Spine Loss

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Bonnie G.; Neely, M. Diana

    2010-01-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) receive glutamatergic afferents from the cerebral cortex and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra (SN). Striatal dopamine loss decreases the number of MSN dendritic spines. This loss of spines has been suggested to reflect the removal of tonic dopamine inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, with increased glutamate release culminating in MSN spine loss. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. We first determined in vivo if decortication reverses or prevents dopamine depletion–induced spine loss by placing motor cortex lesions 4 weeks after, or at the time of, 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the SN. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after cortical lesions. Motor cortex lesions significantly reversed the loss of MSN spines elicited by dopamine denervation; a similar effect was observed in the prevention experiment. We then determined if modulating glutamate release in organotypic cocultures prevented spine loss. Treatment of the cultures with the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 to suppress corticostriatal glutamate release completely blocked spine loss in dopamine-denervated cultures. These studies provide the first evidence to show that MSN spine loss associated with parkinsonism can be reversed and point to suppression of corticostriatal glutamate release as a means of slowing progression in Parkinson's disease. PMID:20118184

  5. Single-Molecule Discrimination within Dendritic Spines of Discrete Perisynaptic Sites of Actin Filament Assembly Driving Postsynaptic Reorganization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanpied, Thomas A.

    2013-03-01

    In the brain, the strength of synaptic transmission between neurons is principally set by the organization of proteins within the receptive, postsynaptic cell. Synaptic strength at an individual site of contact can remain remarkably stable for months or years. However, it also can undergo diverse forms of plasticity which change the strength at that contact independent of changes to neighboring synapses. Such activity-triggered neural plasticity underlies memory storage and cognitive development, and is disrupted in pathological physiology such as addiction and schizophrenia. Much of the short-term regulation of synaptic plasticity occurs within the postsynaptic cell, in small subcompartments surrounding the synaptic contact. Biochemical subcompartmentalization necessary for synapse-specific plasticity is achieved in part by segregation of synapses to micron-sized protrusions from the cell called dendritic spines. Dendritic spines are heavily enriched in the actin cytoskeleton, and regulation of actin polymerization within dendritic spines controls both basal synaptic strength and many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, understanding the mechanism of this control has been difficult because the submicron dimensions of spines limit examination of actin dynamics in the spine interior by conventional confocal microscopy. To overcome this, we developed single-molecule tracking photoactivated localization microscopy (smtPALM) to measure the movement of individual actin molecules within living spines. This revealed inward actin flow from broad areas of the spine plasma membrane, as well as a dense central core of heterogeneous filament orientation. The velocity of single actin molecules along filaments was elevated in discrete regions within the spine, notably near the postsynaptic density but surprisingly not at the endocytic zone which is involved in some forms of plasticity. We conclude that actin polymerization is initiated at many well-separated foci within

  6. Chronic 2P-STED imaging reveals high turnover of dendritic spines in the hippocampus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Thomas; Poll, Stefanie; Bancelin, Stephane; Angibaud, Julie; Inavalli, Vvg Krishna; Keppler, Kevin; Mittag, Manuel; Fuhrmann, Martin; Nägerl, U Valentin

    2018-06-22

    Rewiring neural circuits by the formation and elimination of synapses is thought to be a key cellular mechanism of learning and memory in the mammalian brain. Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic structural component of excitatory synapses, and their experience-dependent plasticity has been extensively studied in mouse superficial cortex using two-photon microscopy in vivo. By contrast, very little is known about spine plasticity in the hippocampus, which is the archetypical memory center of the brain, mostly because it is difficult to visualize dendritic spines in this deeply embedded structure with sufficient spatial resolution. We developed chronic 2P-STED microscopy in mouse hippocampus, using a 'hippocampal window' based on resection of cortical tissue and a long working distance objective for optical access. We observed a two-fold higher spine density than previous studies and measured a spine turnover of ~40% within 4 days, which depended on spine size. We thus provide direct evidence for a high level of structural rewiring of synaptic circuits and new insights into the structure-dynamics relationship of hippocampal spines. Having established chronic super-resolution microscopy in the hippocampus in vivo, our study enables longitudinal and correlative analyses of nanoscale neuroanatomical structures with genetic, molecular and behavioral experiments. © 2018, Pfeiffer et al.

  7. ERK1/2 Activation Is Necessary for BDNF to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Mariana; Medina, Jorge H.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of synaptic transmission and plasticity in the CNS, acting both pre- and postsynaptically. We demonstrated recently that BDNF/TrkB signaling increases dendritic spine density in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we tested whether activation of the prominent ERK (MAPK) signaling…

  8. Wnt-5a/Frizzled9 Receptor Signaling through the Gαo-Gβγ Complex Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Lorenzo, Alfredo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-09-02

    Wnt ligands play crucial roles in the development and regulation of synapse structure and function. Specifically, Wnt-5a acts as a secreted growth factor that regulates dendritic spine formation in rodent hippocampal neurons, resulting in postsynaptic development that promotes the clustering of the PSD-95 (postsynaptic density protein 95). Here, we focused on the early events occurring after the interaction between Wnt-5a and its Frizzled receptor at the neuronal cell surface. Additionally, we studied the role of heterotrimeric G proteins in Wnt-5a-dependent synaptic development. We report that FZD9 (Frizzled9), a Wnt receptor related to Williams syndrome, is localized in the postsynaptic region, where it interacts with Wnt-5a. Functionally, FZD9 is required for the Wnt-5a-mediated increase in dendritic spine density. FZD9 forms a precoupled complex with Gαo under basal conditions that dissociates after Wnt-5a stimulation. Accordingly, we found that G protein inhibition abrogates the Wnt-5a-dependent pathway in hippocampal neurons. In particular, the activation of Gαo appears to be a key factor controlling the Wnt-5a-induced dendritic spine density. In addition, we found that Gβγ is required for the Wnt-5a-mediated increase in cytosolic calcium levels and spinogenesis. Our findings reveal that FZD9 and heterotrimeric G proteins regulate Wnt-5a signaling and dendritic spines in cultured hippocampal neurons. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. The effects of cocaine self-administration on dendritic spine density in the rat hippocampus are dependent on genetic background.

    PubMed

    Miguéns, Miguel; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Coria, Santiago M; Selvas, Abraham; Ballesteros-Yañez, Inmaculada; DeFelipe, Javier; Ambrosio, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to cocaine induces modifications to neurons in the brain regions involved in addiction. Hence, we evaluated cocaine-induced changes in the hippocampal CA1 field in Fischer 344 (F344) and Lewis (LEW) rats, 2 strains that have been widely used to study genetic predisposition to drug addiction, by combining intracellular Lucifer yellow injection with confocal microscopy reconstruction of labeled neurons. Specifically, we examined the effects of cocaine self-administration on the structure, size, and branching complexity of the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. In addition, we quantified spine density in the collaterals of the apical dendritic arbors of these neurons. We found differences between these strains in several morphological parameters. For example, CA1 apical dendrites were more branched and complex in LEW than in F344 rats, while the spine density in the collateral dendrites of the apical dendritic arbors was greater in F344 rats. Interestingly, cocaine self-administration in LEW rats augmented the spine density, an effect that was not observed in the F344 strain. These results reveal significant structural differences in CA1 pyramidal cells between these strains and indicate that cocaine self-administration has a distinct effect on neuron morphology in the hippocampus of rats with different genetic backgrounds. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Aβ mediates F-actin disassembly in dendritic spines leading to cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kommaddi, Reddy Peera; Das, Debajyoti; Karunakaran, Smitha; Nanguneri, Siddharth; Bapat, Deepti; Ray, Ajit; Shaw, Eisha; Bennett, David A; Nair, Deepak; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2018-01-31

    Dendritic spine loss is recognized as an early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Dendritic spine structure is defined by filamentous actin (F-actin) and we observed depolymerization of synaptosomal F-actin accompanied by increased globular-actin (G-actin) at as early as 1 month of age in a mouse model of AD (APPswe/PS1ΔE9, male mice). This led to recall deficit after contextual fear conditioning (cFC) at 2 months of age in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 male mice, which could be reversed by the actin-polymerizing agent jasplakinolide. Further, the F-actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin induced recall deficit after cFC in WT mice, indicating the importance of maintaining F-/G-actin equilibrium for optimal behavioral response. Using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we show that F-actin depolymerization in spines leads to a breakdown of the nano-organization of outwardly radiating F-actin rods in cortical neurons from APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice. Our results demonstrate that synaptic dysfunction seen as F-actin disassembly occurs very early, before onset of pathological hallmarks in AD mice, and contributes to behavioral dysfunction, indicating that depolymerization of F-actin is causal and not consequent to decreased spine density. Further, we observed decreased synaptosomal F-actin levels in postmortem brain from mild cognitive impairment and AD patients compared with subjects with normal cognition. F-actin decrease correlated inversely with increasing AD pathology (Braak score, Aβ load, and tangle density) and directly with performance in episodic and working memory tasks, suggesting its role in human disease pathogenesis and progression. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Synaptic dysfunction underlies cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The cytoskeletal protein actin plays a critical role in maintaining structure and function of synapses. Using cultured neurons and an AD mouse model, we show for the

  11. Early increase and late decrease of purkinje cell dendritic spine density in prion-infected organotypic mouse cerebellar cultures.

    PubMed

    Campeau, Jody L; Wu, Gengshu; Bell, John R; Rasmussen, Jay; Sim, Valerie L

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are infectious neurodegenerative diseases associated with the accumulation of protease-resistant prion protein, neuronal loss, spongiform change and astrogliosis. In the mouse model, the loss of dendritic spines is one of the earliest pathological changes observed in vivo, occurring 4-5 weeks after the first detection of protease-resistant prion protein in the brain. While there are cell culture models of prion infection, most do not recapitulate the neuropathology seen in vivo. Only the recently developed prion organotypic slice culture assay has been reported to undergo neuronal loss and the development of some aspects of prion pathology, namely small vacuolar degeneration and tubulovesicular bodies. Given the rapid replication of prions in this system, with protease-resistant prion protein detectable by 21 days, we investigated whether the dendritic spine loss and altered dendritic morphology seen in prion disease might also develop within the lifetime of this culture system. Indeed, six weeks after first detection of protease-resistant prion protein in tga20 mouse cerebellar slice cultures infected with RML prion strain, we found a statistically significant loss of Purkinje cell dendritic spines and altered dendritic morphology in infected cultures, analogous to that seen in vivo. In addition, we found a transient but statistically significant increase in Purkinje cell dendritic spine density during infection, at the time when protease-resistant prion protein was first detectable in culture. Our findings support the use of this slice culture system as one which recapitulates prion disease pathology and one which may facilitate study of the earliest stages of prion disease pathogenesis.

  12. Reelin Regulates the Maturation of Dendritic Spines, Synaptogenesis and Glial Ensheathment of Newborn Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Carles; Masachs, Nuria; Exposito-Alonso, David; Martínez, Albert; Teixeira, Cátia M; Fernaud, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Ulloa, Fausto; Comella, Joan X; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2016-10-17

    The extracellular protein Reelin has an important role in neurological diseases, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and psychiatric diseases, targeting hippocampal circuits. Here we address the role of Reelin in the development of synaptic contacts in adult-generated granule cells (GCs), a neuronal population that is crucial for learning and memory and implicated in neurological and psychiatric diseases. We found that the Reelin pathway controls the shapes, sizes, and types of dendritic spines, the complexity of multisynaptic innervations and the degree of the perisynaptic astroglial ensheathment that controls synaptic homeostasis. These findings show a pivotal role of Reelin in GC synaptogenesis and provide a foundation for structural circuit alterations caused by Reelin deregulation that may occur in neurological and psychiatric disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Asymptotic analysis of the narrow escape problem in dendritic spine shaped domain: three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaofei; Lee, Hyundae; Wang, Yuliang

    2017-08-01

    This paper deals with the three-dimensional narrow escape problem in a dendritic spine shaped domain, which is composed of a relatively big head and a thin neck. The narrow escape problem is to compute the mean first passage time of Brownian particles traveling from inside the head to the end of the neck. The original model is to solve a mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary value problem for the Poisson equation in the composite domain, and is computationally challenging. In this paper we seek to transfer the original problem to a mixed Robin-Neumann boundary value problem by dropping the thin neck part, and rigorously derive the asymptotic expansion of the mean first passage time with high order terms. This study is a nontrivial three-dimensional generalization of the work in Li (2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47 505202), where a two-dimensional analogue domain is considered.

  14. Antihypertensive drug Valsartan promotes dendritic spine density by altering AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Young In; Lee, Nathanael J.; Chung, Andrew; Saavedra, Juan M.; Turner, R. Scott; Pak, Daniel T. S.; Hoe, Hyang-Sook

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the antihypertensive drug Valsartan improved spatial and episodic memory in mouse models of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and human subjects with hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism by which Valsartan can regulate cognitive function is still unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of Valsartan on dendritic spine formation in primary hippocampal neurons, which is correlated with learning and memory. Interestingly, we found that Valsartan promotes spinogenesis in developing and mature neurons. In addition, we found that Valsartan increases the puncta number of PSD-95 and trends toward an increase in the puncta number of synaptophysin. Moreover, Valsartan increased the cell surface levels of AMPA receptors and selectively altered the levels of spinogenesis-related proteins, including CaMKIIα and phospho-CDK5. These data suggest that Valsartan may promote spinogenesis by enhancing AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity signaling. PMID:24012668

  15. Abnormal dendritic maturation of neurons under the influence of a Tilorone analogue (R 10.874).

    PubMed

    Pfau, D; Westphal, S; Bossanyi, P V; Dietzmann, K

    1995-11-01

    Tilorone analogue (R 10.874) has a close affinity to the lysosomal compartment of cells and forms a non degradable carbohydrate-lipid-drug complex accumulated within digesting organelles. Resembling biochemical and structural changes are seen in hereditary mucopolysaccharidoses accompanied with abnormal dendritogenesis. On the other hand, developmental toxicity (TERRY et al. 1992), antiproliferative effects (ALGARRA et al. 1993) and interactions with DNA (GELLER et al. 1985) are generated by tilorone. Therefore it should be interesting to know whether the amphiphilic cationic compound is able to produce an abnormal dendritogenesis as in storage diseases or an impaired arborisation of dendrites and what could be the reason for the misdevelopment. We demonstrate that there was a fetal retardation in the development of dendritic network, even under influence of low dosis of the analogue R 10.874. The dendritic dismaturation was concomitant with an increased amount of fatty acids and a slightly disarranged metabolic pathway of gangliosides. The dendritic arborisation closed the gap of retarded development between intrauterine treated and untreated rats after 7 days of postnatal drug elimination. We suppose that a fetotoxic effect and not the lysosomopathy is responsible for the reduced dendritic network.

  16. High throughput, detailed, cell-specific neuroanatomy of dendritic spines using microinjection and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dumitriu, Dani; Rodriguez, Alfredo; Morrison, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Morphological features such as size, shape and density of dendritic spines have been shown to reflect important synaptic functional attributes and potential for plasticity. Here we describe in detail a protocol for obtaining detailed morphometric analysis of spines using microinjection of fluorescent dyes, high resolution confocal microscopy, deconvolution and image analysis using NeuronStudio. Recent technical advancements include better preservation of tissue resulting in prolonged ability to microinject, and algorithmic improvements that compensate for the residual Z-smear inherent in all optical imaging. Confocal imaging parameters were probed systematically for the identification of both optimal resolution as well as highest efficiency. When combined, our methods yield size and density measurements comparable to serial section transmission electron microscopy in a fraction of the time. An experiment containing 3 experimental groups with 8 subjects in each can take as little as one month if optimized for speed, or approximately 4 to 5 months if the highest resolution and morphometric detail is sought. PMID:21886104

  17. Calmodulin Activation by Calcium Transients in the Postsynaptic Density of Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Daniel X.; Franks, Kevin M.; Bartol, Thomas M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2008-01-01

    The entry of calcium into dendritic spines can trigger a sequence of biochemical reactions that begins with the activation of calmodulin (CaM) and ends with long-term changes to synaptic strengths. The degree of activation of CaM can depend on highly local elevations in the concentration of calcium and the duration of transient increases in calcium concentration. Accurate measurement of these local changes in calcium is difficult because the spaces are so small and the numbers of molecules are so low. We have therefore developed a Monte Carlo model of intracellular calcium dynamics within the spine that included calcium binding proteins, calcium transporters and ion channels activated by voltage and glutamate binding. The model reproduced optical recordings using calcium indicator dyes and showed that without the dye the free intracellular calcium concentration transient was much higher than predicted from the fluorescent signal. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials induced large, long-lasting calcium gradients across the postsynaptic density, which activated CaM. When glutamate was released at the synapse 10 ms before an action potential occurred, simulating activity patterns that strengthen hippocampal synapses, the calcium gradient and activation of CaM in the postsynaptic density were much greater than when the order was reversed, a condition that decreases synaptic strengths, suggesting a possible mechanism underlying the induction of long-term changes in synaptic strength. The spatial and temporal mechanisms for selectivity in CaM activation demonstrated here could be used in other signaling pathways. PMID:18446197

  18. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and withdrawal leads to adaptations in nucleus accumbens core postsynaptic density proteome and dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D; McGuier, Natalie S; Gass, Justin T; Griffin, William C; Ball, Lauren E; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2016-05-01

    Alcohol use disorder is a chronic relapsing brain disease characterized by the loss of ability to control alcohol (ethanol) intake despite knowledge of detrimental health or personal consequences. Clinical and pre-clinical models provide strong evidence for chronic ethanol-associated alterations in glutamatergic signaling and impaired synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, the neural mechanisms that contribute to aberrant glutamatergic signaling in ethanol-dependent individuals in this critical brain structure remain unknown. Using an unbiased proteomic approach, we investigated the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on neuroadaptations in postsynaptic density (PSD)-enriched proteins in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice. Compared with controls, CIE exposure significantly changed expression levels of 50 proteins in the PSD-enriched fraction. Systems biology and functional annotation analyses demonstrated that the dysregulated proteins are expressed at tetrapartite synapses and critically regulate cellular morphology. To confirm this latter finding, the density and morphology of dendritic spines were examined in the NAc core of ethanol-dependent mice. We found that CIE exposure and withdrawal differentially altered dendrite diameter and dendritic spine density and morphology. Through the use of quantitative proteomics and functional annotation, these series of experiments demonstrate that ethanol dependence produces neuroadaptations in proteins that modify dendritic spine morphology. In addition, these studies identified novel PSD-related proteins that contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms of ethanol dependence that drive maladaptive structural plasticity of NAc neurons. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. The Endosome Localized Arf-GAP AGAP1 Modulates Dendritic Spine Morphology Downstream of the Neurodevelopmental Disorder Factor Dysbindin

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Miranda; Cross, Rebecca; Singleton, Kaela S.; Zlatic, Stephanie; Chapleau, Christopher; Mullin, Ariana P.; Rolle, Isaiah; Moore, Carlene C.; Theibert, Anne; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Faundez, Victor; Larimore, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    AGAP1 is an Arf1 GTPase activating protein that interacts with the vesicle-associated protein complexes adaptor protein 3 (AP-3) and Biogenesis of Lysosome Related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1). Overexpression of AGAP1 in non-neuronal cells results in an accumulation of endosomal cargoes, which suggests a role in endosome-dependent traffic. In addition, AGAP1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for two neurodevelopmental disorders, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia (SZ); yet its localization and function in neurons have not been described. Here, we describe that AGAP1 localizes to axons, dendrites, dendritic spines and synapses, colocalizing preferentially with markers of early and recycling endosomes. Functional studies reveal overexpression and down-regulation of AGAP1 affects both neuronal endosomal trafficking and dendritic spine morphology, supporting a role for AGAP1 in the recycling endosomal trafficking involved in their morphogenesis. Finally, we determined the sensitivity of AGAP1 expression to mutations in the DTNBP1 gene, which is associated with neurodevelopmental disorder, and found that AGAP1 mRNA and protein levels are selectively reduced in the null allele of the mouse ortholog of DTNBP1. We postulate that endosomal trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders affecting dendritic spine morphology, and thus excitatory synapse structure and function. PMID:27713690

  20. Preferential stabilization of newly formed dendritic spines in motor cortex during manual skill learning predicts performance gains, but not memory endurance.

    PubMed

    Clark, Taylor A; Fu, Min; Dunn, Andrew K; Zuo, Yi; Jones, Theresa A

    2018-07-01

    Previous findings that skill learning is associated with the formation and preferential stabilization of new dendritic spines in cortex have raised the possibility that this preferential stabilization is a mechanism for lasting skill memory. We investigated this possibility in adult mice using in vivo two-photon imaging to monitor spine dynamics on superficial apical dendrites of layer V pyramidal neurons in motor cortex during manual skill learning. Spine formation increased over the first 3 days of training on a skilled reaching task, followed by increased spine elimination. A greater proportion of spines formed during the first 3 training days were lost if training stopped after 3, compared with 15 days. However, performance gains achieved in 3 training days persisted, indicating that preferential new spine stabilization was non-essential for skill retention. Consistent with a role in ongoing skill refinement, the persistence of spines formed early in training strongly predicted performance improvements. Finally, while we observed no net spine density change on superficial dendrites, the density of spines on deeper apical branches of the same neuronal population was increased regardless of training duration, suggestive of a potential role in the retention of the initial skill memory. Together, these results indicate dendritic subpopulation-dependent variation in spine structural responses to skill learning, which potentially reflect distinct contributions to the refinement and retention of newly acquired motor skills. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Remodeling of Dendritic Spines in the Avian Vocal Motor Cortex Following Deafening Depends on the Basal Ganglia Circuit.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Fu, Xin; Lin, Chun; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Liu, Jin; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xinwen; Zuo, Mingxue; Fan, Xiaolong; Li, Dapeng; Sun, Yingyu

    2017-05-01

    Deafening elicits a deterioration of learned vocalization, in both humans and songbirds. In songbirds, learned vocal plasticity has been shown to depend on the basal ganglia-cortical circuit, but the underlying cellular basis remains to be clarified. Using confocal imaging and electron microscopy, we examined the effect of deafening on dendritic spines in avian vocal motor cortex, the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), and investigated the role of the basal ganglia circuit in motor cortex plasticity. We found rapid structural changes to RA dendritic spines in response to hearing loss, accompanied by learned song degradation. In particular, the morphological characters of RA spine synaptic contacts between 2 major pathways were altered differently. However, experimental disruption of the basal ganglia circuit, through lesions in song-specialized basal ganglia nucleus Area X, largely prevented both the observed changes to RA dendritic spines and the song deterioration after hearing loss. Our results provide cellular evidence to highlight a key role of the basal ganglia circuit in the motor cortical plasticity that underlies learned vocal plasticity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. ADP-ribosylation Factor 6 (ARF6) Bidirectionally Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation Depending on Neuronal Maturation and Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoonju; Lee, Sang-Eun; Park, Joohyun; Kim, Minhyung; Lee, Boyoon; Hwang, Daehee; Chang, Sunghoe

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have reported conflicting results regarding the role of ARF6 in dendritic spine development, but no clear answer for the controversy has been suggested. We found that ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) either positively or negatively regulates dendritic spine formation depending on neuronal maturation and activity. ARF6 activation increased the spine formation in developing neurons, whereas it decreased spine density in mature neurons. Genome-wide microarray analysis revealed that ARF6 activation in each stage leads to opposite patterns of expression of a subset of genes that are involved in neuronal morphology. ARF6-mediated Rac1 activation via the phospholipase D pathway is the coincident factor in both stages, but the antagonistic RhoA pathway becomes involved in the mature stage. Furthermore, blocking neuronal activity in developing neurons using tetrodotoxin or enhancing the activity in mature neurons using picrotoxin or chemical long term potentiation reversed the effect of ARF6 on each stage. Thus, activity-dependent dynamic changes in ARF6-mediated spine structures may play a role in structural plasticity of mature neurons. PMID:25605715

  3. Spine and rib abnormalities and stature in spondylocostal dysostosis.

    PubMed

    Takikawa, Kazuharu; Haga, Nobuhiko; Maruyama, Toru; Nakatomi, Akiko; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Makita, Yoshio; Hata, Akira; Kawabata, Hidehiko; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2006-04-01

    A retrospective study of radiographic and clinical findings of spondylocostal dysostosis. To determine the features of spondylocostal dysostosis diagnosed using consistent diagnostic criteria. To our knowledge, no clear definition of spondylocostal dysostosis exists, and little information is available regarding its clinical or radiographic features. We defined spondylocostal dysostosis as a congenital spinal disorder consisting of >or=2 vertebral anomalies associated with rib anomalies, without crab-like chest. For 30 patients, including 12 males and 18 females, who met these criteria, we evaluated vertebral and rib anomalies, birth and present body height, and associated anomalies. There were only 2 familial cases. Features of spondylocostal dysostosis were: (1) anomalies involved the thoracic region in all cases; many also involved the cervical spine; (2) most patients had >or=4 vertebral anomalies; (3) frequent vertebral anomalies were butterfly vertebra, hemivertebra, complete block, and unilateral bar, which were associated with both rib absence and fusion; (4) short stature was not always present at birth; and (5) complete block was 1 factor identified as being related to short stature after 12 years of age. Several features of sporadic spondylocostal dysostosis disorder were determined, including new findings related to body height.

  4. Neuregulin 1 Deficiency Modulates Adolescent Stress-Induced Dendritic Spine Loss in a Brain Region-Specific Manner and Increases Complement 4 Expression in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Clarke, David J; Chohan, Tariq W; Kassem, Mustafa S; Smith, Kristie L; Chesworth, Rose; Karl, Tim; Kuligowski, Michael P; Fok, Sandra Y; Bennett, Maxwell R; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2018-03-16

    One neuropathological feature of schizophrenia is a diminished number of dendritic spines in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) system is involved in the plasticity of dendritic spines, and chronic stress decreases dendritic spine densities in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Here, we aimed to assess whether Nrg1 deficiency confers vulnerability to the effects of adolescent stress on dendritic spine plasticity. We also assessed other schizophrenia-relevant neurobiological changes such as microglial cell activation, loss of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and induction of complement factor 4 (C4). Adolescent male wild-type (WT) and Nrg1 heterozygous mice were subjected to chronic restraint stress before their brains underwent Golgi impregnation or immunofluorescent staining of PV interneurons, microglial cells, and C4. Stress in WT mice promoted dendritic spine loss and microglial cell activation in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. However, Nrg1 deficiency rendered mice resilient to stress-induced dendritic spine loss in the infralimbic cortex and the CA3 region of the hippocampus without affecting stress-induced microglial cell activation in these brain regions. Nrg1 deficiency and adolescent stress combined to trigger increased dendritic spine densities in the prelimbic cortex. In the hippocampal CA1 region, Nrg1 deficiency accentuated stress-induced dendritic spine loss. Nrg1 deficiency increased C4 protein and decreased C4 mRNA expression in the hippocampus, and the number of PV interneurons in the basolateral amygdala. This study demonstrates that Nrg1 modulates the impact of stress on the adolescent brain in a region-specific manner. It also provides first evidence of a link between Nrg1 and C4 systems in the hippocampus.

  5. βIII Spectrin Is Necessary for Formation of the Constricted Neck of Dendritic Spines and Regulation of Synaptic Activity in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Efimova, Nadia; Korobova, Farida; Stankewich, Michael C; Moberly, Andrew H; Stolz, Donna B; Wang, Junling; Kashina, Anna; Ma, Minghong; Svitkina, Tatyana

    2017-07-05

    Dendritic spines are postsynaptic structures in neurons often having a mushroom-like shape. Physiological significance and cytoskeletal mechanisms that maintain this shape are poorly understood. The spectrin-based membrane skeleton maintains the biconcave shape of erythrocytes, but whether spectrins also determine the shape of nonerythroid cells is less clear. We show that βIII spectrin in hippocampal and cortical neurons from rodent embryos of both sexes is distributed throughout the somatodendritic compartment but is particularly enriched in the neck and base of dendritic spines and largely absent from spine heads. Electron microscopy revealed that βIII spectrin forms a detergent-resistant cytoskeletal network at these sites. Knockdown of βIII spectrin results in a significant decrease in the density of dendritic spines. Surprisingly, the density of presynaptic terminals is not affected by βIII spectrin knockdown. However, instead of making normal spiny synapses, the presynaptic structures in βIII spectrin-depleted neurons make shaft synapses that exhibit increased amplitudes of miniature EPSCs indicative of excessive postsynaptic excitation. Thus, βIII spectrin is necessary for formation of the constricted shape of the spine neck, which in turn controls communication between the synapse and the parent dendrite to prevent excessive excitation. Notably, mutations of SPTNB2 encoding βIII spectrin are associated with neurodegenerative syndromes, spinocerebellar ataxia Type 5, and spectrin-associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia Type 1, but molecular mechanisms linking βIII spectrin functions to neuronal pathologies remain unresolved. Our data suggest that spinocerebellar ataxia Type 5 and spectrin-associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia Type 1 pathology likely arises from poorly controlled synaptic activity that leads to excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dendritic spines are small protrusions from neuronal

  6. βIII Spectrin Is Necessary for Formation of the Constricted Neck of Dendritic Spines and Regulation of Synaptic Activity in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Efimova, Nadia; Korobova, Farida; Moberly, Andrew H.; Stolz, Donna B.; Wang, Junling; Kashina, Anna; Ma, Minghong

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic spines are postsynaptic structures in neurons often having a mushroom-like shape. Physiological significance and cytoskeletal mechanisms that maintain this shape are poorly understood. The spectrin-based membrane skeleton maintains the biconcave shape of erythrocytes, but whether spectrins also determine the shape of nonerythroid cells is less clear. We show that βIII spectrin in hippocampal and cortical neurons from rodent embryos of both sexes is distributed throughout the somatodendritic compartment but is particularly enriched in the neck and base of dendritic spines and largely absent from spine heads. Electron microscopy revealed that βIII spectrin forms a detergent-resistant cytoskeletal network at these sites. Knockdown of βIII spectrin results in a significant decrease in the density of dendritic spines. Surprisingly, the density of presynaptic terminals is not affected by βIII spectrin knockdown. However, instead of making normal spiny synapses, the presynaptic structures in βIII spectrin-depleted neurons make shaft synapses that exhibit increased amplitudes of miniature EPSCs indicative of excessive postsynaptic excitation. Thus, βIII spectrin is necessary for formation of the constricted shape of the spine neck, which in turn controls communication between the synapse and the parent dendrite to prevent excessive excitation. Notably, mutations of SPTNB2 encoding βIII spectrin are associated with neurodegenerative syndromes, spinocerebellar ataxia Type 5, and spectrin-associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia Type 1, but molecular mechanisms linking βIII spectrin functions to neuronal pathologies remain unresolved. Our data suggest that spinocerebellar ataxia Type 5 and spectrin-associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia Type 1 pathology likely arises from poorly controlled synaptic activity that leads to excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dendritic spines are small protrusions from neuronal

  7. Very low density lipoprotein receptor regulates dendritic spine formation in a RasGRF1/CaMKII dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    DiBattista, Amanda Marie; Dumanis, Sonya B.; Song, Jung Min; Bu, Guojun; Weeber, Edwin; Rebeck, G. William; Hoe, Hyang-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (VLDLR) is an apolipoprotein E receptor involved in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. However, it is unknown how VLDLR can regulate synaptic and cognitive function. In the present study, we found that VLDLR is present at the synapse both pre- and post-synaptically. Overexpression of VLDLR significantly increases, while knockdown of VLDLR decreases, dendritic spine number in primary hippocampal cultures. Additionally, knockdown of VLDLR significantly decreases synaptophysin puncta number while differentially regulating cell surface and total levels of glutamate receptor subunits. To identify the mechanism by which VLDLR induces these synaptic effects, we investigated whether VLDLR affects dendritic spine formation through the Ras signaling pathway, which is involved in spinogenesis and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, we found that VLDLR interacts with RasGRF1, a Ras effector, and knockdown of RasGRF1 blocks the effect of VLDLR on spinogenesis. Moreover, we found that VLDLR did not rescue the deficits induced by the absence of Ras signaling proteins CaMKIIα or CaMKIIβ. Taken together, our results suggest that VLDLR requires RasGRF1/CaMKII to alter dendritic spine formation. PMID:25644714

  8. Constancy and variability in cortical structure. A study on synapses and dendritic spines in hedgehog and monkey.

    PubMed

    Schüz, A; Demianenko, G P

    1995-01-01

    Synapses and dendritic spines were investigated in the parietal cortex of the hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) and the monkey (Macaca mulatta). There was no significant difference in the density of synapses between the two species (14 synapses/100 microns2 in the hedgehog, 15/100 microns2 in the monkey), neither in the size of the synaptic junctions, in the proportion of Type I and Type II synapses (8-10% were of Type II in the hedgehog, 10-14% in the monkey) nor in the proportion of perforated synapses (8% in the hedgehog, 5% in the monkey). The only striking difference at the electron microscopic level concerned the frequency of synapses in which the postsynaptic profile was deeply indented into the presynaptic terminal. Such synapses were 10 times more frequent in the monkey. Dendritic spines were investigated in Golgi-preparations. The density of spines along dendrites was similar in both species. The results are discussed with regard to connectivity in the cortex of small and large brains.

  9. miR-132 Regulates Dendritic Spine Structure by Direct Targeting of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jasińska, Magdalena; Miłek, Jacek; Cymerman, Iwona A; Łęski, Szymon; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Dziembowska, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Mir-132 is a neuronal activity-regulated microRNA that controls the morphology of dendritic spines and neuronal transmission. Similar activities have recently been attributed to matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an extrasynaptic protease. In the present study, we provide evidence that miR-132 directly regulates MMP-9 mRNA in neurons to modulate synaptic plasticity. With the use of luciferase reporter system, we show that miR-132 binds to the 3'UTR of MMP-9 mRNA to regulate its expression in neurons. The overexpression of miR-132 in neurons reduces the level of endogenous MMP-9 protein secretion. In synaptoneurosomes, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-induced signaling stimulates the dissociation of miR-132 from polyribosomal fractions and shifts it towards the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP)-containing fraction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the overexpression of miR-132 in the cultured hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice that have increased synaptic MMP-9 level provokes enlargement of the dendritic spine heads, a process previously implicated in enhanced synaptic plasticity. We propose that activity-dependent miR-132 regulates structural plasticity of dendritic spines through matrix metalloproteinase 9.

  10. Repeated Exposure to Ketamine-Xylazine during Early Development Impairs Motor Learning-dependent Dendritic Spine Plasticity in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lianyan; Yang, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies in rodents suggest that repeated and prolonged anesthetic exposure at early stages of development leads to cognitive and behavioral impairments later in life. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we tested whether exposure to general anesthesia during early development will disrupt the maturation of synaptic circuits and compromise learning-related synaptic plasticity later in life. Methods Mice received ketamine/xylazine (20/3 mg/kg) anesthesia for one or three times, starting at either early [postnatal day 14 (P14)] or late (P21) stages of development (n=105). Control mice received saline injections (n=34). At P30, mice were subjected to rotarod motor training and fear conditioning. Motor learning-induced synaptic remodeling was examined in vivo by repeatedly imaging fluorescently-labeled postsynaptic dendritic spines in the primary motor cortex before and after training using two-photon microscopy. Results Three exposures to ketamine/xylazine anesthesia between P14–18 impair the animals’ motor learning and learning-dependent dendritic spine plasticity [new spine formation, 8.4 ± 1.3% (mean ± SD) versus 13.4 ± 1.8%, P = 0.002] without affecting fear memory and cell apoptosis. One exposure at P14 or three exposures between P21–25 has no effects on the animals’ motor learning or spine plasticity. Finally, enriched motor experience ameliorates anesthesia-induced motor learning impairment and synaptic deficits. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that repeated exposures to ketamine/xylazine during early development impair motor learning and learning-dependent dendritic spine plasticity later in life. The reduction in synaptic structural plasticity may underlie anesthesia-induced behavioral impairment. PMID:25575163

  11. GSK-3β Overexpression Alters the Dendritic Spines of Developmentally Generated Granule Neurons in the Mouse Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus.

    PubMed

    Pallas-Bazarra, Noemí; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Avila, Jesús; DeFelipe, Javier; Llorens-Martín, María

    2017-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) plays a crucial role in hippocampal-related memory. The most abundant cellular type in the DG, namely granule neurons, are developmentally generated around postnatal day P6 in mice. Moreover, a unique feature of the DG is the occurrence of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a process that gives rise to newborn granule neurons throughout life. Adult-born and developmentally generated granule neurons share some maturational aspects but differ in others, such as in their positioning within the granule cell layer. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis encompasses a series of plastic changes that modify the function of the hippocampal trisynaptic network. In this regard, it is known that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) regulates both synaptic plasticity and memory. By using a transgenic mouse overexpressing GSK-3β in hippocampal neurons, we previously demonstrated that the overexpression of this kinase has deleterious effects on the maturation of newborn granule neurons. In the present study, we addressed the effects of GSK-3β overexpression on the morphology and number of dendritic spines of developmentally generated granule neurons. To this end, we performed intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in developmentally generated granule neurons of wild-type and GSK-3β-overexpressing mice and analyzed the number and morphologies of dendritic spines (namely, stubby, thin and mushroom). GSK-3β overexpression led to a general reduction in the number of dendritic spines. In addition, it caused a slight reduction in the percentage, head diameter and length of thin spines, whereas the head diameter of mushroom spines was increased.

  12. GSK-3β Overexpression Alters the Dendritic Spines of Developmentally Generated Granule Neurons in the Mouse Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Pallas-Bazarra, Noemí; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Avila, Jesús; DeFelipe, Javier; Llorens-Martín, María

    2017-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) plays a crucial role in hippocampal-related memory. The most abundant cellular type in the DG, namely granule neurons, are developmentally generated around postnatal day P6 in mice. Moreover, a unique feature of the DG is the occurrence of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a process that gives rise to newborn granule neurons throughout life. Adult-born and developmentally generated granule neurons share some maturational aspects but differ in others, such as in their positioning within the granule cell layer. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis encompasses a series of plastic changes that modify the function of the hippocampal trisynaptic network. In this regard, it is known that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) regulates both synaptic plasticity and memory. By using a transgenic mouse overexpressing GSK-3β in hippocampal neurons, we previously demonstrated that the overexpression of this kinase has deleterious effects on the maturation of newborn granule neurons. In the present study, we addressed the effects of GSK-3β overexpression on the morphology and number of dendritic spines of developmentally generated granule neurons. To this end, we performed intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in developmentally generated granule neurons of wild-type and GSK-3β-overexpressing mice and analyzed the number and morphologies of dendritic spines (namely, stubby, thin and mushroom). GSK-3β overexpression led to a general reduction in the number of dendritic spines. In addition, it caused a slight reduction in the percentage, head diameter and length of thin spines, whereas the head diameter of mushroom spines was increased. PMID:28344548

  13. The brain-specific double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen2 is required for dendritic spine morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Bernhard; Tuebing, Fabian; Xie, Yunli; Dorostkar, Mario M; Thomas, Sabine; Pehl, Ulrich; Boehm, Stefan; Macchi, Paolo; Kiebler, Michael A

    2006-01-16

    Mammalian Staufen2 (Stau2) is a member of the double-stranded RNA-binding protein family. Its expression is largely restricted to the brain. It is thought to play a role in the delivery of RNA to dendrites of polarized neurons. To investigate the function of Stau2 in mature neurons, we interfered with Stau2 expression by RNA interference (RNAi). Mature neurons lacking Stau2 displayed a significant reduction in the number of dendritic spines and an increase in filopodia-like structures. The number of PSD95-positive synapses and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents were markedly reduced in Stau2 down-regulated neurons. Akin effects were caused by overexpression of dominant-negative Stau2. The observed phenotype could be rescued by overexpression of two RNAi cleavage-resistant Stau2 isoforms. In situ hybridization revealed reduced expression levels of beta-actin mRNA and fewer dendritic beta-actin mRNPs in Stau2 down-regulated neurons. Thus, our data suggest an important role for Stau2 in the formation and maintenance of dendritic spines of hippocampal neurons.

  14. The brain-specific double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen2 is required for dendritic spine morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goetze, Bernhard; Tuebing, Fabian; Xie, Yunli; Dorostkar, Mario M.; Thomas, Sabine; Pehl, Ulrich; Boehm, Stefan; Macchi, Paolo; Kiebler, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian Staufen2 (Stau2) is a member of the double-stranded RNA-binding protein family. Its expression is largely restricted to the brain. It is thought to play a role in the delivery of RNA to dendrites of polarized neurons. To investigate the function of Stau2 in mature neurons, we interfered with Stau2 expression by RNA interference (RNAi). Mature neurons lacking Stau2 displayed a significant reduction in the number of dendritic spines and an increase in filopodia-like structures. The number of PSD95-positive synapses and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents were markedly reduced in Stau2 down-regulated neurons. Akin effects were caused by overexpression of dominant-negative Stau2. The observed phenotype could be rescued by overexpression of two RNAi cleavage-resistant Stau2 isoforms. In situ hybridization revealed reduced expression levels of β-actin mRNA and fewer dendritic β-actin mRNPs in Stau2 down-regulated neurons. Thus, our data suggest an important role for Stau2 in the formation and maintenance of dendritic spines of hippocampal neurons. PMID:16418534

  15. A Simple Rule for Dendritic Spine and Axonal Bouton Formation Can Account for Cortical Reorganization after Focal Retinal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Butz, Markus; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2013-01-01

    Lasting alterations in sensory input trigger massive structural and functional adaptations in cortical networks. The principles governing these experience-dependent changes are, however, poorly understood. Here, we examine whether a simple rule based on the neurons' need for homeostasis in electrical activity may serve as driving force for cortical reorganization. According to this rule, a neuron creates new spines and boutons when its level of electrical activity is below a homeostatic set-point and decreases the number of spines and boutons when its activity exceeds this set-point. In addition, neurons need a minimum level of activity to form spines and boutons. Spine and bouton formation depends solely on the neuron's own activity level, and synapses are formed by merging spines and boutons independently of activity. Using a novel computational model, we show that this simple growth rule produces neuron and network changes as observed in the visual cortex after focal retinal lesions. In the model, as in the cortex, the turnover of dendritic spines was increased strongest in the center of the lesion projection zone, while axonal boutons displayed a marked overshoot followed by pruning. Moreover, the decrease in external input was compensated for by the formation of new horizontal connections, which caused a retinotopic remapping. Homeostatic regulation may provide a unifying framework for understanding cortical reorganization, including network repair in degenerative diseases or following focal stroke. PMID:24130472

  16. MET receptor tyrosine kinase controls dendritic complexity, spine morphogenesis, and glutamatergic synapse maturation in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shenfeng; Lu, Zhongming; Levitt, Pat

    2014-12-03

    The MET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), implicated in risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in functional and structural circuit integrity in humans, is a temporally and spatially regulated receptor enriched in dorsal pallial-derived structures during mouse forebrain development. Here we report that loss or gain of function of MET in vitro or in vivo leads to changes, opposite in nature, in dendritic complexity, spine morphogenesis, and the timing of glutamatergic synapse maturation onto hippocampus CA1 neurons. Consistent with the morphological and biochemical changes, deletion of Met in mutant mice results in precocious maturation of excitatory synapse, as indicated by a reduction of the proportion of silent synapses, a faster GluN2A subunit switch, and an enhanced acquisition of AMPA receptors at synaptic sites. Thus, MET-mediated signaling appears to serve as a mechanism for controlling the timing of neuronal growth and functional maturation. These studies suggest that mistimed maturation of glutamatergic synapses leads to the aberrant neural circuits that may be associated with ASD risk. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416166-14$15.00/0.

  17. MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Controls Dendritic Complexity, Spine Morphogenesis, and Glutamatergic Synapse Maturation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongming; Levitt, Pat

    2014-01-01

    The MET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), implicated in risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in functional and structural circuit integrity in humans, is a temporally and spatially regulated receptor enriched in dorsal pallial-derived structures during mouse forebrain development. Here we report that loss or gain of function of MET in vitro or in vivo leads to changes, opposite in nature, in dendritic complexity, spine morphogenesis, and the timing of glutamatergic synapse maturation onto hippocampus CA1 neurons. Consistent with the morphological and biochemical changes, deletion of Met in mutant mice results in precocious maturation of excitatory synapse, as indicated by a reduction of the proportion of silent synapses, a faster GluN2A subunit switch, and an enhanced acquisition of AMPA receptors at synaptic sites. Thus, MET-mediated signaling appears to serve as a mechanism for controlling the timing of neuronal growth and functional maturation. These studies suggest that mistimed maturation of glutamatergic synapses leads to the aberrant neural circuits that may be associated with ASD risk. PMID:25471559

  18. Oligodendrocyte- and Neuron-Specific Nogo-A Restrict Dendritic Branching and Spine Density in the Adult Mouse Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zemmar, Ajmal; Chen, Chia-Chien; Weinmann, Oliver; Kast, Brigitt; Vajda, Flora; Bozeman, James; Isaad, Noel; Zuo, Yi; Schwab, Martin E

    2018-06-01

    Nogo-A has been well described as a myelin-associated inhibitor of neurite outgrowth and functional neuroregeneration after central nervous system (CNS) injury. Recently, a new role of Nogo-A has been identified as a negative regulator of synaptic plasticity in the uninjured adult CNS. Nogo-A is present in neurons and oligodendrocytes. However, it is yet unclear which of these two pools regulate synaptic plasticity. To address this question we used newly generated mouse lines in which Nogo-A is specifically knocked out in (1) oligodendrocytes (oligoNogo-A KO) or (2) neurons (neuroNogo-A KO). We show that both oligodendrocyte- and neuron-specific Nogo-A KO mice have enhanced dendritic branching and spine densities in layer 2/3 cortical pyramidal neurons. These effects are compartmentalized: neuronal Nogo-A affects proximal dendrites whereas oligodendrocytic Nogo-A affects distal regions. Finally, we used two-photon laser scanning microscopy to measure the spine turnover rate of adult mouse motor cortex layer 5 cells and find that both Nogo-A KO mouse lines show enhanced spine remodeling after 4 days. Our results suggest relevant control functions of glial as well as neuronal Nogo-A for synaptic plasticity and open new possibilities for more selective and targeted plasticity enhancing strategies.

  19. Kinetic magnetic resonance imaging analysis of abnormal segmental motion of the functional spine unit.

    PubMed

    Kong, Min Ho; Hymanson, Henry J; Song, Kwan Young; Chin, Dong Kyu; Cho, Yong Eun; Yoon, Do Heum; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2009-04-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective observational study using kinetic MR imaging to investigate the relationship between instability, abnormal sagittal segmental motion, and radiographic variables consisting of intervertebral disc degeneration, facet joint osteoarthritis (FJO), degeneration of the interspinous ligaments, ligamentum flavum hypertrophy (LFH), and the status of the paraspinal muscles. Abnormal segmental motion, defined as > 10 degrees angulation and > 3 mm of translation in the sagittal plane, was investigated in 1575 functional spine units (315 patients) in flexion, neutral, and extension postures using kinetic MR imaging. Each segment was assessed based on the extent of disc degeneration (Grades I-V), FJO (Grades 1-4), interspinous ligament degeneration (Grades 1-4), presence of LFH, and paraspinal muscle fatty infiltration observed on kinetic MR imaging. These factors are often noted in patients with degenerative disease, and there are grading systems to describe these changes. For the first time, the authors attempted to address the relationship between these radiographic observations and the effects on the motion and instability of the functional spine unit. The prevalence of abnormal translational motion was significantly higher in patients with Grade IV degenerative discs and Grade 3 arthritic facet joints (p < 0.05). In patients with advanced disc degeneration and FJO, there was a lesser amount of motion in both segmental translation and angulation when compared with lower grades of degeneration, and this difference was statistically significant for angular motion (p < 0.05). Patients with advanced degenerative Grade 4 facet joint arthritis had a significantly lower percentage of abnormal angular motion compared to patients with normal facet joints (p < 0.001). The presence of LFH was strongly associated with abnormal translational and angular motion. Grade 4 interspinous ligament degeneration and the presence of paraspinal muscle fatty

  20. [Abnormal growth of spine in patients with adolescent idiopathic thoracic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongda; Liu, Zhen; Qiu, Yong; Zhu, Feng; Zhu, Zezhang; Zhang, Wen

    2014-05-01

    To investigate if the growth patterns of the spine and pelvis are consistent in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients with single thoracic curves. Forty-eight thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (T-AIS) female patients and 48 healthy age-matched adolescents were recruited consecutively between December 2011 and October 2012. Radiographic parameters including height of spine (HOS), length of spine (LOS), height of thoracic spine (HOT), length of thoracic spine (LOT), height of pelvis (HOP), width of pelvis (WOP) and width of thorax (WOT) were measured on the long-cassette posteroanterior standing radiographs. In addition, ratios including HOS/HOP, LOS/HOP, HOT/HOP, LOT/HOP, LOS/LOT, WOT/WOP were also calculated. Independent t-test was performed to compare the radiographic parameters and ratios between the two groups. Compared to the age-matched healthy adolescents, T-AIS patients had a significantly higher LOS and LOT (t = -2.364 and -1.495, P = 0.020 and 0.043) and smaller HOS and HOT (t = 2.060 and 3.359, P = 0.042 and 0.001). Yet, all of HOP, WOP and WOT showed no significant difference between T-AIS patients and healthy adolescents. Similarly, LOS/HOP and LOT/HOP were significantly higher in T-AIS patients as may be expected with an average LOS/HOP of 2.26 ± 0.14 in normal controls.In addition, LOS/LOT in normal controls had a trend of increase with age which was different from the stable LOS/LOT in T-AIS patients, indicating an increased growth of thoracic vertebra compared to lumbar vertebra. Compared to the age-matched healthy adolescents, T-AIS patients have an abnormal growth characteristics with longer spine. The growth of pelvis and thorax show no significant differences between T-AIS patients and healthy adolescents.

  1. The therapeutic effect of memantine through the stimulation of synapse formation and dendritic spine maturation in autism and fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongen; Dobkin, Carl; Sheikh, Ashfaq M; Malik, Mazhar; Brown, W Ted; Li, Xiaohong

    2012-01-01

    Although the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie autism are not well understood, there is evidence showing that metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors are hyper-stimulated and the GABAergic system is hypo-stimulated in autism. Memantine is an uncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors and is widely prescribed for treatment of Alzheimer's disease treatment. Recently, it has been shown to improve language function, social behavior, and self-stimulatory behaviors of some autistic subjects. However the mechanism by which memantine exerts its effect remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used cultured cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, a mouse model for fragile X syndrome (FXS) and syndromic autism, to examine the effects of memantine on dendritic spine development and synapse formation. Our results show that the maturation of dendritic spines is delayed in Fmr1-KO CGCs. We also detected reduced excitatory synapse formation in Fmr1-KO CGCs. Memantine treatment of Fmr1-KO CGCs promoted cell adhesion properties. Memantine also stimulated the development of mushroom-shaped mature dendritic spines and restored dendritic spine to normal levels in Fmr1-KO CGCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that memantine treatment promoted synapse formation and restored the excitatory synapses to a normal range in Fmr1-KO CGCs. These findings suggest that memantine may exert its therapeutic capacity through a stimulatory effect on dendritic spine maturation and excitatory synapse formation, as well as promoting adhesion of CGCs.

  2. FIB/SEM technology and high-throughput 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines and synapses in GFP-labeled adult-generated neurons.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Carles; Martínez, Albert; Masachs, Nuria; Teixeira, Cátia M; Fernaud, Isabel; Ulloa, Fausto; Pérez-Martínez, Esther; Lois, Carlos; Comella, Joan X; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The fine analysis of synaptic contacts is usually performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and its combination with neuronal labeling techniques. However, the complex 3D architecture of neuronal samples calls for their reconstruction from serial sections. Here we show that focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) allows efficient, complete, and automatic 3D reconstruction of identified dendrites, including their spines and synapses, from GFP/DAB-labeled neurons, with a resolution comparable to that of TEM. We applied this technology to analyze the synaptogenesis of labeled adult-generated granule cells (GCs) in mice. 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines in GCs aged 3-4 and 8-9 weeks revealed two different stages of dendritic spine development and unexpected features of synapse formation, including vacant and branched dendritic spines and presynaptic terminals establishing synapses with up to 10 dendritic spines. Given the reliability, efficiency, and high resolution of FIB/SEM technology and the wide use of DAB in conventional EM, we consider FIB/SEM fundamental for the detailed characterization of identified synaptic contacts in neurons in a high-throughput manner.

  3. FIB/SEM technology and high-throughput 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines and synapses in GFP-labeled adult-generated neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Martínez, Albert; Masachs, Nuria; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Fernaud, Isabel; Ulloa, Fausto; Pérez-Martínez, Esther; Lois, Carlos; Comella, Joan X.; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The fine analysis of synaptic contacts is usually performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and its combination with neuronal labeling techniques. However, the complex 3D architecture of neuronal samples calls for their reconstruction from serial sections. Here we show that focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) allows efficient, complete, and automatic 3D reconstruction of identified dendrites, including their spines and synapses, from GFP/DAB-labeled neurons, with a resolution comparable to that of TEM. We applied this technology to analyze the synaptogenesis of labeled adult-generated granule cells (GCs) in mice. 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines in GCs aged 3–4 and 8–9 weeks revealed two different stages of dendritic spine development and unexpected features of synapse formation, including vacant and branched dendritic spines and presynaptic terminals establishing synapses with up to 10 dendritic spines. Given the reliability, efficiency, and high resolution of FIB/SEM technology and the wide use of DAB in conventional EM, we consider FIB/SEM fundamental for the detailed characterization of identified synaptic contacts in neurons in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26052271

  4. The Therapeutic effect of Memantine through the Stimulation of Synapse Formation and Dendritic Spine Maturation in Autism and Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hongen; Dobkin, Carl; Sheikh, Ashfaq M.; Malik, Mazhar; Brown, W. Ted; Li, Xiaohong

    2012-01-01

    Although the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie autism are not well understood, there is evidence showing that metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors are hyper-stimulated and the GABAergic system is hypo-stimulated in autism. Memantine is an uncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors and is widely prescribed for treatment of Alzheimer's disease treatment. Recently, it has been shown to improve language function, social behavior, and self-stimulatory behaviors of some autistic subjects. However the mechanism by which memantine exerts its effect remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used cultured cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, a mouse model for fragile X syndrome (FXS) and syndromic autism, to examine the effects of memantine on dendritic spine development and synapse formation. Our results show that the maturation of dendritic spines is delayed in Fmr1-KO CGCs. We also detected reduced excitatory synapse formation in Fmr1-KO CGCs. Memantine treatment of Fmr1-KO CGCs promoted cell adhesion properties. Memantine also stimulated the development of mushroom-shaped mature dendritic spines and restored dendritic spine to normal levels in Fmr1-KO CGCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that memantine treatment promoted synapse formation and restored the excitatory synapses to a normal range in Fmr1-KO CGCs. These findings suggest that memantine may exert its therapeutic capacity through a stimulatory effect on dendritic spine maturation and excitatory synapse formation, as well as promoting adhesion of CGCs. PMID:22615862

  5. Association of Anxiety and Depression With Microtubule-Associated Protein 2– and Synaptopodin-Immunolabeled Dendrite and Spine Densities in Hippocampal CA3 of Older Humans

    PubMed Central

    Soetanto, Ainie; Wilson, Robert S.; Talbot, Konrad; Un, Ashley; Schneider, Julie A.; Sobiesk, Mark; Kelly, Jeremiah; Leurgans, Sue; Bennett, David A.; Arnold, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Context Chronic psychological distress has deleterious effects on many of the body’s physiological systems. In experimental animal models, chronic stress leads to neuroanatomic changes in the hippocampus, in particular a decrease in the length and branching of dendrites as well as a decrease in the number of dendritic spines. Objectives To examine whether analogous distress-related neuroanatomic changes occur in humans and whether such changes might also be related to cognitive dysfunction observed in older people who report greater psychological distress. Design Postmortem study of brain tissues from participants of the Religious Orders Study, an ongoing population-based clinicopathological study of aging and cognition. Setting The Rush University Religious Orders Study and the University of Pennsylvania Cellular and Molecular Neuropathology Program. Participants Seventy-two deceased participants of the Religious Orders Study. Main Outcome Measures Densities of microtubule-associated protein 2–immunolabeled dendrites and synaptopodin-immunolabeled dendritic spines in the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus, quantified using semiautomated image acquisition and analysis. Results Higher levels of trait anxiety and longitudinal depression scores were associated with decreased densities of dendrites and spines in CA3. Dendrite and spine densities did not correlate with an index of global cognition or with densities of common age-related pathological changes. Conclusions Regressive neuronal changes occur in humans who experience greater psychological distress. These changes are analogous to neuronal changes in animal models of chronic stress. PMID:20439826

  6. Novel Song-Stimulated Dendritic Spine Formation and Arc/Arg 3.1 Expression in Zebra Finch Auditory Telencephalon are Disrupted by Cannabinoid Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Marcoita T; Soderstrom, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids are well-established to alter processes of sensory perception; however neurophysiological mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Arc, an immediate-early gene (IEG) product involved in dendritic spine dynamics and necessary for plasticity changes such as long-term potentiation, is rapidly induced within zebra finch caudal medial nidopallium (NCM) following novel song exposure, a response that habituates after repeated stimuli. Arc appears unique in its rapid postsynaptic dendritic expression following excitatory input. Previously, we found that vocal development-altering cannabinoid treatments are associated with elevated dendritic spine densities in motor- (HVC) and learning-related (Area X) song regions of zebra finch telencephalon. Given Arc’s dendritic morphological role, we hypothesized that cannabinoid-altered spine densities may involve Arc-related signaling. To test this, we examined the ability of the cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) to: (1) acutely disrupt song-induced Arc expression; (2) interfere with habituation to auditory stimuli and; (3) alter dendritic spine densities in auditory regions. We found that WIN (3 mg/kg) acutely reduced Arc expression within both NCM and Field L2 in an antagonist-reversible manner. WIN did not alter Arc expression in thalamic auditory relay Nucleus Ovoidalis (Ov), suggesting cannabinoid signaling selectively alters responses to auditory stimulation. Novel song stimulation rapidly increased dendritic spine densities within auditory telencephalon, an effect blocked by WIN pretreatments. Taken together, cannabinoid inhibition of both Arc induction and its habituation to repeated stimuli, combined with prevention of rapid increases in dendritic spine densities, implicates cannabinoid signaling in modulation of physiological processes important to auditory responsiveness and memory. PMID:24134952

  7. Early Postnatal Lesion of the Medial Dorsal Nucleus Leads to Loss of Dendrites and Spines in Adult Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Marmolejo, Naydu; Paez, Jesse; Levitt, Jonathan B.; Jones, Liesl B.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that the medial dorsal nucleus (MD) of the thalamus influences pyramidal cell development in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in an activity-dependent manner. The MD is reciprocally connected to the PFC. Many psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, affect the PFC, and one of the most consistent findings in schizophrenia is a decrease in volume and neuronal number in the MD. Therefore, understanding the role the MD plays in the development of the PFC is important and may help in understanding the progression of psychiatric disorders that have their root in development. Focusing on the interplay between the MD and the PFC, this study examined the hypothesis that the MD plays a role in the dendritic development of pyramidal cells in the PFC. Unilateral electrolytic lesions of the MD in Long-Evans rat pups were made on postnatal day 4 (P4), and the animals developed to P60. We then examined dendritic morphology by examining MAP2 immunostaining and by using Golgi techniques to determine basilar dendrite number and spine density. Additionally, we examined pyramidal cell density in cingulate area 1 (Cg1), prelimbic region, and dorsolateral anterior cortex, which receive afferents from the MD. Thalamic lesions caused a mean MD volume decrease of 12.4% which led to a significant decrease in MAP2 staining in both superficial and deep layers in all 3 cortical areas. The lesions also caused a significant decrease in spine density and in the number of primary and secondary basilar dendrites on superficial and deep layer pyramidal neurons in all 3 regions. No significant difference was observed in pyramidal cell density in any of the regions or layers, but a nonsignificant increase in cell density was observed in 2 regions. Our data are thus consistent with the hypothesis that the MD plays a role in the development of the PFC and, therefore, may be a good model to begin to examine neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. PMID:23406908

  8. Protracted dendritic growth in the typically developing human amygdala and increased spine density in young ASD brains.

    PubMed

    Weir, R K; Bauman, M D; Jacobs, B; Schumann, C M

    2018-02-01

    The amygdala is a medial temporal lobe structure implicated in social and emotional regulation. In typical development (TD), the amygdala continues to increase volumetrically throughout childhood and into adulthood, while other brain structures are stable or decreasing in volume. In autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the amygdala undergoes rapid early growth, making it volumetrically larger in children with ASD compared to TD children. Here we explore: (a) if dendritic arborization in the amygdala follows the pattern of protracted growth in TD and early overgrowth in ASD and (b), if spine density in the amygdala in ASD cases differs from TD from youth to adulthood. The amygdala from 32 postmortem human brains (7-46 years of age) were stained using a Golgi-Kopsch impregnation. Ten principal neurons per case were selected in the lateral nucleus and traced using Neurolucida software in their entirety. We found that both ASD and TD individuals show a similar pattern of increasing dendritic length with age well into adulthood. However, spine density is (a) greater in young ASD cases compared to age-matched TD controls (<18 years old) and (b) decreases in the amygdala as people with ASD age into adulthood, a phenomenon not found in TD. Therefore, by adulthood, there is no observable difference in spine density in the amygdala between ASD and TD age-matched adults (≥18 years old). Our findings highlight the unique growth trajectory of the amygdala and suggest that spine density may contribute to aberrant development and function of the amygdala in children with ASD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dendritic Spines and Development: Towards a Unifying Model of Spinogenesis—A Present Day Review of Cajal's Histological Slides and Drawings

    PubMed Central

    García-López, Pablo; García-Marín, Virginia; Freire, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic spines receive the majority of excitatory connections in the central nervous system, and, thus, they are key structures in the regulation of neural activity. Hence, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying their generation and plasticity, both during development and in adulthood, are a matter of fundamental and practical interest. Indeed, a better understanding of these mechanisms should provide clues to the development of novel clinical therapies. Here, we present original results obtained from high-quality images of Cajal's histological preparations, stored at the Cajal Museum (Instituto Cajal, CSIC), obtained using extended focus imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction, and rendering. Based on the data available in the literature regarding the formation of dendritic spines during development and our results, we propose a unifying model for dendritic spine development. PMID:21584262

  10. 'Abnormal' cervical imaging?: Cervical pneumatocysts - A case report of a cervical spine pneumatocyst.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Hanna; Patel, Amit; Boctor, Daniel Sherif Zakaria Matta; Hakmi, Mohamed Atef

    2015-10-01

    To our knowledge there are only 15 reported cases of pneumatocysts in the cervical spine, but awareness of their existence should help the clinician when diagnosing abnormalities in radiological images. When faced with intravertebral gas, in addition to considering more sinister causes, one should consider the differentials including pneumatocysts. Despite our relative lack of understanding of these benign lesions the knowledge that they can change over time should prevent unnecessary testing or treating. We present a patient who fell down stairs and was found to have cervical intravertebral gas, on computed tomography imaging, with the typical appearance of a pneumatocyst.

  11. Transactivation of TrkB by Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced changes in dendritic spine density and morphology in hippocampal and cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Minhan; Kook, Yeon-Hee; Liao, Ke; Buch, Shilpa; Kim, Woo-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine is a highly addictive narcotic associated with dendritic spine plasticity in the striatum. However, it remains elusive whether cocaine modifies spines in a cell type-specific or region-specific manner or whether it alters different types of synapses in the brain. In addition, there is a paucity of data on the regulatory mechanism(s) involved in cocaine-induced modification of spine density. In the current study, we report that cocaine exposure differentially alters spine density, spine morphology, and the types of synapses in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Cocaine exposure in the hippocampus resulted in increased spine density, but had no significant effect on cortical neurons. Although cocaine exposure altered spine morphology in both cell types, the patterns of spine morphology were distinct for each cell type. Furthermore, we observed that cocaine selectively affects the density of excitatory synapses. Intriguingly, in hippocampal neurons cocaine-mediated effects on spine density and morphology involved sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1 R) and its downstream TrkB signaling, which were not the case in cortical neurons. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of Sig-1 R prevented cocaine-induced TrkB activation in hippocampal neurons. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism by which cocaine induces selective changes in spine morphology, spine density, and synapse formation, and could provide insights into the cellular basis for the cognitive impairment observed in cocaine addicts. PMID:27735948

  12. Oral supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid and uridine-5'-monophosphate increases dendritic spine density in adult gerbil hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Toshimasa; Cansev, Mehmet; Wurtman, Richard J

    2007-11-28

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is an essential component of membrane phosphatides and has been implicated in cognitive functions. Low levels of circulating or brain DHA are associated with various neurocognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), while laboratory animals, including animal models of AD, can exhibit improved cognitive ability with a diet enriched in DHA. Various cellular mechanisms have been proposed for DHA's behavioral effects, including increases in cellular membrane fluidity, promotion of neurite extension and inhibition of apoptosis. However, there is little direct evidence that DHA affects synaptic structure in living animals. Here we show that oral supplementation with DHA substantially increases the number of dendritic spines in adult gerbil hippocampus, particularly when animals are co-supplemented with a uridine source, uridine-5'-monophosphate (UMP), which increases brain levels of the rate-limiting phosphatide precursor CTP. The increase in dendritic spines (>30%) is accompanied by parallel increases in membrane phosphatides and in pre- and post-synaptic proteins within the hippocampus. Hence, oral DHA may promote neuronal membrane synthesis to increase the number of synapses, particularly when co-administered with UMP. Our findings provide a possible explanation for the effects of DHA on behavior and also suggest a strategy to treat cognitive disorders resulting from synapse loss.

  13. K-Cl Cotransporter 2-mediated Cl- Extrusion Determines Developmental Stage-dependent Impact of Propofol Anesthesia on Dendritic Spines.

    PubMed

    Puskarjov, Martin; Fiumelli, Hubert; Briner, Adrian; Bodogan, Timea; Demeter, Kornel; Lacoh, Claudia-Marvine; Mavrovic, Martina; Blaesse, Peter; Kaila, Kai; Vutskits, Laszlo

    2017-05-01

    General anesthetics potentiating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated signaling are known to induce a persistent decrement in excitatory synapse number in the cerebral cortex when applied during early postnatal development, while an opposite action is produced at later stages. Here, the authors test the hypothesis that the effect of general anesthetics on synaptogenesis depends upon the efficacy of GABA receptor type A (GABAA)-mediated inhibition controlled by the developmental up-regulation of the potassium-chloride (K-Cl) cotransporter 2 (KCC2). In utero electroporation of KCC2 was used to prematurely increase the efficacy of (GABAA)-mediated inhibition in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the immature rat somatosensory cortex. Parallel experiments with expression of the inward-rectifier potassium channel Kir2.1 were done to reduce intrinsic neuronal excitability. The effects of these genetic manipulations (n = 3 to 4 animals per experimental group) were evaluated using iontophoretic injection of Lucifer Yellow (n = 8 to 12 cells per animal). The total number of spines analyzed per group ranged between 907 and 3,371. The authors found a robust effect of the developmental up-regulation of KCC2-mediated Cl transport on the age-dependent action of propofol on dendritic spines. Premature expression of KCC2, unlike expression of a transport-inactive KCC2 variant, prevented a propofol-induced decrease in spine density. In line with a reduction in neuronal excitability, the above result was qualitatively replicated by overexpression of Kir2.1. The KCC2-dependent developmental increase in the efficacy of GABAA-mediated inhibition is a major determinant of the age-dependent actions of propofol on dendritic spinogenesis.

  14. Synaptic pruning in the female hippocampus is triggered at puberty by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors on dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Sonia; Parato, Julie; Shen, Hui; Smith, Sheryl Sue

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent synaptic pruning is thought to enable optimal cognition because it is disrupted in certain neuropathologies, yet the initiator of this process is unknown. One factor not yet considered is the α4βδ GABAA receptor (GABAR), an extrasynaptic inhibitory receptor which first emerges on dendritic spines at puberty in female mice. Here we show that α4βδ GABARs trigger adolescent pruning. Spine density of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells decreased by half post-pubertally in female wild-type but not α4 KO mice. This effect was associated with decreased expression of kalirin-7 (Kal7), a spine protein which controls actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Kal7 decreased at puberty as a result of reduced NMDAR activation due to α4βδ-mediated inhibition. In the absence of this inhibition, Kal7 expression was unchanged at puberty. In the unpruned condition, spatial re-learning was impaired. These data suggest that pubertal pruning requires α4βδ GABARs. In their absence, pruning is prevented and cognition is not optimal. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15106.001 PMID:27136678

  15. Stable Density and Dynamics of Dendritic Spines of Cortical Neurons Across the Estrous Cycle While Expressing Differential Levels of Sensory-Evoked Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Bailin H; Barnes, Heather M; Trimmer, Emma; Davidson, Andrew M; Ogola, Benard O; Lindsey, Sarah H; Mostany, Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Periodic oscillations of gonadal hormone levels during the estrous cycle exert effects on the female brain, impacting cognition and behavior. While previous research suggests that changes in hormone levels across the cycle affect dendritic spine dynamics in the hippocampus, little is known about the effects on cortical dendritic spines and previous studies showed contradictory results. In this in vivo imaging study, we investigated the impact of the estrous cycle on the density and dynamics of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex of mice. We also examined if the induction of synaptic plasticity during proestrus, estrus, and metestrus/diestrus had differential effects on the degree of remodeling of synapses in this brain area. We used chronic two-photon excitation (2PE) microscopy during steady-state conditions and after evoking synaptic plasticity by whisker stimulation at the different stages of the cycle. We imaged apical dendritic tufts of layer 5 pyramidal neurons of naturally cycling virgin young female mice. Spine density, turnover rate (TOR), survival fraction, morphology, and volume of mushroom spines remained unaltered across the estrous cycle, and the values of these parameters were comparable with those of young male mice. However, while whisker stimulation of female mice during proestrus and estrus resulted in increases in the TOR of spines (74.2 ± 14.9% and 75.1 ± 12.7% vs. baseline, respectively), sensory-evoked plasticity was significantly lower during metestrus/diestrus (32.3 ± 12.8%). In males, whisker stimulation produced 46.5 ± 20% increase in TOR compared with baseline-not significantly different from female mice at any stage of the cycle. These results indicate that, while steady-state density and dynamics of dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex of female mice are constant during the estrous cycle, the susceptibility of these neurons to sensory

  16. Stable Density and Dynamics of Dendritic Spines of Cortical Neurons Across the Estrous Cycle While Expressing Differential Levels of Sensory-Evoked Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Bailin H.; Barnes, Heather M.; Trimmer, Emma; Davidson, Andrew M.; Ogola, Benard O.; Lindsey, Sarah H.; Mostany, Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Periodic oscillations of gonadal hormone levels during the estrous cycle exert effects on the female brain, impacting cognition and behavior. While previous research suggests that changes in hormone levels across the cycle affect dendritic spine dynamics in the hippocampus, little is known about the effects on cortical dendritic spines and previous studies showed contradictory results. In this in vivo imaging study, we investigated the impact of the estrous cycle on the density and dynamics of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex of mice. We also examined if the induction of synaptic plasticity during proestrus, estrus, and metestrus/diestrus had differential effects on the degree of remodeling of synapses in this brain area. We used chronic two-photon excitation (2PE) microscopy during steady-state conditions and after evoking synaptic plasticity by whisker stimulation at the different stages of the cycle. We imaged apical dendritic tufts of layer 5 pyramidal neurons of naturally cycling virgin young female mice. Spine density, turnover rate (TOR), survival fraction, morphology, and volume of mushroom spines remained unaltered across the estrous cycle, and the values of these parameters were comparable with those of young male mice. However, while whisker stimulation of female mice during proestrus and estrus resulted in increases in the TOR of spines (74.2 ± 14.9% and 75.1 ± 12.7% vs. baseline, respectively), sensory-evoked plasticity was significantly lower during metestrus/diestrus (32.3 ± 12.8%). In males, whisker stimulation produced 46.5 ± 20% increase in TOR compared with baseline—not significantly different from female mice at any stage of the cycle. These results indicate that, while steady-state density and dynamics of dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex of female mice are constant during the estrous cycle, the susceptibility of these neurons to sensory

  17. Plasma hormonal profiles and dendritic spine density and morphology in the hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum, evidenced by light microscopy, of virgin and postpartum female rats.

    PubMed

    Brusco, Janaína; Wittmann, Raul; de Azevedo, Márcia S; Lucion, Aldo B; Franci, Celso R; Giovenardi, Márcia; Rasia-Filho, Alberto A

    2008-06-27

    Successful reproduction requires that changes in plasma follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), oxytocin (OT), estrogen (E(2)) and progesterone (P(4)) occur together with the display of maternal behaviors. Ovarian steroids and environmental stimuli can affect the dendritic spines in the rat hippocampus. Here, studying Wistar rats, it is described: (a) the sequential and concomitant changes in the hormonal profile of females at postpartum days (PP) 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24, comparing to estrous cycle referential values; (b) the dendritic spine density in the stratum radiatum of CA1 (CA1-SR) Golgi-impregnated neurons in virgin females across the estrous cycle and in multiparous age-matched ones; and (c) the proportion of different types of spines in the CA1-SR of virgin and postpartum females, both in diestrus. Plasma levels of gonadotrophins and ovarian hormones remained low along PP while LH increased and PRL decreased near the end of the lactating period. The lowest dendritic spine density was found in virgin females in estrus when compared to diestrus and proestrus phases or to postpartum females in diestrus (p<0.03). Other comparisons among groups were not statistically significant (p>0.4). There were no differences in the proportions of the different spine types in nulliparous and postpartum females (p>0.2). Results suggest that medium layer CA1-SR spines undergo rapid modifications in Wistar females across the estrous cycle (not quite comparable to Sprague-Dawley data or to hormonal substitutive therapy following ovariectomy), but persistent effects of motherhood on dendritic spine density and morphology were not found in this area.

  18. From neurodevelopment to neurodegeneration: the interaction of neurofibromin and valosin-containing protein/p97 in regulation of dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2012-03-26

    Both Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) and inclusion body myopathy with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) are autosomal dominant genetic disorders. These two diseases are fully penetrant but with high heterogeneity in phenotypes, suggesting the involvement of genetic modifiers in modulating patients' phenotypes. Although NF1 is recognized as a developmental disorder and IBMPFD is associated with degeneration of multiple tissues, a recent study discovered the direct protein interaction between neurofibromin, the protein product of the NF1 gene, and VCP/p97, encoded by the causative gene of IBMPFD. Both NF1 and VCP/p97 are critical for dendritic spine formation, which provides the cellular mechanism explaining the cognitive deficits and dementia found in patients. Moreover, disruption of the interaction between neurofibromin and VCP impairs dendritic spinogenesis. Neurofibromin likely influences multiple downstream pathways to control dendritic spinogenesis. One is to activate the protein kinase A pathway to initiate dendritic spine formation; another is to regulate the synaptic distribution of VCP and control the activity of VCP in dendritic spinogenesis. Since neurofibromin and VCP/p97 also regulate cell growth and bone metabolism, the understanding of neurofibromin and VCP/p97 in neurons may be applied to study of cancer and bone. Statin treatment rescues the spine defects caused by VCP deficiency, suggesting the potential role of statin in clinical treatment for these two diseases.

  19. Dim light at night provokes depression-like behaviors and reduces CA1 dendritic spine density in female hamsters.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Walton, James C; Haim, Abraham; Nelson, Randy J

    2011-08-01

    The prevalence of major depression has increased in recent decades; however, the underlying causes of this phenomenon remain unspecified. One environmental change that has coincided with elevated rates of depression is increased exposure to artificial light at night. Shift workers and others chronically exposed to light at night are at increased risk of mood disorders, suggesting that nighttime illumination may influence brain mechanisms mediating affect. We tested the hypothesis that exposure to dim light at night may impact affective responses and alter morphology of hippocampal neurons. Ovariectomized adult female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were housed for 8 weeks in either a light/dark cycle (LD) or a light/dim light cycle (DM), and then behavior was assayed. DM-hamsters displayed more depression-like responses in the forced swim and the sucrose anhedonia tests compared with LD-hamsters. Conversely, in the elevated plus maze DM-hamsters reduced anxiety-like behaviors. Brains from the same animals were processed using the Golgi-Cox method and hippocampal neurons within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus were analyzed for morphological characteristics. In CA1, DM-hamsters significantly reduced dendritic spine density on both apical and basilar dendrites, an effect which was not mediated by baseline cortisol, as concentrations were equivalent between groups. These results demonstrate dim light at night is sufficient to reduce synaptic spine connections to CA1. Importantly, the present results suggest that night-time low level illumination, comparable to levels that are pervasive in North America and Europe, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of mood disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) serine 561 phosphorylation regulates a conformational switch and bidirectional dendritic spine structural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Sun, Miao; Bernard, Laura P; Zhang, Huaye

    2017-09-29

    Postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) is a major synaptic scaffolding protein that plays a key role in bidirectional synaptic plasticity, which is a process important for learning and memory. It is known that PSD-95 shows increased dynamics upon induction of plasticity. However, the underlying structural and functional changes in PSD-95 that mediate its role in plasticity remain unclear. Here we show that phosphorylation of PSD-95 at Ser-561 in its guanylate kinase (GK) domain, which is mediated by the partitioning-defective 1 (Par1) kinases, regulates a conformational switch and is important for bidirectional plasticity. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor, we show that a phosphomimetic mutation of Ser-561 promotes an intramolecular interaction between GK and the nearby Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, leading to a closed conformation, whereas a non-phosphorylatable S561A mutation or inhibition of Par1 kinase activity decreases SH3-GK interaction, causing PSD-95 to adopt an open conformation. In addition, S561A mutation facilitates the interaction between PSD-95 and its binding partners. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching imaging reveals that the S561A mutant shows increased stability, whereas the phosphomimetic S561D mutation increases PSD-95 dynamics at the synapse. Moreover, molecular replacement of endogenous PSD-95 with the S561A mutant blocks dendritic spine structural plasticity during chemical long-term potentiation and long-term depression. Endogenous Ser-561 phosphorylation is induced by synaptic NMDA receptor activation, and the SH3-GK domains exhibit a Ser-561 phosphorylation-dependent switch to a closed conformation during synaptic plasticity. Our results provide novel mechanistic insight into the regulation of PSD-95 in dendritic spine structural plasticity through phosphorylation-mediated regulation of protein dynamics and conformation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Fluoxetine induces input-specific hippocampal dendritic spine remodeling along the septotemporal axis in adulthood and middle age.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, Kathleen; Russo, Craig; Kim, Shannen; Rankin, Genelle; Sahay, Amar

    2015-11-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is known to induce structural rearrangements and changes in synaptic transmission in hippocampal circuitry. In the adult hippocampus, structural changes include neurogenesis, dendritic, and axonal plasticity of pyramidal and dentate granule neurons, and dedifferentiation of dentate granule neurons. However, much less is known about how chronic fluoxetine affects these processes along the septotemporal axis and during the aging process. Importantly, studies documenting the effects of fluoxetine on density and distribution of spines along different dendritic segments of dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons along the septotemporal axis of hippocampus in adulthood and during aging are conspicuously absent. Here, we use a transgenic mouse line in which mature dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons are genetically labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to investigate the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment (18 mg/kg/day) on input-specific spine remodeling and mossy fiber structural plasticity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in adulthood and middle age. In addition, we examine levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, maturation state of dentate granule neurons, neuronal activity, and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 expression in response to chronic fluoxetine in adulthood and middle age. Our studies reveal that while chronic fluoxetine fails to augment adult hippocampal neurogenesis in middle age, the middle-aged hippocampus retains high sensitivity to changes in the dentate gyrus (DG) such as dematuration, hypoactivation, and increased glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) expression. Interestingly, the middle-aged hippocampus shows greater sensitivity to fluoxetine-induced input-specific synaptic remodeling than the hippocampus in adulthood with the stratum-oriens of CA1 exhibiting heightened structural plasticity. The input-specific changes and circuit

  2. Fluoxetine induces input-specific hippocampal dendritic spine remodeling along the septo-temporal axis in adulthood and middle age

    PubMed Central

    McAvoy, Kathleen; Russo, Craig; Kim, Shannen; Rankin, Genelle; Sahay, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is known to induce structural rearrangements and changes in synaptic transmission in hippocampal circuitry. In the adult hippocampus, structural changes include neurogenesis, dendritic and axonal plasticity of pyramidal and dentate granule neurons, and dedifferentiation of dentate granule neurons. However, much less is known about how chronic fluoxetine affects these processes along the septo-temporal axis and during the aging process. Importantly, studies documenting the effects of fluoxetine on density and distribution of spines along different dendritic segments of dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons along the septo-temporal axis of hippocampus in adulthood and during aging are conspicuously absent. Here, we use a transgenic mouse line in which mature dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons are genetically labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to investigate the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment (18mg/kg/day) on input-specific spine remodeling and mossy fiber structural plasticity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in adulthood and middle age. In addition, we examine levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, maturation state of dentate granule neurons, neuronal activity and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 expression in response to chronic fluoxetine in adulthood and middle age. Our studies reveal that while chronic fluoxetine fails to augment adult hippocampal neurogenesis in middle age, the middle-aged hippocampus retains high sensitivity to changes in the dentate gyrus (DG) such as dematuration, hypoactivation, and increased glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) expression. Interestingly, the middle-aged hippocampus shows greater sensitivity to fluoxetine-induced input-specific synaptic remodeling than the hippocampus in adulthood with the stratum-oriens of CA1 exhibiting heightened structural plasticity. The input-specific changes and circuit

  3. Reactivating fear memory under propranolol resets pre-trauma levels of dendritic spines in basolateral amygdala but not dorsal hippocampus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vetere, Gisella; Piserchia, Valentina; Borreca, Antonella; Novembre, Giovanni; Aceti, Massimiliano; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Fear memory enhances connectivity in cortical and limbic circuits but whether treatments disrupting fear reset connectivity to pre-trauma level is unknown. Here we report that C56BL/6J mice exposed to a tone-shock association in context A (conditioning), and briefly re-exposed to the same tone-shock association in context B (reactivation), exhibit strong freezing to the tone alone delivered 48 h later in context B (long term fear memory). This intense fear response is associated with a massive increase in dendritic spines and phospho-Erk (p-ERK) signaling in basolateral amygdala (BLA) but neurons. We then show that propranolol (a central/peripheral β-adrenergic receptor blocker) administered before, but not after, the reactivation trial attenuates long term fear memory assessed drug free 48 h later, and completely prevents the increase in spines and p-ERK signaling in BLA neurons. An increase in spines, but not of p-ERK, was also detected in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) of the conditioned mice. DH spines, however, were unaffected by propranolol suggesting their independence from the ERK/β-ARs cascade. We conclude that propranolol selectively blocks dendritic spines and p-ERK signaling enhancement in the BLA; its effect on fear memory is, however, less pronounced suggesting that the persistence of spines at other brain sites decreases the sensitivity of the fear memory trace to treatments selectively targeting β ARs in the BLA. PMID:24391566

  4. Reelin Supplementation Enhances Cognitive Ability, Synaptic Plasticity, and Dendritic Spine Density

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Justin T.; Rusiana, Ian; Trotter, Justin; Zhao, Lisa; Donaldson, Erika; Pak, Daniel T.S.; Babus, Lenard W.; Peters, Melinda; Banko, Jessica L.; Chavis, Pascale; Rebeck, G. William; Hoe, Hyang-Sook; Weeber, Edwin J.

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein receptors belong to an evolutionarily conserved surface receptor family that has intimate roles in the modulation of synaptic plasticity and is necessary for proper hippocampal-dependent memory formation. The known lipoprotein receptor ligand Reelin is important for normal synaptic plasticity, dendritic morphology, and cognitive…

  5. Shaping dendritic spines in autism spectrum disorder: mTORC1-dependent macroautophagy.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Heather; Klann, Eric

    2014-09-03

    In this issue of Neuron, Tang et al. (2014) explore the relationship between developmental dendritic pruning, elevated mTORC1 signaling, macroautophagy, and autism spectrum disorder. The study provides valuable new insight into mTORC1-dependent cellular dysfunction and neurodevelopmental disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Palmitoylation-dependent CDKL5-PSD-95 interaction regulates synaptic targeting of CDKL5 and dendritic spine development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Chuan; Li, Dan; Wang, Lu; Lu, Bin; Zheng, Jing; Zhao, Shi-Lin; Zeng, Rong; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2013-05-28

    The X-linked gene cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is mutated in severe neurodevelopmental disorders, including some forms of atypical Rett syndrome, but the function and regulation of CDKL5 protein in neurons remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that CDKL5 binds to the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density (PSD)-95, and that this binding promotes the targeting of CDKL5 to excitatory synapses. Interestingly, this binding is not constitutive, but governed by palmitate cycling on PSD-95. Furthermore, pathogenic mutations that truncate the C-terminal tail of CDKL5 diminish its binding to PSD-95 and synaptic accumulation. Importantly, down-regulation of CDKL5 by RNA interference (RNAi) or interference with the CDKL5-PSD-95 interaction inhibits dendritic spine formation and growth. These results demonstrate a critical role of the palmitoylation-dependent CDKL5-PSD-95 interaction in localizing CDKL5 to synapses for normal spine development and suggest that disruption of this interaction by pathogenic mutations may be implicated in the pathogenesis of CDKL5-related disorders.

  7. Palmitoylation-dependent CDKL5–PSD-95 interaction regulates synaptic targeting of CDKL5 and dendritic spine development

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong-Chuan; Li, Dan; Wang, Lu; Lu, Bin; Zheng, Jing; Zhao, Shi-Lin; Zeng, Rong; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked gene cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is mutated in severe neurodevelopmental disorders, including some forms of atypical Rett syndrome, but the function and regulation of CDKL5 protein in neurons remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that CDKL5 binds to the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density (PSD)-95, and that this binding promotes the targeting of CDKL5 to excitatory synapses. Interestingly, this binding is not constitutive, but governed by palmitate cycling on PSD-95. Furthermore, pathogenic mutations that truncate the C-terminal tail of CDKL5 diminish its binding to PSD-95 and synaptic accumulation. Importantly, down-regulation of CDKL5 by RNA interference (RNAi) or interference with the CDKL5–PSD-95 interaction inhibits dendritic spine formation and growth. These results demonstrate a critical role of the palmitoylation-dependent CDKL5–PSD-95 interaction in localizing CDKL5 to synapses for normal spine development and suggest that disruption of this interaction by pathogenic mutations may be implicated in the pathogenesis of CDKL5-related disorders. PMID:23671101

  8. Metal Ionophore Treatment Restores Dendritic Spine Density and Synaptic Protein Levels in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adlard, Paul A.; Bica, Laura; White, Anthony R.; Nurjono, Milawaty; Filiz, Gulay; Crouch, Peter J.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Cappai, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that brief treatment of APP transgenic mice with metal ionophores (PBT2, Prana Biotechnology) rapidly and markedly improves learning and memory. To understand the potential mechanisms of action underlying this phenomenon we examined hippocampal dendritic spine density, and the levels of key proteins involved in learning and memory, in young (4 months) and old (14 months) female Tg2576 mice following brief (11 days) oral treatment with PBT2 (30 mg/kg/d). Transgenic mice exhibited deficits in spine density compared to littermate controls that were significantly rescued by PBT2 treatment in both the young (+17%, p<0.001) and old (+32%, p<0.001) animals. There was no effect of PBT2 on spine density in the control animals. In the transgenic animals, PBT2 treatment also resulted in significant increases in brain levels of CamKII (+57%, p = 0.005), spinophilin (+37%, p = 0.04), NMDAR1A (+126%, p = 0.02), NMDAR2A (+70%, p = 0.05), pro-BDNF (+19%, p = 0.02) and BDNF (+19%, p = 0.04). While PBT2-treatment did not significantly alter neurite-length in vivo, it did increase neurite outgrowth (+200%, p = 0.006) in cultured cells, and this was abolished by co-incubation with the transition metal chelator, diamsar. These data suggest that PBT2 may affect multiple aspects of snaptic health/efficacy. In Alzheimer's disease therefore, PBT2 may restore the uptake of physiological metal ions trapped within extracellular β-amyloid aggregates that then induce biochemical and anatomical changes to improve cognitive function. PMID:21412423

  9. The Polarity Protein Partitioning-defective 1 (PAR-1) Regulates Dendritic Spine Morphogenesis through Phosphorylating Postsynaptic Density Protein 95 (PSD-95)*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; DiBona, Victoria L.; Bernard, Laura P.; Zhang, Huaye

    2012-01-01

    The polarity protein PAR-1 plays an essential role in many cellular contexts, including embryogenesis, asymmetric cell division, directional migration, and epithelial morphogenesis. Despite its known importance in different cellular processes, the role of PAR-1 in neuronal morphogenesis is less well understood. In particular, its role in the morphogenesis of dendritic spines, which are sites of excitatory synaptic inputs, has been unclear. Here, we show that PAR-1 is required for normal spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons. We further show that PAR-1 functions through phosphorylating the synaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95 in this process. Phosphorylation at a conserved serine residue in the KXGS motif in PSD-95 regulates spine morphogenesis, and a phosphomimetic mutant of this site can rescue the defects of kinase-dead PAR-1. Together, our findings uncover a role of PAR-1 in spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons through phosphorylating PSD-95. PMID:22807451

  10. The polarity protein partitioning-defective 1 (PAR-1) regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis through phosphorylating postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95).

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; DiBona, Victoria L; Bernard, Laura P; Zhang, Huaye

    2012-08-31

    The polarity protein PAR-1 plays an essential role in many cellular contexts, including embryogenesis, asymmetric cell division, directional migration, and epithelial morphogenesis. Despite its known importance in different cellular processes, the role of PAR-1 in neuronal morphogenesis is less well understood. In particular, its role in the morphogenesis of dendritic spines, which are sites of excitatory synaptic inputs, has been unclear. Here, we show that PAR-1 is required for normal spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons. We further show that PAR-1 functions through phosphorylating the synaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95 in this process. Phosphorylation at a conserved serine residue in the KXGS motif in PSD-95 regulates spine morphogenesis, and a phosphomimetic mutant of this site can rescue the defects of kinase-dead PAR-1. Together, our findings uncover a role of PAR-1 in spine morphogenesis in hippocampal neurons through phosphorylating PSD-95.

  11. Association of N-cadherin levels and downstream effectors of Rho GTPases with dendritic spine loss induced by chronic stress in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Patricia; Muñoz, Mauricio; García-Rojo, Gonzalo; Ulloa, José L; Bravo, Javier A; Márquez, Ruth; García-Pérez, M Alexandra; Arancibia, Damaris; Araneda, Karina; Rojas, Paulina S; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela; Mora, Sergio; Aliaga, Esteban; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2015-10-01

    Chronic stress promotes cognitive impairment and dendritic spine loss in hippocampal neurons. In this animal model of depression, spine loss probably involves a weakening of the interaction between pre- and postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules, such as N-cadherin, followed by disruption of the cytoskeleton. N-cadherin, in concert with catenin, stabilizes the cytoskeleton through Rho-family GTPases. Via their effector LIM kinase (LIMK), RhoA and ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC) GTPases phosphorylate and inhibit cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing molecule, favoring spine growth. Additionally, RhoA, through Rho kinase (ROCK), inactivates myosin phosphatase through phosphorylation of the myosin-binding subunit (MYPT1), producing actomyosin contraction and probable spine loss. Some micro-RNAs negatively control the translation of specific mRNAs involved in Rho GTPase signaling. For example, miR-138 indirectly activates RhoA, and miR-134 reduces LIMK1 levels, resulting in spine shrinkage; in contrast, miR-132 activates RAC1, promoting spine formation. We evaluated whether N-cadherin/β-catenin and Rho signaling is sensitive to chronic restraint stress. Stressed rats exhibit anhedonia, impaired associative learning, and immobility in the forced swim test and reduction in N-cadherin levels but not β-catenin in the hippocampus. We observed a reduction in spine number in the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, with no effect on the levels of miR-132 or miR-134. Although the stress did not modify the RAC-LIMK-cofilin signaling pathway, we observed increased phospho-MYPT1 levels, probably mediated by RhoA-ROCK activation. Furthermore, chronic stress raises the levels of miR-138 in accordance with the observed activation of the RhoA-ROCK pathway. Our findings suggest that a dysregulation of RhoA-ROCK activity by chronic stress could potentially underlie spine loss in hippocampal neurons. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dissociation between extension of the sensitive period for avian vocal learning and dendritic spine loss in the song nucleus lMAN.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, J E; Nordeen, K W; Nordeen, E J

    2005-03-01

    Several instances of early learning coincide with significant rearrangements of neural connections in regions contributing to these behaviors. In fact developmentally restricted learning may be constrained temporally by the opportunity for experience to selectively maintain appropriate synapses amidst the elimination of exuberant connections. Consistent with this notion, during the normal sensitive period for vocal learning in zebra finches (Taenopygia guttata), there is a decline in the density of dendritic spines within a region essential for song development, the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (lMAN). Moreover, in birds isolated from conspecific song shortly after hatching, both the closure of the sensitive period for vocal learning and the pruning of spines from lMAN neurons is delayed. Here, we employed a more subtle form of deprivation to delay the close of the sensitive period for song learning, and found that late song learning occurred without obvious alterations in the pruning of dendritic spines on lMAN neurons. At posthatch day (PHD) 65 (beyond the end of the normal sensitive period for song memorization in zebra finches), birds isolated from song beginning on PHD30 did not differ from normally reared birds in measures of dendritic spine density on Golgi-Cox stained lMAN neurons. Moreover, tutor exposure from PHD65 to 90 did not increase spine elimination in these isolates (who memorized new song material) relative to controls (who did not). Thus, we conclude that the extent of normally occurring lMAN spine loss is not sufficient to account for the timing of the sensitive period for zebra finch song learning.

  13. CYFIP1 Coordinates mRNA Translation and Cytoskeleton Remodeling to Ensure Proper Dendritic Spine Formation

    PubMed Central

    De Rubeis, Silvia; Pasciuto, Emanuela; Li, Ka Wan; Fernández, Esperanza; Di Marino, Daniele; Buzzi, Andrea; Ostroff, Linnaea E.; Klann, Eric; Zwartkruis, Fried J.T.; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Grant, Seth G.N.; Poujol, Christel; Choquet, Daniel; Achsel, Tilmann; Posthuma, Danielle; Smit, August B.; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Summary The CYFIP1/SRA1 gene is located in a chromosomal region linked to various neurological disorders, including intellectual disability, autism, and schizophrenia. CYFIP1 plays a dual role in two apparently unrelated processes, inhibiting local protein synthesis and favoring actin remodeling. Here, we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-driven synaptic signaling releases CYFIP1 from the translational inhibitory complex, triggering translation of target mRNAs and shifting CYFIP1 into the WAVE regulatory complex. Active Rac1 alters the CYFIP1 conformation, as demonstrated by intramolecular FRET, and is key in changing the equilibrium of the two complexes. CYFIP1 thus orchestrates the two molecular cascades, protein translation and actin polymerization, each of which is necessary for correct spine morphology in neurons. The CYFIP1 interactome reveals many interactors associated with brain disorders, opening new perspectives to define regulatory pathways shared by neurological disabilities characterized by spine dysmorphogenesis. PMID:24050404

  14. Ingested d-Aspartate Facilitates the Functional Connectivity and Modifies Dendritic Spine Morphology in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Akihiko; Hojo, Yasushi; Ikeda, Muneki; Karakawa, Sachise; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Kim, Jonghyuk; Soma, Mika; Kawato, Suguru; Tsurugizawa, Tomokazu

    2018-05-30

    d-Aspartate (d-Asp), the stereoisomer of l-aspartate, has a role in memory function in rodents. However, the mechanism of the effect of d-Asp has not been fully understood. In this study, we hypothesized that ingested d-Asp directly reaches the hippocampal tissues via the blood circulation and modifies the functional connectivity between hippocampus and other regions through spinogenesis in hippocampal CA1 neurons. The spinogenesis induced by the application of d-Asp was investigated using rat acute hippocampal slices. The density of CA1 spines was increased following 21 and 100 μM d-Asp application. The nongenomic spine increase pathway involved LIM kinase. In parallel to the acute slice study, brain activation was investigated in awake rats using functional MRI following the intragastric administration of 5 mM d-Asp. Furthermore, the concentration of d-Asp in the blood serum and hippocampus was significantly increased 15 min after intragastric administration of d-Asp. A functional connectivity by awake rat fMRI demonstrated increased slow-frequency synchronization in the hippocampus and other regions, including the somatosensory cortex, striatum, and the nucleus accumbens, 10-20 min after the start of d-Asp administration. These results suggest that ingested d-Asp reaches the brain through the blood circulation and modulates hippocampal neural networks through the modulation of spines.

  15. Plastic changes to dendritic spines on layer V pyramidal neurons are involved in the rectifying role of the prefrontal cortex during the fast period of motor learning.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, David; Martínez-Torres, Nestor I; Hernández-González, Marisela; Guevara, Miguel Angel; González-Burgos, Ignacio

    2016-02-01

    The prefrontal cortex participates in the rectification of information related to motor activity that favors motor learning. Dendritic spine plasticity is involved in the modifications of motor patterns that underlie both motor activity and motor learning. To study this association in more detail, adult male rats were trained over six days in an acrobatic motor learning paradigm and they were subjected to a behavioral evaluation on each day of training. Also, a Golgi-based morphological study was carried out to determine the spine density and the proportion of the different spine types. In the learning paradigm, the number of errors diminished as motor training progressed. Concomitantly, spine density increased on days 1 and 3 of training, particularly reflecting an increase in the proportion of thin (day 1), stubby (day 1) and branched (days 1, 2 and 5) spines. Conversely, mushroom spines were less prevalent than in the control rats on days 5 and 6, as were stubby spines on day 6, together suggesting that this plasticity might enhance motor learning. The increase in stubby spines on day 1 suggests a regulation of excitability related to the changes in synaptic input to the prefrontal cortex. The plasticity to thin spines observed during the first 3 days of training could be related to the active rectification induced by the information relayed to the prefrontal cortex -as the behavioral findings indeed showed-, which in turn could be linked to the lower proportion of mushroom and stubby spines seen in the last days of training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Plasminogen Activation System Promotes Dendritic Spine Recovery and Improvement in Neurological Function After an Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jeanneret, Valerie; Yepes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neurocritical care and interventional neuroradiology have led to a significant decrease in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) mortality. In contrast, due to the lack of an effective therapeutic strategy to promote neuronal recovery among AIS survivors, cerebral ischemia is still a leading cause of disability in the world. Ischemic stroke has a harmful impact on synaptic structure and function, and plasticity-mediated synaptic recovery is associated with neurological improvement following an AIS. Dendritic spines (DSs) are specialized dendritic protrusions that receive most of the excitatory input in the brain. The deleterious effect of cerebral ischemia on DSs morphology and function has been associated with impaired synaptic transmission and neurological deterioration. However, these changes are reversible if cerebral blood flow is restored on time, and this recovery has been associated with neurological improvement following an AIS. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) are two serine proteases that besides catalyzing the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin in the intravascular and pericellular environment, respectively, are also are efficient inductors of synaptic plasticity. Accordingly, recent evidence indicates that both, tPA and uPA, protect DSs from the metabolic stress associated with the ischemic injury, and promote their morphological and functional recovery during the recovery phase from an AIS. Here we will review data indicating that plasticity-induced changes in DSs and the associated post-synaptic density play a pivotal role in the recovery process from AIS, making special emphasis on the role of tPA and uPA in this process. PMID:26846991

  17. Hyperforin modulates dendritic spine morphology in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by activating Ca(2+) -permeable TRPC6 channels.

    PubMed

    Leuner, Kristina; Li, Wei; Amaral, Michelle D; Rudolph, Stephanie; Calfa, Gaston; Schuwald, Anita M; Harteneck, Christian; Inoue, Takafumi; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The standardized extract of the St. John's wort plant (Hypericum perforatum) is commonly used to treat mild to moderate depression. Its active constituent is hyperforin, a phloroglucinol derivative that reduces the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine by increasing intracellular Na(+) concentration through the activation of nonselective cationic TRPC6 channels. TRPC6 channels are also Ca(2+) -permeable, resulting in intracellular Ca(2+) elevations. Indeed, hyperforin activates TRPC6-mediated currents and Ca(2+) transients in rat PC12 cells, which induce their differentiation, mimicking the neurotrophic effect of nerve growth factor. Here, we show that hyperforin modulates dendritic spine morphology in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of hippocampal slice cultures through the activation of TRPC6 channels. Hyperforin also evoked intracellular Ca(2+) transients and depolarizing inward currents sensitive to the TRPC channel blocker La(3+) , thus resembling the actions of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. These results suggest that the antidepressant actions of St. John's wort are mediated by a mechanism similar to that engaged by BDNF. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. HYPERFORIN MODULATES DENDRITIC SPINE MORPHOLOGY IN HIPPOCAMPAL PYRAMIDAL NEURONS BY ACTIVATING Ca2+-PERMEABLE TRPC6 CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Leuner, Kristina; Li, Wei; Amaral, Michelle D.; Rudolph, Stephanie; Calfa, Gaston; Schuwald, Anita M.; Harteneck, Christian; Inoue, Takafumi; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    The standardized extract of the St. John’s wort plant (Hypericum perforatum) is commonly used to treat mild to moderate depression. Its active constituent is hyperforin, a phloroglucinol derivative that reduces the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine by increasing intracellular Na+ concentration through the activation of non-selective cationic TRPC6 channels. TRPC6 channels are also Ca2+-permeable, resulting in intracellular Ca2+ elevations. Indeed, hyperforin activates TRPC6-mediated currents and Ca2+ transients in rat PC12 cells, which induce their differentiation, mimicking the neurotrophic effect of NGF. Here, we show that hyperforin modulates dendritic spine morphology in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of hippocampal slice cultures through the activation of TRPC6 channels. Hyperforin also evoked intracellular Ca2+ transients and depolarizing inward currents sensitive to the TRPC channel blocker La3+, thus resembling the actions of the neurotrophin BDNF in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. These results suggest that the antidepressant actions of St. John’s wort are mediated by a mechanism similar to that engaged by BDNF. PMID:22815087

  19. Hippocampal neuronal subtypes develop abnormal dendritic arbors in the presence of Fragile X astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S; Cheng, C; Doering, L C

    2016-06-02

    Astrocytes are now recognized as key players in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome. However, the nature of Fragile X astrocyte-mediated control of dendrite development in subtypes of hippocampal neurons is not yet known. We used a co-culture procedure in which wildtype primary hippocampal neurons were cultured with astrocytes from either a wildtype or Fragile X mouse, for either 7, 14 or 21 days. The neurons were processed for immunocytochemistry with the dendritic marker MAP2, classified by morphological criteria into one of five neuronal subtypes, and subjected to Sholl analyses. Both linear and semi-log methods of Sholl analyses were applied to the neurons in order to provide an in depth analysis of the dendritic arborizations. We found that Fragile X astrocytes affect the development of dendritic arborization of all subtypes of wildtype hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we show that hippocampal neurons with spiny stellate neuron morphology exhibit the most pervasive developmental delays, with significant dendritic arbor alterations persisting at 21 days in culture. The results further dictate the critical role astrocytes play in governing neuronal morphology including altered dendrite development in Fragile X. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Essential role of GluD1 in dendritic spine development and GluN2B to GluN2A NMDAR subunit switch in the cortex and hippocampus reveals ability of GluN2B inhibition in correcting hyperconnectivity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subhash C; Yadav, Roopali; Pavuluri, Ratnamala; Morley, Barbara J; Stairs, Dustin J; Dravid, Shashank M

    2015-06-01

    The glutamate delta-1 (GluD1) receptor is highly expressed in the forebrain. We have previously shown that loss of GluD1 leads to social and cognitive deficits in mice, however, its role in synaptic development and neurotransmission remains poorly understood. Here we report that GluD1 is enriched in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and GluD1 knockout mice exhibit a higher dendritic spine number, greater excitatory neurotransmission as well as higher number of synapses in mPFC. In addition abnormalities in the LIMK1-cofilin signaling, which regulates spine dynamics, and a lower ratio of GluN2A/GluN2B expression was observed in the mPFC in GluD1 knockout mice. Analysis of the GluD1 knockout CA1 hippocampus similarly indicated the presence of higher spine number and synapses and altered LIMK1-cofilin signaling. We found that systemic administration of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor partial agonist d-cycloserine (DCS) at a high-dose, but not at a low-dose, and a GluN2B-selective inhibitor Ro-25-6981 partially normalized the abnormalities in LIMK1-cofilin signaling and reduced excess spine number in mPFC and hippocampus. The molecular effects of high-dose DCS and GluN2B inhibitor correlated with their ability to reduce the higher stereotyped behavior and depression-like behavior in GluD1 knockout mice. Together these findings demonstrate a critical requirement for GluD1 in normal spine development in the cortex and hippocampus. Moreover, these results identify inhibition of GluN2B-containing receptors as a mechanism for reducing excess dendritic spines and stereotyped behavior which may have therapeutic value in certain neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Utility of three-dimensional and multiplanar reformatted computed tomography for evaluation of pediatric congenital spine abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Newton, Peter O; Hahn, Gregory W; Fricka, Kevin B; Wenger, Dennis R

    2002-04-15

    A retrospective radiographic review of 31 patients with congenital spine abnormalities who underwent conventional radiography and advanced imaging studies was conducted. To analyze the utility of three-dimensional computed tomography with multiplanar reformatted images for congenital spine anomalies, as compared with plain radiographs and axial two-dimensional computed tomography imaging. Conventional radiographic imaging for congenital spine disorders often are difficult to interpret because of the patient's small size, the complexity of the disorder, a deformity not in the plane of the radiographs, superimposed structures, and difficulty in forming a mental three-dimensional image. Multiplanar reformatted and three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging offers many potential advantages for defining congenital spine anomalies including visualization of the deformity in any plane, from any angle, with the overlying structures subtracted. The imaging studies of patients who had undergone a three-dimensional computed tomography for congenital deformities of the spine between 1992 and 1998 were reviewed (31 cases). All plain radiographs and axial two-dimensional computed tomography images performed before the three-dimensional computed tomography were reviewed and the findings documented. This was repeated for the three-dimensional reconstructions and, when available, the multiplanar reformatted images (15 cases). In each case, the utility of the advanced imaging was graded as one of the following: Grade A (substantial new information obtained), Grade B (confirmatory with improved visualization and understanding of the deformity), and Grade C (no added useful information obtained). In 17 of 31 cases, the multiplanar reformatted and three-dimensional images allowed identification of unrecognized malformations. In nine additional cases, the advanced imaging was helpful in better visualizing and understanding previously identified deformities. In five cases, no new

  2. Longitudinal two-photon imaging in somatosensory cortex of behaving mice reveals dendritic spine formation enhancement by subchronic administration of low-dose ketamine.

    PubMed

    Pryazhnikov, Evgeny; Mugantseva, Ekaterina; Casarotto, Plinio; Kolikova, Julia; Fred, Senem Merve; Toptunov, Dmytro; Afzalov, Ramil; Hotulainen, Pirta; Voikar, Vootele; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan; Engel, Sharon; Kirov, Sergei; Castren, Eero; Khiroug, Leonard

    2018-04-24

    Ketamine, a well-known anesthetic, has recently attracted renewed attention as a fast-acting antidepressant. A single dose of ketamine induces rapid synaptogenesis, which may underlie its antidepressant effect. To test whether repeated exposure to ketamine triggers sustained synaptogenesis, we administered a sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine (10 mg/kg i.p.) once-daily for 5 days, and repeatedly imaged dendritic spines of the YFP-expressing pyramidal neurons in somatosensory cortex of awake female mice using in vivo two-photon microscopy. We found that the spine formation rate became significantly higher at 72-132 h after the first ketamine injection (but not at 6-24 h), while the rate of elimination of pre-existing spines remained unchanged. In contrast to the net gain of spines observed in ketamine-treated mice, the vehicle-injected control mice exhibited a net loss typical for young-adult animals undergoing synapse pruning. Ketamine-induced spinogenesis was correlated with increased PSD-95 and phosphorylated actin, consistent with formation of new synapses. Moreover, structural synaptic plasticity caused by ketamine was paralleled by a significant improvement in the nest building behavioral assay. Taken together, our data show that subchronic low-dose ketamine induces a sustained shift towards spine formation.

  3. Sequential Elution Interactome Analysis of the Mind Bomb 1 Ubiquitin Ligase Reveals a Novel Role in Dendritic Spine Outgrowth*

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Joseph; Tan, Haiyan; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Bai, Bing; Chen, Ping-Chung; Li, Yuxin; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Shaw, Timothy; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin

    2015-01-01

    The mind bomb 1 (Mib1) ubiquitin ligase is essential for controlling metazoan development by Notch signaling and possibly the Wnt pathway. It is also expressed in postmitotic neurons and regulates neuronal morphogenesis and synaptic activity by mechanisms that are largely unknown. We sought to comprehensively characterize the Mib1 interactome and study its potential function in neuron development utilizing a novel sequential elution strategy for affinity purification, in which Mib1 binding proteins were eluted under different stringency and then quantified by the isobaric labeling method. The strategy identified the Mib1 interactome with both deep coverage and the ability to distinguish high-affinity partners from low-affinity partners. A total of 817 proteins were identified during the Mib1 affinity purification, including 56 high-affinity partners and 335 low-affinity partners, whereas the remaining 426 proteins are likely copurified contaminants or extremely weak binding proteins. The analysis detected all previously known Mib1-interacting proteins and revealed a large number of novel components involved in Notch and Wnt pathways, endocytosis and vesicle transport, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, cellular morphogenesis, and synaptic activities. Immunofluorescence studies further showed colocalization of Mib1 with five selected proteins: the Usp9x (FAM) deubiquitinating enzyme, alpha-, beta-, and delta-catenins, and CDKL5. Mutations of CDKL5 are associated with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy-2 (EIEE2), a severe form of mental retardation. We found that the expression of Mib1 down-regulated the protein level of CDKL5 by ubiquitination, and antagonized CDKL5 function during the formation of dendritic spines. Thus, the sequential elution strategy enables biochemical characterization of protein interactomes; and Mib1 analysis provides a comprehensive interactome for investigating its role in signaling networks and neuronal development. PMID:25931508

  4. A Mouse Model of Visual Perceptual Learning Reveals Alterations in Neuronal Coding and Dendritic Spine Density in the Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Xian; Hu, Xu; Li, Yue; Lou, Shihao; Ma, Xiao; An, Xu; Liu, Hui; Peng, Jing; Ma, Danyi; Zhou, Yifeng; Yang, Yupeng

    2016-01-01

    Visual perceptual learning (VPL) can improve spatial vision in normally sighted and visually impaired individuals. Although previous studies of humans and large animals have explored the neural basis of VPL, elucidation of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remains a challenge. Owing to the advantages of molecular genetic and optogenetic manipulations, the mouse is a promising model for providing a mechanistic understanding of VPL. Here, we thoroughly evaluated the effects and properties of VPL on spatial vision in C57BL/6J mice using a two-alternative, forced-choice visual water task. Briefly, the mice underwent prolonged training at near the individual threshold of contrast or spatial frequency (SF) for pattern discrimination or visual detection for 35 consecutive days. Following training, the contrast-threshold trained mice showed an 87% improvement in contrast sensitivity (CS) and a 55% gain in visual acuity (VA). Similarly, the SF-threshold trained mice exhibited comparable and long-lasting improvements in VA and significant gains in CS over a wide range of SFs. Furthermore, learning largely transferred across eyes and stimulus orientations. Interestingly, learning could transfer from a pattern discrimination task to a visual detection task, but not vice versa. We validated that this VPL fully restored VA in adult amblyopic mice and old mice. Taken together, these data indicate that mice, as a species, exhibit reliable VPL. Intrinsic signal optical imaging revealed that mice with perceptual training had higher cut-off SFs in primary visual cortex (V1) than those without perceptual training. Moreover, perceptual training induced an increase in the dendritic spine density in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of V1. These results indicated functional and structural alterations in V1 during VPL. Overall, our VPL mouse model will provide a platform for investigating the neurobiological basis of VPL.

  5. [Quantitative analysis of the structure of neuronal dendritic spines in the striatum using the Leitz-ASM system].

    PubMed

    Leontovich, T A; Zvegintseva, E G

    1985-10-01

    Two principal classes of striatum long axonal neurons (sparsely ramified reticular cells and densely ramified dendritic cells) were analyzed quantitatively in four animal species: hedgehog, rabbit, dog and monkey. The cross section area, total dendritic length and the area of dendritic field were measured using "LEITZ-ASM" system. Classes of neurons studied were significantly different in dogs and monkeys, while no differences were noted between hedgehog and rabbit. Reticular neurons of different species varied much more than dendritic ones. Quantitative analysis has revealed the progressive increase in the complexity of dendritic tree in mammals from rabbit to monkey.

  6. Rapid effects of the G-protein coupled oestrogen receptor (GPER) on learning and dorsal hippocampus dendritic spines in female mice.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Christopher; Lymer, Jennifer; Phan, Anna; Choleris, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Recently, oestrogen receptors (ERs) have been implicated in rapid learning processes. We have previously shown that 17β-estradiol, ERα and ERβ agonists can improve learning within 40 min of drug administration in mice. However, oestrogen action at the classical receptors may only in part explain these rapid learning effects. Chronic treatment of a G-protein coupled oestrogen receptor (GPER) agonist has been shown to affect learning and memory in ovariectomized rats, yet little is known about its rapid learning effects. Therefore we investigated whether the GPER agonist G-1 at 1 μg/kg, 6 μg/kg, 10 μg/kg, and 30 μg/kg could affect social recognition, object recognition, and object placement learning in ovariectomized CD1 mice within 40 min of drug administration. We also examined rapid effects of G-1 on CA1 hippocampal dendritic spine density and length within 40 min of drug administration, but in the absence of any learning tests. Results suggest a rapid enhancing effect of GPER activation on social recognition, object recognition and object placement learning. G-1 treatment also resulted in increased dendritic spine density in the stratum radiatum of the CA1 hippocampus. Hence GPER, along with the classical ERs, may mediate the rapid effects of oestrogen on learning and neuronal plasticity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of GPER effects occurring within a 40 min time frame. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Antidepressant effects of acupoint stimulation and fluoxetine by increasing dendritic arborization and spine density in CA1 hippocampal neurons of socially isolated rats.

    PubMed

    Dávila-Hernández, Amalia; Zamudio, Sergio R; Martínez-Mota, Lucía; González-González, Roberto; Ramírez-San Juan, Eduardo

    2018-05-14

    Given the importance of depression and the adverse effects of conventional treatment, it is necessary to seek complementary therapies. In a rat model of depression, this study aimed to assess the behavioral and morphological effects of embedding absorbable thread in acupoints (acu-catgut), and compare the results to those of fluoxetine treatment and the corresponding control groups. Therefore, depressive-like behavior was evaluated with the forced swimming test, and dendritic morphology (in the CA1 hippocampal region) with the Golgi-Cox technique and Sholl analysis. After weaning, male Sprague-Dawley rats were housed in social isolation for 8 weeks to induce depressive-like behavior. They were then given a 21-day treatment by stimulating acupoints with acu-catgut (AC) or fluoxetine (FX) (2 mg/kg). Rats were divided into six groups: Control (socially housed), social isolation (SI), SI + AC, SI + Sham (sham embedding of thread), SI + FX and SI + VH (vehicle). Compared to fluoxetine, acu-catgut treatment was more effective in reversing depressive-like behavior elicited by SI. The SI-induced reduction in dendritic length and spine density in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was attenuated after prolonged treatment with acu-catgut or fluoxetine. Hence, both treatments proved capable of reversing depressive-like alterations caused by SI, likely due to dendritic remodeling in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Environmental enrichment reveals effects of genotype on hippocampal spine morphologies in the mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lauterborn, Julie C; Jafari, Matiar; Babayan, Alex H; Gall, Christine M

    2015-02-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) and the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model of this disorder exhibit abnormal dendritic spines in neocortex, but the degree of spine disturbances in hippocampus is not clear. The present studies tested if the mutation influences dendritic branching and spine measures for CA1 pyramidal cells in Fmr1 KO and wild-type (WT) mice provided standard or enriched environment (EE) housing. Automated measures from 3D reconstructions of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled cells showed that spine head volumes were ∼ 40% lower in KOs when compared with WTs in both housing conditions. With standard housing, average spine length was greater in KOs versus WTs but there was no genotype difference in dendritic branching, numbers of spines, or spine length distribution. However, with EE rearing, significant effects of genotype emerged including greater dendritic branching in WTs, greater spine density in KOs, and greater numbers of short thin spines in KOs when compared with WTs. Thus, EE rearing revealed greater effects of the Fmr1 mutation on hippocampal pyramidal cell morphology than was evident with standard housing, suggesting that environmental enrichment allows for fuller appreciation of the impact of the mutation and better representation of abnormalities likely to be present in human FXS. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Environmental Enrichment Reveals Effects of Genotype on Hippocampal Spine Morphologies in the Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lauterborn, Julie C.; Jafari, Matiar; Babayan, Alex H.; Gall, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) and the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model of this disorder exhibit abnormal dendritic spines in neocortex, but the degree of spine disturbances in hippocampus is not clear. The present studies tested if the mutation influences dendritic branching and spine measures for CA1 pyramidal cells in Fmr1 KO and wild-type (WT) mice provided standard or enriched environment (EE) housing. Automated measures from 3D reconstructions of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled cells showed that spine head volumes were ∼40% lower in KOs when compared with WTs in both housing conditions. With standard housing, average spine length was greater in KOs versus WTs but there was no genotype difference in dendritic branching, numbers of spines, or spine length distribution. However, with EE rearing, significant effects of genotype emerged including greater dendritic branching in WTs, greater spine density in KOs, and greater numbers of short thin spines in KOs when compared with WTs. Thus, EE rearing revealed greater effects of the Fmr1 mutation on hippocampal pyramidal cell morphology than was evident with standard housing, suggesting that environmental enrichment allows for fuller appreciation of the impact of the mutation and better representation of abnormalities likely to be present in human FXS. PMID:24046080

  10. Activity-dependent release of tissue plasminogen activator from the dendritic spines of hippocampal neurons revealed by live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Janis E; Honigman, Leah S; Grant, Wilmon F; Gessford, Sarah K; Hansen, Alexis B; Silverman, Michael A; Scalettar, Bethe A

    2006-05-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been implicated in a variety of important cellular functions, including learning-related synaptic plasticity and potentiating N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent signaling. These findings suggest that tPA may localize to, and undergo activity-dependent secretion from, synapses; however, conclusive data supporting these hypotheses have remained elusive. To elucidate these issues, we studied the distribution, dynamics, and depolarization-induced secretion of tPA in hippocampal neurons, using fluorescent chimeras of tPA. We found that tPA resides in dense-core granules (DCGs) that traffic to postsynaptic dendritic spines and that can remain in spines for extended periods. We also found that depolarization induced by high potassium levels elicits a slow, partial exocytotic release of tPA from DCGs in spines that is dependent on extracellular Ca(+2) concentrations. This slow, partial release demonstrates that exocytosis occurs via a mechanism, such as fuse-pinch-linger, that allows partial release and reuse of DCG cargo and suggests a mechanism that hippocampal neurons may rely upon to avoid depleting tPA at active synapses. Our results also demonstrate release of tPA at a site that facilitates interaction with NMDA-type glutamate receptors, and they provide direct confirmation of fundamental hypotheses about tPA localization and release that bear on its neuromodulatory functions, for example, in learning and memory.

  11. A loss of function allele for murine Staufen1 leads to impairment of dendritic Staufen1-RNP delivery and dendritic spine morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vessey, John P.; Macchi, Paolo; Stein, Joel M.; Mikl, Martin; Hawker, Kelvin N.; Vogelsang, Petra; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Vendra, Georgia; Riefler, Julia; Tübing, Fabian; Aparicio, Samuel A. J.; Abel, Ted; Kiebler, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The dsRNA-binding protein Staufen was the first RNA-binding protein proven to play a role in RNA localization in Drosophila. A mammalian homolog, Staufen1 (Stau1), has been implicated in dendritic RNA localization in neurons, translational control, and mRNA decay. However, the precise mechanisms by which it fulfills these specific roles are only partially understood. To determine its physiological functions, the murine Stau1 gene was disrupted by homologous recombination. Homozygous stau1tm1Apa mutant mice express a truncated Stau1 protein lacking the functional RNA-binding domain 3. The level of the truncated protein is significantly reduced. Cultured hippocampal neurons derived from stau1tm1Apa homozygous mice display deficits in dendritic delivery of Stau1-EYFP and β-actin mRNA-containing ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). Furthermore, these neurons have a significantly reduced dendritic tree and develop fewer synapses. Homozygous stau1tm1Apa mutant mice are viable and show no obvious deficits in development, fertility, health, overall brain morphology, and a variety of behavioral assays, e.g., hippocampus-dependent learning. However, we did detect deficits in locomotor activity. Our data suggest that Stau1 is crucial for synapse development in vitro but not critical for normal behavioral function. PMID:18922781

  12. Positional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for People With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome or Suspected Craniovertebral or Cervical Spine Abnormalities: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an inherited disorder affecting the connective tissue. EDS can manifest with symptoms attributable to the spine or craniovertebral junction (CVJ). In addition to EDS, numerous congenital, developmental, or acquired disorders can increase ligamentous laxity in the CVJ and cervical spine. Resulting abnormalities can lead to morbidity and serious neurologic complications. Appropriate imaging and diagnosis is needed to determine patient management and need for complex surgery. Some spinal abnormalities cause symptoms or are more pronounced while patients sit, stand, or perform specific movements. Positional magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) allows imaging of the spine or CVJ with patients in upright, weight-bearing positions and can be combined with dynamic maneuvers, such as flexion, extension, or rotation. Imaging in these positions could allow diagnosticians to better detect spinal or CVJ abnormalities than recumbent MRI or even a combination of other available imaging modalities might allow. Objectives To determine the diagnostic impact and clinical utility of pMRI for the assessment of (a) craniovertebral or spinal abnormalities among people with EDS and (b) major craniovertebral or cervical spine abnormalities among symptomatic people. Data Sources A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 1998, to September 28, 2014. Review Methods Studies comparing pMRI to recumbent MRI or other available imaging modalities for diagnosis and management of spinal or CVJ abnormalities were reviewed. All studies of spinal or CVJ imaging in people with EDS were included as well as studies among people with suspected major CVJ or cervical spine abnormalities (cervical or craniovertebral spine instability, basilar invagination, cranial settling, cervical stenosis, spinal cord compression, Chiari

  13. Back pain and degenerative abnormalities in the spine of young elite divers: a 5-year follow-up magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Baranto, Adad; Hellström, Mikael; Nyman, Rickard; Lundin, Olof; Swärd, Leif

    2006-09-01

    Several studies have been published on disc degeneration among young athletes in sports with great demands on the back, but few on competitive divers; however, there are no long-term follow-up studies. Twenty elite divers between 10 and 21 years of age, with the highest possible national ranking, were selected at random without knowledge of previous or present back injuries or symptoms for an MRI study of the thoraco-lumbar spine in a 5-year longitudinal study. The occurrence of MRI abnormalities and their correlation with back pain were evaluated. Eighty-nine percent of the divers had a history of back pain and the median age at the first episode of back pain was 15 years. Sixty-five percent of the divers had MRI abnormalities in the thoraco-lumbar spine already at baseline. Only one diver without abnormalities at baseline had developed abnormalities at follow-up. Deterioration of any type of abnormality was found in 9 of 17 (53%) divers. Including all disc levels in all divers, the total number of abnormalities increased by 29% at follow-up, as compared to baseline. The most common abnormalities were reduced disc signal, Schmorl's nodes, and disc height reduction. Since almost all divers had previous or present back pain, a differentiated analysis of the relationship between pain and MRI findings was not possible. However, the high frequency of both back pain and MRI changes suggests a causal relationship. In conclusion, elite divers had high frequency of back pain at young ages and they run a high risk of developing degenerative abnormalities of the thoraco-lumbar spine, probably due to injuries to the spine during the growth spurt.

  14. Increased signaling by the autism-related Engrailed-2 protein enhances dendritic branching and spine density, alters synaptic structural matching, and exaggerates protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Asma; Lebrun, Solène; Carpentier, Gilles; Zunino, Giulia; Chantepie, Sandrine; Maïza, Auriane; Bozzi, Yuri; Desnos, Claire; Darchen, François; Stettler, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Engrailed 1 (En1) and 2 (En2) code for closely related homeoproteins acting as transcription factors and as signaling molecules that contribute to midbrain and hindbrain patterning, to development and maintenance of monoaminergic pathways, and to retinotectal wiring. En2 has been suggested to be an autism susceptibility gene and individuals with autism display an overexpression of this homeogene but the mechanisms remain unclear. We addressed in the present study the effect of exogenously added En2 on the morphology of hippocampal cells that normally express only low levels of Engrailed proteins. By means of RT-qPCR, we confirmed that En1 and En2 were expressed at low levels in hippocampus and hippocampal neurons, and observed a pronounced decrease in En2 expression at birth and during the first postnatal week, a period characterized by intense synaptogenesis. To address a putative effect of Engrailed in dendritogenesis or synaptogenesis, we added recombinant En1 or En2 proteins to hippocampal cell cultures. Both En1 and En2 treatment increased the complexity of the dendritic tree of glutamatergic neurons, but only En2 increased that of GABAergic cells. En1 increased the density of dendritic spines both in vitro and in vivo. En2 had similar but less pronounced effect on spine density. The number of mature synapses remained unchanged upon En1 treatment but was reduced by En2 treatment, as well as the area of post-synaptic densities. Finally, both En1 and En2 elevated mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis in hippocampal cells, suggesting that some effects of Engrailed proteins may require mRNA translation. Our results indicate that Engrailed proteins can play, even at low concentrations, an active role in the morphogenesis of hippocampal cells. Further, they emphasize the over-regulation of GABA cell morphology and the vulnerability of excitatory synapses in a pathological context of En2 overexpression.

  15. Increased signaling by the autism-related Engrailed-2 protein enhances dendritic branching and spine density, alters synaptic structural matching, and exaggerates protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Asma; Lebrun, Solène; Carpentier, Gilles; Zunino, Giulia; Chantepie, Sandrine; Maïza, Auriane; Bozzi, Yuri; Desnos, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Engrailed 1 (En1) and 2 (En2) code for closely related homeoproteins acting as transcription factors and as signaling molecules that contribute to midbrain and hindbrain patterning, to development and maintenance of monoaminergic pathways, and to retinotectal wiring. En2 has been suggested to be an autism susceptibility gene and individuals with autism display an overexpression of this homeogene but the mechanisms remain unclear. We addressed in the present study the effect of exogenously added En2 on the morphology of hippocampal cells that normally express only low levels of Engrailed proteins. By means of RT-qPCR, we confirmed that En1 and En2 were expressed at low levels in hippocampus and hippocampal neurons, and observed a pronounced decrease in En2 expression at birth and during the first postnatal week, a period characterized by intense synaptogenesis. To address a putative effect of Engrailed in dendritogenesis or synaptogenesis, we added recombinant En1 or En2 proteins to hippocampal cell cultures. Both En1 and En2 treatment increased the complexity of the dendritic tree of glutamatergic neurons, but only En2 increased that of GABAergic cells. En1 increased the density of dendritic spines both in vitro and in vivo. En2 had similar but less pronounced effect on spine density. The number of mature synapses remained unchanged upon En1 treatment but was reduced by En2 treatment, as well as the area of post-synaptic densities. Finally, both En1 and En2 elevated mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis in hippocampal cells, suggesting that some effects of Engrailed proteins may require mRNA translation. Our results indicate that Engrailed proteins can play, even at low concentrations, an active role in the morphogenesis of hippocampal cells. Further, they emphasize the over-regulation of GABA cell morphology and the vulnerability of excitatory synapses in a pathological context of En2 overexpression. PMID:28809922

  16. Glutaminase and MMP-9 Downregulation in Cortex and Hippocampus of LPA1 Receptor Null Mice Correlate with Altered Dendritic Spine Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Peñalver, Ana; Campos-Sandoval, José A.; Blanco, Eduardo; Cardona, Carolina; Castilla, Laura; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Sánchez-Varo, Raquel; Alonso, Francisco J.; Pérez-Hernández, Mercedes; Colado, María I.; Gutiérrez, Antonia; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Márquez, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an extracellular lipid mediator that regulates nervous system development and functions acting through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here we explore the crosstalk between LPA1 receptor and glutamatergic transmission by examining expression of glutaminase (GA) isoforms in different brain areas isolated from wild-type (WT) and KOLPA1 mice. Silencing of LPA1 receptor induced a severe down-regulation of Gls-encoded long glutaminase protein variant (KGA) (glutaminase gene encoding the kidney-type isoforms, GLS) protein expression in several brain regions, particularly in brain cortex and hippocampus. Immunohistochemical assessment of protein levels for the second type of glutaminase (GA) isoform, glutaminase gene encoding the liver-type isoforms (GLS2), did not detect substantial differences with regard to WT animals. The regional mRNA levels of GLS were determined by real time RT-PCR and did not show significant variations, except for prefrontal and motor cortex values which clearly diminished in KO mice. Total GA activity was also significantly reduced in prefrontal and motor cortex, but remained essentially unchanged in the hippocampus and rest of brain regions examined, suggesting activation of genetic compensatory mechanisms and/or post-translational modifications to compensate for KGA protein deficit. Remarkably, Golgi staining of hippocampal regions showed an altered morphology of glutamatergic pyramidal cells dendritic spines towards a less mature filopodia-like phenotype, as compared with WT littermates. This structural change correlated with a strong decrease of active matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of KOLPA1 mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LPA signaling through LPA1 influence expression of the main isoenzyme of glutamate biosynthesis with strong repercussions on dendritic spines maturation, which may partially explain the cognitive and learning defects previously

  17. Vitamin B1-deficient mice show impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation and loss of hippocampal neurons and dendritic spines: potential microendophenotypes of Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroyoshi; Kishimoto, Takuya; Oishi, Satoru; Nagata, Kan; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Tamae; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with severe Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency (TD) show enduring impairment of memory formation. The mechanisms of memory impairment induced by TD remain unknown. Here, we show that hippocampal degeneration is a potential microendophenotype (an endophenotype of brain disease at the cellular and synaptic levels) of WKS in pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) mice, a rodent model of WKS. PTD mice show deficits in the hippocampus-dependent memory formation, although they show normal hippocampus-independent memory. Similarly with WKS, impairments in memory formation did not recover even at 6 months after treatment with PTD. Importantly, PTD mice exhibit a decrease in neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus and reduced density of wide dendritic spines in the DG. Our findings suggest that TD induces hippocampal degeneration, including the loss of neurons and spines, thereby leading to enduring impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation. PMID:27576603

  18. Vitamin B1-deficient mice show impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation and loss of hippocampal neurons and dendritic spines: potential microendophenotypes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hiroyoshi; Kishimoto, Takuya; Oishi, Satoru; Nagata, Kan; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Tamae; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Patients with severe Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency (TD) show enduring impairment of memory formation. The mechanisms of memory impairment induced by TD remain unknown. Here, we show that hippocampal degeneration is a potential microendophenotype (an endophenotype of brain disease at the cellular and synaptic levels) of WKS in pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) mice, a rodent model of WKS. PTD mice show deficits in the hippocampus-dependent memory formation, although they show normal hippocampus-independent memory. Similarly with WKS, impairments in memory formation did not recover even at 6 months after treatment with PTD. Importantly, PTD mice exhibit a decrease in neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus and reduced density of wide dendritic spines in the DG. Our findings suggest that TD induces hippocampal degeneration, including the loss of neurons and spines, thereby leading to enduring impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation.

  19. Post-synaptic Density-95 (PSD-95) Binding Capacity of G-protein-coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30), an Estrogen Receptor That Can Be Identified in Hippocampal Dendritic Spines*

    PubMed Central

    Akama, Keith T.; Thompson, Louisa I.; Milner, Teresa A.; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    The estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) modulates dendritic spine plasticity in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) region of the hippocampus, and GPR30 (G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1)) is an estrogen-sensitive G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in the mammalian brain and in specific subregions that are responsive to E2, including the hippocampus. The subcellular localization of hippocampal GPR30, however, remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that GPR30 immunoreactivity is detected in dendritic spines of rat CA1 hippocampal neurons in vivo and that GPR30 protein can be found in rat brain synaptosomes. GPR30 immunoreactivity is identified at the post-synaptic density (PSD) and in the adjacent peri-synaptic zone, and GPR30 can associate with the spine scaffolding protein PSD-95 both in vitro and in vivo. This PSD-95 binding capacity of GPR30 is specific and determined by the receptor C-terminal tail that is both necessary and sufficient for PSD-95 interaction. The interaction with PSD-95 functions to increase GPR30 protein levels residing at the plasma membrane surface. GPR30 associates with the N-terminal tandem pair of PDZ domains in PSD-95, suggesting that PSD-95 may be involved in clustering GPR30 with other receptors in the hippocampus. We demonstrate that GPR30 has the potential to associate with additional post-synaptic GPCRs, including the membrane progestin receptor, the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor, and the 5HT1a serotonin receptor. These data demonstrate that GPR30 is well positioned in the dendritic spine compartment to integrate E2 sensitivity directly onto multiple inputs on synaptic activity and might begin to provide a molecular explanation as to how E2 modulates dendritic spine plasticity. PMID:23300088

  20. Post-synaptic density-95 (PSD-95) binding capacity of G-protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), an estrogen receptor that can be identified in hippocampal dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Akama, Keith T; Thompson, Louisa I; Milner, Teresa A; McEwen, Bruce S

    2013-03-01

    The estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) modulates dendritic spine plasticity in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) region of the hippocampus, and GPR30 (G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1)) is an estrogen-sensitive G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in the mammalian brain and in specific subregions that are responsive to E2, including the hippocampus. The subcellular localization of hippocampal GPR30, however, remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that GPR30 immunoreactivity is detected in dendritic spines of rat CA1 hippocampal neurons in vivo and that GPR30 protein can be found in rat brain synaptosomes. GPR30 immunoreactivity is identified at the post-synaptic density (PSD) and in the adjacent peri-synaptic zone, and GPR30 can associate with the spine scaffolding protein PSD-95 both in vitro and in vivo. This PSD-95 binding capacity of GPR30 is specific and determined by the receptor C-terminal tail that is both necessary and sufficient for PSD-95 interaction. The interaction with PSD-95 functions to increase GPR30 protein levels residing at the plasma membrane surface. GPR30 associates with the N-terminal tandem pair of PDZ domains in PSD-95, suggesting that PSD-95 may be involved in clustering GPR30 with other receptors in the hippocampus. We demonstrate that GPR30 has the potential to associate with additional post-synaptic GPCRs, including the membrane progestin receptor, the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor, and the 5HT1a serotonin receptor. These data demonstrate that GPR30 is well positioned in the dendritic spine compartment to integrate E2 sensitivity directly onto multiple inputs on synaptic activity and might begin to provide a molecular explanation as to how E2 modulates dendritic spine plasticity.

  1. Adolescent cocaine exposure simplifies orbitofrontal cortical dendritic arbors

    PubMed Central

    DePoy, Lauren M.; Perszyk, Riley E.; Zimmermann, Kelsey S.; Koleske, Anthony J.; Gourley, Shannon L.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine and amphetamine remodel dendritic spines within discrete cortico-limbic brain structures including the orbitofrontal cortex (oPFC). Whether dendrite structure is similarly affected, and whether pre-existing cellular characteristics influence behavioral vulnerabilities to drugs of abuse, remain unclear. Animal models provide an ideal venue to address these issues because neurobehavioral phenotypes can be defined both before, and following, drug exposure. We exposed mice to cocaine from postnatal days 31–35, corresponding to early adolescence, using a dosing protocol that causes impairments in an instrumental reversal task in adulthood. We then imaged and reconstructed excitatory neurons in deep-layer oPFC. Prior cocaine exposure shortened and simplified arbors, particularly in the basal region. Next, we imaged and reconstructed orbital neurons in a developmental-genetic model of cocaine vulnerability—the p190rhogap+/– mouse. p190RhoGAP is an actin cytoskeleton regulatory protein that stabilizes dendrites and dendritic spines, and p190rhogap+/– mice develop rapid and robust locomotor activation in response to cocaine. Despite this, oPFC dendritic arbors were intact in drug-naïve p190rhogap+/– mice. Together, these findings provide evidence that adolescent cocaine exposure has long-term effects on dendrite structure in the oPFC, and they suggest that cocaine-induced modifications in dendrite structure may contribute to the behavioral effects of cocaine more so than pre-existing structural abnormalities in this cell population. PMID:25452728

  2. Role of proBDNF and BDNF in dendritic spine plasticity and depressive-like behaviors induced by an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hui; An, Shu-Cheng; Xu, Chang; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2017-05-15

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorder, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Increasing evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the structural plasticity induced by depression. Considering the opposite effects of BDNF and its precursor proBDNF on neural plasticity, we hypothesized that the balance of BDNF and proBDNF plays a critical role in chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS)-induced depressive-like behaviors and structural plasticity in the rodent hippocampus. The aims of this study were to compare the functions of BDNF and proBDNF in the CUMS-induced depressive-like behaviors, and determine the effects of BDNF and proBDNF on expressions of kalirin-7, postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) and NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the hippocampus of stressed and naïve control rats, respectively. Our results showed that CUMS induced depressive-like behaviors, caused a decrease in the ratio of BDNF/proBDNF in the hippocampus and resulted in a reduction in spine density in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons; these alterations were accompanied by a decrease in the levels of kalirin-7, PSD95 and NR2B in the hippocampus. Injection of exogenous BDNF into the CA1 area of stressed rats reversed CUMS-induced depressive-like behaviors and prevented CUMS-induced spine loss and decrease in kalirin-7, NR2B and PSD95 levels. In contrast, injection of exogenous proBDNF into the CA1 region of naïve rats caused depressive-like behavior and an accompanying decrease in both spine density and the levels of kalirin-7, NR2B and PSD95. Taken together, our results suggest that the ratio of BDNF to proBDNF in the hippocampus plays a key role in CUMS-induced depressive-like behaviors and alterations of dendritic spines in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Kalirin-7 may play an important role during this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Estradiol and the Relationship between Dendritic Spines, NR2B Containing NMDA Receptors, and the Magnitude of Long-Term Potentiation at Hippocampal CA3-CA1 Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Caroline C.; Vedder, Lindsey C.; McMahon, Lori L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary When circulating estrogen levels decline as a natural consequence of menopause and aging in women, there is an increased incidence of deficits in working memory. In many cases, these deficits are rescued by estrogen replacement therapy. These clinical data therefore highlight the importance of defining the biological pathways linking estrogen to the cellular substrates of learning and memory. It has been known for nearly two decades that estrogen enhances dendritic spine density on apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampus, a brain region required for learning. Interestingly, at synapses between CA3-CA1 pyramidal cells, estrogen has also been shown to enhance synaptic NMDA receptor current and the magnitude of long term potentiation, a cellular correlate of learning and memory. Given that synapse density, NMDAR function, and long term potentiation at CA3-CA1 synapses in hippocampus are associated with normal learning, it is likely that modulation of these parameters by estrogen facilitates the improvement in learning observed in rats, primates and humans following estrogen replacement. To facilitate the design of clinical strategies to potentially prevent or reverse the age-related decline in learning and memory during menopause, the relationship between the estrogen-induced morphological and functional changes in hippocampus must be defined and the role these changes play in facilitating learning must be elucidated. The aim of this report is to provide a summary of the proposed mechanisms by which this hormone increases synaptic function and in doing so, it briefly addresses potential mechanisms contributing to the estrogen-induced increase in synaptic morphology and plasticity, as well as important future directions. PMID:19596521

  4. Excessive Astrocyte-Derived Neurotrophin-3 Contributes to the Abnormal Neuronal Dendritic Development in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan-yan; Liu, Shui-bing; Wu, Yu-mei; Li, Xiao-qiang; Zhao, Ming-gao

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a form of inherited mental retardation in humans that results from expansion of a CGG repeat in the Fmr1 gene. Recent studies suggest a role of astrocytes in neuronal development. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation process of astrocytes from FXS remain unclear. In this study, we found that astrocytes derived from a Fragile X model, the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse which lacks FMRP expression, inhibited the proper elaboration of dendritic processes of neurons in vitro. Furthermore, astrocytic conditioned medium (ACM) from KO astrocytes inhibited proper dendritic growth of both wild-type (WT) and KO neurons. Inducing expression of FMRP by transfection of FMRP vectors in KO astrocytes restored dendritic morphology and levels of synaptic proteins. Further experiments revealed elevated levels of the neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in KO ACM and the prefrontal cortex of Fmr1 KO mice. However, the levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) were normal. FMRP has multiple RNA–binding motifs and is involved in translational regulation. RNA–binding protein immunoprecipitation (RIP) showed the NT-3 mRNA interacted with FMRP in WT astrocytes. Addition of high concentrations of exogenous NT-3 to culture medium reduced the dendrites of neurons and synaptic protein levels, whereas these measures were ameliorated by neutralizing antibody to NT-3 or knockdown of NT-3 expression in KO astrocytes through short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Prefrontal cortex microinjection of WT astrocytes or NT-3 shRNA infected KO astrocytes rescued the deficit of trace fear memory in KO mice, concomitantly decreased the NT-3 levels in the prefrontal cortex. This study indicates that excessive NT-3 from astrocytes contributes to the abnormal neuronal dendritic development and that astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target for FXS. PMID:23300470

  5. Defects in dendrite and spine maturation and synaptogenesis associated with an anxious-depressive-like phenotype of GABAA receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhen; Sahir, Nadia; Murakami, Shoko; Luellen, Beth A; Earnheart, John C; Lal, Rachnanjali; Kim, Ju Young; Song, Hongjun; Luscher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Mice that were rendered heterozygous for the γ2 subunit of GABAA receptors (γ2(+/-) mice) have been characterized extensively as a model for major depressive disorder. The phenotype of these mice includes behavior indicative of heightened anxiety, despair, and anhedonia, as well as defects in hippocampus-dependent pattern separation, HPA axis hyperactivity and increased responsiveness to antidepressant drugs. The γ2(+/-) model thereby provides strong support for the GABAergic deficit hypothesis of major depressive disorder. Here we show that γ2(+/-) mice additionally exhibit specific defects in late stage survival of adult-born hippocampal granule cells, including reduced complexity of dendritic arbors and impaired maturation of synaptic spines. Moreover, cortical γ2(+/-) neurons cultured in vitro show marked deficits in GABAergic innervation selectively when grown under competitive conditions that may mimic the environment of adult-born hippocampal granule cells. Finally, brain extracts of γ2(+/-) mice show a numerical but insignificant trend (p = 0.06) for transiently reduced expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) at three weeks of age, which might contribute to the previously reported developmental origin of the behavioral phenotype of γ2(+/-) mice. The data indicate increasing congruence of the GABAergic, glutamatergic, stress-based and neurotrophic deficit hypotheses of major depressive disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. α4βδ GABAA Receptors Reduce Dendritic Spine Density In CA1 Hippocampus And Impair Relearning Ability Of Adolescent Female Mice: Effects Of A GABA Agonist And A Stress Steroid

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Sonia; Shen, Hui; Smith, Sheryl S.

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic pruning underlies the transition from an immature to an adult CNS through refinements of neuronal circuits. Our recent study indicates that pubertal synaptic pruning is triggered by the inhibition generated by extrasynaptic α4βδ GABAA receptors (GABARs) which are increased for 10 d on dendritic spines of CA1 pyramidal cells at the onset of puberty (PND 35–44) in the female mouse, suggesting α4βδ GABARs as a novel target for the regulation of adolescent synaptic pruning. In the present study we used a pharmacological approach to further examine the role of these receptors in altering spine density during puberty of female mice and the impact of these changes on spatial learning, assessed in adulthood. Two drugs were chronically administered during the pubertal period (PND 35–44): the GABA agonist gaboxadol (GBX, 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), to enhance current gated by α4βδ GABARs and the neurosteroid/stress steroid THP (3α-OH-5β-pregnan-20-one, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) to decrease expression of α4βδ. Spine density was determined on PND 56 with Golgi staining. Spatial learning and relearning were assessed using the multiple object relocation task (MPORT) and an active place avoidance task (APA) on PND 56. Pubertal GBX decreased spine density post-pubertally by 70% (P<0.05), while decreasing α4βδ expression with THP increased spine density by two-fold (P<0.05), in both cases, with greatest effects on the mushroom spines. Adult relearning ability was compromised in both hippocampus-dependent tasks after pubertal administration of either drug. These findings suggest that an optimal spine density produced by α4βδ GABARs is necessary for optimal cognition in adults. PMID:28189613

  7. VEGF can protect against blood brain barrier dysfunction, dendritic spine loss and spatial memory impairment in an experimental model of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephanie L; Trudeau, Dustin; Arnold, Brendan; Wang, Joshua; Gerrow, Kim; Summerfeldt, Kieran; Holmes, Andrew; Zamani, Akram; Brocardo, Patricia S; Brown, Craig E

    2015-06-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown a clear link between diabetes, vascular dysfunction and cognitive impairment. However, the molecular underpinnings of this association remain unclear. Since vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling is important for maintaining vascular integrity and function, we hypothesized that vascular and cognitive impairment in the diabetic brain could be related to a deficiency in VEGF signaling. Here we show that chronic hyperglycemia (~8weeks) in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes leads to a selective reduction in the expression of VEGF and its cognate receptor (VEGF-R2) in the hippocampus. Correlating with this, diabetic mice showed selective deficits in spatial memory in the Morris water maze, increased vessel area, width and permeability in the dentate gyrus/CA1 region of the hippocampus and reduced spine densities in CA1 neurons. Chronic low dose infusion of VEGF in diabetic mice was sufficient to restore VEGF signaling, protect them from memory deficits, as well as vascular and synaptic abnormalities in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that a hippocampal specific reduction in VEGF signaling and resultant vascular/neuronal defects may underlie early manifestations of cognitive impairment commonly associated with diabetes. Furthermore, restoring VEGF signaling may be a useful strategy for preserving hippocampal-related brain circuitry in degenerative vascular diseases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Expression of gp120 in mice evokes anxiety behavior: Co-occurrence with increased dendritic spines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Bachis, Alessia; Forcelli, Patrick; Masliah, Eliezer; Campbell, Lee; Mocchetti, Italo

    2016-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection of the brain produces cognitive and motor disorders. In addition, HIV positive individuals exhibit behavioral alterations, such as apathy, and a decrease in spontaneity or emotional responses, typically seen in anxiety disorders. Anxiety can lead to psychological stress, which has been shown to influence HIV disease progression. These considerations underscore the importance of determining if anxiety in HIV is purely psychosocial, or if by contrast, there are the molecular cascades associated directly with HIV infection that may mediate anxiety. The present study had two goals: (1) to determine if chronic exposure to viral proteins would induce anxiety-like behavior in an animal model and (2) to determine if this exposure results in anatomical abnormalities that could explain increased anxiety. We have used gp120 transgenic mice, which display behavior and molecular deficiencies similar to HIV positive subjects with cognitive and motor impairments. In comparison to wild type mice, 6 months old gp120 transgenic mice demonstrated an anxiety like behavior measured by open field, light/dark transition task, and prepulse inhibition tests. Moreover, gp120 transgenic mice have an increased number of spines in the amygdala, as well as higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tissue plasminogen activator when compared to age-matched wild type. Our data support the hypothesis that HIV, through gp120, may cause structural changes in the amygdala that lead to maladaptive responses to anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The immediate large-scale dendritic plasticity of cortical pyramidal neurons subjected to acute epidural compression.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-R; Wang, T-J; Wang, Y-J; Tseng, G-F

    2010-05-05

    Head trauma and acute disorders often instantly compress the cerebral cortex and lead to functional abnormalities. Here we used rat epidural bead implantation model and investigated the immediate changes following acute compression. The dendritic arbors of affected cortical pyramidal neurons were filled with intracellular dye and reconstructed 3-dimensionally for analysis. Compression was found to shorten the apical, but not basal, dendrites of underlying layer III and V cortical pyramidal neurons and reduced dendritic spines on the entire dendritic arbor immediately. Dendrogram analysis showed that in addition to distal, proximal apical dendrites also quickly reconfigured. We then focused on apical dendritic trunks and explored how proximal dendrites were rapidly altered. Compression instantly twisted the microtubules and deformed the membrane contour of dendritic trunks likely a result of the elastic nature of dendrites as immediate decompression restored it and stabilization of microtubules failed to block it. Subsequent adaptive remodeling restored plasmalemma and microtubules to normal appearance in 3 days likely via active mechanisms as taxol blocked the restoration of microtubules and in addition partly affected plasmalemmal reorganization which presumably engaged recycling of excess membrane. In short, the structural dynamics and the associated mechanisms that we revealed demonstrate how compression quickly altered the morphology of cortical output neurons and hence cortical functions consequently. (c) 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mice with experimental antiphospholipid syndrome display hippocampal dysfunction and a reduction of dendritic complexity in hippocampal CA1 neurones.

    PubMed

    Frauenknecht, Katrin; Katzav, Aviva; Weiss Lavi, Ronen; Sabag, Avishag; Otten, Susanne; Chapman, Joab; Sommer, Clemens J

    2015-08-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by high titres of auto-antibodies (aPL) leading to thrombosis and consequent infarcts. However, many affected patients develop neurological symptoms in the absence of stroke. Similarly, in a mouse model of this disease (eAPS), animals consistently develop behavioural abnormalities despite lack of ischemic brain injury. Therefore, the present study was designed to identify structural alterations of hippocampal neurones underlying the neurological symptoms in eAPS. Adult female Balb/C mice were subjected to either induction of eAPS by immunization with β2-Glycoprotein 1 or to a control group. After sixteen weeks animals underwent behavioural and cognitive testing using Staircase test (experiment 1 and 2) and Y-maze alternation test (experiment 1) and were tested for serum aPL levels (both experiments). Animals of experiment 1 (n = 7/group) were used for hippocampal neurone analysis using Golgi-Cox staining. Animals of experiment 2 (n = 7/group) were used to analyse molecular markers of total dendritic integrity (MAP2), presynaptic plasticity (synaptobrevin 2/VAMP2) and dendritic spines (synaptopodin) using immunohistochemistry. eAPS mice developed increased aPL titres and presented with abnormal behaviour and impaired short term memory. Further, they revealed a reduction of dendritic complexity of hippocampal CA1 neurones as reflected by decreased dendritic length, arborization and spine density, respectively. Additional decrease of the spine-associated protein expression of Synaptopodin points to dendritic spines as major targets in the pathological process. Reduction of hippocampal dendritic complexity may represent the structural basis for the behavioural and cognitive abnormalities of eAPS mice. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  11. Abnormal costimulatory phenotype and function of dendritic cells before and after the onset of severe murine lupus

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Dinnall, Joudy-Ann; Shivers, Debra K; Frisoni, Lorenza; Caricchio, Roberto; Gallucci, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed the activation and function of dendritic cells (DCs) in the spleens of diseased, lupus-prone NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice and age-matched BALB/c and C57BL/6 control mice. Lupus DCs showed an altered ex vivo costimulatory profile, with a significant increase in the expression of CD40, decreased expression of CD80 and CD54, and normal expression of CD86. DCs from young lupus-prone NZM2410 mice, before the development of the disease, expressed normal levels of CD80 and CD86 but already overexpressed CD40. The increase in CD40-positive cells was specific for DCs and involved the subset of myeloid and CD8α+ DCs before disease onset, with a small involvement of plasmacytoid DCs in diseased mice. In vitro data from bone marrow-derived DCs and splenic myeloid DCs suggest that the overexpression of CD40 is not due to a primary alteration of CD40 regulation in DCs but rather to an extrinsic stimulus. Our analyses suggest that the defect of CD80 in NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice, which closely resembles the costimulatory defect found in DCs from humans with systemic lupus erythematosus, is linked to the autoimmune disease. The increase in CD40 may instead participate in disease pathogenesis, being present months before any sign of autoimmunity, and its downregulation should be explored as an alternative to treatment with anti-CD40 ligand in lupus. PMID:16507174

  12. Autocrine action of BDNF on dendrite development of adult-born hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Chang, Xingya; She, Liang; Xu, Duo; Huang, Wei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2015-06-03

    Dendrite development of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus is critical for their incorporation into existing hippocampal circuits, but the cellular mechanisms regulating their dendrite development remains largely unclear. In this study, we examined the function of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is expressed in adult-born GCs, in regulating their dendrite morphogenesis. Using retrovirus-mediated gene transfection, we found that deletion and overexpression of BDNF in adult-born GCs resulted in the reduction and elevation of dendrite growth, respectively. This effect was mainly due to the autocrine rather than paracrine action of BDNF, because deletion of BDNF only in the newborn GCs resulted in dendrite abnormality of these neurons to a similar extent as that observed in conditional knockout (cKO) mice with BDNF deleted in the entire forebrain. Furthermore, selective expression of BDNF in adult-born GCs in BDNF cKO mice fully restored normal dendrite development. The BDNF autocrine action was also required for the development of normal density of spines and normal percentage of spines containing the postsynaptic marker PSD-95, suggesting autocrine BDNF regulation of synaptogenesis. Furthermore, increased dendrite growth of adult-born GCs caused by voluntary exercise was abolished by BDNF deletion specifically in these neurons and elevated dendrite growth due to BDNF overexpression in these neurons was prevented by reducing neuronal activity with coexpression of inward rectifier potassium channels, consistent with activity-dependent autocrine BDNF secretion. Therefore, BDNF expressed in adult-born GCs plays a critical role in dendrite development by acting as an autocrine factor. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358384-10$15.00/0.

  13. Modification of dendritic development.

    PubMed

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  14. Dendritic spine density and EphrinB2 levels of hippocampal and anterior cingulate cortex neurons increase sequentially during formation of recent and remote fear memory in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Abate, Georgia; Colazingari, Sandra; Accoto, Alessandra; Conversi, David; Bevilacqua, Arturo

    2018-05-15

    Memory consolidation is a dynamic process that involves a sequential remodeling of hippocampal-cortical circuits. Although synaptic events underlying memory consolidation are well assessed, fine molecular events controlling this process deserve further characterization. To this aim, we challenged male C57BL/6N mice in a contextual fear conditioning (CFC) paradigm and tested their memory 24 h, 7 days or 36 days later. Mice displayed a strong fear response at all time points with an increase in dendritic spine density and protein levels of the cell adhesion factor EphrinB2 in CA1 hippocampal neurons 24 h and 7 days post conditioning (p.c.), and in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) neurons 36 days p.c. We then investigated whether the formation of remote memory and neuronal modifications in the ACC would depend on p.c. protein synthesis in hippocampal neurons. Bilateral intrahippocampal infusions with the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin administered immediately p.c. decreased fear response, neuronal spine growth and EphrinB2 protein levels of hippocampal and ACC neurons 24 h and 36 days p.c., respectively. Anisomycin infusion 24 h p.c. had no effects on fear response, increase in spine density and in EphrinB2 protein levels in ACC neurons 36 days p.c. Our results thus confirm that early but not late p.c. hippocampal protein synthesis is necessary for the formation of remote memory and provide the first evidence of a possible involvement of EphrinB2 in neuronal plasticity in the ACC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison between basal and apical dendritic spines in estrogen-induced rapid spinogenesis of CA1 principal neurons in the adult hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Gen; Mukai, Hideo; Hojo, Yasushi

    2006-12-15

    Modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by estrogen has been attracting much attention. Here, we demonstrated the rapid effect of 17{beta}-estradiol on the density and morphology of spines in the stratum oriens (s.o., basal side) and in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare (s.l.m., apical side) by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected CA1 neurons in adult male rat hippocampal slices, because spines in s.o. and s.l.m. have been poorly understood as compared with spines in the stratum radiatum. The application of 1 nM estradiol-induced a rapid increase in the density of spines of pyramidal neurons within 2 h. This increase by estradiol was blocked by Erkmore » MAP kinase inhibitor and estrogen receptor inhibitor in both regions. Effect of blockade by agonists of AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors was different between s.o. and s.l.m. In both regions, ER{alpha} agonist PPT induced the same enhancing effect of spinogenesis as that induced by estradiol.« less

  16. Spatial and Working Memory Is Linked to Spine Density and Mushroom Spines

    PubMed Central

    Aher, Yogesh D.; Sase, Ajinkya; Gröger, Marion; Mokhtar, Maher; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Background Changes in synaptic structure and efficacy including dendritic spine number and morphology have been shown to underlie neuronal activity and size. Moreover, the shapes of individual dendritic spines were proposed to correlate with their capacity for structural change. Spine numbers and morphology were reported to parallel memory formation in the rat using a water maze but, so far, there is no information on spine counts or shape in the radial arm maze (RAM), a frequently used paradigm for the evaluation of complex memory formation in the rodent. Methods 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, 8 were trained, 8 remained untrained in the RAM and 8 rats served as cage controls. Dendritic spine numbers and individual spine forms were counted in CA1, CA3 areas and dentate gyrus of hippocampus using a DIL dye method with subsequent quantification by the Neuronstudio software and the image J program. Results Working memory errors (WME) and latency in the RAM were decreased along the training period indicating that animals performed the task. Total spine density was significantly increased following training in the RAM as compared to untrained rats and cage controls. The number of mushroom spines was significantly increased in the trained as compared to untrained and cage controls. Negative significant correlations between spine density and WME were observed in CA1 basal dendrites and in CA3 apical and basal dendrites. In addition, there was a significant negative correlation between spine density and latency in CA3 basal dendrites. Conclusion The study shows that spine numbers are significantly increased in the trained group, an observation that may suggest the use of this method representing a morphological parameter for memory formation studies in the RAM. Herein, correlations between WME and latency in the RAM and spine density revealed a link between spine numbers and performance in the RAM. PMID:26469788

  17. The spine neck filters membrane potentials.

    PubMed

    Araya, Roberto; Jiang, Jiang; Eisenthal, Kenneth B; Yuste, Rafael

    2006-11-21

    Dendritic spines receive most synaptic inputs in the forebrain. Their morphology, with a spine head isolated from the dendrite by a slender neck, indicates a potential role in isolating inputs. Indeed, biochemical compartmentalization occurs at spine heads because of the diffusional bottleneck created by the spine neck. Here we investigate whether the spine neck also isolates inputs electrically. Using two-photon uncaging of glutamate on spine heads from mouse layer-5 neocortical pyramidal cells, we find that the amplitude of uncaging potentials at the soma is inversely proportional to neck length. This effect is strong and independent of the position of the spine in the dendritic tree and size of the spine head. Moreover, spines with long necks are electrically silent at the soma, although their heads are activated by the uncaging event, as determined with calcium imaging. Finally, second harmonic measurements of membrane potential reveal an attenuation of somatic voltages into the spine head, an attenuation directly proportional to neck length. We conclude that the spine neck plays an electrical role in the transmission of membrane potentials, isolating synapses electrically.

  18. The spine neck filters membrane potentials

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto; Jiang, Jiang; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.; Yuste, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic spines receive most synaptic inputs in the forebrain. Their morphology, with a spine head isolated from the dendrite by a slender neck, indicates a potential role in isolating inputs. Indeed, biochemical compartmentalization occurs at spine heads because of the diffusional bottleneck created by the spine neck. Here we investigate whether the spine neck also isolates inputs electrically. Using two-photon uncaging of glutamate on spine heads from mouse layer-5 neocortical pyramidal cells, we find that the amplitude of uncaging potentials at the soma is inversely proportional to neck length. This effect is strong and independent of the position of the spine in the dendritic tree and size of the spine head. Moreover, spines with long necks are electrically silent at the soma, although their heads are activated by the uncaging event, as determined with calcium imaging. Finally, second harmonic measurements of membrane potential reveal an attenuation of somatic voltages into the spine head, an attenuation directly proportional to neck length. We conclude that the spine neck plays an electrical role in the transmission of membrane potentials, isolating synapses electrically. PMID:17093040

  19. Glutamate induces the elongation of early dendritic protrusions via mGluRs in wild type mice, but not in fragile X mice.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martín, Alberto; Crespo, Michelle; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited from of autism and mental impairment, is caused by transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene, resulting in the loss of the RNA-binding protein FMRP. Dendritic spines of cortical pyramidal neurons in affected individuals are abnormally immature and in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice they are also abnormally unstable. This could result in defects in synaptogenesis, because spine dynamics are critical for synapse formation. We have previously shown that the earliest dendritic protrusions, which are highly dynamic and might serve an exploratory role to reach out for axons, elongate in response to glutamate. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this process is mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and that it is defective in Fmr1 KO mice. Using time-lapse imaging with two-photon microscopy in acute brain slices from early postnatal mice, we find that early dendritic protrusions in layer 2/3 neurons become longer in response to application of glutamate or DHPG, a Group 1 mGluR agonist. Blockade of mGluR5 signaling, which reverses some adult phenotypes of KO mice, prevented the glutamate-mediated elongation of early protrusions. In contrast, dendritic protrusions from KO mice failed to respond to glutamate. Thus, absence of FMRP may impair the ability of cortical pyramidal neurons to respond to glutamate released from nearby pre-synaptic terminals, which may be a critical step to initiate synaptogenesis and stabilize spines.

  20. Environmental enrichment attenuates behavioral abnormalities in valproic acid-exposed autism model mice.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hara, Yuta; Ago, Yukio; Takano, Erika; Hasebe, Shigeru; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Toshio; Takuma, Kazuhiro

    2017-08-30

    We recently demonstrated that prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA) at embryonic day 12.5 causes autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-like phenotypes such as hypolocomotion, anxiety-like behavior, social deficits and cognitive impairment in mice and that it decreases dendritic spine density in the hippocampal CA1 region. Previous studies show that some abnormal behaviors are improved by environmental enrichment in ASD rodent models, but it is not known whether environmental enrichment improves cognitive impairment. In the present study, we examined the effects of early environmental enrichment on behavioral abnormalities and neuromorphological changes in prenatal VPA-treated mice. We also examined the role of dendritic spine formation and synaptic protein expression in the hippocampus. Mice were housed for 4 weeks from 4 weeks of age under either a standard or enriched environment. Enriched housing was found to increase hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels in both control and VPA-exposed mice. Furthermore, in VPA-treated mice, the environmental enrichment improved anxiety-like behavior, social deficits and cognitive impairment, but not hypolocomotion. Prenatal VPA treatment caused loss of dendritic spines in the hippocampal CA1 region and decreases in mRNA levels of postsynaptic density protein-95 and SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 2 in the hippocampus. These hippocampal changes were improved by the enriched housing. These findings suggest that the environmental enrichment improved most ASD-like behaviors including cognitive impairment in the VPA-treated mice by enhancing dendritic spine function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microtubule-Actin Crosslinking Factor 1 is required for dendritic arborization and axon outgrowth in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Minhan; Kim, Woo-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic arborization and axon outgrowth are critical steps in the establishment of neural connectivity in the developing brain. Changes in the connectivity underlie cognitive dysfunction in neurodevelopmental disorders. However, molecules and associated mechanisms that play important roles in dendritic and axon outgrowth in the brain are only partially understood. Here, we show that Microtubule-Actin Crosslinking Factor 1 (MACF1) regulates dendritic arborization and axon outgrowth of developing pyramidal neurons by arranging cytoskeleton components and mediating GSK-3 signaling. MACF1 deletion using conditional mutant mice and in utero gene transfer in the developing brain markedly decreased dendritic branching of cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. MACF1-deficient neurons showed reduced density and aberrant morphology of dendritic spines. Also, loss of MACF1 impaired the elongation of callosal axons in the brain. Actin and microtubule arrangement appeared abnormal in MACF1-deficient neurites. Finally, we found that GSK-3 is associated with MACF1-controlled dendritic differentiation. Our findings demonstrate a novel role for MACF1 in neurite differentiation that is critical to the creation of neuronal connectivity in the developing brain. PMID:26526844

  2. Microtubule-Actin Crosslinking Factor 1 Is Required for Dendritic Arborization and Axon Outgrowth in the Developing Brain.

    PubMed

    Ka, Minhan; Kim, Woo-Yang

    2016-11-01

    Dendritic arborization and axon outgrowth are critical steps in the establishment of neural connectivity in the developing brain. Changes in the connectivity underlie cognitive dysfunction in neurodevelopmental disorders. However, molecules and associated mechanisms that play important roles in dendritic and axon outgrowth in the brain are only partially understood. Here, we show that microtubule-actin crosslinking factor 1 (MACF1) regulates dendritic arborization and axon outgrowth of developing pyramidal neurons by arranging cytoskeleton components and mediating GSK-3 signaling. MACF1 deletion using conditional mutant mice and in utero gene transfer in the developing brain markedly decreased dendritic branching of cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. MACF1-deficient neurons showed reduced density and aberrant morphology of dendritic spines. Also, loss of MACF1 impaired the elongation of callosal axons in the brain. Actin and microtubule arrangement appeared abnormal in MACF1-deficient neurites. Finally, we found that GSK-3 is associated with MACF1-controlled dendritic differentiation. Our findings demonstrate a novel role for MACF1 in neurite differentiation that is critical to the creation of neuronal connectivity in the developing brain.

  3. The Transfection of BDNF to Dopamine Neurons Potentiates the Effect of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Recovering the Striatal Innervation, Dendritic Spines and Motor Behavior in an Aged Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F.; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J.; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J.; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  4. Hampered long-term depression and thin spine loss in the nucleus accumbens of ethanol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Spiga, Saturnino; Talani, Giuseppe; Mulas, Giovanna; Licheri, Valentina; Fois, Giulia R; Muggironi, Giulia; Masala, Nicola; Cannizzaro, Carla; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico; Diana, Marco

    2014-09-02

    Alcoholism involves long-term cognitive deficits, including memory impairment, resulting in substantial cost to society. Neuronal refinement and stabilization are hypothesized to confer resilience to poor decision making and addictive-like behaviors, such as excessive ethanol drinking and dependence. Accordingly, structural abnormalities are likely to contribute to synaptic dysfunctions that occur from suddenly ceasing the use of alcohol after chronic ingestion. Here we show that ethanol-dependent rats display a loss of dendritic spines in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) shell, accompanied by a reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining and postsynaptic density 95-positive elements. Further analysis indicates that "long thin" but not "mushroom" spines are selectively affected. In addition, patch-clamp experiments from Nacc slices reveal that long-term depression (LTD) formation is hampered, with parallel changes in field potential recordings and reductions in NMDA-mediated synaptic currents. These changes are restricted to the withdrawal phase of ethanol dependence, suggesting their relevance in the genesis of signs and/or symptoms affecting ethanol withdrawal and thus the whole addictive cycle. Overall, these results highlight the key role of dynamic alterations in dendritic spines and their presynaptic afferents in the evolution of alcohol dependence. Furthermore, they suggest that the selective loss of long thin spines together with a reduced NMDA receptor function may affect learning. Disruption of this LTD could contribute to the rigid emotional and motivational state observed in alcohol dependence.

  5. Non-Markovian Model for Transport and Reactions of Particles in Spiny Dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, Sergei; Méndez, Vicenç

    2008-11-01

    Motivated by the experiments [Santamaria , Neuron 52, 635 (2006)NERNET0896-627310.1016/j.neuron.2006.10.025] that indicated the possibility of subdiffusive transport of molecules along dendrites of cerebellar Purkinje cells, we develop a mesoscopic model for transport and chemical reactions of particles in spiny dendrites. The communication between spines and a parent dendrite is described by a non-Markovian random process and, as a result, the overall movement of particles can be subdiffusive. A system of integrodifferential equations is derived for the particles densities in dendrites and spines. This system involves the spine-dendrite interaction term which describes the memory effects and nonlocality in space. We consider the impact of power-law waiting time distributions on the transport of biochemical signals and mechanism of the accumulation of plasticity-inducing signals inside spines.

  6. Astrocytic Contributions to Synaptic and Learning Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Jennifer L; Yu, Xinzhu; Gilmore, Anthony; Bennett, Hannah; Tjia, Michelle; Perna, James F; Chen, Chia-Chien; Li, Xiang; Lu, Ju; Zuo, Yi

    2017-07-15

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common type of mental retardation attributable to a single-gene mutation. It is caused by FMR1 gene silencing and the consequent loss of its protein product, fragile X mental retardation protein. Fmr1 global knockout (KO) mice recapitulate many behavioral and synaptic phenotypes associated with FXS. Abundant evidence suggests that astrocytes are important contributors to neurological diseases. This study investigates astrocytic contributions to the progression of synaptic abnormalities and learning impairments associated with FXS. Taking advantage of the Cre-lox system, we generated and characterized mice in which fragile X mental retardation protein is selectively deleted or exclusively expressed in astrocytes. We performed in vivo two-photon imaging to track spine dynamics/morphology along dendrites of neurons in the motor cortex and examined associated behavioral defects. We found that adult astrocyte-specific Fmr1 KO mice displayed increased spine density in the motor cortex and impaired motor-skill learning. The learning defect coincided with a lack of enhanced spine dynamics in the motor cortex that normally occurs in response to motor skill acquisition. Although spine density was normal at 1 month of age in astrocyte-specific Fmr1 KO mice, new spines formed at an elevated rate. Furthermore, fragile X mental retardation protein expression in only astrocytes was insufficient to rescue most spine or behavioral defects. Our work suggests a joint astrocytic-neuronal contribution to FXS pathogenesis and reveals that heightened spine formation during adolescence precedes the overabundance of spines and behavioral defects found in adult Fmr1 KO mice. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dendrite inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for removing dendrites or other crystalline matter from the surface of a liquid in a matter transport process, and an electrolytic cell including such an apparatus. A notch may be provided to allow continuous exposure of the liquid surface, and a bore may be further provided to permit access to the liquid.

  8. Dendrite inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.

    1988-06-07

    An apparatus for removing dendrites or other crystalline matter from the surface of a liquid in a matter transport process, and an electrolytic cell including such an apparatus. A notch may be provided to allow continuous exposure of the liquid surface, and a bore may be further provided to permit access to the liquid. 2 figs.

  9. Dendrite Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Donald Gilles, the Discipline Scientist for Materials Science in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Applications Department, demonstrates to Carl Dohrman a model of dendrites, the branch-like structures found in many metals and alloys. Dohrman was recently selected by the American Society for Metals International as their 1999 ASM International Foundation National Merit Scholar. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign freshman recently toured NASA's materials science facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. Abnormal cytokine production by circulating monocytes and dendritic cells of myeloid origin in ART-treated HIV-1+ patients relates to CD4+ T-cell recovery and HCV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria; Cordero, Miguel; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2007-05-01

    HIV-1 infection is associated with dysregulation of cytokine production by peripheral blood (PB) monocytes and dendritic cells (DC), but controversial results have been reported. We aimed to analyze the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines by PB-stimulated monocytes and DC of myeloid origin -CD33(high+ ) myeloid DC (mDC) and CD33(+)/CD14(-/dim+)/CD16(high+) DC- from HIV-1+ patients and its relationship with CD4+ T-cell recovery and co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). In vitro cytokine production was analyzed at the single cell level in 32 HIV-1+ patients, grouped according to the number of CD4+ T-cells/microl in PB (<200 CD4 versus >200 CD4). Patients were tested prior to therapy and at weeks +2, +4, +8, +12 and +52 after ART. Prior to ART, production of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IL-12 by mDC and of IL-8 and IL-12 by CD16+ DC was significantly increased among >200 CD4 patients. After one year of ART, increased production of IL-8 by monocytes, of TNF-alpha by mDC and of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha by CD16+ DC was specifically observed among <200 CD4 HIV-1+ individuals showing a high recovery of PB CD4+ T-cell counts. In turn, we found that the significantly reduced percentage of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha-producing monocytes and of IL-6 and IL-8-producing mDC and CD16+ DC, as well as the significantly diminished mean amount of IL-6 produced per monocyte, mDC and CD16+ DC and of IL-12 produced per CD16+ DC observed at week +52 for the >200 CD4 patients, were related to the presence of co-infection with HCV. In summary, HIV-1+ individuals show abnormal production of inflammatory cytokines by PB-stimulated monocytes and DC of myeloid origin even after one year of ART, such abnormalities being associated with the degree of recovery of PB CD4+ T-cell counts in more immunocompromised patients and HCV co-infection in more immunocompetent HIV-1+ individuals.

  11. Nerve Conduction Through Dendrites via Proton Hopping.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont B

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies of nerve conduction conducted by proton hopping, we have considered the axon, soma, synapse and the nodes of Ranvier. The role of proton hopping described the passage of information through each of these units of a typical nerve system. The synapse projects information from the axon to the dendrite and their associated spines. We have invoked the passage of protons via a hopping mechanism to illustrate the continuum of the impulse through the system, via the soma following the dendrites. This is proposed to be a continuum invoked by the proton hopping method. With the proposal of the activity through the dendrites, via proton hopping, a complete model of the nerve function is invoked. At each step to the way, a water pathway is present and is invoked in the proposed model as the carrier of the message via proton hopping. The importance of the dendrites is evident by the presence of a vast number of spines, each possessing the possibility to carry unique messages through the nervous system. With this model of the role of dendrites, functioning with the presence of proton hopping, a complete model of the nerve system is presented. The validity of this model will be available for further studies and models to assess it's validity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Longitudinal Effects of Ketamine on Dendritic Architecture In Vivo in the Mouse Medial Frontal Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Phoumthipphavong, Victoria; Barthas, Florent; Hassett, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A single subanesthetic dose of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, leads to fast-acting antidepressant effects. In rodent models, systemic ketamine is associated with higher dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex, reflecting structural remodeling that may underlie the behavioral changes. However, turnover of dendritic spines is a dynamic process in vivo, and the longitudinal effects of ketamine on structural plasticity remain unclear. The purpose of the current study is to use subcellular resolution optical imaging to determine the time course of dendritic alterations in vivo following systemic ketamine administration in mice. We used two-photon microscopy to visualize repeatedly the same set of dendritic branches in the mouse medial frontal cortex (MFC) before and after a single injection of ketamine or saline. Compared to controls, ketamine-injected mice had higher dendritic spine density in MFC for up to 2 weeks. This prolonged increase in spine density was driven by an elevated spine formation rate, and not by changes in the spine elimination rate. A fraction of the new spines following ketamine injection was persistent, which is indicative of functional synapses. In a few cases, we also observed retraction of distal apical tuft branches on the day immediately after ketamine administration. These results indicate that following systemic ketamine administration, certain dendritic inputs in MFC are removed immediately, while others are added gradually. These dynamic structural modifications are consistent with a model of ketamine action in which the net effect is a rebalancing of synaptic inputs received by frontal cortical neurons. PMID:27066532

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is ... of CT Scanning of the Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly ...

  14. Diagnostic Approach to Pediatric Spine Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the developmental features of the pediatric spine and spinal cord, including embryologic steps and subsequent growth of the osteocartilaginous spine and contents is necessary for interpretation of the pathologic events that may affect the pediatric spine. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients suspected of harboring spinal abnormalities, whereas computed tomography and ultrasonography play a more limited, complementary role. This article discusses the embryologic and developmental anatomy features of the spine and spinal cord, together with some technical points and pitfalls, and the most common indications for pediatric spinal MR imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Spiny Dendrites Using Straightening and Unrolling Transforms

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Pastor, Luis; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of the synaptic organization of the brain depends to a large extent on knowledge about the synaptic inputs to the neurons. Indeed, the dendritic surfaces of pyramidal cells (the most common neuron in the cerebral cortex) are covered by thin protrusions named dendritic spines. These represent the targets of most excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex and therefore, dendritic spines prove critical in learning, memory and cognition. This paper presents a new method that facilitates the analysis of the 3D structure of spine insertions in dendrites, providing insight on spine distribution patterns. This method is based both on the implementation of straightening and unrolling transformations to move the analysis process to a planar, unfolded arrangement, and on the design of DISPINE, an interactive environment that supports the visual analysis of 3D patterns. PMID:22644869

  16. Loss of PSD-95 Enrichment is not a Prerequisite for Spine Retraction

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Georgia F.; Oh, Won Chan; Boudewyn, Lauren C.; Mikula, Sarah K.; Zito, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Changes in neuronal structure are thought to underlie long-term behavioral modifications associated with learning and memory. In particular, considerable evidence implicates the destabilization and retraction of dendritic spines along with the loss of spine synapses as an important cellular mechanism for refining brain circuits, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating spine elimination remain ill-defined. The postsynaptic density protein, PSD-95, is highly enriched in dendritic spines and has been associated with spine stability. Because spines with low levels of PSD-95 are more dynamic, and the recruitment of PSD-95 to nascent spines has been associated with spine stabilization, we hypothesized that loss of PSD-95 enrichment would be a prerequisite for spine retraction. To test this hypothesis, we used dual-color time-lapse two-photon microscopy to monitor rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons co-transfected with PSD-95-GFP and DsRed-Express, and we analyzed the relationship between PSD-95-GFP enrichment and spine morphological changes. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that the majority of spines that retracted were relatively unenriched for PSD-95-GFP. However, in the subset of PSD-95-GFP-enriched spines that retracted, spine shrinkage and loss of PSD-95-GFP were tightly coupled, suggesting that loss of PSD-95-GFP enrichment did not precede spine retraction. Moreover, we found that in some instances spine retraction resulted in a significant enrichment of PSD-95-GFP on the dendritic shaft. Our data support a model of spine retraction in which loss of PSD-95 enrichment is not required prior to the destabilization of spines. PMID:21865455

  17. Estrogen levels regulate the subcellular distribution of phosphorylated Akt in hippocampal CA1 dendrites.

    PubMed

    Znamensky, Vladimir; Akama, Keith T; McEwen, Bruce S; Milner, Teresa A

    2003-03-15

    In addition to genomic pathways, estrogens may regulate gene expression by activating specific signal transduction pathways, such as that involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) and the subsequent phosphorylation of Akt (protein kinase B). The Akt pathway regulates various cellular events, including the initiation of protein synthesis. Our previous studies showed that synaptogenesis in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell dendritic spines is highest when brain estrogen levels are highest. To address the role of Akt in this process, the subcellular distribution of phosphorylated Akt immunoreactivity (pAkt-I) in the hippocampus of female rats across the estrous cycle and male rats was analyzed by light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). By LM, the density of pAkt-I in stratum radiatum of CA1 was significantly higher in proestrus rats (or in estrogen-supplemented ovariectomized females) compared with diestrus, estrus, or male rats. By EM, pAkt-I was found throughout the shafts and in select spines of stratum radiatum dendrites. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis identifying pAkt-I with immunogold particles revealed that proestrus rats compared with diestrus, estrus, and male rats contained significantly higher pAkt-I associated with (1) dendritic spines (both cytoplasm and plasmalemma), (2) spine apparati located within 0.1 microm of dendritic spine bases, (3) endoplasmic reticula and polyribosomes in the cytoplasm of dendritic shafts, and (4) the plasmalemma of dendritic shafts. These findings suggest that estrogens may regulate spine formation in CA1 pyramidal neurons via Akt-mediated signaling events.

  18. Spine Formation and Maturation in the Developing Rat Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Schachtele, Scott J.; Losh, Joe; Dailey, Michael E.; Green, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    The rat auditory cortex is organized as a tonotopic map of sound frequency. This map is broadly tuned at birth and is refined during the first 3 weeks postnatal. The structural correlates underlying tonotopic map maturation and reorganization during development are poorly understood. We employed fluorescent dye ballistic labeling (“DiOlistics”) alone, or in conjunction with immunohistochemistry, to quantify synaptogenesis in the auditory cortex of normal hearing rats. We show that the developmental appearance of dendritic protrusions, which include both immature filopodia and mature spines, on layers 2/3, 4, and 5 pyramidal and layer 4 spiny nonpyramidal neurons occurs in three phases: slow addition of dendritic protrusions from postnatal day 4 (P4) to P9, rapid addition of dendritic protrusions from P9 to P19, and a final phase where mature protrusion density is achieved (>P21). Next, we combined DiOlistics with immunohistochemical labeling of bassoon, a presynaptic scaffolding protein, as a novel method to categorize dendritic protrusions as either filopodia or mature spines in cortex fixed in vivo. Using this method we observed an increase in the spine-to-filopodium ratio from P9–P16, indicating a period of rapid spine maturation. Previous studies report mature spines as being shorter in length compared to filopodia. We similarly observed a reduction in protrusion length between P9 and P16, corroborating our immunohistochemical spine maturation data. These studies show that dendritic protrusion formation and spine maturation occur rapidly at a time previously shown to correspond to auditory cortical tonotopic map refinement (P11–P14), providing a structural correlate of physiological maturation. PMID:21800311

  19. Effect of the environment on the dendritic morphology of the rat auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Mitali; Muñoz-Llancao, Pablo; Roychowdhury, Swagata; Nichols, Justin A.; Jakkamsetti, Vikram; Porter, Benjamin; Byrapureddy, Rajasekhar; Salgado, Humberto; Kilgard, Michael P.; Aboitiz, Francisco; Dagnino-Subiabre, Alexies; Atzori, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify morphological correlates of environment-induced changes at excitatory synapses of the primary auditory cortex (A1). We used the Golgi-Cox stain technique to compare pyramidal cells dendritic properties of Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to different environmental manipulations. Sholl analysis, dendritic length measures, and spine density counts were used to monitor the effects of sensory deafness and an auditory version of environmental enrichment (EE). We found that deafness decreased apical dendritic length leaving basal dendritic length unchanged, whereas EE selectively increased basal dendritic length without changing apical dendritic length. On the contrary, deafness decreased while EE increased spine density in both basal and apical dendrites of A1 layer 2/3 (LII/III) neurons. To determine whether stress contributed to the observed morphological changes in A1, we studied neural morphology in a restraint-induced model that lacked behaviorally relevant acoustic cues. We found that stress selectively decreased apical dendritic length in the auditory but not in the visual primary cortex. Similar to the acoustic manipulation, stress-induced changes in dendritic length possessed a layer specific pattern displaying LII/III neurons from stressed animals with normal apical dendrites but shorter basal dendrites, while infragranular neurons (layers V and VI) displayed shorter apical dendrites but normal basal dendrites. The same treatment did not induce similar changes in the visual cortex, demonstrating that the auditory cortex is an exquisitely sensitive target of neocortical plasticity, and that prolonged exposure to different acoustic as well as emotional environmental manipulation may produce specific changes in dendritic shape and spine density. PMID:19771593

  20. The relationship between PSD-95 clustering and spine stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cane, Michele; Maco, Bohumil; Knott, Graham; Holtmaat, Anthony

    2014-02-05

    The appearance and disappearance of dendritic spines, accompanied by synapse formation and elimination may underlie the experience-dependent reorganization of cortical circuits. The exact temporal relationship between spine and synapse formation in vivo remains unclear, as does the extent to which synapse formation enhances the stability of newly formed spines and whether transient spines produce synapses. We used in utero electroporation of DsRedExpress- and eGFP-tagged postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) to investigate the relationship between spine and PSD stability in mouse neocortical L2/3 pyramidal cells in vivo. Similar to previous studies, spines and synapses appeared and disappeared, even in naive animals. Cytosolic spine volumes and PSD-95-eGFP levels in spines covaried over time, suggesting that the strength of many individual synapses continuously changes in the adult neocortex. The minority of newly formed spines acquired PSD-95-eGFP puncta. Spines that failed to acquire a PSD rarely survived for more than a day. Although PSD-95-eGFP accumulation was associated with increased spine lifetimes, most new spines with a PSD did not convert into persistent spines. This indicates that transient spines may serve to produce short-lived synaptic contacts. Persistent spines that were destined to disappear showed, on average, reduced PSD-95-eGFP levels well before the actual pruning event. Altogether, our data indicate that the PSD size relates to spine stability in vivo.

  1. Investigating sub-spine actin dynamics in rat hippocampal neurons with super-resolution optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Kim, Eun-Ji; Rodionov, Vladimir; Yu, Ji

    2009-11-09

    Morphological changes in dendritic spines represent an important mechanism for synaptic plasticity which is postulated to underlie the vital cognitive phenomena of learning and memory. These morphological changes are driven by the dynamic actin cytoskeleton that is present in dendritic spines. The study of actin dynamics in these spines traditionally has been hindered by the small size of the spine. In this study, we utilize a photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM)-based single-molecule tracking technique to analyze F-actin movements with approximately 30-nm resolution in cultured hippocampal neurons. We were able to observe the kinematic (physical motion of actin filaments, i.e., retrograde flow) and kinetic (F-actin turn-over) dynamics of F-actin at the single-filament level in dendritic spines. We found that F-actin in dendritic spines exhibits highly heterogeneous kinematic dynamics at the individual filament level, with simultaneous actin flows in both retrograde and anterograde directions. At the ensemble level, movements of filaments integrate into a net retrograde flow of approximately 138 nm/min. These results suggest a weakly polarized F-actin network that consists of mostly short filaments in dendritic spines.

  2. A sonographic approach to prenatal classification of congenital spine anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Meiri; Sia, Sock Bee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To develop a classification system for congenital spine anomalies detected by prenatal ultrasound. Methods: Data were collected from fetuses with spine abnormalities diagnosed in our institution over a five‐year period between June 2005 and June 2010. The ultrasound images were analysed to determine which features were associated with different congenital spine anomalies. Findings of the prenatal ultrasound images were correlated with other prenatal imaging, post mortem findings, post mortem imaging, neonatal imaging, karyotype, and other genetic workup. Data from published case reports of prenatal diagnosis of rare congenital spine anomalies were analysed to provide a comprehensive work. Results: During the study period, eighteen cases of spine abnormalities were diagnosed in 7819 women. The mean gestational age at diagnosis was 18.8w ± 2.2 SD. While most cases represented open NTD, a spectrum of vertebral abnormalities were diagnosed prenatally. These included hemivertebrae, block vertebrae, cleft or butterfly vertebrae, sacral agenesis, and a lipomeningocele. The most sensitive features for diagnosis of a spine abnormality included flaring of the vertebral arch ossification centres, abnormal spine curvature, and short spine length. While reported findings at the time of diagnosis were often conservative, retrospective analysis revealed good correlation with radiographic imaging. 3D imaging was found to be a valuable tool in many settings. Conclusions: Analysis of the study findings showed prenatal ultrasound allowed detection of disruption to the normal appearances of the fetal spine. Using the three features of flaring of the vertebral arch ossification centres, abnormal spine curvature, and short spine length, an algorithm was devised to aid with the diagnosis of spine anomalies for those who perform and report prenatal ultrasound. PMID:28191204

  3. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... CT scans rapidly makes detailed pictures of the lower back. The test may be used to look for: ...

  4. Cervical spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical spine; Computed tomography scan of cervical spine; CT scan of cervical spine; Neck CT scan ... table that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the ...

  5. Muscarinic regulation of Kenyon cell dendritic arborizations in adult worker honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Dobrin, Scott E.; Herlihy, J. Daniel; Robinson, Gene E.; Fahrbach, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    The experience of foraging under natural conditions increases the volume of mushroom body neuropil in worker honey bees. A comparable increase in neuropil volume results from treatment of worker honey bees with pilocarpine, an agonist for muscarinic-type cholinergic receptors. A component of the neuropil growth induced by foraging experience is growth of dendrites in the collar region of the calyces. We show here, via analysis of Golgi-impregnated collar Kenyon cells with wedge arborizations, that significant increases in standard measures of dendritic complexity were also found in worker honey bees treated with pilocarpine. This result suggests that signaling via muscarinic-type receptors promotes the increase in Kenyon cell dendritic complexity associated with foraging. Treatment of worker honey bees with scopolamine, a muscarinic inhibitor, inhibited some aspects of dendritic growth. Spine density on the Kenyon cell dendrites varied with sampling location, with the distal portion of the dendritic field having greater total spine density than either the proximal or medial section. This observation may be functionally significant because of the stratified organization of projections from visual centers to the dendritic arborizations of the collar Kenyon cells. Pilocarpine treatment had no effect on the distribution of spines on dendrites of the collar Kenyon cells. PMID:21262388

  6. [Scoliosis: the bent spine].

    PubMed

    Radl, R; Maafe, M; Ziegler, S

    2011-05-01

    Scoliosis, a permanent abnormal curvature of the spine to the side, is divided into four forms: idiopathic (infantile, juvenile and adolescent, accounting for 80% of cases), neurogenic, congenital and adult scoliosis. Most patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis initially have mainly cosmetic problems. However, neurogenic, congenital and adult scoliosis can lead to severe clinical symptoms. The leading symptom is back pain caused by secondary changes. In recent years the Lenke classification has been proven to be a reliable tool for disease classification. Non-progressive scoliosis is usually treated conservatively. In the case of Cobb angles of greater than 50°, surgical therapy is recommended in patients presenting before adulthood. Technical improvements in implants and the optimisation of surgical methods have set a trend in the direction of surgical therapy.

  7. Coexistence of glutamatergic spine synapses and shaft synapses in substantia nigra dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Miae; Bum Um, Ki; Jang, Jinyoung; Jin Kim, Hyun; Cho, Hana; Chung, Sungkwon; Kyu Park, Myoung

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra have long been believed to have multiple aspiny dendrites which receive many glutamatergic synaptic inputs from several regions of the brain. But, here, using high-resolution two-photon confocal microscopy in the mouse brain slices, we found a substantial number of common dendritic spines in the nigral dopamine neurons including thin, mushroom, and stubby types of spines. However, the number of dendritic spines of the dopamine neurons was approximately five times lower than that of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Immunostaining and morphological analysis revealed that glutamatergic shaft synapses were present two times more than spine synapses. Using local two-photon glutamate uncaging techniques, we confirmed that shaft synapses and spine synapses had both AMPA and NMDA receptors, but the AMPA/NMDA current ratios differed. The evoked postsynaptic potentials of spine synapses showed lower amplitudes but longer half-widths than those of shaft synapses. Therefore, we provide the first evidence that the midbrain dopamine neurons have two morphologically and functionally distinct types of glutamatergic synapses, spine synapses and shaft synapses, on the same dendrite. This peculiar organization could be a new basis for unraveling many physiological and pathological functions of the midbrain dopamine neurons. PMID:26435058

  8. Prolonged maternal separation attenuates BDNF-ERK signaling correlated with spine formation in the hippocampus during early brain development.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Ken-Ichi; Suzuki, Shingo; Warita, Katsuhiko; Kaji, Tomohiro; Kusaka, Takashi; Miki, Takanori

    2017-04-01

    Maternal separation (MS) is known to affect hippocampal function such as learning and memory, yet the molecular mechanism remains unknown. We hypothesized that these impairments are attributed to abnormities of neural circuit formation by MS, and focused on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as key factor because BDNF signaling has an essential role in synapse formation during early brain development. Using rat offspring exposed to MS for 6 h/day during postnatal days (PD) 2-20, we estimated BDNF signaling in the hippocampus during brain development. Our results show that MS attenuated BDNF expression and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) around PD 7. Moreover, plasticity-related immediate early genes, which are transcriptionally regulated by BDNF-ERK signaling, were also reduced by MS around PD 7. Interestingly, detailed analysis revealed that MS particularly reduced expression of BDNF gene and immediate early genes in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) of hippocampus at PD 7. Considering that BDNF-ERK signaling is involved in spine formation, we next evaluated spine formation in the hippocampus during the weaning period. Our results show that MS particularly reduced mature spine density in proximal apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons at PD 21. These results suggest that MS could attenuate BDNF-ERK signaling during primary synaptogenesis with a region-specific manner, which is likely to lead to decreased spine formation and maturation observed in the hippocampal CA1 region. It is speculated that this incomplete spine formation during early brain development has an influence on learning capabilities throughout adulthood. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Differential excitability and modulation of striatal medium spiny neuron dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Day, Michelle; Wokosin, David; Plotkin, Joshua L.; Tian, Xinyoung; Surmeier, D. James

    2011-01-01

    The loss of striatal dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's disease (PD) models triggers a cell-type specific reduction in the density of dendritic spines in D2 receptor-expressing striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (D2 MSNs). How the intrinsic properties of MSN dendrites, where the vast majority of DA receptors are found, contribute to this adaptation is not clear. To address this question, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) was performed in patch-clamped mouse MSNs identified in striatal slices by expression of green fluorescent protein (eGFP) controlled by DA receptor promoters. These studies revealed that single back-propagating action potentials (bAP) produced more reliable elevations in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration at distal dendritic locations in D2 MSNs than at similar locations in D1 receptor-expressing striatonigral MSNs (D1 MSNs). In both cell types, the dendritic Ca2+ entry elicited by bAPs was enhanced by pharmacological blockade of Kv4, but not Kv1 K+ channels. Local application of DA depressed dendritic bAP-evoked Ca2+ transients, whereas application of ACh increased these Ca2+ transients in D2 MSNs—but not in D1 MSNs. Following DA depletion, bAP-evoked Ca2+ transients were enhanced in distal dendrites and spines in D2 MSNs. Taken together, these results suggest that normally D2 MSN dendrites are more excitable than those of D1 MSNs and that DA depletion exaggerates this asymmetry, potentially contributing to adaptations in PD models. PMID:18987196

  10. Leptin-induced spine formation requires TrpC channels and the CaM kinase cascade in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Matasha; Wayman, Gary A; Zhu, Mingyan; Lambert, Talley J; Davare, Monika A; Appleyard, Suzanne M

    2014-07-23

    Leptin is a critical neurotrophic factor for the development of neuronal pathways and synaptogenesis in the hypothalamus. Leptin receptors are also found in other brain regions, including the hippocampus, and a postnatal surge in leptin correlates with a time of rapid growth of dendritic spines and synapses in the hippocampus. Leptin is critical for normal hippocampal dendritic spine formation as db/db mice, which lack normal leptin receptor signaling, have a reduced number of dendritic spines in vivo. Leptin also positively influences hippocampal behaviors, such as cognition, anxiety, and depression, which are critically dependent on dendritic spine number. What is not known are the signaling mechanisms by which leptin initiates spine formation. Here we show leptin induces the formation of dendritic protrusions (thin headless, stubby and mushroom shaped spines), through trafficking and activation of TrpC channels in cultured hippocampal neurons. Leptin-activation of the TrpC current is dose dependent and blocked by targeted knockdown of the leptin receptor. The nonselective TrpC channel inhibitors SKF96365 and 2-APB or targeted knockdown of TrpC1 or 3, but not TrpC5, channels also eliminate the leptin-induced current. Leptin stimulates the phosphorylation of CaMKIγ and β-Pix within 5 min and their activation is required for leptin-induced trafficking of TrpC1 subunits to the membrane. Furthermore, we show that CaMKIγ, CaMKK, β-Pix, Rac1, and TrpC1/3 channels are all required for both the leptin-sensitive current and leptin-induced spine formation. These results elucidate a critical pathway underlying leptin's induction of dendritic morphological changes that initiate spine and excitatory synapse formation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410022-12$15.00/0.

  11. What do dendrites and their synapses tell the neuron?

    PubMed

    Segev, Idan

    2006-03-01

    This essay looks at the historical significance of four APS classic papers that are freely available online: Rall W. Distinguishing theoretical synaptic potentials computed for different soma-dendritic distributions of synaptic input. J Neurophysiol 30: 1138-1168, 1967 (http://jn.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/30/5/1138). Rall W, Burke RE, Smith TG, Nelson PG, and Frank K. Dendritic location of synapses and possible mechanisms for the monosynaptic EPSP in motoneurons. J Neurophysiol 30: 1169-1193, 1967 (http://jn.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/30/5/1169). Rall W and Shepherd GM. Theoretical reconstruction of field potentials and dendrodendritic synaptic interactions in olfactory bulb. J Neurophysiol 31: 884-915, 1968 (http://jn.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/31/6/884). Segev I and Rall W. Computational study of an excitable dendritic spine. J Neurophysiol 60: 499-523, 1988 (http://jn.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/60/2/499).

  12. Ultrastructure of spines and associated terminals on brainstem neurons controlling auditory input

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.; Benson, Thane E.

    2013-01-01

    Spines are unique cellular appendages that isolate synaptic input to neurons and play a role in synaptic plasticity. Using the electron microscope, we studied spines and their associated synaptic terminals on three groups of brainstem neurons: tensor tympani motoneurons, stapedius motoneurons, and medial olivocochlear neurons, all of which exert reflexive control of processes in the auditory periphery. These spines are generally simple in shape; they are infrequent and found on the somata as well as the dendrites. Spines do not differ in volume among the three groups of neurons. In all cases, the spines are associated with a synaptic terminal that engulfs the spine rather than abuts its head. The positions of the synapses are variable, and some are found at a distance from the spine, suggesting that the isolation of synaptic input is of diminished importance for these spines. Each group of neurons receives three common types of synaptic terminals. The type of terminal associated with spines of the motoneurons contains pleomorphic vesicles, whereas the type associated with spines of olivocochlear neurons contains large round vesicles. Thus, spine-associated terminals in the motoneurons appear to be associated with inhibitory processes but in olivocochlear neurons they are associated with excitatory processes. PMID:23602963

  13. Increased CYFIP1 dosage alters cellular and dendritic morphology and dysregulates mTOR.

    PubMed

    Oguro-Ando, A; Rosensweig, C; Herman, E; Nishimura, Y; Werling, D; Bill, B R; Berg, J M; Gao, F; Coppola, G; Abrahams, B S; Geschwind, D H

    2015-09-01

    Rare maternally inherited duplications at 15q11-13 are observed in ~1% of individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), making it among the most common causes of ASD. 15q11-13 comprises a complex region, and as this copy number variation encompasses many genes, it is important to explore individual genotype-phenotype relationships. Cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 1 (CYFIP1) is of particular interest because of its interaction with Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), its upregulation in transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with duplications at 15q11-13 and ASD and the presence of smaller overlapping deletions of CYFIP1 in patients with schizophrenia and intellectual disability. Here, we confirm that CYFIP1 is upregulated in transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and demonstrate its upregulation in the post-mortem brain from 15q11-13 duplication patients for the first time. To investigate how increased CYFIP1 dosage might predispose to neurodevelopmental disease, we studied the consequence of its overexpression in multiple systems. We show that overexpression of CYFIP1 results in morphological abnormalities including cellular hypertrophy in SY5Y cells and differentiated mouse neuronal progenitors. We validate these results in vivo by generating a BAC transgenic mouse, which overexpresses Cyfip1 under the endogenous promotor, observing an increase in the proportion of mature dendritic spines and dendritic spine density. Gene expression profiling on embryonic day 15 suggested the dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which was confirmed at the protein level. Importantly, similar evidence of mTOR-related dysregulation was seen in brains from 15q11-13 duplication patients with ASD. Finally, treatment of differentiated mouse neuronal progenitors with an mTOR inhibitor (rapamycin) rescued the morphological abnormalities resulting from CYFIP1 overexpression. Together, these data show that CYFIP1 overexpression

  14. Abnormal tau phosphorylation in the thorny excrescences of CA3 hippocampal neurons in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Ávila, Jesús; DeFelipe, Javier

    2011-01-01

    A key symptom in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the loss of declarative memory. The anatomical substrate that supports this kind of memory involves the neural circuits of the medial temporal lobe, and in particular, of the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex. A main feature of AD is the abnormal phosphorylation of the tau protein and the presence of tangles. The sequence of cellular changes related to tau phosphorylation and tangle formation has been studied with an antibody that binds to diffuse phosphotau (AT8). Moreover, another tau antibody (PHF-1) has been used to follow the pathway of neurofibrillary (tau aggregation) degeneration in AD. We have used a variety of quantitative immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy to visualize and characterize neurons labeled with AT8 and PHF-1 antibodies. We present here the rather unexpected discovery that in AD, there is conspicuous abnormal phosphorylation of the tau protein in a selective subset of dendritic spines. We identified these spines as the typical thorny excrescences of hippocampal CA3 neurons in a pre-tangle state. Since thorny excrescences represent a major synaptic target of granule cell axons (mossy fibers), such aberrant phosphorylation may play an essential role in the memory impairment typical of AD patients.

  15. Cervical spine injuries in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Patrick; Jaindl, Manuela; Thalhammer, Gerhild; Dittrich, Stefan; Kutscha-Lissberg, Florian; Vecsei, Vilmos; Gaebler, Christian

    2007-02-01

    study were similar to several previous reports, underscoring a low incidence (1.2%) and age-related characteristics. Younger children had a predilection for injuries of the upper cervical spine, whereas children in the older age group sustained significantly more injuries of the lower cervical spine. Spinal cord injuries without radiographic abnormalities were only seen in the younger age group. Despite the low incidence of cervical spine injuries in pediatric patients, increased efforts at prevention are demanded because mortality rate (27%) and incidence of neurologic deficits (66%) were dreadfully high in our series.

  16. Translocation of CaMKII to dendritic microtubules supports the plasticity of local synapses

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Mado; Labrecque, Simon; Tardif, Christian; Labrie-Dion, Étienne; LeBel, Éric

    2012-01-01

    The processing of excitatory synaptic inputs involves compartmentalized dendritic Ca2+ oscillations. The downstream signaling evoked by these local Ca2+ transients and their impact on local synaptic development and remodeling are unknown. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is an important decoder of Ca2+ signals and mediator of synaptic plasticity. In addition to its known accumulation at spines, we observed with live imaging the dynamic recruitment of CaMKII to dendritic subdomains adjacent to activated synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons. This localized and transient enrichment of CaMKII to dendritic sites coincided spatially and temporally with dendritic Ca2+ transients. We show that it involved an interaction with microtubular elements, required activation of the kinase, and led to localized dendritic CaMKII autophosphorylation. This process was accompanied by the adjacent remodeling of spines and synaptic AMPA receptor insertion. Replacement of endogenous CaMKII with a mutant that cannot translocate within dendrites lessened this activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Thus, CaMKII could decode compartmental dendritic Ca2+ transients to support remodeling of local synapses. PMID:22965911

  17. Inhibitory dendrite dynamics as a general feature of the adult cortical microcircuit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jerry L; Flanders, Genevieve H; Lee, Wei-Chung Allen; Lin, Walter C; Nedivi, Elly

    2011-08-31

    The mammalian neocortex is functionally subdivided into architectonically distinct regions that process various types of information based on their source of afferent input. Yet, the modularity of neocortical organization in terms of cell type and intrinsic circuitry allows afferent drive to continuously reassign cortical map space. New aspects of cortical map plasticity include dynamic turnover of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons and remodeling of interneuron dendritic arbors. While spine remodeling occurs in multiple cortical regions, it is not yet known whether interneuron dendrite remodeling is common across primary sensory and higher-level cortices. It is also unknown whether, like pyramidal dendrites, inhibitory dendrites respect functional domain boundaries. Given the importance of the inhibitory circuitry to adult cortical plasticity and the reorganization of cortical maps, we sought to address these questions by using two-photon microscopy to monitor interneuron dendritic arbors of thy1-GFP-S transgenic mice expressing GFP in neurons sparsely distributed across the superficial layers of the neocortex. We find that interneuron dendritic branch tip remodeling is a general feature of the adult cortical microcircuit, and that remodeling rates are similar across primary sensory regions of different modalities, but may differ in magnitude between primary sensory versus higher cortical areas. We also show that branch tip remodeling occurs in bursts and respects functional domain boundaries.

  18. Palmitoylation of LIM Kinase-1 ensures spine-specific actin polymerization and morphological plasticity

    PubMed Central

    George, Joju; Soares, Cary; Montersino, Audrey; Beique, Jean-Claude; Thomas, Gareth M

    2015-01-01

    Precise regulation of the dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton is critical for neurodevelopment and neuronal plasticity, but how neurons spatially control actin dynamics is not well defined. Here, we identify direct palmitoylation of the actin regulator LIM kinase-1 (LIMK1) as a novel mechanism to control spine-specific actin dynamics. A conserved palmitoyl-motif is necessary and sufficient to target LIMK1 to spines and to anchor LIMK1 in spines. ShRNA knockdown/rescue experiments reveal that LIMK1 palmitoylation is essential for normal spine actin polymerization, for spine-specific structural plasticity and for long-term spine stability. Palmitoylation is critical for LIMK1 function because this modification not only controls LIMK1 targeting, but is also essential for LIMK1 activation by its membrane-localized upstream activator PAK. These novel roles for palmitoylation in the spatial control of actin dynamics and kinase signaling provide new insights into structural plasticity mechanisms and strengthen links between dendritic spine impairments and neuropathological conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06327.001 PMID:25884247

  19. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Classification and Management of Pediatric Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries.

    PubMed

    Madura, Casey J; Johnston, James M

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate management of subaxial spine injury in children requires an appreciation for the differences in anatomy, biomechanics, injury patterns, and treatment options compared with adult patients. Increased flexibility, weak neck muscles, and cranial disproportion predispose younger children to upper cervical injuries and spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality. A majority of subaxial cervical spine injuries can be treated nonoperatively. Surgical instrumentation options for children have significantly increased in recent years. Future studies of outcomes for children with subaxial cervical spine injury should focus on injury classification and standardized outcome measures to ensure continued improvement in quality of care for this patient population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dendritic release of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Mike; Apps, David; Menzies, John; Patel, Jyoti C.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2017-01-01

    Release of neuroactive substances by exocytosis from dendrites is surprisingly widespread and is not confined to a particular class of transmitters: it occurs in multiple brain regions, and includes a range of neuropeptides, classical neurotransmitters and signaling molecules such as nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, ATP and arachidonic acid. This review is focused on hypothalamic neuroendocrine cells that release vasopressin and oxytocin and midbrain neurons that release dopamine. For these two model systems, the stimuli, mechanisms and physiological functions of dendritic release have been explored in greater detail than is yet available for other neurons and neuroactive substances. PMID:28135005

  2. The robotic lumbar spine: dynamics and feedback linearization control.

    PubMed

    Karadogan, Ernur; Williams, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The robotic lumbar spine (RLS) is a 15 degree-of-freedom, fully cable-actuated robotic lumbar spine which can mimic in vivo human lumbar spine movements to provide better hands-on training for medical students. The design incorporates five active lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum, with dimensions of an average adult human spine. It is actuated by 20 cables connected to electric motors. Every vertebra is connected to the neighboring vertebrae by spherical joints. Medical schools can benefit from a tool, system, or method that will help instructors train students and assess their tactile proficiency throughout their education. The robotic lumbar spine has the potential to satisfy these needs in palpatory diagnosis. Medical students will be given the opportunity to examine their own patient that can be programmed with many dysfunctions related to the lumbar spine before they start their professional lives as doctors. The robotic lumbar spine can be used to teach and test medical students in their capacity to be able to recognize normal and abnormal movement patterns of the human lumbar spine under flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. This paper presents the dynamics and nonlinear control of the RLS. A new approach to solve for positive and nonzero cable tensions that are also continuous in time is introduced.

  3. Pediatric Cervical Spine Injuries: A Rare But Challenging Entity.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Florian; Ernstberger, Toni; Neumann, Carsten; Nerlich, Michael; Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Loibl, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Injuries to the cervical spine in pediatric patients are uncommon. A missed injury can have devastating consequences in this age group. Because of the lack of routine in diagnosis and management of pediatric cervical spine injuries (PCSI), each of these cases represents a logistic and personal challenge. By means of clinical cases, we demonstrate key points in diagnostics and treatment of pediatric spine injuries. We highlight typical pediatric injury patterns and more adult-like injuries. The most common cause of injury is blunt trauma. There is an age-related pattern of injuries in pediatric patients. Children under the age of 8 frequently sustain ligamentous injuries in the upper cervical spine. After the age of 8, the biomechanics of the cervical spine are similar to adults, and therefore, bony injuries of the subaxial cervical spine are most likely to occur. Clinical presentation of PCSI is heterogeneous. Younger children can neither interpret nor communicate neurological abnormalities, which make timely and accurate diagnosis difficult. Plain radiographs are often misinterpreted. We find different types of injuries at different locations, because of different biomechanical properties of the immature spine. We outline that initial management is crucial for long-term outcome. Knowledge of biomechanical properties and radiographic presentation of the immature spine can improve the awareness for PCSI. Diagnosis and management of pediatric patients after neck trauma can be demanding. Level IV.

  4. Dendritic structural plasticity in the basolateral amygdala after fear conditioning and its extinction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Stephen C.; Leite-Morris, Kimberly A.; Guy, Marsha D.; Goldberg, Lisa R.; Young, Angela J.; Kaplan, Gary B.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that morphology and arborization of dendritic spines change as a result of fear conditioning in cortical and subcortical brain regions. This study uniquely aims to delineate these structural changes in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) after both fear conditioning and fear extinction. C57BL/6 mice acquired robust conditioned fear responses (70–80% cued freezing behavior) after six pairings with a tone cue associated with footshock in comparison to unshocked controls. During fear acquisition, freezing behavior was significantly affected by both shock exposure and trial number. For fear extinction, mice were exposed to the conditioned stimulus tone in the absence of shock administration and behavioral responses significantly varied by shock treatment. In the retention tests over 3 weeks, the percentage time spent freezing varied with the factor of extinction training. In all treatment groups, alterations in dendritic plasticity were analyzed using Golgi–Cox staining of dendrites in the BLA. Spine density differed between the fear conditioned group and both the fear extinction and control groups on third order dendrites. Spine density was significantly increased in the fear conditioned group compared to the fear extinction group and controls. Similarly in Sholl analyses, fear conditioning significantly increased BLA spine numbers and dendritic intersections while subsequent extinction training reversed these effects. In summary, fear extinction produced enduring behavioral plasticity that is associated with a reversal of alterations in BLA dendritic plasticity produced by fear conditioning. These neuroplasticity findings can inform our understanding of structural mechanisms underlying stress-related pathology can inform treatment research into these disorders. PMID:23570859

  5. Lis1 controls dynamics of neuronal filopodia and spines to impact synaptogenesis and social behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Sudarov, Anamaria; Gooden, Frank; Tseng, Debbie; Gan, Wen-Biao; Ross, Margaret Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    LIS1 (PAFAH1B1) mutation can impair neuronal migration, causing lissencephaly in humans. LIS1 loss is associated with dynein protein motor dysfunction, and disrupts the actin cytoskeleton through disregulated RhoGTPases. Recently, LIS1 was implicated as an important protein-network interaction node with high-risk autism spectrum disorder genes expressed in the synapse. How LIS1 might participate in this disorder has not been investigated. We examined the role of LIS1 in synaptogenesis of post-migrational neurons and social behaviour in mice. Two-photon imaging of actin-rich dendritic filopodia and spines in vivo showed significant reductions in elimination and turnover rates of dendritic protrusions of layer V pyramidal neurons in adolescent Lis1+/− mice. Lis1+/− filopodia on immature hippocampal neurons in vitro exhibited reduced density, length and RhoA dependent impaired dynamics compared to Lis1+/+. Moreover, Lis1+/− adolescent mice exhibited deficits in social interaction. Lis1 inactivation restricted to the postnatal hippocampus resulted in similar deficits in dendritic protrusion density and social interactions. Thus, LIS1 plays prominently in dendritic filopodia dynamics and spine turnover implicating reduced dendritic spine plasticity as contributing to developmental autistic-like behaviour. PMID:23483716

  6. Mapping of dendritic lesions in patients with herpes simplex keratitis using in vivo confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Akira; Mori, Natsuko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To produce a two-dimensional reconstruction map of dendritic lesions in patients with herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) using in vivo confocal microscopy. Methods Four eyes of four patients (mean 65.8 years) with HSK presenting with a dendritic lesion were enrolled. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy and in vivo laser confocal microscopy were performed. Acquired confocal images at the level of the epithelium were arranged and mapped into subconfluent montages. Changes in the shape and degree of light reflection of abnormal cells and deposits around dendritic lesions as well as other corneal layers were qualitatively evaluated. Results Mapping of dendritic lesion was successful in all cases, and the subconfluent montages clearly showed the larger image of dendritic lesion. In all cases, the dendritic lesion consisted of hyperreflective irregular epithelial cells, and was surrounded by distorted and elongated epithelial cells. In three cases, hyperreflective deposits were noted at the midline of the lesion. The corneal stroma showed a hyperreflective honeycomb pattern. In two cases, inflammatory cells were observed at the level of endothelial cell layer. Conclusion Mapping of dendritic lesions in patients with HSK was successful in all patients using in vivo confocal microscopy. Cellular level observation of dendritic lesion at a relatively larger magnification may help understand the in vivo morphological change of HSK. Further study in more patients with HSK and nonherpetic dendritic lesion is needed to utilize confocal microscopy images in differential diagnosis and follow-up of the epithelial lesions with dendrite. PMID:26445524

  7. Mapping of dendritic lesions in patients with herpes simplex keratitis using in vivo confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Akira; Mori, Natsuko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To produce a two-dimensional reconstruction map of dendritic lesions in patients with herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) using in vivo confocal microscopy. Four eyes of four patients (mean 65.8 years) with HSK presenting with a dendritic lesion were enrolled. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy and in vivo laser confocal microscopy were performed. Acquired confocal images at the level of the epithelium were arranged and mapped into subconfluent montages. Changes in the shape and degree of light reflection of abnormal cells and deposits around dendritic lesions as well as other corneal layers were qualitatively evaluated. Mapping of dendritic lesion was successful in all cases, and the subconfluent montages clearly showed the larger image of dendritic lesion. In all cases, the dendritic lesion consisted of hyperreflective irregular epithelial cells, and was surrounded by distorted and elongated epithelial cells. In three cases, hyperreflective deposits were noted at the midline of the lesion. The corneal stroma showed a hyperreflective honeycomb pattern. In two cases, inflammatory cells were observed at the level of endothelial cell layer. Mapping of dendritic lesions in patients with HSK was successful in all patients using in vivo confocal microscopy. Cellular level observation of dendritic lesion at a relatively larger magnification may help understand the in vivo morphological change of HSK. Further study in more patients with HSK and nonherpetic dendritic lesion is needed to utilize confocal microscopy images in differential diagnosis and follow-up of the epithelial lesions with dendrite.

  8. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Z. H.; Chen, H.; Yang, F. S.; Luo, C. R.; Zhao, X. P.

    2016-01-01

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths. PMID:27886279

  9. Aβ-mediated spine changes in the hippocampus are microtubule-dependent and can be reversed by a subnanomolar concentration of the microtubule-stabilizing agent epothilone D

    PubMed Central

    Penazzi, Lorène; Tackenberg, Christian; Ghori, Adnan; Golovyashkina, Nataliya; Niewidok, Benedikt; Selle, Karolin; Ballatore, Carlo; Smith, Amos B.; Bakota, Lidia; Brandt, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines represent the major postsynaptic input of excitatory synapses. Loss of spines and changes in their morphology correlate with cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and are thought to occur early during pathology. Therapeutic intervention at a preclinical stage of AD to modify spine changes might thus be warranted. To follow the development and to potentially interfere with spine changes over time, we established a long term ex vivo model from organotypic cultures of the hippocampus from APP transgenic and control mice. The cultures exhibit spine loss in principal hippocampal neurons, which closely resembles the changes occurring in vivo, and spine morphology progressively changes from mushroom-shaped to stubby. We demonstrate that spine changes are completely reversed within few days after blocking amyloid-β (Aβ) production with the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT. We show that the microtubule disrupting drug nocodazole leads to spine loss similar to Aβ expressing cultures and suppresses DAPT-mediated spine recovery in slices from APP transgenic mice. Finally, we report that epothilone D (EpoD) at a subnanomolar concentration, which slightly stabilizes microtubules in model neurons, completely reverses Aβ-induced spine loss and increases thin spine density. Taken together the data indicate that Aβ causes spine changes by microtubule destabilization and that spine recovery requires microtubule polymerization. Moreover, our results suggest that a low, subtoxic concentration of EpoD is sufficient to reduce spine loss during the preclinical stage of AD. PMID:26772969

  10. North American Spine Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles Policy & Regulation Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service Food & Drug Administration Scientific & Policy Comments Coverage Recommendations About Coverage Recommendations Access eBook Payor Access Practice Management Market Your Practice Career Center Spine Fellowship Directory ...

  11. Sonic hedgehog signaling regulates actin cytoskeleton via Tiam1-Rac1 cascade during spine formation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobunari; Kurisu, Junko; Kengaku, Mineko

    2010-12-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway has essential roles in several processes during development of the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS). Here, we report that Shh regulates dendritic spine formation in hippocampal pyramidal neurons via a novel pathway that directly regulates the actin cytoskeleton. Shh signaling molecules Patched (Ptc) and Smoothened (Smo) are expressed in several types of postmitotic neurons, including cerebellar Purkinje cells and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Knockdown of Smo induces dendritic spine formation in cultured hippocampal neurons independently of Gli-mediated transcriptional activity. Smo interacts with Tiam1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1, via its cytoplasmic C-terminal region. Inhibition of Tiam1 or Rac1 activity suppresses spine induction by Smo knockdown. Shh induces remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton independently of transcriptional activation in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These findings demonstrate a novel Shh pathway that regulates the actin cytoskeleton via Tiam1-Rac1 activation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Synaptic dysfunction and abnormal behaviors in mice lacking major isoforms of Shank3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; McCoy, Portia A; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Pan, Yanzhen; Je, H Shawn; Roberts, Adam C; Kim, Caroline J; Berrios, Janet; Colvin, Jennifer S; Bousquet-Moore, Danielle; Lorenzo, Isabel; Wu, Gangyi; Weinberg, Richard J; Ehlers, Michael D; Philpot, Benjamin D; Beaudet, Arthur L; Wetsel, William C; Jiang, Yong-Hui

    2011-08-01

    SHANK3 is a synaptic scaffolding protein enriched in the postsynaptic density (PSD) of excitatory synapses. Small microdeletions and point mutations in SHANK3 have been identified in a small subgroup of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability. SHANK3 also plays a key role in the chromosome 22q13.3 microdeletion syndrome (Phelan-McDermid syndrome), which includes ASD and cognitive dysfunction as major clinical features. To evaluate the role of Shank3 in vivo, we disrupted major isoforms of the gene in mice by deleting exons 4-9. Isoform-specific Shank3(e4-9) homozygous mutant mice display abnormal social behaviors, communication patterns, repetitive behaviors and learning and memory. Shank3(e4-9) male mice display more severe impairments than females in motor coordination. Shank3(e4-9) mice have reduced levels of Homer1b/c, GKAP and GluA1 at the PSD, and show attenuated activity-dependent redistribution of GluA1-containing AMPA receptors. Subtle morphological alterations in dendritic spines are also observed. Although synaptic transmission is normal in CA1 hippocampus, long-term potentiation is deficient in Shank3(e4-9) mice. We conclude that loss of major Shank3 species produces biochemical, cellular and morphological changes, leading to behavioral abnormalities in mice that bear similarities to human ASD patients with SHANK3 mutations.

  13. Dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Leguey, Ignacio; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rojo, Concepción; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier

    2016-09-01

    The characterization of the structural design of cortical microcircuits is essential for understanding how they contribute to function in both health and disease. Since pyramidal neurons represent the most abundant neuronal type and their dendritic spines constitute the major postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the neocortex largely depends on the available knowledge regarding the structure of pyramidal cells. Previous studies have identified several apparently common rules in dendritic geometry. We study the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers to further shed light on the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells. We find that the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells from layers II-VI of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex suggest common design principles, despite the particular morphological and functional features that are characteristic of pyramidal cells in each cortical layer. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2567-2576, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Early social enrichment rescues adult behavioral and brain abnormalities in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oddi, Diego; Subashi, Enejda; Middei, Silvia; Bellocchio, Luigi; Lemaire-Mayo, Valerie; Guzmán, Manuel; Crusio, Wim E; D'Amato, Francesca R; Pietropaolo, Susanna

    2015-03-13

    Converging lines of evidence support the use of environmental stimulation to ameliorate the symptoms of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. Applying these interventions at very early ages is critical to achieve a marked reduction of the pathological phenotypes. Here we evaluated the impact of early social enrichment in Fmr1-KO mice, a genetic mouse model of fragile X syndrome (FXS), a major developmental disorder and the most frequent monogenic cause of autism. Enrichment was achieved by providing male KO pups and their WT littermates with enhanced social stimulation, housing them from birth until weaning with the mother and an additional nonlactating female. At adulthood they were tested for locomotor, social, and cognitive abilities; furthermore, dendritic alterations were assessed in the hippocampus and amygdala, two brain regions known to be involved in the control of the examined behaviors and affected by spine pathology in Fmr1-KOs. Enrichment rescued the behavioral FXS-like deficits displayed in adulthood by Fmr1-KO mice, that is, hyperactivity, reduced social interactions, and cognitive deficits. Early social enrichment also eliminated the abnormalities shown by adult KO mice in the morphology of hippocampal and amygdala dendritic spines, namely an enhanced density of immature vs mature types. Importantly, enrichment did not induce neurobehavioral changes in WT mice, thus supporting specific effects on FXS-like pathology. These findings show that early environmental stimulation has profound and long-term beneficial effects on the pathological FXS phenotype, thereby encouraging the use of nonpharmacological interventions for the treatment of this and perhaps other neurodevelopmental diseases.

  15. Theory of electric resonance in the neocortical apical dendrite.

    PubMed

    Kasevich, Ray S; LaBerge, David

    2011-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons of the neocortex display a wide range of synchronous EEG rhythms, which arise from electric activity along the apical dendrites of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Here we present a theoretical description of oscillation frequency profiles along apical dendrites which exhibit resonance frequencies in the range of 10 to 100 Hz. The apical dendrite is modeled as a leaky coaxial cable coated with a dielectric, in which a series of compartments act as coupled electric circuits that gradually narrow the resonance profile. The tuning of the peak frequency is assumed to be controlled by the average amplitude of voltage-gated outward currents, which in turn are regulated by the subthreshold noise in the thousands of synaptic spines that are continuously bombarded by local circuits. The results of simulations confirmed the ability of the model both to tune the peak frequency in the 10-100 Hz range and to gradually narrow the resonance profile. Considerable additional narrowing of the resonance profile is provided by repeated looping through the apical dendrite via the corticothalamocortical circuit, which reduced the width of each resonance curve (at half-maximum) to approximately 1 Hz. Synaptic noise in the neural circuit is discussed in relation to the ways it can influence the narrowing process.

  16. Theory of Electric Resonance in the Neocortical Apical Dendrite

    PubMed Central

    Kasevich, Ray S.; LaBerge, David

    2011-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons of the neocortex display a wide range of synchronous EEG rhythms, which arise from electric activity along the apical dendrites of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Here we present a theoretical description of oscillation frequency profiles along apical dendrites which exhibit resonance frequencies in the range of 10 to 100 Hz. The apical dendrite is modeled as a leaky coaxial cable coated with a dielectric, in which a series of compartments act as coupled electric circuits that gradually narrow the resonance profile. The tuning of the peak frequency is assumed to be controlled by the average amplitude of voltage-gated outward currents, which in turn are regulated by the subthreshold noise in the thousands of synaptic spines that are continuously bombarded by local circuits. The results of simulations confirmed the ability of the model both to tune the peak frequency in the 10–100 Hz range and to gradually narrow the resonance profile. Considerable additional narrowing of the resonance profile is provided by repeated looping through the apical dendrite via the corticothalamocortical circuit, which reduced the width of each resonance curve (at half-maximum) to approximately 1 Hz. Synaptic noise in the neural circuit is discussed in relation to the ways it can influence the narrowing process. PMID:21853129

  17. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  18. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  19. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-03-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  20. Silicon dendritic web growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, S.

    1984-01-01

    Technological goals for a silicon dendritic web growth program effort are presented. Principle objectives for this program include: (1) grow long web crystals front continuously replenished melt; (2) develop temperature distribution in web and melt; (3) improve reproductibility of growth; (4) develop configurations for increased growth rates (width and speed); (5) develop new growth system components as required for improved growth; and (6) evaluate quality of web growth.

  1. Web-dendritic ribbon growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, R. B., Jr.; Faust, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A web furnace was constructed for pulling dendritic-web samples. The effect of changes in the furnace thermal geometry on the growth of dendritic-web was studied. Several attempts were made to grow primitive dendrites for use as the dendritic seed crystals for web growth and to determine the optimum twin spacing in the dendritic seed crystal for web growth. Mathematical models and computer programs were used to determine the thermal geometries in the susceptor, crucible melt, meniscus, and web. Several geometries were determined for particular furnace geometries and growth conditions. The information obtained was used in conjunction with results from the experimental growth investigations in order to achieve proper conditions for sustained pulling of two dendrite web ribbons. In addition, the facilities for obtaining the following data were constructed: twin spacing, dislocation density, web geometry, resistivity, majority charge carrier type, and minority carrier lifetime.

  2. Degenerative Changes of the Spine of Pilots of the RNLAF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    views of the spine taken in standing 7-3 Table 2 Classification of disorders Disorder Levels General: Osteo-arthrosis / Spondylosis / Arthrosis...Deformans Cervical, thoracic, lumbar Scoliosis Cervical, thoracic, lumbar Abnormal alignment Cervical, lumbar Scheuermann’s disease / Enchondrosis Thoracic... lumbar Specific: Degenerative changes in the intervertebral disc / Discopathy Cervical, thoracic, lumbar Presence of Osteophyte’s / Osteophytic

  3. The Degenerative Spine.

    PubMed

    Clarençon, Frédéric; Law-Ye, Bruno; Bienvenot, Peggy; Cormier, Évelyne; Chiras, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a leading cause of back pain and radiculopathy, and is a frequent indication for spine MR imaging. Disc degeneration, disc protrusion/herniation, discarhtrosis, spinal canal stenosis, and facet joint arthrosis, as well as interspinous processes arthrosis, may require an MR imaging workup. This review presents the MR imaging patterns of these diseases and describes the benefit of the MR imaging in these indications compared with the other imaging modalities like plain radiographs or computed tomography scan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  5. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  6. Rapid effects on memory consolidation and spine morphology by estradiol in female and male rodents.

    PubMed

    Luine, Victoria; Serrano, Peter; Frankfurt, Maya

    2018-05-16

    Rapid, neurosteroid-like effects of estrogens on memory consolidation during recognition memory tasks in both male and female rodents are described. We discuss how these mnemonic changes are related to rapid estrogenic effects on dendritic spine density, the distribution of spine types and the expression of PSD95 and GluA2 within spines in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, two areas critical for learning and memory. Overall, these data lead to the conclusion that estrogens are capable of exerting rapid and potent influences on memory and spine morphology in both sexes. The demonstration of estrogenic effects in males, which are used in the majority of memory studies, may provide a model for better understanding how hormone dependent changes in signaling pathways mediating memory and spinogenesis are coordinated to promote memory consolidation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Periscopic Spine Surgery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    radiation medicine, the neurosurgery intensive care unit (ICU), and the pediatrics ICU [Geary 1999a]. The major procedures impacted are spine tumor...radiation medicine, and the pediatric intensive care unit . Hardware and software problems addressed included modifications of patient positioning...planning. Attempts have been made to link mechanical tissue properties to cellular interaction through electrical impedance [7] and to Hounsfield units

  8. [Cervical spine trauma].

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, U; Hellen, P

    2016-08-01

    In the emergency department 65 % of spinal injuries and 2-5 % of blunt force injuries involve the cervical spine. Of these injuries approximately 50 % involve C5 and/or C6 and 30 % involve C2. Older patients tend to have higher spinal injuries and younger patients tend to have lower injuries. The anatomical and development-related characteristics of the pediatric spine as well as degenerative and comorbid pathological changes of the spine in the elderly can make the radiological evaluation of spinal injuries difficult with respect to possible trauma sequelae in young and old patients. Two different North American studies have investigated clinical criteria to rule out cervical spine injuries with sufficient certainty and without using imaging. Imaging of cervical trauma should be performed when injuries cannot be clinically excluded according to evidence-based criteria. Degenerative changes and anatomical differences have to be taken into account in the evaluation of imaging of elderly and pediatric patients.

  9. Degenerative changes in adolescent spines: a comparison of motocross racers and age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Daniels, David J; Luo, T David; Puffer, Ross; McIntosh, Amy L; Larson, A Noelle; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Clarke, Michelle J

    2015-03-01

    Motocross racing is a popular sport; however, its impact on the growing/developing pediatric spine is unknown. Using a retrospective cohort model, the authors compared the degree of advanced degenerative findings in young motocross racers with findings in age-matched controls. Patients who had been treated for motocross-related injury at the authors' institution between 2000 and 2007 and had been under 18 years of age at the time of injury and had undergone plain radiographic or CT examination of any spinal region were eligible for inclusion. Imaging was reviewed in a blinded fashion by 3 physicians for degenerative findings, including endplate abnormalities, loss of vertebral body height, wedging, and malalignment. Acute pathological segments were excluded. Spine radiographs from age-matched controls were similarly reviewed and the findings were compared. The motocross cohort consisted of 29 riders (mean age 14.7 years; 82% male); the control cohort consisted of 45 adolescents (mean age 14.3 years; 71% male). In the cervical spine, the motocross cohort had 55 abnormalities in 203 segments (average 1.90 abnormalities/patient) compared with 20 abnormalities in 213 segments in the controls (average 0.65/patient) (p = 0.006, Student t-test). In the thoracic spine, the motocross riders had 51 abnormalities in 292 segments (average 2.04 abnormalities/patient) compared with 25 abnormalities in 299 segments in the controls (average 1.00/patient) (p = 0.045). In the lumbar spine, the motocross cohort had 11 abnormalities in 123 segments (average 0.44 abnormalities/patient) compared with 15 abnormalities in 150 segments in the controls (average 0.50/patient) (p = 0.197). Increased degenerative changes in the cervical and thoracic spine were identified in adolescent motocross racers compared with age-matched controls. The long-term consequences of these changes are unknown; however, athletes and parents should be counseled accordingly about participation in motocross

  10. Schedule-induced polydipsia is associated with increased spine density in dorsolateral striatum neurons.

    PubMed

    Íbias, J; Soria-Molinillo, E; Kastanauskaite, A; Orgaz, C; DeFelipe, J; Pellón, R; Miguéns, M

    2015-08-06

    Schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) is an adjunctive behavior in which rats exhibit excessive drinking as a consequence of intermittent feeding, and it has been proposed as a candidate model to study the development of compulsive and repetitive behavior. Although several brain structures are involved in compulsive behavior, it has been suggested that alterations in fronto-striatal circuits may underlie compulsive spectrum disorders. In the present work, we examined whether SIP would induce modifications in dorsolateral striatum (DLS) and anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC) neurons. Specifically, the effects of 20 sessions of SIP were determined in the dendrites of DLS medium spiny neurons and in the basal dendritic arbors of layer V pyramidal cells in the aPFC. The structure, size and branching complexity in aPFC neurons were also studied. Results showed that SIP resulted in an increase in dendritic spine density in DLS neurons. Moreover, dendritic spine density was highly correlated with the level of drinking in animals subjected to SIP. By contrast, we observed no differences either in dendritic spine density or in the morphological structure of the dendrites of the aPFC in SIP rats compared to their control counterparts. We hypothesize that SIP-induced structural plasticity in DLS neurons could be related to inflexible response in compulsive behavior. The findings of this study could provide new insights into the involvement of particular cell populations of the dorsolateral striatum and anterior prefrontal cortex regions in compulsive spectrum disorders. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Review of Vascular Abnormalities of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rahul; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Gyure, Kymberly; Boo, Sohyun

    2017-01-01

    Patients with spinal vascular lesions present with unique symptoms and have important anatomical and physiologic changes that must be considered prior to treatment. In this mini-review, we provide an overview of normal spinal vascular anatomy and discuss several key spinal vascular lesions. We provide an overview of cavernous malformations, intradural arteriovenous malformations, perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas, and dural arteriovenous fistulas. Important considerations are addressed in terms of pathologic characterization, specific imaging findings, and treatment approaches. PMID:28191502

  12. A Review of Vascular Abnormalities of the Spine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Gyure, Kymberly; Boo, Sohyun

    2016-01-01

    Patients with spinal vascular lesions present with unique symptoms and have important anatomical and physiologic changes that must be considered prior to treatment. In this mini-review, we provide an overview of normal spinal vascular anatomy and discuss several key spinal vascular lesions. We provide an overview of cavernous malformations, intradural arteriovenous malformations, perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas, and dural arteriovenous fistulas. Important considerations are addressed in terms of pathologic characterization, specific imaging findings, and treatment approaches.

  13. Abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Samuel T; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal placentation poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge for all providers caring for pregnant women. As one of the leading causes of postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation involves the attachment of placental villi directly to the myometrium with potentially deeper invasion into the uterine wall or surrounding organs. Surgical procedures that disrupt the integrity of uterus, including cesarean section, dilatation and curettage, and myomectomy, have been implicated as key risk factors for placenta accreta. The diagnosis is typically made by gray-scale ultrasound and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, which may better delineate the extent of placental invasion. It is critical to make the diagnosis before delivery because preoperative planning can significantly decrease blood loss and avoid substantial morbidity associated with placenta accreta. Aggressive management of hemorrhage through the use of uterotonics, fluid resuscitation, blood products, planned hysterectomy, and surgical hemostatic agents can be life-saving for these patients. Conservative management, including the use of uterine and placental preservation and subsequent methotrexate therapy or pelvic artery embolization, may be considered when a focal accreta is suspected; however, surgical management remains the current standard of care.

  14. Dendritic Degeneration, Neurovascular Defects, and Inflammation Precede Neuronal Loss in a Mouse Model for Tau-Mediated Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Tomasz; Lechat, Benoit; Demedts, David; Gielis, Lies; Devijver, Herman; Borghgraef, Peter; Duimel, Hans; Verheyen, Fons; Kügler, Sebastian; Van Leuven, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)–mediated expression of wild-type or mutant P301L protein tau produces massive degeneration of pyramidal neurons without protein tau aggregation. We probed this novel model for genetic and structural factors and early parameters of pyramidal neurodegeneration. In yellow fluorescent protein–expressing transgenic mice, intracerebral injection of AAV-tauP301L revealed early damage to apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, whereas their somata remained normal. Ultrastructurally, more and enlarged autophagic vacuoles were contained in degenerating dendrites and manifested as dark, discontinuous, vacuolated processes surrounded by activated astrocytes. Dendritic spines were lost in AAV-tauP301L–injected yellow fluorescent protein–expressing transgenic mice, and ultrastructurally, spines appeared dark and degenerating. In CX3CR1EGFP/EGFP-deficient mice, microglia were recruited early to neurons expressing human tau. The inflammatory response was accompanied by extravasation of plasma immunoglobulins. α2-Macroglobulin, but neither albumin nor transferrin, became lodged in the brain parenchyma. Large proteins, but not Evans blue, entered the brain of mice injected with AAV-tauP301L. Ultrastructurally, brain capillaries were constricted and surrounded by swollen astrocytes with extensions that contacted degenerating dendrites and axons. Together, these data corroborate the hypothesis that neuroinflammation participates essentially in tau-mediated neurodegeneration, and the model recapitulates early dendritic defects reminiscent of “dendritic amputation” in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21839061

  15. The Spine in Patients With Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Maegen J; Kruse, Richard W; Shah, Suken A

    2017-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder of type I collagen. Although multiple genotypes and phenotypes are associated with osteogenesis imperfecta, approximately 90% of the mutations are in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. Osteogenesis imperfecta is characterized by bone fragility. Patients typically have multiple fractures or limb deformity; however, the spine can also be affected. Spinal manifestations include scoliosis, kyphosis, craniocervical junction abnormalities, and lumbosacral pathology. The incidence of lumbosacral spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis is higher in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta than in the general population. Use of diphosphonates has been found to decrease the rate of progression of scoliosis in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. A lateral cervical radiograph is recommended in patients with this condition before age 6 years for surveillance of craniocervical junction abnormalities, such as basilar impression. Intraoperative and anesthetic considerations in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta include challenges related to fracture risk, airway management, pulmonary function, and blood loss.

  16. α-Actinin-2 Mediates Spine Morphology and Assembly of the Post-Synaptic Density in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Jennifer L.; Vilchez, Samuel Martin; Asmussen, Hannelore; Whitmore, Leanna A.; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that constitute the primary post-synaptic sites of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Spines mature from a filopodia-like protrusion into a mushroom-shaped morphology with a post-synaptic density (PSD) at its tip. Modulation of the actin cytoskeleton drives these morphological changes as well as the spine dynamics that underlie learning and memory. Several PSD molecules respond to glutamate receptor activation and relay signals to the underlying actin cytoskeleton to regulate the structural changes in spine and PSD morphology. α-Actinin-2 is an actin filament cross-linker, which localizes to dendritic spines, enriched within the post-synaptic density, and implicated in actin organization. We show that loss of α-actinin-2 in rat hippocampal neurons creates an increased density of immature, filopodia-like protrusions that fail to mature into a mushroom-shaped spine during development. α-Actinin-2 knockdown also prevents the recruitment and stabilization of the PSD in the spine, resulting in failure of synapse formation, and an inability to structurally respond to chemical stimulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor. The Ca2+-insensitive EF-hand motif in α-actinin-2 is necessary for the molecule's function in regulating spine morphology and PSD assembly, since exchanging it for the similar but Ca2+-sensitive domain from α-actinin-4, another α-actinin isoform, inhibits its function. Furthermore, when the Ca2+-insensitive domain from α-actinin-2 is inserted into α-actinin-4 and expressed in neurons, it creates mature spines. These observations support a model whereby α-actinin-2, partially through its Ca2+-insensitive EF-hand motif, nucleates PSD formation via F-actin organization and modulates spine maturation to mediate synaptogenesis. PMID:25007055

  17. Low-level laser therapy promotes dendrite growth via upregulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chengbo; He, Zhiyong; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since BDNF plays a critical role in neuronal survival and dendrite growth, BDNF upregulation may contribute to rescue dendrite atrophy and cell loss in AD. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to regulate neuronal function both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we found that LLLT rescued neurons loss and dendritic atrophy via the increase of both BDNF mRNA and protein expression. In addition, dendrite growth was improved after LLLT, characterized by upregulation of PSD95 expression, and the increase in length, branching, and spine density of dendrites in hippocampal neurons. Together, these studies suggest that upregulation of BDNF with LLLT can ameliorate Aβ-induced neurons loss and dendritic atrophy, thus identifying a novel pathway by which LLLT protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Our research may provide a feasible therapeutic approach to control the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Early Environmental Enrichment Enhances Abnormal Brain Connectivity in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Illa, Miriam; Brito, Verónica; Pla, Laura; Eixarch, Elisenda; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; Batallé, Dafnis; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Crispi, Fatima; Udina, Esther; Figueras, Francesc; Ginés, Silvia; Gratacós, Eduard

    2017-10-12

    The structural correspondence of neurodevelopmental impairments related to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) that persists later in life remains elusive. Moreover, early postnatal stimulation strategies have been proposed to mitigate these effects. Long-term brain connectivity abnormalities in an IUGR rabbit model and the effects of early postnatal environmental enrichment (EE) were explored. IUGR was surgically induced in one horn, whereas the contralateral one produced the controls. Postnatally, a subgroup of IUGR animals was housed in an enriched environment. Functional assessment was performed at the neonatal and long-term periods. At the long-term period, structural brain connectivity was evaluated by means of diffusion-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging and by histological assessment focused on the hippocampus. IUGR animals displayed poorer functional results and presented altered whole-brain networks and decreased median fractional anisotropy in the hippocampus. Reduced density of dendritic spines and perineuronal nets from hippocampal neurons were also observed. Of note, IUGR animals exposed to enriched environment presented an improvement in terms of both function and structure. IUGR is associated with altered brain connectivity at the global and cellular level. A strategy based on early EE has the potential to restore the neurodevelopmental consequences of IUGR. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Role of Microglia Disturbances and Immune-Related Marker Abnormalities in Cortical Circuitry Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Volk, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Studies of genetics, serum cytokines, and autoimmune illnesses suggest that immune-related abnormalities are involved in the disease process of schizophrenia. Furthermore, direct evidence of cortical immune activation, including markedly elevated levels of many immune-related markers, have been reported in the prefrontal cortex in multiple cohorts of schizophrenia subjects. Within the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, deficits in the basilar dendritic spines of layer 3 pyramidal neurons and disturbances in inhibitory inputs to pyramidal neurons have also been commonly reported. Interestingly, microglia, the resident immune-related cells of the brain, also regulate excitatory and inhibitory input to pyramidal neurons. Consequently, in this review, we describe the cytological and molecular evidence of immune activation that has been reported in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia and the potential links between these immune-related disturbances with previously reported disturbances in pyramidal and inhibitory neurons in the disorder. Finally, we discuss the role that activated microglia may play in connecting these observations and as potential therapeutic treatment targets in schizophrenia. PMID:28007586

  1. Cervical Spine Injuries in Children Associated With Sports and Recreational Activities.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Lynn; Olsen, Cody S; Jaffe, David M; Leonard, Julie C

    2016-09-30

    The aim of this study was to ascertain potential factors associated with cervical spine injuries in children injured during sports and recreational activities. This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter retrospective case-control study involving children younger than 16 years who presented to emergency departments after blunt trauma and underwent cervical spine radiography. Cases had cervical spine injury from sports or recreational activities (n = 179). Comparison groups sustained (1) cervical spine injury from other mechanisms (n = 361) or (2) other injuries from sports and recreational activities but were free of cervical spine injury (n = 180). For children with sport and recreational activity-related cervical spine injuries, common injury patterns were subaxial (49%) and fractures (56%). These children were at increased odds of spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormalities compared with children with cervical spine injuries from other mechanisms (25% vs 6%). Children with sport and recreational activity-related trauma had increased odds of cervical spine injury if they had focal neurologic findings (odds ratio [OR], 5.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.5-9.4), had complaints of neck pain (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.9-5.0), were injured diving (OR, 43.5; 95% CI, 5.9-321.3), or sustained axial loading impacts (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.3-3.5). Football (22%), diving (20%), and bicycle crashes (11%) were the leading activities associated with cervical spine injury. In children injured during sports and recreational activities, focal neurologic findings, neck pain, axial loading impacts, and the possibility of spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality should guide the diagnostic evaluation for potential cervical spine injuries. Certain activities have a considerable frequency of cervical spine injury, which may benefit from activity-specific preventive measures.

  2. Can dendritic cells see light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    There are many reports showing that low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) can enhance wound healing, upregulate cell proliferation and has anti-apoptotic effects by activating intracellular protective genes. In the field of immune response study, it is not known with any certainty whether light/laser is proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Increasingly in recent times dendritic cells have been found to play an important role in inflammation and the immunological response. In this study, we try to look at the impact of low level near infrared light (810-nm) on murine bone-marrow derived dendritic cells. Changes in surface markers, including MHC II, CD80 and CD11c and the secretion of interleukins induced by light may provide additional evidence to reveal the mystery of how light affects the maturation of dendritic cells as well how these light-induced mature dendritic cells would affect the activation of adaptive immune response.

  3. Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Dendritic Plasticity Support Running-Improved Spatial Learning and Depression-Like Behaviour in Stressed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jian-Bin; Wong, Richard; Ching, Yick-Pang; Qiu, Guang; Tang, Siu-Wa; Lee, Tatia M. C.; So, Kwok-Fai

    2011-01-01

    Exercise promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic plasticity while stress shows the opposite effects, suggesting a possible mechanism for exercise to counteract stress. Changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic modification occur simultaneously in rats with stress or exercise; however, it is unclear whether neurogenesis or dendritic remodeling has a greater impact on mediating the effect of exercise on stress since they have been separately examined. Here we examined hippocampal cell proliferation in runners treated with different doses (low: 30 mg/kg; moderate: 40 mg/kg; high: 50 mg/kg) of corticosterone (CORT) for 14 days. Water maze task and forced swim tests were applied to assess hippocampal-dependent learning and depression-like behaviour respectively the day after the treatment. Repeated CORT treatment resulted in a graded increase in depression-like behaviour and impaired spatial learning that is associated with decreased hippocampal cell proliferation and BDNF levels. Running reversed these effects in rats treated with low or moderate, but not high doses of CORT. Using 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats, we further studied the role of neurogenesis and dendritic remodeling in mediating the effects of exercise on stress. Co-labelling with BrdU (thymidine analog) /doublecortin (immature neuronal marker) showed that running increased neuronal differentiation in vehicle- and CORT-treated rats. Running also increased dendritic length and spine density in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats. Ablation of neurogenesis with Ara-c infusion diminished the effect of running on restoring spatial learning and decreasing depression-like behaviour in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated animals in spite of dendritic and spine enhancement. but not normal runners with enhanced dendritic length. The results indicate that both restored hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic remodelling within the hippocampus are essential for running to counteract stress. PMID:21935393

  4. Osseous anatomy of the lumbosacral spine in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sponseller, P D; Ahn, N U; Ahn, U M; Nallamshetty, L; Rose, P S; Kuszyk, B S; Fishman, E K

    2000-11-01

    This study examines pedicle widths, laminar thicknesses, and scalloping values for lumbosacral spine elements in Marfan volunteers. Comparisons were made between these measurements and norms as well as measurements between Marfan patients with and without dural ectasia. To determine if the lumbosacral vertebral elements are altered in the patient with Marfan syndrome. Several abnormalities have been noted in Marfan lumbar spine, including pedicular attenuation and widened interpediculate distances. This may be due to abnormalities of growth or presence of dural ectasia. Given the large numbers of Marfan patients requiring spinal surgery and the high postoperative failure rate, better understanding of the bony anatomy of Marfan lumbar spine is necessary, especially if use of instrumentation is anticipated. Thirty-two volunteers with Marfan syndrome based on the Ghent criteria underwent spiral computed tomography of the lumbosacral spine. Images were evaluated for dural ectasia, and measurements of pedicle width, laminar thickness, and vertebral scalloping were made. Pedicle widths and laminar thicknesses were significantly smaller in Marfan patients at all levels (P<0.001). Mean pedicle widths at L1-L3 were smaller than the smallest available pedicle screw (5 mm). In Marfan patients with dural ectasia, laminar thickness from L5-S2 and pedicle widths at all lumbar levels were significantly reduced (P<0.01). Vertebral scalloping at S1 was significantly greater in Marfan patients with dural ectasia (P = 0.02). Lumbar pedicle width and laminar thickness are significantly reduced in Marfan individuals. Those with dural ectasia demonstrate increased bony erosion of anterior and posterior elements of lumbosacral spine. Preoperative planning and routine computed tomography scans are recommended when operating on Marfan lumbosacral spine.

  5. A Retrospective Study of Cervical Spine MRI Findings in Children with Abusive Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Governale, Lance S; Brink, Farah W; Pluto, Charles P; Schunemann, Victoria A; Weber, Rachel; Rusin, Jerome; Fischer, Beth A; Letson, Megan M

    2018-01-01

    Increasing attention has been given to the possible association of cervical spine (c-spine) injuries with abusive head trauma (AHT). The aims of this study were to describe c-spine MRI findings in hospitalized AHT patients. This is a retrospective study of children under the age of 5 years with AHT admitted to hospital in 2004-2013. Those with c-spine MRI were identified, and the images were reviewed. 250 AHT cases were identified, with 34 (14%) undergoing c-spine MRI. Eleven patients (32%) had 25 findings, including hematoma in 2, occiput-C1-C2 edema in 3, prevertebral edema in 6, facet edema in 2, and interspinous and/or muscular edema in 10. No patients had a clinically evident c-spine injury, a clinically unstable c-spine, or required c-spine surgery. C-spine MRI may identify abnormalities not apparent upon physical examination and the procedure should therefore be considered in cases of suspected AHT. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Malarik, D. C.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of dendrites is one of the commonly observed forms of solidification encountered when metals and alloys freeze under low thermal gradients, as occurs in most casting and welding processes. In engineering alloys, the details of the dendritic morphology directly relates to important material responses and properties. Of more generic interest, dendritic growth is also an archetypical problem in morphogenesis, where a complex pattern evolves from simple starting conditions. Thus, the physical understanding and mathematical description of how dendritic patterns emerge during the growth process are of interest to both scientists and engineers. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is a basic science experiment designed to measure, for a fundamental test of theory, the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth without complications induced by gravity-driven convection. The IDGE, a collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in Troy NY, and NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC) was developed over a ten year period from a ground-based research program into a space flight experiment. Important to the success of this flight experiment was provision of in situ near-real-time teleoperations during the spaceflight experiment.

  7. Single-Molecule Imaging of PSD-95 mRNA Translation in Dendrites and Its Dysregulation in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ifrim, Marius F.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the loss of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA binding protein that regulates translation of numerous target mRNAs, some of which are dendritically localized. Our previous biochemical studies using synaptoneurosomes demonstrate a role for FMRP and miR-125a in regulating the translation of PSD-95 mRNA. However, the local translation of PSD-95 mRNA within dendrites and spines, as well as the roles of FMRP or miR-125a, have not been directly studied. Herein, local synthesis of a Venus-PSD-95 fusion protein was directly visualized in dendrites and spines using single-molecule imaging of a diffusion-restricted Venus-PSD-95 reporter under control of the PSD-95 3′UTR. The basal translation rates of Venus-PSD-95 mRNA was increased in cultured hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice compared with WT neurons, which correlated with a transient elevation of endogenous PSD-95 within dendrites. Following mGluR stimulation with (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, the rate of Venus-PSD-95 mRNA translation increased rapidly in dendrites of WT hippocampal neurons, but not in those of Fmr1 KO neurons or when the binding site of miR125a, previously shown to bind PSD-95 3′UTR, was mutated. This study provides direct support for the hypothesis that local translation within dendrites and spines is dysregulated in FXS. Impairments in the regulated local synthesis of PSD-95, a critical regulator of synaptic structure and function, may affect the spatiotemporal control of PSD-95 levels and affect dendritic spine development and synaptic plasticity in FXS. PMID:25948262

  8. Single-Molecule Imaging of PSD-95 mRNA Translation in Dendrites and Its Dysregulation in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ifrim, Marius F; Williams, Kathryn R; Bassell, Gary J

    2015-05-06

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the loss of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA binding protein that regulates translation of numerous target mRNAs, some of which are dendritically localized. Our previous biochemical studies using synaptoneurosomes demonstrate a role for FMRP and miR-125a in regulating the translation of PSD-95 mRNA. However, the local translation of PSD-95 mRNA within dendrites and spines, as well as the roles of FMRP or miR-125a, have not been directly studied. Herein, local synthesis of a Venus-PSD-95 fusion protein was directly visualized in dendrites and spines using single-molecule imaging of a diffusion-restricted Venus-PSD-95 reporter under control of the PSD-95 3'UTR. The basal translation rates of Venus-PSD-95 mRNA was increased in cultured hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice compared with WT neurons, which correlated with a transient elevation of endogenous PSD-95 within dendrites. Following mGluR stimulation with (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, the rate of Venus-PSD-95 mRNA translation increased rapidly in dendrites of WT hippocampal neurons, but not in those of Fmr1 KO neurons or when the binding site of miR125a, previously shown to bind PSD-95 3'UTR, was mutated. This study provides direct support for the hypothesis that local translation within dendrites and spines is dysregulated in FXS. Impairments in the regulated local synthesis of PSD-95, a critical regulator of synaptic structure and function, may affect the spatiotemporal control of PSD-95 levels and affect dendritic spine development and synaptic plasticity in FXS. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357116-15$15.00/0.

  9. Stress during a Critical Postnatal Period Induces Region-Specific Structural Abnormalities and Dysfunction of the Prefrontal Cortex via CRF1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Dun; Liao, Xue-Mei; Uribe-Mariño, Andrés; Liu, Rui; Xie, Xiao-Meng; Jia, Jiao; Su, Yun-Ai; Li, Ji-Tao; Schmidt, Mathias V; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Si, Tian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    During the early postnatal period, environmental influences play a pivotal role in shaping the development of the neocortex, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) that is crucial for working memory and goal-directed actions. Exposure to stressful experiences during this critical period may disrupt the development of PFC pyramidal neurons and impair the wiring and function of related neural circuits. However, the molecular mechanisms of the impact of early-life stress on PFC development and function are not well understood. In this study, we found that repeated stress exposure during the first postnatal week hampered dendritic development in layers II/III and V pyramidal neurons in the dorsal agranular cingulate cortex (ACd) and prelimbic cortex (PL) of neonatal mice. The deleterious effects of early postnatal stress on structural plasticity persisted to adulthood only in ACd layer V pyramidal neurons. Most importantly, concurrent blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1) by systemic antalarmin administration (20 μg/g of body weight) during early-life stress exposure prevented stress-induced apical dendritic retraction and spine loss in ACd layer V neurons and impairments in PFC-dependent cognitive tasks. Moreover, the magnitude of dendritic regression, especially the shrinkage of apical branches, of ACd layer V neurons predicted the degree of cognitive deficits in stressed mice. Our data highlight the region-specific effects of early postnatal stress on the structural plasticity of prefrontal pyramidal neurons, and suggest a critical role of CRF1 in modulating early-life stress-induced prefrontal abnormalities. PMID:25403725

  10. Pathogenesis and Treatment of Spine Disease in the Mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Sun H.; Casal, Margret L.; Malhotra, Neil R.; Ficicioglu, Can; Smith, Lachlan J.

    2016-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are a family of lysosomal storage disorders characterized by deficient activity of enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Skeletal disease is common in MPS patients, with the severity varying both within and between subtypes. Within the spectrum of skeletal disease, spinal manifestations are particularly prevalent. Developmental and degenerative abnormalities affecting the substructures of the spine can result in compression of the spinal cord and associated neural elements. Resulting neurological complications, including pain and paralysis, significantly reduce patient quality of life and life expectancy. Systemic therapies for MPS such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and enzyme replacement therapy have shown limited efficacy for improving spinal manifestations in patients and animal models, and there is therefore a pressing need for new therapeutic approaches that specifically target this debilitating aspect of the disease. In this review, we examine how pathological abnormalities affecting the key substructures of the spine – the discs, vertebrae, odontoid process and dura – contribute to the progression of spinal deformity and symptomatic compression of neural elements. Specifically, we review current understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of spine disease in MPS, how the tissues of the spine respond to current clinical and experimental treatments, and discuss future strategies for improving the efficacy of these treatments. PMID:27296532

  11. Dendrite architecture organized by transcriptional control of the F-actin nucleator Spire.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tiago; Ou, Yimiao; Li, Sally; Giniger, Edward; van Meyel, Donald J

    2014-02-01

    The architectures of dendritic trees are crucial for the wiring and function of neuronal circuits because they determine coverage of receptive territories, as well as the nature and strength of sensory or synaptic inputs. Here, we describe a cell-intrinsic pathway sculpting dendritic arborization (da) neurons in Drosophila that requires Longitudinals Lacking (Lola), a BTB/POZ transcription factor, and its control of the F-actin cytoskeleton through Spire (Spir), an actin nucleation protein. Loss of Lola from da neurons reduced the overall length of dendritic arbors, increased the expression of Spir, and produced inappropriate F-actin-rich dendrites at positions too near the cell soma. Selective removal of Lola from only class IV da neurons decreased the evasive responses of larvae to nociception. The increased Spir expression contributed to the abnormal F-actin-rich dendrites and the decreased nocifensive responses because both were suppressed by reduced dose of Spir. Thus, an important role of Lola is to limit expression of Spir to appropriate levels within da neurons. We found Spir to be expressed in dendritic arbors and to be important for their development. Removal of Spir from class IV da neurons reduced F-actin levels and total branch number, shifted the position of greatest branch density away from the cell soma, and compromised nocifensive behavior. We conclude that the Lola-Spir pathway is crucial for the spatial arrangement of branches within dendritic trees and for neural circuit function because it provides balanced control of the F-actin cytoskeleton.

  12. Regulatory Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsuaki; Uto, Tomofumi; Fukaya, Tomohiro; Takagi, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) comprise heterogeneous subsets, functionally classified into conventional DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). DCs are considered to be essential antigen (Ag)-presenting cells (APCs) that play crucial roles in activation and fine-tuning of innate and adaptive immunity under inflammatory conditions, as well as induction of immune tolerance to maintain immune homeostasis under steady-state conditions. Furthermore, DC functions can be modified and influenced by stimulation with various extrinsic factors, such as ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and cytokines. On the other hand, treatment of DCs with certain immunosuppressive drugs and molecules leads to the generation of tolerogenic DCs that show downregulation of both the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and costimulatory molecules, and not only show defective T-cell activation, but also possess tolerogenic properties including the induction of anergic T-cells and regulatory T (T reg ) cells. To develop an effective strategy for Ag-specific intervention of T-cell-mediated immune disorders, we have previously established the modified DCs with moderately high levels of MHC molecules that are defective in the expression of costimulatory molecules that had a greater immunoregulatory property than classical tolerogenic DCs, which we therefore designated as regulatory DCs (DC reg ). Herein, we integrate the current understanding of the role of DCs in the control of immune responses, and further provide new information of the characteristics of tolerogenic DCs and DC reg , as well as their regulation of immune responses and disorders.

  13. PHARMACOLOGIC SUPPRESSION OF OXIDATIVE DAMAGE AND DENDRITIC DEGENERATION FOLLOWING KAINIC ACID-INDUCED EXCITOTOXICITY IN MOUSE CEREBRUM

    PubMed Central

    Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Aschner, Michael; Montine, Thomas J.; Milatovic, Dejan

    2008-01-01

    Intense seizure activity associated with status epilepticus and excitatory amino acid (EAA) imbalance initiates oxidative damage and neuronal injury in CA1 of the ventral hippocampus. We tested the hypothesis that dendritic degeneration of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 hippocampal area resulting from seizure-induced neurotoxicity is modulated by cerebral oxidative damage. Kainic acid (KA, 1 nmol/5 μl) was injected intracerebroventricularly to C57Bl/6 mice. F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and F4-neuroprostanes (F4-NeuroPs) were used as surrogate measures of in vivo oxidative stress and biomarkers of lipid peroxidation. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was quantified by evaluating citrulline level and pyramidal neuron dendrites and spines were evaluated using rapid Golgi stains and a Neurolucida system. KA produced severe seizures in mice immediately after its administration and a significant (p<0.001) increase in F2-IsoPs, F4-NeuroPs and citrulline levels were seen 30 min following treatment. At the same time, hippocampal pyramidal neurons showed significant (p<0.001) reduction in dendritic length and spine density. In contrast, no significant change in neuronal dendrite and spine density or F2-IsoP, F4-NeuroPs and citrulline levels were found in mice pretreated with Vitamin E (α-tocopherol, 100 mg/kg, ip) for 3 days, or with N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN, 200 mg/kg, ip) or ibuprofen (inhibitors of cyclooxygenase, COX, 14 μg/ml of drinking water) for 2 weeks prior to KA treatment. These findings indicate novel interactions among free radical-induced generation of F2-IsoPs and F4-NeuroPs, nitric oxide and dendritic degeneration, closely associate oxidative damage to neuronal membranes with degeneration of the dendritic system, and point to possible interventions to limit severe damage in acute neurological disorders. PMID:18556069

  14. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray ...

  15. Store-Operated Calcium Channel Complex in Postsynaptic Spines: A New Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Sun, Suya; Wu, Lili; Pchitskaya, Ekaterina; Zakharova, Olga; Fon Tacer, Klementina; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2016-11-23

    Mushroom dendritic spine structures are essential for memory storage and the loss of mushroom spines may explain memory defects in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The stability of mushroom spines depends on stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2)-mediated neuronal-store-operated Ca 2+ influx (nSOC) pathway, which is compromised in AD mouse models, in aging neurons, and in sporadic AD patients. Here, we demonstrate that the Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 6 (TRPC6) and Orai2 channels form a STIM2-regulated nSOC Ca 2+ channel complex in hippocampal mushroom spines. We further demonstrate that a known TRPC6 activator, hyperforin, and a novel nSOC positive modulator, NSN21778 (NSN), can stimulate activity of nSOC pathway in the spines and rescue mushroom spine loss in both presenilin and APP knock-in mouse models of AD. We further show that NSN rescues hippocampal long-term potentiation impairment in APP knock-in mouse model. We conclude that the STIM2-regulated TRPC6/Orai2 nSOC channel complex in dendritic mushroom spines is a new therapeutic target for the treatment of memory loss in aging and AD and that NSN is a potential candidate molecule for therapeutic intervention in brain aging and AD. Mushroom dendritic spine structures are essential for memory storage and the loss of mushroom spines may explain memory defects in Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study demonstrated that Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 6 (TRPC6) and Orai2 form stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2)-regulated neuronal-store-operated Ca 2+ influx (nSOC) channel complex in hippocampal synapse and the resulting Ca 2+ influx is critical for long-term maintenance of mushroom spines in hippocampal neurons. A novel nSOC-positive modulator, NSN21778 (NSN), rescues mushroom spine loss and synaptic plasticity impairment in AD mice models. The TRPC6/Orai2 nSOC channel complex is a new therapeutic target and NSN is a potential candidate molecule for therapeutic intervention in brain aging

  16. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin spines.

    PubMed

    Tsafnat, Naomi; Fitz Gerald, John D; Le, Hai N; Stachurski, Zbigniew H

    2012-01-01

    The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine's unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT) and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine's architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material.

  17. Fractures of the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Teixeira, William Jacobsen; Narasaki, Douglas Kenji; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2) and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification), which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative. PMID:24270959

  18. Early developmental bisphenol-A exposure sex-independently impairs spatial memory by remodeling hippocampal dendritic architecture and synaptic transmission in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Ding, Jin-Jun; Yang, Qian-Qian; Song, Hua-Zeng; Chen, Xiang-Tao; Xu, Yi; Xiao, Gui-Ran; Wang, Hui-Li

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA, 4, 4‧-isopropylidene-2-diphenol), a synthetic xenoestrogen that widely used in the production of polycarbonate plastics, has been reported to impair hippocampal development and function. Our previous study has shown that BPA exposure impairs Sprague-Dawley (SD) male hippocampal dendritic spine outgrowth. In this study, the sex-effect of chronic BPA exposure on spatial memory in SD male and female rats and the related synaptic mechanism were further investigated. We found that chronic BPA exposure impaired spatial memory in both SD male and female rats, suggesting a dysfunction of hippocampus without gender-specific effect. Further investigation indicated that BPA exposure causes significant impairment of dendrite and spine structure, manifested as decreased dendritic complexity, dendritic spine density and percentage of mushroom shaped spines in hippocampal CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) neurons. Furthermore, a significant reduction in Arc expression was detected upon BPA exposure. Strikingly, BPA exposure significantly increased the mIPSC amplitude without altering the mEPSC amplitude or frequency, accompanied by increased GABAARβ2/3 on postsynaptic membrane in cultured CA1 neurons. In summary, our study indicated that Arc, together with the increased surface GABAARβ2/3, contributed to BPA induced spatial memory deficits, providing a novel molecular basis for BPA achieved brain impairment.

  19. APC/CCdh1-Rock2 pathway controls dendritic integrity and memory

    PubMed Central

    Bobo-Jiménez, Verónica; Delgado-Esteban, María; Angibaud, Julie; Sánchez-Morán, Irene; de la Fuente, Antonio; Yajeya, Javier; Nägerl, U. Valentin; Castillo, José; Bolaños, Juan P.

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of neuronal morphology contributes to the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that postnatal deletion of Cdh1, a cofactor of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase in neurons [Cdh1 conditional knockout (cKO)], disrupts dendrite arborization and causes dendritic spine and synapse loss in the cortex and hippocampus, concomitant with memory impairment and neurodegeneration, in adult mice. We found that the dendrite destabilizer Rho protein kinase 2 (Rock2), which accumulates in the brain of AD patients, is an APC/CCdh1 substrate in vivo and that Rock2 protein and activity increased in the cortex and hippocampus of Cdh1 cKO mice. In these animals, inhibition of Rock activity, using the clinically approved drug fasudil, prevented dendritic network disorganization, memory loss, and neurodegeneration. Thus, APC/CCdh1-mediated degradation of Rock2 maintains the dendritic network, memory formation, and neuronal survival, suggesting that pharmacological inhibition of aberrantly accumulated Rock2 may be a suitable therapeutic strategy against neurodegeneration. PMID:28396402

  20. Coding and decoding with dendrites.

    PubMed

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Kastellakis, George; Psarrou, Maria; Anastasakis, Stelios; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of complex, voltage dependent mechanisms in the dendrites of multiple neuron types, great effort has been devoted in search of a direct link between dendritic properties and specific neuronal functions. Over the last few years, new experimental techniques have allowed the visualization and probing of dendritic anatomy, plasticity and integrative schemes with unprecedented detail. This vast amount of information has caused a paradigm shift in the study of memory, one of the most important pursuits in Neuroscience, and calls for the development of novel theories and models that will unify the available data according to some basic principles. Traditional models of memory considered neural cells as the fundamental processing units in the brain. Recent studies however are proposing new theories in which memory is not only formed by modifying the synaptic connections between neurons, but also by modifications of intrinsic and anatomical dendritic properties as well as fine tuning of the wiring diagram. In this review paper we present previous studies along with recent findings from our group that support a key role of dendrites in information processing, including the encoding and decoding of new memories, both at the single cell and the network level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cidaroids spines facing ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Dery, Aurélie; Tran, Phuong Dat; Compère, Philippe; Dubois, Philippe

    2018-07-01

    When facing seawater undersaturated towards calcium carbonates, spines of classical sea urchins (euechinoids) show traces of corrosion although they are covered by an epidermis. Cidaroids (a sister clade of euechinoids) are provided with mature spines devoid of epidermis, which makes them, at first sight, more sensitive to dissolution when facing undersaturated seawater. A recent study showed that spines of a tropical cidaroid are resistant to dissolution due to the high density and the low magnesium concentration of the peculiar external spine layer, the cortex. The biofilm and epibionts covering the spines was also suggested to take part in the spine protection. Here, we investigate the protective role of these factors in different cidaroid species from a broad range of latitude, temperature and depth. The high density of the cortical layer and the cover of biofilm and epibionts were confirmed as key protection against dissolution. The low magnesium concentration of cidaroid spines compared to that of euechinoid ones makes them less soluble in general. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional anatomy of the spine.

    PubMed

    Bogduk, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Among other important features of the functional anatomy of the spine, described in this chapter, is the remarkable difference between the design and function of the cervical spine and that of the lumbar spine. In the cervical spine, the atlas serves to transmit the load of the head to the typical cervical vertebrae. The axis adapts the suboccipital region to the typical cervical spine. In cervical intervertebrtal discs the anulus fibrosus is not circumferential but is crescentic, and serves as an interosseous ligament in the saddle joint between vertebral bodies. Cervical vertebrae rotate and translate in the sagittal plane, and rotate in the manner of an inverted cone, across an oblique coronal plane. The cervical zygapophysial joints are the most common source of chronic neck pain. By contrast, lumbar discs are well designed to sustain compression loads, but rely on posterior elements to limit axial rotation. Internal disc disruption is the most common basis for chronic low-back pain. Spinal muscles are arranged systematically in prevertebral and postvertebral groups. The intrinsic elements of the spine are innervated by the dorsal rami of the spinal nerves, and by the sinuvertebral nerves. Little modern research has been conducted into the structure of the thoracic spine, or the causes of thoracic spinal pain. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dendritic morphology of amygdala and hippocampal neurons in more and less predator stress responsive rats and more and less spontaneously anxious handled controls

    PubMed Central

    Adamec, Robert; Hebert, Mark; Blundell, Jacqueline; Mervis, Ronald F.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the neurobiological bases of variation in response to predator stress (PS). Sixteen days after treatment (PS or handling), rats were grouped according to anxiety in the elevated plus maze (EPM). Acoustic startle was also measured. We examined the structure of dendritic trees of basolateral amygdala (BLA) output neurons (stellate and pyramidal cells) and of dorsal hippocampal (DHC) dentate granule cells of less anxious (LA) and more (extremely) anxious (MA) stressed animals (PSLA and PSMA). Handled controls (HC) which were less anxious (HCLA) and spontaneously more anxious (HCMA) equivalently to predator stressed subgroups were also studied. Golgi analysis revealed BLA output neurons of HCMA rats exhibited longer, more branched dendrites with higher spine density than the other groups of rats, which did not differ. Finally, spine density of DHC granule cells was equally depressed in HCMA and PSMA rats relative to HCLA and PSLA rats. Total dendritic length of BLA pyramidal and stellate cells (positive predictor) and DHC spine density (negative predictor) together accounted for 96% of the variance of anxiety of handled rats. DHC spine density was a negative predictor of PSMA and PSLA anxiety, accounting for 70% of the variance. Data are discussed in the context of morphological differences as phenotypic markers of a genetic predisposition to anxiety in handled controls, and a possible genetic vulnerability to predator stress expressed as reduced spine density in the DHC. Significance of findings for animal models of anxiety and hyperarousal comorbidities of PTSD are discussed. PMID:21925210

  4. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  5. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding is any heavy or unusual bleeding from the uterus (through your ... one symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding. Having extremely heavy bleeding during your period can also be considered ...

  6. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    role of dendritic cells in pancreatitis. Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells which initiate innate and adaptive immune... Lymphoid -tissue-specific homing of bone- marrow-derived dendritic cells . Blood. 113:6638–6647. http://dx.doi .org/10.1182/blood-2009-02-204321 Dapito...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0313 TITLE: Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. George Miller

  7. Utility of plain radiographs in detecting traumatic injuries of the cervical spine in children.

    PubMed

    Nigrovic, Lise E; Rogers, Alexander J; Adelgais, Kathleen M; Olsen, Cody S; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Jaffe, David M; Leonard, Julie C

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the sensitivity of plain radiographs in identifying bony or ligamentous cervical spine injury in children. We identified a retrospective cohort of children younger than 16 years with blunt trauma-related bony or ligamentous cervical spine injury evaluated between 2000 and 2004 at 1 of 17 hospitals participating in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network. We excluded children who had a single or undocumented number of radiographic views or one of the following injuries types: isolated spinal cord injury, spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormalities, or atlantoaxial rotary subluxation. Using consensus methods, study investigators reviewed the radiology reports and assigned a classification (definite, possible, or no cervical spine injury) as well as film adequacy. A pediatric neurosurgeon, blinded to the classification of the radiology reports, reviewed complete case histories and assigned final cervical spine injury type. We identified 206 children who met inclusion criteria, of which 127 had definite and 41 had possible cervical spine injury identified by plain radiograph. Of the 186 children with adequate cervical spine radiographs, 168 had definite or possible cervical spine injury identified by plain radiograph for a sensitivity of 90% (95% confidence interval, 85%-94%). Cervical spine radiographs did not identify the following cervical spine injuries: fracture (15 children) and ligamentous injury alone (3 children). Nine children with normal cervical spine radiographs presented with 1 or more of the following: endotracheal intubation (4 children), altered mental status (5 children), or focal neurologic findings (5 children). Plain radiographs had a high sensitivity for cervical spine injury in our pediatric cohort.

  8. Dendritic cells in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Vuckovic, S; Fearnley, D B; Gunningham, S; Spearing, R L; Patton, W N; Hart, D N

    1999-06-01

    Blood dendritic cells (DC) differentiate in vitro via two separate pathways: either directly from blood DC precursors (DCp) or from CD14+ monocytes. In chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) abnormal bone marrow precursors contribute to blood monocyte development but DC development has not been studied previously. Monocytes comprised 60% of blood MNC in 15 CMML patients studied, compared with 20% in 16 age-matched controls. The increase in blood monocytes was accompanied by a reciprocal decrease in mean blood DC percentage (from 0.42% of MNC in normal individuals to 0.16% of MNC in CMML patients). Absolute blood DC numbers showed a minimal (non-significant) reduction from 9.8 x 10(6)/l in normal individuals to 7.5 x 10(6)/l in CMML patients. The CD14(low) WCD16+ monocyte subpopulation was not found in CMML patients. After culture in GM-CSF/IL-4, CMML CD14+ monocytes acquired the phenotype of immature monocyte derived DC (Mo-DC) with similar yields to normal blood Mo-DC generation. Addition of TNF-alpha or LPS induced both normal and CMML Mo-DC to express prominent dendritic processes, the CMRF44+ and CD83+ antigens and high levels of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86. Treatment either with TNF-alpha or LPS increased the allostimulatory activity of normal Mo-DC, but had little effect on the allostimulatory activity of CMML Mo-DC, perhaps reflecting the underlying neoplastic changes in monocyte precursors. We conclude that the blood DC numbers are relatively unaffected in CMML, suggesting discrete regulation of monocyte and DC production.

  9. Aspergillus osteomyelitis of the spine.

    PubMed

    Govender, S; Rajoo, R; Goga, I E; Charles, R W

    1991-07-01

    Aspergillosis involving either the vertebral body or the intervertebral disc is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the spine. The following is a report of five cases of Aspergillus fumigatus infection of the spine treated successfully with amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine. In three patients, the diagnosis was established at closed-needle biopsy; two patients with paraplegia had an anterior decompression and fusion. The follow-up period ranged from 19 to 48 months.

  10. Advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop the technology of the silicon dendritic web ribbon growth process is examined. The effort is being concentrated on the area rate and quality requirements necessary to meet the JPL/DOE goals for terrestrial PV applications. Closed loop web growth system development and stress reduction for high area rate growth is considered.

  11. Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, Camille M.; Weiden, Jorieke; Eggermont, Loek J.; Figdor, Carl G.

    2018-06-01

    Camille M. Le Gall, Jorieke Weiden, Loek J. Eggermont and Carl G. Figdor provide an overview of immunotherapeutics for cancer treatment that harness dendritic cells, their challenges in clinical use, and approaches employed to enhance their recruitment and activation to promote effective anti-tumour immunity.

  12. Neutrophils, dendritic cells and Toxoplasma.

    PubMed

    Denkers, Eric Y; Butcher, Barbara A; Del Rio, Laura; Bennouna, Soumaya

    2004-03-09

    Toxoplasma gondii rapidly elicits strong Type 1 cytokine-based immunity. The necessity for this response is well illustrated by the example of IFN-gamma and IL-12 gene knockout mice that rapidly succumb to the effects of acute infection. The parasite itself is skilled at sparking complex interactions in the innate immune system that lead to protective immunity. Neutrophils are one of the first cell types to arrive at the site of infection, and the cells release several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to Toxoplasma. Dendritic cells are an important source of IL-12 during infection with T. gondii and other microbial pathogens, and they are also specialized for high-level antigen presentation to T lymphocytes. Tachyzoites express at least two types of molecules that trigger innate immune cell cytokine production. One of these involves Toll-like receptor/MyD88 pathways common to many microbial pathogens. The second pathway is less conventional and involves molecular mimicry between a parasite cyclophilin and host CC chemokine receptor 5-binding ligands. Neutrophils, dendritic cells and Toxoplasma work together to elicit the immune response required for host survival. Cytokine and chemokine cross-talk between parasite-triggered neutrophils and dendritic cells results in recruitment, maturation and activation of the latter. Neutrophil-empowered dendritic cells possess properties expected of highly potent antigen presenting cells that drive T helper 1 generation.

  13. [Iliac spine fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Sułko, Jerzy; Olipra, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    Iliac spine fractures in children are a form of avulsion fractures at mechanically weak spot caused by the presence of the growth plate. Presentation of observations concerning treatment and results of iliac spine fractures in children. 49 children (1 girl and 48 boys). Age, at the time of injury, average 15.1 years (10.6-18 years). We analyzed medical and radiological documentation of patients. 17 patients sustained anterior superior iliac spine fractures (ASIS), 32 fracture of the inferior iliac spine (AIIS). Most of injuries happened during sport activities--27 patients suffered fracture while playing football. 37 patients asked for medical advice immediately after the injury. Rest of patients, who came late--sustained AIIS fracture. We hospitalized 26 patients (53%), all of them suffered significant pain. The average length of stay in hospital was 8 days. All patients were treated conservatively. All of the fractures healed without complications. Larger study than ours group, concerning 84 patients with iliac spine fractures, was presented only by Italian authors who analyzed injures of professional athletes. In literature reviewed conservative treatment strongly predominates. Only a small group of patients were treated surgically (including athletes treated by Croatian surgeons). The treatment of iliac spines in children should be conservative, consisting of a couple days of bed rest and then for 2-3 weeks walking on crutches with only toe touching until the pain resolves. We recommend return to full activities after 2 months.

  14. Chronic In Vivo Imaging Shows No Evidence of Dendritic Plasticity or Functional Remapping in the Contralesional Cortex after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, David G.; Denizet, Marie; Mostany, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Most stroke survivors exhibit a partial recovery from their deficits. This presumably occurs because of remapping of lost capabilities to functionally related brain areas. Functional brain imaging studies suggest that remapping in the contralateral uninjured cortex might represent a transient stage of compensatory plasticity. Some postmortem studies have also shown that cortical lesions, including stroke, can trigger dendritic plasticity in the contralateral hemisphere, but the data are controversial. We used longitudinal in vivo two-photon microscopy in the contralateral homotopic cortex to record changes in dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in green fluorescent protein mice. We could not detect de novo growth of dendrites or changes in the density or turnover of spines for up to 4 weeks after stroke. We also used intrinsic optical signal imaging to investigate whether the forepaw (FP) sensory representation is remapped to the spared homotopic cortex after stroke. Stimulation of the contralateral FP reliably produced strong intrinsic signals in the spared hemisphere, but we could never detect a signal with ipsilateral FP stimulation after stroke. This lack of contralateral plasticity at the level of apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons and FP sensory maps suggests that the contralesional cortex may not contribute to functional recovery after stroke and that, at least in mice, the peri-infarct cortex plays the dominant role in postischemic plasticity. PMID:22499800

  15. Chronic corticosterone administration reduces dendritic complexity in mature, but not young granule cells in the rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Yau, Suk-Yu; Li, Ang; Tong, Jian-Bin; Bostrom, Crystal; Christie, Brian R; Lee, Tatia M C; So, Kwok-Fai

    2016-09-21

    Our previous work has shown that exposure to the stress hormone corticosterone (40 mg/kg CORT) for two weeks induces dendritic atrophy of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region and behavioral deficits. However, it is unclear whether this treatment also affects the dentate gyrus (DG), a subregion of the hippocampus comprising a heterogeneous population of young and mature neurons. We examined the effect of CORT treatment on the dendritic complexity of mature and young granule cells in the DG. We utilized a Golgi staining method to investigate the dendritic morphology and spine density of young neurons in the inner granular cell layer (GCL) and mature neurons in the outer GCL in response to CORT application. The expressions of glucocorticoid receptors during neuronal maturation were examined using Western blot analysis in a primary hippocampal neuronal culture. Sholl analysis revealed that CORT treatment decreased the number of intersections and shortened the dendritic length in mature, but not young, granule cells. However, the spine density of mature and young neurons was not affected. Western blot analysis showed a progressive increase in the protein levels of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the cultured primary hippocampal neurons during neuronal maturation. These data suggest that mature neurons are likely more vulnerable to chronic exposure to CORT; this may be due to their higher expression of GRs when compared to younger DG neurons.

  16. Chronic in vivo imaging shows no evidence of dendritic plasticity or functional remapping in the contralesional cortex after stroke.

    PubMed

    Johnston, David G; Denizet, Marie; Mostany, Ricardo; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Most stroke survivors exhibit a partial recovery from their deficits. This presumably occurs because of remapping of lost capabilities to functionally related brain areas. Functional brain imaging studies suggest that remapping in the contralateral uninjured cortex might represent a transient stage of compensatory plasticity. Some postmortem studies have also shown that cortical lesions, including stroke, can trigger dendritic plasticity in the contralateral hemisphere, but the data are controversial. We used longitudinal in vivo two-photon microscopy in the contralateral homotopic cortex to record changes in dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in green fluorescent protein mice. We could not detect de novo growth of dendrites or changes in the density or turnover of spines for up to 4 weeks after stroke. We also used intrinsic optical signal imaging to investigate whether the forepaw (FP) sensory representation is remapped to the spared homotopic cortex after stroke. Stimulation of the contralateral FP reliably produced strong intrinsic signals in the spared hemisphere, but we could never detect a signal with ipsilateral FP stimulation after stroke. This lack of contralateral plasticity at the level of apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons and FP sensory maps suggests that the contralesional cortex may not contribute to functional recovery after stroke and that, at least in mice, the peri-infarct cortex plays the dominant role in postischemic plasticity.

  17. Osteoporosis in Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Javier Z; Feldman, Zachary M; McAnany, Steven; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-04-01

    Retrospective administrative database analysis. To investigate the effect of osteoporosis (OS) on complications and outcomes in patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. OS is the most prevalent degenerative human bone disease, and spine surgeons will inevitably perform procedures on patients with OS. These patients might present a difficult patient cohort because many fixation techniques depend on bone quality and adequate bone healing--both of which are compromised in OS. The nationwide inpatient sample was queried using the Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine procedures and diagnosis codes for degenerative conditions of cervical spine from 2002 to 2011. Patients were separated into two cohorts, those patients with OS and those without OS. Demographics, hospital characteristics, and adjusted complication likelihood were analyzed. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine odds of revision surgery in patients with OS. Of all patients undergoing degenerative cervical spine surgery, 2% were identified as having OS (32,557 of a sample of 1,602,129 patients). Osteoporotic patients were more likely to undergo posterior cervical spine fusion when compared with those patients without OS (11.3% vs. 5.4%, P < 0.0001). Moreover, circumferential fusion was performed 3 times more frequently in the osteoporotic cohort. Adjusted complications showed increased odds for postoperative hemorrhage (odds ratio = 1.70, 95% confidence interval = 1.46-1.98, P < 0.0001). Patients with OS stayed in the hospital longer (3.5 vs. 2.5 days, P < 0.0001) and had 30% costlier hospitalizations. Multivariate for revision surgery indicated that osteoporotic patients had significantly increased odds of revision surgery (odds ratio = 1.54, P ≤ 0.0001) when referenced to non-osteoporotic patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. Osteoporotic patients were more likely to undergo revision surgery, have longer

  18. Prickly Pear Spine Keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Odat, Thabit Ali Mustafa; Al-Tawara, Mohammad Jebreel; Hammouri, Eman Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To study the ocular and extra-ocular features, clinical presentation, and treatment of prickly pear glochids. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study included 23 eyes of 21 patients with ocular prickly pear spines who were seen between August and October 2011 in the outpatient ophthalmic clinic at Prince Rashid Bin Al Hassan military hospital in Jordan. Medical records of patients including age, gender, history of exposure to prickly pear plants, and ocular examination were reviewed. All glochids were localized and removed with forceps under topical anesthesia with the patient at the slit lamp. Patients were followed up after one week. Results: The mean age of patients was 37.1 years with a male to female ratio of 1.6: 1. Involvement of the right eye was seen in 61.9% patients, left eye in 28.6% patients, and bilateral involvement in 9.5% patients. Glochids were most commonly found in the upper subtarsal conjunctival space (47.6%) followed by inferior palpebral conjunctiva in 23.8% eyes. The most common complaint was eye irritation in 95.2% patients. Pain was a complaint in 57.1% patients. Superior corneal epithelial erosions or ulcer were found in 33.3% patients, inferior corneal epithelial erosions in 19.1% patients, and diffuse epithelial erosions in 9.5% patients. Glochids were found in other parts of the body in 38.1% patients. Conclusion: Although prickly pear glochid ocular surface injury is not uncommon in the region during summer, it should be considered in patient with eye pain during that period. Farmers who are in close contact with prickly pears should use protective eyeglasses and gloves. PMID:24669148

  19. Rapamycin Reverses Status Epilepticus-Induced Memory Deficits and Dendritic Damage

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Amy L.; Lugo, Joaquin N.; Patil, Vinit V.; Lee, Wai L.; Qian, Yan; Vanegas, Fabiola; Anderson, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are prominent sequelae of prolonged continuous seizures (status epilepticus; SE) in humans and animal models. While often associated with dendritic injury, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is hyperactivated following SE. This pathway modulates learning and memory and is associated with regulation of neuronal, dendritic, and glial properties. Thus, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that SE-induced mTORC1 hyperactivation is a candidate mechanism underlying cognitive deficits and dendritic pathology seen following SE. We examined the effects of rapamycin, an mTORC1 inhibitor, on the early hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory deficits associated with an episode of pilocarpine-induced SE. Rapamycin-treated SE rats performed significantly better than the vehicle-treated rats in two spatial memory tasks, the Morris water maze and the novel object recognition test. At the molecular level, we found that the SE-induced increase in mTORC1 signaling was localized in neurons and microglia. Rapamycin decreased the SE-induced mTOR activation and attenuated microgliosis which was mostly localized within the CA1 area. These findings paralleled a reversal of the SE-induced decreases in dendritic Map2 and ion channels levels as well as improved dendritic branching and spine density in area CA1 following rapamycin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that mTORC1 hyperactivity contributes to early hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory deficits and dendritic dysregulation associated with SE. PMID:23536771

  20. Large variability in synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor density on interneurons and a comparison with pyramidal-cell spines in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nyíri, G; Stephenson, F A; Freund, T F; Somogyi, P

    2003-01-01

    Pyramidal cells receive input from several types of GABA-releasing interneurons and innervate them reciprocally. Glutamatergic activation of interneurons involves both alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type glutamate receptors expressed in type I synapses, mostly on their dendritic shafts. On average, the synaptic AMPA receptor content is several times higher on interneurons than in the spines of pyramidal cells. To compare the NMDA receptor content of synapses, we used a quantitative postembedding immunogold technique on serial electron microscopic sections, and analysed the synapses on interneuron dendrites and pyramidal cell spines in the CA1 area. Because all NMDA receptors contain the obligatory NR1 subunit, receptor localisation was carried out using antibodies recognising all splice variants of the NR1 subunit. Four populations of synapse were examined: i). on spines of pyramidal cells in stratum (str.) radiatum and str. oriens; ii). on parvalbumin-positive interneuronal dendritic shafts in str. radiatum; iii). on randomly found dendritic shafts in str. oriens and iv). on somatostatin-positive interneuronal dendritic shafts and somata in str. oriens. On average, the size of the synapses on spines was about half of those on interneurons. The four populations of synapse significantly differed in labelling for the NR1 subunit. The median density of NR1 subunit labelling was highest on pyramidal cell spines. It was lowest in the synapses on parvalbumin-positive dendrites in str. radiatum, where more than half of these synapses were immunonegative. In str. oriens, synapses on interneurons had a high variability of receptor content; some dendrites were similar to those in str. radiatum, including the proximal synapses of somatostatin-positive cells, whereas others had immunoreactivity for the NR1 subunit similar to or higher than synapses on pyramidal cell spines. These results show that synaptic NMDA

  1. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  2. Impaired spine formation and learning in GPCR kinase 2 interacting protein-1 (GIT1) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Menon, Prashanthi; Deane, Rashid; Sagare, Abhay; Lane, Steven M; Zarcone, Troy J; O'Dell, Michael R; Yan, Chen; Zlokovic, Berislav V; Berk, Bradford C

    2010-03-04

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-kinase interacting proteins 1 and 2 (GIT1 and GIT2) are scaffold proteins with ADP-ribosylating factor GTPase activity. GIT1 and GIT2 control numerous cellular functions and are highly expressed in neurons, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. GIT1 promotes dendritic spine formation, growth and motility in cultured neurons, but its role in brain in vivo is unknown. By using global GIT1 knockout mice (GIT1 KO), we show that compared to WT controls, deletion of GIT1 results in markedly reduced dendritic length and spine density in the hippocampus by 36.7% (p<0.0106) and 35.1% (p<0.0028), respectively. This correlated with their poor adaptation to new environments as shown by impaired performance on tasks dependent on learning. We also studied the effect of GIT1 gene deletion on brain microcirculation. In contrast to findings in systemic circulation, GIT1 KO mice had an intact blood-brain barrier and normal regional cerebral blood flow as determined with radiotracers. Thus, our data suggest that GIT1 plays an important role in brain in vivo by regulating spine density involved in synaptic plasticity that is required for processes involved in learning. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Spine growth in the anterior cingulate cortex is necessary for the consolidation of contextual fear memory

    PubMed Central

    Vetere, Gisella; Restivo, Leonardo; Cole, Christina J.; Ross, P. Joel; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Frankland, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    Remodeling of cortical connectivity is thought to allow initially hippocampus-dependent memories to be expressed independently of the hippocampus at remote time points. Consistent with this, consolidation of a contextual fear memory is associated with dendritic spine growth in neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex (aCC). To directly test whether such cortical structural remodeling is necessary for memory consolidation, we disrupted spine growth in the aCC at different times following contextual fear conditioning in mice. We took advantage of previous studies showing that the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) negatively regulates spinogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We found that increasing MEF2-dependent transcription in the aCC during a critical posttraining window (but not at later time points) blocked both the consolidation-associated dendritic spine growth and subsequent memory expression. Together, these data strengthen the causal link between cortical structural remodeling and memory consolidation and, further, identify MEF2 as a key regulator of these processes. PMID:21531906

  4. Utility of MRI for cervical spine clearance in blunt trauma patients after a negative CT.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Ajay; Durand, David; Wu, Xiao; Geng, Bertie; Abbed, Khalid; Nunez, Diego B; Sanelli, Pina

    2018-07-01

    To determine the utility of cervical spine MRI in blunt trauma evaluation for instability after a negative non-contrast cervical spine CT. A review of medical records identified all adult patients with blunt trauma who underwent CT cervical spine followed by MRI within 48 h over a 33-month period. Utility of subsequent MRI was assessed in terms of findings and impact on outcome. A total of 1,271 patients with blunt cervical spine trauma underwent both cervical spine CT and MRI within 48 h; 1,080 patients were included in the study analysis. Sixty-six percent of patients with a CT cervical spine study had a negative study. Of these, the subsequent cervical spine MRI had positive findings in 20.9%; 92.6% had stable ligamentous or osseous injuries, 6.0% had unstable injuries and 1.3% had potentially unstable injuries. For unstable injury, the NPV for CT was 98.5%. In all 712 patients undergoing both CT and MRI, only 1.5% had unstable injuries, and only 0.42% had significant change in management. MRI for blunt trauma evaluation remains not infrequent at our institution. MRI may have utility only in certain patients with persistent abnormal neurological examination. • MRI has limited utility after negative cervical CT in blunt trauma. • MRI is frequently positive for non-specific soft-tissue injury. • Unstable injury missed on CT is infrequent.

  5. Robotic systems in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Onen, Mehmet Resid; Naderi, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Surgical robotic systems have been available for almost twenty years. The first surgical robotic systems were designed as supportive systems for laparoscopic approaches in general surgery (the first procedure was a cholecystectomy in 1987). The da Vinci Robotic System is the most common system used for robotic surgery today. This system is widely used in urology, gynecology and other surgical disciplines, and recently there have been initial reports of its use in spine surgery, for transoral access and anterior approaches for lumbar inter-body fusion interventions. SpineAssist, which is widely used in spine surgery, and Renaissance Robotic Systems, which are considered the next generation of robotic systems, are now FDA approved. These robotic systems are designed for use as guidance systems in spine instrumentation, cement augmentations and biopsies. The aim is to increase surgical accuracy while reducing the intra-operative exposure to harmful radiation to the patient and operating team personnel during the intervention. We offer a review of the published literature related to the use of robotic systems in spine surgery and provide information on using robotic systems.

  6. Prolactin, dendritic cells, and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jara, Luis J; Benitez, Gamaliel; Medina, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in the induction of autoimmunity in T and B cells. DC express a high level of the major histocompatibility complex that interact with the receptors on T cells. Immature DC present antigens efficiently. Prolactin (PRL) participates in DC maturation. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by a loss of tolerance to self-antigens and persistent production of autoantibodies. Serum from SLE patients induces normal monocytes to differentiate into DC in correlation with disease activity depending on the actions of interferon-alpha, immune complexes, PRL, etc. High serum PRL levels have been found in a subset of SLE patients associated with active disease and organ involvement. It is possible that PRL interacts with DC, skewing its function from antigen presentation to a proinflammatory phenotype with high interferon-alpha production. Therefore, SLE is characterized by deficiency of DC functions and abnormal PRL secretion. The relationships between PRL and DC may have a role in the pathogenesis of SLE.

  7. Morphological abnormalities in the cladoceran Ilyocryptus spinifer (Apipucos Reservoir, Pernambuco State, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Elmoor-Loureiro, L M

    2004-02-01

    In a sample taken from Apipucos Reservoir (Recife, PE, Brazil) for taxonomic study, a high percentage (40%) was found of cladoceran Ilyocryptus spinifer individuals with morphological abnormalities on their postabdomen. There was not a fixed pattern of the malformations, which varied in gravity, and could affect the postanal spines or terminal claws. The postabdominal abnormalities are described and compared to the ones described in the literature. The hypothesis of the morphological abnormalities being induced by an occasional environmental toxicant is discussed.

  8. Early Exposure to Haloperidol or Olanzapine Induces Long-Term Alterations of Dendritic Form

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Douglas O.; Page, Stephanie Cerceo; Carroll, Cathy; Kolb, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Exposure of the developing brain to a wide variety of drugs of abuse (eg., stimulants, opioids, ethanol, etc.) can induce life-long changes in behavior and neural circuitry. However, the long-term effects of exposure to therapeutic, psychotropic drugs have only recently begun to be appreciated. Antipsychotic drugs are little studied in this regard. Here we quantitatively analyzed dendritic architecture in adult mice treated with paradigmatic typical- (haloperidol) or atypical (olanzapine) antipsychotic drugs at developmental stages corresponding to fetal or fetal plus early childhood stages in humans. In layer 3 pyramidal cells of the medial and orbital prefrontal cortices and the parietal cortex and in spiny neurons of the core of the nucleus accumbens, both drugs induced significant changes (predominantly reductions) in the amount and complexity of dendritic arbor and the density of dendritic spines. The drug-induced plasticity of dendritic architecture suggests changes in patterns of neuronal connectivity in multiple brain regions that are likely to be functionally significant. PMID:19862684

  9. Method of inhibiting dislocation generation in silicon dendritic webs

    DOEpatents

    Spitznagel, John A.; Seidensticker, Raymond G.; McHugh, James P.

    1990-11-20

    A method of tailoring the heat balance of the outer edge of the dendrites adjacent the meniscus to produce thinner, smoother dendrites, which have substantially less dislocation sources contiguous with the dendrites, by changing the view factor to reduce radiation cooling or by irradiating the dendrites with light from a quartz lamp or a laser to raise the temperature of the dendrites.

  10. Diversity of Spine Synapses in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Xian; Mattson, Mark P.; Yao, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Here we examine the structure of the various types of spine synapses throughout the animal kingdom. Based on available evidence, we suggest that there are two major categories of spine synapses: invaginating and non-invaginating, with distributions that vary among different groups of animals. In the simplest living animals with definitive nerve cells and synapses, the cnidarians and ctenophores, most chemical synapses do not form spine synapses. But some cnidarians have invaginating spine synapses, especially in photoreceptor terminals of motile cnidarians with highly complex visual organs, and also in some mainly sessile cnidarians with rapid prey capture reflexes. This association of invaginating spine synapses with complex sensory inputs is retained in the evolution of higher animals in photoreceptor terminals and some mechanoreceptor synapses. In contrast to invaginating spine synapse, non-invaginating spine synapses have been described only in animals with bilateral symmetry, heads and brains, associated with greater complexity in neural connections. This is apparent already in the simplest bilaterians, the flatworms, which can have well-developed non-invaginating spine synapses in some cases. Non-invaginating spine synapses diversify in higher animal groups. We also discuss the functional advantages of having synapses on spines and more specifically, on invaginating spines. And finally we discuss pathologies associated with spine synapses, concentrating on those systems and diseases where invaginating spine synapses are involved. PMID:27230661

  11. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  12. Cervical Spine Instrumentation in Children.

    PubMed

    Hedequist, Daniel J; Emans, John B

    2016-06-01

    Instrumentation of the cervical spine enhances stability and improves arthrodesis rates in children undergoing surgery for deformity or instability. Various morphologic and clinical studies have been conducted in children, confirming the feasibility of anterior or posterior instrumentation of the cervical spine with modern implants. Knowledge of the relevant spine anatomy and preoperative imaging studies can aid the clinician in understanding the pitfalls of instrumentation for each patient. Preoperative planning, intraoperative positioning, and adherence to strict surgical techniques are required given the small size of children. Instrumentation options include anterior plating, occipital plating, and a variety of posterior screw techniques. Complications related to screw malposition include injury to the vertebral artery, neurologic injury, and instrumentation failure.

  13. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin Spines

    PubMed Central

    Tsafnat, Naomi; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Le, Hai N.; Stachurski, Zbigniew H.

    2012-01-01

    The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine’s unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT) and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine’s architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material. PMID:22984468

  14. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  15. Active Dendrites Enhance Neuronal Dynamic Range

    PubMed Central

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Kinouchi, Osame; Copelli, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the past decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of an active dendritic tree is a highly non-linear function of its afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease in dynamic range. PMID:19521531

  16. Risk factors for water sports-related cervical spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Chang, Spencer K Y; Tominaga, Gail T; Wong, Jan H; Weldon, Edward J; Kaan, Kenneth T

    2006-05-01

    To examine risk factors associated with water sports-related cervical spine injuries (WSCSI). A retrospective analysis of all patients admitted for WSCSI from 1993 to 1997 was performed. The severity of cervical spine injury was assessed by review of medical records and imaging studies. Mechanisms of injury and activities at the time of injury were noted to determine risk factors for cervical spine injuries caused by wave forced impacts (WFI) from activities such as bodysurfing and body boarding. These risks were compared with injuries incurred by shallow water dives (SWD). One hundred patients were analyzed (mean age, 36 years old); 89% were male, 62% were nonresidents of Hawaii, and 75% had a large build. Patients without radiographic evidence of fractures, subluxations, and/or dislocations (n = 26) were significantly older (48 versus 32 years old, p < 0.0001) with a higher rate of pre-existing cervical spine abnormalities (65% versus 15%, p < 0.0001) compared with the remainder of patients (n = 74). Seventy-seven percent of WFI involved nonresidents. The mean age of WFI patients was significantly older than patients involved in SWD (42 versus 25 years). Ninety-six percent of wave-related accidents occurred at moderately to severely rated shorebreak beaches. Wave forced impacts of the head with the ocean bottom typically occurred at moderate to severe shorebreaks, and involved inexperienced, large-build males in their 40s. Spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylosis may increase the risk of cervical spine injury associated with WFI due to the increased risk of neck hyperextension and hyperflexion impacts inherent to this activity.

  17. Control of axonal sprouting and dendrite branching by the Nrg-Ank complex at the neuron-glia interface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Misato; Ueda, Ryu; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Saigo, Kaoru; Uemura, Tadashi

    2006-08-22

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with distinct subcellular compartments, including dendritic arbors and an axon. The proper function of the nervous system relies not only on correct targeting of axons, but also on development of neuronal-class-specific geometry of dendritic arbors [1-4]. To study the intercellular control of the shaping of dendritic trees in vivo, we searched for cell-surface proteins expressed by Drosophila dendritic arborization (da) neurons [5-7]. One of them was Neuroglian (Nrg), a member of the Ig superfamily ; Nrg and vertebrate L1-family molecules have been implicated in various aspects of neuronal wiring, such as axon guidance, axonal myelination, and synapse formation [9-12]. A subset of the da neurons in nrg mutant embryos exhibited deformed dendritic arbors and abnormal axonal sprouting. Our functional analysis in a cell-type-selective manner strongly suggested that those da neurons employed Nrg to interact with the peripheral glia for suppressing axonal sprouting and for forming second-order dendritic branches. At least for the former role, Nrg functioned in concert with the intracellular adaptor protein Ankyrin (Ank) [13]. Thus, the neuron-glia interaction that is mediated by Nrg, together with Ank under some situations, contributes to axonal and dendritic morphogenesis.

  18. Cortical Composition Hierarchy Driven by Spine Proportion Economical Maximization or Wire Volume Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Karbowski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The structure and quantitative composition of the cerebral cortex are interrelated with its computational capacity. Empirical data analyzed here indicate a certain hierarchy in local cortical composition. Specifically, neural wire, i.e., axons and dendrites take each about 1/3 of cortical space, spines and glia/astrocytes occupy each about (1/3)2, and capillaries around (1/3)4. Moreover, data analysis across species reveals that these fractions are roughly brain size independent, which suggests that they could be in some sense optimal and thus important for brain function. Is there any principle that sets them in this invariant way? This study first builds a model of local circuit in which neural wire, spines, astrocytes, and capillaries are mutually coupled elements and are treated within a single mathematical framework. Next, various forms of wire minimization rule (wire length, surface area, volume, or conduction delays) are analyzed, of which, only minimization of wire volume provides realistic results that are very close to the empirical cortical fractions. As an alternative, a new principle called “spine economy maximization” is proposed and investigated, which is associated with maximization of spine proportion in the cortex per spine size that yields equally good but more robust results. Additionally, a combination of wire cost and spine economy notions is considered as a meta-principle, and it is found that this proposition gives only marginally better results than either pure wire volume minimization or pure spine economy maximization, but only if spine economy component dominates. However, such a combined meta-principle yields much better results than the constraints related solely to minimization of wire length, wire surface area, and conduction delays. Interestingly, the type of spine size distribution also plays a role, and better agreement with the data is achieved for distributions with long tails. In sum, these results suggest that for the

  19. Orientations of dendritic growth during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Nyung

    2017-03-01

    Dendrites are crystalline forms which grow far from the limit of stability of the plane front and adopt an orientation which is as close as possible to the heat flux direction. Dendritic growth orientations for cubic metals, bct Sn, and hcp Zn, can be controlled by thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and surface energy. The control factors have been elaborated. Since the dendrite is a single crystal, its properties such as thermal conductivity that influences the heat flux direction, the minimum Young's modulus direction that influences the strain energy minimization, and the minimum surface energy plane that influences the crystal/liquid interface energy minimization have been proved to control the dendritic growth direction. The dendritic growth directions of cubic metals are determined by the minimum Young's modulus direction and/or axis direction of symmetry of the minimum crystal surface energy plane. The dendritic growth direction of bct Sn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction. The primary dendritic growth direction of hcp Zn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction and the secondary dendrite arm direction of hcp Zn is normal to the primary dendritic growth direction.

  20. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator, such as porous polypropylene, adjacent to the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  1. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator such as porous polypropylene adjacent the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator such as polytetrafluoroethylene that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  2. A Rare Variant Identified Within the GluN2B C-Terminus in a Patient with Autism Affects NMDA Receptor Surface Expression and Spine Density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuxi; Zhou, Liang; Yuan, Hongjie; Vieira, Marta; Sanz-Clemente, Antonio; Badger, John D; Lu, Wei; Traynelis, Stephen F; Roche, Katherine W

    2017-04-12

    information from deep sequencing of patients with neurological or psychiatric disorders, we investigated missense variants identified in the intracellular C-terminal domain of the GluN2B NMDAR subunit. We found several variants that displayed altered properties. In particular, one variant identified in a patient with autism, human GluN2B S1415L, displayed reduced surface expression and binding to PSD-95. Furthermore expression of GluN2B S1415L (S1413L in mouse) showed a deficit in rescue of synaptic NMDAR currents and fewer dendritic spines, consistent with other reports of spine abnormalities being associated with autism. More broadly, we demonstrate that using patient data is an effective approach to probing the structure/function relationship of NMDARs. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/374094-10$15.00/0.

  3. Absence of clinical findings reliably excludes unstable cervical spine injuries in children 5 years or younger.

    PubMed

    Hale, Diane F; Fitzpatrick, Colleen M; Doski, John J; Stewart, Ronald M; Mueller, Deborah L

    2015-05-01

    Increased accessibility and rapidity of computed tomography (CT) have led to increased use and radiation exposure to pediatric trauma patients. The thyroid is radiosensitive and therefore at risk for developing malignancy from radiation exposure during cervical spine CT. This analysis aimed to determine which preelementary trauma patients warrant cervical spine CT by defining incidence and clinical characteristics of preelementary cervical spine injury. This was a retrospective review of pre-elementary trauma patients from 1998 to 2010 with cervical spine injury admitted to a Level I trauma center. Patients were identified from the trauma registry using DRG International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev. codes and reviewed for demographics, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, injury location, injury type, treatment, and outcome. A total of 2,972 preelementary trauma patients were identified. Twenty-two (0.74%) had confirmed cervical spine injuries. Eleven (50%) were boys, and the mean (SD) age was 3 (1.7) years. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle collision (n = 16, 73%). The majority (59%) were in extremis, and 12 (55%) arrived intubated. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was 3 (interquartile range, 3-10); the median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 33 (interquartile range, 17-56). Nineteen injuries (76%) were at the level of C4 level and higher. The mortality rate was 50%. All patients had clinical findings suggestive of or diagnostic for cervical spine injury; 18 (82%) had abnormal neurologic examination result, 2 (9%) had torticollis, and 2 (9%) had neck pain. The incidence of cervical spine injury in preelementary patients was consistent with previous reports. Missing a cervical spine injury in asymptomatic preelementary patients is extremely low. Reserving cervical spine CT to symptomatic preelementary patients would decrease unnecessary radiation exposure to the thyroid. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  4. Positioning patients for spine surgery: Avoiding uncommon position-related complications

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Ihab; Barnette, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Positioning patients for spine surgery is pivotal for optimal operating conditions and operative-site exposure. During spine surgery, patients are placed in positions that are not physiologic and may lead to complications. Perioperative peripheral nerve injury (PPNI) and postoperative visual loss (POVL) are rare complications related to patient positioning during spine surgery that result in significant patient disability and functional loss. PPNI is usually due to stretch or compression of the peripheral nerve. PPNI may present as a brachial plexus injury or as an isolated injury of single nerve, most commonly the ulnar nerve. Understanding the etiology, mechanism and pattern of injury with each type of nerve injury is important for the prevention of PPNI. Intraoperative neuromonitoring has been used to detect peripheral nerve conduction abnormalities indicating peripheral nerve stress under general anesthesia and to guide modification of the upper extremity position to prevent PPNI. POVL usually results in permanent visual loss. Most cases are associated with prolonged spine procedures in the prone position under general anesthesia. The most common causes of POVL after spine surgery are ischemic optic neuropathy and central retinal artery occlusion. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy is the most common cause of POVL after spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to be aware of POVL and to participate in safe, collaborative perioperative care of spine patients. Proper education of perioperative staff, combined with clear communication and collaboration while positioning patients in the operating room is the best and safest approach. The prevention of uncommon complications of spine surgery depends primarily on identifying high-risk patients, proper positioning and optimal intraoperative management of physiological parameters. Modification of risk factors extrinsic to the patient may help reduce the incidence of PPNI and POVL. PMID:25232519

  5. Myeloid dendritic cells frequencies are increased in children with autism spectrum disorder and associated with amygdala volume and repetitive behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Breece, Elizabeth; Paciotti, Brian; Nordahl, Christine Wu; Ozonoff, Sally; Van de Water, Judy A.; Rogers, Sally J.; Amaral, David; Ashwood, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is not yet known; however, studies suggest that dysfunction of the immune system affects many children with ASD. Increasing evidence points to dysfunction of the innate immune system including activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages, increases in inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in brain tissue and CSF, and abnormal peripheral monocyte cell function. Dendritic cells are major players in innate immunity and have important functions in the phagocytosis of pathogens or debris, antigen presentation, activation of naïve T cells, induction of tolerance and cytokine/chemokine production. In this study, we assessed circulating frequencies of myeloid dendritic cells (defined as Lin-1−BDCA1+CD11c+ and Lin-1−BDCA3+CD123−) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (Lin-1− BDCA2+CD123+ or Lin-1−BDCA4+ CD11c−) in 57 children with ASD, and 29 typically developing controls of the same age, all of who were enrolled as part of the Autism Phenome Project (APP). The frequencies of dendritic cells and associations with behavioral assessment and MRI measurements of amygdala volume were compared in the same participants. The frequencies of myeloid dendritic cells were significantly increased in children with ASD compared to typically developing controls (p < 0.03). Elevated frequencies of myeloid dendritic cells were positively associated with abnormal right and left amygdala enlargement, severity of gastrointestinal symptoms and increased repetitive behaviors. The frequencies of plasmacytoid dendritic cells were also associated with amygdala volumes as well as developmental regression in children with ASD. Dendritic cells play key roles in modulating immune responses and differences in frequencies or functions of these cells may result in immune dysfunction in children with ASD. These data further implicate innate immune cells in the complex pathophysiology of ASD. PMID:23063420

  6. Reducing premature KCC2 expression rescues seizure susceptibility and spine morphology in atypical febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Awad, Patricia N; Sanon, Nathalie T; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Carriço, Josianne Nunes; Ouardouz, Mohamed; Gagné, Jonathan; Duss, Sandra; Wolf, Daniele; Desgent, Sébastien; Cancedda, Laura; Carmant, Lionel; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Atypical febrile seizures are considered a risk factor for epilepsy onset and cognitive impairments later in life. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a history of atypical febrile seizures often carry a cortical malformation. This association has led to the hypothesis that the presence of a cortical dysplasia exacerbates febrile seizures in infancy, in turn increasing the risk for neurological sequelae. The mechanisms linking these events are currently poorly understood. Potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 affects several aspects of neuronal circuit development and function, by modulating GABAergic transmission and excitatory synapse formation. Recent data suggest that KCC2 downregulation contributes to seizure generation in the epileptic adult brain, but its role in the developing brain is still controversial. In a rodent model of atypical febrile seizures, combining a cortical dysplasia and hyperthermia-induced seizures (LHS rats), we found a premature and sustained increase in KCC2 protein levels, accompanied by a negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA. In parallel, we observed a significant reduction in dendritic spine size and mEPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons, accompanied by spatial memory deficits. To investigate whether KCC2 premature overexpression plays a role in seizure susceptibility and synaptic alterations, we reduced KCC2 expression selectively in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by in utero electroporation of shRNA. Remarkably, KCC2 shRNA-electroporated LHS rats show reduced hyperthermia-induced seizure susceptibility, while dendritic spine size deficits were rescued. Our findings demonstrate that KCC2 overexpression in a compromised developing brain increases febrile seizure susceptibility and contribute to dendritic spine alterations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigating Methodological Differences in the Assessment of Dendritic Morphology of Basolateral Amygdala Principal Neurons-A Comparison of Golgi-Cox and Neurobiotin Electroporation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Klenowski, Paul M; Wright, Sophie E; Mu, Erica W H; Noakes, Peter G; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Bartlett, Selena E; Bellingham, Mark C; Fogarty, Matthew J

    2017-12-19

    Quantitative assessments of neuronal subtypes in numerous brain regions show large variations in dendritic arbor size. A critical experimental factor is the method used to visualize neurons. We chose to investigate quantitative differences in basolateral amygdala (BLA) principal neuron morphology using two of the most common visualization methods: Golgi-Cox staining and neurobiotin (NB) filling. We show in 8-week-old Wistar rats that NB-filling reveals significantly larger dendritic arbors and different spine densities, compared to Golgi-Cox-stained BLA neurons. Our results demonstrate important differences and provide methodological insights into quantitative disparities of BLA principal neuron morphology reported in the literature.

  8. Osteosarcoma of the mobile spine.

    PubMed

    Zils, K; Bielack, S; Wilhelm, M; Werner, M; Schwarz, R; Windhager, R; Hofmann-Wackersreuther, G; Andus, T; Kager, L; Kuehne, T; Reichardt, P; von Kalle, T

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this analysis were to investigate features and outcome of high-grade osteosarcomas of the mobile spine. Since 1977, 20 Cooperative Osteosarcoma Study Group patients had a diagnosis of high-grade osteosarcomas of the mobile spine and were included in this retrospective analysis of patient-, tumor- and treatment-related variables and outcome. The median age was 29 years (range 5-58). Most frequent tumor sites were thoracic and lumbar spine. All but three patients had nonmetastatic disease at diagnosis. Treatment included surgery and chemotherapy for all patients, 13 were also irradiated. Eight patients failed to achieve a macroscopically complete surgical remission (five local, one primary metastases, two both), six died, two are alive, both with radiotherapy. Of 12 patients with complete remission at all sites, three had a recurrence (two local, one metastases) and died. The median follow-up of the 11 survivors was 8.7 years (range 3.1-22.3), 5-year overall and event-free survival rates were 60% and 43%. Age <40 years, nonmetastatic disease at diagnosis and complete remission predicted for better overall survival (OS, P < 0.05). Osteosarcomas of the mobile spine are rare. With complete resection (and potentially radiotherapy) and chemotherapy, prognosis may be comparable with that of appendicular osteosarcomas.

  9. Sex-specific effects of early life stress on social interaction and prefrontal cortex dendritic morphology in young rats.

    PubMed

    Farrell, M R; Holland, F H; Shansky, R M; Brenhouse, H C

    2016-09-01

    Early life stress has been linked to depression, anxiety, and behavior disorders in adolescence and adulthood. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is implicated in stress-related psychopathology, is a target for stress hormones, and mediates social behavior. The present study investigated sex differences in early-life stress effects on juvenile social interaction and adolescent mPFC dendritic morphology in rats using a maternal separation (MS) paradigm. Half of the rat pups of each sex were separated from their mother for 4h a day between postnatal days 2 and 21, while the other half remained with their mother in the animal facilities and were exposed to minimal handling. At postnatal day 25 (P25; juvenility), rats underwent a social interaction test with an age and sex matched conspecific. Distance from conspecific, approach and avoidance behaviors, nose-to-nose contacts, and general locomotion were measured. Rats were euthanized at postnatal day 40 (P40; adolescence), and randomly selected infralimbic pyramidal neurons were filled with Lucifer yellow using iontophoretic microinjections, imaged in 3D, and then analyzed for dendritic arborization, spine density, and spine morphology. Early-life stress increased the latency to make nose-to-nose contact at P25 in females but not males. At P40, early-life stress increased infralimbic apical dendritic branch number and length and decreased thin spine density in stressed female rats. These results indicate that MS during the postnatal period influenced juvenile social behavior and mPFC dendritic arborization in a sex-specific manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurolastin, a dynamin family GTPase, regulates excitatory synapses and spine density

    PubMed Central

    Madan Lomash, Richa; Gu, Xinglong; Youle, Richard J.; Lu, Wei; Roche, Katherine W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Membrane trafficking and spinogenesis contribute significantly to changes in synaptic strength during development and in various paradigms of synaptic plasticity. GTPases of the dynamin family are key players regulating membrane trafficking. Here, we identify a brain-specific dynamin family GTPase, neurolastin (RNF112/Znf179), with closest homology to atlastin. We demonstrate that neurolastin has functional GTPase and RING domains, making it a unique protein identified with this multi-enzymatic domain organization. We also show that neurolastin is a peripheral membrane protein, which localizes to endosomes and affects endosomal membrane dynamics via its RING domain. In addition, neurolastin knockout mice have fewer dendritic spines, and rescue of the wildtype phenotype requires both the GTPase and RING domains. Furthermore, we find fewer functional synapses and reduced paired pulse facilitation in neurolastin knockout mice. Thus, we identify neurolastin as a dynamin family GTPase that affects endosome size and spine density. PMID:26212327

  11. Semaphorin-1a prevents Drosophila olfactory projection neuron dendrites from mis-targeting into select antennal lobe regions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hung-Chang; Chu, Sao-Yu; Hsu, Tsai-Chi; Wang, Chun-Han; Lin, I-Ya; Yu, Hung-Hsiang

    2017-04-01

    Elucidating how appropriate neurite patterns are generated in neurons of the olfactory system is crucial for comprehending the construction of the olfactory map. In the Drosophila olfactory system, projection neurons (PNs), primarily derived from four neural stem cells (called neuroblasts), populate their cell bodies surrounding to and distribute their dendrites in distinct but overlapping patterns within the primary olfactory center of the brain, the antennal lobe (AL). However, it remains unclear whether the same molecular mechanisms are employed to generate the appropriate dendritic patterns in discrete AL glomeruli among PNs produced from different neuroblasts. Here, by examining a previously explored transmembrane protein Semaphorin-1a (Sema-1a) which was proposed to globally control initial PN dendritic targeting along the dorsolateral-to-ventromedial axis of the AL, we discover a new role for Sema-1a in preventing dendrites of both uni-glomerular and poly-glomerular PNs from aberrant invasion into select AL regions and, intriguingly, this Sema-1a-deficient dendritic mis-targeting phenotype seems to associate with the origins of PNs from which they are derived. Further, ectopic expression of Sema-1a resulted in PN dendritic mis-projection from a select AL region into adjacent glomeruli, strengthening the idea that Sema-1a plays an essential role in preventing abnormal dendritic accumulation in select AL regions. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Sema-1a repulsion keeps dendrites of different types of PNs away from each other, enabling the same types of PN dendrites to be sorted into destined AL glomeruli and permitting for functional assembly of olfactory circuitry.

  12. Semaphorin-1a prevents Drosophila olfactory projection neuron dendrites from mis-targeting into select antennal lobe regions

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Sao-Yu; Wang, Chun-Han; Lin, I-Ya

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating how appropriate neurite patterns are generated in neurons of the olfactory system is crucial for comprehending the construction of the olfactory map. In the Drosophila olfactory system, projection neurons (PNs), primarily derived from four neural stem cells (called neuroblasts), populate their cell bodies surrounding to and distribute their dendrites in distinct but overlapping patterns within the primary olfactory center of the brain, the antennal lobe (AL). However, it remains unclear whether the same molecular mechanisms are employed to generate the appropriate dendritic patterns in discrete AL glomeruli among PNs produced from different neuroblasts. Here, by examining a previously explored transmembrane protein Semaphorin-1a (Sema-1a) which was proposed to globally control initial PN dendritic targeting along the dorsolateral-to-ventromedial axis of the AL, we discover a new role for Sema-1a in preventing dendrites of both uni-glomerular and poly-glomerular PNs from aberrant invasion into select AL regions and, intriguingly, this Sema-1a-deficient dendritic mis-targeting phenotype seems to associate with the origins of PNs from which they are derived. Further, ectopic expression of Sema-1a resulted in PN dendritic mis-projection from a select AL region into adjacent glomeruli, strengthening the idea that Sema-1a plays an essential role in preventing abnormal dendritic accumulation in select AL regions. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Sema-1a repulsion keeps dendrites of different types of PNs away from each other, enabling the same types of PN dendrites to be sorted into destined AL glomeruli and permitting for functional assembly of olfactory circuitry. PMID:28448523

  13. Somatic and neuritic spines on tyrosine hydroxylase–immunopositive cells of rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Fasoli, Anna; Dang, James; Johnson, Jeffrey S.; Gouw, Aaron H.; Iseppe, Alex Fogli; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2018-01-01

    Dopamine- and tyrosine hydroxylase–immunopositive cells (TH cells) modulate visually driven signals as they flow through retinal photoreceptor, bipolar, and ganglion cells. Previous studies suggested that TH cells release dopamine from varicose axons arborizing in the inner and outer plexiform layers after glutamatergic synapses depolarize TH cell dendrites in the inner plexiform layer and these depolarizations propagate to the varicosities. Although it has been proposed that these excitatory synapses are formed onto appendages resembling dendritic spines, spines have not been found on TH cells of most species examined to date or on TH cell somata that release dopamine when exposed to glutamate receptor agonists. By use of protocols that preserve proximal retinal neuron morphology, we have examined the shape, distribution, and synapse-related immunoreactivity of adult rat TH cells. We report here that TH cell somata, tapering and varicose inner plexiform layer neurites, and varicose outer plexiform layer neurites all bear spines, that some of these spines are immunopositive for glutamate receptor and postsynaptic density proteins (viz., GluR1, GluR4, NR1, PSD-95, and PSD-93), that TH cell somata and tapering neurites are also immunopositive for a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunit (GABAARα1), and that a synaptic ribbon-specific protein (RIBEYE) is found adjacent to some colocalizations of GluR1 and TH in the inner plexiform layer. These results identify previously undescribed sites at which glutamatergic and GABAergic inputs may stimulate and inhibit dopamine release, especially at somata and along varicose neurites that emerge from these somata and arborize in various levels of the retina. PMID:28035673

  14. Dendrites of medial olivocochlear neurons in mouse.

    PubMed

    Brown, M C; Levine, J L

    2008-06-12

    Stains for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and retrograde labeling with Fluorogold (FG) were used to study olivocochlear neurons and their dendritic patterns in mice. The two methods gave similar results for location and number of somata. The total number of medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons in the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB) is about 170 per side. An additional dozen large olivocochlear neurons are located in the dorsal periolivary nucleus (DPO). Dendrites of all of these neurons are long and extend in all directions from the cell bodies, a pattern that contrasts with the sharp frequency tuning of their responses. For VNTB neurons, there were greater numbers of dendrites directed medially than laterally and those directed medially were longer (on average, 25-50% longer). Dendrite extensions were most pronounced for neurons located in the rostral portion of the VNTB. When each dendrite from a single neuron was represented as a vector, and all the vectors summed, the result was also skewed toward the medial direction. DPO neurons, however, had more symmetric dendrites that projected into more dorsal parts of the trapezoid body, suggesting that this small group of olivocochlear neurons has very different physiological properties. Dendrites of both types of neurons were somewhat elongated rostrally, about 20% longer than those directed caudally. These results can be interpreted as extensions of dendrites of olivocochlear neurons toward their synaptic inputs: medially to meet crossing fibers from the cochlear nucleus that are part of the MOC reflex pathway, and rostrally to meet descending inputs from higher centers.

  15. Building the Vertebrate Spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourquié, Olivier

    2008-03-01

    The vertebrate body can be subdivided along the antero-posterior (AP) axis into repeated structures called segments. This periodic pattern is established during embryogenesis by the somitogenesis process. Somites are generated in a rhythmic fashion from the paraxial mesoderm and subsequently differentiate to give rise to the vertebrae and skeletal muscles of the body. Somite formation involves an oscillator-the segmentation clock-whose periodic signal is converted into the periodic array of somite boundaries. This clock drives the dynamic expression of cyclic genes in the presomitic mesoderm and requires Notch and Wnt signaling. Microarray studies of the mouse presomitic mesoderm transcriptome reveal that the segmentation clock drives the periodic expression of a large network of cyclic genes involved in cell signaling. Mutually exclusive activation of the Notch/FGF and Wnt pathways during each cycle suggests that coordinated regulation of these three pathways underlies the clock oscillator. In humans, mutations in the genes associated to the function of this oscillator such as Dll3 or Lunatic Fringe result in abnormal segmentation of the vertebral column such as those seen in congenital scoliosis. Whereas the segmentation clock is thought to set the pace of vertebrate segmentation, the translation of this pulsation into the reiterated arrangement of segment boundaries along the AP axis involves dynamic gradients of FGF and Wnt signaling. The FGF signaling gradient is established based on an unusual mechanism involving mRNA decay which provides an efficient means to couple the spatio-temporal activation of segmentation to the posterior elongation of the embryo. Another striking aspect of somite production is the strict bilateral symmetry of the process. Retinoic acid was shown to control aspects of this coordination by buffering destabilizing effects from the embryonic left-right machinery. Defects in this embryonic program controlling vertebral symmetry might lead

  16. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. All rights reserved.

  17. Aquatic antagonists: cutaneous sea urchin spine injury.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Clifford; Aronson, Erica R; Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M

    2016-11-01

    Injuries from sea urchin spines are commonly seen in coastal regions with high levels of participation in water activities. Although these injuries may seem minor, the consequences vary based on the location of the injury. Sea urchin spine injuries may cause arthritis and synovitis from spines in the joints. Nonjoint injuries have been reported, and dermatologic aspects of sea urchin spine injuries rarely have been discussed. We present a case of a patient with sea urchin spines embedded in the thigh who subsequently developed painful skin nodules. Tissue from the site of the injury demonstrated foreign-body type granulomas. Following the removal of the spines and granulomatous tissue, the patient experienced resolution of the nodules and associated pain. Extraction of sea urchin spines can attenuate the pain and decrease the likelihood of granuloma formation, infection, and long-term sequelae.

  18. Cervical Spine Injuries in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries are extremely common and range from relatively minor injuries, such as cervical muscle strains, to severe, life-threatening cervical fractures with spinal cord injuries. Although cervical spine injuries are most common in athletes who participate in contact and collision sports, such as American football and rugby, they also have been reported in athletes who participate in noncontact sports, such as baseball, gymnastics, and diving. Cervical spine injuries in athletes are not necessarily the result of substantial spine trauma; some athletes have chronic conditions, such as congenital stenosis, that increase their risk for a serious cervical spine injury after even minor trauma. Therefore, physicians who cover athletic events must have a thorough knowledge of cervical spine injures and the most appropriate ways in which they should be managed. Although cervical spine injuries can be career-ending injuries, athletes often are able to return to play after appropriate treatment if the potential for substantial re-injury is minimized.

  19. The Impact of Development and Sensory Deprivation on Dendritic Protrusions in the Mouse Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Chien; Bajnath, Adesh; Brumberg, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic protrusions (spines and filopodia) are structural indicators of synapses that have been linked to neuronal learning and memory through their morphological alterations induced by development and experienced-dependent activities. Although previous studies have demonstrated that depriving sensory experience leads to structural changes in neocortical organization, the more subtle effects on dendritic protrusions remain unclear, mostly due to focus on only one specific cell type and/or age of manipulation. Here, we show that sensory deprivation induced by whisker trimming influences the dendritic protrusions of basilar dendrites located in thalamocortical recipient lamina (IV and VI) of the mouse barrel cortex in a layer-specific manner. Following 1 month of whisker trimming after birth, the density of dendritic protrusions increased in layer IV, but decreased in layer VI. Whisker regrowth for 1 month returned protrusion densities to comparable level of age-matched controls in layer VI, but not in layer IV. In adults, chronic sensory deprivation led to an increase in protrusion densities in layer IV, but not in layer VI. In addition, chronic pharmacological blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) increased protrusion density in both layers IV and VI, which returned to the control level after 1 month of drug withdrawal. Our data reveal that different cortical layers respond to chronic sensory deprivation in different ways, with more pronounced effects during developmental critical periods than adulthood. We also show that chronically blocking NMDARs activity during developmental critical period also influences the protrusion density and morphology in the cerebral cortex. PMID:24408954

  20. Forebrain CRHR1 deficiency attenuates chronic stress-induced cognitive deficits and dendritic remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Yuncai; Wolf, Miriam; Wagner, Klaus V.; Liebl, Claudia; Scharf, Sebastian H.; Harbich, Daniela; Mayer, Bianca; Wurst, Wolfgang; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M.; Baram, Tallie Z.; Müller, Marianne B.; Schmidt, Mathias V.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic stress evokes profound structural and molecular changes in the hippocampus, which may underlie spatial memory deficits. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) mediate some of the rapid effects of stress on dendritic spine morphology and modulate learning and memory, thus providing a potential molecular basis for impaired synaptic plasticity and spatial memory by repeated stress exposure. Using adult male mice with CRHR1 conditionally inactivated in the forebrain regions, we investigated the role of CRH-CRHR1 signaling in the effects of chronic social defeat stress on spatial memory, the dendritic morphology of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons, and the hippocampal expression of nectin-3, a synaptic cell adhesion molecule important in synaptic remodeling. In chronically stressed wild-type mice, spatial memory was disrupted, and the complexity of apical dendrites of CA3 neurons reduced. In contrast, stressed mice with forebrain CRHR1 deficiency exhibited normal dendritic morphology of CA3 neurons and mild impairments in spatial memory. Additionally, we showed that the expression of nectin-3 in the CA3 area was regulated by chronic stress in a CRHR1-dependent fashion and associated with spatial memory and dendritic complexity. Moreover, forebrain CRHR1 deficiency prevented the down-regulation of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression by chronic stress but induced increased body weight gain during persistent stress exposure. These findings underscore the important role of forebrain CRH-CRHR1 signaling in modulating chronic stress-induced cognitive, structural and molecular adaptations, with implications for stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:21296667

  1. Neurodevelopmental Role for VGLUT2 in Pyramidal Neuron Plasticity, Dendritic Refinement, and in Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongbo; Mahnke, Amanda H.; Doyle, Sukhjeevan; Fan, Ni; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Hall, Benjamin J.; Tang, Ya-Ping; Inglis, Fiona M.; Chen, Chu; Erickson, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    The level and integrity of glutamate transmission during critical periods of postnatal development plays an important role in the refinement of pyramidal neuron dendritic arbor, synaptic plasticity, and cognition. Presently, it is not clear how excitatory transmission via the two predominant isoforms of the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2) participate in this process. To assess a neurodevelopmental role for VGLUT2 in pyramidal neuron maturation we have generated recombinant VGLUT2 knockout mice and inactivated VGLUT2 throughout development using Emx1-Cre+/+ knockin mice. We show that VGLUT2-deficiency in cortico-limbic circuits results in reduced evoked glutamate transmission, release probability, and LTD at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses during a formative developmental period (postnatal days 11–14). In adults, we find a marked reduction in the amount of dendritic arbor across the span of the dendritic tree of CA1 pyramidal neurons, reduced LTP and levels of synaptic markers spinophilin and VGLUT1. Loss of dendritic arbor is accompanied by corresponding reductions in the number of dendritic spines, suggesting widespread alterations in synaptic connectivity. Conditional VGLUT2 knockout mice exhibit increased open-field exploratory activity, yet impaired spatial learning and memory; endophenotypes similar to NMDA receptor knockdown mice. Remarkably, the impairment in learning can be partially restored selectively increasing NMDA-receptor mediated glutamate transmission in adult mice by prolonged treatment with D-serine and a D-amino acid oxidase inhibitor. Our data indicate that VGLUT2 expression is pivotal to the proper development of mature pyramidal neuronal architecture and plasticity, and that such glutamatergic deficiency leads to cognitive malfunction as observed in several neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders. PMID:23136427

  2. Neurodevelopmental role for VGLUT2 in pyramidal neuron plasticity, dendritic refinement, and in spatial learning.

    PubMed

    He, Hongbo; Mahnke, Amanda H; Doyle, Sukhjeevan; Fan, Ni; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Hall, Benjamin J; Tang, Ya-Ping; Inglis, Fiona M; Chen, Chu; Erickson, Jeffrey D

    2012-11-07

    The level and integrity of glutamate transmission during critical periods of postnatal development plays an important role in the refinement of pyramidal neuron dendritic arbor, synaptic plasticity, and cognition. Presently, it is not clear how excitatory transmission via the two predominant isoforms of the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2) participate in this process. To assess a neurodevelopmental role for VGLUT2 in pyramidal neuron maturation, we generated recombinant VGLUT2 knock-out mice and inactivated VGLUT2 throughout development using Emx1-Cre(+/+) knock-in mice. We show that VGLUT2 deficiency in corticolimbic circuits results in reduced evoked glutamate transmission, release probability, and LTD at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses during a formative developmental period (postnatal days 11-14). In adults, we find a marked reduction in the amount of dendritic arbor across the span of the dendritic tree of CA1 pyramidal neurons and reduced long-term potentiation and levels of synaptic markers spinophilin and VGLUT1. Loss of dendritic arbor is accompanied by corresponding reductions in the number of dendritic spines, suggesting widespread alterations in synaptic connectivity. Conditional VGLUT2 knock-out mice exhibit increased open-field exploratory activity yet impaired spatial learning and memory, endophenotypes similar to those of NMDA receptor knock-down mice. Remarkably, the impairment in learning can be partially restored by selectively increasing NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in adult mice by prolonged treatment with d-serine and a d-amino acid oxidase inhibitor. Our data indicate that VGLUT2 expression is pivotal to the proper development of mature pyramidal neuronal architecture and plasticity, and that such glutamatergic deficiency leads to cognitive malfunction as observed in several neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders.

  3. Vertical solidification of dendritic binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Felicelli, S.; Poirier, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three numerical techniques are employed to analyze the influence of thermosolutal convection on defect formation in directionally solidified (DS) alloys. The finite-element models are based on the Boussinesq approximation and include the plane-front model and two plane-front models incorporating special dendritic regions. In the second model the dendritic region has a time-independent volume fraction of liquid, and in the last model the dendritic region evolves as local conditions dictate. The finite-element models permit the description of nonlinear thermosolutal convection by treating the dendritic regions as porous media with variable porosities. The models are applied to lead-tin alloys including DS alloys, and severe segregation phenomena such as freckles and channels are found to develop in the DS alloys. The present calculations and the permeability functions selected are shown to predict behavior in the dendritic regions that qualitatively matches that observed experimentally.

  4. Short-term withdrawal from developmental exposure to cocaine activates the glucocorticoid receptor and alters spine dynamics.

    PubMed

    Caffino, Lucia; Giannotti, Giuseppe; Malpighi, Chiara; Racagni, Giorgio; Fumagalli, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Although glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) contribute to the action of cocaine, their role following developmental exposure to the psychostimulant is still unknown. To address this issue, we exposed adolescent male rats to cocaine (20mg/kg/day) from post-natal day (PND) 28 to PND 42 and sacrificed them at PND 45 or 90. We studied the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a brain region that is still developing during adolescence. In PND 45 rats we found enhanced GR transcription and translation as well as increased trafficking toward the nucleus of the receptor, with no alteration in plasma corticosterone levels. We also showed reduced expression of the GR co-chaperone FKBP51, that normally keeps the receptor in the cytoplasm, and increased expression of Src1, which cooperates in the activation of GR transcriptional activity, revealing that short withdrawal alters the finely tuned mechanisms regulating GR action. Since activation of GRs regulate dendritic spine morphology, we next investigated spine dynamics in cocaine-withdrawn rats. We found that PSD95, cofilin and F-actin, molecules regulating spine actin network, are reduced in the mPFC of PND 45 rats suggesting reduced spine density, confirmed by confocal imaging. Further, formation of filopodia, i.e. the inactive spines, is enhanced suggesting the formation of non-functional spines. Of note, no changes were found in molecules related to GR machinery or spine dynamics following long-term abstinence, i.e. in adult rats (PND 90). These findings demonstrate that short withdrawal promotes plastic changes in the developing brain via the dysregulation of the GR system and alterations in the spine network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. Three-dimensional analysis of cervical spine segmental motion in rotation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiong; Wu, Zi-Xiang; Han, Bao-Jun; Yan, Ya-Bo; Zhang, Yang; Lei, Wei

    2013-06-20

    The movements of the cervical spine during head rotation are too complicated to measure using conventional radiography or computed tomography (CT) techniques. In this study, we measure three-dimensional segmental motion of cervical spine rotation in vivo using a non-invasive measurement technique. Sixteen healthy volunteers underwent three-dimensional CT of the cervical spine during head rotation. Occiput (Oc) - T1 reconstructions were created of volunteers in each of 3 positions: supine and maximum left and right rotations of the head with respect to the bosom. Segmental motions were calculated using Euler angles and volume merge methods in three major planes. Mean maximum axial rotation of the cervical spine to one side was 1.6° to 38.5° at each level. Coupled lateral bending opposite to lateral bending was observed in the upper cervical levels, while in the subaxial cervical levels, it was observed in the same direction as axial rotation. Coupled extension was observed in the cervical levels of C5-T1, while coupled flexion was observed in the cervical levels of Oc-C5. The three-dimensional cervical segmental motions in rotation were accurately measured with the non-invasive measure. These findings will be helpful as the basis for understanding cervical spine movement in rotation and abnormal conditions. The presented data also provide baseline segmental motions for the design of prostheses for the cervical spine.

  6. [Evaluation of upper cervical spine injury (C1-C2) with computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Siemianowicz, Anna; Baron, Jan; Wawrzynek, Wojciech; Koczy, Bogdan; Kasprowska, Sabina

    2006-01-01

    Cervical spine injuries are common and essential diagnostic problem. Diagnostic imaging is necessary for proper and effective treatment. Helical computed tomography (CT) and plain radiography are the basic diagnostic methods in cervical spine injuries. The purpose of this work was the comparison of CT examination of the upper cervical spine (CI-C2) with patients' clinical state. Twenty four patients (17 men and 7 women) were introduced into the study. The most common cause of cervical spine injuries were car accidents (48.5%). CT examination was performed in all patients. Six patients (25%) had multilevel injury, localized at C1-C2 level and in the lower part of cervical spine. The main pathology diagnosed by CT in the studied group was rotatory subluxation (66.6%). Eight patients (33.3%), with rotatory subluxation did not present any abnormalities in neurological examination performed immediately after the admission to the hospital. C1 and/or C2 fractures were diagnosed in 11 patients (45.8%), in some cases (in 3 patients - 12.5%) they were accompanied by rotatory subluxations. CT examination is the basic technique of diagnostic imaging in a case of cervical spine injuries. It enables quick, accurate and precise evaluation of bone structures and surrounding soft tissues. CT also enables multiplanar imaging and 3-dimentional imaging.

  7. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  8. NgR1: A Tunable Sensor Regulating Memory Formation, Synaptic, and Dendritic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Tobias E; Smedfors, Gabriella; Brodin, Alvin T S; Åberg, Elin; Mattsson, Anna; Högbeck, Isabelle; Wellfelt, Katrin; Josephson, Anna; Brené, Stefan; Olson, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) is expressed in forebrain neurons and mediates nerve growth inhibition in response to Nogo and other ligands. Neuronal activity downregulates NgR1 and the inability to downregulate NgR1 impairs long-term memory. We investigated behavior in a serial behavioral paradigm in mice that overexpress or lack NgR1, finding impaired locomotor behavior and recognition memory in mice lacking NgR1 and impaired sequential spatial learning in NgR1 overexpressing mice. We also investigated a role for NgR1 in drug-mediated sensitization and found that repeated cocaine exposure caused stronger locomotor responses but limited development of stereotypies in NgR1 overexpressing mice. This suggests that NgR1-regulated synaptic plasticity is needed to develop stereotypies. Ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging analyses of NgR1 overexpressing brains did not reveal any major alterations. NgR1 overexpression resulted in significantly reduced density of mature spines and dendritic complexity. NgR1 overexpression also altered cocaine-induced effects on spine plasticity. Our results show that NgR1 is a negative regulator of both structural synaptic plasticity and dendritic complexity in a brain region-specific manner, and highlight anterior cingulate cortex as a key area for memory-related plasticity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. NgR1: A Tunable Sensor Regulating Memory Formation, Synaptic, and Dendritic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Tobias E.; Smedfors, Gabriella; Brodin, Alvin T. S.; Åberg, Elin; Mattsson, Anna; Högbeck, Isabelle; Wellfelt, Katrin; Josephson, Anna; Brené, Stefan; Olson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) is expressed in forebrain neurons and mediates nerve growth inhibition in response to Nogo and other ligands. Neuronal activity downregulates NgR1 and the inability to downregulate NgR1 impairs long-term memory. We investigated behavior in a serial behavioral paradigm in mice that overexpress or lack NgR1, finding impaired locomotor behavior and recognition memory in mice lacking NgR1 and impaired sequential spatial learning in NgR1 overexpressing mice. We also investigated a role for NgR1 in drug-mediated sensitization and found that repeated cocaine exposure caused stronger locomotor responses but limited development of stereotypies in NgR1 overexpressing mice. This suggests that NgR1-regulated synaptic plasticity is needed to develop stereotypies. Ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging analyses of NgR1 overexpressing brains did not reveal any major alterations. NgR1 overexpression resulted in significantly reduced density of mature spines and dendritic complexity. NgR1 overexpression also altered cocaine-induced effects on spine plasticity. Our results show that NgR1 is a negative regulator of both structural synaptic plasticity and dendritic complexity in a brain region-specific manner, and highlight anterior cingulate cortex as a key area for memory-related plasticity. PMID:26838771

  10. Performance Indicators in Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Godefroy Hardy; Yang, Michael H; Bourget-Murray, Jonathan; Thomas, Ken C; Hurlbert, Robin John; Matthes, Nikolas

    2018-02-15

    Systematic review. To elucidate how performance indicators are currently used in spine surgery. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has given significant traction to the idea that healthcare must provide value to the patient through the introduction of hospital value-based purchasing. The key to implementing this new paradigm is to measure this value notably through performance indicators. MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched for studies reporting the use of performance indicators specific to spine surgery. We followed the Prisma-P methodology for a systematic review for entries from January 1980 to July 2016. All full text articles were then reviewed to identify any measure of performance published within the article. This measure was then examined as per the three criteria of established standard, exclusion/risk adjustment, and benchmarking to determine if it constituted a performance indicator. The initial search yielded 85 results among which two relevant studies were identified. The extended search gave a total of 865 citations across databases among which 15 new articles were identified. The grey literature search provided five additional reports which in turn led to six additional articles. A total of 27 full text articles and reports were retrieved and reviewed. We were unable to identify performance indicators. The articles presenting a measure of performance were organized based on how many criteria they lacked. We further examined the next steps to be taken to craft the first performance indicator in spine surgery. The science of performance measurement applied to spine surgery is still in its infancy. Current outcome metrics used in clinical settings require refinement to become performance indicators. Current registry work is providing the necessary foundation, but requires benchmarking to truly measure performance. 1.

  11. RSA in Spine: A Review.

    PubMed

    Humadi, Ali; Dawood, Sulaf; Halldin, Klas; Freeman, Brian

    2017-12-01

    Systematic review of literature. This systematic review was conducted to investigate the accuracy of radiostereometric analysis (RSA), its assessment of spinal motion and disorders, and to investigate the limitations of this technique in spine assessment. Systematic review in all current literature to invesigate the role of RSA in spine. The results of this review concluded that RSA is a very powerful tool to detect small changes between 2 rigid bodies such as a vertebral segment. The technique is described for animal and human studies for cervical and lumbar spine and can be used to analyze range of motion, inducible displacement, and fusion of segments. However, there are a few disadvantages with the technique; RSA percutaneous procedure needs to be performed to implant the markers (and cannot be used preoperatively), one needs a specific knowledge to handle data and interpret the results, and is relatively time consuming and expensive. RSA should be looked at as a very powerful research instrument and there are many questions suitable for RSA studies.

  12. RSA in Spine: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Sulaf; Halldin, Klas; Freeman, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Systematic review of literature. Objectives: This systematic review was conducted to investigate the accuracy of radiostereometric analysis (RSA), its assessment of spinal motion and disorders, and to investigate the limitations of this technique in spine assessment. Methods: Systematic review in all current literature to invesigate the role of RSA in spine. Results: The results of this review concluded that RSA is a very powerful tool to detect small changes between 2 rigid bodies such as a vertebral segment. The technique is described for animal and human studies for cervical and lumbar spine and can be used to analyze range of motion, inducible displacement, and fusion of segments. However, there are a few disadvantages with the technique; RSA percutaneous procedure needs to be performed to implant the markers (and cannot be used preoperatively), one needs a specific knowledge to handle data and interpret the results, and is relatively time consuming and expensive. Conclusions: RSA should be looked at as a very powerful research instrument and there are many questions suitable for RSA studies. PMID:29238647

  13. Maxillofacial trauma - Underestimation of cervical spine injury.

    PubMed

    Reich, Waldemar; Surov, Alexey; Eckert, Alexander Walter

    2016-09-01

    Undiagnosed cervical spine injury can have devastating results. The aim of this study was to analyse patients with primary maxillofacial trauma and a concomitant cervical spine injury. It is hypothetised that cervical spine injury is predictable in maxillofacial surgery. A monocentric clinical study was conducted over a 10-year period to analyse patients with primary maxillofacial and associated cervical spine injuries. Demographic data, mechanism of injury, specific trauma and treatments provided were reviewed. Additionally a search of relevant international literature was conducted in PubMed by terms "maxillofacial" AND "cervical spine" AND "injury". Of 3956 patients, n = 3732 (94.3%) suffered from craniomaxillofacial injuries only, n = 174 (4.4%) from cervical spine injuries only, and n = 50 (1.3%) from both craniomaxillofacial and cervical spine injuries. In this study cohort the most prevalent craniofacial injuries were: n = 41 (44%) midfacial and n = 21 (22.6%) skull base fractures. Cervical spine injuries primarily affected the upper cervical spine column: n = 39 (58.2%) vs. n = 28 (41.8%). Only in 3 of 50 cases (6%), the cervical spine injury was diagnosed coincidentally, and the cervical spine column was under immobilised. The operative treatment rate for maxillofacial injuries was 36% (n = 18), and for cervical spine injuries 20% (n = 10). The overall mortality rate was 8% (n = 4). The literature search yielded only 12 papers (11 retrospective and monocentric cohort studies) and is discussed before our own results. In cases of apparently isolated maxillofacial trauma, maxillofacial surgeons should be aware of a low but serious risk of underestimating an unstable cervical spine injury. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons' Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Urrego, Diana; Troncoso, Julieta; Múnera, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1). It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans. PMID:26064916

  15. Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine (AIIS) and Subspine Hip Impingement.

    PubMed

    Carton, Patrick; Filan, David

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal morphology of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) and the subspine region of the acetabular rim are increasingly being recognised as a source of symptomatic extra-articular hip impingement. This review article aims to highlight important differences in the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and management of extra-articular hip impingement from both the AIIS and subspine bony regions, and the outcome following surgical intervention. A literature review was undertaken to examine the supporting evidence for AIIS and subspine hip impingement. A narrative account of the Author's professional experience in this area, including operative technique for arthroscopic correction, is also presented. Abnormal morphology of the AIIS and subspine region has been classified using cadaveric, radiological and arthroscopic means; the clinical presentation and operative treatment has been documented in several case series studies. Dual pathology is often present - recognition and treatment of both intra- and extra-articular components are necessary for good postoperative outcome. AIIS and sub-spine hip impingement should be considered as distinct pathological entities, which may also co-exist. Symptom relief can be expected following arthroscopic deformity correction with the treatment of concomitant intra-articular pathology. Failure to recognise and treat the extra-articular component may affect postoperative outcome. V.

  16. Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine (AIIS) and Subspine Hip Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Carton, Patrick; Filan, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Abnormal morphology of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) and the subspine region of the acetabular rim are increasingly being recognised as a source of symptomatic extra-articular hip impingement. This review article aims to highlight important differences in the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and management of extra-articular hip impingement from both the AIIS and subspine bony regions, and the outcome following surgical intervention. Methods A literature review was undertaken to examine the supporting evidence for AIIS and subspine hip impingement. A narrative account of the Author’s professional experience in this area, including operative technique for arthroscopic correction, is also presented. Results Abnormal morphology of the AIIS and subspine region has been classified using cadaveric, radiological and arthroscopic means; the clinical presentation and operative treatment has been documented in several case series studies. Dual pathology is often present - recognition and treatment of both intra- and extra-articular components are necessary for good postoperative outcome. Conclusions AIIS and sub-spine hip impingement should be considered as distinct pathological entities, which may also co-exist. Symptom relief can be expected following arthroscopic deformity correction with the treatment of concomitant intra-articular pathology. Failure to recognise and treat the extra-articular component may affect postoperative outcome. Level of evidence V. PMID:28066737

  17. From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galenko, P. K.; Alexandrov, D. V.

    2018-01-01

    Transport processes around phase interfaces, together with thermodynamic properties and kinetic phenomena, control the formation of dendritic patterns. Using the thermodynamic and kinetic data of phase interfaces obtained on the atomic scale, one can analyse the formation of a single dendrite and the growth of a dendritic ensemble. This is the result of recent progress in theoretical methods and computational algorithms calculated using powerful co