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Sample records for abnormal dna content

  1. An improved, non-isotopic method of screening cells from patients with abnormalities of sexual differentiation for Y chromosomal DNA content.

    PubMed Central

    Witt, M; Michalczak, K; Latos-Bielenska, A; Jaruzelska, J; Kuczora, I; Lopez, M

    1993-01-01

    The detection of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism in patients with abnormalities of sexual differentiation is of crucial diagnostic importance. Here we present application of a PCR based method of detection of alphoid repeats of Y chromosomal origin. The method detects 0.01% of male DNA on a female DNA background. Out of 28 patients studied, in all cases where the Y chromosome or a part of it containing centromeric sequences was present, a positive amplification signal of Y chromosomal alphoid repeats was detected. In five cases the Y origin of marker chromosomes was diagnosed. The pattern of amplification signal distribution of the SRY gene was identical to that of Y specific alphoid primers, which confirms applicability of this method in the molecular diagnostic laboratory. The other diagnostic advantage is the ability to use dried blood specimens as an easy to handle and efficient source of DNA. Images PMID:8487276

  2. An improved, non-isotopic method of screening cells from patients with abnormalities of sexual differentiation for Y chromosomal DNA content.

    PubMed

    Witt, M; Michalczak, K; Latos-Bielenska, A; Jaruzelska, J; Kuczora, I; Lopez, M

    1993-04-01

    The detection of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism in patients with abnormalities of sexual differentiation is of crucial diagnostic importance. Here we present application of a PCR based method of detection of alphoid repeats of Y chromosomal origin. The method detects 0.01% of male DNA on a female DNA background. Out of 28 patients studied, in all cases where the Y chromosome or a part of it containing centromeric sequences was present, a positive amplification signal of Y chromosomal alphoid repeats was detected. In five cases the Y origin of marker chromosomes was diagnosed. The pattern of amplification signal distribution of the SRY gene was identical to that of Y specific alphoid primers, which confirms applicability of this method in the molecular diagnostic laboratory. The other diagnostic advantage is the ability to use dried blood specimens as an easy to handle and efficient source of DNA.

  3. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  4. Radiation-induced DNA content variability in mouse sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Gledhill, B.L.; van Dilla, M.A.; Lake, S.; Wyrobek, A.J.

    1983-09-01

    Mouse sperm collected from the cauda epididymidis 35 days after acute testicular x-ray exposure and fluorescently stained for DNA show dose-dependent increases in the coefficient of variation (CV) of flow cytometrically obtained fluorescence distributions. By comparing dose-response curves obtained with three protocols which overcome the optical and cytochemical difficulties of sperm measurement in different ways we conclude the response is due to x-ray-induced DNA content variability. Computer modeling of the shapes of the fluorescence distributions show that at 600 rad 30 to 40% of the sperm have abnormal DNA content. Some have errors as large as two whole chromosomes, but it is not clear whether they are due to whole chromosome nondisjunction or a finer fragmentation of the genome. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene and mitomycin C cause no detectable DNA content variability. We conclude mouse sperm DNA content measurements are not sensitive to small amounts of aneuploidy and as such will only be useful in detecting agents that produce substantial DNA content variability. Another animal with a smaller number of chromosomes might be more favorable. These sperm measurement techniques may find additional application in other areas of reproductive biology, such as the determination of the relative numbers of X and Y chromosome-bearing sperm in semen that may be artifically enriched in one population.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of DNA packaging in individual human sperm cells distinguishes normal from abnormal cells.

    PubMed

    Huser, Thomas; Orme, Christine A; Hollars, Christopher W; Corzett, Michele H; Balhorn, Rod

    2009-05-01

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  7. Radiation-induced DNA content variability in mouse sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Lake, S.; Wyrobek, A.J.

    1983-09-01

    Mouse sperm collected from the cauda epididymidis 35 days after acute testicular X-ray exposure and fluorescently stained for DNA show dose-dependent increases in the coefficient of variation (CV) of flow cytometrically obtained fluorescence distributions. By comparing dose-response curves obtained with three protocols which overcome the optical and cytochemical difficulties of sperm measurement in different ways we conclude the response is due to X-ray-induced DNA content variability. In the range between 0 and 600 rad the dose dependence of the square of CV of the DNA content variability, delta CV2D, is described by delta CV2D . Bx + Cx2, with 0 less than or equal to B less than or equal to 0.23 X 10(-2) and C . (0.44 +/- 0.06) X 10(-4). The dose x is measured in rad and delta CVD is expressed in percent. Computer modeling of the shapes of the fluorescence distributions show that at 600 rad 30 to 40% of the sperm have abnormal DNA content. Some have errors as large as two whole chromosomes, but it is not clear whether they are due to whole chromosome nondisjunction or a finer fragmentation of the genome. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene and mitomycin C cause no detectable DNA content variability. We conclude mouse sperm DNA content measurements are not sensitive to small amounts of aneuploidy and as such will only be useful in detecting agents that produce substantial DNA content variability. Another animal with a smaller number of chromosomes might be more favorable. These sperm measurement techniques may find additional application in other areas of reproductive biology, such as the determination of the relative numbers of X and Y chromosome-bearing sperm in semen that may be artificially enriched in one population.

  8. Loss of maintenance DNA methylation results in abnormal DNA origin firing during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Mayumi; Shimada, Midori; Nishiyama, Atsuya; Johmura, Yoshikazu; Le Tallec, Benoît; Debatisse, Michelle; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2016-01-22

    The mammalian maintenance methyltransferase DNMT1 [DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1] mediates the inheritance of the DNA methylation pattern during replication. Previous studies have shown that depletion of DNMT1 causes a severe growth defect and apoptosis in differentiated cells. However, the detailed mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here we show that conditional ablation of Dnmt1 in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in an aberrant DNA replication program showing an accumulation of late-S phase replication and causing severely defective growth. Furthermore, we found that the catalytic activity and replication focus targeting sequence of DNMT1 are required for a proper DNA replication program. Taken together, our findings suggest that the maintenance of DNA methylation by DNMT1 plays a critical role in proper regulation of DNA replication in mammalian cells.

  9. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A.; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q.; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer. PMID:26554006

  10. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-11-24

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer.

  11. Abnormal ion content, hydration and granule expansion of the secretory granules from cystic fibrosis airway glandular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baconnais, S.; Delavoie, F. |; Zahm, J.M.; Milliot, M.; Castillon, N.; Terryn, C.; Banchet, V.; Michel, J.; Danos, O.; Merten, M.; Chinet, T.; Zierold, K.; Bonnet, N.; Puchelle, E. , E-Mail: edith.puchelle@univ-reims.fr; Balossier, G.

    2005-10-01

    The absence or decreased expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) induces increased Na{sup +} absorption and hyperabsorption of the airway surface liquid (ASL) resulting in a dehydrated and hyperviscous ASL. Although the implication of abnormal airway submucosal gland function has been suggested, the ion and water content in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) glandular secretory granules, before exocytosis, is unknown. We analyzed, in non-CF and CF human airway glandular cell lines (MM-39 and KM4, respectively), the ion content in the secretory granules by electron probe X-ray microanalysis and the water content by quantitative dark field imaging on freeze-dried cryosections. We demonstrated that the ion content (Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, P, S and Cl{sup -}) is significantly higher and the water content significantly lower in secretory granules from the CF cell line compared to the non-CF cell line. Using videomicroscopy, we observed that the secretory granule expansion was deficient in CF glandular cells. Transfection of CF cells with CFTR cDNA or inhibition of non-CF cells with CFTR{sub inh}-172, respectively restored or decreased the water content and granule expansion, in parallel with changes in ion content. We hypothesize that the decreased water and increased ion content in glandular secretory granules may contribute to the dehydration and increased viscosity of the ASL in CF.

  12. DNA content and chromosomal composition of malignant human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bigner, S H; Bjerkvig, R; Laerum, O D

    1985-11-01

    A short review is given on DNA aberrations and chromosomal composition of malignant human gliomas. By flow cytometric DNA analysis, a wide range of different ploidies has been reported in biopsied gliomas, from diploid to strongly aneuploid nuclear DNA. However, with the preparation and analysis methods used so far, no clear relationship between the type of ploidy and histology or prognosis has been established. A high proportion of glioblastomas is near-diploid, indicating a high degree of biologic malignancy is not necessarily connected to aberration of the nuclear DNA content. It is possible that improved methods giving a higher degree of resolution will allow separation of the near-diploid populations of malignant human gliomas from normal diploid cells and permit the detection of subpopulations with small differences from the dominant DNA mode. Chromosomal studies of malignant gliomas have confirmed that the majority of them have near-diploid stemlines. These populations are seldom normal diploid, however, as both numerical and structural abnormalities are usually present. In addition, chromosomal analyses have shown that when gliomas are bimodal, the polyploid populations are usually doubled versions of the near-diploid ones. In contrast to the near-diploid populations that characterize biopsied malignant gliomas, both FCM studies and karyotyping have demonstrated that permanent cultured cell lines derived from malignant gliomas are usually near-triploid or near-tetraploid. Sequential karyotypic studies of these tumors from biopsy through establishment in vitro have shown an evolutionary pattern consisting of doubling of the original stemline, followed by gains or losses of individual chromosomes with new marker formation in late culture. Evaluation of biopsied malignant gliomas by karyotyping has also demonstrated that subgroups of them are characterized by specific numerical and structural deviations. These groupings may prove useful in predicting prognosis

  13. Coverage of child maltreatment in abnormal psychology textbooks: Reviewing the adequacy of the content.

    PubMed

    Wilgus, Sam J; Packer, Mary M; Lile-King, Rachel; Miller-Perrin, Cindy L; Brand, Bethany L

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal psychology courses introduce undergraduate students to the range, causes, and treatments of psychological disorders. These courses present important opportunities to instruct students about disorders and treatments associated with childhood maltreatment (CM) as well as its prevalence. Little research has examined the adequacy with which abnormal psychology textbooks present information about CM. The present study reviewed the CM content of 10 abnormal psychology textbooks. The content was assessed in terms of the number of times CM was mentioned, the number of psychological disorders linked to CM, and the number of CM-related research citations. In addition, the authors conducted a content analysis to examine the significance, depth of detail, and organizational structure of the information provided within the sections of text addressing CM. There were significant differences in scores and the accuracy of coverage of CM across textbooks. Most of the textbooks lack key information on CM. The information presented in many textbooks is not consistent with current research and is overly focused on controversies. These findings are concerning because research has linked many psychological disorders and problematic outcomes to CM, but this information is not adequately conveyed to students via abnormal psychology textbooks. The authors make recommendations for improving the coverage of CM in abnormal psychology textbooks.

  14. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  15. Content and persistence of extracellular DNA in native soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Anderson, Traute-Heidi; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    The long-term persistence of soil extracellular DNA is questionable because of high potential activity of nucleases produced by soil microorganisms. By the other hand, the relative persistence of DNA-like biopolymers could be due to their adsorption on clay minerals and humus substances in soil. High-specific and ultra sensitive reagent PicoGreenTM (Molecular Probes) permits the quantitative assessment of microbial dsDNA in diluted soil extracts giving a good tool for tracing the DNA fate in soil. Our goal was to determine intracellular and extracellular DNA content in cambisol (loamy sand) and in chernozem (silty loam) soils and to investigate the possible adsorption and degradation of extracellular DNA in soil. Optimized procedure of mechanical and enzymatic destruction of cell walls was used for direct extraction of microbial DNA with Tris-EDTA buffer (Blagodatskaya et al., 2003). Extracellular dsDNA was determined in distilled water and in Tris-EDTA extracts without enzymatic or mechanical treatments. DNA content was determined after addition of PicoGreen to diluted soil extracts. Degradation of extracellular DNA was traced during 24 h incubation of 2 µg lambda-phage DNA in soil. Possible DNA adsorption to soil matrix was determined by recovery of lambda -phage DNA added to autoclaved soil. Extracellular dsDNA was absent in water extracts of both soils. The content of extracellular dsDNA extracted by Tris-EDTA buffer was 0.46 µg/g in chernozem and 1.59 µg/g in cambisol amounting 0.43 and 2.8% of total dsDNA content in these soils, respectively. 100% and 64.8% of added extracellular lambda -phage dsDNA was found in cambisol and chernozem soils, respectively, in 5 h after application. 39% and 73.5% of added DNA disappeared in cambisol and in chernozem, respectively, during 24 h incubation. Degradation rate of extracellular DNA depended on microbial biomass content, which was 2.5 times higher in chernozem as compared to cambisol. Maximum adsorption of DNA by

  16. Repetitive DNA in three Gramineae species with low DNA content.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, V G; Ranjekar, P K

    1980-08-01

    The genomes of three Gramineae species, namely finger millet (Eleusine coracana), pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum) and rice (Oryza sativa) are characterized by studying their DNA denaturation-reassociation properties. The reassociation kinetics measurement of the sonicated DNA (500--700 nucleotide pairs) indicate the presence of a heterogeneous, repetitive DNA fraction accounting for 49--54% of the total DNA in all three species. From the cot 1/2 value of the slow reassociating DNA, the genome size is estimated as 3.0 X 10(8) np in finger millet, 7.8 X 10(8) np in pearl millet and 9.0 X 10(8) np in rice. The melting patterns of the total DNAs reveal Tm value of 88.6 degrees C in the case of pearl millet and 85.0 degrees C in the case of finger millet and rice. Total repetitive and cot 1.0 DNA fractions in all the three species are isolated and their melting properties are compared with those of respective sonicated DNAs. In finger millet, the Tm values of cot 25 and cot 1 fractions are lower by 10.8 degrees C and 12.8 degrees C, respectively, than that of sonicated DNA and thus exhibit the presence of a base pair mismatch in the range of 10.8--12.8%. In rice, the Tm values of the fractions cot 50 and cot 1 are slightly lower than that of sonicated DNA and reveal a nucleotide mismatching of only 1.8--3.8%. In the case of pearl millet cot 10 DNA fraction a high-melting DNA component (Tm = 92 degrees C) representing 12% of the total cot 10 DNA and a low-melting component with a Tm of 78 degrees C are present. In cot 1 DNA fraction of pearl millet the proportion of the high-melting component is 35% and it has a Tm or 94.8 degrees C. Optical reassociation studies of cot 1.0 DNA fractions have revealed the presence of two kinetically distinct components, namely minor fast-reassociating and major slow-reassociating, having complexities in the range of 330--390 np and 1.28 X 10(5)--6.0 X 10(5) np, respectively in pearl millet and rice and only one DNA fraction with an

  17. Spatial ordering and abnormal optical activity of DNA liquid-crystalline dispersion particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, S. V.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    2016-12-01

    In our work, we investigate physicochemical and optical properties of double-strand DNA dispersions. The study of these properties is of biological interest, because it allows one to describe the characteristics of certain classes of chromosomes and DNA containing viruses. The package pattern of DNA molecules in the dispersions particles (DP) is examined. The consideration of the DNA liquid-crystalline DP optical activity based on the theory of electromagnetic wave absorption by large molecular aggregates has been performed. The investigation is also focused on various effects induced by the interaction between biological active compounds and DNA in the content of liquid-crystalline DP.

  18. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Detection of abnormally high amygdalin content in food by an enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cho, A-Yeon; Yi, Kye Sook; Rhim, Jung-Hyo; Kim, Kyu-Il; Park, Jae-Young; Keum, Eun-Hee; Chung, Junho; Oh, Sangsuk

    2006-04-30

    Amygdalin is a cyanogenic glycoside compound which is commonly found in the pits of many fruits and raw nuts. Although amygdalin itself is not toxic, it can release cyanide (CN) after hydrolysis when the pits and nuts are crushed, moistened and incubated, possibly within the gastrointestinal tract. CN reversibly inhibits cellular oxidizing enzymes and cyanide poisoning generates a range of clinical symptoms. As some pits and nuts may contain unusually high levels of amygdalin such that there is a sufficient amount to induce critical CN poisoning in humans, the detection of abnormal content of amygdalin in those pits and nuts can be a life-saving measure. Although there are various methods to detect amygdalin in food extracts, an enzyme immunoassay has not been developed for this purpose. In this study we immunized New Zealand White rabbits with an amygdalin-KLH (keyhole limpet hemocyanin) conjugate and succeeded in raising anti-sera reactive to amygdalin, proving that amygdalin can behave as a hapten in rabbits. Using this polyclonal antibody, we developed a competition enzyme immunoassay for determination of amygdalin concentration in aqueous solutions. This technique was able to effectively detect abnormally high amygdalin content in various seeds and nuts. In conclusion, we proved that enzyme immunoassay can be used to determine the amount of amygdalin in food extracts, which will allow automated analysis with high throughput.

  20. Analyzing Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA Content by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Boye, Erik; Anda, Silje; Rothe, Christiane; Stokke, Trond; Grallert, Beáta

    2016-06-01

    Flow cytometry can be used to measure the DNA content of individual cells. The data are usually presented as DNA histograms that can be used to examine the cells' progression through the cell cycle. Under standard growth conditions, fission yeast cells do not complete cytokinesis until after G1 phase; therefore, DNA histograms show one major peak representing cells in G1 (2×1C DNA) and G2 phase (1×2C DNA). By analysis of the duration of the fluorescence signal as well as the intensity of the DNA-related signal, it is possible to discriminate between cells in M/G1, S, and G2 This protocol describes how to prepare cells for flow cytometry and analyze them. We also describe the application of barcoding for more accurate comparison of samples.

  1. Estimates of nuclear DNA content in red algal lineages

    PubMed Central

    Kapraun, Donald F.; Freshwater, D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The red algae are an evolutionarily ancient group of predominantly marine organisms with an estimated 6000 species. Consensus higher-level molecular phylogenies support a basal split between the unicellular Cyanidiophytina and morphologically diverse Rhodophytina, the later subphylum containing most red algal species. The Rhodophytina is divided into six classes, of which five represent early diverging lineages of generally uninucleate species, whose evolutionary relationships are poorly resolved. The remaining species compose the large (27 currently recognized orders), morphologically diverse and typically multinucleate Florideophyceae. Nuclear DNA content estimates have been published for <1 % of the described red algae. The present investigation summarizes the state of our knowledge and expands our coverage of DNA content information from 196 isolates of red algae. Methodology The DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and RBC (chicken erythrocytes) standards were used to estimate 2C values with static microspectrophotometry. Principal results Nuclear DNA contents are reported for 196 isolates of red algae, almost doubling the number of estimates available for these organisms. Present results also confirm the reported DNA content range of 0.1–2.8 pg, with species of Ceramiales, Nemaliales and Palmariales containing apparently polyploid genomes with 2C = 2.8, 2.3 and 2.8 pg, respectively. Conclusions Early diverging red algal lineages are characterized by relatively small 2C DNA contents while a wide range of 2C values is found within the derived Florideophyceae. An overall correlation between phylogenetic placement and 2C DNA content is not apparent; however, genome size data are available for only a small portion of red algae. Current data do support polyploidy and aneuploidy as pervasive features of red algal genome evolution. PMID:22479676

  2. Influence of light on DNA content of Helianthus annuus Linnaeus.

    PubMed

    Price, H J; Johnston, J S

    1996-10-01

    Mean nuclear 2C DNA content (C equaling haploid DNA per nucleus) of the first leaf of the sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., is influenced by the quality and the quantity of light. Seedlings of two inbred lines, RHA 299 and RHA 271 were germinated and grown in controlled environmental conditions. Lighting was adjusted to provide different combinations of photon flux densities and red to far red (R:FR) ratios. At R:FR = 5.8 and photon flux densities of 170 mumol.m-2.s-1, 200 mumol.m-2.s-1, and 230 mumol.m-2.s-1, DNA content remained high and relatively constant (x = 6.97 pg for RHA 271 and x = 7.32 pg for RHA 299). When the photon flux density range (R:FR = 5.8) was elevated to 350 mumol.m-2.s-1, 410 mumol.m-2.s-1, and 470 mumol.m-2.s-1, mean DNA content was reduced to 6.23 pg (RHA 271) and 6.46 pg (RHA 299). At R:FR = 1.5, mean DNA content was consistently high (7.2-7.9 pg) only at the lowest photon flux density of 170 mumol.m-2.s-1. Significant decreases in DNA content (< or = 12%) were observed at photon flux densities of 200 mumol.m-2.s-1 and 230 mumol.m-2.s-1. At the higher photon flux densities (350 mumol.m-2.s-1, 410 mumol.m-2.s-1, and 470 mumol.m-2.s-1) and R:RF = 1.5, the plants had extremely low DNA contents (mean x = 3.36 pg for RHA 271 and 3.41 pg for RHA 299) and high between-plant variance. The instability of DNA content, particularly for plants grown under light that is far red rich, suggests that phytochromes may be involved in regulating DNA content of the sunflower.

  3. Blood Cell Mitochondrial DNA Content and Premature Ovarian Aging

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca; Arosio, M.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Biondi, M.; Bione, S.; Bruni, V.; Brigante, C.; Cannavo`, S.; Cavallo, L.; Cisternino, M.; Colombo, I.; Corbetta, S.; Crosignani, P.G.; D'Avanzo, M.G.; Dalpra, L.; Danesino, C.; Di Battista, E.; Di Prospero, F.; Donti, E.; Einaudi, S.; Falorni, A.; Foresta, C.; Fusi, F.; Garofalo, N.; Giotti, I.; Lanzi, R.; Larizza, D.; Locatelli, N.; Loli, P.; Madaschi, S.; Maghnie, M.; Maiore, S.; Mantero, F.; Marozzi, A.; Marzotti, S.; Migone, N.; Nappi, R.; Palli, D.; Patricelli, M.G.; Pisani, C.; Prontera, P.; Petraglia, F.; Radetti, G.; Renieri, A.; Ricca, I.; Ripamonti, A.; Rossetti, R.; Russo, G.; Russo, S.; Tonacchera, M.; Toniolo, D.; Torricelli, F.; Vegetti, W.; Villa, N.; Vineis, P.; Wasniewsk, M.; Zuffardi, O.

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction. PMID:22879975

  4. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Marco; Somigliana, Edgardo; Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction.

  5. Abnormal expression of DNA methyltransferases and genomic imprinting in cloned goat fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yongjie; Deng, Mingtian; Zhang, Guomin; Ren, Caifang; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a useful way to produce cloned animals. However, SCNT animals exhibit DNA methylation and genomic imprinting abnormalities. These abnormalities may be due to the faulty epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells. To investigate the consequence of SCNT on the genomic imprinting and global methylation in the donor cells, growth patterns and apoptosis of cloned goat fibroblast cells (CGFCs) at passage 7 were determined. Growth patterns in CGFCs were similar to the controls; however, the growth rate in log phase was lower and apoptosis in CGFCs were significantly higher (P < 0.01). In addition, quantitative expression analysis of three DNA methyltransferases (Dnmt) and two imprinted genes (H19, IGF2R) was conducted in CGFCs: Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b expression was significantly reduced (P < 0.01), and H19 expression was decreased sixfold (P < 0.01); however, the expression of Dnmt3a was unaltered and IGF2R expression was significantly increased (P < 0.05). Finally, we used bisulfite sequencing PCR to compare the DNA methylation patterns in differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of H19 and IGF2R. The DMRs of H19 (P < 0.01) and IGF2R (P < 0.01) were both highly methylated in CGFCs. These results indicate that the global genome might be hypomethylated. Moreover, there is an aberrant expression of imprinted genes and DMR methylation in CGFCs.

  6. Correlation between sperm ultrastructure in infertile patients with abnormal sperm morphology and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    He, M; Tan, L

    2015-12-15

    This study explored the correlation between sperm ultrastructure in infertile patients with abnormal sperm morphology and DNA damage. Three unusual sperm morphologies were selected for the experimental group namely case 1 (95% headless sperm), case 2 (98% headless sperm), and case 3 (100% headless sperm), and the control group consisted of 2 subjects (20 and 15% headless sperm). For case 1, the patient was negative for sexually transmitted diseases and had normal semen plasma biochemistry, reproductive hormones, peripheral blood chromosomes, and azoospermia factor (AZF). The aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes was 0.6%, and DNA damage index of sperm nuclei was 84.4%. The partner of this patient did not get pregnant after artificial reproductive technology assistance. For case 2, the aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes was 0.8% and DNA damage index of sperm nuclei was 95%. This patient and his spouse did not choose assisted reproduction. For case 3, reproductive hormones, peripheral blood chromosomes and AZF were normal and the aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes was 0.2%. The wife of this patient gave birth to a healthy baby after ova removal, fertilization and transplantation. For the control group, the aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes and DNA damage index of sperm nuclei were approximately 0.3 and 30%, respectively. To sum up, sperm ultrastructure of infertile patients suffering from unusual sperm morphology is associated with DNA damage to some extent and can cause infertility. However, pregnancy is still possible through intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  7. Intra‐ and Interspecific Variation in DNA Content in Cistus (Cistaceae)

    PubMed Central

    ELLUL, PHILIPPE; BOSCAIU, MONICA; VICENTE, OSCAR; MORENO, VICENTE; ROSSELLÓ, JOSEP A.

    2002-01-01

    Flow cytometry, using propidium iodide and 4′,6‐diamidano‐2-phenylindole staining, was used to estimate the nuclear DNA content (2C) and the proportion of A–T base pairs in 16 species of the Mediterranean genus Cistus. Genome sizes were shown to be constant within species, since no significant intraspecific variation in 2C DNA content was detected. At the genus level, up to about 1·5‐fold differences in absolute DNA amounts were observed, ranging from 3·92 pg in C. crispus to 5·88 pg in C. monspeliensis. The (AT) : (GC) ratio was close to 1, and was similar for all species examined, ranging from 47·87 % A–T content in C. clusii, to 50·67 % in C. populifolius. Pink‐flowered species (subgenus Cistus) had lower DNA amounts than white‐flowered species (subgenera Leucocistus and Halimioides). However, the distribution of DNA amounts in Cistus appeared to be continuous and did not permit a clear separation of infra‐generic ranks in the genus. PMID:12234146

  8. DNA Repair Is Associated with Information Content in Bacteria, Archaea, and DNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Sharlene; Carela, Miguelina; Garcia-Gonzalez, Aurian; Gines, Mariela; Vicens, Luis; Cruet, Ricardo; Massey, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    The concept of a "proteomic constraint" proposes that DNA repair capacity is positively correlated with the information content of a genome, which can be approximated to the size of the proteome (P). This in turn implies that DNA repair genes are more likely to be present in genomes with larger values of P. This stands in contrast to the common assumption that informational genes have a core function and so are evenly distributed across organisms. We examined the presence/absence of 18 DNA repair genes in bacterial genomes. A positive relationship between gene presence and P was observed for 17 genes in the total dataset, and 16 genes when only nonintracellular bacteria were examined. A marked reduction of DNA repair genes was observed in intracellular bacteria, consistent with their reduced value of P. We also examined archaeal and DNA virus genomes, and show that the presence of DNA repair genes is likewise related to a larger value of P. In addition, the products of the bacterial genes mutY, vsr, and ndk, involved in the correction of GC/AT mutations, are strongly associated with reduced genome GC content. We therefore propose that a reduction in information content leads to a loss of DNA repair genes and indirectly to a reduction in genome GC content in bacteria by exposure to the underlying AT mutation bias. The reduction in P may also indirectly lead to the increase in substitution rates observed in intracellular bacteria via loss of DNA repair genes.

  9. DNA methylation detection based on difference of base content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shinobu; Ohtsuka, Keiichi; Honda, Satoshi; Sato, Yusuke; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2016-04-01

    Methylation frequently occurs in cytosines of CpG sites to regulate gene expression. The identification of aberrant methylation of certain genes is important for cancer marker analysis. The aim of this study was to determine the methylation frequency in DNA samples of unknown length and/or concentration. Unmethylated cytosine is known to be converted to thymine following bisulfite treatment and subsequent PCR. For this reason, the AT content in DNA increases with an increasing number of methylation sites. In this study, the fluorescein-carrying bis-acridinyl peptide (FKA) molecule was used for the detection of methylation frequency. FKA contains fluorescein and two acridine moieties, which together allow for the determination of the AT content of double-stranded DNA fragments. Methylated and unmethylated human genomes were subjected to bisulfide treatment and subsequent PCR using primers specific for the CFTR, CDH4, DBC1, and NPY genes. The AT content in the resulting PCR products was estimated by FKA, and AT content estimations were found to be in good agreement with those determined by DNA sequencing. This newly developed method may be useful for determining methylation frequencies of many PCR products by measuring the fluorescence in samples excited at two different wavelengths.

  10. Abnormal XPD-induced nuclear receptor transactivation in DNA repair disorders: trichothiodystrophy and xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Khan, Sikandar G; Tamura, Deborah; Ueda, Takahiro; Boyle, Jennifer; Compe, Emmanuel; Egly, Jean-Marc; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-08-01

    XPD (ERCC2) is a DNA helicase involved in nucleotide excision repair and in transcription as a structural bridge tying the transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) core with the cdk-activating kinase complex, which phosphorylates nuclear receptors. Mutations in XPD are associated with several different phenotypes, including trichothiodystrophy (TTD), with sulfur-deficient brittle hair, bone defects, and developmental abnormalities without skin cancer, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), with pigmentary abnormalities and increased skin cancer, or XP/TTD with combined features, including skin cancer. We describe the varied clinical features and mutations in nine patients examined at the National Institutes of Health who were compound heterozygotes for XPD mutations but had different clinical phenotypes: four TTD, three XP, and two combined XP/TTD. We studied TFIIH-dependent transactivation by nuclear receptor for vitamin D (VDR) and thyroid in cells from these patients. The vitamin D stimulation ratio of CYP24 and osteopontin was associated with specific pairs of mutations (reduced in 5, elevated in 1) but not correlated with distinct clinical phenotypes. Thyroid receptor stimulation ratio for KLF9 was not significantly different from normal. XPD mutations frequently were associated with abnormal VDR stimulation in compound heterozygote patients with TTD, XP, or XP/TTD.

  11. Markovian language model of the DNA and its information content

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, S.; Baptista, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a Markovian memoryless model for the DNA that simplifies enormously the complexity of it. We encode nucleotide sequences into symbolic sequences, called words, from which we establish meaningful length of words and groups of words that share symbolic similarities. Interpreting a node to represent a group of similar words and edges to represent their functional connectivity allows us to construct a network of the grammatical rules governing the appearance of groups of words in the DNA. Our model allows us to predict the transition between groups of words in the DNA with unprecedented accuracy, and to easily calculate many informational quantities to better characterize the DNA. In addition, we reduce the DNA of known bacteria to a network of only tens of nodes, show how our model can be used to detect similar (or dissimilar) genes in different organisms, and which sequences of symbols are responsible for most of the information content of the DNA. Therefore, the DNA can indeed be treated as a language, a Markovian language, where a ‘word’ is an element of a group, and its grammar represents the rules behind the probability of transitions between any two groups. PMID:26909179

  12. Abnormal DNA methylation in the lumbar spinal cord following chronic constriction injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lin, Zhi-Ping; Zheng, Hui-Zhe; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Zong-Luan; Chen, Yan; You, Yi-Sheng; Yang, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain is complex and not clearly understood. Glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD 67) is a key synthetic enzyme for the main inhibitory transmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and diminishes in the spinal dorsal horn in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). GAD 67 is coded by gene GAD 1. DNA methylation can regulate the expression of GAD 67 by regulating the methylation of GAD 1 promoter in the psychotic brain. DNA methylation is primarily mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and methyl-DNA binding domain proteins (MBDs). In this study, in order to discover whether DNA methylation regulates GAD 67 expression in the spinal cord in CCI rats and is involved in neuropathic pain, we examined mRNA levels of DNMTs, MBDs and GAD 67 with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and methylation of GAD 1 promoter with Pyromark CpG Assays in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. Our results showed that DNMT3a, DNMT3b and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) expression increased, MBD2 expression decreased, and DNMT1, MBD1 and MBD3 expression hardly changed in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. GAD 67 expression decreased, and methylation of GAD 1 promoter increased in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. These results indicate that decreased GAD 67 may be associated with increased GAD 1 promoter methylation, which may be mediated by DNMT3a, DNMT3b, MeCP2 and MBD2 in CCI rats. These indicate that abnormal DNA methylation may be highly involved in CCI-induced neuropathic pain.

  13. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage

  14. The Nuclear DNA Content and Genetic Diversity of Lampetra morii

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinyu; Meng, Wenbin; Wu, Fenfang; Xu, Anlong; Chen, Shangwu; Huang, Shengfeng

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear DNA content and genetic diversity of a river lamprey, the Korean lamprey Lampetra morii, which is distributed in the northeast of China. L. morii spends its whole life cycle in fresh water, and its adult size is relatively small (~160 mm long) compared with that of other lampreys. The haploid nuclear DNA content of L. morii is 1.618 pg (approximately 1.582 Gb) in germline cells, and there is ~15% germline DNA loss in somatic cells. These values are significantly smaller than those of Petromyzon marinus, a lamprey with a published draft genome. The chromosomes of L. morii are small and acrocentric, with a diploid modal number of 2n = 132, lower than some other lampreys. Sequence and AFLP analyses suggest that the allelic polymorphism rate (~0.14% based on examined nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences) of L. morii is much lower than that (~2%) of P. marinus. Phylogenetic analysis based on a mitochondrial DNA fragment confirms that L. morii belongs to the genus Lampetra, which, together with the genus Lethenteron, forms a sister group to P. marinus. These genetic background data are valuable for subsequent genetic and genomic research on L. morii. PMID:27388621

  15. Screen for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes in mouse embryonic stem cells identifies a model for succinyl-CoA ligase deficiency and mtDNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    Donti, Taraka R.; Stromberger, Carmen; Ge, Ming; Eldin, Karen W.; Craigen, William J.; Graham, Brett H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase/ligase (SCS), a component of the citric acid cycle, are associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, elevation of methylmalonic acid (MMA), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. A FACS-based retroviral-mediated gene trap mutagenesis screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes identified a gene trap allele of Sucla2 (Sucla2SAβgeo), which was used to generate transgenic mice. Sucla2 encodes the ADP-specific β-subunit isoform of SCS. Sucla2SAβgeo homozygotes exhibited recessive lethality, with most mutants dying late in gestation (e18.5). Mutant placenta and embryonic (e17.5) brain, heart and muscle showed varying degrees of mtDNA depletion (20–60%). However, there was no mtDNA depletion in mutant liver, where the gene is not normally expressed. Elevated levels of MMA were observed in embryonic brain. SCS-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated a 50% reduction in mtDNA content compared with wild-type MEFs. The mtDNA depletion resulted in reduced steady state levels of mtDNA encoded proteins and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. mtDNA content could be restored by reintroduction of Sucla2. This mouse model of SCS deficiency and mtDNA depletion promises to provide insights into the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases with mtDNA depletion and into the biology of mtDNA maintenance. In addition, this report demonstrates the power of a genetic screen that combines gene trap mutagenesis and FACS analysis in mouse ES cells to identify mitochondrial phenotypes and to develop animal models of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24271779

  16. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential.

  17. Nuclear DNA content variation and evolution in liverworts.

    PubMed

    Bainard, Jillian D; Forrest, Laura L; Goffinet, Bernard; Newmaster, Steven G

    2013-09-01

    Across embryophytes there is a significant range in DNA content, both in regards to genome size (total DNA in an unreduced chromosome complement) and degree of endoreduplication (when DNA replication not followed by division resulting in various ploidy levels within the same individual). However, there is little information available on DNA content evolution in liverworts, the likely sister group to all other living plants. This study seeks to detect a phylogenetic structure in the variation in genome size and degree of endopolyploidy within liverworts. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that shifts in breeding systems and genome size are correlated, as polyploidy is suggested to be a possible mechanism for the evolution of monoecy in liverworts and could therefore be associated with larger genome sizes. Genome size was determined for 67 liverwort species from 33 families using flow cytometry. Estimates for 48 species and 16 families are new to science. A phylogeny was reconstructed using the plastid gene rbcL. Over all taxa analyzed, there was a considerable range in genome size estimates with 1C-values from 0.27 pg (Jungermannia rubra) to 20.46 pg (Phyllothallia fuegiana). Large genome sizes were also found in the Haplomitriopsida. None of the liverwort species showed evidence of endopolyploidy. Although some taxa may be polyploids, a correlation between shifts in genome size and breeding system is lacking. Importantly, genome size variation in liverworts exhibits strong phylogenetic signal (Pagel's λ=0.99955).

  18. Normal human oral keratinocytes demonstrate abnormal DNA end joining activity during replicative senescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mo K; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Yip, Felix K; Park, No-Hee

    2005-04-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for the maintenance of cellular genetic integrity. DSBs are repaired by cellular end joining activity, which could proceed with varying degrees of accuracy. Abnormal end joining may lead to an accumulation of mutations and contribute to genetic instability and cellular aging. In the present study, we compared the efficiency and accuracy of end joining activities in exponentially replicating and senescing normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). We developed an in vitro end joining assay utilizing a plasmid linearized with a unique EcoR I or EcoR V restriction site. The efficiency of end joining was determined by PCR with primers that could amplify the fragment containing the end joining site. The accuracy of end joining was assessed by determining whether the original EcoR I site was restored after end joining. Both replicating and senescing cultures of NHOK yielded a similar level of end joining efficiency, which was noted by the similar intensity of PCR amplification. However, the frequency of end joining errors was significantly elevated in NHOK during replicative senescence. Senescing NHOK could thus accumulate abnormal end joining products, which might contribute to cellular aging and cancer.

  19. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  20. Nuclear DNA content analysis of plant seeds by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska, Elwira

    2006-02-01

    Procedures describing the utilization of seeds or their parts for flow cytometric determination of plant ploidy and endopolyploidy, genome size, and cell cycle activity are presented. The methods have been developed for a single-fluorescence-parameter flow cytometer, equipped with light sources for 488-nm and UV-light illumination. The procedures presented in this unit utilize the two most widely used fluorochromes for plant DNA content analysis, propidium iodide (PI) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). These methods provide an alternative to estimation of DNA content based on the fluorescence of DNA in cell nuclei isolated from plant leaves. In some instances seeds are more suitable for analysis than leaves, e.g., when plant material must be transported for a long distances or stored for prolonged periods before flow cytometric analysis, or when leaves contain fluorochrome-staining inhibitors. In addition, flow cytometric determination of nuclear replication stages in seeds gives information about their physiological status (e.g., maturity, advancement of germination), which is valuable to seed producers and technologists.

  1. Student Expectations of Course Content Affect Faculty Evaluations in an Abnormal Psychology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bock, Frances A.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a study measuring how student expectations of an abnormal psychology course affect their rating of professors. Findings showed a significant impact, especially in relation to popularized topics. Recommends evaluative instruments separating course-related factors from instructor ratings. (CK)

  2. Genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation differences in abnormally cloned and normally natural mating piglets.

    PubMed

    Zou, C; Fu, Y; Li, C; Liu, H; Li, G; Li, J; Zhang, H; Wu, Y; Li, C

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have proved that DNA methylation can regulate gene expression and further affect skeletal muscle growth and development of pig, whereas the mechanisms of how DNA methylation or gene expression alteration ultimately lead to phenotypical differences between the cloned and natural mating pigs remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation differences between abnormally cloned and normally natural mating piglets and identify molecular markers related to skeletal muscle growth and development in pig. The DNA methylation and genome-wide gene expression in the two groups of piglets were analysed through methylated DNA immunoprecipitation binding high-throughput sequencing and RNA sequencing respectively. We detected 1493 differentially expressed genes between the two groups, of which 382 genes were also differentially methylated. The results of the integrative analysis between DNA methylation and gene expression revealed that the DNA methylation levels showed a significantly negative and monotonic correlation with gene expression levels around the transcription start site of genes. By contrast, no notable monotonic correlation was observed in other regions. Furthermore, we identified some interesting genes and signalling pathways (e.g. myosin, heavy chain 7 and mammalian target of rapamycin) which possibly play essential roles in skeletal muscle growth and development. The results of this study provide insights into the relationship of DNA methylation with gene expression in newborn piglets and into the mechanisms in abnormally cloned animals through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  3. Relationship between DAPI-fluorescence fading and nuclear DNA content: An alternative method to DNA quantification?

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Alvarez-Borrego, Josué; Von Brand, Elisabeth; Dupré, Enrique; Del Río-Portilla, Miguel Angel

    2007-01-01

    In observations by confocal or conventional fluorescence microscopy, important factors should be considered in order to obtain accurate images. One of them, such as the fluorescence bleaching from highest intensity to lowest signal of fluorescence is a common problem with several DNA fluorochromes and especially for DAPI stain. The fluorescence of DAPI fades rapidly when it is exposed to UV light, under optimal conditions of observation. Although the fading process can be retarded using a mounting medium with antifading reagents, the photochemical process underlying the fluorescence decay has not yet been fully explained. In addition, no relationship between fluorescence fading and nuclear DNA content has been tested. In order to test this relationship, we measured by means of image analysis the DAPI-fluorescence intensity in several cellular types (spermatozoa, erythrocytes and haemocytes) during their fluorescence bleaching. An algorithm specifically built in MATLAB software was used for this approach. The correlation coefficient between nuclear DNA content and DAPI-fluorescence fading was found equal to 99%. This study demonstrates the feasibility to measure nuclear DNA content by fluorescence fading quantification, as an alternative method concurrently with image analysis procedures.

  4. DASAF: An R Package for Deep Sequencing-Based Detection of Fetal Autosomal Abnormalities from Maternal Cell-Free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Feng; Tao, Chunmei; Gao, Junhui; Ma, Mengmeng; Zhong, Tingyan; Cai, JianPing; Li, Yixue

    2016-01-01

    Background. With the development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), noninvasive prenatal diagnosis using maternal cell-free DNA is fast becoming the preferred method of fetal chromosomal abnormality detection, due to its inherent high accuracy and low risk. Typically, MPS data is parsed to calculate a risk score, which is used to predict whether a fetal chromosome is normal or not. Although there are several highly sensitive and specific MPS data-parsing algorithms, there are currently no tools that implement these methods. Results. We developed an R package, detection of autosomal abnormalities for fetus (DASAF), that implements the three most popular trisomy detection methods—the standard Z-score (STDZ) method, the GC correction Z-score (GCCZ) method, and the internal reference Z-score (IRZ) method—together with one subchromosome abnormality identification method (SCAZ). Conclusions. With the cost of DNA sequencing declining and with advances in personalized medicine, the demand for noninvasive prenatal testing will undoubtedly increase, which will in turn trigger an increase in the tools available for subsequent analysis. DASAF is a user-friendly tool, implemented in R, that supports identification of whole-chromosome as well as subchromosome abnormalities, based on maternal cell-free DNA sequencing data after genome mapping. PMID:27437397

  5. Cytometric analysis of shape and DNA content in mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-10

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. Sperm were analyzed by flow cytometry and slit-scan flow analysis for injury following the exposure of testes to mutagens. The utility of flow cytometry in genotoxin screening and monitoring of occupational exposure was evaluated. The technique proved valuable in separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm and the potential applicability of this technique in artificial insemination and a solution, of accurately assessing the DNA content of sperm were evaluated-with reference to determination of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm.

  6. Age-related sperm DNA methylation changes are transmitted to offspring and associated with abnormal behavior and dysregulated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Milekic, M H; Xin, Y; O'Donnell, A; Kumar, K K; Bradley-Moore, M; Malaspina, D; Moore, H; Brunner, D; Ge, Y; Edwards, J; Paul, S; Haghighi, F G; Gingrich, J A

    2015-08-01

    Advanced paternal age (APA) has been shown to be a significant risk factor in the offspring for neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. During aging, de novo mutations accumulate in the male germline and are frequently transmitted to the offspring with deleterious effects. In addition, DNA methylation during spermatogenesis is an active process, which is susceptible to errors that can be propagated to subsequent generations. Here we test the hypothesis that the integrity of germline DNA methylation is compromised during the aging process. A genome-wide DNA methylation screen comparing sperm from young and old mice revealed a significant loss of methylation in the older mice in regions associated with transcriptional regulation. The offspring of older fathers had reduced exploratory and startle behaviors and exhibited similar brain DNA methylation abnormalities as observed in the paternal sperm. Offspring from old fathers also had transcriptional dysregulation of developmental genes implicated in autism and schizophrenia. Our findings demonstrate that DNA methylation abnormalities arising in the sperm of old fathers are a plausible mechanism to explain some of the risks that APA poses to resulting offspring.

  7. DNA Content Variation and Its Significance in the Evolution of the Genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales, Streptophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Poulíèková, Aloisie; Mazalová, Petra; Vašut, Radim J.; Šarhanová, Petra; Neustupa, Jiøí; Škaloud, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    It is now clear that whole genome duplications have occurred in all eukaryotic evolutionary lineages, and that the vast majority of flowering plants have experienced polyploidisation in their evolutionary history. However, study of genome size variation in microalgae lags behind that of higher plants and seaweeds. In this study, we have addressed the question whether microalgal phylogeny is associated with DNA content variation in order to evaluate the evolutionary significance of polyploidy in the model genus Micrasterias. We applied flow-cytometric techniques of DNA quantification to microalgae and mapped the estimated DNA content along the phylogenetic tree. Correlations between DNA content and cell morphometric parameters were also tested using geometric morphometrics. In total, DNA content was successfully determined for 34 strains of the genus Micrasterias. The estimated absolute 2C nuclear DNA amount ranged from 2.1 to 64.7 pg; intraspecific variation being 17.4–30.7 pg in M. truncata and 32.0–64.7 pg in M. rotata. There were significant differences between DNA contents of related species. We found strong correlation between the absolute nuclear DNA content and chromosome numbers and significant positive correlation between the DNA content and both cell size and number of terminal lobes. Moreover, the results showed the importance of cell/life cycle studies for interpretation of DNA content measurements in microalgae. PMID:24465986

  8. Correlates of Peripheral Blood Mitochondrial DNA Content in a General Population

    PubMed Central

    Knez, Judita; Winckelmans, Ellen; Plusquin, Michelle; Thijs, Lutgarde; Cauwenberghs, Nicholas; Gu, Yumei; Staessen, Jan A.; Nawrot, Tim S.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations leads to alterations of mitochondrial biogenesis and function that might produce a decrease in mtDNA content within cells. This implies that mtDNA content might be a potential biomarker associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. However, data on correlates of mtDNA content in a general population are sparse. Our goal in the present study was to describe in a randomly recruited population sample the distribution and determinants of peripheral blood mtDNA content. From 2009 to 2013, we examined 689 persons (50.4% women; mean age = 54.4 years) randomly selected from a Flemish population (Flemish Study on Environment, Genes, and Health Outcomes). Relative mtDNA copy number as compared with nuclear DNA was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood. There was a curvilinear relationship between relative mtDNA copy number and age. mtDNA content slightly increased until the fifth decade of life and declined in older subjects (Page2 = 0.0002). mtDNA content was significantly higher in women (P = 0.007) and increased with platelet count (P < 0.0001), whereas it was inversely associated with white blood cell count (P < 0.0001). We also observed lower mtDNA content in women using estroprogestogens (P = 0.044). This study demonstrated in a general population that peripheral blood mtDNA content is significantly associated with sex and age. Blood mtDNA content is also influenced by platelet and white blood cell counts and estroprogestogen intake. Further studies are required to clarify the impact of chronic inflammation and hormone therapy on mitochondrial function. PMID:26702630

  9. Variation in nuclear DNA content in Malus species and cultivated apples.

    PubMed

    Tatum, Tatiana C; Stepanovic, Svetlana; Biradar, D P; Rayburn, A Lane; Korban, Schuyler S

    2005-10-01

    The nuclear DNA content for a group of 40 Malus species and hybrids has been estimated using flow cytometry. Estimates of nuclear DNA content for this germplasm collection range from 1.45 pg for Malus fusca (diploid) to 2.57 pg for Malus ioensis (triploid). Among diploids, the nuclear (2C) DNA ranges from 1.45 pg for M. fusca to 1.68 pg for Malus transitoria. Among triploids, the nuclear (3C) DNA content ranges from 2.37 pg / 3C for Malus sikkimensis to 2.57 pg / 3C for M. ioensis. Given the complexity of the apple genome and its suggested allopolyploid origin, the results obtained in this study confirm earlier reports that polyploids can easily withstand the loss of a certain amount of DNA, and that there is a slight tendency towards diminished haploid nuclear DNA content with increased polyploidy.

  10. Abnormal regulation of DNA replication and increased lethality in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to carcinogenic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Jaspers, N.G.; de Wit, J.; Regulski, M.R.; Bootsma, D.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of different carcinogenic agents on the rate of semiconservative DNA replication in normal and ataxia telangiectasis (AT) cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in all AT cell strains tested was depressed to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells after exposure to X-rays under oxia or hypoxia or to bleomycin, agents to which AT cells are hypersensitive. In contrast, inhibition of DNA replication in normal human and AT cells was similar after treatment with some DNA-methylating agents or mitomycin C. Colony-forming ability of AT cells treated with these agents was not different from normal cells. Treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide elicited a variable response in both AT and normal cell strains. In some strains, including those shown to be hypersensitive to the drug by other workers, the inhibition of DNA synthesis was more pronounced than in other cell strains, but no significant difference between AT and normal cells could be detected. The rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rays, measured by DNA elution techniques, occurred within l2 hr after treatment and could not be correlated with the difference in DNA synthesis inhibition in AT and normal cells. After low doses of X-rays, AT cells rejoined single-strand breaks slightly more slowly than did normal cells. The rate of DNA replication in X-irradiation AT and normal cells was not affected by nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis. These data indicate that the diminished inhibition of DNA replication in carcinogen-treated AT cells (a) is a general characteristic of all AT cell strains, (b) correlates with AT cellular hypersensitivity, (c) is not directly caused by the bulk of the DNA strand breaks produced by carcinogenic agents, and (d) is not based on differences in the induction of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis between X-irradiated AT and normal cells.

  11. Renin–angiotensin system inhibitors protect against age-related changes in rat liver mitochondrial DNA content and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    de Cavanagh, Elena M.V.; Flores, Idhaliz; Ferder, Marcelo; Inserra, Felipe; Ferder, León

    2016-01-01

    Chronic renin–angiotensin system inhibition protects against liver fibrosis, ameliorates age-associated mitochondrial dysfunction and increases rodent lifespan. We hypothesized that life-long angiotensin-II-mediated stimulation of oxidant generation might participate in mitochondrial DNA “common deletion” formation, and the resulting impairment of bioenergetic capacity. Enalapril (10 mg/kg/d) or losartan (30 mg/kg/d) administered during 16.5 months were unable to prevent the age-dependent accumulation of rat liver mitochondrial DNA “common deletion”, but attenuated the decrease of mitochondrial DNA content. This evidence – together with the enhancement of NRF-1 and PGC-1 mRNA contents – seems to explain why enalapril and losartan improved mitochondrial functioning and lowered oxidant production, since both the absolute number of mtDNA molecules and increased NRF-1 and PGC-1 transcription are positively related to mitochondrial respiratory capacity, and PGC-1 protects against increases in ROS production and damage. Oxidative stress evoked by abnormal respiratory function contributes to the pathophysiology of mitochondrial disease and human aging. If the present mitochondrial actions of renin–angiotensin system inhibitors are confirmed in humans they may modify the therapeutic significance of that strategy. PMID:18765277

  12. Lysosome abnormalities and lipofucsin content of nerve cells of oedematous human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J

    2004-01-01

    Lysosome alterations and lipofucsin content of nerve cells, capillary endothelial cells and pericytes were examined in the anoxic-ischaemic brain parenchyma of thirty two patients with congenital hydrocephalus, complicated brain traumatic injuries, brain tumours and vascular anomalies. Cortical biopsies of frontal, parietal and temporal cortex were processed for transmission electron microscopy. In oedematous non pyramidal and pyramidal nerve cells, lysosomes showed fragmentation of their limiting membranes and an associated dense granulation. Areas of cytoplasmic focal necrosis were observed surrounding the lysosomes. Lipofucsin granules were also observed in neonate and infant patients with congenital hydrocephalus, suggesting that lipofucsin formation is a life span process. Lysosomes coexisting with an increased amount of lipofucsin granules were observed in young and adult patients with brain trauma, tumours and vascular anomalies. Phagocytic astrocytes and activated oligodendroglial cells showed the overall spectrum of an altered endosomal/lysosomal system. Lipofucsin granules and multivesicular bodies also were distinguished in endothelial and pericyte cells. The role of released and activated lysosomal enzymes is discussed in relation with the cytoplasmatic focal necrosis of nerve cells and the genesis of moderate and severe oedema.

  13. Abnormal Transmethylation/Transsulfuration Metabolism and DNA Hypomethylation among Parents of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, S. Jill; Melnyk, Stepan; Jernigan, Stefanie; Hubanks, Amanda; Rose, Shannon; Gaylor, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An integrated metabolic profile reflects the combined influence of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors that affect the candidate pathway of interest. Recent evidence suggests that some autistic children may have reduced detoxification capacity and may be under chronic oxidative stress. Based on reports of abnormal methionine and…

  14. Mitochondrial DNA content contributes to healthy aging in Chinese: a study from nonagenarians and centenarians.

    PubMed

    He, Yong-Han; Lu, Xiang; Wu, Huan; Cai, Wang-Wei; Yang, Li-Qin; Xu, Liang-You; Sun, Hong-Peng; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content plays an important role in energy production and sustaining normal physiological function. A decline in the mtDNA content and subsequent dysfunction cause various senile diseases, with decreasing mtDNA content observed in the elderly individuals with age-related diseases. In contrast, the oldest old individuals, for example, centenarians, have a delayed or reduced prevalence of these diseases, suggesting centenarians may have a different pattern of the mtDNA content, enabling them to keep normal mitochondrial functions to help delay or escape senile diseases. To test this hypothesis, a total of 961 subjects, consisting of 424 longevity subjects and 537 younger control subjects from Hainan and Sichuan provinces of China, were recruited for this study. The mtDNA content was found to be inversely associated with age among the age of group 40-70 years. Surprisingly, no reduction of mtDNA content was observed in nonagenarians and centenarians; instead, these oldest old showed a significant increase than the elderly people aged between 50 and 70 years. The results suggest the higher mtDNA content may convey a beneficial effect to the longevity of people through assuring sufficient energy supply.

  15. DNA methylation abnormalities at gene promoters are extensive and variable in the elderly and phenocopy cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gautrey, Hannah E; van Otterdijk, Sanne D; Cordell, Heather J; Mathers, John C; Strathdee, Gordon

    2014-07-01

    Abnormal patterns of DNA methylation are one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. The process of aging has also been associated with similar, albeit less dramatic, changes in methylation patterns, leading to the hypothesis that age-related changes in DNA methylation may partially underlie the increased risk of cancer in the elderly. Here we studied 377 participants aged 85 yr from the Newcastle 85+ Study to investigate the extent of, and interindividual variation in, age-related changes in DNA methylation at specific CpG islands. Using highly quantitative pyrosequencing analysis, we found extensive and highly variable methylation of promoter-associated CpG islands with levels ranging from 4% to 35%, even at known tumor suppressor genes such as TWIST2. Furthermore, the interindividual differences in methylation seen across this elderly population phenocopies multiple features of the altered methylation patterns seen in cancer cells. Both aging- and cancer-related methylation can occur at similar sets of genes, both result in the formation of densely methylated, and likely transcriptionally repressed, alleles, and both exhibit coordinate methylation across multiple loci. In addition, high methylation levels were associated with subsequent diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma during a 3-yr follow-up period (P=0.00008). These data suggest that the accumulation of age-related changes in promoter-associated CpG islands may contribute to the increased cancer risk seen during aging.-Gautrey, H. E., van Otterdijk, S. D., Cordell, H. J., Newcastle 85+ study core team, Mathers, J. C., Strathdee, G. DNA methylation abnormalities at gene promoters are extensive and variable in the elderly and phenocopy cancer cells.

  16. Targeting abnormal DNA double strand break repair in tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant chronic myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Lisa A.; Robert, Carine; Rapoport, Aaron P.; Gojo, Ivana; Baer, Maria R.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Rassool, Feyruz V.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to imatinib (IM) and other BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI)s is an increasing problem in leukemias caused by expression of BCR-ABL1. Since chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines expressing BCR-ABL1 utilize an alternative non-homologous end-joining pathway (ALT NHEJ) to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB)s, we asked whether this repair pathway is a novel therapeutic target in TKI-resistant disease. Notably, the steady state levels of two ALT NHEJ proteins, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and DNA ligase IIIα were increased in the BCR-ABL1-positive CML cell line K562 and, to a greater extent, in its imatinib resistant (IMR) derivative. Incubation of these cell lines with a combination of DNA ligase and PARP inhibitors inhibited ALT NHEJ and selectively decreased survival with the effect being greater in the IMR derivative. Similar results were obtained with TKI-resistant derivatives of two hematopoietic cell lines that had been engineered to stably express BCR-ABL1. Together our results show that the sensitivity of cell lines expressing BCR-ABL1 to the combination of DNA ligase and PARP inhibitors correlates with the steady state levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα, and ALT NHEJ activity. Importantly, analysis of clinical samples from CML patients confirmed that the expression levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα correlated with sensitivity to the DNA repair inhibitor combination. Thus, the expression levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα serve as biomarkers to identify a subgroup of CML patients who may be candidates for therapies that target the ALT NHEJ pathway when treatment with TKIs has failed. PMID:22641215

  17. Structural chromosome abnormalities, increased DNA strand breaks and DNA strand break repair deficiency in dermal fibroblasts from old female human donors

    PubMed Central

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Seggewiß, Sabine; Walter, Regina; Tigges, Julia; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bürkle, Alexander; Ohse, Sebastian; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Boege, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts provide a paradigmatic model of cellular adaptation to long-term exogenous stress and ageing processes driven thereby. Here we addressed whether fibroblast ageing analysed ex vivo entails genome instability. Dermal fibroblasts from human female donors aged 20–67 years were studied in primary culture at low population doubling. Under these conditions, the incidence of replicative senescence and rates of age-correlated telomere shortening were insignificant. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed age-related impairment of mitosis, telomere and chromosome maintenance and induction of genes associated with DNA repair and non-homologous end-joining, most notably XRCC4 and ligase 4. We observed an age-correlated drop in proliferative capacity and age-correlated increases in heterochromatin marks, structural chromosome abnormalities (deletions, translocations and chromatid breaks), DNA strand breaks and histone H2AX-phosphorylation. In a third of the cells from old and middle-aged donors repair of X-ray induced DNA strand breaks was impaired despite up-regulation of DNA repair genes. The distinct phenotype of genome instability, increased heterochromatinisation and (in 30% of the cases futile) up-regulation of DNA repair genes was stably maintained over several cell passages indicating that it represents a feature of geroconversion that is distinct from cellular senescence, as it does not encompass a block of proliferation. PMID:25678531

  18. Evaluation of primers and PCR performance on HPV DNA screening in normal and low grade abnormal cervical cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongkot, Arkom; Pientong, Chamsai; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Thinkhamrop, Jadsada; Yuenyao, Pissamai; Sriamporn, Supannee

    2007-01-01

    High risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are associated with increased risk of normal cervical cells developing to dysplasia and cervical carcinoma. Therefore, HR-HPV DNA testing can predict an endpoint of cervical carcinogenesis that is earlier than the development of cervical abnormalities. Not only the sensitivity of methods but also the amount of HPV DNA are very important and might be parameters to distinguish HPV detection. In this study, we evaluated the effects of primer sets and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performance with low viral load samples with normal cervical cytology (140 samples) and mild dysplasia (140 samples) using two consensus primers MY09/MY11 and GP5+/6+. The PCR was performed with single and nested PCR. Positive samples with both primer sets were then HPV genotyped by dot blot hybridization. Results showed higher sensitivity of single PCR using primer GP5+/GP6+ than primer MY09/MY11. HPV DNA was detected in 15% (21 of 140)and 20.7% (29 of 140) of normal cervical samples, respectively. For mild dysplasia samples, HPV DNA was detected in 37.1% (52 of 140) with MY09/MY11 and 50% (70 of 140) using GP5+/GP6+. In normal cervical samples, the positivity rate was increased to 38.5% (54 of 140) by nested PCR using primer GP5+/6+, but only 2 mild dysplasia samples that were negative by single GP5+/6+ were positive by auto-nested PCR. These results suggested that, in low viral load samples, the sensitivity of HPV DNA detection depends not only on primer sets but also PCR performance. HPV 16 was the most common in mild dysplasia samples (20.8%), whereas HPV type 58 was found in 11.1%. This study suggested that nested PCR might be necessary for HPV DNA detection in cervical samples of women participating in cervical cancer screening.

  19. Amelogenin test abnormalities revealed in Belarusian population during forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Borovko, Sergey; Shyla, Alena; Korban, Victorya; Borovko, Alexandra

    2015-03-01

    Study of gender markers is a part of routine forensic genetic examination of crime scene and reference samples, paternity testing and personal identification. Amelogenin locus as a gender marker is included in majority of forensic STR kits of different manufacturers. In current study we report 11 cases of amelogenin abnormalities identified in males of Belarusian origin: 9 cases of AMELY dropout and 2 cases of AMELX dropout. Cases were obtained from forensic casework (n=9) and paternity testing (n=2) groups. In 4 out of 9 AMELY-negative cases deletion of AMELY was associated with the loss of DYS458 marker. In addition, we identified 3 males with SRY-positive XX male syndrome. Deletion of the long arm of the Y-chromosome was detected in two XX males. Loss of the major part of the Y-chromosome was identified in the third XX male. The presence of two X-chromosomes in XX males was confirmed with the use of Mentype(®) Argus X-8 PCR Amplification Kit. AMELY null allele observed in 2 out of 9 cases with AMELY dropout can be caused by mutation in the primer-binding site of AMELY allele. Primer-binding site mutations of AMELX can result in AMELX dropout identified in 2 cases with amplification failure of AMELX. Our study represents the first report and molecular genetic investigation of amelogenin abnormalities in the Belarusian population.

  20. Marker chromosomes lacking {alpha}-satellite DNA: A new intriguing class of abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, L.A.; Zinn, A.B.; Stallard, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies have implicated {alpha}-satellite DNA as an integral part of the centromere and important for the normal segregation of chromosomes. We analyzed four supernumerary marker chromosomes in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) could detect neither pancentromeric or chromosome specific {alpha}-satellite DNA. Mosaicism of the markers existed, but each was present in the majority of cells indicating that they segregated normally. FISH with chromosome-specific libraries identified the origins of these markers as chromosomes 13 (1 case) and 15 (3 cases). High resolution analysis, combined with hybridization of a series of cosmid probes, revealed that each marker was a symmetrical duplication of the terminal long arm of the parent chromosome. Telomeric sequences were detected by FISH indicating linear structures. Breakpoint heterogeneity, as defined by cosmid probes, was demonstrated in the three cases involving chromosome 15. No pericentromeric satellite III DNA could be detected on three markers. Studies with anti-centromere antibodies are in progress to assay for centromeric antigens on the markers, as expected at functional centromeric sites. Our results demonstrate that the precise structural identification and heterogeneity of these markers can be easily elucidated using FISH with unique sequence cosmid probes. We conclude from our studies and others in the literature: (1) there is a newly defined class of markers lacking {alpha}-satellite DNA and containing duplications of terminal sequences; (2)neither {alpha}-satellite nor satellite III DNA at levels detectable by FISH is necessary for fidelity in the normal segregation of chromosomes; and (3) these markers were most likely formed by recombination of the long arms during meiosis.

  1. DNA content, kinetic complexity, and the ploidy question in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Riggsby, W S; Torres-Bauza, L J; Wills, J W; Townes, T M

    1982-01-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is pathogenic for humans. No sexual cycle has been reported for this fungus, and earlier reports have differed on whether typical strains of C. albicans are haploid or diploid. Previous estimates of the DNA content of C. albicans varied by one order of magnitude. We used three independent methods to measure the kinetic complexity of the single-copy DNA from a typical strain of C. albicans (strain H317) to determine the DNA content per haploid genote; we obtained values of 15 and 20 fg per cell by using S1 nuclease and hydroxyapatite assays, respectively. Optical assays for DNA reassociation kinetics, although not definitive in themselves, yielded values in this range. Chemical measurements of the DNA content of several typical strains, including strain H317, yielded values clustered about a mean of 37 fg per cell. We concluded that these strains are diploid. PMID:6765567

  2. DNA content, kinetic complexity, and the ploidy question in Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Riggsby, W.S.; Torres-Bauza, L.J.; Wills, J.W.; Townes, T.M.

    1982-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is pathogenic for humans. No sexual cycle has been reported for this fungus, and earlier reports have differed on whether typical strains of C. albicans are haploid or diploid. Previous estimates of the DNA content of C. albicans varied by one order of magnitude. The authors used three independent methods to measure the kinetic complexity of the single-copy DNA from a typical strain of C. albicans (strain H317) to determine the DNA content per haploid genote; they obtained values of 15 and 20 fg per cell by using S1 nuclease and hydroxyapatite assays, respectively. Optical assays for DNA reassociation kinetics, although not definitive in themselves, yielded values in this range. Chemical measurements of the DNA content of several typical strains, including strain H317, yielded values clustered about a mean of 37 fg per cell. They concluded that these strains are diploid.

  3. Relationship of seminal reactive nitrogen and oxygen species and total antioxidant capacity with sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile couples with normal and abnormal sperm parameters.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, F; Valojerdi, M R; Amanlou, M; Karimian, L; Abolhassani, F

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the amount of superoxide anion, peroxynitrite as oxidative stress (OS) markers and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) with sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile men with abnormal semen parameters. Semen samples were obtained from 102 infertile couples and divided into groups with normal and abnormal semen parameters according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Peroxynitrite and superoxide anions were detected using spectrofluorometric assays combined with 2,7 dicholorofluorescein (DCF)-DA and 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa -1, 3-diazole (NBD-CL). Colorimetric assay was used for evaluation of TAC, while DNA fragmentation was studied by using sperm chromatin dispersion test. Superoxide anion, peroxynitrite and DNA fragmentation were significantly higher in infertile couples with abnormal semen parameters as compared to infertile couples with normal semen (P < 0.01). TAC was significantly lower in infertile men with abnormal semen parameters (P < 0.01). There was also a significant positive correlation between OS markers with sperm DNA fragmentation (r = 0.59, P < 0.01 and r = 0.67, P < 0.01, respectively). We have found that imbalance between superoxide anion and peroxynitrite with antioxidant capacity in infertile men with abnormal sperm parameters is associated with higher sperm DNA fragmentation.

  4. Altered DNA methylation associated with an abnormal liver phenotype in a cattle model with a high incidence of perinatal pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Hélène; Jouneau, Luc; Campion, Évelyne; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Larcher, Thibaut; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Balzergue, Sandrine; Ledevin, Mireille; Prézelin, Audrey; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Heyman, Yvan; Richard, Christophe; Le Bourhis, Daniel; Renard, Jean-Paul; Jammes, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Cloning enables the generation of both clinically normal and pathological individuals from the same donor cells, and may therefore be a DNA sequence-independent driver of phenotypic variability. We took advantage of cattle clones with identical genotypes but different developmental abilities to investigate the role of epigenetic factors in perinatal mortality, a complex trait with increasing prevalence in dairy cattle. We studied livers from pathological clones dying during the perinatal period, clinically normal adult clones with the same genotypes as perinatal clones and conventional age-matched controls. The livers from deceased perinatal clones displayed histological lesions, modifications to quantitative histomorphometric and metabolic parameters such as glycogen storage and fatty acid composition, and an absence of birth-induced maturation. In a genome-wide epigenetic analysis, we identified DNA methylation patterns underlying these phenotypic alterations and targeting genes relevant to liver metabolism, including the type 2 diabetes gene TCF7L2. The adult clones were devoid of major phenotypic and epigenetic abnormalities in the liver, ruling out the effects of genotype on the phenotype observed. These results thus provide the first demonstration of a genome-wide association between DNA methylation and perinatal mortality in cattle, and highlight epigenetics as a driving force for phenotypic variability in farmed animals. PMID:27958319

  5. Mitochondrial DNA content, an inaccurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in human immunodeficiency virus-related lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ji; Jardel, Claude; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Jan, Véronique; Bastard, Jean Philippe; Fillaut-Chapin, Sandrine; Houry, Sydney; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lombès, Anne

    2008-05-01

    Lipoatrophy is a prevalent side effect of antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Its mechanisms are still disputed but include mitochondrial toxicity and, in particular, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. To obtain an integrated evaluation of the mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophy, we investigated the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in 15 samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue from HIV-infected patients with peripheral lipoatrophy and compared the results with those for 15 samples from age- and body mass index-matched controls. The DNA and RNA analyses used PCR-based techniques, while proteins were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and measurement of activities with spectrophotometric assays. Depletion of mtDNA and mtDNA-encoded MT-CO2 mRNA was present, but normal levels of mtDNA-dependent activity (cytochrome c oxidase) and protein (MT-CO2p) showed that it was compensated for. An increase in nuclear-DNA-dependent mitochondrial activities (citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) and protein (COX4I1p), as well as transcriptional up-regulation of nuclear-DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes (COX4I1 and UCP2), demonstrated increased mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the expression of the known transcription factors of mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1, GABPA, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, and PPRC1) was normal or decreased. Increased amounts of activated caspase 3 and of DDIT3 mRNA showed the induction of apoptosis and oxidative stress, respectively. The mtDNA content did not correlate with any other mitochondrial parameter. In conclusion, mtDNA content does not appear to be an accurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophic adipose tissue. The preservation of mtDNA-dependent mitochondrial functions occurred despite severe mtDNA depletion. The presence of significant oxidative stress and apoptosis did not correlate with the mtDNA content.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA Content, an Inaccurate Biomarker of Mitochondrial Alteration in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lipodystrophy▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ji; Jardel, Claude; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Jan, Véronique; Bastard, Jean Philippe; Fillaut-Chapin, Sandrine; Houry, Sydney; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lombès, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is a prevalent side effect of antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Its mechanisms are still disputed but include mitochondrial toxicity and, in particular, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. To obtain an integrated evaluation of the mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophy, we investigated the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in 15 samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue from HIV-infected patients with peripheral lipoatrophy and compared the results with those for 15 samples from age- and body mass index-matched controls. The DNA and RNA analyses used PCR-based techniques, while proteins were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and measurement of activities with spectrophotometric assays. Depletion of mtDNA and mtDNA-encoded MT-CO2 mRNA was present, but normal levels of mtDNA-dependent activity (cytochrome c oxidase) and protein (MT-CO2p) showed that it was compensated for. An increase in nuclear-DNA-dependent mitochondrial activities (citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) and protein (COX4I1p), as well as transcriptional up-regulation of nuclear-DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes (COX4I1 and UCP2), demonstrated increased mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the expression of the known transcription factors of mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1, GABPA, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, and PPRC1) was normal or decreased. Increased amounts of activated caspase 3 and of DDIT3 mRNA showed the induction of apoptosis and oxidative stress, respectively. The mtDNA content did not correlate with any other mitochondrial parameter. In conclusion, mtDNA content does not appear to be an accurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophic adipose tissue. The preservation of mtDNA-dependent mitochondrial functions occurred despite severe mtDNA depletion. The presence of significant oxidative stress and apoptosis did not correlate with the mtDNA content. PMID

  7. Nuclear DNA contents of Echinchloa crus-galli and its Gaussian relationships with environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan-Dan; Lu, Yong-Liang; Guo, Shui-Liang; Yin, Li-Ping; Zhou, Ping; Lou, Yu-Xia

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies on plant nuclear DNA content variation and its relationships with environmental gradients produced conflicting results. We speculated that the relationships between nuclear DNA content of a widely-distributed species and its environmental gradients might be non-linear if it was sampled in a large geographical gradient. Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) P. Beauv. is a worldwide species, but without documents on its intraspecific variation of nuclear DNA content. Our objectives are: 1) to detect intraspecific variation scope of E. crus-galli in its nuclear DNA content, and 2) to testify whether nuclear DNA content of the species changes with environmental gradients following Gaussian models if its populations were sampled in a large geographical gradient. We collected seeds of 36 Chinese populations of E. crus-galli across a wide geographical gradient, and sowed them in a homogeneous field to get their offspring to determine their nuclear DNA content. We analyzed the relationships of nuclear DNA content of these populations with latitude, longitude, and nineteen bioclimatic variables by using Gaussian and linear models. (1) Nuclear DNA content varied from 2.113 to 2.410 pg among 36 Chinese populations of E. crus-galli, with a mean value of 2.256 pg. (2) Gaussian correlations of nuclear DNA content (y) with geographical gradients were detected, with latitude (x) following y = 2.2923*e -(x - 24.9360)2/2*63.79452 (r = 0.546, P < 0.001), and with longitude (x) following y = 2.2933*e -(x - 116.1801)2/2*44.74502 (r = 0.672, P < 0.001). (3) Among the nineteen bioclimatic variables, except temperature isothermality, precipitations of the wettest month, the wettest quarter and the warmest quarter, the others could be better fit with nuclear DNA content by using Gaussian models than by linear models. There exists intra-specific variation among 36 Chinese populations of E. crus-galli, Gaussian models could be applied to fit the correlations of its Nuclear DNA content

  8. Deficiency of the multi-copy mouse Y gene Sly causes sperm DNA damage and abnormal chromatin packaging.

    PubMed

    Riel, Jonathan M; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Sugawara, Atsushi; Li, Ho Yan J; Ruthig, Victor; Stoytcheva, Zoia; Ellis, Peter J I; Cocquet, Julie; Ward, Monika A

    2013-02-01

    In mouse and man Y chromosome deletions are frequently associated with spermatogenic defects. Mice with extensive deletions of non-pairing Y chromosome long arm (NPYq) are infertile and produce sperm with grossly misshapen heads, abnormal chromatin packaging and DNA damage. The NPYq-encoded multi-copy gene Sly controls the expression of sex chromosome genes after meiosis and Sly deficiency results in a remarkable upregulation of sex chromosome genes. Sly deficiency has been shown to be the underlying cause of the sperm head anomalies and infertility associated with NPYq gene loss, but it was not known whether it recapitulates sperm DNA damage phenotype. We produced and examined mice with transgenically (RNAi) silenced Sly and demonstrated that these mice have increased incidence of sperm with DNA damage and poorly condensed and insufficiently protaminated chromatin. We also investigated the contribution of each of the two Sly-encoded transcript variants and noted that the phenotype was only observed when both variants were knocked down, and that the phenotype was intermediate in severity compared with mice with severe NPYq deficiency. Our data demonstrate that Sly deficiency is responsible for the sperm DNA damage/chromatin packaging defects observed in mice with NPYq deletions and point to SLY proteins involvement in chromatin reprogramming during spermiogenesis, probably through their effect on the post-meiotic expression of spermiogenic genes. Considering the importance of the sperm epigenome for embryonic and fetal development and the possibility of its inter-generational transmission, our results are important for future investigations of the molecular mechanisms of this biologically and clinically important process.

  9. Nuclear DNA Content Estimates in Multicellular Green, Red and Brown Algae: Phylogenetic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    KAPRAUN, DONALD F.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Multicellular eukaryotic algae are phylogenetically disparate. Nuclear DNA content estimates have been published for fewer than 1 % of the described species of Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta. The present investigation aims to summarize the state of our knowledge and to add substantially to our database of C-values for theses algae. • Methods The DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and RBC (chicken erythrocyte) standard were used to estimate 2C values with static microspectrophotometry. • Key Results 2C DNA contents for 85 species of Chlorophyta range from 0·2–6·1 pg, excluding the highly polyploidy Charales and Desmidiales with DNA contents of up to 39·2 and 20·7 pg, respectively. 2C DNA contents for 111 species of Rhodophyta range from 0·1–2·8 pg, and for 44 species of Phaeophyta range from 0·2–1·8 pg. • Conclusions New availability of consensus higher-level molecular phylogenies provides a framework for viewing C-value data in a phylogenetic context. Both DNA content ranges and mean values are greater in taxa considered to be basal. It is proposed that the basal, ancestral genome in each algal group was quite small. Both mechanistic and ecological processes are discussed that could have produced the observed C-value ranges. PMID:15596456

  10. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content differences in blood samples obtained by leucoconcentration.

    PubMed

    Pierrez, J; Guerci, A; Guerci, O

    1988-07-01

    The leucoconcentration technique allows rapid obtainment of cellular suspensions from total blood or bone marrow for flow cytometric analysis. The technique is based on picric acid in ethyl alcohol fixation and saponin red cell lysis, followed by mithramycin staining for DNA. It gives a good resolution of DNA distributions that allow detection of slight variations in DNA content. These results were obtained with cellular suspensions differing only in one X or Y chromosome (male, female, Klinefelter and Turner syndromes). In these studies the ratio of the DNA content of X and Y chromosomes agrees with the chromosomal mass ratio already reported by other authors, but the "absolute values" are 10-fold more compared to these same works. Our conclusion is that leucoconcentration technique followed by DNA staining with mithramycin increases the difference in the dye's penetration and binding between X and Y chromosomes.

  11. Relationship between DNA damage in sperm after ex vivo exposure and abnormal embryo development in the progeny of the three-spined stickleback.

    PubMed

    Santos, R; Palos-Ladeiro, M; Besnard, A; Porcher, J M; Bony, S; Sanchez, W; Devaux, A

    2013-04-01

    Many xenobiotics released in the aquatic environment exhibit a genotoxic potential toward organisms. Long term exposure to such compounds is expected to lead to multigenerational reproductive defects, further influencing the recruitment rate and hence, the population dynamics. Paternal exposure to genotoxicants was previously shown to increase abnormal development in the progeny of mammalian or aquatic species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between DNA damage in sperm of the fish three-spined stickleback and progeny developmental defects. Spermatozoa were exposed ex vivo to an alkylating agent (methyl methanesulfonate) before in vitro fertilization and DNA damage was assessed by the alkaline comet assay. A significant relationship between abnormal development and sperm DNA damage was underlined. This study illustrates the interest to use germ cell DNA damage after ex vivo exposure to evaluate the impact of genotoxic compounds on progeny fitness in aquatic organisms.

  12. Specific melanin content in human hairs and mitochondrial DNA typing success.

    PubMed

    Linch, Charles A; Champagne, Jarrod R; Bonnette, Michelle D; Dawson Cruz, Tracey

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated whether a difference exists in the ability to obtain quality mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data from hair shafts due to specific melanin content differences. Eumelanin, the pigment in darker hairs, protects nuclear DNA in the skin by absorbing and scattering UV radiation. In contrast, sensitized pheomelanin, the predominate melanin in red hairs and some blond hairs, is unable to prevent DNA damage in skin upon exposure to UV radiation. It has been reported in the literature that darker hairs (predominate eumelanin content) have a higher mtDNA sequencing success rate than lighter colored hairs. However, others have reported to the contrary when different methodologies are used. In this study, 2-cm hair fragments were cut from dark brown, red, and gray white hairs and typed using standard casework mtDNA sequence analysis methods. All 30 hair fragments produced quality mtDNA sequence data on first attempt from the second half of hypervariable region 1. These results are likely due to the apparent shielding of mtDNA by the hard protein of the hair shaft fiber from radiation-induced damage, regardless of melanin type, after 10-months minimal solar exposure. Nonetheless, this study may serve as a guide for future quantitative studies that investigate hair mtDNA photodamage in circumstances of increased solar, chemical, environmental, or mechanical damage.

  13. Abnormal sensitivity of skin fibroblasts from familial polyposis patients to DNA alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Barfknecht, T.R.; Little, J.B.

    1982-04-01

    Fibroblast cell strains derived from different patients all afflicted with genetic predisposing to the development of intestinal polyposis and cancer were tested for their sensitivity to the lethal effects of the DNA alkylating agents methylmethanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide. The genetic syndromes studied were: (a) adenomatosis of the colon and rectum only, an autosomal dominant trait; (b) Turcot's syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive polyposis syndrome also characterized by central nervous system tumors; and (c) Gardner's syndrome, an autosomal dominant syndrome which, in addition to intestinal polyposis, is also clinically characterized by osteomas and soft tissue tumors. Fibroblasts from a patient with Turcot's syndrome were hypersensitive to MMS, having a D0 value of 0.24 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average D0 of 0.36 mM and a D10 value of 0.95 mM (p less than 0.01) compared with the normal average value of 1.3 mM. Fibroblasts from the Gardner's syndrome proband were moderately sensitive to MMS, ethyl methanesulfonate, and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine due to significant differences of D10 values of 0.60 mM (p less than 0.01), 15 mM (p less than 0.01), and 4.8 microM (p less than 0.025), respectively, versus the normal average values of 1.3 mM, 28 mM, and 9.4 microM. Fibroblasts from the clinically affected Gardner's syndrome daughter of the proband were significantly more sensitive to MMS treatment, D0 of 0.22 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average D0 of 0.36 mM and a D10 of 0.97 mM (p less than 0.01) versus the normal average. This differential sensitivity to the several DNA alkylating agents suggests that different mechanisms of hypersensitivity to these chemicals may be associated with fibroblasts from the various forms of familial polyposis.

  14. A mitochondrial DNA sequence is associated with abnormal pollen development in cytoplasmic male sterile bean plants.

    PubMed Central

    Johns, C; Lu, M; Lyznik, A; Mackenzie, S

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in common bean is associated with the presence of a 3-kb unique mitochondrial sequence designated pvs. The pvs sequence encodes at least two open reading frames (297 and 720 bp in length) with portions derived from the chloroplast genome. Fertility restoration by the nuclear restorer gene Fr results in the loss of this transcriptionally active unique region. We examined the effect of CMS (pvs present) and fertility restoration by Fr (pvs absent) on the pattern of pollen development in bean. In the CMS line, pollen aborted in the tetrad stage late in microgametogenesis. Microspores maintained cytoplasmic connections throughout pollen development, indicating aberrant or incomplete cytokinesis. Pollen-specific events associated with pollen abortion and fertility restoration imply that a gametophytic factor or event may be involved in CMS. In situ hybridization experiments suggested that significant reduction or complete loss of the mitochondrial sterility-associated sequence occurred in fertile pollen of F2 populations segregating for fertility. These observations support a model of fertility restoration by the loss of a mitochondrial DNA sequence prior to or during microsporogenesis/gametogenesis. PMID:1498602

  15. Imprinting mutations suggested by abnormal DNA methylation patterns in familial Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, A.; Dittrich, B.; Greger, V.; Buiting, K.; Lalande, M.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Anvret, M.; Horsthemke, B.

    1994-01-01

    The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. We have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the gene for the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N, which maps 130 kb telomeric to D15S63. Furthermore, we have identified a pair of nondeletion Angelman syndrome sibs and two isolated Angelman syndrome patients who carry a paternal methylation imprint on the maternal chromosome. These Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients may have a defect in the imprinting process in 15q11-13. We propose a model in which a cis-acting mutation prevents the resetting of the imprinting signal in the germ line and thus disturbs the expression of imprinted genes in this region. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8178815

  16. Imprinting mutations suggested by abnormal DNA methylation patterns in familial angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, A. ); Dittrich, B.; Buiting, K.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Horsthemke, B. ); Greger, V.; Lalande, M. ); Anvret, M. )

    1994-05-01

    The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. The authors have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the gene for the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N, which maps 130 kb telomeric to D15S63. Furthermore, they have identified a pair of nondeletion Angelman syndrome sibs and two isolated Angelman syndrome patients who carry a paternal methylation imprint on the maternal chromosome. These Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients may have a defect in the imprinting process in 15q11-13. The authors propose a model in which a cis-acting mutation prevents the resetting of the imprinting signal in the germ line and thus disturbs the expression of imprinted genes in this region. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Whole-Mount DAPI Staining and Measurement of DNA Content in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Schnittger, Arp; Hülskamp, Martin

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONDuring development, many plant cells undergo endoreduplication, whereby ploidy increases to a multiple of the normal 2C content. For example, trichome development is accompanied by an increase in ploidy to 32C, indicating that trichome cells undergo four rounds of endoreduplication. In the protocol described here, DNA levels, and hence developmental progress in the corresponding cells, are measured by staining the DNA with a fluorescent marker and then quantifying the fluorescence of individual nuclei.

  18. Nuclear DNA content in Miscanthus sp. and the geographical variation pattern in Miscanthus lutarioriparius

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiajing; Hu, Xiaohu; Zeng, Xiaofei; Li, Ye; Zhou, Fasong; Hu, Zhongli; Jin, Surong; Diao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The genome sizes of five Miscanthus species, including 79 accessions of M. lutarioriparius, 8 of M. floridulus, 6 of M. sacchariflorus, 7 of M. sinensis, and 4 of M. × giganteus were examined using flow cytometry. The overall average nuclear DNA content were 4.256 ± 0.6 pg/2C in M. lutarioriparius, 5.175 ± 0.3 pg/2C in M. floridulus, 3.956 ± 0.2 pg/2C in M. sacchariflorus, 5.272 ± 0.2 pg/2C in M. sinensis, and 6.932 ± 0.1 pg/2C in M. × giganteus. Interspecific variation was found at the diploid level, suggesting that DNA content might be a parameter that can be used to differentiate the species. Tetraploid populations were found in M. lutarioriparius, M. sacchariflorus, and M. sinensis, and their DNA content were 8.34 ± 1.2, 8.52, and 8.355 pg, respectively. The association between the DNA content of M. lutarioriparius, collected from representative ranges across the Yangtze River, and its geographic distribution was statistically analyzed. A consistent pattern of DNA content variation in 79 M. lutarioriparius accessions across its entire geographic range was found in this study. Along the Yangtze River, the DNA content of M. lutarioriparius tended to increase from the upstream to the downstream areas, and almost all tetraploids gathered in the upstream area extended to coastal regions. PMID:27698438

  19. Nuclear DNA content in Miscanthus sp. and the geographical variation pattern in Miscanthus lutarioriparius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jiajing; Hu, Xiaohu; Zeng, Xiaofei; Li, Ye; Zhou, Fasong; Hu, Zhongli; Jin, Surong; Diao, Ying

    2016-10-01

    The genome sizes of five Miscanthus species, including 79 accessions of M. lutarioriparius, 8 of M. floridulus, 6 of M. sacchariflorus, 7 of M. sinensis, and 4 of M. × giganteus were examined using flow cytometry. The overall average nuclear DNA content were 4.256 ± 0.6 pg/2C in M. lutarioriparius, 5.175 ± 0.3 pg/2C in M. floridulus, 3.956 ± 0.2 pg/2C in M. sacchariflorus, 5.272 ± 0.2 pg/2C in M. sinensis, and 6.932 ± 0.1 pg/2C in M. × giganteus. Interspecific variation was found at the diploid level, suggesting that DNA content might be a parameter that can be used to differentiate the species. Tetraploid populations were found in M. lutarioriparius, M. sacchariflorus, and M. sinensis, and their DNA content were 8.34 ± 1.2, 8.52, and 8.355 pg, respectively. The association between the DNA content of M. lutarioriparius, collected from representative ranges across the Yangtze River, and its geographic distribution was statistically analyzed. A consistent pattern of DNA content variation in 79 M. lutarioriparius accessions across its entire geographic range was found in this study. Along the Yangtze River, the DNA content of M. lutarioriparius tended to increase from the upstream to the downstream areas, and almost all tetraploids gathered in the upstream area extended to coastal regions.

  20. Nuclear DNA content variation in life history phases of the Bonnemasoniaceae (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Salvador Soler, Noemi; Gómez Garreta, Amelia; Ribera Siguan, Ma Antonia; Kapraun, Donald F

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear DNA content in gametophytes and sporophytes or the prostrate phases of the following species of Bonnemaisoniaceae (Asparagopsis armata, Asparagopsis taxiformis, Bonnemaisonia asparagoides, Bonnemaisonia clavata and Bonnemaisonia hamifera) were estimated by image analysis and static microspectrophotometry using the DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, dilactate) and the chicken erythrocytes standard. These estimates expand on the Kew database of DNA nuclear content. DNA content values for 1C nuclei in the gametophytes (spermatia and vegetative cells) range from 0.5 pg to 0.8 pg, and for 2C nuclei in the sporophytes or the prostrate phases range from 1.15-1.7 pg. Although only the 2C and 4C values were observed in the sporophyte or the prostrate phase, in the vegetative cells of the gametophyte the values oscillated from 1C to 4C, showing the possible start of endopolyploidy. The results confirm the alternation of nuclear phases in these Bonnemaisoniaceae species, in those that have tetrasporogenesis, as well as those that have somatic meiosis. The availability of a consensus phylogenetic tree for Bonnemaisoniaceae has opened the way to determine evolutionary trends in DNA contents. Both the estimated genome sizes and the published chromosome numbers for Bonnemaisoniaceae suggest a narrow range of values consistent with the conservation of an ancestral genome.

  1. DNA content in embryo and endosperm of maize kernel (Zea mays L.): impact on GMO quantification.

    PubMed

    Trifa, Youssef; Zhang, David

    2004-03-10

    PCR-based techniques are the most widely used methods for the quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) through the determination of the ratio of transgenic DNA to total DNA. It is shown that the DNA content per mass unit is significantly different among 10 maize cultivars. The DNA contents of endosperms, embryos, and teguments of individual kernels from 10 maize cultivars were determined. According to our results, the tegument's DNA ratio reaches at maximum 3.5% of the total kernel's DNA, whereas the endosperm's and the embryo's DNA ratios are nearly equal to 50%. The embryo cells are diploid and made of one paternal and one maternal haploid genome, whereas the endosperm is constituted of triploid cells made of two maternal haploid genomes and one paternal haploid genome. Therefore, it is shown, in this study, that the accuracy of the GMO quantification depends on the reference material used as well as on the category of the transgenic kernels present in the mixture.

  2. Identifying X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm by DNA content: retrospective perspectives and prospective opinions

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.; Pinkel, D.; Garner, D.L.

    1982-03-05

    Theoretically, since DNA should be the most constant component, quantitatively, of normal sperm, then genotoxic agents arising from energy production and consumption, and chemical and physical mutagens, could be identified by measuring variability in the DNA content of individual sperm from exposed men or test animals. The difference between the DNA content of X and Y sperm seemed a biologically significant benchmark for the measurement technology. Several methods are available for determining the genetic activity of agents in male germ cells, but these tests are generally laborious. Sperm-based methods provide an attractive alternate since they are not invasive, and are directly applicable to the study of human exposure. Slide-based assay of DNA content suggests that human sperm with X, Y, or YY chromosome constitutions can be distinguished by their fluorescence with quinacrine. Subsequent measurement of the dry mass of human sperm heads is performed. Dry mass is proportional to DNA content. While the study showed that human sperm with none and one quinacrine-fluorescent spot are X- and Y-bearing, respectively, the dry mass measurements indicated that many of the sperm with two quinacrine-fluorescent spots are not YY-bearing. While several reports on the initial application of flow cytometry of sperm to the investigation of mammalian infertility have appeared recently, emphasis here has been on the development of an in vivo sperm-based flow cytometric bioassay for mutations, and has not centered on andrological applications. In this review, the ability to differentiate between two equally sized populations of sperm, one bearing X and the other Y chromosomes with mean DNA content differing by about 3 to 4% is described. It has direct application to the preselection of sex of offspring, and could likely have a profound impact on animal improvement. (ERB)

  3. Effects of Spent Pot Liner on mitotic activity and nuclear DNA content in meristematic cells of Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Vieira, Larissa Fonseca; de Campos, José Marcello Salabert; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2012-09-30

    Industrial waste usually contains complex mixtures of mutagenic chemicals. Spent Pot Liner (SPL) is a complex solid waste from the aluminum industry, which is composed of organics, fluoride salts, inorganic cyanides, metals, and sodium. Due to the toxicity of these compounds, this study sought to use cytogenetics and flow cytometry to assess the effects of SPL on cell cycle parameters and DNA content in meristematic cells of Allium cepa. Three concentrations of leachates from SPL-soil mixtures were used for the study: 0, 10, and 25%. Roots were collected and analyzed after 4, 8, 12, 24, and 36 h of exposure to the above SPL leachates. The results showed an overall mitodepressive effect accompanied by an increased percentage of condensed nuclei and genomic instability as evidenced by the presence of cellular/chromosomal abnormalities. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling revealed nuclei with fragmented DNA, a marker of programmed cell death. This study also addressed the question of reversibility of the effects of SPL and found that 36 h of exposure to 25% SPL seemed to be the point at which the effects on the induction of apoptosis became irreversible.

  4. Increased 8-hydroxyguanine content of chloroplast DNA from ozone-treated plants

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, R.A.; West, M.S. ); Hogsett, W.E.; Tingey, D.T. )

    1989-10-01

    The mechanism of ozone-mediated plant injury is not known but has been postulated to involve oxygen free radicals. Hydroxyl free radicals react with DNA causing formation of many products, one of which is 8-hydroxyguanine. By using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, the 8-hydroxy-2-{prime}-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content of a DNA enzymatic digest can be sensitively quantitated. Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and peas (Pisum sativum L.) were treated with an ozone regime that caused acute injury. Chloroplast DNA was obtained from plants harvested either immediately after ozone treatment or 24 hours later. Ozone-exposed plants in general had nearly two-fold higher levels of 8-OHdG as compared to control plants. In vitro treatment of DNA in buffer solution with ozone did not cause formation of 8-OHdG in DNA, even though ozone did react directly with the macromolecule per se. Exposure of isolated, illuminated chloroplasts to ozone caused nearly a seven-fold increase in the amount of 8-OHdG in the chloroplast DNA as compared to none-ozone-exposed chloroplasts. These results suggest that ozone exposure to plants causes formation of enhanced levels of oxygen free radicals, thus mediating formation of 8-OHdG in chloroplast DNA. The reaction of ozone with DNA per se did not cause formation of 8-OHdG. Therefore, it is the interaction of ozone with plant cells and isolated chloroplasts which mediates oxygen free radical formation.

  5. Karyotype characterization and nuclear DNA content measurement in Bromeliaceae: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Andrei C P; Clarindo, Wellington R

    2014-12-01

    In Bromeliaceae, cytogenetic and flow cytometry analyses have been performed to clarify systematic and evolutionary aspects. Karyotyping approaches have shown the relatively high chromosome number, similar morphology and small size of the chromosomes. These facts have prevented a correct chromosome counting and characterization. Authors have established a basic chromosome number of x = 25 for Bromeliaceae. Recently, one karyomorphological analysis revealed that x = 25 is no longer the basic chromosome number, whose genome may have a polyploid origin. Besides cytogenetic characterization, the 2C DNA content of bromeliads has been measured. Nuclear DNA content has varied from 2C = 0.60 to 2C = 3.34 picograms. Thus, in relation to most angiosperms, the 2C DNA content of Bromeliaceae species as well as their chromosome size can be considered relatively small. In spite of some advances, cytogenetic and flow cytometry data are extremely scarce in this group. In this context, this review reports the state of the art in karyotype characterization and nuclear DNA content measurement in Bromeliaceae, emphasizing the main problems and suggesting prospective solutions and ideas for future research.

  6. Cytometric analysis of mammalian sperm for induced morphologic and DNA content errors

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.

    1983-06-27

    Some flow-cytometric and image analysis procedures under development for quantitative analysis of sperm morphology are reviewed. The results of flow-cytometric DNA-content measurements on sperm from radiation exposed mice are also summarized, the results related to the available cytological information, and their potential dosimetric sensitivity discussed. (ACR)

  7. Redox/methylation mediated abnormal DNA methylation as regulators of ambient fine particulate matter-induced neurodevelopment related impairment in human neuronal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hongying; Liang, Fan; Meng, Ge; Nie, Zhiqing; Zhou, Ren; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Xiaomeng; Feng, Yan; Wang, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been implicated as a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders including autism in children. However, the underlying biological mechanism remains unclear. DNA methylation is suggested to be a fundamental mechanism for the neuronal responses to environmental cues. We prepared whole particle of PM2.5 (PM2.5), water-soluble extracts (Pw), organic extracts (Po) and carbon core component (Pc) and characterized their chemical constitutes. We found that PM2.5 induced significant redox imbalance, decreased the levels of intercellular methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine and caused global DNA hypomethylation. Furthermore, PM2.5 exposure triggered gene-specific promoter DNA hypo- or hypermethylation and abnormal mRNA expression of autism candidate genes. PM2.5-induced DNA hypermethylation in promoter regions of synapse related genes were associated with the decreases in their mRNA and protein expression. The inhibiting effects of antioxidative reagents, a methylation-supporting agent and a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor demonstrated the involvement of redox/methylation mechanism in PM2.5-induced abnormal DNA methylation patterns and synaptic protein expression. The biological effects above generally followed a sequence of PM2.5 ≥ Pwo > Po > Pw > Pc. Our results implicated a novel epigenetic mechanism for the neurodevelopmental toxicity of particulate air pollution, and that eliminating the chemical components could mitigate the neurotoxicity of PM2.5.

  8. Identification of human remains by DNA analysis of the gastrointestinal contents of fly larvae.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Chávez-Briones, María; Hernández-Cortés, Raquel; Díaz-Torres, Porfirio; Niderhauser-García, Alberto; Ancer-Rodríguez, Jesús; Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto; Ortega-Martínez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Dipterous fly larvae (maggots) are frequently collected from a corpse during a criminal investigation. Previous studies showed that DNA analysis of the gastrointestinal contents of maggots might be used to reveal the identity of a victim. However, this approach has not been used to date in legal investigations, and thus its practical usefulness is unknown. A badly burned body was discovered with its face and neck colonized by fly larvae. Given the condition of the body, identification was not possible. Short tandem repeat (STR) typing was performed using the gastrointestinal contents of maggots collected from the victim and was compared to STR profiles obtained from the alleged father. The probability of paternity was 99.685%. Thus, this comparative DNA test enabled the conclusive identification of the remains. This is the first reported case of analysis of human DNA isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of maggots used to identify a victim in a criminal case.

  9. Nuclear DNA Content Variation and Species Relationships in the Genus Lupinus (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    NAGANOWSKA, BARBARA; WOLKO, BOGDAN; ŚLIWIŃSKA, ELWIRA; KACZMAREK, ZYGMUNT

    2003-01-01

    The 2C nuclear DNA content has been estimated by flow cytometry in 18 species and botanical forms of the genus Lupinus (family Fabaceae), using propidium iodide as a fluorescent dye. They represented distinct infrageneric taxonomic groups and differed in somatic chromosome numbers. Estimated 2C DNA values ranged from 0·97 pg in L. princei to 2·44 pg in L. luteus, which gives a more than 2·5-fold variation. Statistical analysis of the data obtained resulted in a grouping that supports the generally accepted taxonomic classification of the Old World lupins. The rough-seeded L. princei turned out to be an interesting exception, getting closer to smooth-seeded species. Results of DNA content analyses are discussed with regards to the phylogenetic relationships among the Old World lupins and some aspects of the evolution of the genus. PMID:12853281

  10. DAPI-fluorescent fading: a problem in microscopy or a way to measure nuclear DNA content?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué; Kober, V.; del Río-Portilla, Miguel Á.

    2006-01-01

    In observation by confocal or conventional fluorescence microscopy, the retardation of the lost in fluorescence, from highest signal of fluorescence to lowest intensity are important factors in order to obtain accurate images. This problem is very common in fluorochromes for nuclear DNA and especially for DAPI stain. The fluorescence of DAPI is rapidly lost when it is exposure to excitation by ultra violet (UV) light, and especially under optimal condition of observation. Although the fading process could be retardate by using of mounting medium with antifading solutions, the photochemical process underlying the fluorescence decay has not yet been fully explained. In addiction, neither relationship has been tested between the fluorescence fading and nuclear DNA content. However, the capacity of the DNA to absorb UV light is knows. In order to test this relationship we measured by means of image analysis the fluorescence intensity in several nuclei types during a fading period. The analysis was performed by an algorithm specifically built in MATLAB software. The relationship between nuclear DNA content and DAPI-fluorescence fading was found equal to 99%. This study demonstrates the feasibility for estimates genome size by quantification of fluorescence fading. In this context, the present method allows to measure nuclear DNA content in several medical applications (cancer, HIV, organ transplants, etc). Nowadays, for measuring DNA content, flow cytometry is widely used; however, with the flow cytometry method it is not possible to select a specific group of cells, such as from a specific region of a tumor. Moreover, the using of image analysis allows automatizing diagnostics procedures.

  11. Chromatin organisation in duckweed interphase nuclei in relation to the nuclear DNA content.

    PubMed

    Cao, H X; Vu, G T H; Wang, W; Messing, J; Schubert, I

    2015-01-01

    The accessibility of DNA during fundamental processes, such as transcription, replication and DNA repair, is tightly modulated through a dynamic chromatin structure. Differences in large-scale chromatin structure at the microscopic level can be observed as euchromatic and heterochromatic domains in interphase nuclei. Here, key epigenetic marks, including histone H3 methylation and 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) as a DNA modification, were studied cytologically to describe the chromatin organisation of representative species of the five duckweed genera in the context of their nuclear DNA content, which ranged from 158 to 1881 Mbp. All studied duckweeds, including Spirodela polyrhiza with a genome size and repeat proportion similar to that of Arabidopsis thaliana, showed dispersed distribution of heterochromatin signatures (5mC, H3K9me2 and H3K27me1). This immunolabelling pattern resembles that of early developmental stages of Arabidopsis nuclei, with less pronounced heterochromatin chromocenters and heterochromatic marks weakly dispersed throughout the nucleus.

  12. Effects of reduced mitochondrial DNA content on secondary mitochondrial toxicant exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is intimately linked to cellular and organismal health, as demonstrated by the fact that mutations in and depletion of mtDNA result in severe mitochondrial disease in humans. However, cells contain hundreds to thousands of copies of mtDNA, which provides genetic redundancy, and creates a threshold effect in which a large percentage of mtDNA must be lost prior to clinical pathogenesis. As certain pharmaceuticals and genetic mutations can result in depletion of mtDNA, and as many environmental toxicants target mitochondria, it is important to understand whether reduced mtDNA will sensitize an individual to toxicant exposure. Here, using ethidium bromide (EtBr), which preferentially inhibits mtDNA replication, we reduced mtDNA 35-55% in the in vivo model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Chronic, lifelong, low-dose EtBr exposure did not disrupt nematode development or lifespan, and induced only mild alterations in mitochondrial respiration, while having no effect on steady-state ATP levels. Next, we exposed nematodes with reduced mtDNA to the known and suspected mitochondrial toxicants aflatoxin B1, arsenite, paraquat, rotenone or ultraviolet C radiation (UVC). EtBr pre-exposure resulted in mild sensitization of nematodes to UVC and arsenite, had no effect on AfB1 and paraquat, and provided some protection from rotenone toxicity. These mixed results provide a first line of evidence suggesting that reduced mtDNA content may sensitize an individual to certain environmental exposures.

  13. Nuclear DNA Content Estimates in Green Algal Lineages: Chlorophyta and Streptophyta

    PubMed Central

    Kapraun, Donald F.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Consensus higher-level molecular phylogenies present a compelling case that an ancient divergence separates eukaryotic green algae into two major monophyletic lineages, Chlorophyta and Streptophyta, and a residuum of green algae, which have been referred to prasinophytes or micromonadophytes. Nuclear DNA content estimates have been published for less than 1% of the described green algal members of Chlorophyta, which includes multicellular green marine algae and freshwater flagellates (e.g. Chlamydomonas and Volvox). The present investigation summarizes the state of our knowledge and adds substantially to our database of C-values, especially for the streptophyte charophycean lineage which is the sister group of the land plants. A recent list of 2C nuclear DNA contents for isolates and species of green algae is expanded by 72 to 157. Methods The DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and red blood cell (chicken erythrocytes) standard were used to estimate 2C values with static microspectrophotometry. Key Results In Chlorophyta, including Chlorophyceae, Prasinophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Ulvophyceae, 2C DNA estimates range from 0·01 to 5·8 pg. Nuclear DNA content variation trends are noted and discussed for specific problematic taxon pairs, including Ulotrichales–Ulvales, and Cladophorales–Siphonocladales. For Streptophyta, 2C nuclear DNA contents range from 0·2 to 6·4 pg, excluding the highly polyploid Charales and Desmidiales, which have genome sizes of up to 14·8 and 46·8 pg, respectively. Nuclear DNA content data for Streptophyta superimposed on a contemporary molecular phylogeny indicate that early diverging lineages, including some members of Chlorokybales, Coleochaetales and Klebsormidiales, have genomes as small as 0·1–0·5 pg. It is proposed that the streptophyte ancestral nuclear genome common to both the charophyte and the embryophyte lineages can be characterized as 1C = 0·2 pg and 1n = 6

  14. Intraspecific DNA Content Variability in Festuca pallens on Different Geographical Scales and Ploidy Levels

    PubMed Central

    ŠMARDA, PETR; BUREŠ, PETR

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Intraspecific genome size variability of Festuca pallens occurring on relict rocky steppes in Central Europe was studied on two ploidy levels and three geographical scales: (1) local scale of 24 populations, (2) landscape scale of three transects in river canyons or hill systems, and (3) global scale of 160 samples covering the whole distribution area. • Methods DAPI flow cytometry of homogeneously cultivated samples (≥1 year), measured randomly with two internal standards, Lycopersicon esculentum and Pisum sativum. Differences in DNA content were confirmed (1) by the double peaks of simultaneously measured samples, (2) based on measurements carried out in different seasons, and (3) by additional measurements with propidium iodide. • Key Results On a global scale, the relative DNA content ranged between 1·170-fold in diploids and 1·164-fold in tetraploids. A maximum difference of 1·088-fold between the mean relative DNA content of nearby populations was found. In 16 of 24 populations significant variability was shown (P < 0·001, 1·121-fold as maximum). For both ploidy levels, the relative genome size had the same range and geographical pattern, correlated with geographical coordinates (P < 0·01). Diploids with larger genomes occur on relict habitats (P < 0·01), and in areas of periglacial steppes (20 000 years ago; P < 0·02). In tetraploids, the relative DNA content differs among the three previously recognized geographical types (Alpine, Pannonian and Scabrifolia, P < 0·001). Tetraploids have a relative DNA content smaller than twice that of the diploids (P < 0·001). An influence of microhabitat on DNA content variation was not confirmed. • Conclusions Genome size variability occurs over all spatial scales: intrapopulation, landscape and global. Correlation between geographical coordinates and palaeovegetation type, concomitant with diploids and tetraploids, and no influence of microhabitat were found. Genome size

  15. Genetic stock assessment of spawning arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis) populations by flow cytometric determination of DNA content.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, S F; Bickham, J W

    1991-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in cellular DNA content was measured in five Coregonus autumnalis spawning populations from the Mackenzie River drainage, Canada, using flow cytometry. The rivers assayed were the Peel, Arctic Red, Mountain, Carcajou, and Liard rivers. DNA content was determined from whole blood preparations of fish from all rivers except the Carcajou, for which kidney tissue was used. DNA content measurements of kidney and blood preparations of the same fish from the Mountain River revealed statistically indistinguishable results. Mosaicism was found in blood preparations from the Peel, Arctic Red, Mountain, and Liard rivers, but was not observed in kidney tissue preparations from the Mountain or Carcajou rivers. The Liard River sample had significantly elevated mean DNA content relative to the other four samples; all other samples were statistically indistinguishable. Significant differences in mean DNA content among spawning stocks of a single species reinforces the need for adequate sample sizes of both individuals and populations when reporting "C" values for a particular species.

  16. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts. PMID:26758245

  17. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries.

    PubMed

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-13

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts.

  18. Uncovering Trophic Interactions in Arthropod Predators through DNA Shotgun-Sequencing of Gut Contents.

    PubMed

    Paula, Débora P; Linard, Benjamin; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Srivathsan, Amrita; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Sujii, Edison R; Pires, Carmen S S; Souza, Lucas M; Andow, David A; Vogler, Alfried P

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing trophic networks is fundamental to many questions in ecology, but this typically requires painstaking efforts, especially to identify the diet of small generalist predators. Several attempts have been devoted to develop suitable molecular tools to determine predatory trophic interactions through gut content analysis, and the challenge has been to achieve simultaneously high taxonomic breadth and resolution. General and practical methods are still needed, preferably independent of PCR amplification of barcodes, to recover a broader range of interactions. Here we applied shotgun-sequencing of the DNA from arthropod predator gut contents, extracted from four common coccinellid and dermapteran predators co-occurring in an agroecosystem in Brazil. By matching unassembled reads against six DNA reference databases obtained from public databases and newly assembled mitogenomes, and filtering for high overlap length and identity, we identified prey and other foreign DNA in the predator guts. Good taxonomic breadth and resolution was achieved (93% of prey identified to species or genus), but with low recovery of matching reads. Two to nine trophic interactions were found for these predators, some of which were only inferred by the presence of parasitoids and components of the microbiome known to be associated with aphid prey. Intraguild predation was also found, including among closely related ladybird species. Uncertainty arises from the lack of comprehensive reference databases and reliance on low numbers of matching reads accentuating the risk of false positives. We discuss caveats and some future prospects that could improve the use of direct DNA shotgun-sequencing to characterize arthropod trophic networks.

  19. Action plan for responses to abnormal conditions in Hanford Site radioactive waste tanks with high organic content. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-07-01

    This action plan describes the criteria and the organizational responsibilities required for ensuring that waste storage tanks with high organic contents are maintained in a safe condition at the Hanford Site. In addition, response actions are outlined for (1) prevention or mitigation of excessive temperatures; or (2) a material release from any waste tank with high organic content. Other response actions may be defined by Westinghouse Hanford Company Systems Engineering if a waste tank parameter goes out of specification. Trend analysis indicates the waste tank parameters have seasonal variations, but are otherwise stable.

  20. Karyotype and nuclear DNA content of hexa-, octo-, and duodecaploid lines of Bromus subgen. Ceratochloa

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The subgenus Ceratochloa of the genus Bromus includes a number of closely related allopolyploid forms or species that present a difficult taxonomic problem. The present work combines data concerning chromosome length, heterochromatin distribution and nuclear genome size of different 6x, 8x and 12x accessions in this subgenus. Special attention is paid to the karyotype structure and genomic constitution of duodecaploid plants recently found in South America. Hexaploid lineages possess six almost indistinguishable genomes and a nuclear DNA content between 12.72 pg and 15.10 pg (mean 1Cx value = 2.32 pg), whereas octoploid lineages contain the same six genomes (AABBCC) plus two that are characterized by longer chromosomes and a greater DNA content (1Cx = 4.47 pg). Two duodecaploid accessions found in South America resemble each other and apparently differ from the North American duodecaploid B. arizonicus as regards chromosome size and nuclear DNA content (40.00 and 40.50 pg vs. 27.59 pg). These observations suggest that the South American duodecaploids represent a separate evolutionary lineage of the B. subgenus Ceratochloa, unrecognized heretofore. PMID:21637516

  1. Karyotype analysis, DNA content and molecular screening in Lippia alba (Verbenaceae).

    PubMed

    Pierre, Patrícia M O; Sousa, Saulo M; Davide, Lisete C; Machado, Marco A; Viccini, Lyderson F

    2011-09-01

    Cytogenetic analyses, of pollen viability, nuclear DNA content and RAPD markers were employed to study three chemotypes of Lippia alba (Mill.) (Verbenaceae) in order to understand the genetic variation among them. Different ploidy levels and mixoploid individuals were observed. This work comprises the first report of different chromosome numbers (cytotypes) in L. alba. The chromosome numbers of La2-carvone and La3-linalool chemotypes suggested that they are polyploids. Flow cytometric analysis showed an increase of nuclear DNA content that was not directly proportional to ploidy level variation. A cluster analysis based on RAPD markers revealed that La3-linalool shares genetic markers with La1-citral and La2-carvone. The analysis showed that the majority of genetic variation of La3-linalool could be a consequence of ixoploidy. ur data indicates that sexual reproduction aong those three chemotypes is unlikely and suggests the beginning of reproductive isolation. The results demonstrated that chromosome analysis, nuclear DNA content estimation and RAPD markers constitute excellent tools for detecting genetic variation among L. alba chemotypes.

  2. Relevance of GC content to the conservation of DNA polymerase III/mismatch repair system in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Motohiro; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of DNA replication is one of the driving forces of genome evolution. Bacterial DNA polymerase III, the primary complex of DNA replication, consists of PolC and DnaE. PolC is conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, especially in the Firmicutes with low GC content, whereas DnaE is widely conserved in most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PolC contains two domains, the 3′-5′exonuclease domain and the polymerase domain, while DnaE only possesses the polymerase domain. Accordingly, DnaE does not have the proofreading function; in Escherichia coli, another enzyme DnaQ performs this function. In most bacteria, the fidelity of DNA replication is maintained by 3′-5′ exonuclease and a mismatch repair (MMR) system. However, we found that most Actinobacteria (a group of Gram-positive bacteria with high GC content) appear to have lost the MMR system and chromosomes may be replicated by DnaE-type DNA polymerase III with DnaQ-like 3′-5′ exonuclease. We tested the mutation bias of Bacillus subtilis, which belongs to the Firmicutes and found that the wild type strain is AT-biased while the mutS-deletant strain is remarkably GC-biased. If we presume that DnaE tends to make mistakes that increase GC content, these results can be explained by the mutS deletion (i.e., deletion of the MMR system). Thus, we propose that GC content is regulated by DNA polymerase and MMR system, and the absence of polC genes, which participate in the MMR system, may be the reason for the increase of GC content in Gram-positive bacteria such as Actinobacteria. PMID:24062730

  3. Diet Assessment Based on Rumen Contents: A Comparison between DNA Metabarcoding and Macroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Ruth V.; Åkesson, Mikael; Kjellander, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Dietary choices are central to our understanding of ecology and evolution. Still, many aspects of food choice have been hampered by time consuming procedures and methodological problems. Faster and cheaper methods, such as DNA metabarcoding, have therefore been widely adopted. However, there is still very little empirical support that this new method is better and more accurate compared to the classic methods. Here, we compare DNA metabarcoding to macroscopic identifications of rumen contents in two species of wild free-ranging ungulates: roe deer and fallow deer. We found that the methods were comparable, but they did not completely overlap. Sometimes the DNA method failed to identify food items that were found macroscopically, and the opposite was also true. However, the total number of taxa identified increased using DNA compared to the macroscopic analysis. Moreover, the taxonomic precision of metabarcoding was substantially higher, with on average 90% of DNA-sequences being identified to genus or species level compared to 75% of plant fragments using macroscopy. In niche overlap analyses, presence/absence data showed that both methods came to very similar conclusions. When using the sequence count data and macroscopic weight, niche overlap was lower than when using presence-absence data yet tended to increase when using DNA compared to macroscopy. Nevertheless, the significant positive correlation between macroscopic quantity and number of DNA sequences counted from the same plant group give support for the use of metabarcoding to quantify plants in the rumen. This study thus shows that there is much to be gained by using metabarcoding to quantitatively assess diet composition compared to macroscopic analysis, including higher taxonomic precision, sensitivity and cost efficiency. PMID:27322387

  4. Abnormally High Content of Free Glucosamine Residues Identified in a Preparation of Commercially Available Porcine Intestinal Heparan Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) polysaccharides are ubiquitous in animal tissues as components of proteoglycans, and they participate in many important biological processes. HS carbohydrate chains are complex and can contain rare structural components such as N-unsubstituted glucosamine (GlcN). Commercially available HS preparations have been invaluable in many types of research activities. In the course of preparing microarrays to include probes derived from HS oligosaccharides, we found an unusually high content of GlcN residue in a recently purchased batch of porcine intestinal mucosal HS. Composition and sequence analysis by mass spectrometry of the oligosaccharides obtained after heparin lyase III digestion of the polysaccharide indicated two and three GlcN in the tetrasaccharide and hexasaccharide fractions, respectively. 1H NMR of the intact polysaccharide showed that this unusual batch differed strikingly from other HS preparations obtained from bovine kidney and porcine intestine. The very high content of GlcN (30%) and low content of GlcNAc (4.2%) determined by disaccharide composition analysis indicated that N-deacetylation and/or N-desulfation may have taken place. HS is widely used by the scientific community to investigate HS structures and activities. Great care has to be taken in drawing conclusions from investigations of structural features of HS and specificities of HS interaction with proteins when commercial HS is used without further analysis. Pending the availability of a validated commercial HS reference preparation, our data may be useful to members of the scientific community who have used the present preparation in their studies. PMID:27295282

  5. The relationships among IGF-1, DNA content, and protein accumulation during skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. R.; Haddad, F.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is known to have anabolic effects on skeletal muscle cells. This study examined the time course of muscle hypertrophy and associated IGF-1 peptide and mRNA expression. Data were collected at 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after surgical removal of synergistic muscles of both normal and hypophysectomized (HX) animals. Overloading increased the plantaris (Plant) mass, myofiber size, and protein-to-body weight ratio in both groups (normal and HX; P < 0.05). Muscle IGF-1 peptide levels peaked at 3 (normal) and 7 (HX) days of overloading with maximum 4.1-fold (normal) and 6.2-fold (HX) increases. Increases in muscle IGF-1 preceded the hypertrophic response. Total DNA content of the overloaded Plant increased in both groups. There was a strong positive relationship between IGF-1 peptide and DNA content in the overloaded Plant from both groups. These results indicate that 1) the muscles from rats with both normal and severely depressed systemic levels of IGF-1 respond to functional overload with an increase in local IGF-1 expression and 2) this elevated IGF-1 may be contributing to the hypertrophy response, possibly via the mobilization of satellite cells to provide increases in muscle DNA.

  6. Chemical mapping of DNA and counter-ion content inside phage by energy-filtered TEM.

    PubMed

    Nevsten, Pernilla; Evilevitch, Alex; Wallenberg, Reine

    2012-03-01

    Double-stranded DNA in many bacterial viruses (phage) is strongly confined, which results in internal genome pressures of tens of atmospheres. This pressure is strongly dependent on local ion concentration and distribution within the viral capsid. Here, we have used electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy to provide such chemical information from the capsid and the phage tail through which DNA is injected into the cell. To achieve this, we have developed a method to prepare thin monolayers of self-supporting virus/buffer films, suitable for EELS and EFTEM analysis. The method is based on entrapment of virus particles at air-liquid interfaces; thus, the commonly used method of staining by heavy metal salts can be avoided, eliminating the risk for chemical artifacts. We found that Mg(2 + ) concentration was approximately 2-4 times higher in the DNA-filled capsid than in the surrounding TM buffer (containing 10 mM Mg(2 + )). Furthermore, we also analyzed the DNA content inside the phage tail by mapping phosphorus and magnesium.

  7. Nuclear DNA content and base composition in 28 taxa of Musa.

    PubMed

    Kamaté, K; Brown, S; Durand, P; Bureau, J M; De Nay, D; Trinh, T H

    2001-08-01

    The nuclear DNA content of 28 taxa of Musa was assessed by flow cytometry, using line PxPC6 of Petunia hybrida as an internal standard. The 2C DNA value of Musa balbisiana (BB genome) was 1.16 pg, whereas Musa acuminata (AA genome) had an average 2C DNA value of 1.27 pg, with a difference of 11% between its subspecies. The two haploid (IC) genomes, A and B, comprising most of the edible bananas, are therefore of similar size, 0.63 pg (610 million bp) and 0.58 pg (560 million bp), respectively. The genome of diploid Musa is thus threefold that of Arabidopsis thaliana. The genome sizes in a set of triploid Musa cultivars or clones were quite different, with 2C DNA values ranging from 1.61 to 2.23 pg. Likewise, the genome sizes of tetraploid cultivars ranged from 1.94 to 2.37 pg (2C). Apparently, tetraploids (for instance, accession I.C.2) can have a genome size that falls within the range of triploid genome sizes, and vice versa (as in the case of accession Simili Radjah). The 2C values estimated for organs such as leaf, leaf sheath, rhizome, and flower were consistent, whereas root material gave atypical results, owing to browning. The genomic base composition of these Musa taxa had a median value of 40.8% GC (SD = 0.43%).

  8. Uncovering Trophic Interactions in Arthropod Predators through DNA Shotgun-Sequencing of Gut Contents

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Débora P.; Linard, Benjamin; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Srivathsan, Amrita; Timmermans, Martijn J. T. N.; Sujii, Edison R.; Pires, Carmen S. S.; Souza, Lucas M.; Andow, David A.; Vogler, Alfried P.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing trophic networks is fundamental to many questions in ecology, but this typically requires painstaking efforts, especially to identify the diet of small generalist predators. Several attempts have been devoted to develop suitable molecular tools to determine predatory trophic interactions through gut content analysis, and the challenge has been to achieve simultaneously high taxonomic breadth and resolution. General and practical methods are still needed, preferably independent of PCR amplification of barcodes, to recover a broader range of interactions. Here we applied shotgun-sequencing of the DNA from arthropod predator gut contents, extracted from four common coccinellid and dermapteran predators co-occurring in an agroecosystem in Brazil. By matching unassembled reads against six DNA reference databases obtained from public databases and newly assembled mitogenomes, and filtering for high overlap length and identity, we identified prey and other foreign DNA in the predator guts. Good taxonomic breadth and resolution was achieved (93% of prey identified to species or genus), but with low recovery of matching reads. Two to nine trophic interactions were found for these predators, some of which were only inferred by the presence of parasitoids and components of the microbiome known to be associated with aphid prey. Intraguild predation was also found, including among closely related ladybird species. Uncertainty arises from the lack of comprehensive reference databases and reliance on low numbers of matching reads accentuating the risk of false positives. We discuss caveats and some future prospects that could improve the use of direct DNA shotgun-sequencing to characterize arthropod trophic networks. PMID:27622637

  9. A New Model for Providing Cell-Free DNA and Risk Assessment for Chromosome Abnormalities in a Public Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, Robert; Jelks, Andrea; Garabedian, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) offers highly accurate noninvasive screening for Down syndrome. Incorporating it into routine care is complicated. We present our experience implementing a novel program for cfDNA screening, emphasizing patient education, genetic counseling, and resource management. Study Design. Beginning in January 2013, we initiated a new patient care model in which high-risk patients for aneuploidy received genetic counseling at 12 weeks of gestation. Patients were presented with four pathways for aneuploidy risk assessment and diagnosis: (1) cfDNA; (2) integrated screening; (3) direct-to-invasive testing (chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis); or (4) no first trimester diagnostic testing/screening. Patients underwent follow-up genetic counseling and detailed ultrasound at 18–20 weeks to review first trimester testing and finalize decision for amniocentesis. Results. Counseling and second trimester detailed ultrasound were provided to 163 women. Most selected cfDNA screening (69%) over integrated screening (0.6%), direct-to-invasive testing (14.1%), or no screening (16.6%). Amniocentesis rates decreased following implementation of cfDNA screening (19.0% versus 13.0%, P < 0.05). Conclusion. When counseled about screening options, women often chose cfDNA over integrated screening. This program is a model for patient-directed, efficient delivery of a newly available high-level technology in a public health setting. Genetic counseling is an integral part of patient education and determination of plan of care. PMID:25101177

  10. Cutaneous photoprotection and melanoma susceptibility: reaching beyond melanin content to the frontiers of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kadekaro, Ana Luisa; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A

    2006-09-01

    Melanoma is the most devastating form of skin cancer. The steady increase in the incidence of melanoma, its resistance to chemotherapy, together with its high potential to metastasize, have emphasized the importance of its prevention. It is becoming clear that solar ultraviolet radiation is a main culprit in the etiology of melanoma, the same as in basal and squamous cell carcinomas. It is commonly accepted that skin pigmentation and melanin content are principal determinants of the susceptibility to melanoma and other sun-induced skin cancers. Although this is generally true, however, prediction of melanoma risk based solely on pigmentary phenotype is not always precise and fails to identify high-risk individuals with dark skin color. Other important risk factors need to be considered and better defined, particularly DNA repair capacity. Emerging studies have revealed the role of melanoma susceptibility genes in regulating DNA repair, and indicated that melanoma patients have a lower DNA repair capacity than the general population. As the response of human melanocytes to ultraviolet radiation is modulated by an array of paracrine factors, we have focused our investigation on the role of melanocortins and the melanocortin 1 receptor, as well as endothelin-1, in this response. We have discovered novel roles for melanocortins and endothelin-1 as survival factors that rescue human melanocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis, and importantly enhance repair of DNA photoproducts and reduce the release of hydrogen peroxide that can cause oxidative stress. Our findings, together with epidemiological data showing that loss-of-function mutations in the melanocortin-1 receptor gene increase the risk of melanoma, substantiate the role of DNA repair in melanoma genesis, and suggest that responsiveness to melanocortins and endothelin-1 is important for melanoma prevention.

  11. RF-EMF exposure at 1800 MHz did not elicit DNA damage or abnormal cellular behaviors in different neurogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Liling; Wei, Xiaoxia; Xu, Zhengping; Chen, Guangdi

    2017-04-01

    Despite many years of studies, the debate on genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) continues. To systematically evaluate genotoxicity of RF-EMF, this study examined effects of RF-EMF on DNA damage and cellular behavior in different neurogenic cells. Neurogenic A172, U251, and SH-SY5Y cells were intermittently (5 min on/10 min off) exposed to 1800 MHz RF-EMF at an average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 4.0 W/kg for 1, 6, or 24 h. DNA damage was evaluated by quantification of γH2AX foci, an early marker of DNA double-strand breaks. Cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and cell viability were examined by flow cytometry, hemocytometer, and cell counting kit-8 assay, respectively. Results showed that exposure to RF-EMF at an SAR of 4.0 W/kg neither significantly induced γH2AX foci formation in A172, U251, or SH-SY5Y cells, nor resulted in abnormal cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, or cell viability. Furthermore, prolonged incubation of these cells for up to 48 h after exposure did not significantly affect cellular behavior. Our data suggest that 1800 MHz RF-EMF exposure at 4.0 W/kg is unlikely to elicit DNA damage or abnormal cellular behaviors in neurogenic cells. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:175-185, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Abnormal Expressions of DNA Glycosylase Genes NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 Are Associated with Somatic Mutation Loads in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Kato, Hisami; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Igarashi, Hisaki; Goto, Masanori; Tao, Hong; Inoue, Yusuke; Nakamura, Satoki; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Mineta, Hiroyuki; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of abnormalities in the DNA glycosylases NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 on human cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this paper, we found that the median somatic total mutation loads and the median somatic single nucleotide mutation loads exhibited significant inverse correlations with the median NEIL1 and NEIL2 expression levels and a significant positive correlation with the median NEIL3 expression level using data for 13 cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. A subset of the cancer types exhibited reduced NEIL1 and NEIL2 expressions and elevated NEIL3 expression, and such abnormal expressions of NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 were also significantly associated with the mutation loads in cancer. As a mechanism underlying the reduced expression of NEIL1 in cancer, the epigenetic silencing of NEIL1 through promoter hypermethylation was found. Finally, we investigated the reason why an elevated NEIL3 expression level was associated with an increased number of somatic mutations in cancer and found that NEIL3 expression was positively correlated with the expression of APOBEC3B, a potent inducer of mutations, in diverse cancers. These results suggested that the abnormal expressions of NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 are involved in cancer through their association with the somatic mutation load. PMID:27042257

  13. Thymidine Kinase 2 Deficiency-Induced Mitochondrial DNA Depletion Causes Abnormal Development of Adipose Tissues and Adipokine Levels in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Villarroya, Joan; Dorado, Beatriz; Vilà, Maya R.; Garcia-Arumí, Elena; Domingo, Pere; Giralt, Marta; Hirano, Michio; Villarroya, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Mammal adipose tissues require mitochondrial activity for proper development and differentiation. The components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain/oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS) are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a key element for a functional mitochondrial oxidative activity in mammalian cells. To ascertain the role of mtDNA levels in adipose tissue, we have analyzed the alterations in white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissues in thymidine kinase 2 (Tk2) H126N knockin mice, a model of TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion. We observed respectively severe and moderate mtDNA depletion in TK2-deficient BAT and WAT, showing both tissues moderate hypotrophy and reduced fat accumulation. Electron microscopy revealed altered mitochondrial morphology in brown but not in white adipocytes from TK2-deficient mice. Although significant reduction in mtDNA-encoded transcripts was observed both in WAT and BAT, protein levels from distinct OXPHOS complexes were significantly reduced only in TK2-deficient BAT. Accordingly, the activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly lowered only in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. The analysis of transcripts encoding up to fourteen components of specific adipose tissue functions revealed that, in both TK2-deficient WAT and BAT, there was a consistent reduction of thermogenesis related gene expression and a severe reduction in leptin mRNA. Reduced levels of resistin mRNA were found in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. Analysis of serum indicated a dramatic reduction in circulating levels of leptin and resistin. In summary, our present study establishes that mtDNA depletion leads to a moderate impairment in mitochondrial respiratory function, especially in BAT, causes substantial alterations in WAT and BAT development, and has a profound impact in the endocrine properties of adipose tissues. PMID:22216345

  14. SYBR Green-activated sorting of Arabidopsis pollen nuclei based on different DNA/RNA content.

    PubMed

    Schoft, Vera K; Chumak, Nina; Bindics, János; Slusarz, Lucyna; Twell, David; Köhler, Claudia; Tamaru, Hisashi

    2015-03-01

    Key message: Purification of pollen nuclei. Germ cell epigenetics is a critical topic in plants and animals. The male gametophyte (pollen) of flowering plants is an attractive model to study genetic and epigenetic reprogramming during sexual reproduction, being composed of only two sperm cells contained within, its companion, vegetative cell. Here, we describe a simple and efficient method to purify SYBR Green-stained sperm and vegetative cell nuclei of Arabidopsis thaliana pollen using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to analyze chromatin and RNA profiles. The method obviates generating transgenic lines expressing cell-type-specific fluorescence reporters and facilitates functional genomic analysis of various mutant lines and accessions. We evaluate the purity and quality of the sorted pollen nuclei and analyze the technique's molecular basis. Our results show that both DNA and RNA contents contribute to SYBR Green-activated nucleus sorting and RNA content differences impact on the separation of sperm and vegetative cell nuclei. We demonstrate the power of the approach by sorting wild-type and polyploid mutant sperm and vegetative cell nuclei from mitotic and meiotic mutants, which is not feasible using cell-type-specific transgenic reporters. Our approach should be applicable to pollen nuclei of crop plants and possibly to cell/nucleus types and cell cycle phases of different species containing substantially different amounts of DNA and/or RNA.

  15. Chromosome numbers and DNA content in some species of Mecardonia (Gratiolae, Plantaginaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, María M.; Angulo, María B.; Greppi, Julián A.; Bugallo, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetic characterization and determination of DNA content by flow cytometry of five species of Mecardonia Ruiz et Pavon, 1798 (Gratiolae, Plantaginaceae) was performed. This is the first study of nuclear DNA content carried out in the genus. Mitotic analysis revealed a base chromosome number x = 11 for all entities and different ploidy levels, ranging from diploid (2n = 2x = 22) to hexaploid (2n = 6x = 66). The results include the first report of the chromosome numbers for Mecardonia flagellaris (Chamisso & Schlechtendal, 1827) (2n = 22), Mecardonia grandiflora (Bentham) Pennell, 1946 (2n = 22), Mecardonia kamogawae Greppi & Hagiwara, 2011 (2n = 66), and Mecardonia sp. (2n = 44). The three ploidy levels here reported suggest that polyploidy is common in Mecardonia and appear to be an important factor in the evolution of this genus. The 2C- and 1Cx-values were also estimated in all the species. The 2C-values ranged from 1.91 to 5.29 pg. The 1Cx-values ranged from 0.88 to 1.03 pg. The general tendency indicated a decrease in the 1Cx-value with increasing ploidy level. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to taxonomy of the genus. PMID:28123693

  16. High-content fluorescent-based assay for screening activators of DNA damage checkpoint pathways.

    PubMed

    Bin Zhang; Xiubin Gu; Uppalapati, Uma; Ashwell, Mark A; Leggett, David S; Li, Chiang J

    2008-07-01

    Activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathways, including Chk2, serves as an anticancer barrier in precancerous lesions. In an effort to identify small-molecule activators of Chk2, the authors developed a quantitative cell-based assay using a high-content analysis (HCA) platform. Induction of phosphorylated Chk2 was evaluated using several different parameters, including fold induction, Kolmogorov-Smirnov score, and percentage of positively stained cells. These measurements were highly correlated and provided an accurate method for compound ranking/binning, structure-activity relationship studies, and lead identification. Screening for Chk2 activators was undertaken with a target-focused library and a diversified library from ArQule chemical space. Several compounds exhibited submicromolar EC( 50) values for phosphorylated Chk2 induction. These compounds were further analyzed for Chk2-dependent cytotoxicity, as assessed through a high-content cell death assay in combination with siRNA silencing of Chk2 expression. Several compounds were identified and showed specific inhibition or lethality in a target-dependent manner. Therefore, identification of DNA damage checkpoint pathway activators by HCA is an attractive approach for discovering the next generation of targeted cancer therapeutics.

  17. [Adaptation of the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus Schreber) to conditions of biogeochemical province with abnormally high content of nickel, cobalt and chromium].

    PubMed

    Mikheeva, E V; Zhigal'skiĭ, O A; Mamina, V P; Baĭtimirova, E A

    2006-01-01

    Morphophysiological characteristics and peculiarities of adrenal gland of bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) were studied in the area of natural biogeochemical province with abnormally high content of nickel, cobalt and chromium. The control population inhabited area with usual content of these elements. We used 4-factor analysis of variance to estimate the influence of geochemical conditions, phase of population cycle, sex and reproductive state on the morphophysiological characteristics of animals and functional activity of adrenal gland. Animals from area with high concentration of Ni, Co and Cr show an increase in relative mass of adrenal glands, fascicular zone of adrenal cortex, size of cells and their nuclei. All these changes can be considered as an evidence of increased secretion of glucocorticoids. It is shown that phase of population cycle influences fatness of animals, size of nuclei, cells and adrenal cortex. Females in comparison with males are characterized with higher indexes of liver and adrenal gland, as well as morphometric indexes of adrenal cortex. The maturation of animals is accompanied with increase in body mass, fatness and relative mass of adrenal glands, the size of cortex zone, nuclei and cells themselves. It is supposed that the effect of "geochemical factor" results in intensification of glucocorticoid secretion of adrenal costex, thus increasing non-specific resistance of animals inhabiting area with high concentration of heavy metals. Such factors as "phase of population cycle", "sex" and "reproductive state", influence mineralocorticoid activity, glucocorticoid and androgenic functions of adrenal cortex. Some factors show synergetic effect.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA and STR analyses for human DNA from maggots crop contents: a forensic entomology case from central-southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Cai, J F; Guo, Y D; Xiong, F; Zhang, L; Feng, H; Meng, F M; Fu, Y; Li, J B; Chen, Y Q

    2011-08-01

    Insect larvae and adult insects found on human corpses can provide important forensic evidence however it is useful to be able to prove evidence of association. Without this, it could be claimed that the insect evidence was a contaminant or had been planted on the body. This paper describes how mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and STR analysis of the crop contents of larvae of the blowfly Aldrichina grahami collected from separated body parts was used to provide evidence of association.

  19. Fragile sites, telomeric DNA sequences, B chromosomes, and DNA content in raccoon dogs, Nyctereutes procyonoides, with comparative notes on foxes, coyote, wolf, and raccoon.

    PubMed

    Wurster-Hill, D H; Ward, O G; Davis, B H; Park, J P; Moyzis, R K; Meyne, J

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies of the genus Nyctereutes disclosed two subspecies of differing chromosome numbers accompanied by B chromosomes. To further define the relationship of these subspecies to each other, and to other carnivores, and to learn more about the structure and function of their chromosomes, we characterized and compared the genomes in terms of DNA content by flow cytometry, fragile sites induced by aphidicolin, and telomere sequences using biotinylated DNA probes detected with fluorescence. We also characterized the B chromosomes of these two subspecies.

  20. Diosgenin contents and DNA fingerprint screening of various yam (Dioscorea sp.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Vendl, Oliver; Wawrosch, Christoph; Noe, Christian; Molina, Carlos; Kahl, Günter; Kopp, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    In addition to the importance of many Dioscorea species (yams) as starchy staple food, some representatives are known and still used as a source for the steroidal sapogenin diosgenin, which, besides phytosterols derived from tall-oil, is an important precursor for partial synthesis of steroids for pharmaceutical research and applications. While in edible yams the diosgenin content should be as low as possible, a high yield of the compound is preferable for cultivars which are grown for the extraction of sterols. In the past, miscalculations and insufficiently precise techniques for quantification of diosgenin prevailed. Therefore we set out to re-evaluate the steroid content of a world collection of Dioscorea species, using leaves as sample material. We optimized diosgenin quantification techniques and fingerprinted the whole collection with the DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) technique. Total diosgenin contents ranged from 0.04 to 0.93% of dry weight within the collection. Several Dioscorea cultivars can be characterized via their DAF fingerprint patterns.

  1. Nuclear DNA content affects the productivity of conifer forests by altering hydraulic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Josu; Resco de Dios, Víctor

    2014-05-01

    Predictions of future global climate rely on feedbacks between terrestrial vegetation and the global carbon cycle, but the exact mechanisms underlying this relationship are still being discussed. One of the key knowledge gaps lies on the scaling of cellular processes to the ecosystem level. Here we examine whether an under-explored plant trait, inter-specific variation in the bulk amount of DNA in unreplicated somatic cells (2C DNA content), can explain inter-specific variation in the maximum productivity of conifer forests. We expected 2C DNA content to be negatively related to conifer productivity because: 1) it is positively correlated with cell volume (which, in turn, potentially affects structural features such as leaf mass area, a strong predictor of photosynthetic capacity); 2) it is positively correlated with stomatal size (with larger stomata leading to lower overall stomatal conductance and, by extension, lower CO2 uptake); and 3) larger genome sizes may reduce P availability in RNA (which has been hypothesized to slow growth). We present the results of regression and independent contrasts in different monospecific forests encompassing a 52º latitudinal gradient, each being dominated by 1 of 35 different conifer species. Contrary to expectations, we observed a positive correlation between genome size and maximum Gross Primary Productivity (R2 = 0.47) and also between genome size maximum tree height (R2 = 0.27). This correlation was apparently driven by the effects of genome size on stem hydraulics, since 2C DNA was positively correlated with wood density (R2 = 0.40) and also with resistance to cavitation (P50, R2 = 0.28). That is, increased genome sizes have a positive effect on the productivity of conifer forests by affecting the vascular tissues to increase their capacity for water transport. Our results shed a new light on the evolution of the vascular system of conifer forests and how they affect ecosystem productivity, and indicate the potential to

  2. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  3. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  4. Abnormal rapid non-linear RNA production induced by T7 RNA polymerase in the absence of an exogenous DNA template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Y.; Fujinuma, A.; Fujita, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Umekage, S.

    2015-02-01

    Although recombinant T7 RNA polymerase is commonly used for in vitro RNA synthesis, several reports have pointed out that T7 RNA polymerase can also induce RNA-directed RNA polymerization or replication. In addition, here we show a new aberrant transcription when using T7 RNA polymerase. This polymerization was observed in the presence of both ribonucleotides and a purchasable T7 RNA polymerase, Thermo T7 RNA polymerase, as well as in the absence of an exogenous DNA template. This cryptic RNA production was detectable after several hours of incubation and was inhibited by adding DNase I. These findings suggested that some contaminated DNA along with the Thermo stable T7 RNA polymerase could be used as template DNA. However, to our surprise, RNA production showed a rapid non-linear increase. This finding strongly indicated that a self-replication cycle emerged from the RNA-directed polymerization or replication by T7 RNA polymerase, triggering the abnormal explosive increase.

  5. Myonuclear transcription is responsive to mechanical load and DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; Patel, Rooshil M; McClintock, Timothy S; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A; McCarthy, John J

    2016-03-01

    Myofibers increase size and DNA content in response to a hypertrophic stimulus, thus providing a physiological model with which to study how these factors affect global transcription. Using 5-ethynyl uridine (EU) to metabolically label nascent RNA, we measured a sevenfold increase in myofiber transcription during early hypertrophy before a change in cell size and DNA content. The typical increase in myofiber DNA content observed at the later stage of hypertrophy was associated with a significant decrease in the percentage of EU-positive myonuclei; however, when DNA content was held constant by preventing myonuclear accretion via satellite cell depletion, both the number of transcriptionally active myonuclei and the amount of RNA generated by each myonucleus increased. During late hypertrophy, transcription did not scale with cell size, as smaller myofibers (<1000 μm(2)) demonstrated the highest transcriptional activity. Finally, transcription was primarily responsible for changes in the expression of genes known to regulate myofiber size. These findings show that resident myonuclei possess a significant reserve capacity to up-regulate transcription during hypertrophy and that myofiber transcription is responsive to DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy.

  6. Myonuclear transcription is responsive to mechanical load and DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Tyler J.; Patel, Rooshil M.; McClintock, Timothy S.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.; McCarthy, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Myofibers increase size and DNA content in response to a hypertrophic stimulus, thus providing a physiological model with which to study how these factors affect global transcription. Using 5-ethynyl uridine (EU) to metabolically label nascent RNA, we measured a sevenfold increase in myofiber transcription during early hypertrophy before a change in cell size and DNA content. The typical increase in myofiber DNA content observed at the later stage of hypertrophy was associated with a significant decrease in the percentage of EU-positive myonuclei; however, when DNA content was held constant by preventing myonuclear accretion via satellite cell depletion, both the number of transcriptionally active myonuclei and the amount of RNA generated by each myonucleus increased. During late hypertrophy, transcription did not scale with cell size, as smaller myofibers (<1000 μm2) demonstrated the highest transcriptional activity. Finally, transcription was primarily responsible for changes in the expression of genes known to regulate myofiber size. These findings show that resident myonuclei possess a significant reserve capacity to up-regulate transcription during hypertrophy and that myofiber transcription is responsive to DNA content but uncoupled from cell size during hypertrophy. PMID:26764089

  7. Assessment of electron beam-induced abnormal development and DNA damage in Spodoptera litura (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Seon-Woo; Koo, Hyun-Na; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2014-03-01

    The armyworm, Spodoptera litura (F.) is a polyphagous and important agricultural pest worldwide. In this study, we examined the effect of electron beam irradiation on developmental stages, reproduction, and DNA damage of S. litura. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (3rd instar), pupae (3 days old after pupation), and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with electron beam irradiation of six levels between 30 and 250 Gy. When eggs were irradiated with 100 Gy, egg hatching was completely inhibited. When the larvae were irradiated, the larval period was significantly delayed, depending on the doses applied. At 150 Gy, the fecundity of adults that developed from irradiated pupae was entirely inhibited. However, electron beam irradiation did not induce the instantaneous death of S. litura adults. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated moths demonstrated that females were more radiosensitive than males. We also conducted the comet assay immediately after irradiation and over the following 5 days period. Severe DNA fragmentation in S. litura cells was observed just after irradiation and the damage was repaired during the post-irradiation period in a time-dependent manner. However, at more than 100 Gy, DNA damage was not fully recovered.

  8. New reports of nuclear DNA content for 407 vascular plant taxa from the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Chengke; Alverson, William S.; Follansbee, Aaron; Waller, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The amount of DNA in an unreplicated haploid nuclear genome (C-value) ranges over several orders of magnitude among plant species and represents a key metric for comparing plant genomes. To extend previously published datasets on plant nuclear content and to characterize the DNA content of many species present in one region of North America, flow cytometry was used to estimate C-values of woody and herbaceous species collected in Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA. Methods A total of 674 samples and vouchers were collected from locations across Wisconsin and Michigan, USA. From these, C-value estimates were obtained for 514 species, subspecies and varieties of vascular plants. Nuclei were extracted from samples of these species in one of two buffers, stained with the fluorochrome propidium iodide, and an Accuri C-6 flow cytometer was used to measure fluorescence peaks relative to those of an internal standard. Replicate extractions, coefficients of variation and comparisons to published C-values in the same and related species were used to confirm the accuracy and reliability of our results. Key Results and Conclusions Prime C-values for 407 taxa are provided for which no published data exist, including 390 angiosperms, two gymnosperms, ten monilophytes and five lycophytes. Non-prime reports for 107 additional taxa are also provided. The prime values represent new reports for 129 genera and five families (of 303 genera and 97 families sampled). New family C-value maxima or minima are reported for Betulaceae, Ericaceae, Ranunculaceae and Sapindaceae. These data provide the basis for phylogenetic analyses of C-value variation and future analyses of how C-values covary with other functional traits. PMID:23100602

  9. The megakaryocyte DNA content and platelet formation after the sublethal whole body irradiation of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tanum, G.

    1984-04-01

    The DNA content of rat bone marrow megakaryocytes (MK) was studied by Feulgen photometry, following whole body irradiation with 2 Gy. The DNA measurements were preceded by acetylcholinesterase staining to avoid missing the smaller 2N-8N MK. The number of 2N-8N MK declined immediately following irradiation, whereas the number of 16N-64N MK remained normal for 4 days before decreasing. The number of 2N-8N and 16N-64N MK reached minimum around days 7 and 10, respectively, and thereafter increased to supranormal values at days 14 and 20, respectively. Platelet production, measured by /sup 35/S incorporation into platelets, increased during the first 4 days, then decreased to minimum about day 10. A rise to supranormal values was present at day 20. All values were about normal 30 days after exposure. The observed pattern may be explained as follows: Most of the 16N-64N MK survive the applied dose and maintain their ability to produce platelets. Some of the 2N-4N and 8N MK survive irradiation and transform into platelet-producing MK. No influx of cells from the MK stem cell compartment into the MK compartment can be observed before day 7 after irradiation. One explanation for this time lag may be that thrombocytopenia, which does not occur before then, is an essential stimulus for MK stem cell activation.

  10. Analysis of nuclear DNA content in Capsicum (Solanaceae) by flow cytometry and Feulgen densitometry.

    PubMed

    Moscone, Eduardo A; Baranyi, Monika; Ebert, Irma; Greilhuber, Johann; Ehrendorfer, Friedrich; Hunziker, Armando T

    2003-07-01

    Flow cytometric measurements of nuclear DNA content were performed using ethidium bromide as the DNA stain (internal standard, Hordeum vulgare 'Ditta', 1C = 5.063 pg) in 25 samples belonging to nine diploid species and four varieties of Capsicum: C. chacoense, C. parvifolium, C. frutescens, C. chinense, C. annuum var. annuum, C. baccatum var. baccatum, C. baccatum var. pendulum, C. baccatum var. umbilicatum, C. eximium and C. pubescens, all with 2n = 24, and C. campylopodium with 2n = 26. In addition, one sample each of C. annuum var. annuum and C. pubescens were also analysed using Feulgen densitometry (standard, Allium cepa 'Stuttgarter Riesen', 1C = 16.75 pg). Both staining methods resulted in very similar relative values. Genome size displays significant variation between but not within species (except in C. campylopodium), and contributes to their taxonomic grouping. 1C-values range from 3.34-3.43 pg (3273-3361 Mbp) in C. chacoense and the C. annuum complex to 4.53-5.77 pg (4439-5655 Mbp) in C. campylopodium and C. parvifolium. The data obtained support conclusions on phylogenetic relationships in the genus derived from karyotype analyses using chromosome banding approaches. In Capsicum, constitutive heterochromatin amount is correlated with genome size, except in C. parvifolium, and is regarded as an additive genomic component.

  11. Large-scale evaluation of experimentally determined DNA G+C contents with whole genome sequences of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mincheol; Park, Sang-Cheol; Baek, Inwoo; Chun, Jongsik

    2015-03-01

    Historically, DNA G+C content has played a critical role in the description of bacterial and archaeal species. Despite its importance in prokaryote taxonomy, its accuracy has been questioned due to methodological heterogeneity and measurement errors of conventional methods. Here we investigated the extent of accuracy of experimentally determined DNA G+C contents by comparing the reference values calculated from whole genome sequences. The large-scale comparison revealed that G+C contents determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and buoyant density centrifugation methods were more similar to the genome-derived reference values than those generated by thermal denaturation method. However, there was a substantial degree of discrepancy in DNA G+C contents between values obtained by conventional methods and genome-derived reference values. The majority of the differences between them fell out of the acceptable range (i.e. 1 mol% G+C content difference) for species delimitation of prokaryotes. In contrast, when average nucleotide identity (ANI) was correlated to G+C difference among genomes, most G+C difference was confined to less than 1% within species. Therefore, erroneous conventional methods are not meaningful in the description of bacterial and archaeal species. For taxonomic purposes, DNA G+C content should be determined by calculating directly from high-quality genome sequences with at least 16× or higher sequencing depth of coverage.

  12. Prenatal Ambient Air Pollution, Placental Mitochondrial DNA Content, and Birth Weight in the INMA (Spain) and ENVIRONAGE (Belgium) Birth Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Diana B.P.; Casas, Maribel; Vilahur, Nadia; Begiristain, Haizea; Bustamante, Mariona; Carsin, Anne-Elie; Fernández, Mariana F.; Fierens, Frans; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Iñiguez, Carmen; Janssen, Bram G.; Lefebvre, Wouter; Llop, Sabrina; Olea, Nicolás; Pedersen, Marie; Pieters, Nicky; Santa Marina, Loreto; Souto, Ana; Tardón, Adonina; Vanpoucke, Charlotte; Vrijheid, Martine; Sunyer, Jordi; Nawrot, Tim S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mitochondria are sensitive to environmental toxicants due to their lack of repair capacity. Changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content may represent a biologically relevant intermediate outcome in mechanisms linking air pollution and fetal growth restriction. Objective: We investigated whether placental mtDNA content is a possible mediator of the association between prenatal nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure and birth weight. Methods: We used data from two independent European cohorts: INMA (n = 376; Spain) and ENVIRONAGE (n = 550; Belgium). Relative placental mtDNA content was determined as the ratio of two mitochondrial genes (MT-ND1 and MTF3212/R3319) to two control genes (RPLP0 and ACTB). Effect estimates for individual cohorts and the pooled data set were calculated using multiple linear regression and mixed models. We also performed a mediation analysis. Results: Pooled estimates indicated that a 10-μg/m3 increment in average NO2 exposure during pregnancy was associated with a 4.9% decrease in placental mtDNA content (95% CI: –9.3, –0.3%) and a 48-g decrease (95% CI: –87, –9 g) in birth weight. However, the association with birth weight was significant for INMA (–66 g; 95% CI: –111, –23 g) but not for ENVIRONAGE (–20 g; 95% CI: –101, 62 g). Placental mtDNA content was associated with significantly higher mean birth weight (pooled analysis, interquartile range increase: 140 g; 95% CI: 43, 237 g). Mediation analysis estimates, which were derived for the INMA cohort only, suggested that 10% (95% CI: 6.6, 13.0 g) of the association between prenatal NO2 and birth weight was mediated by changes in placental mtDNA content. Conclusion: Our results suggest that mtDNA content can be one of the potential mediators of the association between prenatal air pollution exposure and birth weight. Citation: Clemente DB, Casas M, Vilahur N, Begiristain H, Bustamante M, Carsin AE, Fernández MF, Fierens F, Gyselaers W, Iñiguez C, Janssen BG

  13. Correlations of geographic distribution and temperature of embryonic development with the nuclear DNA content in the Salamandridae (Urodela, Amphibia).

    PubMed

    Litvinchuk, Spartak N; Rosanov, Jury M; Borkin, Leo J

    2007-04-01

    We used flow cytometry to measure the nuclear DNA content in erythrocytes of 27 salamandrid species. Across these species, diploid genome size varied more than 2 fold (51.3-104.4 pg). According to genome size and geographic distribution, 3 groups of newt species were recognized: West Palearctics with smaller amounts of nuclear DNA; Nearctic, with intermediate values; and East Asiatic, with higher genome sizes. Viviparous West Palearctic salamanders differed from most of the oviparous West Palearctic newts in possessing larger genome sizes. The nuclear DNA content strongly correlates with species range limits. At the same temperature, embryos of salamandrid species with larger genome sizes have a markedly longer developmental time than those with smaller genomes. We present an analysis of the relationships between the amount of nuclear DNA and water temperature at the breeding sites.

  14. Abnormal expression of mRNA, microRNA alteration and aberrant DNA methylation patterns in rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xianglong; Yuan, Xiangfei; Qin, Hai; Zhang, Xipeng

    2017-01-01

    Aim Rectal adenocarcinoma (READ) is a malignancy cancer with the high morbidity and motility worldwide. Our study aimed to explore the potential pathogenesis of READ through integrated analysis of gene expression profiling and DNA methylation data. Methods The miRNA, mRNA expression profiling and corresponding DNA methylation data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Differentially expressed mRNAs/ miRNAs/methylated regions (DEmRNA/DEmiRNAs) were identified in READ. The negatively correlation of DEmiRNA-DEmRNAs and DNA methylation-DEmRNAs were obtained. DEmRNAs expression was validated through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microarray expression profiling analyses. Results 1192 dysregulated DEmRNAs, 27 dysregulated DEmiRNAs and 6403 aberrant methylation CpG sites were screened in READ compared to normal controls. 1987 negative interaction pairs among 27 DEmiRNAs and 668 DEmRNAs were predicted. 446 genes with aberrant methylation were annotated. Eventually, 50 DEmRNAs (39 down- and 11 up-regulated DEmRNAs) with hypermethylation, synchronously negatively targeted by DEmiRNAs, were identified through the correlation analysis among 446 genes with aberrant methylation and 668 DEmRNAs. 50 DEmRNAs were significantly enriched in cAMP signaling pathway, circadian entrainment and glutamatergic synapse. The validation results of expression levels of DEmRNAs through qRT-PCR and microarray analyses were compatible with our study. Conclusion 7 genes of SORCS1, PDZRN4, LONRF2, CNGA3, HAND2, RSPO2 and GNAO1 with hypermethylation and negatively regulation by DEmiRNAs might contribute to the tumorigenesis of READ. Our work might provide valuable foundation for the READ in mechanism elucidation, early diagnosis and therapeutic target identification. PMID:28350845

  15. Evaluation of oxidative DNA lesions in plasma and nuclear abnormalities in erythrocytes of wild fish (Liza aurata) as an integrated approach to genotoxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M; Ahmad, I; Maria, V L; Ferreira, C S S; Serafim, A; Bebianno, M J; Pacheco, M; Santos, M A

    2010-12-21

    Genetic lesions (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA) were seasonally quantified in the blood of Liza aurata caught at Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), a multi-contaminated aquatic system. Thus, five critical sites were assessed and compared with a reference site (Torreira). Oxidative DNA damage was found in Gafanha (harbour-water area), Laranjo (metal-contaminated) and Vagos (contaminated with PAHs) in the spring; Rio Novo do Principe (near a former paper-mill effluent) in the autumn; Rio Novo do Principe and Vagos in the winter. ENA were higher than Torreira at VAG (spring and winter). Torreira did not display seasonal variation neither in terms of 8-OHdG or total ENA. A positive correlation between 8-OHdG and ENA was found, suggesting oxidative stress as a mechanism involved in the formation of ENA. This study clearly demonstrates the presence of DNA-damaging substances in Ria de Aveiro and recommends the use of 8-OHdG and ENA as biomarkers of environmental contamination.

  16. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Screening for Methylated Poly(l-histidine) with Various Dimethylimidazolium/Methylimidazole/Imidazole Contents as DNA Carrier.

    PubMed

    Asayama, Shoichiro; Kumagai, Takao; Kawakami, Hiroyoshi

    2015-08-25

    : Methylated poly(l-histidine) (PLH-Me), our original polypeptide, has controlled the contents of dimethylimidazolium, τ/π-methylimidazole and imidazole groups for efficient gene delivery. The screening for the PLH-Me as DNA carrier has been carried out by use of the PLH with 25 mol% (τ-methyl, 16 mol%; π-methyl, 17 mol%; deprotonated imidazole, 41 mol%), 68 mol% (τ-methyl, 16 mol%; π-methyl, 8 mol%; deprotonated imidazole, 8 mol%) and 87 mol% (τ-methyl, 7 mol%; π-methyl, 4 mol%; deprotonated imidazole, 2 mol%) dimethylimidazolium groups, that is, PLH-Me(25), PLH-Me(68) and PLH-Me(87), respectively. The screening of the chemical structure of PLH-Me has been carried out for DNA carrier properties, which are the stability of its DNA polyion complexes and gene expression. The DNA complexes with the 25 mol% and 68 mol% dimethylated PLH-Me possessed almost same ability to retain DNA, as compared with the 87 mol% dimethylated PLH-Me, which was examined by competitive exchange with dextran sulfate. From the gene transfection experiment against HepG2 cells, human hepatoma cell line, the PLH-Me(25)/DNA complex was revealed to mediate highest gene expression. These results suggest that the dimethyl-imidazolium/methylimidazole/imidazole balance of the PLH-Me is important for DNA carrier design.

  18. Adsorption of DNA on colloidal Ag nanoparticles: effects of nanoparticle surface charge, base content and length of DNA.

    PubMed

    Abbasian, Sara; Moshaii, Ahmad; Nikkhah, Maryam; Farkhari, Nahid

    2014-04-01

    The adsorption of single and double stranded DNA on colloidal silver nanoparticles has been studied to investigate the effects of surface charge of the nanoparticles, the composition of the oligonucleotide and its length on the adsorption characteristics. The results explain that the nanoparticle surface charge is a key parameter determining the propensity of oligonucleotides to adsorb on nanoparticles. The adsorption also depends on the length and composition of oligonucleotide. The protective effects of both single and double stranded DNA against salt-induced aggregation dramatically increase as the DNA length increases. In contrast to other available reports, we observed that long oligonucleotides (single-stranded and double stranded) can well be adsorbed on the nanoparticles as the short ones leading to almost complete protection of nanoparticles against salt induced aggregation and hence are not suitable for the sensing applications. Finally, the light scattering from the Ag nanoparticles has been simulated and the results compared with the experiments. Our understanding should improve development of colorimetric assays for DNA detection based on aggregation of unmodified metallic nanoparticles.

  19. Cross-species analysis of genic GC3 content and DNA methylation patterns.

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Elhaik, Eran; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The GC content in the third codon position (GC(3)) exhibits a unimodal distribution in many plant and animal genomes. Interestingly, grasses and homeotherm vertebrates exhibit a unique bimodal distribution. High GC(3) was previously found to be associated with variable expression, higher frequency of upstream TATA boxes, and an increase of GC(3) from 5' to 3'. Moreover, GC(3)-rich genes are predominant in certain gene classes and are enriched in CpG dinucleotides that are potential targets for methylation. Based on the GC(3) bimodal distribution we hypothesize that GC(3) has a regulatory role involving methylation and gene expression. To test that hypothesis, we selected diverse taxa (rice, thale cress, bee, and human) that varied in the modality of their GC(3) distribution and tested the association between GC(3), DNA methylation, and gene expression. We examine the relationship between cytosine methylation levels and GC(3), gene expression, genome signature, gene length, and other gene compositional features. We find a strong negative correlation (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = -0.67, P value < 0.0001) between GC(3) and genic CpG methylation. The comparison between 5'-3' gradients of CG(3)-skew and genic methylation for the taxa in the study suggests interplay between gene-body methylation and transcription-coupled cytosine deamination effect. Compositional features are correlated with methylation levels of genes in rice, thale cress, human, bee, and fruit fly (which acts as an unmethylated control). These patterns allow us to generate evolutionary hypotheses about the relationships between GC(3) and methylation and how these affect expression patterns. Specifically, we propose that the opposite effects of methylation and compositional gradients along coding regions of GC(3)-poor and GC(3)-rich genes are the products of several competing processes.

  20. Cross-Species Analysis of Genic GC3 Content and DNA Methylation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Elhaik, Eran; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The GC content in the third codon position (GC3) exhibits a unimodal distribution in many plant and animal genomes. Interestingly, grasses and homeotherm vertebrates exhibit a unique bimodal distribution. High GC3 was previously found to be associated with variable expression, higher frequency of upstream TATA boxes, and an increase of GC3 from 5′ to 3′. Moreover, GC3-rich genes are predominant in certain gene classes and are enriched in CpG dinucleotides that are potential targets for methylation. Based on the GC3 bimodal distribution we hypothesize that GC3 has a regulatory role involving methylation and gene expression. To test that hypothesis, we selected diverse taxa (rice, thale cress, bee, and human) that varied in the modality of their GC3 distribution and tested the association between GC3, DNA methylation, and gene expression. We examine the relationship between cytosine methylation levels and GC3, gene expression, genome signature, gene length, and other gene compositional features. We find a strong negative correlation (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r = −0.67, P value < 0.0001) between GC3 and genic CpG methylation. The comparison between 5′-3′ gradients of CG3-skew and genic methylation for the taxa in the study suggests interplay between gene-body methylation and transcription-coupled cytosine deamination effect. Compositional features are correlated with methylation levels of genes in rice, thale cress, human, bee, and fruit fly (which acts as an unmethylated control). These patterns allow us to generate evolutionary hypotheses about the relationships between GC3 and methylation and how these affect expression patterns. Specifically, we propose that the opposite effects of methylation and compositional gradients along coding regions of GC3-poor and GC3-rich genes are the products of several competing processes. PMID:23833164

  1. Using flow cytometry to estimate pollen DNA content: improved methodology and applications

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Paul; Husband, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Flow cytometry has been used to measure nuclear DNA content in pollen, mostly to understand pollen development and detect unreduced gametes. Published data have not always met the high-quality standards required for some applications, in part due to difficulties inherent in the extraction of nuclei. Here we describe a simple and relatively novel method for extracting pollen nuclei, involving the bursting of pollen through a nylon mesh, compare it with other methods and demonstrate its broad applicability and utility. Methods The method was tested across 80 species, 64 genera and 33 families, and the data were evaluated using established criteria for estimating genome size and analysing cell cycle. Filter bursting was directly compared with chopping in five species, yields were compared with published values for sonicated samples, and the method was applied by comparing genome size estimates for leaf and pollen nuclei in six species. Key Results Data quality met generally applied standards for estimating genome size in 81 % of species and the higher best practice standards for cell cycle analysis in 51 %. In 41 % of species we met the most stringent criterion of screening 10 000 pollen grains per sample. In direct comparison with two chopping techniques, our method produced better quality histograms with consistently higher nuclei yields, and yields were higher than previously published results for sonication. In three binucleate and three trinucleate species we found that pollen-based genome size estimates differed from leaf tissue estimates by 1·5 % or less when 1C pollen nuclei were used, while estimates from 2C generative nuclei differed from leaf estimates by up to 2·5 %. Conclusions The high success rate, ease of use and wide applicability of the filter bursting method show that this method can facilitate the use of pollen for estimating genome size and dramatically improve unreduced pollen production estimation with flow cytometry. PMID

  2. Group-specific primers for DNA-based detection of springtails (Hexapoda: Collembola) within predator gut contents.

    PubMed

    Kuusk, A K; Agustí, N

    2008-05-01

    Group-specific, degenerate polymerase chain reaction primers for DNA-based detection of springtails (Hexapoda: Collembola) within predator gut contents have been developed for the first time. Primers were designed from 18S rDNA and amplified fragments of 272 bp and 177 bp from 17 springtail species collected in agricultural habitats. Specificity tests against 41 nontarget species revealed no cross-reactivity. Group-specific polymerase chain reaction is advantageous when working in species-rich habitats and these primers could facilitate studies of trophic links between springtails and generalist arthropod predators worldwide.

  3. Information content and complexity in the high-order organization of DNA.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Abraham

    2004-01-01

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a vast structural variability. Secondary structural conformations include the main polymorphs A, B, and Z, cruciforms, intrinsic curvature, and multistranded motifs. DNA secondary motifs are stabilized and regulated by the primary base sequence, contextual effects, environmental factors, as well as by high-order DNA packaging modes. The high-order modes are, in turn, affected by secondary structures and by the environment. This review is concerned with the flow of structural information among the hierarchical structural levels of DNA molecules, the intricate interplay between the various factors that affect these levels, and the regulation and physiological significance of DNA high-order structures.

  4. An association analysis between mitochondrial DNA content, G10398A polymorphism, HPV infection, and the prognosis of cervical cancer in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dali; Xu, Hui; Li, Xin; Wei, Yuehua; Jiang, Huangang; Xu, Hong; Luo, Aihua; Zhou, Fuxiang

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to analyze quantitative (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content) and qualitative (G10398A polymorphism) mtDNA alterations as well as human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in cervical cancer prognosis. One hundred and twenty-two cases of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical carcinoma specimens were collected from the Yichang Tumor Hospital and Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University in the recent 10 years together with medical records. A quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to determine the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA and HPV expression levels. G10398A polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP assay. The overall survival of patients with higher mtDNA content was significantly reduced compared with lower mtDNA content patients (P = 0.029). But there was no difference of prognosis between the mtDNA 10398 A allele and G allele. However, the Kaplan-Meier survival curve illustrated a significantly reduced overall survival in the patients with 10398A plus high mtDNA copy number compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). Although no association between HPV expression level and cervical cancer prognosis was observed, 10398A got increased mtDNA content compared with 10398G (P < 0.05) and 10398G displayed an increased HPV-positive rate compared with 10398A. Furthermore, HPV-18 and mtDNA content were positively related in the younger subgroup (≤45 years) (correlation coefficient = 0.456, P = 0.022). This study indicated that mtDNA content and HPV infection status are associated with cervical cancer prognosis. High mitochondrial DNA content plus 10398 A may be a marker of poor prognosis in cervical cancer. And mtDNA variation may potentially influence the predisposition to HPV infection and cervical carcinogenesis.

  5. The relationships between the /sup 67/Ga uptake and nuclear DNA Feulgen content in thyroid tumors: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Hisada, T.; Mimura, T.; Ito, K.; Allison, J.R.

    1982-11-01

    It has been reported that /sup 67/Ga uptake by malignant tumors differs somewhat according to the histologic type. Previously, we reported that uptake of /sup 67/Ga is predictably low in well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland but high in anaplastic carcinoma and malignant lymphoma. We studied the relationship between /sup 67/Ga uptake and nuclear DNA content in four papillary adenocarcinomas, three follicular adenocarcinomas, three anaplastic carcinomas, and five malignant lymphomas of the thyroid gland. In anaplastic carcinoma and malignant lymphoma, the nuclear DNA content and proliferative index were significantly higher than in well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. These results suggest that there is close correlation between /sup 67/Ga uptake and degree of malignancy of thyroid tumor cells.

  6. The relationships between the Ga-67 uptake and nuclear DNA feulgen content in thyroid tumors: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Hisada, T.; Mimura, T.; Ito, K.; Allison, J.R.

    1982-11-01

    It has been reported that Ga-67 uptake by malignant tumors differs somewhat according to the histologic type. Previously, we reported that uptake of Ga-67 is predictably low in well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland but high in anaplastic carcinoma and malignant lymphoma. We studied the relationship between Ga-67 uptake and nuclear DNA content in four papillary adenocarcinomas, three follicular adenocarcinomas, three anaplastic carcinomas, and five malignant lymphomas of the thyroid gland. In anaplastic carcinoma and malignant lymphoma, the nuclear DNA content and proliferative index were significantly higher than in well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. These results suggest that there is close correlation between Ga-67 uptake and degree of malignancy of thyroid tumor cells.

  7. Membrane vesicles in sea water: heterogeneous DNA content and implications for viral abundance estimates.

    PubMed

    Biller, Steven J; McDaniel, Lauren D; Breitbart, Mya; Rogers, Everett; Paul, John H; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2017-02-01

    Diverse microbes release membrane-bound extracellular vesicles from their outer surfaces into the surrounding environment. Vesicles are found in numerous habitats including the oceans, where they likely have a variety of functional roles in microbial ecosystems. Extracellular vesicles are known to contain a range of biomolecules including DNA, but the frequency with which DNA is packaged in vesicles is unknown. Here, we examine the quantity and distribution of DNA associated with vesicles released from five different bacteria. The average quantity of double-stranded DNA and size distribution of DNA fragments released within vesicles varies among different taxa. Although some vesicles contain sufficient DNA to be visible following staining with the SYBR fluorescent DNA dyes typically used to enumerate viruses, this represents only a small proportion (<0.01-1%) of vesicles. Thus DNA is packaged heterogeneously within vesicle populations, and it appears that vesicles are likely to be a minor component of SYBR-visible particles in natural sea water compared with viruses. Consistent with this hypothesis, chloroform treatment of coastal and offshore seawater samples reveals that vesicles increase epifluorescence-based particle (viral) counts by less than an order of magnitude and their impact is variable in space and time.

  8. Arbitrary single primer amplification of trace DNA substrates yields sequence content profiles that are discriminatory and reproducible.

    PubMed

    Waters, James M; Eariss, Graham; Yeadon, P Jane; Kirkbride, K Paul; Burgoyne, Leigh A; Catcheside, David E A

    2012-02-01

    Single primer amplification is shown to yield a DNA profile that is reproducible when based on the sequence content of the amplicons rather than on the pattern of length polymorphism. The sequence-based profile increases in reliability with increasing numbers of cycles of amplification. This process uses an arbitrarily chosen primer and a low initial annealing temperature in order to amplify sequences from the whole metagenome present in a sample that may contain only trace DNA, and a large number of cycles to select subsets of sequences based on variable amplification efficiency. Using arrays, we demonstrate the utility and limitations of this approach for profiling the large metagenomes typical of soils and the trace DNA present in drug seizures. We suggest that this type of profiling will be most effective once next-generation sequencing and advanced sequence analysis becomes routine.

  9. Comparison of the detection of HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 by type-specific DNA- and E6/E7 mRNA-based assays of HPV DNA positive women with abnormal Pap smears.

    PubMed

    Salimović-Bešić, Irma; Tomić-Čiča, Anja; Smailji, Admir; Hukić, Mirsada

    2013-12-01

    This study compares the type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test with E6/E7 mRNA detection assay because of their importance in cervical cancer screening programs. A total of 105 women with positive high-risk Hybrid Capture 2 or Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV screening test and an abnormal cervical Pap smear were enrolled in the study. HPV typing was performed by multiplex real-time PCR (HPV High Risk Typing Real-TM test). HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 E6/E7 mRNAs were determined by type-specific real-time NASBA assay (NucliSENS EasyQ HPV v1.1). Infections caused by HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 types increased with severity of cervical cytology (p=0.008). Global positivity of five HPV E6/E7 mRNAs was lower than DNA positivity within women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (p=0.016; p=0.008). High agreement of the tests was found in the groups of women with low-grade (p=1.000; p=0.063) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (p=0.250; p=0.125). Type-specific agreement of both diagnostic approaches was high regardless of cytology. Based on the found differences between HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 E6/E7 mRNA and DNA positivity, further study is needed to test the role of mRNA testing in the triage of women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance in Pap smear.

  10. Chromosomal instability, aneuploidy and routine high-resolution DNA content analysis in oral cancer risk evaluation.

    PubMed

    Giaretti, Walter; Pentenero, Monica; Gandolfo, Sergio; Castagnola, Patrizio

    2012-10-01

    Carcinogen exposure of the oral cavity is thought to create an extensive 'field cancerization'. According to this model, a very early precursor of oral cancer is a patch of normal-appearing mucosa in which stem cells share genetic/genomic aberrations. These precancerous fields then become clinically visible as white and red lesions (leuko- and erythro-plakias), which represent the vast majority of the oral potentially malignant disorders. This review focuses on aneuploidy (where it is from) and on biomarkers associated with DNA aneuploidy in oral mucosa and oral potentially malignant disorders, as detected by DNA image and flow cytometry. Data from the literature strongly support the association of DNA ploidy with dysplasia. However, work is still needed to prove the clinical value of DNA ploidy in large-scale prospective studies. Using high-resolution DNA flow cytometry with fresh/frozen material and the degree of DNA aneuploidy (DNA Index) might improve the prediction of risk of oral cancer development.

  11. Ploidy Level and DNA Content of Erianthus arundinaceus as Determined by Flow Cytometry and the Association with Biological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kaiyan; Chang, Dan; Bai, Shiqie; Shen, Yixin; Huang, Linkai; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Yanhai

    2016-01-01

    Erianthus arundinaceus is not only an important germplasm resource for sugarcane breeding but also a potential bioenergy plant. Making clear the distribution of the chromosome ploidy of wild E. arundinaceus in china is the premise of the research and utilization of this species. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the ploidy level and DNA content of the 55 E. arundinaceus accessions using flow cytometry and to identify the correlation between ploidy and phenotypic traits. Among the 55 accessions, four tetraploids and 51 hexaploids were identified. The four tetraploids originated from Mengma Yunnan, Shuangjiang Yunnan, Gaozhou Guangdong and Chengle Sichuan. The mean DNA content was 4.82 pg/2C for the tetraploid and 7.30 pg/2C for the hexaploid plants. The ploidy was negatively correlated with cellulose content and positively correlated (P<0.05) with plant height, stem diameter, leaf width, dry weight per plant, fresh weight per plant and hemicellulose content. However, ploidy was not correlated with leaf length, tiller number and the ratio of dry weight and fresh weight. This study will be useful for revealing the distribution of the ploidy of wild E. arundinaceus in Chin, traits markers analysis, and utilization of this species, such as cultivar improvement and sugarcane breeding in the future. PMID:27010798

  12. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  13. Relationship between radiation-induced aberrations in individual chromosomes and their DNA content: effects of interaction distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; Lucas, J. N.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the effect of the interaction distance on the frequency of inter- and intrachromosome exchanges in individual chromosomes with respect to their DNA content. Assumptions: Chromosome exchanges are formed by misrejoining of two DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) induced within an interaction distance, d. It is assumed that chromosomes in G(0)/G(1) phase of the cell cycle occupy a spherical domain in a cell nucleus, with no spatial overlap between individual chromosome domains. RESULTS: Formulae are derived for the probability of formation of inter-, as well as intra-, chromosome exchanges relating to the DNA content of the chromosome for a given interaction distance. For interaction distances <1 microm, the relative frequency of interchromosome exchanges predicted by the present model is similar to that by Cigarran et al. (1998) based on the assumption that the probability of interchromosome exchanges is proportional to the "surface area" of the chromosome territory. The "surface area" assumption is shown to be a limiting case of d-->0 in the present model. The present model also predicts that the probability of intrachromosome exchanges occurring in individual chromosomes is proportional to their DNA content with correction terms. CONCLUSION: When the interaction distance is small, the "surface area" distribution for chromosome participation in interchromosome exchanges has been expected. However, the present model shows that for the interaction distance as large as 1 microm, the predicted probability of interchromosome exchange formation is still close to the surface area distribution. Therefore, this distribution does not necessarily rule out the formation of complex chromosomal aberrations by long-range misrejoining of DSB.

  14. Phylogenetic Information Content of Copepoda Ribosomal DNA Repeat Units: ITS1 and ITS2 Impact

    PubMed Central

    Zagoskin, Maxim V.; Lazareva, Valentina I.; Grishanin, Andrey K.; Mukha, Dmitry V.

    2014-01-01

    The utility of various regions of the ribosomal repeat unit for phylogenetic analysis was examined in 16 species representing four families, nine genera, and two orders of the subclass Copepoda (Crustacea). Fragments approximately 2000 bp in length containing the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) 18S and 28S gene fragments, the 5.8S gene, and the internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS1 and ITS2) were amplified and analyzed. The DAMBE (Data Analysis in Molecular Biology and Evolution) software was used to analyze the saturation of nucleotide substitutions; this test revealed the suitability of both the 28S gene fragment and the ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions for the reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. Distance (minimum evolution) and probabilistic (maximum likelihood, Bayesian) analyses of the data revealed that the 28S rDNA and the ITS1 and ITS2 regions are informative markers for inferring phylogenetic relationships among families of copepods and within the Cyclopidae family and associated genera. Split-graph analysis of concatenated ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions of cyclopoid copepods suggested that the Mesocyclops, Thermocyclops, and Macrocyclops genera share complex evolutionary relationships. This study revealed that the ITS1 and ITS2 regions potentially represent different phylogenetic signals. PMID:25215300

  15. Phylogenetic information content of Copepoda ribosomal DNA repeat units: ITS1 and ITS2 impact.

    PubMed

    Zagoskin, Maxim V; Lazareva, Valentina I; Grishanin, Andrey K; Mukha, Dmitry V

    2014-01-01

    The utility of various regions of the ribosomal repeat unit for phylogenetic analysis was examined in 16 species representing four families, nine genera, and two orders of the subclass Copepoda (Crustacea). Fragments approximately 2000 bp in length containing the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) 18S and 28S gene fragments, the 5.8S gene, and the internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS1 and ITS2) were amplified and analyzed. The DAMBE (Data Analysis in Molecular Biology and Evolution) software was used to analyze the saturation of nucleotide substitutions; this test revealed the suitability of both the 28S gene fragment and the ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions for the reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. Distance (minimum evolution) and probabilistic (maximum likelihood, Bayesian) analyses of the data revealed that the 28S rDNA and the ITS1 and ITS2 regions are informative markers for inferring phylogenetic relationships among families of copepods and within the Cyclopidae family and associated genera. Split-graph analysis of concatenated ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions of cyclopoid copepods suggested that the Mesocyclops, Thermocyclops, and Macrocyclops genera share complex evolutionary relationships. This study revealed that the ITS1 and ITS2 regions potentially represent different phylogenetic signals.

  16. Variation of karyotype and nuclear DNA content among four species of Plectranthus L' Héritier, 1788 (Lamiaceae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nani, Thaís Furtado; Mesquita, Amanda Teixeira; Bustamante, Fernanda de Oliveira; Barbosa, Sandro; Barbosa, João Vítor Calvelli; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2015-01-01

    Plectranthus is a genus which includes species of ornamental and medicinal potential. It faces taxonomic problems due to aggregating species previously belonging to the genus Coleus, a fact that has contributed to the existence of various synonymies. The species Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus barbatus, Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus neochilus are included in this context. Some authors consider Plectranthus barbatus and Plectranthus grandis as synonyms. The present work was carried out with the aim of comparing plants of the above-mentioned species, originating from different localities in Brazil, with regards to chromosome number and karyotypic morphology, correlated to the nuclear DNA content. There was no variation in chromosome number among plants of the same species. Plectranthus amboinicus was the only species to exhibit 2n=34, whereas the others had 2n=30. No karyotypic differences were found among the plants of each species, except for Plectranthus barbatus. The plants of the Plectranthus species revealed little coincidence between chromosome pairs. The nuclear DNA content allowed grouping Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus, with the highest mean values, and Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus barbatus with the lowest ones. Differences in DNA amount among the plants were identified only for Plectranthus barbatus. These results allow the inference that the populations of Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus present coincident karyotypes among their plants, and Plectranthus grandis is probably a synonym of Plectranthus barbatus.

  17. Variation of karyotype and nuclear DNA content among four species of Plectranthus L’ Héritier, 1788 (Lamiaceae) from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nani, Thaís Furtado; Mesquita, Amanda Teixeira; Bustamante, Fernanda de Oliveira; Barbosa, Sandro; Barbosa, João Vítor Calvelli; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plectranthus is a genus which includes species of ornamental and medicinal potential. It faces taxonomic problems due to aggregating species previously belonging to the genus Coleus, a fact that has contributed to the existence of various synonymies. The species Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus barbatus, Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus neochilus are included in this context. Some authors consider Plectranthus barbatus and Plectranthus grandis as synonyms. The present work was carried out with the aim of comparing plants of the above-mentioned species, originating from different localities in Brazil, with regards to chromosome number and karyotypic morphology, correlated to the nuclear DNA content. There was no variation in chromosome number among plants of the same species. Plectranthus amboinicus was the only species to exhibit 2n=34, whereas the others had 2n=30. No karyotypic differences were found among the plants of each species, except for Plectranthus barbatus. The plants of the Plectranthus species revealed little coincidence between chromosome pairs. The nuclear DNA content allowed grouping Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus, with the highest mean values, and Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus barbatus with the lowest ones. Differences in DNA amount among the plants were identified only for Plectranthus barbatus. These results allow the inference that the populations of Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus present coincident karyotypes among their plants, and Plectranthus grandis is probably a synonym of Plectranthus barbatus. PMID:26753074

  18. Measuring the DNA Content of Cells in Apoptosis and at Different Cell-Cycle Stages by Propidium Iodide Staining and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Chojnowski, Grace; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-10-03

    All cells are created from preexisting cells. This involves complete duplication of the parent cell to create two daughter cells by a process known as the cell cycle. For this process to be successful, the DNA of the parent cell must be faithfully replicated so that each daughter cell receives a full copy of the genetic information. During the cell cycle, the DNA content of the parent cell increases as new DNA is synthesized (S phase). When there are two full copies of the DNA (G2/M phase), the cell splits to form two new cells (G0/G1 phase). As such, cells in different stages of the cell cycle have different DNA contents. The cell cycle is tightly regulated to safeguard the integrity of the cell and any cell that is defective or unable to complete the cell cycle is programmed to die by apoptosis. When this occurs, the DNA is fragmented into oligonucleosomal-sized fragments that are disposed of when the dead cell is removed by phagocytosis. Consequently apoptotic cells have reduced DNA content compared with living cells. This can be measured by staining cells with propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent molecule that intercalates with DNA at a specific ratio. The level of PI fluorescence in a cell is, therefore, directly proportional to the DNA content of that cell. This protocol describes the use of PI staining to determine the percentage of cells in each phase of the cell cycle and the percentage of apoptotic cells in a sample.

  19. TOTO and YOYO: New very bright fluorochromes for DNA content analyses by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hirons, G.T.; Fawcett, J.J.; Crissman, H.A. )

    1994-02-01

    Flow cytometric (FCM) studies were performed on nuclei, ethanol-fixed CHO cells, and isolated human GM130 chromosomes stained with two new cyanine dyes, TOTO and YOYO. These fluorochromes, which are dimers of thiazole orange and oxazole yellow, respectively, have high quantum efficiencies and exhibit specificities for both DNA and RNA. Bound to dsDNA in solution, TOTO and YOYO emit at 530 and 510 nm, respectively, when excited at 488 nm and 457 nm, wavelengths available from most lasers employed in FCM. RNase-treated CHO nuclei, stained with either TOTO or YOYO, provided DNA histograms, with low coefficients of variation, that were as good as or better than those obtained with nuclei stained with propidium iodide (PI) or mithramycin (MI). In addition, by comparison on an equimolar basis, nuclei stained with YOYO fluoresced over 1,000 times more intensely than nuclei stained with MI. Fluorescence ratio analyses of nuclei stained with both YOYO and Hoechst 33258 showed that the ratio of YOYO to Hoechst fluorescence remained relatively constant for G[sub 1] and S phase cells, but decreased significantly for cells in G[sub 2]/M. These results indicate that the cyanine dyes may be useful in examining specific changes in chromatin structure during G[sub 2]/M phases of the cell cycle. Ethanol-fixed CHO cells stained with TOTO or YOYO did not yield reproducible DNA histograms of good quality, presumably because of the poor accessibility of DNA to these large fluorochromes. However, bivariate analyses of human GM130 chromosomes stained with TOTO or YOYO alone and excited sequentially with uv and visible wavelengths showed resolution of many individual chromosome peaks similar to results obtained for chromosomes stained with HO and chromomycin A[sub 3]. Collectively, these studies show potential advantages for the use of these new cyanine dyes in FCM studies that require the sensitive detection of DNA. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. DNA repeat lengths of erythrocyte chromatins differing in content of histones H1 and H5.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, B L; Neelin, J M

    1980-01-01

    Among the erythrocytes of chicken, trout, carp, and sucker, the relative proportion of the lysine-rich histone H5 varied from 20 to 0% of the total histones. Following digestion of nuclear chromatin with micrococcal nuclease, each of them displayed a longer DNA repeat length and greater repeat length heterogeneity than found in liver chromatin. Fish erythrocytes possessed similar repeat lengths of 207-209 base pairs which was 10-12 base pairs shorter than in chicken erythrocyte chromatin and approximately 10 base pairs longer than in liver chromatin. No correlation existed between the DNA repeat length or repeat length heterogeneity and the relative proportion of H5. Images PMID:6777761

  1. Barcoding, types and the Hirudo files: using information content to critically evaluate the identity of DNA barcodes.

    PubMed

    Kvist, Sebastian; Oceguera-Figueroa, Alejandro; Siddall, Mark E; Erséus, Christer

    2010-12-01

    Species identifications based on DNA barcoding rely on the correct identity of previously barcoded specimens, but little attention has been given to whether deposited barcodes include correspondence to the species' name-bearing type. The information content associated with COX1 sequences in the two most commonly used repositories of barcodes, GenBank and the Barcode of Life Data System (BOLD), is often insufficient for subsequent evaluation of the robustness of the identification procedure. We argue that DNA barcoding and taxonomy alike will benefit from more information content in the annotations of barcoded specimens as this will allow for validation and re-evaluation of the initial specimen identification. The aim should be to closely connect specimens from which reference barcodes are generated with the holotype through straight-forward taxonomy, and geographical and genetic correlations. Annotated information should also include voucher specimens and collector/identifier information. We examine two case studies based on empirical data, in which barcoding and taxonomy benefit from increased information content. On the basis of data from the first case study, we designate a barcoded neotype of the European medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, on morphological and geographical grounds.

  2. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content of living and fixed cells: a comparative study using various fixatives.

    PubMed

    Rousselle, C; Robert-Nicoud, M; Ronot, X

    1998-11-01

    The majority of studies dealing with DNA analyses are made on fixed cells. In this context, the efficiency as fixatives of ethanol, methanol, acetone, Carnoy, Boehm-Sprenger and aldehydes was determined using two different DNA fluorescent probes, Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide. The purpose of our study was to find the fixative that would provide the best results with respect to the following parameters: aggregates, cell size and granularity, and DNA staining analysis. Using murine fibroblasts, we found that 68% ethanol, 85% methanol and aldehydes did not increase aggregate formation, whereas Carnoy, acetone or Boehm-Sprenger fixatives did. The results show that aldehydes seem to alter cell size least. All fixatives induce an increase in cell granularity, which is very pronounced with alcohols, but aldehydes alter morphology less than alcohols. We observed that the fixatives giving the best resolution with Hoechst 33342 staining lead to a lower measurement variability than with propidium iodide staining. This study leads us to conclude that 68% ethanol and 85% methanol can be considered as appropriate fixatives for flow cytometry studies of DNA content.

  3. DNA G+C content of the third codon position and codon usage biases of human genes.

    PubMed

    Sueoka, N; Kawanishi, Y

    2000-12-30

    The human genome, as in other eukaryotes, has a wide heterogeneity in the DNA base composition. The evolutionary basis for this heterogeneity has been unknown. A previous study of the human genome (846 genes analyzed) has shown that, in the major range of the G+C content in the third codon position (0.25-0.75), biases from the Parity Rule 2 (PR2) among the synonymous codons of the four-codon amino acids are similar except in the highest G+C range (Sueoka, N., 1999. Translation-coupled violation of Parity Rule 2 in human genes is not the cause of heterogeneity of the DNA G+C content of third codon position. Gene 238, 53-58.). PR2 is an intra-strand rule where A=T and G=C are expected when there are no biases between the two complementary strands of DNA in mutation and selection rates (substitution rates). In this study, 14,026 human genes were analyzed. In addition, the third codon positions of two-codon amino acids were analyzed. New results show the following: (a) The G+C contents of the third codon position of human genes are scattered in the G+C range of 0.22-0.96 in the third codon position. (b) The PR2 biases are similar in the range of 0.25-0.75, whereas, in the high G+C range (0.75-0.96; 13% of the genes), the PR2-bias fingerprints are different from those of the major range. (c) Unlike the PR2 biases, the G+C contents of the third codon position for both four-codon and two-codon amino acids are all correlated almost perfectly with the G+C content of the third codon position over the total G+C ranges. These results support the notion that the directional mutation pressure, rather than the directional selection pressure, is mainly responsible for the heterogeneity of the G+C content of the third codon position.

  4. The Clinical Value of Flow Cytometric DNA Content Analysis in Patients with Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Samur, Mustafa; Pamir, Ali; Erekul, Selim; Sağlik, Yener; Yildiz, Yusuf; Dinçol, Dilek; Içli, Fikri

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate: (1) the correlation between grade and ploidy or S-phase fraction (SPF), (2) the prognostic value of DNA flow cytometric study in soft tissue sarcomas. Patients /Methods. In all, 47 tissue samples from soft tissue sarcoma patients, surgically treated in the same center, were included. Flow cytometric analyses were performed according to a modified version of the original method of Hedley et al. Results. DNA ploidy status could be determined in 44 samples out of 47 (success rate 94%). Of these 44, S-phase fraction could be calculated in 34 samples (77%). In the study group as a whole, aneuploidy was significantly correlated with high grade. Survival analyses were carried out in 21 patients with soft tissue sarcoma, all surgically treated in the same center, without chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In univariate analyses, DNA ploidy was found to be a significant factor for overall survival (OAS) and metastasis-free survival MFS. Mean OAS for aneuploid tumors and diploid tumors were 35 and 65 months (p=0.034), and mean MFS 23 and 61 months, respectively (p=0.005) . Discussion.There is a relation between histological grade and ploidy in soft tissue sarcomas. It appears that low-grade tumors are generally diploid, whereas high-grade tumors tend to be aneuploid. In a subgroup of patients treated only with surgery, DNA ploidy was found to be an important factor for predicting OAS and MFS. PMID:18521281

  5. Folate supplementation differently affects uracil content in DNA in the mouse colon and liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High folate intake may increase the risk of cancer, especially in the elderly. The present study examined the effects of ageing and dietary folate on uracil misincorporation into DNA, which has a mutagenic effect, in the mouse colon and liver. Old (18 months; n 42) and young (4 months; n 42) male C5...

  6. MITOCHONDRIAL DNA IN THE OOGAMOCHLAMYS CLADE (CHLOROPHYCEAE): HIGH GC CONTENT AND UNIQUE GENOME ARCHITECTURE FOR GREEN ALGAE(1).

    PubMed

    Borza, Tudor; Redmond, Erin K; Laflamme, Mark; Lee, Robert W

    2009-12-01

    Most mitochondrial genomes in the green algal phylum Chlorophyta are AT-rich, circular-mapping DNA molecules. However, mitochondrial genomes from the Reinhardtii clade of the Chlorophyceae lineage are linear and sometimes fragmented into subgenomic forms. Moreover, Polytomella capuana, from the Reinhardtii clade, has an elevated GC content (57.2%). In the present study, we examined mitochondrial genome conformation and GC bias in the Oogamochlamys clade of the Chlorophyceae, which phylogenetic data suggest is closely related to the Reinhardtii clade. Total DNA from selected Oogamochlamys taxa, including four Lobochlamys culleus (H. Ettl) Pröschold, B. Marin, U. G. Schlöss. et Melkonian strains, Lobochlamys segnis (H. Ettl) Pröschold, B. Marin, U. G. Schlöss. et Melkonian, and Oogamochlamys gigantea (O. Dill) Pröschold, B. Marin, U. G. Schlöss. et Melkonian, was subjected to Southern blot analyses with cob and cox1 probes, and the results suggest that the mitochondrial genome of these taxa is represented by multiple-sized linear DNA fragments with overlapping homologies. On the basis of these data, we propose that linear mitochondrial DNA with a propensity to become fragmented arose in an ancestor common to the Reinhardtii and Oogamochlamys clades or even earlier in the evolutionary history of the Chlorophyceae. Analyses of partial cob and cox1 sequences from these Oogamochlamys taxa revealed an unusually high GC content (49.9%-65.1%) and provided evidence for the accumulation of cob and cox1 pseudogenes and truncated sequences in the mitochondrial genome of all L. culleus strains examined.

  7. The content of mutant EGFR DNA correlates with response to EGFR-TKIs in lung adenocarcinoma patients with common EGFR mutations.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Yu-Ching; Fang, Yu-Hung; Hsieh, Meng-Jer; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the association of the content of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with the treatment response to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and survival in patients with lung cancer.This retrospective cohort study included 77 lung adenocarcinoma patients with common EGFR mutations from December 2012 to February 2015. The content of mutant EGFR DNA in lung cancer tissues was determined using an Amplification Refractory Mutation System. The association of the amount of mutant EGFR DNA with treatment response, the clinical variables, and the progression-free survival (PFS) after EGFR-TKI therapy were evaluated.Using the amount of mutant EGR DNA above 4.77% as the cut-off value, the sensitivity to predict EGFR-TKI responder is 82.0% and the specificity is 75.0% (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.734, P = 0.003). The high content of mutant EGFR DNA is an independent factor associated with the response to EGFR-TKIs (odds ratio: 13.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.23-52.11, P = 0.0003). A significantly longer PFS was observed in the group with the high content of mutant EGFR DNA (26.3 months, 95% CI: 12.2-26.3) compared with the low content of mutant EGFR DNA groups (12.3 months, 95% CI: 5.7-14.8, P = 0.0155). A better predictive value of the content of mutant EGFR DNA was noted in patients with exon 19 deletions (AUC: 0.892, P < 0.0001) than exon 21 L858R mutations (AUC: 0.675, P = 0.0856).Our results show that the content of mutant EGFR DNA is associated with the clinical response to EGFR-TKIs, especially in patients with exon 19 deletions mutation.

  8. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  9. Removing external DNA contamination from arthropod predators destined for molecular gut-content analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular gut-content analysis enables detection of arthropod predation with minimal disruption of ecosystem processes. Field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that mass-collection methods, such as sweep-netting, vacuum sampling, and foliage beating, can lead to contamination of fed pred...

  10. Removing external DNA decontamination from arthropod predators destined for molecular gut-content analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular gut-content analysis enables detection of arthropod predation with minimal disruption of ecosystem processes. Field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that mass-collection methods, such as sweep-netting, vacuum sampling, and foliage beating, can lead to contamination of fed pred...

  11. Correlation of Inter-Locus Polyglutamine Toxicity with CAG•CTG Triplet Repeat Expandability and Flanking Genomic DNA GC Content

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Colm E.; Monckton, Darren G.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic expansions of toxic polyglutamine (polyQ)-encoding CAG repeats in ubiquitously expressed, but otherwise unrelated, genes cause a number of late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington disease and the spinocerebellar ataxias. As polyQ toxicity in these disorders increases with repeat length, the intergenerational expansion of unstable CAG repeats leads to anticipation, an earlier age-at-onset in successive generations. Crucially, disease associated alleles are also somatically unstable and continue to expand throughout the lifetime of the individual. Interestingly, the inherited polyQ length mediating a specific age-at-onset of symptoms varies markedly between disorders. It is widely assumed that these inter-locus differences in polyQ toxicity are mediated by protein context effects. Previously, we demonstrated that the tendency of expanded CAG•CTG repeats to undergo further intergenerational expansion (their ‘expandability’) also differs between disorders and these effects are strongly correlated with the GC content of the genomic flanking DNA. Here we show that the inter-locus toxicity of the expanded polyQ tracts of these disorders also correlates with both the expandability of the underlying CAG repeat and the GC content of the genomic DNA flanking sequences. Inter-locus polyQ toxicity does not correlate with properties of the mRNA or protein sequences, with polyQ location within the gene or protein, or steady state transcript levels in the brain. These data suggest that the observed inter-locus differences in polyQ toxicity are not mediated solely by protein context effects, but that genomic context is also important, an effect that may be mediated by modifying the rate at which somatic expansion of the DNA delivers proteins to their cytotoxic state. PMID:22163004

  12. Metallic ion content and damage to the DNA in oral mucosa cells patients treated dental implants.

    PubMed

    López-Jornet, Pía; Perrez, Francisco Parra; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Ros-Llor, Irene; LLor-Ros, Irene; Ramírez-Fernández, Piedad

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential genotoxicity of dental implants, evaluating biomarkers of DNA damage (micronuclei and/or nuclear buds), cytokinetic defects (binucleated cells) and the presence of trace metals in gingival cells of patients with implants, comparing these with a control group. A total of 60 healthy adults (30 patients with dental implants and 30 control patients without) were included in the study. Medical and dental histories were made for each including life-style factors. Genotoxicity effects were assessed by micronucleus assays in the gingival epithelial cells of each patient; 1,000 epithelial cells were analyzed, evaluating the frequency of micronucleated cells and other nuclear anomalies. The concentration of metals (Al(27), Ag(107), Co (59), Cr (52), Cu(63), Fe(56), Sn(118), Mn(55), Mo(92), Ni(60), Pb(208), Ti(47)) were assayed by means of coupled plasma-mass spectrophotometry (ICP-MS). The frequency of micronuclei in the patient group with implants was higher than in the control group but without statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). Similar results were found for binucleated cells and nuclear buds (P > 0.05). For metals assayed by ICP-MS, significant differences were found for Ti(47) (P ≤ 0.045). Univariate analysis identified a significant association between the presence of micronuclei and age. Dental implants do not induce DNA damage in gingival cells, the slight effects observed cannot be indicated as biologically relevant.

  13. Abnormal variation of magnetic properties with Ce content in (PrNdCe)2Fe14B sintered magnets prepared by dual alloy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue-Feng, Zhang; Jian-Ting, Lan; Zhu-Bai, Li; Yan-Li, Liu; Le-Le, Zhang; Yong-Feng, Li; Qian, Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Resource-saving (PrNdCe)2Fe14B sintered magnets with nominal composition (PrNd)15-x Ce x Fe77B8 (x = 0-10) were prepared using a dual alloy method by mixing (PrNd)5Ce10Fe77B8 with (PrNd)15Fe77B8 powders. For Ce atomic percent of 1% and 2%, coercivity decreases dramatically. With further increase of Ce atomic percent, the coercivity increases, peaks at 6.38 kOe in (PrNd)11Ce4Fe77B8, and then declines gradually. The abnormal dependence of coercivity is likely related to the inhomogeneity of rare earth chemical composition in the intergranular phase, where PrNd concentration is strongly dependent on the additive amount of (PrNd)5Ce10Fe77B8 powders. In addition, for Ce atomic percent of 8%, 7%, and 6% the coercivity is higher than that of magnets prepared by the conventional method, which shows the advantage of the dual alloy method in preparing high abundant rare earth magnets. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51461033, 51571126, 51541105, and 11547032), the Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia, China (Grant No. 2013MS0110), and the Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology Innovation Fund, China.

  14. Folding thermodynamics of c-Myb DNA-binding domain in correlation with its α-helical contents.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Satomi; Fukada, Harumi; Oda, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The conformational and thermal stabilities of the minimum functional unit for c-Myb DNA-binding domain, tandem repeat 2 and 3 (R2R3), were analyzed under different pH conditions, ranging from 4.0 to 7.5, using circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry. Secondary structure analysis showed that the solution pH largely affects the conformational stability of the protein domain. Of all conditions analyzed, the α-helical content was maximal at pH 6.5, and the thermal stability was highest at pH 5.0. Thermodynamic parameters for thermal unfolding of R2R3 were determined using differential scanning calorimetry, and the origin of folding thermodynamics at the different pHs and its correlation with the α-helical content were further analyzed. It should be noted that the α-helical content correlates well with the enthalpy change in the pH range from 4.5 to 7.5, suggesting that the strength of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges needed for maintenance of helical structure is related to enthalpy in the native state. Under physiological pH conditions, c-Myb R2R3 exists in the enthalpically unstable but entropically stable state. Due to loss of rigid structure and high stability, the protein can now obtain structural flexibility, befitting its function.

  15. In-vitro replication of UV-irradiated DNA by human cell extracts: Evidence that xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XP-V) cells bypass lesions in an abnormal, error-prone manner

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, W.G.; Nadas, K.; Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    Despite a normal rate of excision repair, XP-V cells are extremely sensitive to UV mutagenicity and abnormally slow in replicating DNA that contains photoproducts. Furthermore, the kinds of mutations induced by UV{sub 254} in the endogenous HPRT gene differ significantly from those of normal cells. Using a replication fidelity assay developed by Kunkel and coworkers, we are testing the hypothesis that the DNA replication complex in XP-V cells is defective when replicating DNA containing UV damage. We compared the frequency of mutants generated during T-antigen-dependent replication of unirradiated and UV{sub 254}-irradiated DNA by extracts from HeLa and XP-V cells. The mutational target was the E. coli lacZ{alpha} gene inserted in SV40 ori-containing M13mp2 (M13mp2SV). With undamaged DNA, neither extract showed an increase in mutant frequency above what is seen with unreplicated M13mp2SV. The presence of an average of five pyrimidine dimers per phage reduced replication by HeLa extract 35% and increased the mutant frequency 5-fold. With XP-V extract these values were 80% and 24-fold, respectively. The mutants are being sequenced to determine whether the kinds of mutations produced by the two extracts differ.

  16. Cryopreservation by encapsulation of Gentiana spp cell suspensions maintains regrowth, embryogenic competence and DNA content.

    PubMed

    Mikula, Anna; Olas, Marta; Sliwinska, Elwira; Rybczynski, Jan J

    2008-01-01

    A reliable technique for cryopreservation by encapsulation was developed for two suspension cultures of gentian species (Gentiana tibetica and G. cruciata) of different ages and embryogenic potential. The effect of water content, aggregate size and the subculture time on viability was determined by the 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) test. Regrowth of a proembryogenic mass (PEM) on agar, liquid or agar/liquid media was assayed by measuring the increase in biomass. A water content of 24-30% (fresh weight basis) after 5-6 h dehydration of encapsulated cells of gentians yielded the highest survival (68% for G. tibetica and 83% for G. cruciata) after cryopreservation. Regardless of species, aggregate size and subculture time, the lowest PEM survival was 44%. These parameters did not influence the survival of G. tibetica PEM, but the survival of G. cruciata was higher when the smaller aggregates were cryopreserved on the 5th day of culture. Agar/liquid culture caused the greatest biomass increase. Cryopreservation did not affect the characteristics of suspension cultures and their regrowth after thawing, nor the number and dynamics of somatic embryos formed. Flow cytometry showed that cryopreservation did not change the genome size of the PEMs or regenerants.

  17. Two aspects of DNA base composition: G+C content and translation-coupled deviation from intra-strand rule of A = T and G = C.

    PubMed

    Sueoka, N

    1999-07-01

    The relative contribution of mutation and selection to the G+C content of DNA was analyzed in bacterial species having widely different G+C contents. The analysis used two methods that were developed previously. The first method was to plot the average G+C content of a set of nucleotides against the G+C content of the third codon position for each gene. This method was used to present the G+C distribution of the third codon position and to assess the relative neutrality of a set of nucleotides to that of the G+C content of the third codon position. The second method was to plot the intrastrand bias of the third codon position from Parity Rule 2 (PR2), where A = T and G = C. It was found that whereas intragenomic distributions of the DNA G+C content of these bacteria are narrow in the majority of species, in some species the G+C content of the minor class of genes distributes over wider ranges than the major class of genes. On the other hand, ubiquitous PR2 biases are amino acid specific and independent of the G+C content of DNA, so that when averaged over the amino acids, the biases are small and not correlated with the DNA G+C content. Therefore, translation coupled PR2-biases are unlikely to explain the wide range of G+C contents among different species. Considering all data available, it was concluded that the amino acid-specific PR2 bias has only a minor effect, if any, on the average G+C content. In addition, PR2 bias patterns of different species show phylogenetic relationships, and the pattern can be as a taxal fingerprint.

  18. Methylation of histone H3 in euchromatin of plant chromosomes depends on basic nuclear DNA content.

    PubMed

    Houben, Andreas; Demidov, Dmitri; Gernand, Dorota; Meister, Armin; Leach, Carolyn R; Schubert, Ingo

    2003-03-01

    Strong methylation of lysine 4 (K4) and low methylation of lysine 9 (K9) have been proposed as modifications of histone H3, typical for transcriptionally active euchromatin and the opposite for inactive heterochromatin. We have analysed the correlation between the global distribution of histone H3, methylated at either lysine 4 or lysine 9, and of microscopically detectable euchromatic or heterochromatic regions in relation to genome size for 24 plant species. Two different distribution patterns of methylated (K9)H3 (Met(K9)H3) were found that depend on genome size. For most species with small genomes (1C <500 Mbp), including Arabidopsis thaliana, strong methylation of (K9)H3 was restricted to constitutive heterochromatin. Species with larger genomes showed a uniform distribution of Met(K9)H3. Contrary to this and regardless of the genome size, methylated (K4)H3 (Met(K4)H3) was found to be enriched within the euchromatin of all species. Transcriptionally less active B chromosomes showed the same patterns as basic A chromosomes. We thus propose that large genomes with high amounts of dispersed repetitive sequences (mainly retroelements) have to silence these sequences and therefore display epigenetic modifications such as methylation of DNA and (K9)H3 also within euchromatic regions.

  19. Probabilities of radiation-induced inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges and their dependence on the DNA content of the chromosome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Yang, T. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A biophysical model has been developed that is based on the assumptions that an interphase chromosome occupies a spherical territory and that chromosome exchanges are formed by the misrejoining of two DNA double-strand breaks induced within a defined interaction distance. The model is used to explain the relative frequencies of inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges and the relationship between radiation-induced aberrations in individual chromosomes and the DNA content of the chromosome. Although this simple model predicts a higher ratio of inter- to intrachromosomal exchanges for low-LET radiation than for high-LET radiation, as has been suggested by others, we argue that the comparison of the prediction of the model with experimental results is not straightforward. With the model, we also show that the probability of the formation of interchromosomal exchanges is proportional to the "surface area" of the chromosome domain plus a correction term. The correction term is small if the interaction distance is less than 1 microm for both low- and high-LET radiations.

  20. Evaluation of two new fluorochromes, TOTO and YOYO, for DNA content analysis in cells and chromosomes by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hirons, G.T.; Crissman, H.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The fluorochromes TOTO and YOYO were evaluated for their effectiveness in staining for DNA content analysis by flow cytometry (FCM). The dyes are dimers of thiazole orange (TO) and yellow oxazole (YO), respectively (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR), and both have a very high quantum efficiency. Spectrofluorometric analysis showed that TOTO and YOYO had little fluorescence until bound to DNA or RNA. YOYO, the brighter of the two dyes, had an emission peak at [approximately]510 nm and TOTO at [approximately]530 nm. Analysis by flow cytometry indicated that cells stained with either dye at a concentration of [approximately]4.0 [mu]M could be preferentially excited at either 457 or 488 nm. Unfixed nuclei and fixed cells both treated with RNase, stained with either TOTO or YOYO, and analyzed by FCM yielded coefficients of variation (CV) comparable to CVs obtained for the same samples stained with mithramycin (MI) when excited at 457 nm and propidium iodide (PI) when excited at 488 nm. Both TOTO and YOYO are also being evaluated for their effectiveness in staining Chinese hamster embryo chromosomes; these results are being compared with results obtained with PI stained chromosomes.

  1. Novel alterations in CDK1/cyclin B1 kinase complex formation occur during the acquisition of a polyploid DNA content.

    PubMed Central

    Datta, N S; Williams, J L; Caldwell, J; Curry, A M; Ashcraft, E K; Long, M W

    1996-01-01

    The pathways that regulate the S-phase events associated with the control of DNA replication are poorly understood. The bone marrow megakaryocytes are unique in that they leave the diploid (2C) state to differentiate, synthesizing 4 to 64 times the normal DNA content within a single nucleus, a process known as endomitosis. Human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells model this process, becoming polyploid during phorbol diester-induced megakaryocyte differentiation. The mitotic arrest occurring in these polyploid cells involves novel alterations in the cdk1/cyclin B1 complex: a marked reduction in cdk1 protein levels, and an elevated and sustained expression of cyclin B1. Endomitotic cells thus lack cdk1/cyclin B1-associated H1-histone kinase activity. Constitutive over-expression of cdk1 in endomitotic cells failed to re-initiate normal mitotic events even though cdk1 was present in a 10-fold excess. This was due to an inability of cyclin-B1 to physically associate with cdk1. Nonetheless, endomitotic cyclin B1 possesses immunoprecipitable H1-histone kinase activity, and specifically translocates to the nucleus. We conclude that mitosis is abrogated during endomitosis due to the absence of cdk1 and the failure to form M-phase promoting factor, resulting in a disassociation of mitosis from the completion of S-phase. Further studies on cyclin and its interacting proteins should be informative in understanding endomitosis and cell cycle control. Images PMID:8688553

  2. Bivariate flow cytometric analysis of DNA content versus immunopositivity for ribonucleotide reductase M1 subunit in the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, R; Bottone, M G; Danova, M; Pellicciari, C

    1998-06-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is a cytoplasmatic enzyme catalyzing the reduction of all four ribonucleotides to their corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. Its activity strongly correlates to the rate of DNA synthesis. By using a specific monoclonal antibody against the large M1 subunit of RR, we assessed the expression of M1-RR versus DNA content by dual-parameter flow cytometry. The aim of this paper was to compare the variations in the immunopositivity for M1-RR during the cell cycle to the positivity for other cell cycle markers identifying either proliferating cells (Ki-67 and PCNA) or quiescent cells (statin). To do this, normal human embryonic fibroblasts in different growth conditions as well as several other mammalian cell lines (rat C6 glioma cells; mouse 3T3 fibroblasts and B16 melanoma cells; human epithelial EUE cells and mammary carcinoma MCF-7 cells) were used. The expression of M1-RR antigen was found to correlate positively with the expression of Ki-67 and PCNA, and negatively with the expression of statin. During early G1 phase, M1-RR becomes detectable by specific antibodies relatively later compared to PCNA and Ki-67; therefore, the lack of immunopositivity for M1-RR cannot be taken as an absolute indication of cell quiescence in G0.

  3. Detectable urogenital schistosome DNA and cervical abnormalities 6 months after single-dose praziquantel in women with Schistosoma haematobium infection.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jennifer A; Kabangila, Rodrick; Verweij, Jaco J; Jaka, Hyasinta; Peck, Robert N; Kalluvya, Samuel E; Changalucha, John M; Johnson, Warren D; van Lieshout, Lisette; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2013-09-01

    We explored response to single-dose praziquantel therapy in a cohort of 33 women with Schistosoma haematobium infection in rural Mwanza, Tanzania. Women with S. haematobium infection confirmed both by eggs in urine and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) received single-dose praziquantel and treatment of concomitant sexually transmitted infections. Macroscopic cervical abnormalities were also quantified. After 6 months, microscopically detectable egg excretion was eliminated, but 8 of 33 women (24%) were persistently positive for S. haematobium by PCR, and 11 (33%) had cervical abnormalities potentially attributable to schistosomiasis. This suggests that praziquantel treatment more frequently than every 6 months may be necessary for complete elimination of the parasite and prevention of genital tissue pathology. This aggressive therapy may in turn play a key role decreasing HIV susceptibility in millions of people living in regions in which S. haematobium is endemic.

  4. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  5. Nuclear DNA content in Sinningia (Gesneriaceae); intraspecific genome size variation and genome characterization in S. speciosa.

    PubMed

    Zaitlin, David; Pierce, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    The Gesneriaceae (Lamiales) is a family of flowering plants comprising >3000 species of mainly tropical origin, the most familiar of which is the cultivated African violet (Saintpaulia spp.). Species of Gesneriaceae are poorly represented in the lists of taxa sampled for genome size estimation; measurements are available for three species of Ramonda and one each of Haberlea, Saintpaulia, and Streptocarpus, all species of Old World origin. We report here nuclear genome size estimates for 10 species of Sinningia, a neotropical genus largely restricted to Brazil. Flow cytometry of leaf cell nuclei showed that holoploid genome size in Sinningia is very small (approximately two times the size of the Arabidopsis genome), and is small compared to the other six species of Gesneriaceae with genome size estimates. We also documented intraspecific genome size variation of 21%-26% within a group of wild Sinningia speciosa (Lodd.) Hiern collections. In addition, we analyzed 1210 genome survey sequences from S. speciosa to characterize basic features of the nuclear genome such as guanine-cytosine content, types of repetitive elements, numbers of protein-coding sequences, and sequences unique to S. speciosa. We included several other angiosperm species as genome size standards, one of which was the snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.; Veronicaceae, Lamiales). Multiple measurements on three accessions indicated that the genome size of A. majus is ~633 × 10⁶ base pairs, which is approximately 40% of the previously published estimate.

  6. Nuclear DNA content of Vitis vinifera cultivars and ploidy level analyses of somatic embryo-derived plants obtained from anther culture.

    PubMed

    Leal, F; Loureiro, J; Rodriguez, E; Pais, M S; Santos, C; Pinto-Carnide, O

    2006-09-01

    Flow cytometry was employed to determine the ploidy level of Vitis vinifera L. somatic embryo-derived plants obtained from anther culture. Only one among the 41 analysed plants (2.4%) presented somaclonal variation (tetraploidy); the other plants were diploid. No significant differences (PDNA content of nine V. vinifera cultivars was also estimated using flow cytometry. A non-significant variation was found among the cultivars, with DNA content ranging from 1.17 pg/2C (cv. 'Tinta Barroca' and 'Viosinho') to 1.26 pg/2C (cv. 'Cabernet Sauvignon'). These results and previous studies on other Vitis species suggest that Vitis genome is stable with regard to nuclear DNA content.

  7. Genome exclusion and gametic DAPI-DNA content in the hybridogenetic Bacillus rossius-grandii benazzii complex (Insecta Phasmatodea).

    PubMed

    Tinti, F; Scali, V

    1992-11-01

    Among Sicilian stick insects, two hybridogenetic complexes have been discovered: Bacillus rossius-grandii benazzii and B. rossius-grandii grandii, which also produce androgenetic offspring. The egg maturation of the former is analyzed here through DAPI fluorometry, which, besides the assessment of the meiotic stages, also allows their DNA measurements and the analysis of sperm-head evolution into male pronuclei in these polyspermic eggs. Hybridogenetic eggs undergo an extrasynthesis of chromosomes, because two groups of n autobivalents (4C each) are segregated at metaphase 1st; the two groups must correspond to the pure parental species haplosets. Then the grandii chromosomes degenerate (1st polar body), while the rossius chromosomes divide further to produce two groups of n autodiads (2C each); one of them degenerates (2nd polar body), and the other is ready to perform syngamy (female pronucleus). Meanwhile, several B. grandii sperm evolve into male pronuclei by doubling their DNA (from 1C to 2C content) and assuming an interphase nucleus appearance. If regular mixis occurs, the F1 hybrid constitution is restored but, if it fails, a fusion between two sperms may occur, originating fully paternal descendants (natural androgenesis). The genome exclusion mechanism of stick-insect hybridogens appears to be more primitive than those observed in the already known hybridogenetic complexes of Poeciliopsis and Rana esculenta. Unfertilized eggs of hybridogens are capable of self-activation, but the cytology of the related clonally reproducing B. whitei indicates that its parthenogenetic mechanism stems from the hybridization event (hybrid theory) rather than from tychoparthenogenetic potentialities (spontaneous theory).

  8. Translation-coupled violation of Parity Rule 2 in human genes is not the cause of heterogeneity of the DNA G+C content of third codon position.

    PubMed

    Sueoka, N

    1999-09-30

    The genome of higher eukaryotes consists of genes having a widely heterogeneous base composition at the third codon position. Ubiquitous variability of the DNA base composition has the following two aspects: intragenomic heterogeneity of the G+C content and the amino-acid-specific translation-coupled biases from the Parity Rule 2 (PR2). PR2 is an intrastrand rule where A = T and G = C are expected if there is no bias in mutation and selection between the two complementary strands of DNA. To examine whether or not the biases from PR2 are responsible for the wide heterogeneity of the DNA G+C content in human, the third codon position of 846 human genes was analyzed. Genes were separated into six groups according to their G+C content of the third codon position, and each group was examined for the translation-coupled PR2 biases in the nucleotide composition of the third codon position for two- and four-codon amino acids. The results show that genes in the different G+C content groups have similar PR2 biases, indicating that the intragenomic heterogeneity of the G+C content is not correlated with translation-coupled biases from the PR2. Therefore, the heterogeneity of the G+C content is likely to be determined by some other mechanism (e.g. locally variable directional mutation pressures) than amino-acid-specific selections for the codon preference.

  9. Analysis of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content of petrol and diesel engine lubricating oils and determination of DNA adducts in topically treated mice by 32P-postlabelling.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, P L; Jacob, J; Grimmer, G; Phillips, D H

    1990-11-01

    Engine lubricating oils are known to accumulate carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during engine running. Oils from nine petrol-powered and 11 diesel-powered vehicles, in addition to samples of unused oil, were analysed for PAH content and ability to form DNA adducts when applied topically to mouse skin. The levels of 19 PAHs, determined by GC, were in total, approximately 22 times higher in used oils from petrol engines than in oils from diesel engines. Male Parkes mice were treated with 50 microliters of oil daily for 4 days before they were killed and DNA isolated from skin and lung tissue. DNA samples were analysed by nuclease P1-enhanced 32P-postlabelling. Used oils from both diesel and petrol engines showed several adduct spots on PEI-cellulose plates at total adduct levels of up to 0.57 fmol/microgram DNA [approximately 60 times greater than in experiments with samples of unused oil in which adduct levels (0.01-0.02 fmol adducts/microgram DNA) were close to the limit of detection]. Higher adduct levels were generally formed by petrol engine oils than by diesel engine oils. Lung DNA contained similar total adduct levels to those in skin although the adduct maps were less complex. Total adduct levels correlated with extent of oil use in the engine, the total PAH concentration in oils and with the concentrations of certain individual PAHs present in the oils. An adduct spot that co-eluted with that of the major benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct accounted for 9-26% of the total adducts in skin DNA, and approximately 8% of the adducts in lung DNA, of mice treated with petrol engine oils. A major, and as yet unidentified, adduct spot comprised up to 30% of the total adducts in skin DNA, and up to 89% of the total adducts in lung DNA, of these animals.

  10. Abnormal ultraviolet mutagenic spectrum in plasmid DNA replicated in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with the skin cancer-prone disease, xeroderma pigmentosum

    SciTech Connect

    Seetharam, S.; Protic-Sabljic, M.; Seidman, M.M.; Kraemer, K.H.

    1987-12-01

    A shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, was utilized to assess the types of mutations that cells from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D, introduce into ultraviolet (UV) damaged, replicating DNA. Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum have clinical and cellular UV hypersensitivity, increased frequency of sun-induced skin cancer, and deficient DNA repair. In comparison to UV-treated pZ189 replicated in DNA repair-proficient cells, there were fewer surviving plasmids, a higher frequency of plasmids with mutations, fewer plasmids with two or more mutations in the marker gene, and a new mutagenic hotspot. The major type of base substitution mutation was the G:C to A:T transition with both cell lines. These results, together with similar findings published earlier with cells from a xeroderma pigmentosum patient in complementation group A, suggest that isolated G:C to A:T somatic mutations may be particularly important in generation of human skin cancer by UV radiation.

  11. Berberine reverses abnormal expression of L-type pyruvate kinase by DNA demethylation and histone acetylation in the livers of the non-alcoholic fatty disease rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhao; Chang, Xinxia; Song, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Chen, Hongyan; Lu, Zhiqiang; Gao, Xin; Lu, Daru

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) can potentially be used as a drug against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and diabetes. Our previous study found that BBR could change the pattern of DNA methylation. But the mechanisms underlying berberine are still far from completely understood. In this study, the function of L-PK in cell metabolism was explored, and high-fat-diet induced SD rats NAFLD models were created. The NAFLD rats were randomly grouped to be oral administration with BBR at a dosage of 200 mg/kg daily. Then DNA methylation and histone acetylation around the L-type Pyruvate Kinase (L-PK) gene were examined. In the results, we found that L-PK had a positive effect on cell proliferation, glucose utilization and triglyceride metabolism. However, the expression of L-PK was reduced in the livers of NAFLD rats, in accord with the decrease of DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation in the regulatory regions of L-PK. Notably, BBR treatment can restore the expression of L-PK by the demethylation of L-PK promoter and the increase in acetylation levels of histone H3 and H4 around L-PK, which indicated that BBR may be a potential drug for epigenetic-included diseases. PMID:26221297

  12. Detection of rare circulating breast cancer cells by filtration cytometry and identification by DNA content: sensitivity in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, P; Moll, J L; Bisconte, J C; Caldani, C

    1997-01-01

    Current methods of detecting micrometastases in breast cancer fail in a large proportion of patients. Therefore an improved method for detection of metastases in blood samples could be of great clinical interest both for prognosis and selection of patients for adjuvant systemic therapy. We have developed a new non-invasive method which associates immuno-magnetic separation and filtration cytometry. The sensitivity of our procedure was evaluated in a model system using a mixture from a human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and a normal human blood sample. The identification of tumoral cells was achieved by measuring DNA content in comparison with standard cells. The lowest concentration of MCF-7 detected was 1 tumoral cell in 500,000 white blood cells. In addition, filtration cytometry provides a visual control of nuclei permitting the elimination of all doubtful cases and an automatic count of tumoral cells directly per ml of blood, which may be an independent predictor of early relapse. This new method may avoid unnecessary axillary lymph node dissection in patients with negative nodes. Our procedure seems suitable for the detection of rare circulating cells in routine laboratory testing and could be used in other applications.

  13. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  14. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  15. Evaluation of the impacts of different nuclear DNA content in the hull, endosperm, and embryo of rice seeds on GM rice quantification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Donger; Shen, Jie; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing

    2010-04-28

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is a main staple food in the world, and several genetically modified (GM) rice events have been approved for commercialization. To accurately quantify GM contents in rice derived products, we have evaluated the variation of seed DNA density and nuclear DNA content in the hull, endosperm, and embryo of rice seeds from 19 cultivars, as well as their impacts on GM rice quantification. Rice endosperm DNA accounts for 73.71% of total seed DNA, whereas the hull and embryo DNAs account for 3.98% and 22.31%, respectively. Two formulas were established to describe the relationship between GM content on the basis of weight ratio (GM(wt)%) and that on the basis of haploid genome copy number ratio (GM(hg)%) for the samples containing heterozygous GM rice seeds. These two equations were well confirmed in quantification of the heterozygous GM rice TT51-1 seeds containing the GM allele from a female parent or that from a male parent. This work is useful for accurate quantification of GM rice using reference materials containing the heterozygous GM rice seed powder.

  16. Effect of treated-sewage contamination upon bacterial energy charge, adenine nucleotides, and DNA content in a sandy aquifer on cape cod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in adenylate energy charge (EC(A)) and in total adenine nucleotides (A(T)) and DNA content (both normalized to the abundance of free- living, groundwater bacteria) in response to carbon loading were determined for a laboratory-grown culture and for a contaminated aquifer. The latter study involved a 3-km-long transect through a contaminant plume resulting from continued on-land discharge of secondary sewage to a shallow, sandy aquifer on Cape Cod, Mass. With the exception of the most contaminated groundwater immediately downgradient from the contaminant source, DNA and adenylate levels correlated strongly with bacterial abundance and decreased exponentially with increasing distance downgradient. EC(A)s (0.53 to 0.60) and the ratios of ATP to DNA (0.001 to 0.003) were consistently low, suggesting that the unattached bacteria in this groundwater study are metabolically stressed, despite any eutrophication that might have occurred. Elevated EC(A)s (up to 0.74) were observed in glucose-amended groundwater, confirming that the metabolic state of this microbial community could be altered. In general, per-bacterium DNA and ATP contents were approximately twofold higher in the plume than in surrounding groundwater, although EC(A) and per-bacterium levels of A(T) differed little in the plume and the surrounding uncontaminated groundwater. However, per-bacterium levels of DNA and A(T) varied six- and threefold, respectively, during a 6-h period of decreasing growth rate for an unidentified pseudomonad isolated from contaminated groundwater and grown in batch culture. These data suggest that the DNA content of groundwater bacteria may be more sensitive than their A(T) to the degree of carbon loading, which may have significant ramifications in the use of nucleic acids and adenine nucleotides for estimating the metabolic status of bacterial communities within more highly contaminated aquifers.

  17. Changes in nuclear and nucleolar protein content during the growth and differentiation of root parenchyma cells in plant species with different DNA-endoreplication dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, K; Bilecka, A

    1986-01-01

    Using cytophotometric procedures, we measured the nuclear and nucleolar protein content of successive zones of growth and differentiation in consecutive (1-7 mm) root segments obtained from eight species of the Angiospermae after staining the preparations with Feulgen-Naphthol Yellow S (F-NYS). In meristematic cells the nuclear and nucleolar protein content was found to double during the cell cycle. In species in which differentiation occurs at the same time as nuclear DNA endoreplication, i.e. Vicia faba subsp. minor, V. faba subsp. major, Pisum sativum, Hordeum vulgare and Amaryllis belladonna, the pool of nuclear proteins observed during the G2 phase of the cell cycle was seen in the differentiated zone in nuclei containing 8C DNA. Species in which differentiation is not accompanied by the process of nuclear DNA endoreplication, i.e. Levisticum officinale, Tulipa kaufmanniana and Haemanthus katharinae, exhibited the highest nuclear proteins content during the G2 phase of the cell cycle; comparably high values were not found in the differentiated zone. A decrease in nucleolar protein content was observed during the process of differentiation, this tendency being more evident in the studied species that do not exhibit endoreplication.

  18. Cerebellar hypoplasia and brainstem thinning associated with severe white matter and basal ganglia abnormalities in a child with an mtDNA deletion.

    PubMed

    Biancheri, Roberta; Bruno, Claudio; Cassandrini, Denise; Bertini, Enrico; Santorelli, Filippo M; Rossi, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia may occur in different conditions, including those disorders designated as pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH). In particular, when PCH is combined with severe supratentorial white matter involvement and cerebral atrophy, mutations in the mitochondrial arginyl-tRNA synthethase (RARS2) gene causing PCH6 are possible. We describe a patient with a lethal mitochondrial encephalomyopathy due to a mtDNA deletion and no alterations in RARS2, whose magnetic resonance (MR) findings mimicked PCH6. A thorough diagnostic work-up for mitochondrial disorders should be carried out when facing with a PCH-like and severe white matter and basal ganglia involvement on brain MR imaging in children, even if clinical and laboratory mitochondrial "stigmata" are scant or nonspecific.

  19. Abnormal Position and Presentation of the Fetus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interest (Quiz) Breast Cancer (Video) Overview of the Female Reproductive System (News) Study: Plenty of IV Fluids May Make Childbirth Safer, Easier (News) Zejula Approved for Certain Female Cancers Additional Content Medical News Abnormal Position and ...

  20. Quantification of meat proportions by measuring DNA contents in raw and boiled sausages using matrix-adapted calibrators and multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Köppel, René; Eugster, Albert; Ruf, Jürg; Rentsch, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of meat proportions in raw and boiled sausage according to the recipe was evaluated using three different calibrators. To measure the DNA contents from beef, pork, sheep (mutton), and horse, a tetraplex real-time PCR method was applied. Nineteen laboratories analyzed four meat products each made of different proportions of beef, pork, sheep, and horse meat. Three kinds of calibrators were used: raw and boiled sausages of known proportions ranging from 1 to 55% of meat, and a dilution series of DNA from muscle tissue. In general, results generated using calibration sausages were more accurate than those resulting from the use of DNA from muscle tissue, and exhibited smaller measurement uncertainties. Although differences between uses of raw and boiled calibration sausages were small, the most precise and accurate results were obtained by calibration with fine-textured boiled reference sausages.

  1. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  2. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  3. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  4. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  5. ProPSA and Diagnostic Biopsy Tissue DNA Content Combination Improves Accuracy to Predict Need for Prostate Cancer Treatment Among Men Enrolled in an Active Surveillance Program

    PubMed Central

    Isharwal, Sumit; Makarov, Danil V.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Landis, Patricia; Marlow, Cameron; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Partin, Alan W.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Veltri, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess a novel application of the Prostate Health Index (phi) and biopsy tissue DNA content in benign-adjacent and cancer areas to predict which patients would eventually require treatment of prostate cancer in the Proactive Surveillance cohort. METHODS We identified 71 men who had had serum and biopsy tissue from their diagnosis banked and available for the present study. Of the 71 patients, 39 had developed unfavorable biopsy findings and 32 had maintained favorable biopsy status during surveillance. The serum total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA) and [−2]proPSA were measured using the Beckman Coulter immunoassay. The DNA content measurements of Feulgen-stained biopsy sections were performed using the AutoCyte imaging system. RESULTS The ratio of phi was significantly greater (37.23 ± 15.76 vs 30.60 ± 12.28; P = .03) in men who ultimately had unfavorable biopsy findings. The serum phi ratio (P = .003), [−2]proPSA/%fPSA (P = .004), biopsy tissue DNA content (ie, benign-adjacent excess of optical density, P = .019; and cancer area standard deviation of optical density, P = .002) were significant predictors of unfavorable biopsy conversion on Cox regression analysis. However, phi and [−2]proPSA/%fPSA showed a highly significant correlation (rho = 0.927, P < .0001) and no difference in accuracy (c-index, 0.6247 vs 0.6158; P = .704) for unfavorable biopsy conversion prediction. Furthermore, phi and [−2]proPSA/%fPSA remained significant (P = .047 and P = .036, respectively) in the multivariate models and, combined with the biopsy tissue DNA content, showed improvement in the predictive accuracy (c-index, 0.6908 and 0.6884, respectively) for unfavorable biopsy conversion. CONCLUSIONS The Prostate Health Index to proPSA/%fPSA, combined with biopsy tissue DNA content, improved the accuracy to about 70% to predict unfavorable biopsy conversion at the annual surveillance biopsy examination among men enrolled in an Active

  6. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  7. The content of DNA and RNA in microparticles released by Jurkat and HL-60 cells undergoing in vitro apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, Charles F.; Pisetsky, David S.

    2009-03-10

    Microparticles are small membrane-bound vesicles that are released from apoptotic cells during blebbing. These particles contain DNA and RNA and display important functional activities, including immune system activation. Furthermore, nucleic acids inside the particle can be analyzed as biomarkers in a variety of disease states. To elucidate the nature of microparticle nucleic acids, DNA and RNA released in microparticles from the Jurkat T and HL-60 promyelocytic cell lines undergoing apoptosis in vitro were studied. Microparticles were isolated from culture media by differential centrifugation and characterized by flow cytometry and molecular approaches. In these particles, DNA showed laddering by gel electrophoresis and was present in a form that allowed direct binding by a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody, suggesting antigen accessibility even without fixation. Analysis of RNA by gel electrophoresis showed intact 18s and 28s ribosomal RNA bands, although lower molecular bands consistent with 28s ribosomal RNA degradation products were also present. Particles also contained messenger RNA as shown by RT-PCR amplification of sequences for {beta}-actin and GAPDH. In addition, gel electrophoresis showed the presence of low molecular weight RNA in the size range of microRNA. Together, these results indicate that microparticles from apoptotic Jurkat and HL-60 cells contain diverse nucleic acid species, indicating translocation of both nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA and RNA as particle release occurs during death.

  8. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Christopher B.; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, Andre

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  9. DNA content and distribution in ancient feathers and potential to reconstruct the plumage of extinct avian taxa

    PubMed Central

    Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Wood, Jamie R.; Armstrong, Kyle N.; Cooper, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Feathers are known to contain amplifiable DNA at their base (calamus) and have provided an important genetic source from museum specimens. However, feathers in subfossil deposits generally only preserve the upper shaft and feather ‘vane’ which are thought to be unsuitable for DNA analysis. We analyse subfossil moa feathers from Holocene New Zealand rockshelter sites and demonstrate that both ancient DNA and plumage information can be recovered from their upper portion, allowing species identification and a means to reconstruct the appearance of extinct taxa. These ancient DNA sequences indicate that the distal portions of feathers are an untapped resource for studies of museum, palaeontological and modern specimens. We investigate the potential to reconstruct the plumage of pre-historically extinct avian taxa using subfossil remains, rather than assuming morphological uniformity with closely related extant taxa. To test the notion of colour persistence in subfossil feathers, we perform digital comparisons of feathers of the red-crowned parakeet (Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae novaezelandiae) excavated from the same horizons as the moa feathers, with modern samples. The results suggest that the coloration of the moa feathers is authentic, and computer software is used to perform plumage reconstructions of moa based on subfossil remains. PMID:19570784

  10. The DNA methylation level against the background of the genome size and t-heterochromatin content in some species of the genus Secale L

    PubMed Central

    Kalinka, Anna; Poter, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    Methylation of cytosine in DNA is one of the most important epigenetic modifications in eukaryotes and plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene activity and the maintenance of genomic integrity. DNA methylation and other epigenetic mechanisms affect the development, differentiation or the response of plants to biotic and abiotic stress. This study compared the level of methylation of cytosines on a global (ELISA) and genomic scale (MSAP) between the species of the genus Secale. We analyzed whether the interspecific variation of cytosine methylation was associated with the size of the genome (C-value) and the content of telomeric heterochromatin. MSAP analysis showed that S. sylvestre was the most distinct species among the studied rye taxa; however, the results clearly indicated that these differences were not statistically significant. The total methylation level of the studied loci was very similar in all taxa and ranged from 60% in S. strictum ssp. africanum to 66% in S. cereale ssp. segetale, which confirmed the lack of significant differences in the sequence methylation pattern between the pairs of rye taxa. The level of global cytosine methylation in the DNA was not significantly associated with the content of t-heterochromatin and did not overlap with the existing taxonomic rye relationships. The highest content of 5-methylcytosine was found in S. cereale ssp. segetale (83%), while very low in S. strictum ssp. strictum (53%), which was significantly different from the methylation state of all taxa, except for S. sylvestre. The other studied taxa of rye had a similar level of methylated cytosine ranging from 66.42% (S. vavilovii) to 74.41% in (S. cereale ssp. afghanicum). The results obtained in this study are evidence that the percentage of methylated cytosine cannot be inferred solely based on the genome size or t-heterochromatin. This is a significantly more complex issue. PMID:28149679

  11. Fat content and nitrite-curing influence the formation of oxidation products and NOC-specific DNA adducts during in vitro digestion of meat.

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, Thomas; Vossen, Els; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Raes, Katleen; Vanhaecke, Lynn; De Smet, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of fat content and nitrite-curing of pork were investigated on the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic lipid oxidation products (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, volatile simple aldehydes), protein oxidation products (protein carbonyl compounds) and NOC-specific DNA adducts (O6-carboxy-methylguanine) during in vitro digestion. The formation of these products during digestion is suggested to be responsible for the association between red meat and processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Digestion of uncured pork to which fat was added (total fat content 5 or 20%), resulted in significantly higher lipid and protein oxidation in the mimicked duodenal and colonic fluids, compared to digestion of pork without added fat (1% fat). A higher fat content also significantly favored the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine in the colon. Nitrite-curing of meat resulted in significantly lower lipid and protein oxidation before and after digestion, while an inconsistent effect on the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine was observed. The presented results demonstrate that haem-Fe is not solely responsible for oxidation and nitrosation reactions throughout an in vitro digestion approach but its effect is promoted by a higher fat content in meat.

  12. Fat Content and Nitrite-Curing Influence the Formation of Oxidation Products and NOC-Specific DNA Adducts during In Vitro Digestion of Meat

    PubMed Central

    Van Hecke, Thomas; Vossen, Els; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Raes, Katleen; Vanhaecke, Lynn; De Smet, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of fat content and nitrite-curing of pork were investigated on the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic lipid oxidation products (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, volatile simple aldehydes), protein oxidation products (protein carbonyl compounds) and NOC-specific DNA adducts (O6-carboxy-methylguanine) during in vitro digestion. The formation of these products during digestion is suggested to be responsible for the association between red meat and processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Digestion of uncured pork to which fat was added (total fat content 5 or 20%), resulted in significantly higher lipid and protein oxidation in the mimicked duodenal and colonic fluids, compared to digestion of pork without added fat (1% fat). A higher fat content also significantly favored the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine in the colon. Nitrite-curing of meat resulted in significantly lower lipid and protein oxidation before and after digestion, while an inconsistent effect on the formation of O6-carboxy-methylguanine was observed. The presented results demonstrate that haem-Fe is not solely responsible for oxidation and nitrosation reactions throughout an in vitro digestion approach but its effect is promoted by a higher fat content in meat. PMID:24978825

  13. [Current gene study in etiological analysis of congenital craniofacial abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi-miao; Fang, Bing

    2007-04-01

    The cause of congenital craniofacial abnormalities are very complicated. Understanding of the gene mechanisms of abnormalities taking place are very important for prevention and therapy.DNA sequence analysis provides the fundaments of gene study of the congenital craniofacial abnormalities. Human genome project (HGP) paved the confirmation of candidate gene of the congenital craniofacial abnormalities.Transgenic animal models and gene knockout techniques are effective methods in study of gene function. This paper reviews current gene study in etiopathogenisis analysis of the congenital craniofacial abnormalities.

  14. Pyrroloquinoline quinone nutritional status alters lysine metabolism and modulates mitochondrial DNA content in the mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Bauerly, K A; Storms, D H; Harris, C B; Hajizadeh, S; Sun, M Y; Cheung, C P; Satre, M A; Fascetti, A J; Tchaparian, E; Rucker, R B

    2006-11-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) added to purified diets devoid of PQQ improves indices of perinatal development in rats and mice. Herein, PQQ nutritional status and lysine metabolism are described, prompted by a report that PQQ functions as a vitamin-like enzymatic cofactor important in lysine metabolism (Nature 422 [2003] 832). Alternatively, we propose that PQQ influences lysine metabolism, but by mechanisms that more likely involve changes in mitochondrial content. PQQ deprivation in both rats and mice resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial content. In rats, alpha-aminoadipic acid (alphaAA), which is derived from alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (alphaAAS) and made from lysine in mitochondria, and the plasma levels of amino acids known to be oxidized in mitochondria (e.g., Thr, Ser, and Gly) were correlated with changes in the liver mitochondrial content of PQQ-deprived rats, but not PQQ-supplemented rats. In contrast, the levels of NAD dependent alpha-aminoadipate-delta-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (AASDH), a cytosolic enzyme important to alphaAA production from alphaAAS, was not influenced by PQQ dietary status. Moreover, the levels of U26 mRNA were not significantly changed even when diets differed markedly in PQQ and dietary lysine content. U26 mRNA levels were measured, because of U26's proposed, albeit questionable role as a PQQ-dependent enzyme involved in alphaAA formation.

  15. Karnyothrips flavipes, a previously unreported predatory thrips of the coffee berry borer: DNA-based gut content analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new predator of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, was found in the coffee growing area of Kisii in Western Kenya. Field observations, laboratory trials and gut content analysis using molecular tools have confirmed the role of the predatory thrips Karnyothrips flavipes Jones (Phlaeothrip...

  16. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  17. The Effect of Leonurus sibiricus Plant Extracts on Stimulating Repair and Protective Activity against Oxidative DNA Damage in CHO Cells and Content of Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Sitarek, Przemysław; Skała, Ewa; Wysokińska, Halina; Wielanek, Marzena; Szemraj, Janusz; Toma, Monika; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Leonurus sibiricus L. has been used as a traditional and medicinal herb for many years in Asia and Europe. This species is known to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activity and has demonstrated a reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. All tested extracts of L. sibiricus showed protective and DNA repair stimulating effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to H2O2. Preincubation of the CHO cells with 0.5 mg/mL of plant extracts showed increased expression level of antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx). LC-MS/MS and HPLC analyses revealed the presence of nine phenolic compounds in L. sibiricus plant extracts: catechin, verbascoside, two flavonoids (quercetin and rutin), and five phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid). The roots and aerial parts of in vitro L. sibiricus plant extracts, which had the strongest antioxidant properties, may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, as well as protecting DNA via enhanced activation of the antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx) regulating intracellular antioxidant capacity. The content of phenolic compounds in in vitro raised plants was greater than the levels found in plants propagated from seeds.

  18. The Effect of Leonurus sibiricus Plant Extracts on Stimulating Repair and Protective Activity against Oxidative DNA Damage in CHO Cells and Content of Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Sitarek, Przemysław; Skała, Ewa; Wysokińska, Halina; Wielanek, Marzena; Szemraj, Janusz; Toma, Monika; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Leonurus sibiricus L. has been used as a traditional and medicinal herb for many years in Asia and Europe. This species is known to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activity and has demonstrated a reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. All tested extracts of L. sibiricus showed protective and DNA repair stimulating effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to H2O2. Preincubation of the CHO cells with 0.5 mg/mL of plant extracts showed increased expression level of antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx). LC-MS/MS and HPLC analyses revealed the presence of nine phenolic compounds in L. sibiricus plant extracts: catechin, verbascoside, two flavonoids (quercetin and rutin), and five phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid). The roots and aerial parts of in vitro L. sibiricus plant extracts, which had the strongest antioxidant properties, may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, as well as protecting DNA via enhanced activation of the antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx) regulating intracellular antioxidant capacity. The content of phenolic compounds in in vitro raised plants was greater than the levels found in plants propagated from seeds. PMID:26788249

  19. Phylogenetic relationships among phrynosomatid lizards as inferred from mitochondrial ribosomal DNA sequences: substitutional bias and information content of transitions relative to transversions.

    PubMed

    Reeder, T W

    1995-06-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among 40 species, representing all genera, within the North American lizard family Phrynosomatidae were inferred from mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Cladistic analysis of the DNA sequence data (779 bp; 162 informative characters) supported the monophyly of the sand lizards (Callisaurus, Cophosaurus, Holbrookia, and Uma), Petrosaurus, Phrynosoma, Urosaurus, and Uta. All the species of Sceloporus, except S. variabilis and S. chrysostictus, formed a clade. Except for a sand lizard + Phrynosoma clade, the intergeneric relationships inferred from the mtDNA were largely incongruent with recent cladistic analyses based on morphology. Sceloporus group monophyly was not supported, with Petrosaurus being a member of a clade containing Sator, Sceloporus, and Urosaurus, to the exclusion of Uta. The phylogenetic placement of Uta was ambiguous. The substitutional bias in the phrynosomatid mitochondrial rDNA sequences was examined, as well as the phylogenetic information content of transitions relative to transversions. There appeared to be a lower transition bias than observed in other vertebrate sequences, with some classes of transversions occurring as frequently as G <-> A transitions. Transitions were no less informative for phylogeny reconstruction than transversions. Therefore, transitions should not be down-weighted in phylogenetic analysis, as is often done.

  20. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  1. Polyploidization in the trophoblast and uterine glandular epithelium of the endotheliochorial placenta of silver fox (Vulpes fulvus Desm.), as revealed by the DNA content.

    PubMed

    Zybina, T G; Zybina, E V; Kiknadze, I I; Zhelezova, A I

    2001-05-01

    Dynamics of genome multiplication during establishment of interrelations between trophoblast and glandular epithelium of the endometrium has been studied in the course of formation of placenta in the silver fox. During formation of the placenta, penetration of the trophoblast into the zone of the endometrial glandular epithelium and of endometrial blood vessels into the zone of expanding trophoblast occurs. The trophoblast, which gradually replaces epithelium and a part of the stroma of the endometrium, closely adjoins endometrial vessels but does not disrupt them, thereby the endotheliochorial placenta is formed. Cytophotometric measurements of the DNA content in trophoblast nuclei have shown that most of them are polyploid: predominantly 4-64c, occasionally 128c and 256c. Polyploidy of the trophoblast may be a consequence of various types of polyploidizing mitoses. Cytophotometric measurements of the DNA content in mitotic figures have revealed the presence of mitoses of diploid cells, i.e. with the DNA amount of 4c (2n), and polyploid cells, i.e. 8c (4n), and 16c (8n), therefore trophoblast cells in the silver fox placenta are able to enter mitosis up to the octaploid level. Higher degrees of polyploidy in the trophoblast cells seem to be achieved by endoreduplication. Polyploidization of the uterine glandular epithelial cells during placentation in the silver fox occurs until the level of 8c. Thus, the tissue-specific response of the uterus to the implanting embryo consists of active proliferation and polyploidization of the glandular epithelium, which may compensate formation of prominent population of decidual cells (i.e., connective tissue cells). In the endotheliochorial placenta of the silver fox the regularity is confirmed that cells of both maternal and fetal origin are, as a rule, polyploid in sites of their contact in placenta, which may be of protective significance in the contact of allogenic organisms.

  2. Simultaneous analysis of mitochondrial activity and DNA content in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells by dual parameter flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Hämmerle, T; Löffler, M

    1989-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites tumor cells were permeabilized using low concentrations of digitonin, 8 micrograms/10(6) cells. Permeabilization was monitored by the assay of lactate dehydrogenase released into the incubation medium and of hexokinase partially bound to mitochondria. Integrity of the cellular organelles was unaffected as determined by assay of the mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase. Cells were stained with rhodamine 123 as a mitochondrial specific dye and propidium iodide/mithramycin as DNA specific dyes. The green fluorescence of bound rhodamine 123 versus red fluorescence of DNA in individual cells was analysed by dual parameter flow cytometry. Incubation of cells with inhibitors of mitochondrial energy metabolism, such as, potassium cyanide and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone abolished binding of rhodamine 123. Flow cytometric data allowed a correlation between cell position in the mitotic cycle with total mitochondrial activity. In addition, comparison of the characteristics of propidium iodide and ethidium bromide staining further elucidated the molecular basis of the staining with the positively-charged fluorescent dye rhodamine 123.

  3. Intraguild Predation Among Three Common Coccinellids (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in China: Detection Using DNA-Based Gut-Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Qian; Wang, Dongmei; Xu, Bin; Xu, Jianxiang; Lu, Yanhui; Harwood, James D

    2016-12-26

    The ubiquity of intraguild predation (IGP) has been widely recognized for predatory coccinellids (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). In Chinese agroecosystems, three species (Coccinella septempunctata L., Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), and Propylea japonica (Thunberg)) are particularly common, but there is little information of interactions occurring between them. In no-choice laboratory feeding trials, differential directional predation was observed between species: C. septempunctata preyed on eggs of P. japonica more than H. axyridis and H. axyridis consumed eggs of C. septempunctata and P. japonica equally, whereas P. japonica had a very low predation rate on eggs of the other two species. In choice trials, C. septempunctata and P. japonica larvae preyed less on H. axyridis eggs than those of P. japonica and C. septempunctata, respectively, contrasting with H. axyridis larvae, which showed similar preference for both species. Species-specific primers were developed for each coccinellid and used to determine the relative frequency of prey consumption in the field. Prior to field-based analysis, primer specificity was confirmed and consumption of prey elicited a positive reaction success, and detection time varied between different predator-prey combinations. Predators were then collected from cotton agroecosystems and, interestingly, no DNA of C. septempunctata was found in P. japonica, but all other predator-prey combinations yielded positive documentation of IGP in the field, with the greatest rate of 9% of C. septempunctata testing positive for H. axyridis DNA. This study confirmed the frequency of IGP among three common coccinellids in Chinese agroecosystems and the likelihood for interference to the biological control services provided by these important natural enemies.

  4. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  5. Characterizing the DNA Damage Response by Cell Tracking Algorithms and Cell Features Classification Using High-Content Time-Lapse Analysis.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Walter; Osseiran, Alma; Rojec, Maria; Liu, Yueyong; Bombrun, Maxime; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR) with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF) across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were able to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 µm2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when too many DSB

  6. Characterizing the DNA damage response by cell tracking algorithms and cell features classification using high-content time-lapse analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Georgescu, Walter; Osseiran, Alma; Rojec, Maria; ...

    2015-06-24

    Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR) with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF) across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were ablemore » to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 µm2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when too many

  7. Characterizing the DNA damage response by cell tracking algorithms and cell features classification using high-content time-lapse analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Georgescu, Walter; Osseiran, Alma; Rojec, Maria; Liu, Yueyong; Bombrun, Maxime; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.; Huen, Michael Shing-Yan

    2015-06-24

    Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR) with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF) across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were able to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 µm2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when too

  8. Characterizing the DNA Damage Response by Cell Tracking Algorithms and Cell Features Classification Using High-Content Time-Lapse Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Walter; Osseiran, Alma; Rojec, Maria; Liu, Yueyong; Bombrun, Maxime; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR) with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF) across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were able to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 µm2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when too many DSB

  9. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods for four genetically modified maize varieties and maize DNA content in food.

    PubMed

    Brodmann, Peter D; Ilg, Evelyn C; Berthoud, Hélène; Herrmann, Andre

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative detection methods are needed for enforcement of the recently introduced labeling threshold for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food ingredients. This labeling threshold, which is set to 1% in the European Union and Switzerland, must be applied to all approved GMOs. Four different varieties of maize are approved in the European Union: the insect-resistant Bt176 maize (Maximizer), Btl 1 maize, Mon810 (YieldGard) maize, and the herbicide-tolerant T25 (Liberty Link) maize. Because the labeling must be considered individually for each ingredient, a quantitation system for the endogenous maize content is needed in addition to the GMO-specific detection systems. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction detection methods were developed for the 4 approved genetically modified maize varieties and for an endogenous maize (invertase) gene system.

  10. Consequences of stoichiometric error on nuclear DNA content evaluation in Coffea liberica var. dewevrei using DAPI and propidium iodide.

    PubMed

    Noirot, Michel; Barre, Philippe; Louarn, Jacques; Duperray, Christophe; Hamon, Serge

    2002-04-01

    The genome size of coffee trees (Coffea sp.) was assessed using flow cytometry. Nuclear DNA was stained with two dyes [4',6-diamino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride hydrate (DAPI) and propidium iodide (PI)]. Fluorescence in coffee tree nuclei (C-PI or C-DAPI) was compared with that of the standard, petunia (P-PI or P-DAPI). If there is no stoichiometric error, then the ratio between fluorescence of the target nuclei and that of the standard nuclei (R-PI or R-DAPI) is expected to be proportional to the genome size. Between-tree differences in target : standard fluorescence ratios were noted in Coffea liberica var. dewevrei using propidium iodide and DAPI. For both dyes, between-tree differences were due to a lack of proportionality when comparing locations of the coffee peak and the petunia peak. Intraspecific genome size variations clearly cannot explain variations in the target : standard fluorescence ratio. The origin of the lack of proportionality between target and standard fluorescences differed for the two dyes. With propidium iodide, there was a regression line convergence point, and no between-tree differences were noted in this respect, whereas there was no such convergence with DAPI. An accurate estimate of genome size can thus be obtained with PI. Implications with respect to accessibility and binding mode are discussed.

  11. Consequences of Stoichiometric Error on Nuclear DNA Content Evaluation in Coffea liberica var. dewevrei using DAPI and Propidium Iodide

    PubMed Central

    NOIROT, MICHEL; BARRE, PHILIPPE; LOUARN, JACQUES; DUPERRAY, CHRISTOPHE; HAMON, SERGE

    2002-01-01

    The genome size of coffee trees (Coffea sp.) was assessed using flow cytometry. Nuclear DNA was stained with two dyes [4′,6‐diamino‐2‐phenylindole dihydrochloride hydrate (DAPI) and propidium iodide (PI)]. Fluorescence in coffee tree nuclei (C‐PI or C‐DAPI) was compared with that of the standard, petunia (P‐PI or P‐DAPI). If there is no stoichiometric error, then the ratio between fluorescence of the target nuclei and that of the standard nuclei (R‐PI or R‐DAPI) is expected to be proportional to the genome size. Between‐tree differences in target : standard fluorescence ratios were noted in Coffea liberica var. dewevrei using propidium iodide and DAPI. For both dyes, between‐tree differences were due to a lack of proportionality when comparing locations of the coffee peak and the petunia peak. Intraspecific genome size variations clearly cannot explain variations in the target : standard fluorescence ratio. The origin of the lack of proportionality between target and standard fluorescences differed for the two dyes. With propidium iodide, there was a regression line convergence point, and no between‐tree differences were noted in this respect, whereas there was no such convergence with DAPI. An accurate estimate of genome size can thus be obtained with PI. Implications with respect to accessibility and binding mode are discussed. PMID:12096798

  12. Air pollution particles mediated oxidative DNA base damage in a cell free system and in human airway epithelial cells in relation to particulate metal content and bioreactivity.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, A K; Inmon, J; Dailey, L A; Madden, M C; Ghio, A J; Gallagher, J E

    2001-07-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate an association between increased human morbidity and mortality with exposure to air pollution particulate matter. We hypothesized that such effects may be associated with the ability of the particles to mediate generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), either directly, via interaction with ambient oxygen or indirectly through initiation of an oxidative burst in phagocytes. To test this hypothesis, we determined 8-oxo-dG formation as a measure of direct generation of ROS, in response to particulate exposures to 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG), free and in calf thymus DNA in aerated solutions as the target molecule and cell culture, to assess the relationship between induction of oxidative damage, particulate metal content and metal bioreactivity. The HPLC-ECD technique was employed for separation and quantification of 8-oxo-dG, the most widely recognized marker of DNA oxidation. Particles used in this study include: Arizona desert dust (AZDD), coal fly ash (CFA and ECFA), oil fly ash (OFA and ROFA), and ambient air [SRM 1649 and Dusseldorf (DUSS), Germany]. The major difference between these particles is the concentration of water-soluble metals. The fly ash particulates OFA and ROFA showed a significant dose-dependent increase in dG hydroxylation to 8-oxo-dG formation over the control dG (p < 0.05), with yields 0.03 and 1.25% at the highest particulate concentration (1 mg/mL). Metal ion chelators and DMSO, a hydroxyl radical scavenger, inhibited this hydroxylation. In contrast, desert dust, coal fly ash and urban air particles induced 8-oxo-dG with yields ranging from 0.003 to 0.006%, respectively, with levels unaffected by pretreatment of the particles with metal ion chelators or addition of DMSO to the incubation mixture. When calf thymus DNA was used as a substrate, all the particles induced 8-oxo-dG in a pattern similar to that observed for dG hydroxylation, but with relatively less yield. Treatment of the particles with metal ion

  13. [Cell kinetic analysis of human brain tumors by bivariate flow cytometric measurement of cellular DNA content and amount of incorporated bromodeoxyuridine].

    PubMed

    Okuda, Y; Taomoto, K; Saya, H; Ijichi, A; Kudo, H; Kokunai, T; Tamaki, N; Matsumoto, S

    1989-04-01

    Cell kinetics of 91 human brain tumors obtained from 88 patients were analyzed with the following two methods, 1) bivariate (two-color) flow cytometric measurement of cellular DNA content and amount of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporated into cellular DNA, in 66 specimens, 2) immunohistochemical detection of BrdU incorporated S-phase cells, in 34 specimens. Patients were given an intravenous 1 hour infusion of 200 mg/sq. m. of BrdU 1-2 hours before the surgical removal. The excised tumor specimen was divided into several portions. One was fixed with 70% ethanol and embedded in paraffin, and another was digested mechanically and/or chemically to obtain a single cell suspension, and fixed in 70% ethanol. Paraffin-embedded tissue sections were stained by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunohistochemical method using anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody (MoAb). Single cell suspensions were reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated anti-BrdU MoAb, or anti-BrdU MoAb and FITC-conjugated second antibody successively by the staining with propidium iodide, for flow cytometry (FCM). Rates of S-phase fraction in single cell suspensions calculated by bivariate FCM were correlated well with labeling indexes (LI, i.e. the percentage of BrdU incorporated cells) calculated in tissue sections, but not with the result of analysis of DNA histogram by Dean's method. This discrepancy is probably due to large coefficient value in several samples. Histological malignancy of the tumors was reflected both in the proliferating index (PI, i.e. % S+G2M phase) calculated by bivariate FCM and the LI by immunohistochemical method. PI tended to be high in primitive neuroectodermal tumors and metastatic carcinomas, moderately high in gliomas, and low in benign tumor groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Assessment of polyphenolic content, antioxidant activity, protection against ROS-induced DNA damage and anticancer activity of Vitis vinifera stem extracts.

    PubMed

    Apostolou, Anna; Stagos, Dimitrios; Galitsiou, Elissavet; Spyrou, Argiris; Haroutounian, Serko; Portesis, Nikolaos; Trizoglou, Ioanna; Wallace Hayes, A; Tsatsakis, Aristides M; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2013-11-01

    Grape extracts and wine have been studied widely due to their beneficial effects on human health. However, there are only few studies from grape stems extracts. Therefore, the main objective of the present study was the assessment in stem extracts from Greek Vitis vinifera varieties of the total polyphenolic content (TPC), the identification of the polyphenols present in them, and the evaluation of their antioxidant activity, protection against ROS-induced DNA damage and inhibition of liver (HepG2) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell growth. The range of the TPC in grape stem extracts was from 345 to 584 mg GAE/g dry weight. Moreover, stem extracts contained different classes of polyphenols as flavonols, flavanols, procyanidins, phenolic acids and stilbenes. In DPPH and ABTS assays, the IC50 values of the stem extracts had an average of 7.8 ± 2.8 and 5.4 ± 2.6 μg/mL respectively. Also, all stem extracts inhibited OH- and ROO-induced DNA damage dose dependent with average IC50 values of 478 ± 217 and 1.15 ± 0.85 μg/mL respectively. Furthermore, stem extracts inhibited at low concentrations the growth of HepG2 and HeLa cancer cells with average IC50 values of 50 ± 12 and 32 ± 16 μg/mL respectively. The above activities of grape stem extracts were comparable to those of seed extracts.

  15. Universal 1/f noise, crossovers of scaling exponents, and chromosome-specific patterns of guanine-cytosine content in DNA sequences of the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wentian; Holste, Dirk

    2005-04-01

    Spatial fluctuations of guanine and cytosine base content (GC%) are studied by spectral analysis for the complete set of human genomic DNA sequences. We find that (i) 1/fα decay is universally observed in the power spectra of all 24 chromosomes, and (ii) the exponent α≈1 extends to about 107 bases, one order of magnitude longer than has previously been observed. We further find that (iii) almost all human chromosomes exhibit a crossover from α1≈1 (1/fα1) at lower frequency to α2<1 (1/fα2) at higher frequency, typically occurring at around 30 000-100 000 bases, while (iv) the crossover in this frequency range is virtually absent in human chromosome 22. In addition to the universal 1/fα noise in power spectra, we find (v) several lines of evidence for chromosome-specific correlation structures, including a 500 000 base long oscillation in human chromosome 21. The universal 1/fα spectrum in the human genome is further substantiated by a resistance to reduction in variance of guanine and cytosine content when the window size is increased.

  16. On the way to identify microorganisms in drinking water distribution networks via DNA analysis of the gut content of freshwater isopods.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Michael; Keller, Adrian; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Warnecke, Hans-Joachim

    2015-05-10

    Pure drinking water is the basis for a healthy society. In Germany the drinking water regulations demand for analysis of water via detection of certain microbiological parameters by cultivation only. However, not all prokaryotes can be detected by these standard methods. How to gain more and better information about the bacteria present in drinking water and its distribution systems? The biofilms in drinking water distribution systems are built by bacteria and therefore represent a valuable source of information about the species present. Unfortunately, these biofilms are badly accessible. We thus exploited the circumstance that a lot of metazoans graze the biofilms, so that the content of their guts partly reflects the respective biofilm biocenosis. Therefore, we collected omnivorous isopods, prepared their guts and examined and characterized their contents based on 16S und 18S rDNA analysis. These molecularbiological investigations provide a profound basis for the characterization of the biocenosis and thereby biologically assess the drinking water ecosystems. Combined with a thorough identification of the species and the knowledge of their habitats, this approach can provide useful indications for the assessment of drinking-water quality and the early detection of problems in the distribution system.

  17. DNA content, chromatin supraorganization, nuclear glycoproteins and RNA amounts in hepatocytes of mice expressing insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mello, Maria Luiza S; Aldrovani, Marcela; Moraes, Alberto Silva; Guaraldo, Ana Maria Aparecida; Vidal, Benedicto de Campos

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin supraorganization and extensibility and nuclear glycoprotein content have been reported to change in hepatocytes from mice during development and aging, as well as under starvation and refeeding conditions. In non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, the expression of insulin-dependent diabetes may be accompanied by metabolic changes in the liver. These changes are likely to be similar to those involved in the aging processes of non-diabetic animals. Therefore, we hypothesized that the chromatin organization, as well as the physical properties and compositions of hepatocyte nuclei would also be affected in NOD mice in the same way as those in aged non-diabetic mice. Nuclear image parameters were evaluated by image analysis of Feulgen-stained preparations. Chromatin extensibility in response to gravity was observed with polarized light after lysis and toluidine blue staining. The Con-A response of nuclear glycoproteins was evaluated with scanning microspectrophotometry. These characteristics were assessed using hepatocyte imprints from female NOD mice after a 28-day period of diabetes expression. Observations and measurements were made in comparison to healthy BALB/c mice. Total RNA amounts were determined for livers of NOD and BALB/c mice. Enhanced polyploidy levels, a decrease in chromatin higher-order packing states, an increased frequency of extended chromatin fiber formation, and deeper Con-A-responsive chromatin areas were observed in the hepatocytes of the NOD mice expressing insulin-dependent diabetes. Reduced amounts of total RNA were also found in the livers of these mice. Our findings for NOD mice expressing insulin-dependent diabetes are consistent with previously reported data for old-aged mice of the inbred strain A/Uni and may reflect changes in transcriptional activities associated with the stressful physiological demands on the liver during the expression of diabetes.

  18. FISH analysis of 1cen-1q12 breakage, chromosome 1 numerical abnormalities and centromeric content of micronuclei in buccal cells from thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism patients treated with radioactive iodine.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, M J; Surrallés, J; Galofré, P; Creus, A; Marcos, R

    1999-01-01

    One of the health consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident was a radioactive iodine-related increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in exposed children. This radioisotope is used in the treatment of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism patients providing a convenient opportunity to study cytogenetic damage induced by known doses of radioactive iodine in treated patients. We used pancentromeric FISH on micronuclei and chromosome 1 tandem labelling FISH to monitor overall chromosome breakage and loss, 1q12 breakage and decondensation and chromosome 1 numerical abnormalities in buccal cells from 31 radioactive iodine-exposed hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer patients. The overall outcome of the study, with 250,000 buccal cells analysed, is that there was no radioactive iodine-related increase in the frequency of micronuclei, 1q12 breakage, 1q12 decondensation or chromosome 1 numerical abnormalities. In addition, neither age nor gender, health status nor radioactive iodine dose modulated the frequency of the above cytogenetic end points. Although several uncertainties of these emerging molecular cytogenetic methodologies will require further experimentation, we conclude that, at the reported exposure levels, radioactive iodine did not induce detectable chromosome damage in buccal cells from treated patients.

  19. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  20. Dynamic heterogeneity of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in embryonic stem cell populations captured by single-cell 3D high-content analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tajbakhsh, Jian; Stefanovski, Darko; Tang, George; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Liu, Naiyou; Fair, Jeffrey H.

    2015-03-15

    Cell-surface markers and transcription factors are being used in the assessment of stem cell fate and therapeutic safety, but display significant variability in stem cell cultures. We assessed nuclear patterns of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, associated with pluripotency), a second important epigenetic mark, and its combination with 5-methylcytosine (5mC, associated with differentiation), also in comparison to more established markers of pluripotency (Oct-4) and endodermal differentiation (FoxA2, Sox17) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) over a 10-day differentiation course in vitro: by means of confocal and super-resolution imaging together with 3D high-content analysis, an essential tool in single-cell screening. In summary: 1) We did not measure any significant correlation of putative markers with global 5mC or 5hmC. 2) While average Oct-4 levels stagnated on a cell-population base (0.015 lnIU/day), Sox17 and FoxA2 increased 22-fold and 3-fold faster, respectively (Sox17: 0.343 lnIU/day; FoxA2: 0.046 lnIU/day). In comparison, global DNA methylation levels increased 4-fold faster (0.068 lnIU/day), and global hydroxymethylation declined at 0.046 lnIU/day, both with a better explanation of the temporal profile. 3) This progression was concomitant with the occurrence of distinct nuclear codistribution patterns that represented a heterogeneous spectrum of states in differentiation; converging to three major coexisting 5mC/5hmC phenotypes by day 10: 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup −}, 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +}, and 5hmC{sup −}/5mC{sup +} cells. 4) Using optical nanoscopy we could delineate the respective topologies of 5mC/5hmC colocalization in subregions of nuclear DNA: in the majority of 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +} cells 5hmC and 5mC predominantly occupied mutually exclusive territories resembling euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, respectively. Simultaneously, in a smaller subset of cells we observed a tighter colocalization of the two cytosine variants, presumably

  1. Cholera toxin treatment of vascular smooth muscle cells decreases smooth muscle α-actin content and abolishes the platelet-derived growth factor-BB-stimulated DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sachinidis, Agapios; Seul, Claudia; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Seewald, Stefan; Ko, Yon; Vetter, Hans; Fingerle, Jürgen; Hoppe, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic AMP regulates diverse biological processes such as cell morphology and cell growth. We examined the role of the second messenger cyclic AMP on rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) morphology and the intracellular transduction pathway mediated by platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor (PDGF-Rβ). The effect of PDGF-BB on VSMCs growth was assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Tyrosine phosphorylation of PDGF-Rβ, PLC-γ1, ERK1 and ERK2, p125FAK and paxillin as well as Sm α-actin was examined by the chemiluminescence Western blotting method. Actin mRNA level was quantitated by Northern blotting. Visualization of Sm α-actin filaments, paxillin and PDGF-Rβ was performed by immunfluorescence microscopy. Cholera toxin (CTX; 10 nM) treatment lead to a large and sustained increase in the cyclic AMP concentration after 2 h which correlated with change of VSMC morphology including complete disruption of the Sm α-actin filament array and loss of focal adhesions. Treatment of VSMCs with CTX did not influence tyrosine phosphorylation of p125FAK and paxillin but decreased the content of a Sm α-actin protein. Maximal decrease of 70% was observed after 24 h of treatment. CTX also caused a 90% decrease of the actin mRNA level. CTX treatment completely abolished PDGF-BB stimulated DNA-synthesis although PDGF-Rβ level and subcellular distribution and translocation was not altered. Furthermore CTX attenuated the PDGF-BB-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PDGF-Rβ, PI 3′-K, PLC-γ1 and ERK1/2 indicating an action of cyclic AMP on PDGF-β receptor. We conclude that although cyclic AMP attenuates the PDGF-Rβ mediated intracellular transduction pathway, an intact actin filament may be required for the PDGF-BB-induced DNA synthesis in VSMCs. PMID:10928958

  2. Social and Abnormal Psychology Textbooks: An Objective Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopher, Andrew N.; Griggs, Richard A.; Hagans, Chad L.

    2000-01-01

    Provides feature and content analyses of 14 social and 17 abnormal psychology full-length textbooks from 1995-98 that are available for undergraduate psychology courses. Provides instructors of these courses a means for more informed text selection. (CMK)

  3. Modification of tumor cell exosome content by transfection with wt-p53 and microRNA-125b expressing plasmid DNA and its effect on macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, M; Talekar, M; Shah, P; Ouyang, Q; Amiji, M

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are responsible for intercellular communication between tumor cells and others in the tumor microenvironment. These microvesicles promote oncogensis and can support towards metastasis by promoting a pro-tumorogenic environment. Modifying the exosomal content and exosome delivery are emerging novel cancer therapies. However, the clinical translation is limited due to feasibility of isolating and delivery of treated exosomes as well as an associated immune response in patients. In this study, we provide proof-of-concept for a novel treatment approach for manipulating exosomal content by genetic transfection of tumor cells using dual-targeted hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles. Following transfection with plasmid DNA encoding for wild-type p53 (wt-p53) and microRNA-125b (miR-125b), we evaluate the transgene expression in the SK-LU-1 cells and in the secreted exosomes. Furthermore, along with modulation of wt-p53 and miR-125b expression, we also show that the exosomes (i.e., wt-p53/exo, miR-125b/exo and combination/exo) have a reprogramed global miRNA profile. The miRNAs in the exosomes were mainly related to the activation of genes associated with apoptosis as well as p53 signaling. More importantly, these altered miRNA levels in the exosomes could mediate macrophage repolarization towards a more pro-inflammatory/antitumor M1 phenotype. However, further studies, especially in vivo studies, are warranted to assess the direct influence of such macrophage reprogramming on cancer cells and oncogenesis post-treatment. The current study provides a novel platform enabling the development of therapeutic strategies affecting not only the cancer cells but also the tumor microenvironment by utilizing the ‘bystander effect' through genetic transfer with secreted exosomes. Such modification could also support antitumor environment leading to decreased oncogenesis. PMID:27500388

  4. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  5. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  6. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  7. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  8. Dynamic Heterogeneity of DNA Methylation and Hydroxymethylation in Embryonic Stem Cell Populations Captured by Single-Cell 3D High-Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tajbakhsh, Jian; Stefanovski, Darko; Tang, George; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Liu, Naiyou; Fair, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-surface markers and transcription factors are being used in the assessment of stem cell fate and therapeutic safety, but display significant variability in stem cell cultures. We assessed nuclear patterns of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, associated with pluripotency), a second important epigenetic mark, and its combination with 5-methylcytosine (5mC, associated with differentiation), also in comparison to more established markers of pluripotency (Oct-4) and endodermal differentiation (FoxA2, Sox17) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) over a ten-day differentiation course in vitro: by means of confocal and super-resolution imaging together with high-content analysis, an essential tool in single-cell screening. In summary: 1) We did not measure any significant correlation of putative markers with global 5mC or 5hmC. 2) While average Oct-4 levels stagnated on a cell-population base (0.015 lnIU per day), Sox17 and FoxA2 increased 22-fold and 3-fold faster, respectively (Sox17:0.343 lnIU/day; FoxA2: 0.046 lnIU/day). In comparison, DNA global methylation levels increased 4-fold faster (0.068 lnIU/day), and global hydroxymethylation declined at 0.046 lnIU/day, both with a better explanation of the temporal profile. 3) This progression was concomitant with the occurrence of distinct nuclear codistribution patterns that represented a heterogeneous spectrum of states in differentiation; converging to three major coexisting 5mC/5hmC phenotypes by day 10: 5hmC+/5mC−, 5hmC+/5mC+, and 5hmC−/5mC+ cells. 4) Using optical nanoscopy we could delineate the respective topologies of 5mC/5hmC colocalization in subregions of nuclear DNA: in the majority of 5hmC+/5mC+ cells 5hmC and 5mC predominantly occupied mutually exclusive territories resembling euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, respectively. Simultaneously, in a smaller subset of cells we observed a tighter colocalization of the two cytosine variants, presumably delineating chromatin domains in remodeling. We

  9. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  10. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  11. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  12. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Changes in nucleus, nucleolus and cell size accompanying somatic embryogenesis of Theobroma cacao L. I. Relationship between DNA and total protein content and size of nucleus, nucleolus and cell.

    PubMed

    Kononowicz, H; Janick, J

    1988-01-01

    There was a linear relation between an increase in DNA content and size of nuclei, nucleoli and cells in callus and proembryos (Theobroma cacao L.). In callus the increase of DNA content was accompanied by proportional increase in nuclear size whereas in proembryos the increase in nuclear size did not match the increasing amount of DNA. The stimulation of embryogenesis by 10(-2) mg/l 2,4-D was associated with increase in nuclear and nucleolar size and with decrease in cell sizes. Inhibition of embryogenesis by 1.0 mg/l 2,4-D+10% coconut water did not change nuclear size, but increased cell size in relation to the control. The process of embryo formation was accompanied by changes in relationship between nuclear, nucleolar and cell size and the total (DNFB-stained) proteins content. In callus as well as in proembryo the increase in total protein content in nucleus was not equivalent to the increasing sizes of nuclei which leads to the decrease in nuclear protein concentration. Similar situation was observed for nucleoli. Differences were found in the concentration of cytoplasmic proteins between the callus and proembryo cells. The stimulation of embryogenesis by low concentration of 2,4-D resulted in decrease in concentration of total proteins in nuclei and nucleoli and the increase in cytoplasm.

  14. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  15. Parsing abnormal grain growth in specialty aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Abigail Kremer

    multivariate statistical tool called canonical correlation analysis was adopted to seek out relationships between a set of input variables and the abnormal character values. The input variables include the MgO, CaO, Na 2O, and SiO2 contents, the ratio of MgO:(CaO+SiO2), and the annealing time and temperature. The analysis was applied to 33 different samples and showed that the composition ratio and MgO content were the strongest processing variables. These variables are most closely related to the correlation between grain size and aspect ratio, the average magnitude of abnormality, and the variance in grain size. The physical implications of these relationships are explored for a number of samples with different abnormal grain growth behaviors. Several of the samples contained a beta"-alumina phase that is shown to have a dampening effect on abnormal grain growth. TEM investigation provides evidence that there is a grain boundary complexion with a different composition and structure than the second phase. A series of samples are compared after annealing for different times and are shown to have very different behaviors as a result of the second phase competing with complexions for control over the microstructure.

  16. Effect of CoCl₂ on the content of different metals and a relative activity of DNA-hydrolyzing abzymes in the blood plasma of mice.

    PubMed

    Legostaeva, Galina A; Zaksas, Nataliya P; Gluhcheva, Yordanka G; Sedykh, Sergey E; Madzharova, Maria E; Atanassova, Nina N; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition metal and an essential trace element that is required for vitamin B₁₂ biosynthesis, enzyme activation, and so on but is toxic in high concentrations. It was shown that the content of different elements in the plasma of 2-month-old BALB/c mice (control group) decreased in the following order: Ca > Mg > Si > Fe > Zn > Cu ≥ Al ≥ B. The treatment of mice with CoCl₂ did not appreciably change the relative content of Ca, Cu, and Zn, but a significant increase in the content of B (2.3-fold), Mg (1.5-fold), Al and Fe (2.1-fold), and Si (3.4-fold) was found. The treatment of mice led to a 2.2-fold decrease in the concentration of the total blood protein and a 1.7 ± 0.2-fold decrease of total immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs). Deoxyribonuclease IgGs corresponding to mice treated (t-IgGs) and non-treated (nt-IgGs) with CoCl₂ contained intrinsically bound metal ions; these IgGs hydrolyzed DNA with very low activity but were not active in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or after Ab dialysis against ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The average RAs of deoxyribonuclease nt-IgGs increased after addition of external metal ions in the following order: Zn²⁺< Ca²⁺ < Cu²⁺ < Fe²⁺ < Mn²⁺ < Mg²⁺ < Co²⁺ < Ni²⁺. Interestingly, t-IgGs demonstrated lower activities than those for nt-IgGs either in the absence of external metal ions (2.7-fold) or in the presence of Cu²⁺ (9.5-fold) > Co²⁺ (5.6-fold) > Zn²⁺ (5.1-fold) > Mg²⁺ (4.1-fold) > Ca²⁺ (3.0-fold) > Fe²⁺ (1.3-fold). However, the RAs of t-IgGs were remarkably more active than nt-IgGs in the presence of best activators of t-IgGs Ni²⁺ (1.4-fold) and especially Mn²⁺ (2.2-fold). The data may be useful for an understanding of Co toxicity, its effect on the concentration of other metal ions, and a change of metal-dependent specificity of Abzs.

  17. Skeletal abnormalities in homocystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Brenton, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The skeletal changes of thirty-four patients with the biochemical and clinical features of cystathionine synthase deficiency are described. It is emphasized that there is clinical evidence of excessive bone growth and the formation for bone which is structurally weaker than normal. The similarities and differences between this condition and Marfan's syndrome are stressed and the possible nature of the connective tissue defect leading to the skeletal changes discussed. The most characteristic skeletal changes in homocystinuria are the skeletal disproportion (pubis-heel length greater than crown-pubis length), the abnormal vertebrae, sternal deformities, genu valgum and large metaphyses and epiphyses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917963

  18. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  19. DNA systematics. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: PLANTS: PLANT DNA: Contents and Systematics. Repeated DNA Sequences and Polyploidy in Cereal Crops. Homology of Nonrepeated DNA Sequences in Phylogeny of Fungal Species. Chloropast DNA and Phylogenetic Relationships. rDNA: Evolution Over a Billion Years. 23S rRNA-derived Small Ribosomal RNAs: Their Structure and Evolution with Reference to Plant Phylogeny. Molecular Analysis of Plant DNA Genomes: Conserved and Diverged DNA Sequences. A Critical Review of Some Terminologies Used for Additional DNA in Plant Chromosomes and Index.

  20. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  1. Abnormal liver development and resistance to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxicity in mice carrying a mutation in the DNA-binding domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Bunger, Maureen K; Glover, Edward; Moran, Susan M; Walisser, Jacqueline A; Lahvis, Garet P; Hsu, Erin L; Bradfield, Christopher A

    2008-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is known for its role in the adaptive and toxic responses to a large number of environmental contaminants, as well as its role in hepatovascular development. The classical AHR pathway involves ligand binding, nuclear translocation, heterodimerization with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT), and binding of the heterodimer to dioxin response elements (DREs), thereby modulating the transcription of an array of genes. The AHR has also been implicated in signaling events independent of nuclear localization and DNA binding, and it has been suggested that such pathways may play important roles in the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Here, we report the generation of a mouse model that expresses an AHR protein capable of ligand binding, interactions with chaperone proteins, functional heterodimerization with ARNT, and nuclear translocation, but is unable to bind DREs. Using this model, we provide evidence that DNA binding is required AHR-mediated liver development, as Ahr(dbd/dbd) mice exhibit a patent ductus venosus, similar to what is seen in Ahr(-/-) mice. Furthermore, Ahr(dbd/dbd) mice are resistant to TCDD-induced toxicity for all endpoints tested. These data suggest that DNA binding is necessary for AHR-mediated developmental and toxic signaling.

  2. [The development of a test-system for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of DNA content in criminalistic objects by the real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Lapenkov, M I; Plakhina, N V; Alekseev, Ia I; Varlamov, D A

    2011-01-01

    An original test-system for the preliminary quantitative and qualitative evaluation of isolated DNA is proposed by the polymerase chain reaction in real time (PCR-RT) based on the TaqMan technology. This test-system permits to simultaneously measure the amount of DNA in the sample, identify the genetic gender, and detect PCR inhibitors. The method has been approbated in the practical work of forensic medical experts.

  3. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  4. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  5. Different rates of DNA replication at early versus late S-phase sections: multiscale modeling of stochastic events related to DNA content/EdU (5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine) incorporation distributions.

    PubMed

    Li, Biao; Zhao, Hong; Rybak, Paulina; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Kimmel, Marek

    2014-09-01

    Mathematical modeling allows relating molecular events to single-cell characteristics assessed by multiparameter cytometry. In the present study we labeled newly synthesized DNA in A549 human lung carcinoma cells with 15-120 min pulses of EdU. All DNA was stained with DAPI and cellular fluorescence was measured by laser scanning cytometry. The frequency of cells in the ascending (left) side of the "horseshoe"-shaped EdU/DAPI bivariate distributions reports the rate of DNA replication at the time of entrance to S phase while their frequency in the descending (right) side is a marker of DNA replication rate at the time of transition from S to G2 phase. To understand the connection between molecular-scale events and scatterplot asymmetry, we developed a multiscale stochastic model, which simulates DNA replication and cell cycle progression of individual cells and produces in silico EdU/DAPI scatterplots. For each S-phase cell the time points at which replication origins are fired are modeled by a non-homogeneous Poisson Process (NHPP). Shifted gamma distributions are assumed for durations of cell cycle phases (G1, S and G2 M), Depending on the rate of DNA synthesis being an increasing or decreasing function, simulated EdU/DAPI bivariate graphs show predominance of cells in left (early-S) or right (late-S) side of the horseshoe distribution. Assuming NHPP rate estimated from independent experiments, simulated EdU/DAPI graphs are nearly indistinguishable from those experimentally observed. This finding proves consistency between the S-phase DNA-replication rate based on molecular-scale analyses, and cell population kinetics ascertained from EdU/DAPI scatterplots and demonstrates that DNA replication rate at entrance to S is relatively slow compared with its rather abrupt termination during S to G2 transition. Our approach opens a possibility of similar modeling to study the effect of anticancer drugs on DNA replication/cell cycle progression and also to quantify other

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities and mental illness.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, D J; Blackwood, D H R; Porteous, D J; Pickard, B S; Muir, W J

    2003-03-01

    Linkage studies of mental illness have provided suggestive evidence of susceptibility loci over many broad chromosomal regions. Pinpointing causative gene mutations by conventional linkage strategies alone is problematic. The breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in patients with mental illness may be more direct pointers to the relevant gene locus. Publications that describe patients where chromosomal abnormalities co-exist with mental illness are reviewed along with supporting evidence that this may amount to an association. Chromosomal abnormalities are considered to be of possible significance if (a) the abnormality is rare and there are independent reports of its coexistence with psychiatric illness, or (b) there is colocalisation of the abnormality with a region of suggestive linkage findings, or (c) there is an apparent cosegregation of the abnormality with psychiatric illness within the individual's family. Breakpoints have been described within many of the loci suggested by linkage studies and these findings support the hypothesis that shared susceptibility factors for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may exist. If these abnormalities directly disrupt coding regions, then combining molecular genetic breakpoint cloning with bioinformatic sequence analysis may be a method of rapidly identifying candidate genes. Full karyotyping of individuals with psychotic illness especially where this coexists with mild learning disability, dysmorphism or a strong family history of mental disorder is encouraged.

  7. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  8. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  9. Congenital abnormalities and selective abortion.

    PubMed

    Seller, M J

    1976-09-01

    The technique of amniocentesis, by which an abnormal fetus can be detected in utero, has brought a technological advance in medical science but attendant medical and moral problems. Dr Seller describes those congenital disabilities which can be detected in the fetus before birth, for which the "remedy" is selective abortion. She then discusses the arguments for and against selective abortion, for the issue is not simple, even in the strictly genetic sense of attempting to ensure a population free of congenital abnormality.

  10. Myelin vs axon abnormalities in white matter in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Kathryn E; Ongür, Dost; Sperry, Sarah H; Cohen, Bruce M; Sehovic, Selma; Goldbach, Jacqueline R; Du, Fei

    2015-03-13

    White matter (WM) abnormalities are among the most commonly reported neuroimaging findings in bipolar disorder. Nonetheless, the specific nature and pathophysiology of these abnormalities remain unclear. Use of a combination of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and diffusion tensor spectroscopy (DTS) permits examination of myelin and axon abnormalities separately. We aimed to examine myelination and axon geometry in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder with psychosis (BDP) by combining these two complementary noninvasive MRI techniques. We applied a combined MRI approach using MTR to study myelin content and DTS to study metabolite (N-acetylaspartate, NAA) diffusion within axons in patients with BDP (n=21) and healthy controls (n=24). Data were collected from a 1 × 3 × 3-cm voxel within the right prefrontal cortex WM at 4 Tesla. Clinical and cognitive data were examined in association with MTR and DTS data. MTR was significantly reduced in BDP, suggesting reduced myelin content. The apparent diffusion coefficient of NAA did not differ from healthy controls, suggesting no changes in axon geometry in patients with BDP. These findings suggest that patients with BDP exhibit reduced myelin content, but no changes in axon geometry compared with controls. These findings are in contrast with our recent findings, using the same techniques, in patients with schizophrenia (SZ), which suggest both myelination and axon abnormalities in SZ. This difference may indicate that alterations in WM in BDP may have unique causes and may be less extensive than WM abnormalities seen in SZ.

  11. Myelin vs Axon Abnormalities in White Matter in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Kathryn E; Ongür, Dost; Sperry, Sarah H; Cohen, Bruce M; Sehovic, Selma; Goldbach, Jacqueline R; Du, Fei

    2015-01-01

    White matter (WM) abnormalities are among the most commonly reported neuroimaging findings in bipolar disorder. Nonetheless, the specific nature and pathophysiology of these abnormalities remain unclear. Use of a combination of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and diffusion tensor spectroscopy (DTS) permits examination of myelin and axon abnormalities separately. We aimed to examine myelination and axon geometry in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder with psychosis (BDP) by combining these two complementary noninvasive MRI techniques. We applied a combined MRI approach using MTR to study myelin content and DTS to study metabolite (N-acetylaspartate, NAA) diffusion within axons in patients with BDP (n=21) and healthy controls (n=24). Data were collected from a 1 × 3 × 3-cm voxel within the right prefrontal cortex WM at 4 Tesla. Clinical and cognitive data were examined in association with MTR and DTS data. MTR was significantly reduced in BDP, suggesting reduced myelin content. The apparent diffusion coefficient of NAA did not differ from healthy controls, suggesting no changes in axon geometry in patients with BDP. These findings suggest that patients with BDP exhibit reduced myelin content, but no changes in axon geometry compared with controls. These findings are in contrast with our recent findings, using the same techniques, in patients with schizophrenia (SZ), which suggest both myelination and axon abnormalities in SZ. This difference may indicate that alterations in WM in BDP may have unique causes and may be less extensive than WM abnormalities seen in SZ. PMID:25409595

  12. Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Al-Griw, M.A.; Alghazeer, R.O.; Al-Azreg, S.A.; Bennour, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market. PMID:27800299

  13. UniPROBE, update 2015: new tools and content for the online database of protein-binding microarray data on protein–DNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Maxwell A.; Barrera, Luis A.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    The Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation (UniPROBE) serves as a convenient source of information on published data generated using universal protein-binding microarray (PBM) technology, which provides in vitro data about the relative DNA-binding preferences of transcription factors for all possible sequence variants of a length k (‘k-mers’). The database displays important information about the proteins and displays their DNA-binding specificity data in terms of k-mers, position weight matrices and graphical sequence logos. This update to the database documents the growth of UniPROBE since the last update 4 years ago, and introduces a variety of new features and tools, including a new streamlined pipeline that facilitates data deposition by universal PBM data generators in the research community, a tool that generates putative nonbinding (i.e. negative control) DNA sequences for one or more proteins and novel motifs obtained by analyzing the PBM data using the BEEML-PBM algorithm for motif inference. The UniPROBE database is available at http://uniprobe.org. PMID:25378322

  14. UniPROBE, update 2015: new tools and content for the online database of protein-binding microarray data on protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Hume, Maxwell A; Barrera, Luis A; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Bulyk, Martha L

    2015-01-01

    The Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation (UniPROBE) serves as a convenient source of information on published data generated using universal protein-binding microarray (PBM) technology, which provides in vitro data about the relative DNA-binding preferences of transcription factors for all possible sequence variants of a length k ('k-mers'). The database displays important information about the proteins and displays their DNA-binding specificity data in terms of k-mers, position weight matrices and graphical sequence logos. This update to the database documents the growth of UniPROBE since the last update 4 years ago, and introduces a variety of new features and tools, including a new streamlined pipeline that facilitates data deposition by universal PBM data generators in the research community, a tool that generates putative nonbinding (i.e. negative control) DNA sequences for one or more proteins and novel motifs obtained by analyzing the PBM data using the BEEML-PBM algorithm for motif inference. The UniPROBE database is available at http://uniprobe.org.

  15. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  16. Internal validation of the DNAscan/ANDE™ Rapid DNA Analysis™ platform and its associated PowerPlex(®) 16 high content DNA biochip cassette for use as an expert system with reference buccal swabs.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lilliana I; Brown, Alice L; Callaghan, Thomas F

    2017-03-31

    Rapid DNA platforms are fully integrated systems capable of producing and analyzing short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from reference sample buccal swabs in less than two hours. The technology requires minimal user interaction and experience making it possible for high quality profiles to be generated outside an accredited laboratory. The automated production of point of collection reference STR profiles could eliminate the time delay for shipment and analysis of arrestee samples at centralized laboratories. Furthermore, point of collection analysis would allow searching against profiles from unsolved crimes during the normal booking process once the infrastructure to immediately search the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database from the booking station is established. The DNAscan/ANDE™ Rapid DNA Analysis™ System developed by Network Biosystems was evaluated for robustness and reliability in the production of high quality reference STR profiles for database enrollment and searching applications. A total of 193 reference samples were assessed for concordance of the CODIS 13 loci. Studies to evaluate contamination, reproducibility, precision, stutter, peak height ratio, noise and sensitivity were also performed. The system proved to be robust, consistent and dependable. Results indicated an overall success rate of 75% for the 13 CODIS core loci and more importantly no incorrect calls were identified. The DNAscan/ANDE™ could be confidently used without human interaction in both laboratory and non-laboratory settings to generate reference profiles.

  17. Abnormal epidermal changes after argon laser treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, R.A.; Knobler, R.M.; Aberer, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Ott, E. )

    1991-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a congenital port-wine stain on the forehead was treated three times at 2-month intervals with an argon laser. Six months after the last treatment, moderate blanching and mild scaling confined to the treated area was observed. A biopsy specimen of the treated area revealed a significant decrease in ectatic vessels. However, epidermal changes similar to those of actinic keratosis with disorganized cell layers and marked cytologic abnormalities were seen. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes for a defect in DNA repair was negative. Multiple, argon laser-induced photothermal effects may be responsible for the changes observed in our case and may lead to premalignant epidermal transformation.

  18. Time Orientation in the Positive and Negative Free Phantasies of Mildly Abnormal Versus Normal High School Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rychlak, Joseph F.

    1973-01-01

    This study contrasts a group of mildly'' abnormal high school males with matched normals in a two-session free phantasy procedure. Mildly abnormal boys phantasized more negative contents than normal boys. Normal boys projected more positive phantasies into the future than mildly abnormal boys. A logical learning theory'' embracing the…

  19. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  20. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  1. Convention on nomenclature for DNA cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hiddemann, W.; Schumann, J.; Andreeff, M.; Barlogie, B.; Herman, C.J.; Leif, R.C.; Mayall, B.H.; Murphy, R.F.; Sandberg, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Committee on Nomenclature of the Society for Analytical Cytology presents guidelines for the analysis of DNA content by cytometry. These guidelines cover: staining of DNA; cytogenetic and cytometric terminology; DNA index; resolution of measurements; and cytometric standards.

  2. Ectodermal dysplasia and abnormal thumbs.

    PubMed

    Lucky, A W; Esterly, N B; Tunnessen, W W

    1980-05-01

    Two unrelated children, a girl and a boy, with alopecia, anomalous cutaneous pigmentation, abnormal thumbs, and endocrine disorders, including short stature and delayed bone age in one patient and juvenile onset diabetes mellitus in the other, are described. In one instance, the mother and the maternal grandmother had similar abnormalities, although of a less severe nature. Both children had normal nails and no unusual susceptibility to infections. We believe these two patients represent a previously undescribed syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia that may be inherited as an autosomal-dominant trait.

  3. Inactivation of Ceramide Synthase 6 in Mice Results in an Altered Sphingolipid Metabolism and Behavioral Abnormalities*

    PubMed Central

    Ebel, Philipp; vom Dorp, Katharina; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Zlomuzica, Armin; Kinugawa, Kiyoka; Mariani, Jean; Minich, David; Ginkel, Christina; Welcker, Jochen; Degen, Joachim; Eckhardt, Matthias; Dere, Ekrem; Dörmann, Peter; Willecke, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The N-acyl chain length of ceramides is determined by the specificity of different ceramide synthases (CerS). The CerS family in mammals consists of six members with different substrate specificities and expression patterns. We have generated and characterized a mouse line harboring an enzymatically inactive ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6KO) gene and lacz reporter cDNA coding for β-galactosidase directed by the CerS6 promoter. These mice display a decrease in C16:0 containing sphingolipids. Relative to wild type tissues the amount of C16:0 containing sphingomyelin in kidney is ∼35%, whereas we find a reduction of C16:0 ceramide content in the small intestine to about 25%. The CerS6KO mice show behavioral abnormalities including a clasping abnormality of their hind limbs and a habituation deficit. LacZ reporter expression in the brain reveals CerS6 expression in hippocampus, cortex, and the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. Using newly developed antibodies that specifically recognize the CerS6 protein we show that the endogenous CerS6 protein is N-glycosylated and expressed in several tissues of mice, mainly kidney, small and large intestine, and brain. PMID:23760501

  4. Inactivation of ceramide synthase 6 in mice results in an altered sphingolipid metabolism and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ebel, Philipp; Vom Dorp, Katharina; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Zlomuzica, Armin; Kinugawa, Kiyoka; Mariani, Jean; Minich, David; Ginkel, Christina; Welcker, Jochen; Degen, Joachim; Eckhardt, Matthias; Dere, Ekrem; Dörmann, Peter; Willecke, Klaus

    2013-07-19

    The N-acyl chain length of ceramides is determined by the specificity of different ceramide synthases (CerS). The CerS family in mammals consists of six members with different substrate specificities and expression patterns. We have generated and characterized a mouse line harboring an enzymatically inactive ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6KO) gene and lacz reporter cDNA coding for β-galactosidase directed by the CerS6 promoter. These mice display a decrease in C16:0 containing sphingolipids. Relative to wild type tissues the amount of C16:0 containing sphingomyelin in kidney is ∼35%, whereas we find a reduction of C16:0 ceramide content in the small intestine to about 25%. The CerS6KO mice show behavioral abnormalities including a clasping abnormality of their hind limbs and a habituation deficit. LacZ reporter expression in the brain reveals CerS6 expression in hippocampus, cortex, and the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. Using newly developed antibodies that specifically recognize the CerS6 protein we show that the endogenous CerS6 protein is N-glycosylated and expressed in several tissues of mice, mainly kidney, small and large intestine, and brain.

  5. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  6. Chromosome abnormalities in human arrested preimplantation embryos: A multiple-probe FISH study

    SciTech Connect

    Munne, S.; Grifo, J.; Cohen, J. ); Weier, H.U.G. )

    1994-07-01

    Numerical chromosome abnormalities were studied in single blastomeres from arrested or otherwise morphologically abnormal human preimplantation embryos. A 6-h FISH procedure with fluorochrome-labeled DNA probes was developed to determine numerical abnormalities of chromosomes X, Y, and 18. The three chromosomes were stained and detected simultaneously in 571 blastomeres from 131 embryos. Successful analysis including biopsy, fixation, and FISH analysis was achieved in 86.5% of all blastomeres. The procedure described here offers a reliable alternative to sexing of embryos by PCR and allows simultaneous ploidy assessment. For the three chromosomes tested, numerical aberrations were found in 56.5% of the embroys. Most abnormal embryos were polyploid or mosaics, and 6.1% were aneuploid for gonosomes or chromosome 18. Extrapolation of these results to all human chromosomes suggests that the majority of abnormally developing and arrested human embryos carry numerical chromosome abnormalities. 44 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Unusual DNA structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.D.; Harvey, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Unusual DNS Structures and the Probes Used for Their Detection; The Specificity of Single Strand Specific Endonucleases; Chromatin STructure and DNA Structure at the hsp 26 Locus of Drosophilia; Cruciform Extrusion in Supercoiled DNA-Mechanisms and Contextual Influence; Torsional Stress, Unusual DNA Structures, and Eukaryotic Gene Expression; DNA Sequence and Structure: Bending to Biology. Cruciform Transitions Assayed Using a Psoralen Cross-linking Method: Applications to Measurements of DNA Torisonal Tension; NMR-Distance Geometry Studies of Helical Errors and Sequence Dependent Conformations of DNA in Solution; Hyperreactivity of the B-Z Junctions Probed by Two Aromatic Chemical Carcinogens; Inherently Curved DNA and Its Structural Elements; and DNA Flexibility Under Control: The Juma Algorithm and its Application to BZ Junctions.

  8. Mechanisms and consequences of paternally transmitted chromosomal abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Wyrobek, A J

    2005-04-05

    Paternally transmitted chromosomal damage has been associated with pregnancy loss, developmental and morphological defects, infant mortality, infertility, and genetic diseases in the offspring including cancer. There is epidemiological evidence linking paternal exposure to occupational or environmental agents with an increased risk of abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also a large body of literature on germ cell mutagenesis in rodents showing that treatment of male germ cells with mutagens has dramatic consequences on reproduction producing effects such as those observed in human epidemiological studies. However, we know very little about the etiology, transmission and early embryonic consequences of paternally-derived chromosomal abnormalities. The available evidence suggests that: (1) there are distinct patterns of germ cell-stage differences in the sensitivity of induction of transmissible genetic damage with male postmeiotic cells being the most sensitive; (2) cytogenetic abnormalities at first metaphase after fertilization are critical intermediates between paternal exposure and abnormal reproductive outcomes; and, (3) there are maternally susceptibility factors that may have profound effects on the amount of sperm DNA damage that is converted into chromosomal aberrations in the zygote and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes.

  9. Two new species of Limbodessus diving beetles from New Guinea - short verbal descriptions flanked by online content (digital photography, μCT scans, drawings and DNA sequence data)

    PubMed Central

    Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Warikar, Evie Lilly; Neven, Katja; Hendrich, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background To date only one species of Limbodessus diving beetles has been reported from the Island of New Guinea, L. compactus (Clark, 1862), which is widerspread in the Australian region. New information We describe two new species of microendemic New Guinea Limbodessus and use a compact descriptive format flanked by enriched online content in wiki powered species pages. Limbodessus baliem sp.n. is described from ca. 1,600 m altitude in the Baliem Valley of Papua and Limbodessus alexanderi sp.n. from >3,000 m altitude north of Sugapa, Papua. Based on our analysis, we also transfer three species from other genera to Limbodessus Guignot, 1939, with the following changes: Limbodessus deflectus (Ordish, 1966), new combination; Limbodessus leveri (J. Balfour-Browne, 1944), new combination; and Limbodessus plicatus (Sharp, 1882), new combination. PMID:26752969

  10. Optimization of a flow cytometric method for the simultaneous measurement of cell surface antigen, DNA content, and in vitro BrdUrd incorporation into normal and malignant hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Holm, M; Thomsen, M; Høyer, M; Hokland, P

    1998-05-01

    We have designed an assay for the simultaneous measurement of cell surface phenotype, S-phase fraction, and DNA content by single laser instrumentation for the purpose of determining the labeling index (LI), duration of S-phase (Ts), and the potential doubling time (Tpot) of leukocyte subpopulations. The procedure was optimized with regard to: mode of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation, selection of suitable leukocyte differentiation antigens (LDAs) as well as PE-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against myeloid cells, overnight permeabilization and fixation (paraformaldehyde 1% and 0.05% Nonidet P40), DNase I treatment (250 Kunitz units), concentration of FITC-conjugated anti-BrdUrd MoAb (dilution 1:5), and DNA staining with 7-amino-actinomycin (7-AAD) (10 microg/ml). We validated this assay by measuring LI, Ts, and Tpot repeatedly in four leukemic cell lines and found these to be stable (coefficients of variation (CV): 0.06, 0.13, and 0.08, respectively). Finally, we employed the assay on different leukocyte preparations from normal donors (including purified CD34 + cells) and patients with malignant myeloid disorders, and we concluded that it will yield valuable data regarding the cell cycle kinetics of subsets of leukocytes in heterogeneous mixtures of hematopoietic cells.

  11. Evidence for degradation of abnormal prion protein in tissues from sheep with scrapie during composting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongsheng; Spencer, J. Lloyd; Soutyrine, Andrei; Guan, Jeiwen; Rendulich, Jasmine; Balachandran, Aru

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether the abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) in tissues from sheep with scrapie would be destroyed by composting. Tissues from sheep naturally infected with scrapie were placed within fiberglass mesh bags and buried in compost piles for 108 d in experiment 1 or 148 d in experiment 2. The temperature in the compost piles rose quickly; it was above 60°C for about 2 wk and then slowly declined to the ambient temperature. Before composting, PrPSc was detected in all the tissues by Western blotting. In experiment 1, PrPSc was not detected after composting in the tissue remnants or the surrounding sawdust. In experiment 2, 1 of 5 specimens tested negative after composting, whereas PrPSc was detected in the other 4 bags, though in reduced amounts compared with those before composting. Tissue weights were reduced during composting. Analysis of the tissue remnants for microbial 16S ribosomal DNA demonstrated that there were more diverse microbes involved in experiment 1 than in experiment 2 and that the guanine and cytosine content of the microbial 16S DNA was higher in the specimens of experiment 1 than in those of experiment 2, which suggests greater dominance of thermophilic microbes in experiment 1. These results indicate that composting may have value as a means for degrading PrPSc in carcasses and other wastes. PMID:17193880

  12. Endocrine abnormalities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disease associated with notable medical complications and increased mortality. Endocrine abnormalities, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, growth hormone resistance and sick euthyroid syndrome, mediate the clinical manifestations of this disease. Alterations in anorexigenic and orexigenic appetite-regulating pathways have also been described. Decreases in fat mass result in adipokine abnormalities. Although most of the endocrine changes that occur in AN represent physiologic adaptation to starvation, some persist after recovery and might contribute to susceptibility to AN recurrence. In this Review, we summarize key endocrine alterations in AN, with a particular focus on the profound bone loss that can occur in this disease. Although AN is increasingly prevalent among boys and men, the disorder predominantly affects girls and women who are, therefore, the focus of this Review.

  13. Eye abnormalities in Fryns syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Diane M; Taboada, Eugenio; Butler, Merlin G

    2004-03-15

    Fryns syndrome is a rare, generally lethal, autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome first described in 1979. Patients with the syndrome present with the classical findings of cloudy cornea, brain malformations, diaphragmatic defects, and distal limb deformities. Over 70 patients have been reported revealing a wide variety of phenotypic features. Although initially considered a major feature of Fryns syndrome, cloudy cornea has been relegated as a minor diagnostic sign and not commonly reported in patients since the original description. However, eye findings per se are not uncommon. Abnormal eye findings occasionally reported in Fryns syndrome potentially result in amblyopia and blindness, profoundly affecting neurologic outcome of those who survive the neonatal period. We reviewed 77 reported patients with Fryns syndrome and summarized the abnormal eye findings identified in 12 of the reported cases. In addition, we contribute three new patients with Fryns syndrome, one of which demonstrated unilateral microphthalmia and cloudy cornea.

  14. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  15. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  16. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  17. Congenital abnormalities of the goat.

    PubMed

    Basrur, P K

    1993-03-01

    Congenital abnormalities of genetic and environmental causes constitute a striking proportion of the afflictions seen in goats. These include a variety of malformations and metabolic diseases that could occur in all breeds but tend to exhibit predisposition in some breeds of goats. Genetic abnormalities for which the carrier state is detectable with the aid of enzymes and surface protein markers can be eliminated from goat populations, whereas common polygenic disorders including udder problems in does and gynecomastia in bucks are more difficult to eradicate because the mutant genes responsible for these traits generally do not declare themselves until inbreeding brings together a critical concentration of liability genes to create a crisis. A substantial reduction of common abnormalities in this species, such as intersexuality in dairy breeds, abortion in Angora breed, and arthritis in the Pygmy breed, will require a change in breeders' preference and selection practice. In making these changes, however, the beneficial traits will have to be balanced against the undesirable effects of the selected mutant genes (pleiotropy), which hold the key to success or failure of a breed under domestication.

  18. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  19. Visual pathway abnormalities in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Sharma, Lalit; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Ophthalmological complications are common and disabling in patients with tuberculous meningitis. We aimed to study the visual pathway abnormalities in patients with tuberculous meningitis. Forty-three patients with tuberculous meningitis were subjected to visual evoked responses (VER) and neuroophthalmologic assessment. Neuroophthalmologic assessment revealed abnormalities in 22 (51.3%) patients. VER were found to be abnormal in 27 (62.8%) patients. The VER abnormalities included prolonged P100 latencies with relatively normal amplitude and significant interocular latency differences. Visual pathways abnormalities are common in patients with tuberculous meningitis and are often subclinical. Pathophysiologic explanations for electrophysiological abnormalities on VER in these patients are incompletely understood and needs further exploration.

  20. Reconstructing species phylogeny of the carabid beetles Ohomopterus using multiple nuclear DNA sequences: heterogeneous information content and the performance of simultaneous analyses.

    PubMed

    Sota, Teiji; Vogler, Alfried P

    2003-01-01

    We attempted a phylogenetic reconstruction for the carabid subgenus Ohomopterus (genus Carabus), a notable case of radiation with mitochondrial introgression across species. Sequence data from five nuclear single copy loci were used, including wingless (Wg), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PepCK), cytochrome c (Cytc), elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha), and an anonymous single copy locus (Carab1). Sequences of Cytc, EF-1alpha, and Carab1 included intron or intron-like parts with length variation. The analysis of individual loci resulted in low resolution of the phylogenetic relationships, and the monophyly of several morphologically recognized species for which multiple specimens were analyzed was not revealed. Several specimens were heterozygous, with non-monophyletic alleles observed in three of the five loci at which alleles in heterozygotes were separated. In a simultaneous analysis of the five loci with ambiguously aligned parts eliminated and heterozygotic sites treated as missing, the resulting tree was well resolved, but the branch support was generally weak because of conflicting phylogenetic signals from different loci. We also attempted to incorporate allelic sequence data plus the ambiguously aligned parts in the analysis, by using all possible combinations of alleles from different loci in heterozygotic individuals, but the resultant tree was not supported more strongly. Nonetheless, these simultaneous analyses provided support for the monophyly of several species and species groups, and revealed the basic evolutionary trend of OHOMOPTERUS: initial widespread groups with simpler genitalia and the origination of exaggerated genitalia in a derived clade. This study exemplifies problems inherent in the phylogenetic reconstruction of closely related organisms where low levels of variation limit the information content from each locus, while heterozygosity, different phylogenetic history of multiple loci, and alignment ambiguity further hamper

  1. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... most cases, a health care provider finds pinna abnormalities during the first well-baby exam. This exam ...

  2. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  3. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  4. Using DNA looping to measure sequence dependent DNA elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandinov, Alan; Raghunathan, Krishnan; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2012-10-01

    We are using tethered particle motion (TPM) microscopy to observe protein-mediated DNA looping in the lactose repressor system in DNA constructs with varying AT / CG content. We use these data to determine the persistence length of the DNA as a function of its sequence content and compare the data to direct micromechanical measurements with constant-force axial optical tweezers. The data from the TPM experiments show a much smaller sequence effect on the persistence length than the optical tweezers experiments.

  5. Phytoplasma plasmid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mark T; Liefting, Lia W

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma plasmids have generally been detected from DNA extracted from plants and insects using methods designed for the purification of total phytoplasma DNA. Methods include extraction from tissues that are high in phytoplasma titre, such as the phloem of plants, with the use of CsCl-bisbenzimide gradients that exploit the low G+C content of phytoplasma DNA. Many of the methods employed for phytoplasma purification have been described elsewhere in this book. Here we describe in detail two methods that are specifically aimed at isolating plasmid DNA.

  6. Lower extremity abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Sass, Pamela; Hassan, Ghinwa

    2003-08-01

    Rotational and angular problems are two types of lower extremity abnormalities common in children. Rotational problems include intoeing and out-toeing. Intoeing is caused by one of three types of deformity: metatarsus adductus, internal tibial torsion, and increased femoral anteversion. Out-toeing is less common than intoeing, and its causes are similar but opposite to those of intoeing. These include femoral retroversion and external tibial torsion. Angular problems include bowlegs and knock-knees. An accurate diagnosis can be made with careful history and physical examination, which includes torsional profile (a four-component composite of measurements of the lower extremities). Charts of normal values and values with two standard deviations for each component of the torsional profile are available. In most cases, the abnormality improves with time. A careful physical examination, explanation of the natural history, and serial measurements are usually reassuring to the parents. Treatment is usually conservative. Special shoes, cast, or braces are rarely beneficial and have no proven efficacy. Surgery is reserved for older children with deformity from three to four standard deviations from the normal.

  7. Normal and abnormal lid function.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Janet C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter on lid function is comprised of two primary sections, the first on normal eyelid anatomy, neurological innervation, and physiology, and the second on abnormal eyelid function in disease states. The eyelids serve several important ocular functions, the primary objectives of which are protection of the anterior globe from injury and maintenance of the ocular tear film. Typical eyelid behaviors to perform these functions include blinking (voluntary, spontaneous, or reflexive), voluntary eye closure (gentle or forced), partial lid lowering during squinting, normal lid retraction during emotional states such as surprise or fear (startle reflex), and coordination of lid movements with vertical eye movements for maximal eye protection. Detailed description of the neurological innervation patterns and neurophysiology of each of these lid behaviors is provided. Abnormal lid function is divided by conditions resulting in excessive lid closure (cerebral ptosis, apraxia of lid opening, blepharospasm, oculomotor palsy, Horner's syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and mechanical) and those resulting in excessive lid opening (midbrain lid retraction, facial nerve palsy, and lid retraction due to orbital disease).

  8. New insights on single-stranded versus double-stranded DNA library preparation for ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Wales, Nathan; Carøe, Christian; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela; Gamba, Cristina; Barnett, Ross; Samaniego, José Alfredo; Madrigal, Jazmín Ramos; Orlando, Ludovic; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    An innovative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method has sparked great interest among ancient DNA (aDNA) researchers, especially after reports of endogenous DNA content increases >20-fold in some samples. To investigate the behavior of this method, we generated ssDNA and conventional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) libraries from 23 ancient and historic plant and animal specimens. We found ssDNA library preparation substantially increased endogenous content when dsDNA libraries contained <3% endogenous DNA, but this enrichment is less pronounced when dsDNA preparations successfully recover short endogenous DNA fragments (mean size < 70 bp). Our findings can help researchers determine when to utilize the time- and resource-intensive ssDNA library preparation method.

  9. Identification of Streptococcus parasanguinis DNA contamination in human buccal DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of buccal swabs in clinical and scientific studies is a very popular method of collecting DNA, due to its non-invasive nature of collection. However, contamination of the DNA sample may interfere with analysis. Findings Here we report the finding of Streptococcus parasanguinis bacterial DNA contamination in human buccal DNA samples, which led to preferential amplification of bacterial sequence with PCR primers designed against human sequence. Conclusion Contamination of buccal-derived DNA with bacterial DNA can be significant, and may influence downstream genetic analysis. One needs to be aware of possible bacterial contamination when interpreting abnormal findings following PCR amplification of buccal swab DNA samples. PMID:24266944

  10. Borrowing Nuclear DNA Helicases to Protect Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lin; Liu, Yilun

    2015-01-01

    In normal cells, mitochondria are the primary organelles that generate energy, which is critical for cellular metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or an abnormal mtDNA copy number, is linked to a range of human diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, premature aging‎ and cancer. mtDNA resides in the mitochondrial lumen, and its duplication requires the mtDNA replicative helicase, Twinkle. In addition to Twinkle, many DNA helicases, which are encoded by the nuclear genome and are crucial for nuclear genome integrity, are transported into the mitochondrion to also function in mtDNA replication and repair. To date, these helicases include RecQ-like helicase 4 (RECQ4), petite integration frequency 1 (PIF1), DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 (DNA2) and suppressor of var1 3-like protein 1 (SUV3). Although the nuclear functions of some of these DNA helicases have been extensively studied, the regulation of their mitochondrial transport and the mechanisms by which they contribute to mtDNA synthesis and maintenance remain largely unknown. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent research progress on the role of mammalian DNA helicases in mitochondrial genome maintenance and the effects on mitochondria-associated diseases. PMID:25984607

  11. Borrowing nuclear DNA helicases to protect mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Liu, Yilun

    2015-05-13

    In normal cells, mitochondria are the primary organelles that generate energy, which is critical for cellular metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or an abnormal mtDNA copy number, is linked to a range of human diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, premature aging‎ and cancer. mtDNA resides in the mitochondrial lumen, and its duplication requires the mtDNA replicative helicase, Twinkle. In addition to Twinkle, many DNA helicases, which are encoded by the nuclear genome and are crucial for nuclear genome integrity, are transported into the mitochondrion to also function in mtDNA replication and repair. To date, these helicases include RecQ-like helicase 4 (RECQ4), petite integration frequency 1 (PIF1), DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 (DNA2) and suppressor of var1 3-like protein 1 (SUV3). Although the nuclear functions of some of these DNA helicases have been extensively studied, the regulation of their mitochondrial transport and the mechanisms by which they contribute to mtDNA synthesis and maintenance remain largely unknown. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent research progress on the role of mammalian DNA helicases in mitochondrial genome maintenance and the effects on mitochondria-associated diseases.

  12. Aberrant DNA topoisomerase II activity, radioresistance and inherited susceptibility to cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, J. M.; Francis, G. E.; Holland, M. J.; Pirollo, K. F.; Chang, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to a wide variety of neoplasias (Li-Fraumeni syndrome), has been shown in studies of one cancer-prone family, to have an intriguing association with an aberrant c-raf-1 gene and inheritance of a radioresistant phenotype in their non-cancerous skin fibroblasts. This association together with observations that DNA topoisomerases, when defective, can introduce errors into DNA and that these enzymes are perturbed in vitro by serine/threonine kinases similar to raf encoded proteins, prompted investigation of DNA topoisomerase activity of the family's fibroblasts. Since radioresistance was transferred to murine cells (NIH-3T3) when the aberrant c-raf-1 gene from this family was transfected, we also examined transformants containing this and other oncogenes. V-raf/c-myc and EJ-ras transformants were examined, the former because the family's skin fibroblasts also have 3-8-fold elevated myc expression (not apparently relevant to radioresistance) and the latter because ras, like raf, conveys radioresistance. The family members' fibroblasts and the three transfected murine lines, showed a similar perturbation of a spermidine and ATP-dependent DNA catenation activity (typical of DNA topoisomerase II). There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.93; P = 0.0026) between the degree of activation of topoisomerase II and one measure of radioresistance (the Dq value). Relaxation of DNA supercoiling (topoisomerase I activity and other DNA nicking enzymes) was not abnormal. Cytotoxicity assays and evaluation of the influence of topoisomerase II inhibitors on DNA/protein complex formation, corroborated the existence of a qualitative topoisomerase II defect in the family's cells and transfectants. Although the contention that the qualitative topoisomerase II abnormalities observed here may be associated with malfunction is highly speculative, these findings may be relevant to the mechanism of oncogenesis, not only in this family, but with raf and ras

  13. Content Wizard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlers-Zavala, Fabiola P.

    2001-01-01

    This classroom tip focuses on sustained-content language teaching. The game described--content wizard-- illustrates a practical technique for incorporating a range of language and academic skills into subject matter lessons for English-as-a-Second-Language learners. (Author/VWL)

  14. Is the skin barrier abnormal in dogs with atopic dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Olivry, Thierry

    2011-11-15

    In mammalian skin, the stratum corneum exerts a barrier function that protects from transepidermal water loss and the penetration of exogenous molecules, such as allergens, from the environment. Recently, skin barrier defects have been shown to be of prime importance in the pathogenesis of human atopic dermatitis. In this review, we summarize the latest research data pertinent to the stratum corneum and barrier function of dogs with atopic dermatitis. At the time of this writing, there is increasing evidence that a skin barrier defect likely exists in dogs with atopic dermatitis. This barrier dysfunction is characterized by abnormal intercellular stratum corneum lipid lamellae, abnormal stratum corneum morphology, reduced and abnormal ceramide content and, in some but not all dogs, abnormal filaggrin expression. In association with these changes, there is higher transepidermal water loss in atopic than in normal canine skin. Furthermore, atopic inflammation appears to worsen transepidermal water loss and filaggrin expression. It remains unknown, however, if the changes observed are primary (i.e. of genetic origin) or secondary to atopic inflammation that also exists even in clinically normal skin. Finally, whether or not a therapeutic intervention aimed at restoring a dysfunctional skin barrier is of any clinical benefit to atopic dogs has not yet been proven unequivocally.

  15. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients with Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D; Bennett, D; Fisher-Hoch, S P; Farrar, B; McCormick, J B

    1989-10-01

    Electrocardiograms from 32 patients with acute Lassa fever were abnormal in over 70% of cases. The changes noted included non-specific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, ST-segment elevation, generalized low-voltage complexes, and changes reflecting electrolyte disturbance. None of the abnormalities correlated with clinical severity of infection, serum transaminase levels, or eventual outcome. ECG changes are common in Lassa fever, but usually unassociated with clinical manifestations of myocarditis.

  16. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  17. Abnormal band of lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Brian; Goldblatt, John

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a case of an "abnormal band" of the lateral meniscus, extending from the posterior horn of the true lateral meniscus to its antero-mid portion, observed during arthroscopy in a 45-year-old white man of Bosnian descent. The periphery of the aberrant lateral meniscus was freely mobile, and not connected to the underlying true lateral meniscus. Preoperative physical examination findings were consistent with medial-sided meniscal pathology only; however, evidence of an anomalous lateral meniscus was seen with magnetic resonance imaging. This anatomical pattern is rare and has been reported in the literature only once, in a report of 2 Asian patients. This article illustrates an anatomical variant of the lateral meniscus in a non-Asian patient with a clinical presentation that has not been previously described. In addition to the case report, the article presents a comprehensive review of the existing body of literature on anomalous lateral meniscus patterns. We believe that the definitions of the types of aberrant meniscus can be clarified to establish improved accuracy in reporting.

  18. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  19. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.B.; Wagner, M.L.; Dutton, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities.

  20. DNA flow cytometry of human spermatozoa: consistent stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA using a novel decondensation protocol.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Tamás; Békési, Gyöngyi; Fábián, Akos; Rákosy, Zsuzsa; Horváth, Gábor; Mátyus, László; Balázs, Margit; Jenei, Attila

    2008-10-01

    Rapid flow cytometric measurement of the frequency of aneuploid human sperms is in increasing demand but development of an exploitable method is hindered by difficulties of stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA. An aggressive decondensation protocol is needed after which cell integrity still remains intact. We used flow cytometry to examine the effect of lithium diiodosalicylate (LIS, chaotropic agent) on fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide-treated human spermatozoa from 10 normozoospermic men. When flow cytometric identification of diploid spermatozoa was achieved, validation was performed after sorting by three-color FISH. In contrast with the extremely variable histograms of nondecondensed sperms, consistent identification of haploid and diploid spermatozoa was possible if samples were decondensed with LIS prior to flow cytometry. A 76-fold enrichment of diploid sperms was observed in the sorted fractions by FISH. A significant correlation was found between the proportion of sorted cells and of diploid sperms by FISH. Application of LIS during the preparation of sperm for flow cytometry appears to ensure the stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA, making quantification of aneuploid sperm percentage possible. To our knowledge this is the first report in terms of separating spermatozoa with confirmedly abnormal chromosomal content. High correlation between the proportion of cells identified as having double DNA content by flow cytometry and diploid sperm by FISH allows rapid calculation of diploidy rate.

  1. DNA amplification in glial cells of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: An image analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Ariza, A.; Mate, J.L.; Serrano, S.

    1996-06-01

    JC virus (JCV), the agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), has been shown by both immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry to be associated with p53 protein stabilization. Since stabilization/inactivation of p53 is associated with the development of genomic instability, abnormal cell DNA contents are to be expected in JCV-infected cells of PML. This work explores that possibility by image analysis evaluation of DNA content in PML-infected oligodendrocytes and bizarre astrocytes. Brain paraffin sections of PML lesions from five adults male patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were treated with the Feulgen technique to obtain a stochiometric staining of DNA and analyzed with a microscope image processor. Inclusion-bearing oligodendrocytes exhibited near tetraploid DNA indices in each of the five cases, whereas atypical astrocytes were in the hypertetraploid range in all cases and were polyploid in four instances. This evidence of DNA amplification in PML glial cells is congruent with the functional abolition of p53 protein in association with JCV infection and lends further support to the role of p53 as a keeper of diploid status and guardian of genomic stability. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Absence of cytoglobin promotes multiple organ abnormalities in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Thuy, Le Thi Thanh; Van Thuy, Tuong Thi; Matsumoto, Yoshinari; Hai, Hoang; Ikura, Yoshihiro; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawada, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) was identified in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and pericytes of all organs; however, the effects of Cygb on cellular functions remain unclear. Here, we report spontaneous and age-dependent malformations in multiple organs of Cygb−/− mice. Twenty-six percent of young Cygb−/− mice (<1 year old) showed heart hypertrophy, cystic disease in the kidney or ovary, loss of balance, liver fibrosis and lymphoma. Furthermore, 71.3% (82/115) of aged Cygb−/− mice (1–2 years old) exhibited abnormalities, such as heart hypertrophy and cancer development in multiple organs; by contrast, 5.8% (4/68) of aged wild-type (WT) mice had abnormalities (p < 0.0001). Interestingly, serum and urine analysis demonstrated that the concentration of nitric oxide metabolites increased significantly in Cygb−/− mice, resulting in an imbalance in the oxidative stress and antioxidant defence system that was reversed by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine treatment. A senescent phenotype and evidence of DNA damage were found in primary HSCs and the liver of aged Cygb−/− mice. Moreover, compared with HSC+/+, HSC−/− showed high expression of Il-6 and chemokine mRNA when cocultured with mouse Hepa 1–6 cells. Thus, the absence of Cygb in pericytes provokes organ abnormalities, possibly via derangement of the nitric oxide and antioxidant defence system and through accelerated cellular senescence. PMID:27146058

  3. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  4. Immune Abnormalities in Patients with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Reed P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study of 31 autistic patients (3-28 years old) has revealed several immune-system abnormalities, including decreased numbers of T lymphocytes and an altered ratio of helper-to-suppressor T cells. Immune-system abnormalities may be directly related to underlying biologic processes of autism or an indirect reflection of the actual pathologic…

  5. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo*

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. Methods This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Results Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study. PMID:27579738

  6. Can transcutaneous recordings detect gastric electrical abnormalities?

    PubMed Central

    Familoni, B O; Bowes, K L; Kingma, Y J; Cote, K R

    1991-01-01

    The ability of transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity to detect gastric electrical abnormalities was determined by simultaneous measurements of gastric electrical activity with surgically implanted serosal electrodes and cutaneous electrodes in six patients undergoing abdominal operations. Transient abnormalities in gastric electrical activity were seen in five of the six patients during the postoperative period. Recognition of normal gastric electrical activity by visual analysis was possible 67% of the time and with computer analysis 95% of the time. Ninety four per cent of abnormalities in frequency were detected by visual analysis and 93.7% by computer analysis. Abnormalities involving a loss of coupling, however, were not recognised by transcutaneous recordings. Transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity assessed by computer analysis can usually recognise normal gastric electrical activity and tachygastria. Current techniques, however, are unable to detect abnormalities in electrical coupling. PMID:1864531

  7. Abnormal early cleavage events predict early embryo demise: sperm oxidative stress and early abnormal cleavage.

    PubMed

    Burruel, Victoria; Klooster, Katie; Barker, Christopher M; Pera, Renee Reijo; Meyers, Stuart

    2014-10-13

    Human embryos resulting from abnormal early cleavage can result in aneuploidy and failure to develop normally to the blastocyst stage. The nature of paternal influence on early embryo development has not been directly demonstrated although many studies have suggested effects from spermatozoal chromatin packaging, DNA damage, centriolar and mitotic spindle integrity, and plasma membrane integrity. The goal of this study was to determine whether early developmental events were affected by oxidative damage to the fertilizing sperm. Survival analysis was used to compare patterns of blastocyst formation based on P2 duration. Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrate that relatively few embryos with short (<1 hr) P2 times reached blastocysts, and the two curves diverged beginning on day 4, with nearly all of the embryos with longer P2 times reaching blastocysts by day 6 (p < .01). We determined that duration of the 2nd to 3rd mitoses were sensitive periods in the presence of spermatozoal oxidative stress. Embryos that displayed either too long or too short cytokineses demonstrated an increased failure to reach blastocyst stage and therefore survive for further development. Although paternal-derived gene expression occurs later in development, this study suggests a specific role in early mitosis that is highly influenced by paternal factors.

  8. Combination of density gradient centrifugation and swim-up methods effectively decreases morphologically abnormal sperms

    PubMed Central

    YAMANAKA, Masaya; TOMITA, Kazuhisa; HASHIMOTO, Shu; MATSUMOTO, Hiroshi; SATOH, Manabu; KATO, Hiromi; HOSOI, Yoshihiko; INOUE, Masayasu; NAKAOKA, Yoshiharu; MORIMOTO, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Density gradient centrifugation (DGC) and swim-up techniques have been reported for semen preparation in assisted reproductive techniques in humans. We investigated whether semen preparation using a combination of DGC and swim-up techniques could effectively decrease morphologically abnormal human sperms at the ultrastructural level. Semen samples were obtained from 16 infertile males and fractionated by swim-up following DGC. Ultrastructural abnormalities of sperms obtained from original semen, lower layer of swim-up following DGC, and upper layer of swim-up following DGC were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The correlation among ultrastructural head abnormality in sperms from the upper layer of swim-up, fertilization in in vitro fertilization, and pregnancy after embryo transfer was also investigated. Furthermore, sperms with DNA fragmentation in the samples processed via a combination of DGC and swim-up was assessed in a sperm chromatin structure assay. Ultrastructural abnormalities in sperm heads and tails in the upper layer after swim-up following DGC was the lowest among the three groups. Sperms with nuclear vacuoles were the most difficult to eliminate using a combination of DGC and swim-up in all types of head abnormalities. A negative correlation was confirmed between the fertilization rates of intracytoplasmic sperm injection and head abnormality of sperms obtained from the upper layer of the swim-up following DGC. Sperms with DNA fragmentation were effectively decreased using the combination of two techniques. In conclusion, the combination of DGC and swim-up effectively decreased the number of sperms with ultrastructural abnormalities both in the head and in the tail. However, sperms with ultrastructural abnormalities that cannot be completely decreased using a combination of DGC and swim-up may impair fertilization in some cases of intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:27616283

  9. Sensitive Detection of Polyalanine Expansions in PHOX2B by Polymerase Chain Reaction Using Bisulfite-Converted DNA

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Hidekazu; Sasaki, Ayako; Osawa, Motoki; Kijima, Kazuki; Ino, Yukiko; Matoba, Ryoji; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, also known as Ondine’s curse, is characterized by idiopathic abnormal control of respiration during sleep. Recent studies indicate that a polyalanine expansion of PHOX2B is relevant to the pathogenesis of this disorder. However, it is difficult to detect the repeated tract because its high GC content inhibits conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Here, we describe a bisulfite treatment for DNA in which uracil is obtained by deamination of unmethylated cytosine residues. Deamination of DNA permitted direct PCR amplification that yielded a product of 123 bp for the common 20-residue repetitive tract with replacement of C with T by sequencing. It settled allele dropouts accompanied by insufficient amplification of expanded alleles. The defined procedure dramatically improved detection of expansions to 9 of 10 congenital central hypoventilation syndrome patients examined in a previous study. The chemical conversion of DNA before PCR amplification facilitates effective detection of GC-rich polyalanine tracts. PMID:16258163

  10. Mitochondrial DNMT3A and DNA methylation in skeletal muscle and CNS of transgenic mouse models of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Margaret; Gertz, Barry; Chestnut, Barry A.; Martin, Lee J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytosine methylation is an epigenetic modification of DNA catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases. Cytosine methylation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is believed to have relative underrepresentation; however, possible tissue and cell differences in mtDNA methylation and relationships to neurodegenerative disease have not been examined. We show by immunoblotting that DNA methyltransferase 3A (Dnmt3a) isoform is present in pure mitochondria of adult mouse CNS, skeletal muscle, and testes, and adult human cerebral cortex. Dnmt1 was not detected in adult mouse CNS or skeletal muscle mitochondria but appeared bound to the outer mitochondrial membrane. Immunofluorescence confirmed the mitochondrial localization of Dnmt3a and showed 5-methylcytosine (5mC) immunoreactivity in mitochondria of neurons and skeletal muscle myofibers. DNA pyrosequencing of two loci (D-loop and 16S rRNA gene) and twelve cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites in mtDNA directly showed a tissue differential presence of 5mC. Because mitochondria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the disease mechanisms are uncertain, we evaluated mitochondrial Dnmt3a and 5mC levels in human superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) transgenic mouse models of ALS. Mitochondrial Dnmt3a protein levels were reduced significantly in skeletal muscle and spinal cord at presymptomatic or early disease. Immunofluorescence showed that 5mC immunoreactivity was present in mitochondria of neurons and skeletal myofibers, and 5mC immunoreactivity became aggregated in motor neurons of ALS mice. DNA pyrosequencing revealed significant abnormalities in 16S rRNA gene methylation in ALS mice. Immunofluorescence showed that 5mC immunoreactivity can be sequestered into autophagosomes and that mitophagy was increased and mitochondrial content was decreased in skeletal muscle in ALS mice. This study reveals a tissue-preferential mitochondrial localization of Dnmt3a and presence of cytosine methylation in mtDNA

  11. Different methylation of oestrogen receptor DNA in human breast carcinomas with and without oestrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Piva, R.; Rimondi, A. P.; Hanau, S.; Maestri, I.; Alvisi, A.; Kumar, V. L.; del Senno, L.

    1990-01-01

    The methylation of the human oestrogen receptor (ER) gene was analysed by restriction enzymes in normal and neoplastic human breast tissues and cell lines. CCGG sequences in regions inside the gene, which are methylated both in normal breast and in tissues that are not the target of the oestrogen, are hypomethylated in 30% of tumours, both ER+ and ER- carcinomas. Moreover, 5' sequences of the gene, which are hypomethylated in normal breast and not in tissues not the target of oestrogen, are methylated to a lower degree in ER+ carcinomas, whereas they are methylated to a greater degree in ER- carcinomas. However, the same region is equally hypomethylated in both ER+ and ER- cancer cell lines. Our results indicate that in breast carcinomas ER DNA methylation is deranged, and in cancer cell lines is different from that observed in primary tumours. Furthermore, the abnormal methylation in the 5' end seems to be related to abnormal expression, namely diffuse hypomethylation in carcinomas with high ER content and hypermethylation in carcinomas without ER. These findings support our previous hypothesis that DNA methylation could be involved in the control of ER gene expression and demonstrate that abnormal ER gene methylation is a typical feature of breast cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2155643

  12. Sleep Physiology, Abnormal States, and Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wickboldt, Alvah T.; Bowen, Alex F.; Kaye, Aaron J.; Kaye, Adam M.; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  13. Congenital abnormalities of the ovine paramesonephric ducts.

    PubMed

    Smith, K C; Long, S E; Parkinson, T J

    1995-01-01

    A 15 month survey of ovine reproductive tracts was undertaken in slaughterhouses in southwest England. A total of 33506 tracts were examined; 23536 from lambs and 9970 from adults. In total, 3.4% of tracts were pregnant and 3.3% exhibited abnormalities. Twenty cases of uterus unicornis, six of uterus didelphys and 11 of segmental aplasia were encountered, such that partial aplasia of the paramesonephric ducts accounted for 3.3% of all abnormalities. Although developmental abnormalities of the ovine female genital system are relatively uncommon, a substantial proportion of these can be accounted for by development defects of the paramesonephric ducts.

  14. [Radionuclide studies of congenital kidney abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Vlakhov, N

    1984-06-01

    Using the potentialities of isotope nephrograms as a screening test a total of 4746 patients suspected of renal abnormalities were examined. The author established pathological deviations in 561 cases (11.8%). During further verification using scintigraphy unsuspected congenital renal abnormalities (aplasia, hypoplasia, dystopia, double kidney, horseshoe kidney, solitary cyst and polycystic renal disease) were found in 46 patients (8.2%). The diagnosis was confirmed at subsequent venous x-ray urography. A conclusion has been made as to the role of comprehensive nephrographic-scintigraphic examination in the diagnosis of congenital renal abnormalities.

  15. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identified an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 through December 31, 1990. The report discusses five abnormal occurrences, none of which involved a nuclear power plant. Two involved significant overexposures to the hands of two radiographers, two involved medical therapy misadministrations, and one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration. No abnormal occurrences were reported by the Agreement States. The report also contains information that updates a previously reported abnormal occurrence. 8 refs.

  17. MRI Helps Assess Fetal Brain Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about their pregnancy," said lead author Paul Griffiths. He's a professor of radiology at the University ... the fetus may have a suspected brain abnormality," Griffiths said in a journal news release. In this ...

  18. Abnormalities of lung function in hay fever.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, E J; Hall, D R

    1976-01-01

    Twenty subjects with symptoms of hay fever were studied to see whether abnormalities could be detected in the function of small airways. The investigations included dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies, closing capacity, residual volume, transfer factor, and maximal expiratory flow-volume curves. The tests were repeated in the winter when symptoms had resolved. Frequency dependence of compliance was found in eight subjects with symptoms (40%), closing capacities being abnormal in only two instances. Conventional pulmonary function tests, including expiratory flow rates at mid vital capacity, were within the predicted range of all subjects. When tests were repeated in the winter, frequency dependence of compliance was no longer present in subjects whose symptoms had resolved. The study suggests that reversible small airway abnormalities are present in a significant proportion of subjects with symptoms of hay fever and that such abnormalities are best detected by the measurement of dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies. PMID:769243

  19. Counterintuitive DNA Sequence Dependence in Supercoiling-Induced DNA Melting

    PubMed Central

    Vlijm, Rifka; v.d. Torre, Jaco; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of DNA in cells relies on the balance between hybridized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and local de-hybridized regions of ssDNA that provide access to binding proteins. Traditional melting experiments, in which short pieces of dsDNA are heated up until the point of melting into ssDNA, have determined that AT-rich sequences have a lower binding energy than GC-rich sequences. In cells, however, the double-stranded backbone of DNA is destabilized by negative supercoiling, and not by temperature. To investigate what the effect of GC content is on DNA melting induced by negative supercoiling, we studied DNA molecules with a GC content ranging from 38% to 77%, using single-molecule magnetic tweezer measurements in which the length of a single DNA molecule is measured as a function of applied stretching force and supercoiling density. At low force (<0.5pN), supercoiling results into twisting of the dsDNA backbone and loop formation (plectonemes), without inducing any DNA melting. This process was not influenced by the DNA sequence. When negative supercoiling is introduced at increasing force, local melting of DNA is introduced. We measured for the different DNA molecules a characteristic force Fchar, at which negative supercoiling induces local melting of the dsDNA. Surprisingly, GC-rich sequences melt at lower forces than AT-rich sequences: Fchar = 0.56pN for 77% GC but 0.73pN for 38% GC. An explanation for this counterintuitive effect is provided by the realization that supercoiling densities of a few percent only induce melting of a few percent of the base pairs. As a consequence, denaturation bubbles occur in local AT-rich regions and the sequence-dependent effect arises from an increased DNA bending/torsional energy associated with the plectonemes. This new insight indicates that an increased GC-content adjacent to AT-rich DNA regions will enhance local opening of the double-stranded DNA helix. PMID:26513573

  20. Medial medullary infarction: abnormal ocular motor findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Soo; Choi, K-D; Oh, S-Y; Park, S-H; Han, M-K; Yoon, B-W; Roh, J-K

    2005-10-25

    In 20 consecutive patients with isolated medial medullary infarction, abnormal ocular motor findings included nystagmus (n = 8), ocular contrapulsion (n = 5), and contralesional ocular tilt reaction (n = 2). The nystagmus was ipsilesional (n = 4), gaze-evoked (n = 5), upbeating (n = 4), and hemiseesaw (n = 1). The ocular motor abnormalities may be explained by involvements of the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi, medial longitudinal fasciculus or efferent fibers from the vestibular nuclei, climbing fibers, and cells of the paramedian tracts.

  1. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin. PMID:869567

  2. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-05-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin.

  3. Basilar artery migraine and reversible imaging abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Maytal, J; Libman, R B; Lustrin, E S

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of a basilar artery migraine in a 17-year-old boy with transient CT and MR abnormalities after each of two migraine episodes. A repeat MR study 6 months after the last event showed complete resolution of the lesion. Transient abnormalities on brain images similar to those shown in our case have been reported in patients with migraine and other neurologic conditions and are most likely related to cerebral vasogenic edema.

  4. In Situ Observation for Abnormal Grain Coarsening in Vacuum-Carburizing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Kouji

    2014-06-01

    An in situ observation method was developed to investigate abnormal grain coarsening which occurs around the surface of steel during the vacuum-carburizing process. In this method, diffusion of carbon atoms in the vacuum carburizing was simulated by a cementite and steel diffusion couple. Abnormal grain coarsening, which appeared around the cementite and steel interface, was observed by a confocal scanning laser microscope. With this method, it was observed that when holding time was 60 seconds, the temperature at which the abnormal grain coarsening appeared in a specimen was higher when carburized than the temperature when not carburized. On the contrary, when holding time was 120 seconds, the temperature at which the abnormal grain coarsening appeared in a specimen was 10 K to 20 K lower than that in a non-carburized specimen. The validity of the observed results was confirmed by the calculated NbC fraction using Nb solubility and measured carbon content.

  5. Abnormal ovarian cancer screening test result: women's informational, psychological and practical needs.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Patricia Y; Graves, Kristi D; Pavlik, Edward J; Andrykowski, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to the identification of cost-effective approaches to screening for ovarian cancer (OC). Transvaginal ultrasound (TVS) is one such screening approach. Approximately 5-7% of routine TVS screening tests yield abnormal results. Some women experience significant distress after receipt of an abnormal TVS screening test. Four focus groups provided in-depth, qualitative data regarding the informational, psychological, and practical needs of women after the receipt of an abnormal TVS result. Through question and content analytic procedures, we identified four themes: anticipation, emotional response, role of the screening technician, and impact of prior cancer experiences. Results provide initial guidance toward development of interventions to promote adaptive responses after receipt of an abnormal cancer screening test result.

  6. Epigenetic Silencing of the Key Antioxidant Enzyme Catalase in Karyotypically Abnormal Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Konki, Mikko; Pasumarthy, Kalyan; Malonzo, Maia; Sainio, Annele; Valensisi, Cristina; Söderström, Mirva; Emani, Maheswara Reddy; Stubb, Aki; Närvä, Elisa; Ghimire, Bishwa; Laiho, Asta; Järveläinen, Hannu; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Hawkins, R. David; Lund, Riikka J.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenomic regulation is likely to be important in the maintenance of genomic integrity of human pluripotent stem cells, however, the mechanisms are unknown. We explored the epigenomes and transcriptomes of human pluripotent stem cells before and after spontaneous transformation to abnormal karyotypes and in correlation to cancer cells. Our results reveal epigenetic silencing of Catalase, a key regulator of oxidative stress and DNA damage control in abnormal cells. Our findings provide novel insight into the mechanisms associated with spontaneous transformation of human pluripotent stem cells towards malignant fate. The same mechanisms may control the genomic stability of cells in somatic tissues. PMID:26911679

  7. Ablation of XP-V gene causes adipose tissue senescence and metabolic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yih-Wen; Harris, Robert A.; Hatahet, Zafer; Chou, Kai-ming

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and the metabolic syndrome have evolved to be major health issues throughout the world. Whether loss of genome integrity contributes to this epidemic is an open question. DNA polymerase η (pol η), encoded by the xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-V) gene, plays an essential role in preventing cutaneous cancer caused by UV radiation-induced DNA damage. Herein, we demonstrate that pol η deficiency in mice (pol η−/−) causes obesity with visceral fat accumulation, hepatic steatosis, hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose intolerance. In comparison to WT mice, adipose tissue from pol η−/− mice exhibits increased DNA damage and a greater DNA damage response, indicated by up-regulation and/or phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), and poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Concomitantly, increased cellular senescence in the adipose tissue from pol η−/− mice was observed and measured by up-regulation of senescence markers, including p53, p16Ink4a, p21, senescence-associated (SA) β-gal activity, and SA secretion of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) as early as 4 wk of age. Treatment of pol η−/− mice with a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, reduced adipocyte senescence and attenuated the metabolic abnormalities. Furthermore, elevation of adipocyte DNA damage with a high-fat diet or sodium arsenite exacerbated adipocyte senescence and metabolic abnormalities in pol η−/− mice. In contrast, reduction of adipose DNA damage with N-acetylcysteine or metformin ameliorated cellular senescence and metabolic abnormalities. These studies indicate that elevated DNA damage is a root cause of adipocyte senescence, which plays a determining role in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26240351

  8. Theory and Application of DNA Histogram Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagwell, Charles Bruce

    The underlying principles and assumptions associated with DNA histograms are discussed along with the characteristics of fluorescent probes. Information theory was described and used to calculate the information content of a DNA histogram. Two major types of DNA histogram analyses are proposed: parametric and nonparametric analysis. Three levels…

  9. [Abnormal Notch-Hes Signaling Pathways and Acute Leukemia -Review].

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhen-Yang; Wang, Li; Gao, Chun-Ji

    2017-02-01

    The abnormal activation of Notch signaling is closely related to the development of acute leukemia (AL). The core elements of the Notch signaling system include Notch receptors, Notch ligands, CSL DNA-binding proteins, and effectors like target genes. Any factors, which affect ligands, receptors, signal transducers and effectors, can influence the signal transduction of Notch signaling greatly. Based on the role of Notch signaling in AL, several targeted drugs against Notch upstream signaling have been developed. However, due to the complexity and pleiotropic effects of Notch upstream signaling, these targeted drugs display strong side effects. Thus, Hes (Hairy Enhancer of Split) factors as a primary Notch effector, also play an important role in the pathogenesis of AL. This review summarizes recent progresses on Notch-Hes signaling in AL, hopping to provide references for further excavation of the Notch-Hes signaling, and lay foundations for developing the next generation of targeted drugs.

  10. DNA Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  12. Expression of the dnaN and dnaQ genes of Escherichia coli is inducible by mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Kaasch, M; Kaasch, J; Quiñones, A

    1989-10-01

    The dnaN and dnaQ genes encode the beta subunit and the epsilon subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. Using translational fusions to lacZ we found that DNA damage caused by mitomycin C induces expression of the dnaA and dnaQ genes. This induction was not observed in lexA and recA mutants which block the induction of the SOS response, suggesting a relationship between the mechanism(s) of genetic control of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme and the SOS regulatory network. Nevertheless, there is evidence that the mitomycin C induction of dnaN and dnaQ is not a simple lexA-regulated process, because nalidixic acid (an excellent SOS inducer) does not increase dnaN and dnaQ gene expression, and the time course of induction is abnormally slow.

  13. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than..., tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant abnormal findings, NIOSH...

  14. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings... shape or size, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant...

  15. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  16. XYY chromosome abnormality in sexual homicide perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Habermann, Niels; Berner, Wolfgang; Hill, Andreas

    2006-03-05

    In a retrospective investigation of the court reports about sexual homicide perpetrators chromosome analysis had been carried out in 13 of 166 (7.8%) men. Three men (1.8%) with XYY chromosome abnormality were found. This rate is much higher than that found in unselected samples of prisoners (0.7-0.9%) or in the general population (0.01%). The three men had shown prepubescent abnormalities, school problems, and had suffered from physical abuse. The chromosome analysis in all cases had been carried out in connection with the forensic psychiatric court report due to the sexual homicide. However, two men had earlier psychiatric referrals. All were diagnosed as sexual sadistic, showed a psychopathic syndrome or psychopathy according to the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised [Hare RD, 1991, The Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Multi-Health Systems]. Two were multiple murderers. Especially forensic psychiatrists should be vigilant of the possibility of XYY chromosome abnormalities in sexual offenders.

  17. Visual perceptual abnormalities: hallucinations and illusions.

    PubMed

    Norton, J W; Corbett, J J

    2000-01-01

    Visual perceptual abnormalities may be caused by diverse etiologies which span the fields of psychiatry and neurology. This article reviews the differential diagnosis of visual perceptual abnormalities from both a neurological and a psychiatric perspective. Psychiatric etiologies include mania, depression, substance dependence, and schizophrenia. Common neurological causes include migraine, epilepsy, delirium, dementia, tumor, and stroke. The phenomena of palinopsia, oscillopsia, dysmetropsia, and polyopia among others are also reviewed. A systematic approach to the many causes of illusions and hallucinations may help to achieve an accurate diagnosis, and a more focused evaluation and treatment plan for patients who develop visual perceptual abnormalities. This article provides the practicing neurologist with a practical understanding and approach to patients with these clinical symptoms.

  18. Abnormal Head Position in Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Noval, Susana; González-Manrique, Mar; Rodríguez-Del Valle, José María; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José María

    2011-01-01

    Infantile nystagmus is an involuntary, bilateral, conjugate, and rhythmic oscillation of the eyes which is present at birth or develops within the first 6 months of life. It may be pendular or jerk-like and, its intensity usually increases in lateral gaze, decreasing with convergence. Up to 64% of all patients with nystagmus also present strabismus, and even more patients have an abnormal head position. The abnormal head positions are more often horizontal, but they may also be vertical or take the form of a tilt, even though the nystagmus itself is horizontal. The aim of this article is to review available information about the origin and treatment of the abnormal head position associated to nystagmus, and to describe our treatment strategies. PMID:24533187

  19. Schizophrenia and abnormal brain network hubs.

    PubMed

    Rubinov, Mikail; Bullmore, Ed

    2013-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder of unknown cause or characteristic pathology. Clinical neuroscientists increasingly postulate that schizophrenia is a disorder of brain network organization. In this article we discuss the conceptual framework of this dysconnection hypothesis, describe the predominant methodological paradigm for testing this hypothesis, and review recent evidence for disruption of central/hub brain regions, as a promising example of this hypothesis. We summarize studies of brain hubs in large-scale structural and functional brain networks and find strong evidence for network abnormalities of prefrontal hubs, and moderate evidence for network abnormalities of limbic, temporal, and parietal hubs. Future studies are needed to differentiate network dysfunction from previously observed gray- and white-matter abnormalities of these hubs, and to link endogenous network dysfunction phenotypes with perceptual, behavioral, and cognitive clinical phenotypes of schizophrenia.

  20. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy.

  1. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Bhoiwala, Devang L.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: thalassemia major, β-TI: thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelium degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-TM are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy (ICT) in order to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by ICT. Some who were never treated with ICT exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving ICT had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-TM viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  2. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  3. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  4. Chromosome abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Less information is available on the cytogenetic abnormalities in marrow cells of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than on abnormalities in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL); nonetheless, some patterns of karyotypic change in ALL are evident. Even with banding, about 50% of patients appear to have a normal karyotype. The modal chromosome number tends to be higher in ALL than in ANLL. Every patient with B-cell ALL has had an abnormality of one chromosome No. 14 that involved the translocation of material to the end of the long arm. Among seven reported cases, the translocation was from 8q in three patients and 11q in one. Cells with a haploid or near-haploid (24 to 35) chromosome number have been reported in five patients with ALL and in four patients in a lymphoid blast crisis of chronic myelogeneous leukemia. The karyotype in the four ALL patients whose cells were analyzed with banding was remarkably consistent. All patients had the haploid number, usually with both sex chromosomes, plus an additional No. 10, 18, and 21. Evolution of the karyotype, which occurs in the leukemic cells of about 50% of patients, involves cells of patients who had an initially normal or an initially abnormal karyotype. The evidence regarding a correlation between the presence of an abnormal clone prior to treatment and response to treatment is contradictory at present. Some chromosome abnormalities, such as the presence of a Philadelphia (Ph/sup 1/) chromosome, a 14q+chromosome, or a haploid clone, are associated with a relatively short survival.

  5. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  6. Temporal abnormalities in children with developmental dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Rappo, Gaetano; Pepi, Annamaria; Pavan, Andrea; Martino, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have associated Developmental dyscalculia (DD) to structural and functional alterations corresponding Parietal and the Prefrontal cortex (PFC). Since these areas were shown also to be involved in timing abilities, we hypothesized that time processing is abnormal in DD. We compared time processing abilities between 10 children with pure DD (8 years old) and 11 age-matched healthy children. Results show that the DD group underestimated duration of a sub-second scale when asked to perform a time comparison task. The timing abnormality observed in our DD participants is consistent with evidence of a shared fronto-parietal neural network for representing time and quantity.

  7. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  8. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research.

  9. Roentgenographic abnormalities in Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    McCook, T A; Briley, C; Ravin, C E

    1982-02-01

    Rock Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne rickettsial disease which produces a widespread vasculitis. A mortality of 7% to 13% has been reported in the United States which is due at least in part to delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The classic features of this disease include a history of tick bite with the clinical presentation of skin rash and fever in association with thrombocytopenia. Few reports have emphasized the radiologic chest abnormalities in this disease or their relationship to thrombocytopenia. We review 70 cases of RMSF with abnormal roentgenographic features and their pathologic correlation.

  10. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  11. Structural Chromosome Abnormalities Associated with Obesity: Report of Four New subjects and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dasouki, Majed J; Youngs, Erin L; Hovanes, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Obesity in humans is a complex polygenic trait with high inter-individual heritability estimated at 40–70%. Candidate gene, DNA linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have allowed for the identification of a large set of genes and genomic regions associated with obesity. Structural chromosome abnormalities usually result in congenital anomalies, growth retardation and developmental delay. Occasionally, they are associated with hyperphagia and obesity rather than growth delay. We report four new individuals with structural chromosome abnormalities involving 10q22.3-23.2, 16p11.2 and Xq27.1-q28 chromosomal regions with early childhood obesity and developmental delay. We also searched and summarized the literature for structural chromosome abnormalities reported in association with childhood obesity. PMID:22043167

  12. DNA denaturation in ionic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Arghya; Singh, Amar; Singh, Navin

    2016-05-01

    Salt or cations, present in solution play an important role in DNA denaturation and folding kinetics of DNA helix. In this work we study the thermal melting of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecule using Peyrard Bishop Dauxois (PBD) model. We modify the potential of H-bonding between the bases of the complimentary strands to introduce the salt and solvent effect. We choose different DNA sequences having different contents of GC pairs and calculate the melting temperatures. The melting temperature increases logarithmically with the salt concentration of the solution. The more GC base pairs in the chain enhance the stability of DNA chain at a fix salt concentration. The obtained results are in good accordance with experimental findings.

  13. The patient portal and abnormal test results: An exploratory study of patient experiences

    PubMed Central

    Giardina, Traber Davis; Modi, Varsha; Parrish, Danielle E.; Singh, Hardeep

    2016-01-01

    Many health care institutions are implementing patient portals that allow patients to track and maintain their personal health information, mostly in response to the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act requirements. Test results review is an area of high interest to patients and provides an opportunity to foster their involvement in preventing abnormal test results from being overlooked, a common patient safety concern. However, little is known about how patients engage with portals to review abnormal results and which strategies could facilitate that interaction in order to ensure safe follow-up on abnormalities. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore patients’ experiences related to abnormal test result notifications through patient portals. The authors conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with 13 participants, patients and primary caregivers, between February 2014 and October 2014. Using content analysis, the authors explored patient experiences accessing abnormal test results through their portals. Respondents strongly favored access to all types of abnormal test results, but they raised several concerns including need for more timely notification and not being able to interpret the exact relevance of the result. Respondents’ personal experiences with physicians, test result notification, and the portal heavily influenced respondents’ notification preferences. Patient experiences with portals could be improved by development of strategies to help patients understand and manage the information received. These findings suggest important considerations for health professionals and institutions aiming to better engage patients in follow-up of their test results.

  14. Recurrent chromosome 6 abnormalities in malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Ribotta, M; Roseo, F; Salvio, M; Castagneto, B; Carbone, M; Procopio, A; Giordano, A; Mutti, L

    1998-04-01

    The long latency period between asbestos exposure and the onset of malignant mesothelioma (MM) suggests that a multistep tumorigenesis process occurs whilst the capability of asbestos fibres to interfere directly with chromosomes focuses on the critical role of the chromosomal abnormalities in this neoplasm. The aim of our study was to identify any recurrent chromosomal changes in ten primary MM cell cultures derived from pleural effusions of patients with MM from the same geographic area and environmental and/or occupational exposure to asbestos fibers. Cytogenetic analysis was performed in accordance with International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature. Our results confirmed a great number of cytogenetic abnormalities in MM cells. Recurrent loss of the long arms of chromosome 6 (6q-) was the most frequent abnormality detected (four epithelial and two mixed subtypes) while, on the whole, abnormalities of chromosome 6 were found in nine out of ten cases whereas chromosome 6 was normal only in the case with fibromatous subtype. Monosomy 13 and 17 was found in five cases, monosomy 14 in four cases and 22 in three cases. Since deletion of 6q- was detected even in relatively undisturbed karyotype, we hypothesize a multistep carcinogenic process in which deletion of 6q- is an early event in the development and progression of malignant mesothelioma.

  15. Schizophrenogenic Parenting in Abnormal Psychology Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Otto F.

    1989-01-01

    Considers the treatment of family causation of schizophrenia in undergraduate abnormal psychology textbooks. Reviews texts published only after 1986. Points out a number of implications for psychologists which arise from the inclusion in these texts of the idea that parents cause schizophrenia, not the least of which is the potential for…

  16. Teaching Abnormal Psychology in a Multimedia Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, JoAnne

    1996-01-01

    Examines the techniques used in teaching an abnormal psychology class in a multimedia environment with two computers and a variety of audiovisual equipment. Students respond anonymously to various questions via keypads mounted on their desks, then immediately view and discuss summaries of their responses. (MJP)

  17. Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Refractory Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Philip J.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2015-11-01

    High-temperature plastic deformation of the body-centered cubic (BCC) refractory metals Mo and Ta can initiate and propagate abnormal grains at significantly lower temperatures and faster rates than is possible by static annealing alone. This discovery reveals a new and potentially important aspect of abnormal grain growth (AGG) phenomena. The process of AGG during plastic deformation at elevated temperatures, termed dynamic abnormal grain growth (DAGG), was observed at homologous temperatures between 0.52 and 0.72 in both Mo and Ta sheet materials; these temperatures are much lower than those for previous observations of AGG in these materials during static annealing. DAGG was used to repeatedly grow single crystals several centimeters in length. Investigations to date have produced a basic understanding of the conditions that lead to DAGG and how DAGG is affected by microstructure in BCC refractory metals. The current state of understanding for DAGG is reviewed in this paper. Attention is given to the roles of temperature, plastic strain, boundary mobility and preexisting microstructure. DAGG is considered for its potential useful applications in solid-state crystal growth and its possibly detrimental role in creating undesired abnormal grains during thermomechanical processing.

  18. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  19. Abnormal activated partial thromboplastin time and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Delicata, M; Hambley, H

    2011-08-01

    Malignancy often results in clotting abnormalities. The aetiology of haemostasis problems in cancer is complex, and is still not completely understood. We describe a case of a patient with malignant mesothelioma, who was found to have elevated activated partial thromboplastin time, due to lupus anticoagulant. We suggest that patients with malignancy should have their coagulation checked prior to any invasive procedures.

  20. First-Trimester Detection of Surface Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Rousian, Melek; Koning, Anton H. J.; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Eggink, Alex J.; Cornette, Jérôme M. J.; Schoonderwaldt, Ernst M.; Husen-Ebbinge, Margreet; Teunissen, Katinka K.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Exalto, Niek

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to determine the diagnostic performance of 3-dimensional virtual reality ultrasound (3D_VR_US) and conventional 2- and 3-dimensional ultrasound (2D/3D_US) for first-trimester detection of structural abnormalities. Forty-eight first trimester cases (gold standard available, 22 normal, 26 abnormal) were evaluated offline using both techniques by 5 experienced, blinded sonographers. In each case, we analyzed whether each organ category was correctly indicated as normal or abnormal and whether the specific diagnosis was correctly made. Sensitivity in terms of normal or abnormal was comparable for both techniques (P = .24). The general sensitivity for specific diagnoses was 62.6% using 3D_VR_US and 52.2% using 2D/3D_US (P = .075). The 3D_VR_US more often correctly diagnosed skeleton/limb malformations (36.7% vs 10%; P = .013). Mean evaluation time in 3D_VR_US was 4:24 minutes and in 2D/3D_US 2:53 minutes (P < .001). General diagnostic performance of 3D_VR_US and 2D/3D_US apparently is comparable. Malformations of skeleton and limbs are more often detected using 3D_VR_US. Evaluation time is longer in 3D_VR_US. PMID:24440996

  1. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  2. Abnormal Web Usage Control by Proxy Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hsiang-Fu; Tseng, Li-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Approaches to designing a proxy server with Web usage control and to making the proxy server effective on local area networks are proposed to prevent abnormal Web access and to prioritize Web usage. A system is implemented to demonstrate the approaches. The implementation reveals that the proposed approaches are effective, such that the abnormal…

  3. Engineering molecular crystals with abnormally weak cohesion.

    PubMed

    Maly, Kenneth E; Gagnon, Eric; Wuest, James D

    2011-05-14

    Adding astutely placed methyl groups to hexaphenylbenzene increases molecular weight but simultaneously weakens key C-H···π interactions, thereby leading to decreased enthalpies of sublimation and showing that materials with abnormally weak cohesion can be made by identifying and then obstructing interactions that help control association.

  4. Eye movement abnormalities in essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Plinta, Klaudia; Krzak-Kubica, Agnieszka; Zajdel, Katarzyna; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Dylak, Jacek; Ober, Jan; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Rudzińska, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Essential tremor (ET) is the most prevalent movement disorder, characterized mainly by an action tremor of the arms. Only a few studies published as yet have assessed oculomotor abnormalities in ET and their results are unequivocal. The aim of this study was to assess the oculomotor abnormalities in ET patients compared with the control group and to find the relationship between oculomotor abnormalities and clinical features of ET patients. We studied 50 ET patients and 42 matched by age and gender healthy controls. Saccadometer Advanced (Ober Consulting, Poland) was used to investigate reflexive, pace-induced and cued saccades and conventional electrooculography for evaluation of smooth pursuit and fixation. The severity of the tremor was assessed by the Clinical Rating Scale for Tremor. Significant differences between ET patients and controls were found for the incidence of reflexive saccades dysmetria and deficit of smooth pursuit. Reflexive saccades dysmetria was more frequent in patients in the second and third phase of ET compared to the first phase. The reflexive saccades latency increase was correlated with severity of the tremor. In conclusion, oculomotor abnormalities were significantly more common in ET patients than in healthy subjects. The most common oculomotor disturbances in ET were reflexive saccades dysmetria and slowing of smooth pursuit. The frequency of reflexive saccades dysmetria increased with progression of ET. The reflexive saccades latency increase was related to the severity of tremor. PMID:28149393

  5. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  6. Abnormal Saccadic Eye Movements in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemner, C.; Verbaten, M. N.; Cuperus, J. M.; Camfferman, G.; van Engeland, H.

    1998-01-01

    The saccadic eye movements, generated during a visual oddball task, were compared for 10 autistic children, 10 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, 10 dyslexic children, and 10 typically developing children. Several abnormal patterns of saccades were found in the autistic group. (DB)

  7. Pathways to abnormal revenge and forgiveness.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Pat

    2013-02-01

    The target article’s important point is easily misunderstood to claim that all revenge is adaptive. Revenge and forgiveness can overstretch (or understretch) the bounds of utility due to misperceptions, minimization of costly errors, a breakdown within our evolved revenge systems, or natural genetic and developmental variation. Together, these factors can compound to produce highly abnormal instances of revenge and forgiveness.

  8. Meiotic chromosome abnormalities in human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Renée H

    2006-08-01

    The last few years have witnessed an explosion in the information about chromosome abnormalities in human sperm and the meiotic events that predispose to these abnormalities. We have determined that all chromosomes are susceptible to nondisjunction, but chromosomes 21 and 22 and, especially, the sex chromosomes have an increased frequency of aneuploidy. Studies are just beginning on the effects of potential mutagens on the chromosomal constitution of human sperm. The effects of pesticides and cancer therapeutic agents have been reviewed. In the last decade, there has been a great impetus to study chromosome abnormalities in sperm from infertile men because the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) made it possible for these men to father pregnancies. A large number of studies have demonstrated that infertile men have an increased frequency of chromosomally abnormal sperm and children, even when they have a normal somatic karyotype. Meiotic studies on the pachytene stage of spermatogenesis have demonstrated that infertile men have impaired chromosome synapsis, a significantly decreased frequency of recombination, and an increased frequency of chromosomes completely lacking a recombination site. Such errors make these cells susceptible to meiotic arrest and the production of aneuploid gametes.

  9. Sensory Abnormalities in Autism: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klintwall Lars; Holm, Anette; Eriksson, Mats; Carlsson, Lotta Hoglund; Olsson, Martina Barnevik; Hedvall, Asa; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Sensory abnormalities were assessed in a population-based group of 208 20-54-month-old children, diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and referred to a specialized habilitation centre for early intervention. The children were subgrouped based upon degree of autistic symptoms and cognitive level by a research team at the centre. Parents…

  10. [Y chromosome structural abnormalities and Turner's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ravel, C; Siffroi, J-P

    2009-06-01

    Although specifically male, the human Y chromosome may be observed in female karyotypes, mostly in women with Turner syndrome stigmata. In women with isolated gonadal dysgenesis but otherwise normal stature, the testis determining factor or SRY gene may have been removed from the Y chromosome or may be mutated. In other women with Turner syndrome, the karyotype is usually abnormal and shows a frequent 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. In these cases, the phenotype depends on the ratio between Y positive and 45,X cell lines in the body. When in mosaicism, Y chromosomes are likely to carry structural abnormalities which explain mitotic instability, such as the existence of two centromeres. Dicentric Y isochromosomes for the short arm (idic[Yp]) or ring Y chromosomes (r[Y]) are the most frequent abnormal Y chromosomes found in infertile patients and in Turner syndrome in mosaic with 45,X cells. Although monocentric, deleted Y chromosomes for the long arm and those carrying microdeletions in the AZF region are also instable and are frequently associated with a 45,X cell line. Management of infertile patients carrying such abnormal Y chromosomes must take into account the risk and the consequences of a mosaicism in the offspring.

  11. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S.; De Jesus, Danilo R.; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Schutter, Dennis J.L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. Results We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. Limitations The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders. PMID:23937798

  12. Abnormal Selective Attention Normalizes P3 Amplitudes in PDD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeksma, Marco R.; Kemner, Chantal; Kenemans, J. Leon; van Engeland, Herman

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied whether abnormal P3 amplitudes in PDD are a corollary of abnormalities in ERP components related to selective attention in visual and auditory tasks. Furthermore, this study sought to clarify possible age differences in such abnormalities. Children with PDD showed smaller P3 amplitudes than controls, but no abnormalities in…

  13. Hemorheological abnormalities in lipoprotein lipase deficient mice with severe hypertriglyceridemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Tieqiang; Guo Jun; Li Hui; Huang Wei; Xian Xunde; Ross, Colin J.D.; Hayden, Michael R.; Wen Zongyao . E-mail: rheol@bjmu.edu.cn; Liu George . E-mail: vangeorgeliu@gmail.com

    2006-03-24

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a metabolic disturbance often seen in clinical practice. It is known to induce life-threatening acute pancreatitis, but its role in atherogenesis remains elusive. Hemorheological abnormality was thought to play an important role in pathogenesis of both pancreatitis and atherosclerosis. However, hemorheology in severe HTG was not well investigated. Recently, we established a severe HTG mouse model deficient in lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in which severe HTG was observed to cause a significant increase in plasma viscosity. Disturbances of erythrocytes were also documented, including decreased deformability, electrophoresis rate, and membrane fluidity, and increased osmotic fragility. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that most erythrocytes of LPL deficient mice deformed with protrusions, irregular appearances or indistinct concaves. Analysis of erythrocyte membrane lipids showed decreased cholesterol (Ch) and phospholipid (PL) contents but unaltered Ch/PL ratio. The changes of membrane lipids may be partially responsible for the hemorheological and morphologic abnormalities of erythrocytes. This study indicated that severe HTG could lead to significant impairment of hemorheology and this model may be useful in delineating the role of severe HTG in the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis and atherosclerosis.

  14. Abnormal growth of ovarian antral follicles in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Byskov, A G; McNatty, K P; Westergaard, L; Larsen, J K; Grinsted, J; Peters, H

    1983-07-01

    Ovarian antral follicles from patients with breast cancer were compared with follicles from healthy women. Steroid levels in the follicular fluid and the health status of the follicles were evaluated. Follicles were judged to be healthy or atretic by flow cytometric determinations of the deoxyribonucleic acid content of aspirated granulosa cell nuclei. Fifteen of the 25 follicles (60%) from the cancer patients contained unmeasurable or abnormally low steriod levels (i.e., less than 100 ng/ml) which were significantly (P less than 0.001) lower than in follicles of the same health status from healthy women (500 to 1000 ng/ml). It is speculated whether substances other than the usual follicular steriods are produced by the cancer patients, which stimulate mitotic activity of the granulosa cells.

  15. Factors affecting gas content in coal beds

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.

    1996-06-01

    Gas content is one of the most important controls on coalbed methane producibility because coal gas production becomes uneconomical if insufficient amounts of gas are sorbed onto the coal surface. Gas content in coal beds is not fixed but changes when equilibrium conditions within the reservoir are disrupted. Therefore, the distribution of gas content varies laterally within individual coal beds, vertically among coals within a single well, and vertically within thicker coal beds. The key hydrogeologic factors affecting gas content variability include gas generation, coal properties, and reservoir conditions. The potential for high gas content depends on thermogenic and secondary biogenic gas generation, which are controlled by burial history (coal rank), maceral composition, and basin hydrodynamics. Coal properties such as ash and moisture content, maceral type, permeability, and diffusion coefficient affect the sorption capacity and diffusion rates in coal beds and, therefore, the final gas content. Reservoir conditions such as pressure and temperature also affect the amount of gases sorbed to the coal surface, whereas coal geometry, hydrogeology, and the presence or absence of permeability barriers determine whether or not gas contents are increased or decreased. Stratigraphic and/or structural trapping concentrates coal gases, resulting in higher gas contents adjacent to permeability barriers; the presence of abnormally high gas contents in lower-rank coals indicates secondary biogenic gas generation and/or conventional trapping of thermogenic or biogenic gases. Gas content decreases in areas of active recharge caused by flushing or in areas of convergent flow where no trapping mechanisms (seals) are present.

  16. Decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number in the hippocampus and peripheral blood during opiate addiction is mediated by autophagy and can be salvaged by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yue-Mei; Jia, Yun-Fang; Su, Ling-Yan; Wang, Dong; Lv, Li; Xu, Lin; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2013-09-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disease that is a serious social problem and causes enormous financial burden. Because mitochondrial abnormalities have been associated with opiate addiction, we examined the effect of morphine on mtDNA levels in rat and mouse models of addiction and in cultured cells. We found that mtDNA copy number was significantly reduced in the hippocampus and peripheral blood of morphine-addicted rats and mice compared with control animals. Concordantly, decreased mtDNA copy number and elevated mtDNA damage were observed in the peripheral blood from opiate-addicted patients, indicating detrimental effects of drug abuse and stress. In cultured rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and mouse neurons, morphine treatment caused many mitochondrial defects, including a reduction in mtDNA copy number that was mediated by autophagy. Knockdown of the Atg7 gene was able to counteract the loss of mtDNA copy number induced by morphine. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant melatonin restored mtDNA content and neuronal outgrowth and prevented the increase in autophagy upon morphine treatment. In mice, coadministration of melatonin with morphine ameliorated morphine-induced behavioral sensitization, analgesic tolerance and mtDNA content reduction. During drug withdrawal in opiate-addicted patients and improvement of protracted abstinence syndrome, we observed an increase of serum melatonin level. Taken together, our study indicates that opioid addiction is associated with mtDNA copy number reduction and neurostructural remodeling. These effects appear to be mediated by autophagy and can be salvaged by melatonin.

  17. Initial analysis of sperm DNA methylome in Holstein bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aberrant DNA methylation patterns have been associated with abnormal semen parameters, idiopathic male infertility and early embryonic loss in mammals. Using Holstein bulls with high (Bull1) or low (Bull2) fertility rates, we created two representative sperm DNA methylomes at a single-base resolutio...

  18. A-DNA and B-DNA: Comparing Their Historical X-Ray Fiber Diffraction Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Amand A.

    2008-01-01

    A-DNA and B-DNA are two secondary molecular conformations (among other allomorphs) that double-stranded DNA drawn into a fiber can assume, depending on the relative water content and other chemical parameters of the fiber. They were the first two forms to be observed by X-ray fiber diffraction in the early 1950s, respectively by Wilkins and…

  19. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  20. Quality control study by the French Cytometry Association on flow cytometric DNA content and S-phase fraction (S%). The Association Française de Cytométrie.

    PubMed

    D'hautcourt, J L; Spyratos, F; Chassevent, A

    1996-03-15

    Clinical use of flow cytometric (FCM) DNA analysis requires effective quality controls. Thirty-two laboratories with various degrees of FCM experience participated in the first phase of a quality control program organized by the Association Française de Cytométrie. All received diskettes containing ten list-mode files and ten histogram files that were derived from FCM analysis of various unfixed tumor specimens. A total of 610 responses on DNA ploidy and cell cycle were obtained with three different DNA analysis softwares: CellFit used by (44% of responses), MultiCycle (44%), and ModFit (12%). After statistical analysis, 31% of the responses were excluded from the final analysis for precise reasons. The groups were too small to carry out a valid analysis of the slight differences in the percentage of cells in the DNA synthesis phase (S%) between CellFit and MultiCycle. To estimate the influence of gating on the final cell-cycle results, five of the histogram files were derived from corresponding list-mode files, but the participating laboratories were unaware of this. A good correlation (r = 0.98) was obtained for S% values in the five paired files. The fact that 31% of the responses had to be excluded clearly reflects inadequate training in the use of these analysis softwares and, in some cases, a failure to grasp the biological meaning of the results. In contrast, the laboratories fulfilling consensus recommendations obtained remarkably homogeneous results, showing that standardization is feasible.

  1. Characterization of novel dystonia musculorum mutant mice: Implications for central nervous system abnormality.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masao; Mekada, Kazuyuki; Sano, Hiromi; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Chiken, Satomi; Someya, Takuro; Saito, Keisuke; Hossain, M Ibrahim; Nameta, Masaaki; Abe, Kuniya; Sakimura, Kenji; Ono, Katsuhiko; Nambu, Atsushi; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Takebayashi, Hirohide

    2016-12-01

    We identified a novel spontaneous mutant mouse showing motor symptoms that are similar to those of the dystonia musculorum (dt) mouse. The observations suggested that the mutant mice inherited the mild dt phenotype as an autosomal recessive trait. Linkage analysis showed that the causative gene was located near D1Mit373 and D1Mit410 microsatellite markers on chromosome 1, which are close to the dystonin (Dst) gene locus. To investigate whether Dst is the causative gene of the novel mutant phenotype, we crossed the mutant with Dst gene trap (Dst(Gt)) mice. Compound heterozygotes showed a typical dt phenotype with sensory degeneration and progressive motor symptoms. DNA sequencing analysis identified a nonsense mutation within the spectrin repeats of the plakin domain. The novel mutant allele was named dt(23Rbrc). Motor abnormalities in homozygous dt(23Rbrc)/dt(23Rbrc) mice are not as severe as homozygous Dst(Gt)/Dst(Gt) mice. Histological analyses showed abnormal neurofilament (NF) accumulation in the nervous system of homozygous dt(23Rbrc)/dt(23Rbrc) mice, which is characteristic of the dt phenotype. We mapped the distribution of abnormal NF-accumulated neurons in the brain and found that they were located specifically in the brainstem, spinal cord, and in regions such as the vestibular nucleus, reticular nucleus, and red nucleus, which are implicated in posture and motor coordination pathways. The quantification of abnormal NF accumulation in the cytoplasm and spheroids (axons) of neurons showed that abnormal NF immunoreactivity was lower in homozygous dt(23Rbrc)/dt(23Rbrc) mice than in homozygous Dst(Gt)/Dst(Gt) mice. Therefore, we have identified a novel hypomorphic allele of dt, which causes histological abnormalities in the central nervous system that may account for the abnormal motor phenotype. This novel spontaneously occurring mutant may become a good model of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 6, which is caused by mutations in the human DST

  2. Modulating mitochondrial quality in disease transmission: towards enabling mitochondrial DNA disease carriers to have healthy children

    PubMed Central

    Diot, Alan; Dombi, Eszter; Lodge, Tiffany; Liao, Chunyan; Morten, Karl; Carver, Janet; Wells, Dagan; Child, Tim; Johnston, Iain G.; Williams, Suzannah; Poulton, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    One in 400 people has a maternally inherited mutation in mtDNA potentially causing incurable disease. In so-called heteroplasmic disease, mutant and normal mtDNA co-exist in the cells of carrier women. Disease severity depends on the proportion of inherited abnormal mtDNA molecules. Families who have had a child die of severe, maternally inherited mtDNA disease need reliable information on the risk of recurrence in future pregnancies. However, prenatal diagnosis and even estimates of risk are fraught with uncertainty because of the complex and stochastic dynamics of heteroplasmy. These complications include an mtDNA bottleneck, whereby hard-to-predict fluctuations in the proportions of mutant and normal mtDNA may arise between generations. In ‘mitochondrial replacement therapy’ (MRT), damaged mitochondria are replaced with healthy ones in early human development, using nuclear transfer. We are developing non-invasive alternatives, notably activating autophagy, a cellular quality control mechanism, in which damaged cellular components are engulfed by autophagosomes. This approach could be used in combination with MRT or with the regular management, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Mathematical theory, supported by recent experiments, suggests that this strategy may be fruitful in controlling heteroplasmy. Using mice that are transgenic for fluorescent LC3 (the hallmark of autophagy) we quantified autophagosomes in cleavage stage embryos. We confirmed that the autophagosome count peaks in four-cell embryos and this correlates with a drop in the mtDNA content of the whole embryo. This suggests removal by mitophagy (mitochondria-specific autophagy). We suggest that modulating heteroplasmy by activating mitophagy may be a useful complement to mitochondrial replacement therapy. PMID:27528757

  3. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W.; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L.; Patterson, Tucker A.; Paule, Merle G.; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-01-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage. PMID:26206149

  4. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage.

  5. Identification using DNA from skin contact: case reports.

    PubMed

    Tokutomi, Tomoharu; Takada, Yuzo; Kanetake, Jun; Mukaida, Masahiro

    2009-04-01

    The DNA content of different types of forensic materials can vary substantially. "Trace DNA" is the minute quantity of DNA transferred through skin contact. Here, we report three cases of identification of trace DNA using conventional short tandem repeat (STR) or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). DNA was successfully obtained from fabrics by swabbing or by direct extraction and subjected to STR genotyping or mtDNA typing. In two cases, there was no amplification of PCR products containing the STR loci. This indicates that the areas chosen for DNA extraction contained trace DNA and DNA from more than one source. Therefore, it is important for forensic investigators performing DNA typing to know where an item has been frequently touched by victims and/or offenders as this will influence the choice of sites on the item to be used for DNA extraction.

  6. Outcome of "indefinite for dysplasia" in inflammatory bowel disease: correlation with DNA flow cytometry and other risk factors of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Tak; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Wang, Dongliang; Westerhoff, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Dysplasia that develops in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease precedes colorectal cancer (CRC). The category of "indefinite for dysplasia (IND)" is used often in equivocal cases, but its clinical significance remains unclear. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content (aneuploidy) has shown some promise in stratifying patients into low or high risk of CRC, but there are few reports that have specifically evaluated the outcome of IND. As such, we analyzed a series of 84 IND inflammatory bowel disease patients seen at the University of Washington and Harborview Medical Centers from 2003 to 2013 to determine the outcome of IND. Hospital electronic medical records were further reviewed to correlate outcome with the type of lesion (flat versus polypoid), primary sclerosing cholangitis, active inflammation in the area of IND, and DNA flow cytometric data. The data show that 13% of IND cases were found to have low-grade dysplasia, whereas only 2% of IND cases showed advanced neoplasia (high-grade dysplasia or CRC) after a mean follow-up of 28 months. The risk of neoplasia was not significantly associated with the type of lesion (P = .94 from log-rank test), primary sclerosing cholangitis (P = .94), or active inflammation (P = .41) in this cohort. However, the finding of DNA aneuploidy at baseline IND was predictive of subsequent detection of neoplasia (P = .037). IND patients with abnormal DNA flow cytometric results may warrant more careful follow-up, but conversely, IND in the setting of normal DNA content may require less frequent surveillance colonoscopy.

  7. Developmental pragmatics in normal and abnormal children.

    PubMed

    Bara, B G; Bosco, F M; Bucciarelli, M

    1999-07-01

    We propose a critical review of current theories of developmental pragmatics. The underlying assumption is that such a theory ought to account for both normal and abnormal development. From a clinical point of view, we are concerned with the effects of brain damage on the emergence of pragmatic competence. In particular, the paper deals with direct speech acts, indirect speech acts, irony, and deceit in children with head injury, closed head injury, hydrocephalus, focal brain damage, and autism. Since no single theory covers systematically the emergence of pragmatic capacity in normal children, it is not surprising that we have not found a systematic account of deficits in the communicative performance of brain injured children. In our view, the challenge for a pragmatic theory is the determination of the normal developmental pattern within which different pragmatic phenomena may find a precise role. Such a framework of normal behavior would then permit the systematic study of abnormal pragmatic development.

  8. Abnormal single or composite dissipative solitons generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xianqiong; Liu, Dingyao; Cheng, Ke; Sheng, Jianan

    2016-12-01

    The evolution dynamics of the initial finite energy Airy pulses and Airy pulse pairs are numerically investigated in the cubic-quintic complex Ginzberg-Laudau equation governed dissipative system. Depending on different initial excitations and system parameters, abnormal double, triple, and quadruple composite dissipative solitons as well as single dissipative solitons can be observed. The composite dissipative solitons may consist of identical or different types of pulsating solitons. Moreover, the creeping solitons and the single ordinary pulsating solitons can even appear in the parameter regions where originally the other types of pulsating solitons exist. Besides, before evolving into each abnormal dissipative soliton, the initial finite energy Airy pulse or pulse pairs generally exhibit very interesting and unique early evolution behavior.

  9. [Abnormal hemoglobins in Negroid Ecuadorian populations].

    PubMed

    Jara, N O; Guevara Espinoza, A; Guderian, R H

    1989-02-01

    The prevalence of hemoglobinopathies was determined in the black race located in two distinct geographical areas in Ecuador; in the coastal province of Esmeraldas, particularly the Santiago basin (Rio Cayapas and Rio Onzoles) and in the province of Imbabura, particularly in the intermoutain valley, Valle de Chota. A total of 2038 blood samples were analyzed, 1734 in Esmeraldas and 304 in Inbabura, of which 23.2% (473 individuals) were found to be carriers of abnormal hemoglobins, 25.4% (441) in Esmeraldas and 10.5% (32) in Imbabura. The abnormal hemoglobins found in Esmeraldas were Hb AS (19.2%), Hb AC (5.0%), Hb SS (0.6%) and Hb SC (0.5%) while in Imbabura only Hb AS (9.5%) and Hb AC (0.9%) were found. The factors that could influence the difference in prevalence found in the two geographical areas are discussed.

  10. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Gastric emptying abnormalities in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, K.; Magyar, L.; Lange, R.; McCallum, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied gastric emptying (GE) in patients with peripheral manifestations of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) using a radionuclide method. 18 patients underwent esophageal manometry and a GE study using chicken liver labeled in vivo with Tc-99m sulfur colloid as a marker of solid emptying. GE was also measured in 13 normal volunteers. 4 PSS patients with normal esophageal motility also had normal GE. The GE of 14 PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility was significantly (p < 0.05) delayed; with 67.4% retention of isotope after 2 hours compared to 49.8 in normals. The authors conclude that GE of solids is slow in approximately 2/3 of PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility but is normal if the esophagus is uninvolved; Delayed GE may contribute to the severity of gastroesophageal reflux in PSS patients and the degree of dysphasgia; and Metoclopramide accelerates GE in PSS patients and should have a valuable therapeutic role.

  12. Serum Lipoprotein Abnormalities in Patients with Ischaemic Heart Disease: Comparisons with a Control Population

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, B.; Chait, A.; Oakley, C. M. O.; Wootton, I. D. P.; Krikler, D. M.; Onitiri, A.; Sigurdsson, G.; February, A.

    1974-01-01

    The frequency and nature of abnormalities of serum lipoproteins have been studied, using quantitative techniques, in 143 patients with ischaemic heart disease (I.H.D.). Rigorous selection criteria were used. The findings were related to the distribution of lipoprotein concentrations in a carefully screened control population. Hyperlipoproteinaemia occurred in 55% of patients and in 11 out of 15 patients aged less than 40 years. Raised triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations in very low density lipoprotein were the most frequent abnormalities followed by raised cholesterol content of low density lipoprotein. In young patients high density lipoprotein levels were subnormal. Hyperlipoproteinaemia of W.H.O. types IIa, IIb, III, IV, and V all seemed to be over-represented in I.H.D. I.H.D. patients with type IIa, IIb, and IV abnormalities were all significantly younger than I.H.D. patients with normal lipoprotein levels. PMID:4370367

  13. Varenicline and Abnormal Sleep Related Events

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Ruth L.; Zekarias, Alem; Caduff-Janosa, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess adverse drug reaction reports of “abnormal sleep related events” associated with varenicline, a partial agonist to the α4β2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on neurones, indicated for smoking cessation. Design: Twenty-seven reports of “abnormal sleep related events” often associated with abnormal dreams, nightmares, or somnambulism, which are known to be associated with varenicline use, were identified in the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Individual Case Safety Reports Database. Original anonymous reports were obtained from the four national pharmacovigilance centers that submitted these reports and assessed for reaction description and causality. Measurements and Results: These 27 reports include 10 of aggressive activity occurring during sleep and seven of other sleep related harmful or potentially harmful activities, such as apparently deliberate self-harm, moving a child or a car, or lighting a stove or a cigarette. Assessment of these 17 reports of aggression or other actual or potential harm showed that nine patients recovered or were recovering on varenicline withdrawal and there were no consistent alternative explanations. Thirteen patients experienced single events, and two had multiple events. Frequency was not stated for the remaining two patients. Conclusions: The descriptions of the reports of aggression during sleep with violent dreaming are similar to those of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and also nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias in some adults. Patients who experience somnambulism or dreams of a violent nature while taking varenicline should be advised to consult their health providers. Consideration should be given to clarifying the term sleep disorders in varenicline product information and including sleep related harmful and potentially harmful events. Citation: Savage RL, Zekarias A, Caduff-Janosa P. Varenicline and abnormal sleep related events. SLEEP 2015

  14. CT of trauma to the abnormal kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Rhyner, P.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1984-04-01

    Traumatic injuries to already abnormal kidneys are difficult to assess by excretory urography and clinical evaluation. Bleeding and urinary extravasation may accompany minor trauma; conversely, underlying tumors, perirenal hemorrhage, and extravasation may be missed on urography. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in eight cases including three neoplasms, one adult polycystic disease, one simple renal cyst, two hydronephrotic kidneys, and one horseshoe kidney. CT provided specific and clinically useful information in each case that was not apparent on excretory urography.

  15. Computed tomography of the abnormal pericardium

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Harell, G.S.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-06-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 18 patients with documented pericardial disease are reported. The pericardium appears as a thin, curvilinear, 1- to 2-mm-thick density best seen anterior to the right ventricular part of the heart. Pericardial abnormalities detected by CT include effusions, thickening, calcification, and cystic and solid masses. Computed tomography is complimentary to echocardiography in its ability to more accurately characterize pericardial effusions, masses, and pericardial thickening.

  16. Binocular combination in abnormal binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M

    2013-02-08

    We investigated suprathreshold binocular combination in humans with abnormal binocular visual experience early in life. In the first experiment we presented the two eyes with equal but opposite phase shifted sine waves and measured the perceived phase of the cyclopean sine wave. Normal observers have balanced vision between the two eyes when the two eyes' images have equal contrast (i.e., both eyes contribute equally to the perceived image and perceived phase = 0°). However, in observers with strabismus and/or amblyopia, balanced vision requires a higher contrast image in the nondominant eye (NDE) than the dominant eye (DE). This asymmetry between the two eyes is larger than predicted from the contrast sensitivities or monocular perceived contrast of the two eyes and is dependent on contrast and spatial frequency: more asymmetric with higher contrast and/or spatial frequency. Our results also revealed a surprising NDE-to-DE enhancement in some of our abnormal observers. This enhancement is not evident in normal vision because it is normally masked by interocular suppression. However, in these abnormal observers the NDE-to-DE suppression was weak or absent. In the second experiment, we used the identical stimuli to measure the perceived contrast of a cyclopean grating by matching the binocular combined contrast to a standard contrast presented to the DE. These measures provide strong constraints for model fitting. We found asymmetric interocular interactions in binocular contrast perception, which was dependent on both contrast and spatial frequency in the same way as in phase perception. By introducing asymmetric parameters to the modified Ding-Sperling model including interocular contrast gain enhancement, we succeeded in accounting for both binocular combined phase and contrast simultaneously. Adding binocular contrast gain control to the modified Ding-Sperling model enabled us to predict the results of dichoptic and binocular contrast discrimination experiments

  17. DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S

    2001-05-01

    DNA ligases catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between juxtaposed 5' phosphate and a 3'-hydroxyl terminus in duplex DNA. This activity can repair single-stranded nicks in duplex DNA and join duplex DNA restriction fragments having either blunt ends or homologous cohesive ends. Two ligases are used for nucleic acid research and their reaction conditions and applications are described in this unit: E. coli ligase and T4 ligase. These enzymes differ in two important properties. One is the source of energy: T4 ligase uses ATP, while E. coli ligase uses NAD. Another important difference is their ability to ligate blunt ends; under normal reaction conditions, only T4 DNA ligase will ligate blunt ends.

  18. Sensory abnormalities in autism. A brief report.

    PubMed

    Klintwall, Lars; Holm, Anette; Eriksson, Mats; Carlsson, Lotta Höglund; Olsson, Martina Barnevik; Hedvall, Asa; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Sensory abnormalities were assessed in a population-based group of 208 20-54-month-old children, diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and referred to a specialized habilitation centre for early intervention. The children were subgrouped based upon degree of autistic symptoms and cognitive level by a research team at the centre. Parents were interviewed systematically about any abnormal sensory reactions in the child. In the whole group, pain and hearing were the most commonly affected modalities. Children in the most typical autism subgroup (nuclear autism with no learning disability) had the highest number of affected modalities. The children who were classified in an "autistic features" subgroup had the lowest number of affected modalities. There were no group differences in number of affected sensory modalities between groups of different cognitive levels or level of expressive speech. The findings provide support for the notion that sensory abnormality is very common in young children with autism. This symptom has been proposed for inclusion among the diagnostic criteria for ASD in the upcoming DSM-V.

  19. Abnormal parietal encephalomalacia associated with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fen; Wang, Jun-Yuan; Xu, Yi; Huang, Man-Li

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: It is widely believed that structural abnormalities of the brain contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The parietal lobe is a central hub of multisensory integration, and abnormities in this region might account for the clinical features of schizophrenia. However, few cases of parietal encephalomalacia associated with schizophrenia have been described. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: In this paper, we present a case of a 25-year-old schizophrenia patient with abnormal parietal encephalomalacia. The patient had poor nutrition and frequently had upper respiratory infections during childhood and adolescence. She showed severe schizophrenic symptoms such as visual hallucinations for 2 years. After examining all her possible medical conditions, we found that the patient had a lesion consistent with the diagnosis of encephalomalacia in her right parietal lobe and slight brain atrophy. Interventions: The patient was prescribed olanzapine (10 mg per day). Outcomes: Her symptoms significantly improved after antipsychotic treatment and were still well controlled 1 year later. Lessons: This case suggested that parietal encephalomalacia, which might be caused by inflammatory and infectious conditions in early life and be aggravated by undernutrition, might be implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia. PMID:28272261

  20. Abnormal hippocampal shape in offenders with psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Marina; Ganzola, Rossana; Rossi, Roberta; Sabattoli, Francesca; Laakso, Mikko P; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Vaurio, Olli; Könönen, Mervi; Aronen, Hannu J; Thompson, Paul M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Tiihonen, Jari

    2010-03-01

    Posterior hippocampal volumes correlate negatively with the severity of psychopathy, but local morphological features are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate hippocampal morphology in habitually violent offenders having psychopathy. Manual tracings of hippocampi from magnetic resonance images of 26 offenders (age: 32.5 +/- 8.4), with different degrees of psychopathy (12 high, 14 medium psychopathy based on the Psychopathy Checklist Revised), and 25 healthy controls (age: 34.6 +/- 10.8) were used for statistical modelling of local changes with a surface-based radial distance mapping method. Both offenders and controls had similar hippocampal volume and asymmetry ratios. Local analysis showed that the high psychopathy group had a significant depression along the longitudinal hippocampal axis, on both the dorsal and ventral aspects, when compared with the healthy controls and the medium psychopathy group. The opposite comparison revealed abnormal enlargement of the lateral borders in both the right and left hippocampi of both high and medium psychopathy groups versus controls, throughout CA1, CA2-3 and the subicular regions. These enlargement and reduction effects survived statistical correction for multiple comparisons in the main contrast (26 offenders vs. 25 controls) and in most subgroup comparisons. A statistical check excluded a possible confounding effect from amphetamine and polysubstance abuse. These results indicate that habitually violent offenders exhibit a specific abnormal hippocampal morphology, in the absence of total gray matter volume changes, that may relate to different autonomic modulation and abnormal fear-conditioning.

  1. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-06-03

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.

  2. Abnormal dynamics of language in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stephane, Massoud; Kuskowski, Michael; Gundel, Jeanette

    2014-05-30

    Language could be conceptualized as a dynamic system that includes multiple interactive levels (sub-lexical, lexical, sentence, and discourse) and components (phonology, semantics, and syntax). In schizophrenia, abnormalities are observed at all language elements (levels and components) but the dynamic between these elements remains unclear. We hypothesize that the dynamics between language elements in schizophrenia is abnormal and explore how this dynamic is altered. We, first, investigated language elements with comparable procedures in patients and healthy controls. Second, using measures of reaction time, we performed multiple linear regression analyses to evaluate the inter-relationships among language elements and the effect of group on these relationships. Patients significantly differed from controls with respect to sub-lexical/lexical, lexical/sentence, and sentence/discourse regression coefficients. The intercepts of the regression slopes increased in the same order above (from lower to higher levels) in patients but not in controls. Regression coefficients between syntax and both sentence level and discourse level semantics did not differentiate patients from controls. This study indicates that the dynamics between language elements is abnormal in schizophrenia. In patients, top-down flow of linguistic information might be reduced, and the relationship between phonology and semantics but not between syntax and semantics appears to be altered.

  3. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  4. Abnormal asymmetry of brain connectivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ribolsi, Michele; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown a significant reduction of leftward asymmetry in some key white-matter tracts in SCZ. In this paper, we review the studies that investigated both structural brain asymmetry and asymmetry of functional connectivity in healthy subjects and SCZ. From an analysis of the existing literature on this topic, we can hypothesize an overall generally attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in SCZ compared to healthy controls. Such attenuated asymmetry increases with the duration of the disease and correlates with psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that structural deficits across the corpus callosum may contribute to the abnormal asymmetry of intra-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia.

  5. Chemical induction of sperm abnormalities in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wyrobek, A J; Bruce, W R

    1975-01-01

    The sperm of (C57BL X C3H)F1 mice were examined 1, 4, and 10 weeks after a subacute treatment with one of 25 chemicals at two or more dose levels. The fraction of sperm that were abnormal in shape was elevated above control values of 1.2-3.4% for methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, griseofulvin, benzo[a]pyrene, METEPA [tris(2-methyl-l-aziridinyl)phosphine oxide], THIO-TEPA [tris(l-aziridinyl)phosphine sulfide], mitomycin C, myleran, vinblastine sulphate, hydroxyurea, 3-methylcholanthrene, colchicine, actinomycin D, imuran, cyclophosphamide, 5-iododeoxyuridine, dichlorvos, aminopterin, and trimethylphosphate. Dimethylnitrosamine, urethane, DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane], 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, caffeine, and calcium cyclamate did not induce elevated levels of sperm abnormalities. The results suggest that sperm abnormalities might provide a rapid inexpensive mammalian screen for agents that lead to errors in the differentiation of spermatogenic stem cells in vivo and thus indicate agents which might prove to be mutagenic, teratogenic, or carcinogenic. Images PMID:1060122

  6. Clinical implications of chromosomal abnormalities in gastric adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chew-Wun; Chen, Gen-Der; Fann, Cathy S.-J.; Lee, Anna F.-Y.; Chi, Chin-Wen; Liu, Jacqueline M.; Weier, Ulli; Chen, Jeou-Yuan

    2003-06-23

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and has a very poor prognosis. Genetic imbalances in 62 primary gastric adenocarcinomas of various histopathologic types and pathologic stages and six gastric cancer-derived cell lines were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization, and the relationship of genomic abnormalities to clinical features in primary GC was evaluated at a genome-wide level. Eighty-four percent of the tumors and all six cell lines showed DNA copy number changes. The recurrent chromosomal abnormalities including gains at 15 regions and losses at 8 regions were identified. Statistical analyses revealed that gains at 17q24-qter (53 percent), 20q13-qter (48 percent), 1p32-p36 (42 percent), 22q12-qter (27 percent), 17p13-pter (24 percent), 16p13-pter (21 percent), 6p21-pter (19 percent), 20p12-pter (19 percent), 7p21-pter (18 percent), 3q28-qter (8 percent), and 13q13-q14 (8 percent), and losses at 18q12-qter (11 percent), 3p12 (8 percent), 3p25-pter (8 percent), 5q14-q23 (8 percent), and 9p21-p23 (5 percent), are associated with unique patient or tumor-related features. GCs of differing histopathologic features were shown to be associated with distinct patterns of genetic alterations, supporting the notion that they evolve through distinct genetic pathways. Metastatic tumors were also associated with specific genetic changes. These regions may harbor candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of this malignancy.

  7. Abnormalities occurring during female gametophyte development result in the diversity of abnormal embryo sacs and leads to abnormal fertilization in indica/japonica hybrids in rice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu-Xiang; Hu, Chao-Yue; Lu, Yong-Gen; Li, Jin-Quan; Liu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Embryo sac abortion is one of the major reasons for sterility in indica/japonica hybrids in rice. To clarify the causal mechanism of embryo sac abortion, we studied the female gametophyte development in two indica/japonica hybrids via an eosin B staining procedure for embryo sac scanning using confocal laser scanning microscope. Different types of abnormalities occurred during megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis were demonstrated. The earliest abnormality was observed in the megasporocyte. A lot of the chalazal-most megaspores were degenerated before the mono-nucleate embryo sac stage. Disordered positioning of nucleus and abnormal nucellus tissue were characteristics of the abnormal female gametes from the mono-nucleate to four-nucleate embryo sac stages. The abnormalities that occurred from the early stage of the eight-nucleate embryo sac development to the mature embryo sac stage were characterized by smaller sizes and wrinkled antipodals. Asynchronous nuclear migration, abnormal positioning of nucleus, and degeneration of egg apparatus were also found at the eight-nucleate embryo sac stage. The abnormalities that occurred during female gametophyte development resulted in five major types of abnormal embryo sacs. These abnormal embryo sacs led to abnormal fertilization. Hand pollination using normal pollens on the spikelets during anthesis showed that normal pollens could not exclude the effect of abnormal embryo sac on seed setting.

  8. Assessment of DNA replication in central nervous system by Laser Scanning Cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dominik; Mosch, Birgit; Bocsi, Jozsef; Arendt, Thomas; Tárnok, Attila

    2004-07-01

    μIn neurons of patients with Alzheimers's disease (AD) signs of cell cycle re-entry as well as polyploidy have been reported1, 2, indicating that the entire or a part of the genome of the neurons is duplicated before its death but mitosis is not initiated so that the cellular DNA content remains tetraploid. It was concluded, that this imbalance is the direct cause of the neuronal loss in AD3. Manual counting of polyploidal cells is possible but time consuming and possibly statistically insufficient. The aim of this study was to develop an automated method that detects the neuronal DNA content abnormalities with Laser Scanning Cytometry (LSC).Frozen sections of formalin-fixed brain tissue of AD patients and control subjects were labelled with anti-cyclin B and anti-NeuN antibodies. Immunolabelling was performed using Cy5- and Cy2-conjugated secondary antibodies and biotin streptavidin or tyramid signal amplification. In the end sections of 20m thickness were incubated with propidium iodide (PI) (50μg/ml) and covered on slides. For analysis by the LSC PI was used as trigger. Cells identified as neurons by NeuN expression were analyzed for cyclin B expression. Per specimen data of at least 10,000 neurons were acquired. In the frozen brain sections an automated quantification of the amount of nuclear DNA is possible with LSC. The DNA ploidy as well as the cell cycle distribution can be analyzed. A high number of neurons can be scanned and the duration of measuring is shorter than a manual examination. The amount of DNA is sufficiently represented by the PI fluorescence to be able to distinguish between eu- and polyploid neurons.

  9. Patenting DNA.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, Martin; Thomas, Sandy

    2002-12-01

    The protection of inventions based on human DNA sequences has been achieved mainly through application of the patent system. Over the past decade, there has been continuing debate about whether this use of intellectual property rights is acceptable. Companies and universities have been active during this period in filing thousands of patent applications. Although many have argued that to claim a DNA sequence in a patent is to claim a discovery, patent law allows discoveries that are useful to be claimed as part of an invention. As the technology to isolate DNA sequences has advanced, the criterion for inventiveness, necessary for any invention to be eligible for filing, has become more difficult to justify in the case of claims to DNA sequences. Moreover, the discovery that a gene is associated with a particular disease is, it is argued, to discover a fact about the world and undeserving of the status of an invention. Careful examination of the grounds for allowing the patenting of DNA sequences as research tools suggests such rewards will rarely be justified. The patenting of DNA sequences as chemical intermediates necessary for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins is, however, reasonable given that the information within the sequence is applied to produce a tangible substance which has application as a medicine. Despite the legal, technical and political complexities of applying the flexibilities with the current law, it is argued that much could be achieved in the area of patenting DNA by raising the thresholds for patentability.

  10. Flow cytometric measurement of total DNA and incorporated halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, Frank A.; Gray, Joe W.

    1986-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous flow cytometric measurement of the total DNA content and the level of DNA synthesis in normal and malignant cells is disclosed. The sensitivity of the method allows a study of cell cycle traverse rates for large scale cell populations as well as single cell measurements. A DNA stain such as propidium iodide is used as the probe for the measurement of total DNA content and a monoclonal antibody reactive with a DNA precursor such as bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) is used as a probe for the measurement of BrdU uptake by the cells as a measure of DNA synthesis.

  11. Mutations in TFAM, encoding mitochondrial transcription factor A, cause neonatal liver failure associated with mtDNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Ashlee R; Simon, Mariella T; Stover, Alexander; Eftekharian, Shaya; Khanlou, Negar; Wang, Hanlin L; Magaki, Shino; Lee, Hane; Partynski, Kate; Dorrani, Nagmeh; Chang, Richard; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Abdenur, Jose E

    2016-09-01

    In humans, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorders that arise as a consequence of defects in mtDNA replication or nucleotide synthesis. Clinical manifestations are variable and include myopathic, encephalomyopathic, neurogastrointestinal or hepatocerebral phenotypes. Through clinical exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense variant (c.533C>T; p.Pro178Leu) in mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) segregating in a consanguineous kindred of Colombian-Basque descent in which two siblings presented with IUGR, elevated transaminases, conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and hypoglycemia with progression to liver failure and death in early infancy. Results of the liver biopsy in the proband revealed cirrhosis, micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, cholestasis and mitochondrial pleomorphism. Electron microscopy of muscle revealed abnormal mitochondrial morphology and distribution while enzyme histochemistry was underwhelming. Electron transport chain testing in muscle showed increased citrate synthase activity suggesting mitochondrial proliferation, while respiratory chain activities were at the lower end of normal. mtDNA content was reduced in liver and muscle (11% and 21% of normal controls respectively). While Tfam mRNA expression was upregulated in primary fibroblasts, Tfam protein level was significantly reduced. Furthermore, functional investigations of the mitochondria revealed reduced basal respiration and spare respiratory capacity, decreased mtDNA copy number and markedly reduced nucleoids. TFAM is essential for transcription, replication and packaging of mtDNA into nucleoids. Tfam knockout mice display embryonic lethality secondary to severe mtDNA depletion. In this report, for the first time, we associate a homozygous variant in TFAM with a novel mtDNA depletion syndrome.

  12. DNA Damage Response Checkpoint Activation Drives KP1019 Dependent Pre-Anaphase Cell Cycle Delay in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bierle, Lindsey A.; Reich, Kira L.; Taylor, Braden E.; Blatt, Eliot B.; Middleton, Sydney M.; Burke, Shawnecca D.; Stultz, Laura K.; Hanson, Pamela K.; Partridge, Janet F.; Miller, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Careful regulation of the cell cycle is required for proper replication, cell division, and DNA repair. DNA damage–including that induced by many anticancer drugs–results in cell cycle delay or arrest, which can allow time for repair of DNA lesions. Although its molecular mechanism of action remains a matter of debate, the anticancer ruthenium complex KP1019 has been shown to bind DNA in biophysical assays and to damage DNA of colorectal and ovarian cancer cells in vitro. KP1019 has also been shown to induce mutations and induce cell cycle arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that budding yeast can serve as an appropriate model for characterizing the cellular response to the drug. Here we use a transcriptomic approach to verify that KP1019 induces the DNA damage response (DDR) and find that KP1019 dependent expression of HUG1 requires the Dun1 checkpoint; both consistent with KP1019 DDR in budding yeast. We observe a robust KP1019 dependent delay in cell cycle progression as measured by increase in large budded cells, 2C DNA content, and accumulation of Pds1 which functions to inhibit anaphase. Importantly, we also find that deletion of RAD9, a gene required for the DDR, blocks drug-dependent changes in cell cycle progression, thereby establishing a causal link between the DDR and phenotypes induced by KP1019. Interestingly, yeast treated with KP1019 not only delay in G2/M, but also exhibit abnormal nuclear position, wherein the nucleus spans the bud neck. This morphology correlates with short, misaligned spindles and is dependent on the dynein heavy chain gene DYN1. We find that KP1019 creates an environment where cells respond to DNA damage through nuclear (transcriptional changes) and cytoplasmic (motor protein activity) events. PMID:26375390

  13. DNA Damage Response Checkpoint Activation Drives KP1019 Dependent Pre-Anaphase Cell Cycle Delay in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bierle, Lindsey A; Reich, Kira L; Taylor, Braden E; Blatt, Eliot B; Middleton, Sydney M; Burke, Shawnecca D; Stultz, Laura K; Hanson, Pamela K; Partridge, Janet F; Miller, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Careful regulation of the cell cycle is required for proper replication, cell division, and DNA repair. DNA damage--including that induced by many anticancer drugs--results in cell cycle delay or arrest, which can allow time for repair of DNA lesions. Although its molecular mechanism of action remains a matter of debate, the anticancer ruthenium complex KP1019 has been shown to bind DNA in biophysical assays and to damage DNA of colorectal and ovarian cancer cells in vitro. KP1019 has also been shown to induce mutations and induce cell cycle arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that budding yeast can serve as an appropriate model for characterizing the cellular response to the drug. Here we use a transcriptomic approach to verify that KP1019 induces the DNA damage response (DDR) and find that KP1019 dependent expression of HUG1 requires the Dun1 checkpoint; both consistent with KP1019 DDR in budding yeast. We observe a robust KP1019 dependent delay in cell cycle progression as measured by increase in large budded cells, 2C DNA content, and accumulation of Pds1 which functions to inhibit anaphase. Importantly, we also find that deletion of RAD9, a gene required for the DDR, blocks drug-dependent changes in cell cycle progression, thereby establishing a causal link between the DDR and phenotypes induced by KP1019. Interestingly, yeast treated with KP1019 not only delay in G2/M, but also exhibit abnormal nuclear position, wherein the nucleus spans the bud neck. This morphology correlates with short, misaligned spindles and is dependent on the dynein heavy chain gene DYN1. We find that KP1019 creates an environment where cells respond to DNA damage through nuclear (transcriptional changes) and cytoplasmic (motor protein activity) events.

  14. Profiling DNA damage response following mitotic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    S. Pedersen, Ronni; Karemore, Gopal; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Rask, Maj-Britt; Neumann, Beate; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Pepperkok, Rainer; Ellenberg, Jan; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Lukas, Jiri; Lukas, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Genome integrity relies on precise coordination between DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Whereas replication stress attracted much attention, the consequences of mitotic perturbations for genome integrity are less understood. Here, we knockdown 47 validated mitotic regulators to show that a broad spectrum of mitotic errors correlates with increased DNA breakage in daughter cells. Unexpectedly, we find that only a subset of these correlations are functionally linked. We identify the genuine mitosis-born DNA damage events and sub-classify them according to penetrance of the observed phenotypes. To demonstrate the potential of this resource, we show that DNA breakage after cytokinesis failure is preceded by replication stress, which mounts during consecutive cell cycles and coincides with decreased proliferation. Together, our results provide a resource to gauge the magnitude and dynamics of DNA breakage associated with mitotic aberrations and suggest that replication stress might limit propagation of cells with abnormal karyotypes. PMID:27976684

  15. Down's Syndrome and Leukemia: Mechanism of Additional Chromosomal Abnormalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Goh, Kong-oo

    1978-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities, some appearing in a stepwise clonal evoluation, were found in five Down's syndrome patients (35 weeks to 12 years old), four with acute leukemia and one with abnormal regulation of leukopoiesis. (Author/SBH)

  16. Atlas of computed body tomography: normal and abnormal anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, L.C.; Schapiro, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    This atlas contains comparative sections on normal and abnormal computed tomography of the neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, upper and lower limbs, fascia, and peritoneum. Also included is a subject index to aid in the identification of abnormal scans. (DLS)

  17. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  18. Abnormal Hypermethylation at Imprinting Control Regions in Patients with S-Adenosylhomocysteine Hydrolase (AHCY) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Motzek, Antje; Knežević, Jelena; Switzeny, Olivier J.; Cooper, Alexis; Barić, Ivo; Beluzić, Robert; Strauss, Kevin A.; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Vugrek, Oliver; Zechner, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (AHCY) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in methionine metabolism caused by mutations in the AHCY gene. Main characteristics are psychomotor delay including delayed myelination and myopathy (hypotonia, absent tendon reflexes etc.) from birth, mostly associated with hypermethioninaemia, elevated serum creatine kinase levels and increased genome wide DNA methylation. The prime function of AHCY is to hydrolyse and efficiently remove S-adenosylhomocysteine, the by-product of transmethylation reactions and one of the most potent methyltransferase inhibitors. In this study, we set out to more specifically characterize DNA methylation changes in blood samples from patients with AHCY deficiency. Global DNA methylation was increased in two of three analysed patients. In addition, we analysed the DNA methylation levels at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of six imprinted genes (MEST, SNRPN, LIT1, H19, GTL2 and PEG3) as well as Alu and LINE1 repetitive elements in seven patients. Three patients showed a hypermethylation in up to five imprinted gene DMRs. Abnormal methylation in Alu and LINE1 repetitive elements was not observed. We conclude that DNA hypermethylation seems to be a frequent but not a constant feature associated with AHCY deficiency that affects different genomic regions to different degrees. Thus AHCY deficiency may represent an ideal model disease for studying the molecular origins and biological consequences of DNA hypermethylation due to impaired cellular methylation status. PMID:26974671

  19. Abnormal Hypermethylation at Imprinting Control Regions in Patients with S-Adenosylhomocysteine Hydrolase (AHCY) Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Motzek, Antje; Knežević, Jelena; Switzeny, Olivier J; Cooper, Alexis; Barić, Ivo; Beluzić, Robert; Strauss, Kevin A; Puffenberger, Erik G; Mudd, S Harvey; Vugrek, Oliver; Zechner, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (AHCY) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in methionine metabolism caused by mutations in the AHCY gene. Main characteristics are psychomotor delay including delayed myelination and myopathy (hypotonia, absent tendon reflexes etc.) from birth, mostly associated with hypermethioninaemia, elevated serum creatine kinase levels and increased genome wide DNA methylation. The prime function of AHCY is to hydrolyse and efficiently remove S-adenosylhomocysteine, the by-product of transmethylation reactions and one of the most potent methyltransferase inhibitors. In this study, we set out to more specifically characterize DNA methylation changes in blood samples from patients with AHCY deficiency. Global DNA methylation was increased in two of three analysed patients. In addition, we analysed the DNA methylation levels at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of six imprinted genes (MEST, SNRPN, LIT1, H19, GTL2 and PEG3) as well as Alu and LINE1 repetitive elements in seven patients. Three patients showed a hypermethylation in up to five imprinted gene DMRs. Abnormal methylation in Alu and LINE1 repetitive elements was not observed. We conclude that DNA hypermethylation seems to be a frequent but not a constant feature associated with AHCY deficiency that affects different genomic regions to different degrees. Thus AHCY deficiency may represent an ideal model disease for studying the molecular origins and biological consequences of DNA hypermethylation due to impaired cellular methylation status.

  20. Novel brain MRI abnormalities in Gitelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Norbash, Alexander; Vattoth, Surjith

    2015-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome is an autosomal recessive renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. The syndrome is caused by a defective thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride co-transporter in the distal convoluted tubules of the kidneys. Gitelman syndrome could be confused with Bartter syndrome; the main differentiating feature is the presence of low urinary calcium excretion in the former. Descriptions of neuroradiological imaging findings associated with Gitelman syndrome are very scarce in the literature and include basal ganglia calcification, idiopathic intracranial hypertension and sclerochoroidal calcification. Cauda equina syndrome-like presentation has been reported, but without any corresponding imaging findings on lumbar spine MRI. We report a 13-year-old male with Gitelman syndrome who presented with altered mental status following a fall and scalp laceration and unremarkable brain CT, followed during hospitalization by somnolence and seizures. Metabolically the patient demonstrated hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. MRI demonstrated features of encephalopathy including predominantly right-sided cerebral hemispheric signal abnormality and cytotoxic edema, with bilateral symmetric involvement of the thalami, midbrain tegmentum and tectum and cerebellar dentate nuclei. MRI after five months obtained during a later episode of encephalopathy showed resolution of the signal abnormalities with setting in of brain atrophy and also areas of newly developed cytotoxic edema in the left thalamus, bilateral dorsal midbrain and right greater than left dentate nuclei. The described abnormalities, either recurrent or in isolation, have not previously been published in patients with Gitelman syndrome. We believe that the findings are due to alteration of respiratory chain function secondary to the metabolic derangement and hence have a similar imaging appearance as encephalopathy related to mitochondrial cytopathy or

  1. Neurological abnormalities in young adults born preterm

    PubMed Central

    Allin, M; Rooney, M; Griffiths, T; Cuddy, M; Wyatt, J; Rifkin, L; Murray, R

    2006-01-01

    Objective Individuals born before 33 weeks' gestation (very preterm, VPT) have an increased likelihood of neurological abnormality, impaired cognitive function, and reduced academic performance in childhood. It is currently not known whether neurological signs detected in VPT children persist into adulthood or become attenuated by maturation of the CNS. Method We assessed 153 VPT individuals and 71 term‐born controls at 17–18 years old, using a comprehensive neurological examination. This examination divides neurological signs into primary and integrative domains, the former representing the localising signs of classical neurology, and the latter representing signs requiring integration between different neural networks or systems. Integrative signs are sub‐divided into three groups: sensory integration, motor confusion, and sequencing. The VPT individuals have been followed up since birth, and neonatal information is available on them, along with the results of neurological assessment at 4 and 8 years of age and neuropsychological assessment at 18 years of age. Results The total neurology score and primary and integrative scores were significantly increased in VPT young adults compared to term‐born controls. Within the integrative domain, sensory integration and motor confusion scores were significantly increased in the VPT group, but sequencing was not significantly different between the VPT and term groups. Integrative neurological abnormalities at 18 were strongly associated with reduced IQ but primary abnormalities were not. Conclusions Neurological signs are increased in VPT adults compared to term‐born controls, and are strongly associated with reduced neuropsychological function. PMID:16543529

  2. Structural Pituitary Abnormalities Associated With CHARGE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Louise C.; Gevers, Evelien F.; Baker, Joanne; Kasia, Tessa; Chong, Kling; Josifova, Dragana J.; Caimari, Maria; Bilan, Frederic; McCabe, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: CHARGE syndrome is a multisystem disorder that, in addition to Kallmann syndrome/isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, has been associated with anterior pituitary hypoplasia (APH). However, structural abnormalities such as an ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP) have not yet been described in such patients. Objective: The aims of the study were: 1) to describe the association between CHARGE syndrome and a structurally abnormal pituitary gland; and 2) to investigate whether CHD7 variants, which are identified in 65% of CHARGE patients, are common in septo-optic dysplasia /hypopituitarism. Methods: We describe 2 patients with features of CHARGE and EPP. CHD7 was sequenced in these and other patients with septo-optic dysplasia/hypopituitarism. Results: EPP, APH, and GH, TSH, and probable LH/FSH deficiency were present in 1 patient, and EPP and APH with GH, TSH, LH/FSH, and ACTH deficiency were present in another patient, both of whom had features of CHARGE syndrome. Both had variations in CHD7 that were novel and undetected in control cohorts or in the international database of CHARGE patients, but were also present in their unaffected mothers. No CHD7 variants were detected in the patients with septo-optic dysplasia/hypopituitarism without additional CHARGE features. Conclusion: We report a novel association between CHARGE syndrome and structural abnormalities of the pituitary gland in 2 patients with variations in CHD7 that are of unknown significance. However, CHD7 mutations are an uncommon cause of septo-optic dysplasia or hypopituitarism. Our data suggest the need for evaluation of pituitary function/anatomy in patients with CHARGE syndrome. PMID:23526466

  3. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia with associated platelet abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soslau, G; Brodsky, I

    1989-12-01

    A 62 year old male (R.H.) presented with a mild anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) and a history of multiple hemorrhagic episodes. The marrow had 40-50% sideroblasts. Marrow chromosomes were normal. His wife was hematologically normal, while one daughter, age 30 years, had a sideroblastic anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) with 40-50% sideroblasts in the marrow. Her anemia was first noted at age 15 years. Administration of vitamin B6 did not correct the anemia in either the father or daughter. Platelet abnormalities inherited jointly with this disorder are described for the first time. Both R.H. and his daughter had prolonged bleeding times, with normal PTT, PT times, fVIII:C, fVIII:Ag levels, and vWF multimers, which may rule out a von Willebrand's disease. They have normal platelet numbers but abnormally low platelet adhesiveness and greatly depressed ADP, collagen, and epinephrine responsiveness. Response to ristocetin was in the low normal range, and aggregation with thrombin was normal. While desmopressin completely normalized R.H.'s bleeding time, none of these platelet parameters were improved. No differences in the SDS PAGE protein patterns of RH platelets could be detected in comparison to normal samples. His platelets took up and released serotonin (5HT) normally, and electron micrographs defined no morphological abnormalities. However, no ATP was released from platelets activated with collagen, and when followed by thrombin about fourfold greater ATP was released by control platelets as compared to RH platelets. The dense granule fraction derived from RH platelets contained about 20% the level of ATP, 40% the level of ADP, and 50% the level of 5HT detected in a normal sample. The results indicate that the bleeding disorder is related to a non-classical heritable storage pool defect. The connection between the inherited sideroblastic anemia and platelet defects is obscure.

  4. [Abnormal daytime drowsiness--attempt at typology].

    PubMed

    Meier-Ewert, K

    1991-11-01

    Abnormal drowsiness during the day is defined on the basis of three criteria: 1. subjective feeling of increased tiredness, 2. objective observation of attacks of falling asleep, 3. detection of premature falling asleep in the multiple sleep latency test. About 3 to 4% of the population of modern industrial countries complain of this symptom which very quickly leads to inability to work in numerous occupations (driving instructors, lorry drivers, airline pilots). In many cases, the symptoms can be eliminated by effective methods of treatment. Early diagnosis and therapy is hence an important task of physicians. Clinically suitable tools and methods of measurement for appraising the phenomena are at present: 1. the multiple sleep latency test (Richardson et al., 1978), 2. the multiple staying awake test (Mitler et al., 1982), 3. the vigilance test according to Quatember and Maly from the Vienna test system. In neurophysiological terms, an attempt is made to differentiate between: REM drowsiness, non-REM drowsiness, hypofunction of the arousal systems of the reticular formation, and hyperfunction and overstimulation of the arousal systems of the reticular formation (over-aroused tiredness). Approaches to a clinical typology of abnormal drowsiness are available from two points of departure: 1. Forms of permanent somnolence which are not alleviated but intensified by a brief restorative sleep and resemble the 'oversleeping syndrome' of the healthy individual. 2. Attacks of imperative falling asleep in narcoleptic patients. The characteristic of this form of abnormal drowsiness during the day is that in the interval between the attacks of falling asleep patients can take on any healthy person with regard to alertness, reaction capacity and ready wit. After a brief restorative sleep of less than 5 min., they immediately feel fresh, alert and fit again.

  5. Chromosome abnormalities in primary ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yonescu, R.; Currie, J.; Griffin, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that are specific and recurrent may occur in regions of the genome that are involved in the conversion of normal cells to those with tumorigenic potential. Ovarian cancer is the primary cause of death among patients with gynecological malignancies. We have performed cytogenetic analysis of 16 ovarian tumors from women age 28-82. Three tumors of low malignant potential and three granulosa cell tumors had normal karyotypes. To look for the presence of trisomy 12, which has been suggested to be a common aberration in this group of tumors, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on direct preparations from three of these tumors using a probe for alpha satellite sequences of chromosome 12. In the 3 preparations, 92-98 percent of the cells contained two copies of chromosome 12, indicating that trisomy 12 is not a universal finding in low grade ovarian tumors. Endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary is histologically indistinguishable from endometial carcinoma of the uterus. We studied 10 endometrioid tumors to determine the degree of genetic similarity between these two carcinomas. Six out of ten endometrioid tumors showed a near-triploid modal number, and one presented with a tetraploid modal number. Eight of the ten contained structural chromosome abnormalities, of which the most frequent were 1p- (5 tumors), 19q+ (3 tumors), 6q- or ins(6) (4 tumors), 3q- or 3q+ (4 tumors). These cytogenetic results resemble those reported for papillary ovarian tumors and differ from those of endometrial carcinoma of the uterus. We conclude that despite the histologic similarities between the endometrioid and endometrial carcinomas, the genetic abnormalities in the genesis of these tumors differ significantly.

  6. Pea amyloplast DNA is qualitatively similar to pea chloroplast DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaynor, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloplast DNA (apDNA), when subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases, yields patterns nearly identical to that of DNA from mature pea chloroplasts (ctDNA). Southern transfers of apDNA and ctDNA, probed with the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), shows hybridization to the expected restriction fragments for both apDNA and ctDNA. However, Northern transfers of total RNA from chloroplasts and amyloplasts, probed again with the LS gene of Rubisco, shows that no detectable LS meggage is found in amyloplasts although LS expression in mature chloroplasts is high. Likewise, two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of etiolated gravisensitive pea tissue shows that both large and small subunits of Rubisco are conspicuously absent; however, in greening tissue these two constitute the major soluble proteins. These findings suggest that although the informational content of these two organelle types is equivalent, gene expression is quite different and is presumably under nuclear control.

  7. Unusual and abnormal canine estrous cycles.

    PubMed

    Meyers-Wallen, V N

    2007-12-01

    Preovulatory serum progesterone concentrations are used to estimate the day of LH peak (day 0), not only to accurately time insemination and predict parturition, but to identify abnormal or unusual estrous cycles due to ovarian dysfunction. Early identification of these disorders is of therapeutic and economic importance. This review discusses anovulation, slow preovulatory progesterone rise, "split heat", insufficient luteal phase, and persistent estrus in the bitch. Some of these were temporary dysfunctions; with appropriate breeding management, pregnancy can be achieved. However, in other cases, these were signs of severe, permanent ovarian dysfunction associated with infertility, with potentially lethal sequelae.

  8. Cranial computed tomographic abnormalities in leptomeningeal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Glass, J.P.; Geoffray, A.; Wallace, S.

    1984-11-01

    Sixty-four (57.6%) of 111 cancer patients with cerebrospinal fluid cytology positive for malignant cells had cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans within 2 weeks before or after a lumbar puncture. Twenty-two (34.3%) of the 64 had abnormal CT findings indicative of leptomeningeal metastasis. Thirteen (59.6%) of these 22 patients had associated parenchymal metastases. Recognition of leptomeningeal disease may alter the management of patients with parenchymal metastases. Communicating hydrocephalus in cancer patients should be considered to be related to leptomeningeal metastasis until proven otherwise.

  9. Two types of abnormal genes for plasminogen in families with a predisposition for thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ichinose, Akitada; Espling, E.S.; Petersen, T.E.; Davie, E.W. ); Takamatsu, Junki; Saito, Hidehiko ); Shinmyozu, Koichi; Maruyama, Ikuro )

    1991-01-01

    The gene coding for plasminogen has been compared with several abnormal genes from Japanese patients by the polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequence analysis. Two types of abnormal genes coding for plasminogen were identified in these patients. In the type I mutation, a guanosine in GCT coding for Ala-601 near the active-site histidine was replaced by an adenosine resulting in ACT coding for threonine. This mutation was also shown by the loss of a cleavage site for Fnu4HI endonuclease, a restriction enzyme that recognizes GCTGC but not ACTGC. In the type II mutation, a guanosine in GTC coding for Val-355 was replaced by a thymidine resulting in TTC coding for phenylalanine. This change was readily shown by digestion with Ava II endonuclease, a restriction enzyme that recognized GGTCC and not GTTCC. The type I mutation has been found to be identical to a plasminogen variant identified in Japanese patients by amino acid sequence analysis and also detected by isoelectric focusing, whereas the type II mutation is a unique amino acid substitution in the connecting region between the third and fourth kringles in plasminogen. DNA sequence analysis also revealed that the abnormal genes carry several silent nucleotide substitutions located primarily within introns and 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking regions.

  10. DNA adductomics.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  11. Genetic abnormality of the visual pathways in a "white" tiger.

    PubMed

    Guillery, R W; Kaas, J H

    1973-06-22

    "White"tigers show an inherited reduction of pigment, produced by an autosomal recessive gene. The brain of one of these tigers shows an abnormality of the visual pathways similar to abnormalities that are associated with albinism in many other mammals. There is a close relationship between the reduced pigment formation, the pathway abnormality, and strabismus.

  12. Abnormal Behavior in Relation to Cage Size in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulk, H. H.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of cage size on stereotyped and normal locomotion and on other abnormal behaviors in singly caged animals, whether observed abnormal behaviors tend to co-occur, and if the development of an abnormal behavior repertoire leads to reduction in the number of normal behavior categories. (Author/RK)

  13. Large nuclear vacuoles are indicative of abnormal chromatin packaging in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Franco, J G; Mauri, A L; Petersen, C G; Massaro, F C; Silva, L F I; Felipe, V; Cavagna, M; Pontes, A; Baruffi, R L R; Oliveira, J B A; Vagnini, L D

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the presence of abnormal sperm chromatin packaging in spermatozoa with large nuclear vacuoles (LNV) selected via high magnification by analysing the pattern of chromomycin A3 (CMA3) staining. A prospective observational study was designed to analyse semen samples obtained from 66 men undergoing infertility diagnosis and treatment. The numbers of cells with normal (dull yellow staining of the sperm head/CMA3-negative) and abnormal (bright yellow fluorescence of the sperm head/CMA3-positive) chromatin packaging were determined on slides with normal and LNV spermatozoa. The presence of bright yellow fluorescence (CMA3-positive) was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in spermatozoa with LNV than in normal spermatozoa (719/1351; 53.2% vs. 337/835; 40.3%, respectively), reflecting a higher percentage of abnormal chromatin packaging in spermatozoa with large LNV. Our data support the hypothesis that the presence of LNV reflects the presence of abnormal chromatin packaging, which may facilitate sperm DNA damage. As sperm nuclear vacuoles are evaluated more precisely at high magnifications using motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME), the present results support the use of high-magnification sperm selection for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

  14. Bisphenol A exposure at an environmentally relevant dose induces meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Shangcheng; Li, Renyan; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Wu, Hongjuan; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Whether environmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) may induce reproductive disorders is still controversial but certain studies have reported that BPA may cause meiotic abnormalities in C. elegans and female mice. However, little is known about the effect of BPA on meiosis in adult males. To determine whether BPA exposure at an environmentally relevant dose could induce meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats, we exposed 9-week-old male Wistar rats to BPA by gavage at 20 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 60 consecutive days. We found that BPA significantly increased the proportion of stage VII seminiferous epithelium and decreased the proportion of stage VIII. Consequently, spermiation was inhibited and spermatogenesis was disrupted. Further investigation revealed that BPA exposure delayed meiosis initiation in the early meiotic stage and induced the accumulation of chromosomal abnormalities and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the late meiotic stage. The latter event subsequently activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (ATM). Our results suggest that long-term exposure to BPA may lead to continuous meiotic abnormalities and ultimately put mammalian reproductive health at risk.

  15. Autophagy in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Czarny, Piotr; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Bialkowska-Warzecha, Jolanta; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2015-01-23

    DNA damage response (DDR) involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2-Atg13-FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADP)ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1), Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  16. Chemotactic properties of Escherichia coli mutants having abnormal Ca2+ content.

    PubMed Central

    Tisa, L S; Adler, J

    1995-01-01

    The calA, calC, and calD mutants of Escherichia coli are known to be sensitive to Ca2+ (R. N. Brey and B. P. Rosen, J. Bacteriol. 139:824-834, 1979). In the absence of any added stimuli for chemotaxis, both the calC and the calD mutants swam with a tumbly bias. Both the calC and the calD mutants were defective in chemotaxis as measured by computer analysis, use of swarm plates, and capillary assays. The calA mutant was only slightly defective in motility and only slightly impaired in chemotaxis. Chemotactically wild-type cells had an intra-cellular free-Ca2+ level of about 105 nM. The intracellular free-Ca2+ levels of the mutants, as determined by use of the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye fura-2 or fluo-3, were about 90, about 1,130, and about 410 nM for calA, calC, and calD, respectively. Lowering the intracellular free-Ca2+ levels in wild-type cells and in the tumbly cal mutants by use of Ca2+ chelators promoted running (smooth swimming). Overexpression of CheZ (which causes dephosphorylation of CheY-phosphate) in the wild type and in the tumbly cal mutants decreased the level of tumbliness (which is caused by CheY-phosphate). The calA mutant was 4- to 10-fold more resistant than the wild type to the inhibitory effect of omega-conotoxin on chemotaxis. omega-Conotoxin had no effect on Ca2+ extrusion by wild-type E. coli; that result suggests that omega-conotoxin affects Ca2+ transport at the point of entry instead of exit. PMID:8522517

  17. Lipid abnormalities in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Erum, Uzma; Ahsan, Tasnim; Khowaja, Danish

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of dyslipidemia in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Methods: This is a prospective, cross-sectional, observational study, conducted at the ‘Rheumatology Clinic’ of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center (JPMC), Karachi, from November 2013 to May 2014. A total of 200 patients of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), diagnosed according to the ACR/EULAR criteria 2010, were included in the study. Laboratory investigations including creatinine, ALT, CBC, TSH and fasting lipid profile (LDL, HDL, and Total cholesterol) were done for all patients. Results: Out of 200 patients, 23 (11.5%) were male and 177 (88.5%) were female. The mean age was 36.31±10.46 years and the mean duration of disease was 3.82±3.03 years. A total of 107 (53.5%) patients had dyslipidemia, and the commonest abnormality was a low HDL, seen in 83 (41.5 %) patients. Conclusion: Dyslipidemia was frequently observed in Rheumatoid Arthritis. This may be considered as a secondary impact of chronic inflammatory state, seen in RA. Lipid abnormalities should be sought at regular intervals, and corrective actions taken to mitigate increased cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:28367205

  18. Acquired and congenital coronary artery abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Young, Ming-Lon; McLeary, Michael; Chan, Kak-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Sudden unexpected cardiac deaths in approximately 20% of young athletes are due to acquired or congenital coronary artery abnormalities. Kawasaki disease is the leading cause for acquired coronary artery abnormalities, which can cause late coronary artery sequelae including aneurysms, stenosis, and thrombosis, leading to myocardial ischaemia and ventricular fibrillation. Patients with anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery can develop adequate collateral circulation from the right coronary artery in the newborn period, which remains asymptomatic only to manifest in adulthood with myocardial ischaemia, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death. Anomalous origin of coronary artery from the opposite sinus occurs in 0.7% of the young general population aged between 11 and 15 years. If the anomalous coronary artery courses between the pulmonary artery and the aorta, sudden cardiac death may occur during or shortly after vigorous exercise, especially in patients where the anomalous left coronary artery originates from the right sinus of Valsalva. Symptomatic patients with evidence of ischaemia should have surgical correction. No treatment is needed for asymptomatic patients with an anomalous right coronary artery from the left sinus of Valsalva. At present, there is no consensus regarding how to manage asymptomatic patients with anomalous left coronary artery from the right sinus of Valsalva and interarterial course. Myocardial bridging is commonly observed in cardiac catheterisation and it rarely causes exercise-induced coronary syndrome or cardiac death. In symptomatic patients, refractory or β-blocker treatment and surgical un-bridging may be considered.

  19. Klinefelter syndrome: cardiovascular abnormalities and metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Calogero, A E; Giagulli, V A; Mongioì, L M; Triggiani, V; Radicioni, A F; Jannini, E A; Pasquali, D

    2017-03-03

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is one of the most common genetic causes of male infertility. This condition is associated with much comorbidity and with a lower life expectancy. The aim of this review is to explore more in depth cardiovascular and metabolic disorders associated to KS. KS patients have an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease (standardized mortality ratio, SMR, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.6-3.0), but it is not clear whether the cause of the death is of thrombotic or hemorrhagic nature. Cardiovascular congenital anomalies (SMR, 7.3; 95% CI, 2.4-17.1) and the development of thrombosis or leg ulcers (SMR, 7.9; 95% CI, 2.9-17.2) are also more frequent in these subjects. Moreover, cardiovascular abnormalities may be at least partially reversed by testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). KS patients have also an increased probability of endocrine and/or metabolic disease, especially obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The effects of TRT on these abnormalities are not entirely clear.

  20. Control of Abnormal Synchronization in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    In the nervous system, synchronization processes play an important role, e.g., in the context of information processing and motor control. However, pathological, excessive synchronization may strongly impair brain function and is a hallmark of several neurological disorders. This focused review addresses the question of how an abnormal neuronal synchronization can specifically be counteracted by invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation as, for instance, by deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, or by acoustic stimulation for the treatment of tinnitus. On the example of coordinated reset (CR) neuromodulation, we illustrate how insights into the dynamics of complex systems contribute to successful model-based approaches, which use methods from synergetics, non-linear dynamics, and statistical physics, for the development of novel therapies for normalization of brain function and synaptic connectivity. Based on the intrinsic multistability of the neuronal populations induced by spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), CR neuromodulation utilizes the mutual interdependence between synaptic connectivity and dynamics of the neuronal networks in order to restore more physiological patterns of connectivity via desynchronization of neuronal activity. The very goal is to shift the neuronal population by stimulation from an abnormally coupled and synchronized state to a desynchronized regime with normalized synaptic connectivity, which significantly outlasts the stimulation cessation, so that long-lasting therapeutic effects can be achieved. PMID:25566174

  1. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trong-Nguyen; Huynh, Huu-Hung; Meunier, Jean

    2016-10-26

    Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton) in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%.

  2. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trong-Nguyen; Huynh, Huu-Hung; Meunier, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton) in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%. PMID:27792181

  3. Abnormal mandibular growth and the condylar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Peltomäki, Timo; Müller, Lukas; Luder, Hans U

    2009-02-01

    Deviations in the growth of the mandibular condyle can affect both the functional occlusion and the aesthetic appearance of the face. The reasons for these growth deviations are numerous and often entail complex sequences of malfunction at the cellular level. The aim of this review is to summarize recent progress in the understanding of pathological alterations occurring during childhood and adolescence that affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and, hence, result in disorders of mandibular growth. Pathological conditions taken into account are subdivided into (1) congenital malformations with associated growth disorders, (2) primary growth disorders, and (3) acquired diseases or trauma with associated growth disorders. Among the congenital malformations, hemifacial microsomia (HFM) appears to be the principal syndrome entailing severe growth disturbances, whereas growth abnormalities occurring in conjunction with other craniofacial dysplasias seem far less prominent than could be anticipated based on their often disfiguring nature. Hemimandibular hyperplasia and elongation undoubtedly constitute the most obscure conditions that are associated with prominent, often unilateral, abnormalities of condylar, and mandibular growth. Finally, disturbances of mandibular growth as a result of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and condylar fractures seem to be direct consequences of inflammatory and/or mechanical damage to the condylar cartilage.

  4. Abnormal appearances: inspection, display and the clinic.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, Katie; Atkinson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We provide an examination of the field of dysmorphology, a clinical speciality that in its current form combines a long history of inspection and display with the identification and representation of associated underlying molecular changes. The recognition and description of abnormal appearances is thus increasingly accompanied by genetic and other molecular investigations. Our analysis draws on our long-term ethnographic engagement with a UK clinical genetics service and the work of two clinical genetics teams within a regional teaching hospital. We document the intersection of genetic science with clinical work to suggest that while molecular testing often identifies the genetic basis for unusual appearances and abnormal development, it does not fully supplant clinical apperception and interpretation. The two modes of knowledge--the clinical and the biomedical--co-exist in the work and the discourse of dysmorphology practice. The contemporary dysmorphology clinic thus encapsulates the epistemological systems of modern medicine, grounded in the clinical gaze and on the classificatory systems of classic nosology. Within such a system of clinical knowledge, the 'monstrous' does not escape the boundaries of knowledge. Monstrous appearances are accommodated and domesticated within the classificatory systems of normal medicine.

  5. Native fluorescence characterization of human liver abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Madhuri, S.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Suchitra, S.; Srinivasan, T. G.

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules has been extensively used in biology and medicine for the past several decades. In the present study, we report the native fluorescence characteristics of blood plasma from normal human subjects and patients with different liver abnormalities such as hepatitis, leptospirosis, jaundice, cirrhosis and liver cell failure. Native fluorescence spectra of blood plasma -- acetone extract were measured at 405 nm excitation. The average spectrum of normal blood plasma has a prominent emission peak around 464 nm whereas in the case of liver diseased subjects, the primary peak is red shifted with respect to normal. In addition, liver diseased cases show distinct secondary emission peak around 615 nm, which may be attributed to the presence of endogenous porphyrins. The red shift of the prominent emission peak with respect to normal is found to be maximum for hepatitis and minimum for cirrhosis whereas the secondary emission peak around 615 nm was found to be more prominent in the case of cirrhosis than the rest. The ratio parameter I465/I615 is found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.001) in discriminating liver abnormalities from normal.

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with cyclopia and synophthalmia.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, R O

    1977-01-01

    At the present time, essentially all known facts concerning cyclopia are consistent with some chromosomal disease, including clinical features of the pregnancy (fetal wastage, prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, maternal age factor, complications of pregnancy), the generalized developmental abnormalities, specific ocular dysgenesis, by the high incidence of chromosomal abnormality already demonstrated, and the possibility of error in those cases of cyclopia with normal chromosomes. Even if chromosomal aberrations represent only one group of several different etiologic factors leading to cyclopia, at the present time chromosomal errors would seem to be the most common cause of cyclopia now recognized. Further studies will establish or disprove a chromosomal error in those instances which are now considered to be the result of an environmental factor alone or those with apparent familial patterns of inheritance. This apparent diverse origin of cyclopia can be clarified if future cyclopic specimens are carefully investigated. The evaluation should include a careful gross and microscopic examination of all organs, including the eye, and chromosome banding studies of all organs, including the eye, and chromosome banding studies of at least two cyclopic tissues. Then the presence or absence of multiple causative factors can be better evaluated. Images FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 1 D FIGURE 1 E FIGURE 1 F FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 4 C FIGURE 4 D FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B PMID:418547

  7. Protruding labia minora: abnormal or just uncool?

    PubMed

    Michala, Lina; Koliantzaki, Sofia; Antsaklis, Aris

    2011-09-01

    There is a wide variety in the appearance of normal female external genitalia. Nevertheless a specific prototype is promoted by the media, leading to a false sense that all other appearances are abnormal. As adolescents become sexually aware at an earlier age, most of them are worried about the appearance of their genitalia, especially when labia minora protrude beyond labia majora. This is a prospective audit of adolescents presenting for assessment of their perceived abnormal genitalia. Sixteen girls aged 10.2 to 17.8 years presented between June 2009 and December 2010 to a specialist adolescent gynecology service. Their mean labial width was 36 mm (range: 20-55 mm). In six girls, the reason for attending the service was inequality of the size of labia ranging between 6 mm and 35 mm (mean of 20 mm). Among the remaining 10 girls, the concern had arisen through comparison with a prepubescent sibling (one case), change of genitalia during puberty (four cases), looking at internet pictures (four cases), and looking at an anatomy book (one case). Risks of Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery (FGCS) have not been adequately documented, especially with regards to sexual function and long-term patient satisfaction. External genitalia are likely to change during puberty and therefore, any genital operation in the absence of clear pathology should be deferred until adulthood. Even then, women should have clear expectations of what will be achieved with the operation in terms of appearance and function.

  8. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  9. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  10. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  11. Abnormal methylation pattern in constitutive and facultative heterochromatin of ICF patients

    SciTech Connect

    Miniou, P.; Blanquet, V.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.

    1994-09-01

    ICF syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by variable immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial abnormalities. Stretchings and frequent associations of centromeric or juxtacentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 1 and 16 principally, and to a lesser degree, chromosome 9 mimic chromosome features of normal PHA-stimulated lymphocytes treated with 5-azacytidine, an inducer of demethylation. In fact, in these patients we have detected by DNA digestion with methyl-sensitive enzymes a hypomethylation of classical satellites 2 and 3, located in heterochromatin. To assess the role of other satellite DNA in the heterochromatin modifications and chromosome rearrangements, in situ fluorescent method using 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) monoclonal antibody on chromosomes and nuclei were performed in parallel with Southern blot analysis of other satellite sequences located in heterochromatin. 5-MeC reveals that constitutive and facultative heterochromatin (X inactive chromosome) are hypomethylated. Alpha satellite sequences corresponding to centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 9, 16, 18 and X are mostly methylated in patients G and R, and are undermethylated in patient S. Both molecular and cytogenetic analysis are in agreement. By in situ hybridization, breakpoints of rearranged chromosomes were located in stretched and hypomethylated classical satellites. In euchromatin, 5-MeC antibodies reveal an R-like banding pattern indicating an unequal distribution of DNA methylation, disclosing another aspect of chromosome organization. The underlying hypomethylation, associated with an abnormal chromatin structure, may predispose to chromosome instability.

  12. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of limb abnormalities: role of fetal ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ermito, Santina; Dinatale, Angela; Carrara, Sabina; Cavaliere, Alessandro; Imbruglia, Laura; Recupero, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Fetal ultrasonografy is the most important tool to provide prenatal diagnosis of fetal anomalies. The detection of limb abnormalities may be a complex problem if the correct diagnostic approch is not established. A careful description of the abnormality using the rigth nomenclature is the first step. Looking for other associated abnormalities is the threshold to suspect chromosomal abnormalities or single gene disorder. According to the patogenic point of view, limb abnormalities may be the result of malformation, deformation, or disruption. The prenatal diagnosis and the management of limb abnormalities involve a multidisciplinary team of ostetrician, radiologist/sonologist, clinical geneticist, neonatologist, and orthopedic surgeons to provide the parents with the information regarding etiology of the disorder, prognosis, option related to the pregnancy and recurrence risk for future pregnancies. The aim of this review is to describe the importance of detailed fetal ultrasonography in prenatal diagnosis of limb abnormalities. PMID:22439035

  14. Abnormal selective attention normalizes P3 amplitudes in PDD.

    PubMed

    Hoeksma, Marco R; Kemner, Chantal; Kenemans, J Leon; van Engeland, Herman

    2006-07-01

    This paper studied whether abnormal P3 amplitudes in PDD are a corollary of abnormalities in ERP components related to selective attention in visual and auditory tasks. Furthermore, this study sought to clarify possible age differences in such abnormalities. Children with PDD showed smaller P3 amplitudes than controls, but no abnormalities in selective attention. Adolescents with PDD showed abnormal selective attention, as reflected by larger auditory Processing Negativity (PN) and visual N2b, but no P3 abnormalities. Dipole localizations revealed that the locations of PN generators in subjects with PDD differed from controls. It was concluded that the abnormalities in selective attention in adolescents with PDD have a normalizing effect on P3, and possibly act as a compensatory process.

  15. Kidney abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    López Revuelta, K; Ricard Andrés, M P

    2011-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease exhibits numerous kidney structural and functional abnormalities, changes that are seen along the entire length of the nephron. Changes are most marked in patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia, but are also seen in those with compound heterozygous states and the sickle cell trait. The renal features of sickle cell disease include some of the most common reasons for referral to nephrologists, such as hematuria, proteinuria, tubular disturbances and chronic kidney disease. Therapy of these conditions requires specialized knowledge of their distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Spanish Haemathology and Hemotherapy Association has recently publicated their Clinical Practice Guidelines of SCD management. Renal chapter is reproduced in this article for Nefrología difussion.

  16. Cardiac abnormalities and sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sweeting, Joanna; Semsarian, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Many factors have been implicated in SIDS cases including environmental influences such as sleeping arrangements and smoking. Most recently, cardiac abnormalities have been hypothesised to play a role in some cases, particularly the primary genetic arrhythmogenic disorders such as familial long QT syndrome (LQTS). Both post-mortem and clinical studies of SIDS cases have provided supporting evidence for the involvement of cardiac genetic disorders in SIDS. This review provides a summary of this evidence focussing particularly on the primary hypothesis related to underlying familial LQTS. In addition, the current literature relating to other cardiac genetic conditions such as Brugada syndrome (BrS) and structural heart diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is briefly presented. Finally, the implications of a possible cardiac genetic cause of SIDS is discussed with reference to the need for genetic testing in SIDS cases and subsequent clinical and genetic testing in family members.

  17. Liver abnormalities in drug and substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Pateria, Puraskar; de Boer, Bastiaan; MacQuillan, Gerry

    2013-08-01

    Drug and substance abuse remains a major medical problem. Alcohol use, abuse and dependence are highly prevalent conditions. Alcohol related liver disease can present as simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis or liver cirrhosis. Paracetamol hepatotoxicity secondary to accidental or deliberate overdose is another common problem. While the adverse cardiovascular, neurological, renal and psychiatric consequences of various illicit substance abuses are widely studied and publicized, less attention has been directed towards possible hepatotoxic effects. Illicit drug abuse can cause a range of liver abnormalities ranging from asymptomatic derangement of liver function tests to fulminant hepatic failure. This article reviews the epidemiology, risk factors, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, investigations, management and prognostic factors of alcohol related liver disease and paracetamol hepatotoxicity as well as the current knowledge pertaining to hepatotoxicity of the more commonly used illicit substances including cannabis, amphetamine type stimulants, cocaine, khat chewing and complementary and alternate medicine.

  18. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Levitt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and in defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.

  19. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension and BMP system abnormality].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Fumio

    2008-11-01

    Genetic analysis has uncovered that familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is linked to germline mutations in BMP type II receptor (BMPRII). PAH is characterized by enhanced remodeling of pulmonary arteries due to arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation. BMPRII mutations contribute to abnormal mitotic responses to BMP ligands in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Unbalanced Smad signaling induced by BMP and TGFbeta is functionally involved in the pathogenesis of PAH. BMPRII mutations also increase the susceptibility of endothelial cell apoptosis. The combination of increased endothelial injury and impaired suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation is critical for the cellular pathogenesis of PAH. However, the detailed molecular mechanism leading to severe vascular remodeling caused by BMPRII mutations has yet to be elucidated.

  20. [Ultrasonic diagnosis of congenital uterine abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Funk, A; Fendel, H

    1988-01-01

    1-2% of women has abnormal uterine development due to nonunification of the Müllerian ducts in the embryonal period. At the RWTH Aachen, in the department of gynaecology and obstetrics, between January and June 1987, we had searched systematically for maldevelopment of the uterus in 2299 echosonografies. In 13 cases we found maldevelopment of internal genital; 5 of these cases were diagnosed by an echosonografic routine-examination. The echografic criteria of the different grades of uterine malformations have been determined, systematized and discussed in relation to the symptoms. The most frequent malformations as uterus subseptus, uterus septus, uterus bicornis and uterus duplex are subject of a detailed discussion. This work demonstrates that echosonografic is a very efficient instrument to diagnose uterine malformations and gives us a very exact anatomic interpretation of malformations.

  1. DNA repair capacity of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Raquel

    2007-08-14

    Damage to the genome is unavoidable in living creatures, because of sunlight exposure as well as environmental chemicals present in food and drinking water. There is a need to monitor and purify the drinking water; therefore, several methods of detection have been developed. A very promising model system for this purpose is the zebrafish (Danio rerio), which is endowed with special qualities for detecting external as well as internal abnormalities. Grossman and Wei's assay [Grossman L, Wei Q (1995) Clin Chem 12:1854-1863], which measures the expression level of a nonreplicating recombinant plasmid DNA containing a UV-damaged luciferase reporter gene, shows that zebrafish can repair chromosomal lesions to a much greater extent than the human population. This vertebrate model is still very promising after possible down-regulation of the DNA repair enzymes.

  2. Renal abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ataga, K I; Orringer, E P

    2000-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia and the related hemoglobinopathies are associated with a large spectrum of renal abnormalities. The patients have impaired urinary concentrating ability, defects in urinary acidification and potassium excretion, and supranormal proximal tubular function. The latter is manifest by increased secretion of creatinine and by reabsorption of phosphorus and beta(2)-microglobulin. Young patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have supranormal renal hemodynamics with elevations in both effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These parameters decrease with age as well as following the administration of prostaglandin inhibitors. Proteinuria, a common finding in adults with sickle cell disease, may progress to the nephrotic syndrome. Proteinuria, hypertension, and increasing anemia predict end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While ESRD can be managed by dialysis and/or renal transplantation, there may be an increased rate of complications in renal transplant recipients with SCD. Hematuria is seen in individuals with all of the SCDs as well as with sickle cell trait. In most cases the etiology of the hematuria turns out to be benign. However, there does appear to be an increased association between SCD and renal medullary carcinoma. Therefore, those SCD patients who present with hematuria should initially undergo a thorough evaluation in order to exclude this aggressive neoplasm. Papillary necrosis may occur due to medullary ischemia and infarction. Erythropoietin levels are usually lower than expected for their degree of anemia and decrease further as renal function deteriorates. An abnormal balance of renal prostaglandins may be responsible for some of the changes in sickle cell nephropathy. Acute renal failure is a component of the acute multiorgan failure syndrome (MOFS). Finally, progression of sickle cell nephropathy to ESRD may be slowed by adequate control of hypertension and proteinuria. However, the prevention of the

  3. Abnormal Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Kumar, Priyanka; Ghasia, Fatema F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fixational saccades shift the foveal image to counteract visual fading related to neural adaptation. Drifts are slow eye movements between two adjacent fixational saccades. We quantified fixational saccades and asked whether their changes could be attributed to pathologic drifts seen in amblyopia, one of the most common causes of blindness in childhood. Methods Thirty-six pediatric subjects with varying severity of amblyopia and eleven healthy age-matched controls held their gaze on a visual target. Eye movements were measured with high-resolution video-oculography during fellow eye-viewing and amblyopic eye-viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and drifts were analyzed in the amblyopic and fellow eye and compared with controls. Results We found an increase in the amplitude with decreased frequency of fixational saccades in children with amblyopia. These alterations in fixational eye movements correlated with the severity of their amblyopia. There was also an increase in eye position variance during drifts in amblyopes. There was no correlation between the eye position variance or the eye velocity during ocular drifts and the amplitude of subsequent fixational saccade. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in fixational saccades in amblyopia are independent of the ocular drift. Discussion This investigation of amblyopia in pediatric age group quantitatively characterizes the fixation instability. Impaired properties of fixational saccades could be the consequence of abnormal processing and reorganization of the visual system in amblyopia. Paucity in the visual feedback during amblyopic eye-viewing condition can attribute to the increased eye position variance and drift velocity. PMID:26930079

  4. Carotid Vascular Abnormalities in Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M. D.; Fleischer, J.; Rundek, T.; McMahon, D. J.; Homma, S.; Sacco, R.; Silverberg, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Data on the presence, extent, and reversibility of cardiovascular disease in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) are conflicting. Objective: This study evaluated carotid structure and function in PHPT patients compared with population-based controls. Design: This is a case-control study. Setting: The study was conducted in a university hospital metabolic bone disease unit. Participants: Forty-nine men and women with PHPT and 991 controls without PHPT were studied. Outcome Measures: We measured carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaque presence and thickness, and carotid stiffness, strain, and distensibility. Results: IMT, carotid plaque thickness, carotid stiffness, and distensibility were abnormal in PHPT patients, and IMT was higher in patients than controls (0.959 vs. 0.907 mm, P < 0.0001). In PHPT, PTH levels, but not calcium concentration, predicted carotid stiffness (P = 0.04), strain (P = 0.06), and distensibility (P = 0.07). Patients with increased carotid stiffness had significantly higher PTH levels than did those with normal stiffness (141 ± 48 vs. 94.9 ± 44 pg/ml, P = 0.002), and odds of abnormal stiffness increased 1.91 (confidence interval = 1.09–3.35; P = 0.024) for every 10 pg/ml increase in PTH, adjusted for age, creatinine, and albumin-corrected calcium. Conclusions: Mild PHPT is associated with subclinical carotid vascular manifestations. IMT, a predictor of cardiovascular outcomes, is increased. Measures of carotid stiffness are associated with extent of PTH elevation, suggesting that those with more severe PHPT may have impaired vascular compliance and that PTH, rather than calcium, is the mediator. PMID:19755478

  5. DNA methylation by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea: methylation pattern changes in single- and double-stranded DNA, and in DNA with mismatched or bulged guanines.

    PubMed Central

    Wurdeman, R L; Douskey, M C; Gold, B

    1993-01-01

    The detection of abnormal DNA base pairing arrangements and conformations is chemically probed in synthetic 32P-end-labeled deoxyribonucleotide oligomers using N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and 2,12,-dimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetraazabicyclo-[11.3.1]heptadeca-1 -[17],2,11,13,15 pentaene-Ni (II) (Ni-complex) with KHSO5. The DNA targets studied are single-stranded (s-s) DNA, double-stranded (d-s) DNA, d-s DNA with G-G, G-A and G-T mismatches, d-s DNA with a single bulged G and d-s DNA with two bulged G's. The effect of the non-Watson--Crick structures on the formation of N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG) by MNU and the oxidation of G by Ni-complex is reported along with the Tm's and circular dichroism spectra of the different duplex oligomers. The results for MNU and Ni-complex show that the qualitative and quantitative character of the cleavage patterns at a G3 run change with the nature of the abnormal base pairing motif. Based on the DNA substrates studied, the results indicate that a combination of reagents which report electronic and steric perturbations can be a useful approach to monitor DNA mismatches and bulges. Images PMID:8177747

  6. Germ cell DNA quantification shortly after IR laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, D; Carrasco, F; Diaz, F; Perez-de-Vargas, I

    1991-01-01

    The immediate effect of IR laser radiation on rat germ cells was studied by cytophotometric quantification of the nuclear DNA content in testicular sections. Two different levels of radiation were studied: one according to clinical application (28.05 J/cm2) and another known to increase the germ cell number (46.80 J/cm2). The laser beam induced changes in the germ cell DNA content depending on the cell type, the cell cycle phase and the doses of radiation energy applied. Following irradiation at both doses the percentage of spermatogonia showing a 4c DNA content was increased, while the percentage of these with a 2c DNA content was decreased. Likewise, the percentages of primary spermatocytes with a DNA content equal to 4c (at 28.05 J/cm2), between 2c and 4c (at 46.80 J/cm2) and higher than 4c (at both doses) were increased. No change in the mean spermatid DNA content was observed. Nevertheless, at 46.80 J/cm2 the percentages of elongated spermatids with a c or 2c DNA content differed from the controls. Data show that, even at laser radiation doses used in therapy, the germ cell DNA content is increased shortly after IR laser radiation.

  7. DNA recovery from soils of diverse composition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Bruns, M A; Tiedje, J M

    1996-02-01

    A simple, rapid method for bacterial lysis and direct extraction of DNA from soils with minimal shearing was developed to address the risk of chimera formation from small template DNA during subsequent PCR. The method was based on lysis with a high-salt extraction buffer (1.5 M NaCl) and extended heating (2 to 3 h) of the soil suspension in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, and proteinase K. The extraction method required 6 h and was tested on eight soils differing in organic carbon, clay content, and pH, including ones from which DNA extraction is difficult. The DNA fragment size in crude extracts from all soils was > 23 kb. Preliminary trials indicated that DNA recovery from two soils seeded with gram-negative bacteria was 92 to 99%. When the method was tested on all eight unseeded soils, microscopic examination of indigenous bacteria in soil pellets before and after extraction showed variable cell lysis efficiency (26 to 92%). Crude DNA yields from the eight soils ranged from 2.5 to 26.9 micrograms of DNA g-1, and these were positively correlated with the organic carbon content in the soil (r = 0.73). DNA yields from gram-positive bacteria from pure cultures were two to six times higher when the high-salt-SDS-heat method was combined with mortar-and-pestle grinding and freeze-thawing, and most DNA recovered was of high molecular weight. Four methods for purifying crude DNA were also evaluated for percent recovery, fragment size, speed, enzyme restriction, PCR amplification, and DNA-DNA hybridization. In general, all methods produced DNA pure enough for PCR amplification. Since soil type and microbial community characteristics will influence DNA recovery, this study provides guidance for choosing appropriate extraction and purification methods on the basis of experimental goals.

  8. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  9. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  10. Synthetic DNA

    PubMed Central

    O’ Driscoll, Aisling; Sleator, Roy D.

    2013-01-01

    With world wide data predicted to exceed 40 trillion gigabytes by 2020, big data storage is a very real and escalating problem. Herein, we discuss the utility of synthetic DNA as a robust and eco-friendly archival data storage solution of the future. PMID:23514938

  11. Chromothripsis Is a Recurrent Genomic Abnormality in High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Abáigar, María; Robledo, Cristina; Benito, Rocío; Ramos, Fernando; Díez-Campelo, María; Hermosín, Lourdes; Sánchez-del-Real, Javier; Alonso, Jose M.; Cuello, Rebeca; Megido, Marta; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Martín-Núñez, Guillermo; Aguilar, Carlos; Vargas, Manuel; Martín, Ana A.; García, Juan L.; Kohlmann, Alexander; del Cañizo, M. Consuelo; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    To explore novel genetic abnormalities occurring in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) through an integrative study combining array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a series of MDS and MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) patients. 301 patients diagnosed with MDS (n = 240) or MDS/MPN (n = 61) were studied at the time of diagnosis. A genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number abnormalities was performed. In addition, a mutational analysis of DNMT3A, TET2, RUNX1, TP53 and BCOR genes was performed by NGS in selected cases. 285 abnormalities were identified in 71 patients (23.6%). Three high-risk MDS cases (1.2%) displayed chromothripsis involving exclusively chromosome 13 and affecting some cancer genes: FLT3, BRCA2 and RB1. All three cases carried TP53 mutations as revealed by NGS. Moreover, in the whole series, the integrative analysis of aCGH and NGS enabled the identification of cryptic recurrent deletions in 2p23.3 (DNMT3A; n = 2.8%), 4q24 (TET2; n = 10%) 17p13 (TP53; n = 8.5%), 21q22 (RUNX1; n = 7%), and Xp11.4 (BCOR; n = 2.8%), while mutations in the non-deleted allele where found only in DNMT3A (n = 1), TET2 (n = 3), and TP53 (n = 4). These cryptic abnormalities were detected mainly in patients with normal (45%) or non-informative (15%) karyotype by conventional cytogenetics, except for those with TP53 deletion and mutation (15%), which had a complex karyotype. In addition to well-known copy number defects, the presence of chromothripsis involving chromosome 13 was a novel recurrent change in high-risk MDS patients. Array CGH analysis revealed the presence of cryptic abnormalities in genomic regions where MDS-related genes, such as TET2, DNMT3A, RUNX1 and BCOR, are located. PMID:27741277

  12. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  13. Working with DNA & Bacteria in Precollege Science Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Toby Mogollon; Frame, Kathy, Ed.

    This document describes ways to work with DNA and host organisms in precollege classrooms. The guidelines are intended to assist the teacher who already has training in working with microbes, DNA, and associated chemicals. The contents of the guidelines include: (1) Permitted DNA molecules, vectors, and recommended host organisms for constructing…

  14. Abnormal iron metabolism in fibroblasts from a patient with the neurodegenerative disease hereditary ferritinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nucleotide duplications in exon 4 of the ferritin light polypeptide (FTL) gene cause the autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease neuroferritinopathy or hereditary ferritinopathy (HF). Pathologic examination of patients with HF has shown abnormal ferritin and iron accumulation in neurons and glia in the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in cells of other organ systems, including skin fibroblasts. To gain some understanding on the molecular basis of HF, we characterized iron metabolism in primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts from an individual with the FTL c.497_498dupTC mutation. Results Compared to normal controls, HF fibroblasts showed abnormal iron metabolism consisting of increased levels of ferritin polypeptides, divalent metal transporter 1, basal iron content and reactive oxygen species, and decreased levels of transferrin receptor-1 and IRE-IRP binding activity. Conclusions Our data indicates that HF fibroblasts replicate the abnormal iron metabolism observed in the CNS of patients with HF. We propose that HF fibroblasts are a unique cellular model in which to study the role of abnormal iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of HF without artifacts derived from over-expression or lack of endogenous translational regulatory elements. PMID:21067605

  15. Getting Ready for the Dance: FANCJ Irons Out DNA Wrinkles

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Awate, Sanket; Banerjee, Taraswi; Brosh, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that alternate DNA structures, which deviate from normal double helical DNA, form in vivo and influence cellular processes such as replication and transcription. However, our understanding of how the cellular machinery deals with unusual DNA structures such as G-quadruplexes (G4), triplexes, or hairpins is only beginning to emerge. New advances in the field implicate a direct role of the Fanconi Anemia Group J (FANCJ) helicase, which is linked to a hereditary chromosomal instability disorder and important for cancer suppression, in replication past unusual DNA obstacles. This work sets the stage for significant progress in dissecting the molecular mechanisms whereby replication perturbation by abnormal DNA structures leads to genomic instability. In this review, we focus on FANCJ and its role to enable efficient DNA replication when the fork encounters vastly abundant naturally occurring DNA obstacles, which may have implications for targeting rapidly dividing cancer cells. PMID:27376332

  16. [DNA image-fluorimetry of individual human chromosomes].

    PubMed

    Agafonova, N A; Sakuta, G A; Rozanov, Iu M; Shteĭn, G I; Kudriavtsev, B N

    2013-01-01

    Mucrofluorimetric method for the determination of DNA content in individual human chromosomes has been developed. The method is based on a preliminary identification of chromosomes with Hoechst 33258, followed by staining of the chromosomes with Feulgen reaction using Schiffs reagent type ethidium bromide-SO2, then measuring the fluorescence intensity of the chromosomes using an image analyzer. The method allows to determine the DNA content of individual chromosomes with accuracy up to 4.5 fg. DNA content of individual human chromosomes, their p-and q-arms as well as homologous chromosomes were measured using the developed method. It has been shown that the DNA content in the chromosomes of normal human karyotype is unstable. Fluctuations in the DNA content in some chromosomes can vary 35-40 fg.

  17. T-DNA integration into the Arabidopsis genome depends on sequences of pre-insertion sites

    PubMed Central

    Brunaud, Véronique; Balzergue, Sandrine; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Aubourg, Sébastien; Samson, Franck; Chauvin, Stéphanie; Bechtold, Nicole; Cruaud, Corinne; DeRose, Richard; Pelletier, Georges; Lepiniec, Loïc; Caboche, Michel; Lecharny, Alain

    2002-01-01

    A statistical analysis of 9000 flanking sequence tags characterizing transferred DNA (T-DNA) transformants in Arabidopsis sheds new light on T-DNA insertion by illegitimate recombination. T-DNA integration is favoured in plant DNA regions with an A-T-rich content. The formation of a short DNA duplex between the host DNA and the left end of the T-DNA sets the frame for the recombination. The sequence immediately downstream of the plant A-T-rich region is the master element for setting up the DNA duplex, and deletions into the left end of the integrated T-DNA depend on the location of a complementary sequence on the T-DNA. Recombination at the right end of the T-DNA with the host DNA involves another DNA duplex, 2–3 base pairs long, that preferentially includes a G close to the right end of the T-DNA. PMID:12446565