Science.gov

Sample records for abnormal esophageal motility

  1. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  2. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  3. Motility abnormalities in esophageal body in GERD: are they truly related to reflux?

    PubMed

    Ciriza de los Ríos, C; García Menéndez, L; Díez Hernández, A; Fernández Eroles, A L; Vega Fernández, A; Enguix Armada, A

    2005-03-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities have been observed in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The aim of the present study was to determine if esophageal motor disorders in patients with a positive response to the omeprazole test are related to the existence of reflux or they are concomitant findings. A 24-hour pH monitoring and a stationary manometry were performed on 128 patients: 49 of them had normal manometry, 31 hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter, 29 motor disorder in esophageal body, and 19 hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter and motor disorder in esophageal body. We found an association between the presence of abnormal reflux and motor disorder in esophageal body (chi test; P < 0.05). However, ineffective esophageal motility was the disorder most strongly related to reflux, whereas the hypercontractile disorders were not clearly attributed to it. Esophageal manometric abnormalities should be considered cautiously before considering a motor disorder as a consequence of abnormal reflux.

  4. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, A H; Iorio, N; Schey, R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus and is a potential cause of dysphagia and food impaction, most commonly affecting young men. Esophageal manometry findings vary from normal motility to aperistalsis, simultaneous contractions, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (LES). It remains unclear whether esophageal dysmotility plays a significant role in the clinical symptoms of EoE. Our aim is to review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and effect of treatment on esophageal dysmotility in EoE. A literature search utilizing the PubMed database was performed using keywords: eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, motility, manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagogram, endoscopic ultrasound, and dysphagia. Fifteen studies, totaling 387 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis were identified as keeping in accordance with the aim of this study and included in this review. The occurrence of abnormal esophageal manometry was reported to be between 4 and 87% among patients with EoE. Esophageal motility studies have shown reduced distensibility, abnormal peristalsis, and hypotonicity of the LES in patients with EoE, which may also mimic other esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia or nutcracker esophagus. Studies have shown conflicting results regarding the presence of esophageal dysmotility and symptoms with some reports suggesting a higher rate of food impaction, while others report no correlation between motor function and dysphagia. Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on

  5. Esophageal motility in children with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Ilse; De Greef, Toon; Haesendonck, Nancy; Tack, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Motility abnormalities in adults with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include nontransmitted contractions, reduced distal esophageal contraction amplitude, and simultaneous contractions. Information on esophageal body motility in children with GERD is scarce. Our aim was to study esophageal motility patterns in children with GERD, taking into account the presence of anatomical abnormalities and neurological impairment, the effect of age on esophageal motility in GERD, and the relation between esophageal manometry and GERD severity parameters (acid exposure and presence of esophagitis). Consecutive children referred for severe GER(D) symptoms underwent a barium swallow, upper endoscopy, pH monitoring, and stationary water-perfused esophageal manometry. Mean lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure and velocity of propagation in the proximal and distal esophagus decreased with age in this group of children with GERD (all P < 0.01). Severely disturbed esophageal motility was found in children with previous esophageal atresia. Patients with psychomotor retardation had significantly lower occurrence of peristaltic waves (94% +/- 21% vs 79% +/- 38%; P = 0.001), distal propagation velocity (0.8 +/- 0.4 vs 0.6 +/- 0.5 cm/s; P = 0.05), and distal contraction duration (3.1 +/- 0.8 vs 3.4 +/- 1 seconds; P = 0.05). None of the manometric characteristics differed between patients with normal or abnormal esophageal pH monitoring or with or without erosive esophagitis. LES pressure and esophageal velocity decreased with increasing age. Esophageal manometry is severely impaired in children with esophageal atresia and psychomotor retardation. No specific esophageal motor abnormalities related to the presence of endoscopic esophagitis or abnormal pH monitoring were found.

  6. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2017-06-30

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus, absent contractility) and minor disorders of peristalsis (ineffective esophageal motility, fragmented peristalsis). The aim of this study was to review the current diagnosis and management of esophageal motility disorders other than achalasia.

  7. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G.

    2017-01-01

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus, absent contractility) and minor disorders of peristalsis (ineffective esophageal motility, fragmented peristalsis). The aim of this study was to review the current diagnosis and management of esophageal motility disorders other than achalasia. PMID:28665309

  8. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  9. Evaluation of Esophageal Motility Utilizing the Functional Lumen Imaging Probe.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Dustin A; Kahrilas, Peter J; Lin, Zhiyue; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Listernick, Zoe; Ritter, Katherine; Tye, Michael; Ponds, Fraukje A; Wong, Ian; Pandolfino, John E

    2016-12-01

    Esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility and distension-mediated peristalsis can be assessed with the functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) during a sedated upper endoscopy. We aimed to describe esophageal motility assessment using FLIP topography in patients presenting with dysphagia. In all, 145 patients (aged 18-85 years, 54% female) with dysphagia that completed upper endoscopy with a 16-cm FLIP assembly and high-resolution manometry (HRM) were included. HRM was analyzed according to the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility disorders; major esophageal motility disorders were considered "abnormal". FLIP studies were analyzed using a customized program to calculate the EGJ-distensibility index (DI) and generate FLIP topography plots to identify esophageal contractility patterns. FLIP topography was considered "abnormal" if EGJ-DI was <2.8 mm 2 /mm Hg or contractility pattern demonstrated absent contractility or repetitive, retrograde contractions. HRM was abnormal in 111 (77%) patients: 70 achalasia (19 type I, 39 type II, and 12 type III), 38 EGJ outflow obstruction, and three jackhammer esophagus. FLIP topography was abnormal in 106 (95%) of these patients, including all 70 achalasia patients. HRM was "normal" in 34 (23%) patients: five ineffective esophageal motility and 29 normal motility. In all, 17 (50%) had abnormal FLIP topography including 13 (37%) with abnormal EGJ-DI. FLIP topography provides a well-tolerated method for esophageal motility assessment (especially to identify achalasia) at the time of upper endoscopy. FLIP topography findings that are discordant with HRM may indicate otherwise undetected abnormalities of esophageal function, thus FLIP provides an alternative and complementary method to HRM for evaluation of non-obstructive dysphagia.

  10. Physiology of Normal Esophageal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Raj K; Chaudhury, Arun

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus consists of two different parts. In humans, the cervical esophagus is composed of striated muscles and the thoracic esophagus is composed of phasic smooth muscles. The striated muscle esophagus is innervated by the lower motor neurons and peristalsis in this segment is due to sequential activation of the motor neurons in the nucleus ambiguus. Both primary and secondary peristaltic contractions are centrally mediated. The smooth muscle of esophagus is phasic in nature and is innervated by intramural inhibitory (nitric oxide releasing) and excitatory (acetylcholine releasing) neurons that receive inputs from separate sets of preganglionic neurons located in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus. The primary peristalsis in this segment involves both central and peripheral mechanisms. The primary peristalsis consist of inhibition (called deglutitive inhibition) followed by excitation. The secondary peristalsis is entirely due to peripheral mechanisms and also involves inhibition followed by excitation. The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is characterized by tonic muscle that is different from the muscle of the esophageal body. The LES, like the esophageal body smooth muscle, is also innervated by the inhibitory and excitatory neurons. The LES maintains tonic closure due to its myogenic property. The LES tone is modulated by the inhibitory and the excitatory nerves. Inhibitory nerves mediate LES relaxation and the excitatory nerves mediate reflex contraction or rebound contraction of the LES. Clinical disorders of esophageal motility can be classified on the basis of disorders of the inhibitory and excitatory innervations and the smooth muscles. PMID:18364578

  11. Loss of Peristaltic Reserve, Determined by Multiple Rapid Swallows, Is the Most Frequent Esophageal Motility Abnormality in Patients With Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Dustin A; Crowell, Michael D; Kimmel, Jessica N; Patel, Amit; Gyawali, C Prakash; Hinchcliff, Monique; Griffing, W Leroy; Pandolfino, John E; Vela, Marcelo F

    2016-10-01

    We assessed peristaltic reserve using multiple rapid swallows (MRS) during esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) of 111 patients with systemic sclerosis (89 women; ages, 42-64 y). We performed a retrospective analysis of HRM studies that included MRS in patients with systemic sclerosis, performed at 2 tertiary referral centers, and compared data with those from 18 healthy volunteers (controls). HRM findings were analyzed according to the Chicago Classification to provide an esophageal motility diagnosis. Response to MRS was evaluated for the presence of contraction and for augmentation, defined as the distal contractile integral after MRS greater than the median distal contractile integral of 10 supine swallows. Esophageal motility diagnoses included 41% with absent contractility, 31% with normal motility, 23% with ineffective esophageal motility, and 5% that met the criteria for other esophageal motility disorders. Contraction (37%) and peristaltic augmentation (18%) after MRS were observed less frequently in patients with systemic sclerosis than in controls (83% and 100%, respectively). Impaired peristaltic reserve, as assessed with MRS during HRM, is therefore the most common esophageal motility finding among patients with systemic sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. What is the real impairment on esophageal motility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    PubMed

    Falcão, Angela; Nasi, Ary; Brandão, Jeovana; Sallum, Rubens; Cecconello, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    Impairment of esophageal motility is a common finding in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as reduced lower esophageal sphincter (LES) basal pressure. A very low LES pressure might facilitate the occurrence of more gastroesophageal reflux whereas abnormal esophageal peristalsis may contribute to impaired esophageal clearance after reflux. Evaluate the esophageal motor function of the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal body in the various forms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The manometrics records of 268 patients, who had evaluation of the esophageal motility as part of the diagnostic gastroesophageal reflux disease were split into four groups, as follows: 33 patients who had no esophagitis; 92 patients who had erosive esophagitis; 101 patients who had short Barrett's esophagus and 42 patients who had long Barrett's esophagus. The group who had long Barrett's esophagus showed smaller mean LES pressure and higher percentage of marked LES hypotonia; in the distal segment of the esophageal body the this group showed higher percentage of marked hypocontractility of the distal segment (<30 mm Hg); this same group showed higher percentage of esophageal motility disorders. The most intense esophageal motility disorders and lower pressure of lower esophageal sphincter were noted in the group with long Barrett's esophagus. Those with reflux esophagitis and short Barrett's esophagus had esophageal motility impairment, intermediate among patients with esophagitis and long Barrett's esophagus. Patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux but without esophagitis by endoscopy study showed no impairment of esophageal motility.

  13. Evaluation of esophageal function in patients with esophageal motor abnormalities using multichannel intraluminal impedance esophageal manometry.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yu Kyung; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Park, Jae Myung; Oh, Jung Hwan; Paik, Chang Nyol; Lee, Joon Wook; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Chung, In-Sik

    2006-10-21

    To evaluate the functional aspect of esophageal motility in healthy subjects and in patients who were referred for esophageal function testing using multichannel intraluminal impedance-esophageal manometry (MII-EM), and to assess the clinical utility of MII-EM. From September 2003 to January 2004, we performed the MII-EM on healthy volunteers and all the patients who were referred for esophageal function testing. Each patient received 10 liquid and 10 viscous swallows. We analyzed the results, the impedance and the manometric findings. Some of the subjects had additional ambulatory 24-h pH study performed to diagnose gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Among 89 studied subjects, the MII-EM findings showed normal esophageal motility in 50 (56.17%), ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) in 17 (19.10%), nutcracker esophagus in 7 (7.86%), achalasia in 4 (4.49%), and scleroderma esophagus in 11 (12.35%) cases. The completeness and the speed of bolus transit were in the order of nutcracker esophagus, normal manometry and IEM. Some of the swallows showing normal manometry and IEM had incomplete transit. In the achalasia and scleroderma esophagus, almost all the swallows had incomplete transit. The body amplitudes were higher for the swallows with complete transit than for the swallows with incomplete transit. There was not a significant difference in the manometric and impedance findings between the subjects with and without GERD. MII-EM is a useful tool in assessing the esophageal function in the patients having esophageal motility abnormality. The primary factors influencing the bolus transit are the amplitude of the esophageal body and normal peristalsis.

  14. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequently performed using minimally invasive techniques (laparoscopic or robotic ) using five small incisions although it can also ... Guide to Heart, Lung, and Esophageal Surgery A website presented by cardiothoracic surgeons committed to improving patient ...

  15. Advances in Management of Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Bredenoord, Albert J; Carlson, Dustin A; Pandolfino, John E

    2018-04-24

    The widespread adoption of high-resolution manometry (HRM) has led to a restructuring in the classification of esophageal motility disorder classification summarized in the Chicago Classification, currently in version 3.0. It has become apparent that the cardinal feature of achalasia, impaired lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, can occur in several disease phenotypes: without peristalsis, with premature (spastic) distal esophageal contractions, with panesophageal pressurization, or even with preserved peristalsis. Furthermore, despite these advances in diagnostics, no single manometric pattern is perfectly sensitive or specific for idiopathic achalasia and complimentary assessments with provocative maneuvers during HRM or interrogating the esophagogastric junction with the functional luminal imaging probe during endoscopy can be useful in clarifying equivocal or inexplicable HRM findings. Using these tools, we have come to conceptualize esophageal motility disorders as characterized by obstructive physiology at the esophagogastric junction, smooth muscle esophagus, or both. Recognizing obstructive physiology as a primary target of therapy has become particularly relevant with the development of a minimally invasive technique for performing a calibrated myotomy of the esophageal circular muscle, the POEM procedure. Now and going forward, optimal management is to render treatment in a phenotype-specific manner: e.g. POEM calibrated to patient-specific physiology for spastic achalasia and spastic disorders of the smooth muscle esophagus, more conservative strategies (pneumatic dilation) for the disorders limited to the sphincter. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Esophageal motility pattern and gastro-esophageal reflux in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gadel, Abil Ali; Mostafa, Mohamed; Younis, Ahmed; Haleem, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    The association of esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms with respiratory symptoms is not well established in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this work is to study the abnormalities of esophageal function in COPD patients and study its relation to smoking index, body mass index and indices of hyperinflation. This study included 40 male COPD patients and 10 healthy controls. The patients and controls were subjected to spirometry, body plethysmography, esophageal manometry and 24hr pH-metry. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms were found in 55% of patients, hypotensive upper esophageal sphincter pressure in 65% of patients and hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter pressure in 52.5% of patients. Pathological acid reflux was found in 35% of patients. The severity of GERD increased with increased age, smoking index and body mass index, p<0.005. There was negative correlation between LESP and UESP compared with indices of hyperinflation, p<0.001. There was high prevalence of esophageal motility disorders in COPD patients, LESP and UESP were significantly negatively correlated to indices of hyperinflation. There was a high prevalence of GERD in COPD patents especially elderly, severe stage of COPD, high smoking index and high body mass index (BMI).

  17. Esophageal motor abnormalities in eosinophilic esophagitis identified by high-resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Martín Martín, Leticia; Santander, Cecilio; Lopez Martín, Mari Carmen; Espinoza-Ríos, Jorge; Chavarría-Herbozo, Carlos; Gisbert, Javier P; Moreno-Otero, Ricardo

    2011-09-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities, as measured by conventional manometry (CM), are non-specific in the majority of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Moreover, the study of CM is limited by poor interobserver agreement. The aims of the present study were: (i) to assess the esophageal patterns in EoE by a topographic analysis of high-resolution manometry (HRM) data; and (ii) to establish a relationship between motility abnormalities and symptoms of EoE, such as dysphagia and bolus impaction. All adult patients with EoE diagnosed according to histological criteria, and controls with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and dysphagia, were included. HRM was done in EoE patients and controls. For the analysis of data, the Chicago classification was followed. HRM was performed in 21 patients with EoE, as well as in 21 controls. Of the 21 patients with EoE, 10 (48%) showed pan-esophageal pressurization, six (28%) showed peristaltic dysfunction, and in five cases (24%), HRM was normal. There was no pan-esophageal pressurization in controls. Nine of 10 patients with pan-esophageal pressurization required endoscopic bolus removal (P < 0.05); none had obstructive endoscopy findings. The most frequent esophageal motor abnormality measured by HRM was a pan-esophageal pressurization. Bolus impaction in patients with EoE was associated with pan-esophageal pressurization. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Chicago classification criteria of esophageal motility disorders defined in high resolution esophageal pressure topography.

    PubMed

    Bredenoord, A J; Fox, M; Kahrilas, P J; Pandolfino, J E; Schwizer, W; Smout, A J P M

    2012-03-01

    The Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) studies, concurrent with the widespread adoption of this technology into clinical practice. The Chicago Classification has been an evolutionary process, molded first by published evidence pertinent to the clinical interpretation of high resolution manometry (HRM) studies and secondarily by group experience when suitable evidence is lacking. This publication summarizes the state of our knowledge as of the most recent meeting of the International High Resolution Manometry Working Group in Ascona, Switzerland in April 2011. The prior iteration of the Chicago Classification was updated through a process of literature analysis and discussion. The major changes in this document from the prior iteration are largely attributable to research studies published since the prior iteration, in many cases research conducted in response to prior deliberations of the International High Resolution Manometry Working Group. The classification now includes criteria for subtyping achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, motility disorders not observed in normal subjects (Distal esophageal spasm, Hypercontractile esophagus, and Absent peristalsis), and statistically defined peristaltic abnormalities (Weak peristalsis, Frequent failed peristalsis, Rapid contractions with normal latency, and Hypertensive peristalsis). The Chicago Classification is an algorithmic scheme for diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders from clinical EPT studies. Moving forward, we anticipate continuing this process with increased emphasis placed on natural history studies and outcome data based on the classification. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of esophageal motility utilizing the functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP)

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dustin A.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Lin, Zhiyue; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Listernick, Zoe; Ritter, Katherine; Tye, Michael; Ponds, Fraukje A.; Wong, Ian; Pandolfino, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility and distension-mediated peristalsis can be assessed with the functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) during a sedated upper endoscopy. We aimed to describe esophageal motility assessment using FLIP topography in patients presenting with dysphagia. Methods 145 patients (ages 18 – 85, 54% female) with dysphagia that completed upper endoscopy with a 16-cm FLIP assembly and high-resolution manometry (HRM) were included. HRM was analyzed according to the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility disorders; major esophageal motility disorders were considered ‘abnormal’. FLIP studies were analyzed using a customized program to calculate the EGJ-distensibility index (DI) and generate FLIP topography plots to identify esophageal contractility patterns. FLIP topography was considered ‘abnormal’ if EGJ-DI was < 2.8 mm2/mmHg or contractility pattern demonstrated absent contractility or repetitive, retrograde contractions. Results HRM was abnormal in 111 (77%) patients: 70 achalasia (19 type I, 39 type II, 12 type III), 38 EGJ outflow obstruction, and three jackhammer esophagus. FLIP topography was abnormal in 106 (95%) of these patients, including all 70 achalasia patients. HRM was ‘normal’ in 34 (23%) patients: five ineffective esophageal motility and 29 normal motility. 17 (50%) had abnormal FLIP topography including 13 (37%) with abnormal EGJ-DI. Conclusions FLIP topography provides a well-tolerated method for esophageal motility assessment (especially to identify achalasia) at the time of upper endoscopy. FLIP topography findings that are discordant with HRM may indicate otherwise undetected abnormalities of esophageal function, thus FLIP provides an alternative and complementary method to HRM for evaluation of non-obstructive dysphagia. PMID:27725650

  20. Exploratory Research on Latent Esophageal Motility Disorders in Dysphagia Patients.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Shinpei; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Inoue, Yousuke; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Ozaki, Haruhiko; Ota, Kazuhiro; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Fukuchi, Takumi; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has been applied to assess esophageal motility disorders. However, the frequency and types of motility disorders in patients with dysphagia, which are frequently seen in clinical practice, are not clear. We evaluated latent esophageal motility disorders associated with dysphagia. The study included patients without erosive esophageal mucosal damage and with dysphagia symptoms refractory to at least 8 weeks of standard-dose proton pump inhibitors. After enrolment, HRM was used to evaluate for esophageal motility disorder based on the Chicago classification. Esophageal motility disorder was found in 58 of 100 patients and was classified based on the causes: achalasia (13%), esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (16%), distal esophageal spasms (3%), weak peristalsis (14%), frequently failed peristalsis (5%), and hypertensive peristalsis (7%). Primary esophageal motility disorder was found in approximately 50% of cases in dysphagia patients. Therefore, esophageal motility disorder is not an uncommon condition and should be sought for in order to elucidate precisely the cause of dysphagia. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Esophageal Motility after Extensive Circumferential Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Superficial Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Iizuka, Toshiro; Nomura, Kosuke; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Yamashita, Satoshi; Matsui, Akira; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Mitani, Toshifumi; Kaise, Mitsuru; Hoteya, Shu

    2018-06-05

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for superficial esophageal cancer is sometimes extensive, and in our experience, patients not infrequently present with dysphagia after ESD even in the absence of esophageal stricture. The aim of this study was to evaluate esophageal motility using high-resolution manometry (HRM) in patients with and without dysphagia after extensive circumferential ESD. HRM was performed in a total of 52 patients who had undergone ESD for superficial esophageal cancer and a mucosal defect after ESD exceeded more than two-thirds of the esophageal circumference. The frequency and type of esophageal dysmotility and the relationship between esophageal motility and dysphagia were evaluated. Esophageal dysmotility was observed in 13 patients (25%): jackhammer esophagus in 4, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction in 4, absent contractility in 2, and distal esophageal spasm, ineffective esophageal motility, and fragmented peristalsis in 1 patient each. Of the 22 patients with dysphagia after ESD, 9 (41%) had esophageal dysmotility. Of the 30 patients without dysphagia after ESD, 4 (13%) had esophageal dysmotility. The relationship between dysmotility and dysphagia was significant (p = 0.025). Esophageal dysmotility exists in approximately one-quarter of patients after extensive circumferential ESD, which is associated with dysphagia in the absence of esophageal stricture. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-31

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately.

  3. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately. PMID:26631942

  4. Scintigraphic Evaluation of Esophageal Motility and Gastroesophageal Reflux in Patients Presenting with Upper Respiratory Tract Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Amalachandran, Jaykanth; Simon, Shelley; Elangoven, Indirani; Jain, Avani; Sivathapandi, Thangalakshmi

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of Study: The purpose is to evaluate the findings and utility of esophageal transit scintigraphy (ETS) and gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) in patients presenting with upper respiratory tract (URT) symptoms suspected to be due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients aged between 19 and 60 years underwent nasopharyngolaryngoscopy (NPL), ETS, and GES. Correlation between GER, esophageal motility, and NPL was evaluated. Inclusion criteria include patients with recurrent URT symptoms such as chronic dry cough/hoarseness of voice and itching/foreign body sensation in throat. Those with typical gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of GER, URT symptoms relieved by antibiotics, surgical intervention in abdomen, cardiac/hepatobiliary diseases, etc. were excluded from the study. Results: Significant correlation was found between GER and NPL in 28/30 patients. More the grade of reflux, more severe was the NPL findings. Two patients with Grade II reflux had normal NPL suggesting structural inflammatory changes due to acidic pH of refluxate which have not yet manifested or symptoms could be due to nonacid refluxate. Incidence of esophageal motility disorder was statistically significant in patients with GER disease (GERD). Patients who had symptoms, but no demonstrable GER showed delayed ET in supine position suggesting the presence of esophageal motility disorder even before GERD. Conclusion: GES demonstrated GER in patients presenting with URT symptoms without typical GI symptoms. ETS showed coexistence of esophageal motility disorder in most patients presenting with URT symptoms even without an associated reflux disease. We hypothesize that primary abnormal esophageal motility leads to delayed esophageal clearance and consequently to URT symptoms. Addition of ETS to GES is easily feasible with no significant additional cost, time, or radiation burden. PMID:29430111

  5. Esophageal Body Motility for Clinical Assessment in Patients with Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liuqin; Ye, Bixing; Wang, Ying; Wang, Meifeng; Lin, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Little data exists about esophageal body dysmotility and reflux patterns in refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (RGERD) patients off therapy. We aimed to evaluate effects of esophageal body dysmotility on reflux parameters in RGERD patients by combining impedance-pH monitoring and high-resolution manometry (HRM). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data and HRM metrics in patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Impedance-pH monitoring and manometric data were compared between 2 groups: ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) and normal motility. Results Forty-eight patients (30 males, mean age 54.5 years) were included (16 erosive esophagitis, 24 non-erosive reflux disease, and 8 functional heartburn), amongst which 24 subjects showed IEM, and others had normal motility. Number of patients who had a large break in the IEM group was significantly higher than that of normal motility patients. IEM group had more patients with weakly acid reflux and long term acid reflux than the normal group (P = 0.008, P = 0.004, respectively). There was no statistical difference in baseine impedance levels from z4 to z6 between the 2 groups (2911 ± 1160 Ω vs 3604 ± 1232 Ω, 2766 ± 1254 Ω vs 3752 ± 1439 Ω, 2349 ± 1131 Ω vs 3038 ± 1254 Ω, all P > 0.05). Acid exposure time, numbers of long term acid reflux and weakly acid reflux showed strong negative correlation with esophageal body motility and/or lower esophageal sphincter function. Conclusions IEM was associated more with acid exposure, abnormal weakly acid reflux, and long term acid reflux in RGERD patients. These data suggested the role of esophageal body dysmotility in the pathophysiological mechanisms of RGERD patients. PMID:27599539

  6. Esophageal Body Motility for Clinical Assessment in Patients with Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuqin; Ye, Bixing; Wang, Ying; Wang, Meifeng; Lin, Lin

    2017-01-30

    Little data exists about esophageal body dysmotility and reflux patterns in refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (RGERD) patients off therapy. We aimed to evaluate effects of esophageal body dysmotility on reflux parameters in RGERD patients by combining impedance-pH monitoring and high-resolution manometry (HRM). We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data and HRM metrics in patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Impedance-pH monitoring and manometric data were compared between 2 groups: ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) and normal motility. Forty-eight patients (30 males, mean age 54.5 years) were included (16 erosive esophagitis, 24 non-erosive reflux disease, and 8 functional heartburn), amongst which 24 subjects showed IEM, and others had normal motility. Number of patients who had a large break in the IEM group was significantly higher than that of normal motility patients. IEM group had more patients with weakly acid reflux and long term acid reflux than the normal group ( P = 0.008, P = 0.004, respectively). There was no statistical difference in baseine impedance levels from z4 to z6 between the 2 groups (2911 ± 1160 Ω vs 3604 ± 1232 Ω, 2766 ± 1254 Ω vs 3752 ± 1439 Ω, 2349 ± 1131 Ω vs 3038 ± 1254 Ω, all P > 0.05). Acid exposure time, numbers of long term acid reflux and weakly acid reflux showed strong negative correlation with esophageal body motility and/or lower esophageal sphincter function. IEM was associated more with acid exposure, abnormal weakly acid reflux, and long term acid reflux in RGERD patients. These data suggested the role of esophageal body dysmotility in the pathophysiological mechanisms of RGERD patients.

  7. Chicago Classification Criteria of Esophageal Motility Disorders Defined in High Resolution Esophageal Pressure Topography (EPT)†

    PubMed Central

    Bredenoord, Albert J; Fox, Mark; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E; Schwizer, Werner; Smout, AJPM; Conklin, Jeffrey L; Cook, Ian J; Gyawali, Prakash; Hebbard, Geoffrey; Holloway, Richard H; Ke, Meiyun; Keller, Jutta; Mittal, Ravinder K; Peters, Jeff; Richter, Joel; Roman, Sabine; Rommel, Nathalie; Sifrim, Daniel; Tutuian, Radu; Valdovinos, Miguel; Vela, Marcelo F; Zerbib, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) studies, concurrent with the widespread adoption of this technology into clinical practice. The Chicago Classification has been, and will continue to be, an evolutionary process, molded first by published evidence pertinent to the clinical interpretation of high resolution manometry (HRM) studies and secondarily by group experience when suitable evidence is lacking. Methods This publication summarizes the state of our knowledge as of the most recent meeting of the International High Resolution Manometry Working Group in Ascona, Switzerland in April 2011. The prior iteration of the Chicago Classification was updated through a process of literature analysis and discussion. Key Results The major changes in this document from the prior iteration are largely attributable to research studies published since the prior iteration, in many cases research conducted in response to prior deliberations of the International High Resolution Manometry Working Group. The classification now includes criteria for subtyping achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, motility disorders not observed in normal subjects (Distal esophageal spasm, Hypercontractile esophagus, and Absent peristalsis), and statistically defined peristaltic abnormalities (Weak peristalsis, Frequent failed peristalsis, Rapid contractions with normal latency, and Hypertensive peristalsis). Conclusions & Inferences The Chicago Classification is an algorithmic scheme for diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders from clinical EPT studies. Moving forward, we anticipate continuing this process with increased emphasis placed on natural history studies and outcome data based on the classification. PMID:22248109

  8. Esophageal motility after peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Li, Meng; Lu, Bin; Meng, Lina; Fan, Yihong; Bao, Haibiao

    2016-05-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been introduced as a novel endoscopic treatment for achalasia. The aim of this work is to assess the changes in esophageal motility caused by POEM in patients with achalasia. Forty-one patients with achalasia underwent POEM from September 2012 to November 2014. Esophageal motility of all patients was evaluated preoperatively and 1 month after POEM utilizing high-resolution manometry, which was performed with ten water swallows, ten steamed bread swallows, and multiple rapid swallows (MRS). In single swallows, including liquid swallows and bread swallows, all the parameters of lower esophagus sphincter resting pressure (LESP), 4-s integrated relaxation pressure (4sIRP), and intra-bolus pressure (IBP) were decreased between pre- and post-POEM patients (all p < 0.05). Postoperatively, the trend of distal contractile integral (DCI) and distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude declined in subtype II and subtype III (subtype II: p < 0.05; subtype III: p > 0.05), but increased in subtype I (subtype I: p > 0.05). In liquid swallows, the Eckardt score of subtype II patients decreased with DCI, and distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude after POEM was significantly lower compared with those showing increased values of those two parameters (p < 0.05). In MRS, the rate of LES relaxation increased from 66.67 to 95.24%, but without normal response in all achalasia patients. POEM reduces LES pressure in achalasia, and partly restores esophageal motility. POEM displayed varying effect on esophageal motility in patients with different patterns of swallowing. In addition, the changes in parameters associated with esophageal peristalsis correlated with decreases in Eckardt score.

  9. Effects of Age on Esophageal Motility: Use of High-resolution Esophageal Impedance Manometry

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Jong-Chan; Sung, Jihee; Choi, Yoon Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Disturbances of esophageal motility have been reported to be more frequent the aged population. However, the physiology of disturbances in esophageal motility during aging is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of age on esophageal motility using high-resolution esophageal impedance manometry (HRIM). Methods Esophageal motor function of 268 subjects were measured using HRIM in 3 age groups, < 40 years (Group A, n = 32), 40–65 years (Group B, n = 185), and > 65 years (Group C, n = 62). Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures, integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, contractile front velocity, distal latency, and pressures and duration of contraction on 4 positions along the esophagus, and complete bolus transit were measured. Results Basal UES pressure was lower in Group C (P < 0.001) but there was no significant difference in the LES pressure among groups. Contractile duration on position 3 (10 cm from proximal LES high pressure zone) was longer in Group C (P = 0.001), and the contractile amplitude on position 4 (5 cm from proximal LES high pressure zone) was lower in Group C (P = 0.005). Distal contractile integral was lower in Group C (P = 0.037). Contractile front velocity (P = 0.015) and the onset velocity (P = 0.040) was lower in Group C. There was no significant difference in impedance values. Conclusions The decrease of UES pressure, distal esophageal motility, and peristaltic velocity might be related with esophageal symptoms in the aged population. PMID:28163259

  10. Correlation of radiographic and manometric findings in patients with ineffective esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Shakespear, J S; Blom, D; Huprich, J E; Peters, J H

    2004-03-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility disorder (IEM) is a new, manometrically defined, esophageal motility disorder, associated with severe gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), GERD-associated respiratory symptoms, delayed acid clearance, and mucosal injury. Videoesophagram is an important, inexpensive, and widely available tool in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with esophageal pathologies. The efficacy of videoesophagography has not been rigorously examined in patients with IEM. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of videoesophagography in patients with IEM. The radiographic and manometric findings of 202 consecutive patients presenting with foregut symptoms were evaluated. IEM was defined by strict manometric criteria. All other named motility disorders such as achalasia were excluded. Videoesophagography was performed according to a standard protocol. Of patients in this cohort, 16% (33/202) had IEM by manometric criteria. Of IEM patients, 55% (18/33) had an abnormal videoesophagram, while in 45% (15/33) this test was read as normal. Only 11% (15/137) of patients with a normal videoesophagram were found to have IEM. Sensitivity of videoesophagram was 54.6%, specificity 72.2%, positive predictive value only 27.7%, and negative predictive value 89.1% in the diagnosis of IEM. These data show that videoesophagram is relatively insensitive in detecting patients with IEM and should not be considered a valid diagnostic test for this disorder. We conclude that esophageal manometry is an indispensable diagnostic modality in the workup of a patient with suspected of IEM.

  11. Treatment of esophageal motility disorders based on the chicago classification.

    PubMed

    Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gabbard, Scott; Fass, Ronnie

    2014-12-01

    The Chicago Classification divides esophageal motor disorders based on the recorded value of the integrated relaxation pressure (IRP). The first group includes those with an elevated mean IRP that is associated with peristaltic abnormalities such as achalasia and esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. The second group includes those with a normal mean IRP that is associated with esophageal hypermotility disorders such as distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus (jackhammer esophagus), and hypertensive peristalsis (nutcracker esophagus). The third group includes those with a normal mean IRP that is associated with esophageal hypomotility peristaltic abnormalities such as absent peristalsis, weak peristalsis with small or large breaks, and frequent failed peristalsis. The therapeutic options vary greatly between the different groups of esophageal motor disorders. In achalasia patients, potential treatment strategies comprise medical therapy (calcium channel blockers, nitrates, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors), endoscopic procedures (botulinum toxin A injection, pneumatic dilation, or peroral endoscopic myotomy) or surgery (Heller myotomy). Patients with a normal IRP and esophageal hypermotility disorder are candidates for medical therapy (nitrates, calcium channel blockers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, cimetropium/ipratropium bromide, proton pump inhibitors, benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants, trazodone, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), endoscopic procedures (botulinum toxin A injection and peroral endoscopic myotomy), or surgery (Heller myotomy). Lastly, in patients with a normal IRP and esophageal hypomotility disorder, treatment is primarily focused on controlling the presence of gastroesophageal reflux with proton pump inhibitors and lifestyle modifications (soft and liquid diet and eating in the upright position) to address patient's dysphagia.

  12. Relationship between esophageal clinical symptoms and manometry findings in patients with esophageal motility disorders: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    FakhreYaseri, Hashem; FakhreYaseri, Ali Mohammad; Baradaran Moghaddam, Ali; Soltani Arabshhi, Seyed Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Manometry is the gold-standard diagnostic test for motility disorders in the esophagus. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The diagnostic value of particular esophageal clinical symptoms among patients suspected of esophageal motor disorders (EMDs) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy of presenting esophageal symptoms between abnormal and normal esophageal manometry findings. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 623 patients aged 11-80 years. Data were collected from clinical examinations as well as patient questionnaires. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated after high-resolution manometry plots were reviewed according to the most recent Chicago Criteria. The clinical symptoms were not sensitive enough to discriminate between EMDs. Nevertheless, dysphagia, noncardiac chest pain, hoarseness, vomiting, and weight loss had high specificity and high accuracy to distinguish EMDs from normal findings. Regurgitation and heartburn did not have good accuracy for the diagnosis of EMDs. Clinical symptoms are not reliable enough to discriminate between EMDs. Clinical symptoms can, however, discriminate between normal findings and EMDs, especially achalasia.

  13. Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders: Esophageal Pressure Topography vs. Conventional Line Tracing.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Dustin A; Ravi, Karthik; Kahrilas, Peter J; Gyawali, C Prakash; Bredenoord, Arjan J; Castell, Donald O; Spechler, Stuart J; Halland, Magnus; Kanuri, Navya; Katzka, David A; Leggett, Cadman L; Roman, Sabine; Saenz, Jose B; Sayuk, Gregory S; Wong, Alan C; Yadlapati, Rena; Ciolino, Jody D; Fox, Mark R; Pandolfino, John E

    2015-07-01

    Enhanced characterization of esophageal peristaltic and sphincter function provided by esophageal pressure topography (EPT) offers a potential diagnostic advantage over conventional line tracings (CLT). However, high-resolution manometry (HRM) and EPT require increased equipment costs over conventional systems and evidence demonstrating a significant diagnostic advantage of EPT over CLT is limited. Our aim was to investigate whether the inter-rater agreement and/or accuracy of esophageal motility diagnosis differed between EPT and CLT. Forty previously completed patient HRM studies were selected for analysis using a customized software program developed to perform blinded independent interpretation in either EPT or CLT (six pressure sensors) format. Six experienced gastroenterologists with a clinical focus in esophageal disease (attendings) and six gastroenterology trainees with minimal manometry experience (fellows) from three academic centers interpreted each of the 40 studies using both EPT and CLT formats. Rater diagnoses were assessed for inter-rater agreement and diagnostic accuracy, both for exact diagnosis and for correct identification of a major esophageal motility disorder. The total group agreement was moderate (κ=0.57; 95% CI: 0.56-0.59) for EPT and fair (κ=0.32; 0.30-0.33) for CLT. Inter-rater agreement between attendings was good (κ=0.68; 0.65-0.71) for EPT and moderate (κ=0.46; 0.43-0.50) for CLT. Inter-rater agreement between fellows was moderate (κ=0.48; 0.45-0.50) for EPT and poor to fair (κ=0.20; 0.17-0.24) for CLT. Among all raters, the odds of an incorrect exact esophageal motility diagnosis were 3.3 times higher with CLT assessment than with EPT (OR: 3.3; 95% CI: 2.4-4.5; P<0.0001), and the odds of incorrect identification of a major motility disorder were 3.4 times higher with CLT than with EPT (OR: 3.4; 2.4-5.0; P<0.0001). Superior inter-rater agreement and diagnostic accuracy of esophageal motility diagnoses were demonstrated with

  14. Diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders: esophageal pressure topography versus conventional line tracing

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, DA; Ravi, K; Kahrilas, PJ; Gyawali, CP; Bredenoord, AJ; Castell, DO; Spechler, SJ; Halland, M; Kanuri, N; Katzka, DA; Leggett, CL; Roman, S; Saenz, JB; Sayuk, GS; Wong, AC; Yadlapati, R; Ciolino, JD; Fox, MR; Pandolfino, JE

    2015-01-01

    Background Enhanced characterization of esophageal peristaltic and sphincter function provided by esophageal pressure topography (EPT) offers a potential diagnostic advantage over conventional line tracings (CLT). However, high-resolution manometry (HRM) and EPT require increased equipment costs over conventional systems and evidence demonstrating a significant diagnostic advantage of EPT over CLT is limited. Our aim was to investigate whether the inter-rater agreement and/or accuracy of esophageal motility diagnosis differed between EPT and CLT. Methods Forty previously-completed patient HRM studies were selected for analysis using a customized software program developed to perform blinded independent interpretation in either EPT or CLT (six pressure sensors) format. Six experienced gastroenterologists with a clinical focus in esophageal disease (attendings) and six gastroenterology trainees with minimal manometry experience (fellows) from three academic centers interpreted each of the 40 studies using both EPT and CLT formats. Rater diagnoses were assessed for inter-rater agreement and diagnostic accuracy, both for exact diagnosis and for correct identification of a major esophageal motility disorder. Results The total group agreement was moderate (κ = 0.57; 95% CI 0.56–0.59) for EPT and fair (κ = 0.32; 0.30–0.33) for CLT. Inter-rater agreement between attendings was good (κ = 0.68; 0.65–0.71) for EPT and moderate (κ = 0.46; 0.43–0.50) for CLT. Inter-rater agreement between fellows was moderate (κ = 0.48; 0.45–0.50) for EPT and poor to fair (κ = 0.20; 0.17–0.24) for CLT. Among all raters, the odds of an incorrect exact esophageal motility diagnosis were 3.3 times higher with CLT assessment than with EPT (OR 3.3; 95% CI 2.4–4.5; p<0.0001) and the odds of incorrect identification of a major motility disorder were 3.4 times higher with CLT than EPT (OR 3.4; 2.4–5.0; p<0.0001). Conclusions Superior inter-rater agreement and diagnostic accuracy

  15. Oropharyngeal acid reflux and motility abnormalities of the proximal esophagus.

    PubMed

    Passaretti, Sandro; Mazzoleni, Giorgia; Vailati, Cristian; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2016-10-28

    To investigate the relationship between pathological oropharyngeal (OP) acid exposure and esophageal motility in patients with extra-esophageal syndromes. In this prospective study we enrolled consecutive outpatients with extra-esophageal symptoms suspected to be related to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We enrolled only patients with a reflux symptom index (RSI) score-higher than 13 and with previous lung, allergy and ear, nose and throat evaluations excluding other specific diagnoses. All patients underwent 24-h OP pH-metry with the Dx probe and esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM). Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of a normal or pathological pH-metric finding (Ryan Score) and all manometric characteristics of the two groups were compared. We examined 135 patients with chronic extra-esophageal syndromes. Fifty-one were considered eligible for the study. Of these, 42 decided to participate in the protocol. Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of normal or pathological OP acid exposure. All the HRM parameters were compared for the two groups. Significant differences were found in the median upper esophageal sphincter resting pressure (median 71 mmHg vs 126 mmHg, P = 0.004) and the median proximal contractile integral (median 215.5 cm•mmHg•s vs 313.5 cm•mmHg•s, P = 0.039), both being lower in the group with pathological OP acid exposure, and the number of contractions with small or large breaks, which were more frequent in the same group. This group also had a larger number of peristaltic contractions with breaks in the 20 mmHg isobaric contour (38.7% vs 15.38%, P < 0.0001). In patients with suspected GERD-related extra-esophageal syndromes pathological OP acid exposure was associated with weaker proximal esophageal motility.

  16. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treating Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Young Hoon; Minami, Hitomi; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is the application of esophageal myotomy to the concept of natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) by utilizing a submucosal tunneling method. Since the first case of POEM was performed for treating achalasia in Japan in 2008, this procedure is being more widely used by many skillful endosopists all over the world. Currently, POEM is a spotlighted, emerging treatment option for achalasia, and the indications for POEM are expanding to include long-standing, sigmoid shaped esophagus in achalasia, even previously failed endoscopic treatment or surgical myotomy, and other spastic esophageal motility disorders. Accumulating data about POEM demonstrate excellent short-term outcomes with minimal risk of major adverse events, and some existing long-term data show the efficacy of POEM to be long lasting. In this review article, we review the technical details and clinical outcomes of POEM, and discuss some considerations of POEM in special situations. PMID:26717928

  17. Ineffective esophageal motility phenotypes following fundoplication in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mello, M D; Shriver, A R; Li, Y; Patel, A; Gyawali, C P

    2016-02-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) is associated with reflux disease, but its natural history is unclear. We evaluated patients undergoing repeat esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM) for symptomatic presentations after antireflux surgery (ARS) to understand the progression of IEM. Patients with repeat HRM after ARS were included. Ineffective esophageal motility was diagnosed if ≥5 sequences had distal contractile integral (DCI) <450 mmHg cm s. Augmentation of DCI following multiple rapid swallows (MRS) was assessed. The esophagogastric junction (EGJ) was interrogated using the EGJ contractile integral (EGJ-CI). Esophageal motor function was compared between patients with and without IEM. Sixty-eight patients (53.9 ± 1.8 years, 66.2% female) had pre- and post-ARS HRM studies 2.1 ± 0.19 years apart. Esophagogastric junction-CI augmented by a mean of 26.3% following ARS. Four IEM phenotypes were identified: 14.7% had persistent IEM, 8.8% resolved IEM after ARS, 19.1% developed new IEM, and 57.4% had no IEM at any point. Patients with IEM had a lower DCI pre- and post-ARS, lower pre-ARS EGJ CI, and lower pre-ARS-integrated relaxation pressure (p ≤ 0.02 for all comparisons); presenting symptoms and other EGJ metrics were similar (p ≥ 0.08 for all comparisons). The IEM phenotypes could be predicted by MRS DCI response patterns (p = 0.008 across groups); patients with persistent IEM had the least DCI augmentation (p = 0.007 compared to no IEM), while those who resolved IEM had DCI augmentation comparable to no IEM (p = 0.08). Distinct phenotypes of IEM exist among symptomatic reflux patients following ARS. Provocative testing with MRS may help identify these phenotypes pre-ARS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Analyses of the characteristics of esophageal motility in patients with pharyngeal paraesthesia who visit the Department of gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjiang; Chen, Yuping; Guo, Tingting

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the influence of the local sensory abnormality in throat while the change of motility in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and lower esophageal sphincter (LES), as well as the change of esophageal body in pharyngeal paraesthesia. From January 2014 to January 2015 there were sixty-four patients who had pharyngeal susceptible syndrome (PSS) but without confirmed organic disease were enrolled as the PSS group, forty healthy volunteers as the control group. High resolution manometry (HRM) was utilized to distinguish esophageal motility patterns of PSS, including the muscular tension of LES and UES, the integrity, adaptability, amplitude, speed and duration of esophageal peristalsis at 10 swallows. The resting LES and UES pressures and the distal contractile integral (DCI) of esophagus in PSS group were lower than that in control group (P < 0.05). The esophageal peristalsis was decelerated and shortened in duration, and amplitude of contraction notably lower in PSS group compared with its counterpart (P < 0.05). The integrity of esophageal peristalsis was impaired in PSS with remarkable changes in motility patterns, involving ratio of major and minor interrupts, and synchronous contraction rate (P < 0.05). As for the time course from relaxation to the lowest pressure point of UES and time for restoration, no definite difference was noticed between the two groups (P > 0.05). The average peak pressure was similar in two groups (P > 0.05). Muscle tension around the UES has no obvious change when pharyngeal paraesthesia occurred, but the reduction of esophageal motor function, clearance ability, anti-reflux gastroesophageal junction, causing the abnormal reflux which hurt the pharyngeal surface mucosa maybe one of the most important reasons leading to pharyngeal paresthesia.

  19. Factors Determining the Inter-observer Variability and Diagnostic Accuracy of High-resolution Manometry for Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sung Eun; Cho, Yu Kyung; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Park, Moo In; Hwang, Jin Won; Jang, Jae-Sik; Oh, Minkyung

    2018-01-30

    Although high-resolution manometry (HRM) has the advantage of visual intuitiveness, its diagnostic validity remains under debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of HRM for esophageal motility disorders. Six staff members and 8 trainees were recruited for the study. In total, 40 patients enrolled in manometry studies at 3 institutes were selected. Captured images of 10 representative swallows and a single swallow in analyzing mode in both high-resolution pressure topography (HRPT) and conventional line tracing formats were provided with calculated metrics. Assessments of esophageal motility disorders showed fair agreement for HRPT and moderate agreement for conventional line tracing (κ = 0.40 and 0.58, respectively). With the HRPT format, the k value was higher in category A (esophagogastric junction [EGJ] relaxation abnormality) than in categories B (major body peristalsis abnormalities with intact EGJ relaxation) and C (minor body peristalsis abnormalities or normal body peristalsis with intact EGJ relaxation). The overall exact diagnostic accuracy for the HRPT format was 58.8% and rater's position was an independent factor for exact diagnostic accuracy. The diagnostic accuracy for major disorders was 63.4% with the HRPT format. The frequency of major discrepancies was higher for category B disorders than for category A disorders (38.4% vs 15.4%; P < 0.001). The interpreter's experience significantly affected the exact diagnostic accuracy of HRM for esophageal motility disorders. The diagnostic accuracy for major disorders was higher for achalasia than distal esophageal spasm and jackhammer esophagus.

  20. Distal esophageal hypercontractility is related to abnormal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Soto-Pérez, Julio César; Sobrino-Cossío, Sergio; Higgins, Paul B; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Vargas Romero, Jose Antonio; Reding-Bernal, Arturo; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos

    2011-02-01

    Nutcracker esophagus (NE) is a frequent primary motility disorder of the distal esophagus, and the relationship with acid exposure remains controversial. We studied simultaneous distal esophageal hypercontractility (EH) using two sensors at 8 and 3 cm above the lower sphincter (LES) and abnormal exposure to acid (pH DeMeester score). From 400 screened patients with chest pain and heartburn, 54 (age 44.5 ± 8.8 years and 74% females) had abnormal manometry and underwent acid exposure measurement. Frequencies of the EH disorder were classic NE (EH(3 cm)) found in 29 (40.8%) patients, diffuse (EH(3,8 cm)) in 30 patients (42.3%), and upper segmental (EH(8 cm)) in 12 patients (16.9%). We found a positive correlation among age with high amplitude in EH(3 cm) and EH(3,8 cm). DeMeester's score (DMS) had the lowest value for EH(3,8 cm) (2.58 ± 0.23) compared with EH(8 cm) (3.78 ± 0.3, p <0.003) and EH(3 cm) (3.12 ± 0.2, p <0.06). Surface response for joint effect of age and DMS on amplitude at EH(3 cm) confirmed the highest amplitude was for older age and lower DMS. EH(3 cm) and EH(3,8 cm) were common for esophageal motility and were inversely associated with DMS. Meanwhile, acid exposure was higher in younger patients and hypercontractility was more frequent in older subjects. The former group may benefit more from proton pump inhibitors and the latter from visceral analgesics or possibly both. Copyright © 2011 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities: frequent finding on high-resolution esophageal manometry and associated with poorer treatment response in achalasia.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Yamile H; Ciarleglio, Maria M; Clarke, John O; Nandwani, Monica; Stein, Ellen; Roland, Bani C

    2015-01-01

    studies, especially in patients with impaired LES relaxation, including both achalasia and esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Interestingly, the most common UES abnormality associated with achalasia was a hypertensive resting UES, despite the fact that achalasia is thought to spare striated muscle. Among patients with achalasia, we found a significant association between the lack of treatment response and the presence of UES dysfunction. The routine evaluation of UES function in patients referred for manometry may enhance our understanding of esophageal motility disorders and may yield important prognostic information, particularly in subjects with achalasia. Future prospective studies are needed to further delineate the underlying mechanism between UES dysfunction with achalasia and other esophageal motility disorders to predict treatment response and guide therapeutic treatment modalities.

  2. Failure to respond to physiologic challenge characterizes esophageal motility in erosive gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Daum, C; Sweis, R; Kaufman, E; Fuellemann, A; Anggiansah, A; Fried, M; Fox, M

    2011-06-01

    Non-specific esophageal dysmotility with impaired clearance is often present in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), especially those with erosive disease; however the physio-mechanic basis of esophageal dysfunction is not well defined. Retrospective assessment of patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD; n=20) and endoscopy negative reflux disease (ENRD; n=20) with pathologic acid exposure on pH studies (>4.2% time/24 h) and also healthy controls (n=20) studied by high resolution manometry. Esophageal motility in response to liquid and solid bolus swallows and multiple water swallows (MWS) was analyzed. Peristaltic dysfunction was defined as failed peristalsis, spasm, weak or poorly coordinated esophageal contraction (>3cm break in 30 mmHg isocontour). Peristaltic dysfunction was present in 33% of water swallows in controls, 56% ENRD and 76% ERD respectively (P<0.023 vs controls, P=0.185 vs ENRD). The proportion of effective peristaltic contractions improved with solid compared to liquid bolus in controls (18%vs 33%, P=0.082) and ENRD (22%vs 54%, P=0.046) but not ERD (62%vs 76%, P=0.438). Similarly, MWS was followed by effective peristalsis in 83% of controls and 70% ENRD but only 30% ERD patients (P<0.017 vs controls and P<0.031 vs ENRD). The association between acid exposure and dysmotility was closer for solid than liquid swallows (r=0.52 vs 0.27). Peristaltic dysfunction is common in GERD. ERD patients are characterized by a failure to respond to the physiologic challenge of solid bolus and MWS that is likely also to impair clearance following reflux events and increase exposure to gastric refluxate. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Effects of pacifier and taste on swallowing, esophageal motility, transit, and respiratory rhythm in human neonates.

    PubMed

    Shubert, T R; Sitaram, S; Jadcherla, S R

    2016-04-01

    Pacifier use is widely prevalent globally despite hygienic concerns and uncertain mechanistic effects on swallowing or airway safety. The effects of pacifier and taste interventions on pharyngo-esophageal motility, bolus transit, and respiratory rhythms were investigated by determining the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), esophageal body, esophagogastric junction (EGJ) motor patterns and deglutition apnea, respiratory rhythm disturbances, and esophageal bolus clearance. Fifteen infants (six males; median gestation 31 weeks and birth weight 1.4 kg) underwent high-resolution impedance manometry at 43 (41-44) weeks postmenstrual age. Manometric, respiratory, and impedance characteristics of spontaneous swallows, pacifier-associated dry swallowing and taste (pacifier dipped in 3% sucrose)-associated swallowing were analyzed. Linear mixed and generalized estimating equation models were used. Data are presented as mean ± SEM, %, or median (IQR). Pharyngo-esophageal motility, respiratory, and impedance characteristics of 209 swallows were analyzed (85 spontaneous swallows, 63 pacifier- swallows, 61 taste- swallows). Basal UES and EGJ pressures decreased upon pacifier (p < 0.05) and taste interventions (p < 0.05); however, esophageal motility, respiratory rhythm, and impedance transit characteristics were similar with both interventions. Oral stimulus with pacifier or taste interventions decreases UES and EGJ basal pressure, but has no effects on pharyngo-esophageal motility, airway interactions, or esophageal bolus transit. A decrease in central parasympathetic-cholinergic excitatory drive is likely responsible for the basal effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Esophageal motility and 24-h pH profiles of patients with heterotopic gastric mucosa in the cervical esophagus.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Esin; Bektaş, Mehmet; Alkan, Murat; Ustün, Yusuf; Meco, Cem; Ozden, Ali; Soykan, Irfan

    2010-02-01

    Heterotopic gastric mucosa occurs as a flat island of red mucosa in the proximal third of the esophagus where it gives rise to the cervical inlet patch. The aims of this study were to investigate the esophageal motility pattern and 24-h pH profiles of patients with cervical inlet patch. Thirty patients (16 women, mean age: 44.9 years, range: 23-72) diagnosed as having heterotopic gastric mucosa in the cervical esophagus with upper gastrointestinal symptoms had undergone esophageal motility testing and 24-h pH monitorisation with a double-channel pH probe. Manometric investigation was abnormal in 7 patients (non-specific esophageal motor disorder in 4 patients, esophageal hypomotility in 1 patient, and hypotensive LES in 2 patients). Pathological acid reflux (pH<4) was found in 9 (30%) of 30 heterotopic gastric mucosa patients during pH monitorisation from the distal probe. Pathological acid reflux in the proximal esophagus (percentage of total time of pH<4) was seen in four of these nine patients. Only four of the 30 patients (13.3%) presented with "acid independent episodes" during the 24-h esophageal pH monitorisation. Manometric investigation and 24-h pH monitorisation revealed that some of the patients with HGM have signs of esophageal motor dysfunction and "acid independent episodes" from the patches. These abnormalities may be responsible for some of the symptoms of HGM patients. Copyright 2009 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for treating esophageal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Pneumatic dilatation and Heller myotomy have been thoroughly studied as the most viable treatment options for achalasia. The pendulum, however, is shifting to the minimally invasive approach. Since Inoue et al. published the experience of the first 17 cases of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) in 2010, there have been at least 5,000 cases performed worldwide and the number is increasing exponentially. Experts across the globe have been extending the indications to various esophageal motility disorders, to patients of extremes of age, sigmoidal esophagus and re-operated patients. There are a few variations in technique across different centers in defining the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) and adequacy of myotomy, the optimal length, site of myotomy and whether the full thickness of the muscle wall should be cut. Large case series demonstrated its promising efficacy & reasonable complication profile. Randomized controlled trial in comparison with the gold standard, Heller myotomy, is ongoing. The future application of submucosal tunnelling technique is thrilling with its extension in tumour resection, antropyloromyotomy and other natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). PMID:28616407

  6. The Potential Benefits of Applying Recent Advances in Esophageal Motility Testing in Patients with Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Nathalie; Rayyan, Maissa; Scheerens, Charlotte; Omari, Taher

    2017-01-01

    Infants and children with esophageal atresia commonly present with swallowing dysfunction or dysphagia. Dysphagia can lead to a range of significant consequences such as aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration, and food impaction. To improve oral intake, the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia in patients with esophageal atresia should focus on both the pharynx and the esophagus. To characterize the complex interactions of bolus flow and motor function between mouth, pharynx, and esophagus, a detailed understanding of normal and abnormal deglutition is required through the use of adequate and objective assessment techniques. As clinical symptoms do not correlate well with conventional assessment methods of motor function such as radiology or manometry but do correlate with bolus flow, the current state-of-the-art diagnosis involves high-resolution manometry combined with impedance measurements to characterize the interplay between esophageal motor function and bolus clearance. Using a novel pressure flow analysis (PFA) method as an integrated analysis method of manometric and impedance measurements, differentiation of patients with impaired esophago-gastric junction relaxation from patients with bolus outflow disorders is clinically relevant. In this, pressure flow matrix categorizing the quantitative PFA measures may be used to make rational therapeutic decisions in patients with esophageal atresia. Through more advanced diagnostics, improved understanding of pathophysiology may improve our patient care by directly targeting the failed biomechanics of both the pharynx and the esophagus.

  7. The Potential Benefits of Applying Recent Advances in Esophageal Motility Testing in Patients with Esophageal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Rommel, Nathalie; Rayyan, Maissa; Scheerens, Charlotte; Omari, Taher

    2017-01-01

    Infants and children with esophageal atresia commonly present with swallowing dysfunction or dysphagia. Dysphagia can lead to a range of significant consequences such as aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration, and food impaction. To improve oral intake, the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia in patients with esophageal atresia should focus on both the pharynx and the esophagus. To characterize the complex interactions of bolus flow and motor function between mouth, pharynx, and esophagus, a detailed understanding of normal and abnormal deglutition is required through the use of adequate and objective assessment techniques. As clinical symptoms do not correlate well with conventional assessment methods of motor function such as radiology or manometry but do correlate with bolus flow, the current state-of-the-art diagnosis involves high-resolution manometry combined with impedance measurements to characterize the interplay between esophageal motor function and bolus clearance. Using a novel pressure flow analysis (PFA) method as an integrated analysis method of manometric and impedance measurements, differentiation of patients with impaired esophago-gastric junction relaxation from patients with bolus outflow disorders is clinically relevant. In this, pressure flow matrix categorizing the quantitative PFA measures may be used to make rational therapeutic decisions in patients with esophageal atresia. Through more advanced diagnostics, improved understanding of pathophysiology may improve our patient care by directly targeting the failed biomechanics of both the pharynx and the esophagus. PMID:28680874

  8. High Resolution Manometry Correlates of Ineffective Esophageal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinglian; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Kwasny, Mary J.; Roman, Sabine; Lin, Zhiyue; Nicodème, Frédéric; Lu, Chang; Pandolfino, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are currently no criteria for ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) and ineffective swallow (IES) in High Resolution Manometry (HRM) and Esophageal Pressure Topography (EPT). Our aims were to utilize HRM metrics to define IEM within the Chicago Classification and to determine the distal contractile integral (DCI) threshold for IES. Methods The EPT of 150 patients with either dysphagia or reflux symptoms were reviewed for the breaks >2 cm in the proximal, middle and distal esophagus in the 20 mmHg isobaric contour (IBC). Peristaltic function in EPT was defined by the Chicago Classification, the corresponding conventional line tracing (CLT) were reviewed separately for IEM and IES. Generalized linear mixed models were used to find thresholds for DCI corresponding to traditionally determined IES and failed swallows. An external validation sample was used to confirm these thresholds. Results In terms of swallow subtypes, IES in CLT were a mixture of normal, weak and failed peristalsis in EPT. A DCI of 450mmHg-s-cm was determined to be optimal in predicting IES. In the validation sample, the threshold of 450 mmHg-s-cm showed strong agreement with CLT determination of IES (positive percent agreement 83%, negative percent agreement 90%) Thirty-three among 42 IEM patients in CLT had large peristaltic breaks, small peristaltic breaks or ‘frequent failed peristalsis’ in EPT; 87.2% (34/39) of patients classified as normal in CLT had proximal IBC-breaks in EPT. the patient level diagnostic agreement between CLT and EPT was good (78.6% positive percent agreement, 63.9% negative percent agreement), with negative agreement increasing to 92.0% if proximal breaks were excluded. Conclusions The manometric correlate of IEM in EPT is a mixture of failed swallows and IBC break in the middle/ distal troughs. A DCI value<450 mmHg-s-cm can be utilized to predict IES previously defined in CLT. IEM can be defined by >5 swallows with weak /failed peristalsis or with a

  9. Multiple Rapid Swallow Maneuver Enhances the Clinical Utility of High-Resolution Manometry in Patients Showing Ineffective Esophageal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Shin, Inseub; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical significance of ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) together with multiple rapid swallow (MRS) has not been yet evaluated in the Chicago Classification v3.0. This study evaluated the adjunctive role of MRS in IEM and determined the criteria of abnormal MRS to maximize the utility of IEM. We analyzed 186 patients showing IEM or normal esophageal motility (NEM), who underwent esophageal high-resolution impedance–manometry for esophageal symptoms. Two different criteria for abnormal MRS were applied to IEM subjects, resulting in 2 corresponding subgroups: IEM-A when distal contractile integral (DCI) ratio between an average wet swallows and MRS contraction was <1 and IEM-B when MRS contraction DCI was <450 mm Hg-s-cm. One IEM subject inadequately performed MRS. Among the remaining 52 IEM subjects, 18 (34.6%) were classified into IEM-A and 23 (44.2%) into IEM-B. IEM subjects showed less complete bolus transit (median 0.0%, interquartile range 0.0–20.0% vs 60.0%, 30.0–80.0; P < 0.001) resulting in higher impaired bolus transit than NEM subjects (98.1% vs 66.9%, P = 0.001). IEM-B subjects showed additionally higher pathologic bolus exposure than NEM subjects (55.6% vs 29.3%, P = 0.001), whereas IEM-A subjects could not. Although IEM-B subjects had the highest prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease among the subjects groups, it did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, IEM patients with abnormal MRS contraction have an increased risk of prolonged bolus clearance, poor bolus transit, and pathologic bolus exposure. IEM patients need to be assessed concerning whether MRS contraction DCI is <450 mm Hg-s-cm to segregate clinically relevant patients. PMID:26448010

  10. Gastrointestinal motility and sensory abnormalities may contribute to food refusal in medically fragile toddlers.

    PubMed

    Zangen, Tsili; Ciarla, Carla; Zangen, Samuel; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Flores, Alex F; Cocjin, Jose; Reddy, Sarabudla Narasimha; Rowhani, Anita; Schwankovsky, Lenore; Hyman, Paul E

    2003-09-01

    In chronically ill children who refuse to eat, surgery to correct anatomic problems and behavioral treatments to overcome oral aversion often succeed. A few patients fail with standard treatments. The aims of the study were to: 1) investigate motility and gastric sensory abnormalities and 2) describe treatment that was individualized based on pathophysiology in children who failed surgery and behavioral treatments. We studied 14 patients (age 1.5-6; mean 2.5; M/F: 7/7). All had a lifelong history of food aversion and retching or vomiting persisting after feeding therapy and fundoplication. All were fed through gastrostomy or gastro-jejunostomy tubes. We studied esophageal and antroduodenal manometry, and gastric volume threshold for retching. We identified when gastric antral contractions were associated with retching and pain. A multidisciplinary treatment program included a variable combination of continuous post-pyloric feedings, drugs to decrease visceral pain, drugs for motility disorders, and behavioral, cognitive, and family therapy. We interviewed parents 2-6 months following testing to evaluate symptoms, mode of feeding and emotional health. We found a motility disorder alone in 2, decreased threshold for retching alone in 5 and both motility and sensory abnormalities in 7. After treatment, 6 of 14 (43%) began eating orally and 80% had improved emotional health. Retching decreased from 15 episodes per day to an average of 1.4 per day (p <0.01). Upper gastrointestinal motor and/or sensory disorders contributed to reduced quality of life for a majority of children and families with persistent feeding problems. A multidisciplinary approach improved symptoms and problems in these children

  11. Changes in esophageal motility after endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal cancer: a high-resolution manometry study.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Sato, Y; Takeuchi, M; Sato, H; Nakajima, N; Ikarashi, S; Hayashi, K; Mizuno, K-I; Honda, Y; Hashimoto, S; Yokoyama, J; Terai, S

    2017-11-01

    The effect of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) on esophageal motility remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study is to elucidate changes in esophageal motility after ESD along with the cause of dysphagia using high-resolution manometry (HRM). This is a before-and-after trial of the effect of ESD on the esophageal motility. Twenty patients who underwent ESD for superficial esophageal carcinoma were enrolled in this study. Patients filled out a questionnaire about dysphagia and underwent HRM before and after ESD. Results before and after ESD were compared. Data were obtained from 19 patients. The number of patients who complained of dysphagia before and after ESD was 1/19 (5.3%) and 6/19 (31.6%), respectively (P = 0.131). Scores from the five-point Likert scale before and after ESD were 0.1 ± 0.5 and 1.0 ± 1.6, respectively (P = 0.043). The distal contractile integral (DCI) before and after ESD and the number of failed, weak, or fragmented contractions were not significantly different. However, in five patients with circumferential ESD, DCI was remarkably decreased and the frequency of fail, weak, or fragmented contractions increased. Univariate regression analysis showed a relatively strong inverse correlation of ΔDCI with the circumferential mucosal defect ratio {P < 0.01, standardized regression coefficient (r) = -0.65}, the number of stricture preventions (P < 0.01, r = -0.601), and the number of stricture resolutions (P < 0.01, r = -0.77). This HRM study showed that impairment of esophageal motility could be caused by ESD. The impairment of esophageal motility was conspicuous, especially in patients with circumferential ESD and subsequent procedures such as endoscopic triamcinolone injection and endoscopic balloon dilatation. Impaired esophageal motility after ESD might explain dysphagia. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions

  12. Esophageal motility disorders-Symptomatic and manometric spectrum in Punjab, northern India.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Omesh; Bansal, Monika; Sood, Ajit

    2017-05-01

    Data on the spectrum of esophageal motility disorders in Indian population are scarce. We aimed to study the symptomatic and manometric profile of patients with suspected esophageal motility disorders. Consecutive patients with esophageal symptoms who underwent esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) from January 2010 to December 2014 were included in this retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data. HRM was performed with 22-channel water-perfusion system and patients classified using Chicago classification v3.0. Of the 401 patients studied [median age 43 (18-85) years; 61% males], 217 presented with dysphagia, 157 with predominant retrosternal discomfort and 27 with predominant regurgitation. Among patients with dysphagia, 43.8% had ineffective esophageal motility [IEM], 26.3% had achalasia cardia [AC], 6.9% had distal esophageal spasm [DES] and 19.4% had normal manometry [NM]. Among patients with retrosternal discomfort, 42.7% had IEM, 5.7% had AC, 4.5% had DES and 42% had NM. AC was significantly more common among patients presenting with dysphagia compared to those with retrosternal discomfort [p< 0.001] or regurgitation [p< 0.001]. NM was significantly more common among patients presenting with retrosternal symptoms compared to those with dysphagia [p< 0.001]. AC patients had longer duration of dysphagia, more frequent bolus obstruction and more weight loss compared to those with IEM or NM [p< 0.05]. Dysphagia was the commonest presenting symptom followed by retrosternal discomfort. Ineffective esophageal motility (not achalasia cardia) was the commonest manometric finding both among patients with dysphagia and retrosternal discomfort. This study highlights the high prevalence of IEM among patients with esophageal symptoms, which can present with dysphagia or retrosternal discomfort due to poor bolus transit.

  13. Esophageal abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Levine, Marc S; Carucci, Laura R

    2018-06-01

    Fluoroscopic esophagography is a widely available, safe, and inexpensive test for detecting gastroesophageal reflux disease. In this article, we review the technique for performing a high-quality esophagram, including upright, double-contrast views of the esophagus and cardia with high-density barium; prone, single-contrast views of the esophagus with low-density barium; and evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux. We then discuss the radiographic findings associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease, including esophageal dysmotility, reflux esophagitis, peptic strictures, and Barrett's esophagus. Finally, we consider the differential diagnosis for the various radiographic findings associated with this condition. When carefully performed and interpreted, the esophagram is a useful test for evaluating gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications.

  14. Muscle layer histopathology and manometry pattern of primary esophageal motility disorders including achalasia.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, N; Sato, H; Takahashi, K; Hasegawa, G; Mizuno, K; Hashimoto, S; Sato, Y; Terai, S

    2017-03-01

    Histopathology of muscularis externa in primary esophageal motility disorders has been characterized previously. We aimed to correlate the results of high-resolution manometry with those of histopathology. During peroral endoscopic myotomy, peroral esophageal muscle biopsy was performed in patients with primary esophageal motility disorders. Immunohistochemical staining for c-kit was performed to assess the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs). Hematoxylin Eosin and Azan-Mallory staining were used to detect muscle atrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, respectively. Slides from 30 patients with the following motility disorders were analyzed: achalasia (type I: 14, type II: 5, type III: 3), one diffuse esophageal spasm (DES), two outflow obstruction (OO), four jackhammer esophagus (JE), and one nutcracker esophagus (NE). ICCs were preserved in high numbers in type III achalasia (n=9.4±1.2 cells/high power field [HPF]), compared to types I (n=3.7±0.3 cells/HPF) and II (n=3.5±1.0 cells/HPF). Moreover, severe fibrosis was only observed in type I achalasia and not in other types of achalasia, OO, or DES. Four of five patients with JE and NE had severe inflammation with eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal muscle layer (73.8±50.3 eosinophils/HPF) with no epithelial eosinophils. One patient with JE showed a visceral myopathy pattern. Compared to types I and II, type III achalasia showed preserved ICCs, with variable data regarding DES and OO. In disorders considered as primary esophageal motility disorders, a disease category exists, which shows eosinophilic infiltration in the esophageal muscle layer with no eosinophils in the epithelium. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A pictorial presentation of 3.0 Chicago Classification for esophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Herbella, Fernando Augusto; Armijo, Priscila Rodrigues; Patti, Marco Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    High resolution manometry changed several esophageal motility paradigms. The 3.0 Chicago Classification defined manometric criteria for named esophageal motility disorders. We present a pictorial atlas of motility disorders. Achalasia types, esophagogastric junction obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus (jackhammer), ineffective esophageal motility, and fragmented peristalsis are depicted with high-resolution manometry plots. RESUMO A manometria de alta resolução mudou vários paradigmas da motilidade digestiva. A Classificação de Chicago, na versão 3.0, definiu critérios manométricos para as doenças da motilidade esofagiana. O presente artigo é um atlas das dismotilidades descritas. Tipos de acalásia, obstrução ao nível da junção esofagogástrica, contrações ausentes, espasmo esofagiano distal, esôfago hipercontrátil, motilidade esofagiana ineficaz e peristalse fragmentada são mostradas em traçados de manometria de alta resolução.

  16. Motility, digestive and nutritional problems in Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Gottrand, Madeleine; Michaud, Laurent; Sfeir, Rony; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is a rare congenital malformation. Digestive and nutritional problems remain frequent in children with EA both in early infancy and at long-term follow-up. These patients are at major risk of presenting with gastroesophageal reflux and its complications, such as anastomotic strictures. Esophageal dysmotility is constant, and can have important consequences on feeding and nutritional status. Patients with EA need a systematic follow-up with a multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Not All Children with Cystic Fibrosis Have Abnormal Esophageal Neutralization during Chemical Clearance of Acid Reflux.

    PubMed

    Woodley, Frederick W; Moore-Clingenpeel, Melissa; Machado, Rodrigo Strehl; Nemastil, Christopher J; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R; Hayes, Don; Kopp, Benjamin T; Kaul, Ajay; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Mousa, Hayat

    2017-09-01

    Acid neutralization during chemical clearance is significantly prolonged in children with cystic fibrosis, compared to symptomatic children without cystic fibrosis. The absence of available reference values impeded identification of abnormal findings within individual patients with and without cystic fibrosis. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that significantly more children with cystic fibrosis have acid neutralization durations during chemical clearance that fall outside the physiological range. Published reference value for acid neutralization duration during chemical clearance (determined using combined impedance/pH monitoring) was used to assess esophageal acid neutralization efficiency during chemical clearance in 16 children with cystic fibrosis (3 to <18 years) and 16 age-matched children without cystic fibrosis. Duration of acid neutralization during chemical clearance exceeded the upper end of the physiological range in 9 of 16 (56.3%) children with and in 3 of 16 (18.8%) children without cystic fibrosis ( p =0.0412). The likelihood ratio for duration indicated that children with cystic fibrosis are 2.1-times more likely to have abnormal acid neutralization during chemical clearance, and children with abnormal acid neutralization during chemical clearance are 1.5-times more likely to have cystic fibrosis. Significantly more (but not all) children with cystic fibrosis have abnormally prolonged esophageal clearance of acid. Children with cystic fibrosis are more likely to have abnormal acid neutralization during chemical clearance. Additional studies involving larger sample sizes are needed to address the importance of genotype, esophageal motility, composition and volume of saliva, and gastric acidity on acid neutralization efficiency in cystic fibrosis children.

  18. Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Non-Achalasia Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Improved Criteria, Prevalence, Strength of Association and Natural History

    PubMed Central

    Putra, Juan; Muller, Kristen E.; Hussain, Zilla H.; Parker, Siddhartha; Gabbard, Scott; Brickley, Elizabeth B.; Lacy, Brian E.; Rothstein, Richard; Lisovsky, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Lymphocytic esophagitis (LE) is a histologic pattern with no established clinical correlates in the majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between non-achalasia primary esophageal motility disorders (PMED) and LE. Sixty-nine patients with PMED and esophageal biopsies, including 22 with nutcracker esophagus, 33 with ineffective motility and 14 with diffuse spasm, constituted the study group. The control group consisted of 70 patients with severe dysmotility-negative gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) requiring referral for Nissen fundoplication. To improve the criteria for LE, a lymphocyte reference range at different esophageal levels was first established in 17 healthy volunteers. The cutoffs for normal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), defined as lymphocyte levels not exceeding mean level + 2 standard deviations, were set at 62, 46, and 41 lymphocytes per high power field at 0 to 2 cm, 5 cm, and 10 cm above the gastroesophageal junction, respectively. Predominantly focal peripapillary LE was observed in approximately 40% of patients with nutcracker esophagus or diffuse spasm and 20% of patients with ineffective motility, in comparison to 4% of patients with dysmotility-negative GERD (P < 0.035 versus any subtype of PMED). Overall, LE was strongly associated with PMED in multivariate analysis (adjusted odds ratio, 7.93; 95% CI: 2.26, 27.9; P=0.001). LE had a chronic course in 56% of the patients with follow-up biopsies. In conclusion, LE has a strong association with PMED, suggesting utility of LE in raising the possibility of PMED. PMID:27526295

  19. Long-term esophageal motility changes after thyroidectomy: associations with aerodigestive disorders.

    PubMed

    Scerrino, G; Inviati, A; Di Giovanni, S; Paladino, N C; Di Giovanni, S; Paladino, N C; Di Paola, V; Raspanti, C; Melfa, G I; Cupido, F; Mazzola, S; Porrello, C; Bonventre, S; Gullotta, G

    2017-01-01

    Patients undergoing thyroidectomy often complain aerodigestive disorders. In a previous study we showed the associations between voice impairment and proximal acid reflux, swallowing impairment and Upper Esophageal Sphyncter (UES) incoordination and the decrease in UES pressure in thirty-six patients observed before and soon afterwards uncomplicated thyroidectomy. This study investigated the state of post-thyroidectomy esophageal motility changes and its associations with these disorders after 18-24 months. The thirty-six patients prospectively recruited according to selection criteria (thyroid volume ≤60 ml, benign disease, age 18-65 years, previous neck surgery, thyroiditis, pre- or postoperative vocal cord palsy) underwent voice (VIS) and swallowing (SIS) impairment scores, esophageal manometry and pH monitoring once again. After 18-24 months, both VIS and SIS recovered (respectively: p=0,022; p=0,0001); UES pressure increased (p=0,0001) nearing the preoperative values. The persistence of swallowing complaints were associated with the persistence of esophageal incoordination (p=0,03); the association between voice impairment and proximal acid reflux was confirmed (p<0,001). Our study confirms that aerodigestive disorders after uncomplicated thyroidectomy, largely transient, are strictly connected with upper esophageal motility changes. In this viewpoint, the innervation of upper aerodigestive anatomical structures (larynx, pharynx, upper esophagus) and its variations should be focused.

  20. Characterization of esophageal pressure-flow abnormalities in patients with non-obstructive dysphagia and normal manometry findings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Omari, Taher I

    2013-06-01

    Patients with non-obstructive dysphagia (NOD) report symptoms of impaired esophageal bolus transit without evidence of bolus stasis. In such patients, manometric investigation may diagnose esophageal motility disorders; however, many have normal motor patterns. We hypothesized that patients with NOD would demonstrate evidence of high flow-resistance during bolus passage which in turn would relate to the reporting of bolus hold up perception. Esophageal pressure-impedance recordings of 5 mL liquid and viscous swallows from 18 NOD patients (11 male; 19-71 years) and 17 control subjects (9 male; 25-60 years) were analyzed. The relationship between intrabolus pressure and bolus flow timing in the esophagus was assessed using the pressure flow index (PFI). Bolus perception was assessed swallow by swallow using standardized descriptors. NOD patients were characterized by a higher PFI than controls. The PFI defined a pressure-flow abnormality in all patients who appeared normal based on the assessment esophageal motor patterns and bolus clearance. The PFI was higher for individual swallows during which subjects reported perception of bolus passage. Bolus flow-resistance is higher in NOD patients compared with controls as well as higher in relation to perception of bolus transit, suggesting the presence of an esophageal motility disorder despite normal findings on conventional analysis. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. High-resolution impedance manometry parameters enhance the esophageal motility evaluation in non-obstructive dysphagia patients without a major Chicago Classification motility disorder

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, DA; Omari, T; Lin, Z; Rommel, N; Starkey, K; Kahrilas, PJ; Tack, J; Pandolfino, JE

    2016-01-01

    Background High-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) allows evaluation of esophageal bolus retention, flow, and pressurization. We aimed to perform a collaborative analysis of HRIM metrics to evaluate patients with non-obstructive dysphagia. Methods 14 asymptomatic controls (58% female; ages 20 – 50) and 41 patients (63% female; ages 24 – 82), 18 evaluated for dysphagia, 23 for reflux (‘non-dysphagia patients’), with esophageal motility diagnoses of normal motility or ineffective esophageal motility were evaluated with HRIM and a global dysphagia symptom score (Brief Esophageal Dysphagia Questionnaire). HRIM were analyzed to assess Chicago Classification metrics, automated pressure-flow metrics, the esophageal impedance integral (EII) ratio, and the bolus flow time (BFT). Key Results Significant symptom-metric correlations were detected only with basal EGJ pressure, EII ratio, and BFT. The EII ratio, BFT, and impedance ratio differed between controls and dysphagia patients, while the EII ratio in the upright position was the only measure that differentiated dysphagia from non-dysphagia patients. Conclusions & Inferences The EII ratio and BFT appear to offer an improved diagnostic evaluation in patients with non-obstructive dysphagia without a major esophageal motility disorder. Bolus retention as measured with the EII ratio appears to carry the strongest association with dysphagia, and thus may aid in the characterization of symptomatic patients with otherwise normal manometry. PMID:27647522

  2. High-resolution impedance manometry parameters enhance the esophageal motility evaluation in non-obstructive dysphagia patients without a major Chicago Classification motility disorder.

    PubMed

    Carlson, D A; Omari, T; Lin, Z; Rommel, N; Starkey, K; Kahrilas, P J; Tack, J; Pandolfino, J E

    2017-03-01

    High-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) allows evaluation of esophageal bolus retention, flow, and pressurization. We aimed to perform a collaborative analysis of HRIM metrics to evaluate patients with non-obstructive dysphagia. Fourteen asymptomatic controls (58% female; ages 20-50) and 41 patients (63% female; ages 24-82), 18 evaluated for dysphagia and 23 for reflux (non-dysphagia patients), with esophageal motility diagnoses of normal motility or ineffective esophageal motility, were evaluated with HRIM and a global dysphagia symptom score (Brief Esophageal Dysphagia Questionnaire). HRIM was analyzed to assess Chicago Classification metrics, automated pressure-flow metrics, the esophageal impedance integral (EII) ratio, and the bolus flow time (BFT). Significant symptom-metric correlations were detected only with basal EGJ pressure, EII ratio, and BFT. The EII ratio, BFT, and impedance ratio differed between controls and dysphagia patients, while the EII ratio in the upright position was the only measure that differentiated dysphagia from non-dysphagia patients. The EII ratio and BFT appear to offer an improved diagnostic evaluation in patients with non-obstructive dysphagia without a major esophageal motility disorder. Bolus retention as measured with the EII ratio appears to carry the strongest association with dysphagia, and thus may aid in the characterization of symptomatic patients with otherwise normal manometry. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Characterization of Esophageal Motility Disorders in Children Presenting With Dysphagia Using High-Resolution Manometry.

    PubMed

    Edeani, Francis; Malik, Adeel; Kaul, Ajay

    2017-03-01

    The Chicago classification was based on metrics derived from studies in asymptomatic adult subjects. Our objectives were to characterize esophageal motility disorders in children and to determine whether the spectrum of manometric findings is similar between the pediatric and adult populations. Studies have suggested that the metrics utilized in manometric diagnosis depend on age, size, and manometric assembly. This would imply that a different set of metrics should be used for the pediatric population. There are no standardized and generally accepted metrics for use in the pediatric population, though there have been attempts to establish metrics specific to this population. Overall, we found that the distribution of esophageal motility disorders in children was like that described in adults using the Chicago classification. This analysis will serve as a prequel to follow-up studies exploring the individual metrics for variability among patients, with the objective of establishing novel metrics for the pediatric population.

  4. Complications of botulinum toxin injections for treatment of esophageal motility disorders†.

    PubMed

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Tack, Jan F; Pandolfino, John E; Sternbach, Joel M; Roman, Sabine; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2017-02-01

    In achalasia and spastic esophageal motility disorders, botulinum toxin (botox) injection is considered an effective and low-risk procedure for short-term symptom relief. It is mainly offered to medically high-risk patients. However, no analysis of risks of botox injections has been performed. To determine the incidence and risk factors of procedure-related complications after esophageal botox injections, we analyzed the records of all patients undergoing botox injection therapy for esophageal motility disorders at four university hospitals in Europe and North America between 2008 and 2014. Complications were assigned grades according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. In 386 patients, 661 botox treatments were performed. Main indications were achalasia (51%) and distal esophageal spasm (DES) (30%). In total, 52 (7.9%) mild complications (Clavien-Dindo grade I) were reported by 48 patients, the majority consisting of chest pain or heartburn (29 procedures) or epigastric pain (5 procedures). No ulceration, perforation, pneumothorax, or abscess were reported. One patient died after developing acute mediastinitis (Clavien-Dindo grade V) following injections in the body of the esophagus. In univariate logistic regression, younger age was associated with an increased risk of complications (OR 1.43, 95%CI 1.03-1.96). Treatment for DES, injections into the esophageal body, more injections per procedure, more previous treatments and larger amount of injected botulinum toxin were no risk factors for complications. Esophageal botox injection seems particularly appropriate for high-risk patients due to low complication rate. However, it should not be considered completely safe, as it is associated with rare side effects that cannot be predicted. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  5. Impact of deep brain stimulation on pharyngo-esophageal motility: a randomized cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Derrey, S; Chastan, N; Maltete, D; Verin, E; Dechelotte, P; Lefaucheur, R; Proust, F; Freger, P; Leroi, A M; Weber, J; Gourcerol, G

    2015-09-01

    Bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation is used to alleviate Parkinson's disease (PD) motor symptoms. Recently, it has been shown that this therapeutic also increased gut cholinergic contractions. We therefore investigated the effect of STN stimulation on esophageal motility in an interventional randomized study. Sixteen humans PD patients (4 women, 12 men; age: 62.4 ± 9.3-years old) who underwent STN stimulation for at least 6 months were randomly evaluated with either stimulator turned OFF then ON, or inversely. Esophageal high resolution manometry was performed at the end of each ON and OFF period, with a 5 min resting period followed by ten swallows of 5 mL. During the ON, an increase in the distal contractility index was found (OFF: 1750 ± 629 vs ON: 2171 ± 755 mmHg/cm/s; p = 0.03), with no difference in the distal front velocity. A decrease in the integrative relaxation pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) was noted (OFF: 11.1 ± 1.8 mmHg vs ON: 7.2 ± 1.8 mmHg; p < 0.05) in ON. The LES resting pressure remained unchanged during the two periods. This resulted in a decrease in the intrabolus pressure (p = 0.03). No difference was observed for the upper esophageal sphincter, nor the pharyngeal contraction amplitude and velocity. In conclusion, STN stimulation in PD patients increased esophageal body contractions and enhanced the LES opening. This suggests that the nigrostriatal-striatonigral loop is involved in the control of esophageal motility. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The effects of sleeve gastectomy on gastro-esophageal reflux and gastro-esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Jamal O; Wan, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy is an increasingly performed bariatric procedure associated with low morbidity and good short to medium term effects on weight loss and comorbid conditions. Studies assessing the prevalence of post-operative gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), show sleeve gastrectomy may provoke de novo GERD symptoms or worsening of pre-existing GERD. Pathophysiological mechanisms of GERD after sleeve gastrectomy include a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter, increased gastro-esophageal pressure gradient and intra-thoracic migration of the remnant stomach. A reduction in the compliance of the gastric remnant may provoke an increase in transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations. Time-resolved MRI suggests relative gastric stasis in the proximal remnant and increased emptying from the antrum. A lack of standardisation of technique, along with heterogeneity of studies assessing GERD may explain the wide variability in reported results. Simultaneous and careful repair of an associated hiatus hernia may result in a reduction in the prevalence of post-operative GERD.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for simultaneous morphological and functional evaluation of esophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Sumikawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamasaki, Makoto; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Shuji; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of esophageal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the diagnosis of achalasia. Eleven patients with suspected achalasia and three normal subjects underwent fMRI while swallowing clear liquid with original sequences; "T2-weighed single-shot fast spin-echo" and "Fast Imaging Employing Steady-state Acquisition". The fMRI-based diagnosis was compared with that based on manometry. The luminal fluctuation index (LFI) and Dd/Ds ratio were used for the objective evaluation of the esophageal peristalsis and relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Functional MRI showed a dilated tortuous esophagus with no tumor, poor clearance, simultaneous waves, aperistalsis, and impaired LES relaxation in all but one case, allowing the diagnosis of achalasia with accuracy similar to that of manometry. The LFI (median 0.08, range 0.03-0.25) and Dd/Ds ratio (1.40, 1.0-2.3) of the patient group were significantly lower than those of the normal subjects [1.50, 2.32-4.05, and 2.59 (2.32-4.05)]. No severe adverse events directly related to fMRI were noted. Using our protocol, fMRI was considered to be safe and feasible for the diagnosis of achalasia. Given the widespread use of MRI, esophageal fMRI, which does not require exposure to radiation, could be a potentially useful diagnostic tool for patients with esophageal motility disorders.

  8. Age-Related Differences in Clinical Characteristics and Esophageal Motility in Patients with Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Nakato, Rui; Manabe, Noriaki; Kamada, Tomoari; Matsumoto, Hideo; Shiotani, Akiko; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2017-06-01

    Dysphagia in elderly patients has a major effect on nutrition and quality of life (QOL). Although several studies have shown that aging itself is associated with changes in esophageal motility, the impact of these changes on dysphagia symptoms and QOL is unknown. This study assessed the manometric diagnoses of elderly patients with dysphagia compared with diagnoses in younger counterparts. Participants included 116 consecutive patients examined for dysphagia from 2007 to 2014. We divided patients into three groups by age: Group A, 66 years and older (24 men, 23 women); Group B, 45-65 years (18 men, 24 women); and Group C, 44 years and younger (15 men, 12 women). The three groups were compared in regard to symptoms, esophageal motility, and health-related QOL (HRQOL). All patients underwent esophageal manometry examination and completed a self-administered questionnaire concerning their symptoms; HRQOL assessment was based on results of the Short Form-8 General Health Survey. Symptoms rated ≥4 points on the Likert scale were defined as significant. Although all patients had dysphagia as a major symptom, more elderly patients reported globus sensation, whereas more young patients reported heartburn as the primary symptom. Manometric diagnoses were generally similar across the three groups. Ineffective esophageal motility was more prevalent in Groups A and C than in Group B, although the difference was not statistically significant. No significant differences in manometric parameters or HRQOL were detected among the three groups. Despite differences in symptom patterns, broad manometric diagnoses and impairment of HRQOL in elderly patients with dysphagia are similar to those in younger counterparts.

  9. High-Resolution Manometry Evaluation of the Pharynx and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Motility in Patients with Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mariano A; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2015-10-01

    The motility of the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) is still poorly understood. It is also unclear if the motility of this area may be compromised in patients with achalasia. This study aims to evaluate the motility of the pharynx, UES, and proximal esophagus in patients with esophageal achalasia. Sixty patients with achalasia underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM) (52 % females, mean age 54 years). Esophageal dilatation was classified according to the radiologic diameter in Type I (<4 cm): 6 %; Type II (4-7 cm): 36 %; Type III (7-10 cm): 34 %; and Type IV (>10 cm): 24 %. HRM classified 43 % of the patients as Chicago Type I and 57 % as Type II. Manometric parameters were compared to normal values obtained from a previous study in volunteers. The motility of the velopharynx showed short, premature, and hypertonic contraction. The epiglottis also showed hypertonic contraction. The UES had increased residual pressure. Chicago classification Type II patients had higher UES residual pressure (p = 0.03). The degree of esophageal dilatation did not correlate with manometric parameters. Achalasia may affect the motility of the pharyngo-upper esophageal area. The changes observed may represent functional alterations to prevent aspiration, especially in patients with Chicago classification Type II achalasia.

  10. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on esophageal motility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Vigneri, Simone; Bonventre, Sebastiano; Inviati, Angela; Schifano, Domenico; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Puma, Angela; Giglia, Giuseppe; Paladino, Piera; Brighina, Filippo; Fierro, Brigida

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on esophageal peristalsis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients with GERD preliminary diagnosis were included in a randomized double-blind sham-controlled study. Esophageal manometry was performed before and during transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the right precentral cortex. Half of patients were randomly assigned to anodal, half to sham stimulation. Distal waves amplitude and pathological waves percentage were measured, after swallowing water boli, for ten subsequent times. Last, a 24h pH-bilimetry was done to diagnose non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) or functional heartburn (FH). The values obtained before and during anodal or sham tDCS were compared. Sixty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. Distal waves mean amplitude increased significantly only during anodal tDCS in NERD (p=0.00002) and FH subgroups (p=0.008) while percentage of pathological waves strongly decreased only in NERDs (p=0.002). Transcranial stimulation can influence cortical control of esophageal motility and improve pathological motor pattern in NERD and FH but not in erosive reflux disease (ERD) patients. Pathophysiological processes in GERD are not only due to peripheral damage but to central neural control involvement as well. In ERD patients dysfunctions of the cortico-esophageal circuit seem to be more severe and may affect central nervous system physiology. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A physiological model for the investigation of esophageal motility in healthy and pathologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Carniel, Emanuele Luigi; Frigo, Alessandro; Costantini, Mario; Giuliani, Tommaso; Nicoletti, Loredana; Merigliano, Stefano; Natali, Arturo N

    2016-07-15

    Recent technological advances in esophageal manometry allowed the definition of new classification methods for the diagnosis of disorders of esophageal motility and the implementation of innovative computational tools for the autonomic, reliable and unbiased detection of different disorders. Computational models can be developed aiming to interpret the mechanical behavior and functionality of the gastrointestinal tract and to summarize the results from clinical measurements, as high-resolution manometry pressure plots, into model parameters. A physiological model was here developed to interpret data from esophageal high-resolution manometry. Such model accounts for parameters related to specific physiological properties of the biological structures involved in the peristaltic mechanism. The identification of model parameters was performed by minimizing the discrepancy between clinical data from high-resolution manometry and model results. Clinical data were collected from both healthy volunteers (n = 35) and patients with different motor disorders, such as achalasia patterns 1 (n = 13), 2 (n = 20) and 3 (n = 5), distal esophageal spasm (n = 69), esophago-gastric junction outflow obstruction (n = 25), nutcracker esophagus (n = 11) and normal motility (n = 42). The physiological model that was formulated in this work can properly explain high-resolution manometry data, as confirmed by the evaluation of the coefficient of determination R 2  = 0.83 - 0.96. The study finally led to identify the statistical distributions of model parameters for each healthy or pathologic conditions considered, addressing the applicability of the achieved results for the implementation of autonomic diagnosis procedures to support the medical staff during the traditional diagnostic process. © IMechE 2016.

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease-associated esophagitis induces endogenous cytokine production leading to motor abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Florian; Cheng, Ling; Harnett, Karen M; Chak, Amitabh; Cooper, Gregory S; Isenberg, Gerard; Ray, Monica; Katz, Jeffry A; Catanzaro, Andrew; O'Shea, Robert; Post, Anthony B; Wong, Richard; Sivak, Michael V; McCormick, Thomas; Phillips, Manijeh; West, Gail A; Willis, Joseph E; Biancani, Piero; Fiocchi, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a condition frequently associated with esophagitis and motor abnormalities. Recent evidence suggests that proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6, may be implicated because they reduce esophageal muscle contractility, but these results derive from in vitro or animal models of esophagitis. This study used human esophageal cells and tissues to identify the cellular source of cytokines in human esophagitis investigate whether cytokines can be induced by gastric refluxate, and examine whether esophageal tissue- or cell-derived mediators affect muscle contractility. Endoscopic mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained from patients with and without esophagitis, organ-cultured, and undernatants were assessed for cytokine content. The cytokine profile of esophageal epithelial, fibroblast, and muscle cells was analyzed, and esophageal mucosa and cell products were tested in an esophageal circular muscle contraction assay. The mucosa of esophagitis patients produced significantly greater amounts of IL-1beta and IL-6 compared with those of control patients. Cultured esophageal epithelial cells produced IL-6, as did fibroblasts and muscle cells. Epithelial cells exposed to buffered, but not denatured, gastric juice produced IL-6. Undernatants of mucosal biopsy cultures from esophagitis patients reduced esophageal muscle contraction, as did supernatants from esophageal epithelial cell cultures. The human esophagus produces cytokines capable of reducing contractility of esophageal muscle cells. Exposure to gastric juice is sufficient to stimulate esophageal epithelial cells to produce IL-6, a cytokine able to alter esophageal contractility. These results indicate that classic cytokines are important mediators of the motor disturbances associated with human esophageal inflammation.

  13. The role of impaired esophageal and gastric motility in end-stage lung diseases and after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fisichella, Piero Marco; Jalilvand, Anahita

    2014-01-01

    Today, many questions persist regarding the causal relationship of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) to promote aspiration and its potential to induce both pulmonary and allograft failure. Current hypotheses, which have identified GERD as a nonimmune risk factor in inducing pulmonary and allograft failure, center on the role of GERD-induced aspiration of gastroduodenal contents. Risk factors of GERD, such as impaired esophageal and gastric motility, may indirectly play a role in the aspiration process. In fact, although impaired esophageal and gastric motility is not independently a cause of lung deterioration or allograft failure, they may cause and or exacerbate GERD. This report seeks to review present research on impaired esophageal and gastric motility in end-stage lung disease to characterize prevalence, etiology, pathophysiology, and current treatment options within this special patient population. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Anxiety can significantly explain bolus perception in the context of hypotensive esophageal motility: Results of a large multicenter study in asymptomatic individuals.

    PubMed

    Cisternas, D; Scheerens, C; Omari, T; Monrroy, H; Hani, A; Leguizamo, A; Bilder, C; Ditaranto, A; Ruiz de León, A; Pérez de la Serna, J; Valdovinos, M A; Coello, R; Abrahao, L; Remes-Troche, J; Meixueiro, A; Zavala, M A; Marin, I; Serra, J

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies have not been able to correlate manometry findings with bolus perception. The aim of this study was to evaluate correlation of different variables, including traditional manometric variables (at diagnostic and extreme thresholds), esophageal shortening, bolus transit, automated impedance manometry (AIM) metrics and mood with bolus passage perception in a large cohort of asymptomatic individuals. High resolution manometry (HRM) was performed in healthy individuals from nine centers. Perception was evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale. Anxiety was evaluated using Hospitalized Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD). Subgroup analysis was also performed classifying studies into normal, hypotensive, vigorous, and obstructive patterns. One hundred fifteen studies were analyzed (69 using HRM and 46 using high resolution impedance manometry (HRIM); 3.5% swallows in 9.6% of volunteers were perceived. There was no correlation of any of the traditional HRM variables, esophageal shortening, AIM metrics nor bolus transit with perception scores. There was no HRM variable showing difference in perception when comparing normal vs extreme values (percentile 1 or 99). Anxiety but not depression was correlated with perception. Among hypotensive pattern, anxiety was a strong predictor of variance in perception (R 2 up to .70). Bolus perception is less common than abnormal motility among healthy individuals. Neither esophageal motor function nor bolus dynamics evaluated with several techniques seems to explain differences in bolus perception. Different mechanisms seem to be relevant in different manometric patterns. Anxiety is a significant predictor of bolus perception in the context of hypotensive motility. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. T-helper 2 cytokines, transforming growth factor β1, and eosinophil products induce fibrogenesis and alter muscle motility in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Florian; Nonevski, Ilche; Ma, Jie; Ouyang, Zhufeng; West, Gail; Protheroe, Cheryl; DePetris, Giovanni; Schirbel, Anja; Lapinski, James; Goldblum, John; Bonfield, Tracey; Lopez, Rocio; Harnett, Karen; Lee, James; Hirano, Ikuo; Falk, Gary; Biancani, Piero; Fiocchi, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    Patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) often become dysphagic from the combination of organ fibrosis and motor abnormalities. We investigated mechanisms of dysphagia, assessing the response of human esophageal fibroblasts (HEFs), human esophageal muscle cells (HEMCs), and esophageal muscle strips to eosinophil-derived products. Biopsy specimens were collected via endoscopy from the upper, middle, and lower thirds of the esophagus of 18 patients with EoE and 21 individuals undergoing endoscopy for other reasons (controls). Primary cultures of esophageal fibroblasts and muscle cells were derived from 12 freshly resected human esophagectomy specimens. Eosinophil distribution was investigated by histologic analyses of full-thickness esophageal tissue. Active secretion of EoE-related mediators was assessed from medium underlying mucosal biopsy cultures. We quantified production of fibronectin and collagen I by HEF and HEMC in response to eosinophil products. We also measured the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 by, and adhesion of human eosinophils to, HEFs and HEMCs. Eosinophil products were tested in an esophageal muscle contraction assay. Activated eosinophils were present in all esophageal layers. Significantly higher concentrations of eosinophil-related mediators were secreted spontaneously in mucosal biopsy specimens from patients with EoE than controls. Exposure of HEFs and HEMCs to increasing concentrations of eosinophil products or co-culture with eosinophils caused HEFs and HEMCs to increase secretion of fibronectin and collagen I; this was inhibited by blocking transforming growth factor β1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Eosinophil binding to HEFs and HEMCs increased after incubation of mesenchymal cells with eosinophil-derived products, and decreased after blockade of transforming growth factor β1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase blockade. Eosinophil products reduced

  16. T-helper 2 Cytokines, Transforming Growth Factor β1, and Eosinophil Products Induce Fibrogenesis and Alter Muscle Motility in Patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Nonevski, Ilche; Ma, Jie; Ouyang, Zhufeng; West, Gail; Protheroe, Cheryl; DePetris, Giovanni; Schirbel, Anja; Lapinski, James; Goldblum, John; Bonfield, Tracey; Lopez, Rocio; Harnett, Karen; Lee, James; Hirano, Ikuo; Falk, Gary; Biancani, Piero; Fiocchi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) often become dysphagic from the combination of organ fibrosis and motor abnormalities. We investigated mechanisms of dysphagia, assessing the response of human esophageal fibroblasts (HEF), muscle cells (HEMC), and esophageal muscle strips to eosinophil-derived products. METHODS Biopsies were collected via endoscopy from the upper, middle and lower thirds of the esophagus of 18 patients with EoE and 21 individuals undergoing endoscopy for other reasons (controls). Primary cultures of esophageal fibroblasts and muscle cells were derived from 12 freshly resected human esophagectomy specimens. Eosinophil distribution was investigated by histologic analyses of full-thickness esophageal tissue. Active secretion of EoE-related mediators was assessed from medium underlying mucosal biopsy cultures. We quantified production of fibronectin and collagen I by HEF and HEMC in response to eosinophil products. We also measured expression of ICAM1 and VCAM1 by, and adhesion of human eosinophils to, HEF and HEMC. Eosinophil products were tested in an esophageal muscle contraction assay. RESULTS Activated eosinophils were present in all esophageal layers. Significantly higher concentrations of eosinophil-related mediators were spontaneously secreted in mucosal biopsies from patients with EoE than controls. Exposure of HEF and HEMC to increasing concentrations of eosinophil products or co-culture with eosinophils caused HEF and HEMC to increase secretion of fibronectin and collagen I; this was inhibited by blocking transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAKP) signaling. Eosinophil binding to HEF and HEMC increased following incubation of mesenchymal cells with eosinophil-derived products, and decreased following blockade of TGFβ1 and p38MAPK blockade. Eosinophil products reduced electrical field-induced contraction of esophageal muscle strips, but not acetylcholine

  17. Anorectal motility abnormalities in children with encopresis and chronic constipation.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, Neeraj; Glassman, Mark S; Halata, Michael S; Berezin, Stuart H; Stewart, Julian M; Medow, Marvin S

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the response to rectal distension in children with chronic constipation and children with chronic constipation and encopresis. We studied 27 children, aged 3 to 16 years, with chronic constipation; 12 had encopresis. Anorectal motility was measured with a solid state catheter. When the catheter was located in the internal sphincter, the balloon was inflated to 60 mL with air. There were no differences in age, sex distribution, and duration of constipation in the two groups. Comparing groups, anorectal manometry showed no differences in the resting sphincter pressure, recovery pressure, the lowest relaxation pressure, and percent relaxation. However, time to maximum relaxation, time to recovery to baseline pressure, and duration of relaxation were significantly higher in patients with constipation and encopresis, compared with patients who had constipation alone. There may be an imbalance in neuromuscular control of defecation in constipated patients with encopresis that results in incontinence as a consequence of the increased time to recovery and duration of relaxation of the internal anal sphincter. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome and organic diseases: A comparative analysis of esophageal motility

    PubMed Central

    Thomaidis, Thomas; Goetz, Martin; Gregor, Sebastian Paul; Hoffman, Arthur; Kouroumalis, Elias; Moehler, Markus; Galle, Peter Robert; Schwarting, Andreas; Kiesslich, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess the esophageal motility in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to compare those with patients with autoimmune disorders. METHODS: 15 patients with IBS, 22 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 19 with systemic sclerosis (SSc) were prospectively selected from a total of 115 patients at a single university centre and esophageal motility was analysed using standard manometry (Mui Scientific PIP-4-8SS). All patients underwent esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy before entering the study so that only patients with normal endoscopic findings were included in the current study. All patients underwent a complete physical, blood biochemistry and urinary examination. The grade of dysphagia was determined for each patient in accordance to the intensity and frequency of the presented esophageal symptoms. Furthermore, disease activity scores (SLEDAI and modified Rodnan score) were obtained for patients with autoimmune diseases. Outcome parameter: A correlation coefficient was calculated between amplitudes, velocity and duration of the peristaltic waves throughout esophagus and patients’ dysphagia for all three groups. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in the standard blood biochemistry and urinary analysis in all three groups. Patients with IBS showed similar pathologic dysphagia scores compared to patients with SLE and SSc. The mean value of dysphagia score was in IBS group 7.3, in SLE group 6.73 and in SSc group 7.56 with a P-value > 0.05. However, the manometric patterns were different. IBS patients showed during esophageal manometry peristaltic amplitudes at the proximal part of esophagus greater than 60 mmHg in 46% of the patients, which was significant higher in comparison to the SLE (11.8%) and SSc-Group (0%, P = 0.003). Furthermore, IBS patients showed lower mean resting pressure of the distal esophagus sphincter (Lower esophageal sphincter, 22 mmHg) when compared with SLE (28 mmHg, P = 0.037) and SSc (26 mmHg, P = 0.052). 23

  19. Ineffective esophageal motility and the vagus: current challenges and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) is characterized by low to very low amplitude propulsive contractions in the distal esophagus, hence primarily affecting the smooth muscle part of the esophagus. IEM is often found in patients with dysphagia or heartburn and is commonly associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease. IEM is assumed to be associated with ineffective bolus transport; however, this can be verified using impedance measurements or evaluation of a barium coated marshmallow swallow. Furthermore, water swallows may not assess accurately the motor capabilities of the esophagus, since contraction amplitude is strongly determined by the size and consistency of the bolus. The “peristaltic reserve” of the esophagus can be evaluated by multiple rapid swallows that, after a period of diglutative inhibition, normally give a powerful peristaltic contraction suggestive of the integrity of neural orchestration and smooth muscle action. The amplitude of contraction is determined by a balance between intrinsic excitatory cholinergic, inhibitory nitrergic, as well as postinhibition rebound excitatory output to the musculature. This is strongly influenced by vagal efferent motor neurons and this in turn is influenced by vagal afferent neurons that send bolus information to the solitary nucleus where programmed activation of the vagal motor neurons to the smooth muscle esophagus is initiated. Solitary nucleus activity is influenced by sensory activity from a large number of organs and various areas of the brain, including the hypothalamus and the cerebral cortex. This allows interaction between swallowing activities and respiratory and cardiac activities and allows the influence of acute and chronic emotional states on swallowing behavior. Interstitial cells of Cajal are part of the sensory units of vagal afferents, the intramuscular arrays, and they provide pacemaker activity to the musculature that can generate peristalsis in the absence of innervation. This

  20. Ineffective esophageal motility and the vagus: current challenges and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) is characterized by low to very low amplitude propulsive contractions in the distal esophagus, hence primarily affecting the smooth muscle part of the esophagus. IEM is often found in patients with dysphagia or heartburn and is commonly associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease. IEM is assumed to be associated with ineffective bolus transport; however, this can be verified using impedance measurements or evaluation of a barium coated marshmallow swallow. Furthermore, water swallows may not assess accurately the motor capabilities of the esophagus, since contraction amplitude is strongly determined by the size and consistency of the bolus. The "peristaltic reserve" of the esophagus can be evaluated by multiple rapid swallows that, after a period of diglutative inhibition, normally give a powerful peristaltic contraction suggestive of the integrity of neural orchestration and smooth muscle action. The amplitude of contraction is determined by a balance between intrinsic excitatory cholinergic, inhibitory nitrergic, as well as postinhibition rebound excitatory output to the musculature. This is strongly influenced by vagal efferent motor neurons and this in turn is influenced by vagal afferent neurons that send bolus information to the solitary nucleus where programmed activation of the vagal motor neurons to the smooth muscle esophagus is initiated. Solitary nucleus activity is influenced by sensory activity from a large number of organs and various areas of the brain, including the hypothalamus and the cerebral cortex. This allows interaction between swallowing activities and respiratory and cardiac activities and allows the influence of acute and chronic emotional states on swallowing behavior. Interstitial cells of Cajal are part of the sensory units of vagal afferents, the intramuscular arrays, and they provide pacemaker activity to the musculature that can generate peristalsis in the absence of innervation. This

  1. [Esophageal motor disorders in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices non-submitted to endoscopic treatment].

    PubMed

    Flores, Priscila Pollo; Lemme, Eponina Maria de Oliveira; Coelho, Henrique Sérgio Moraes

    2005-01-01

    The hepatic cirrhosis has as one of the main morbid-mortality causes, the portal hypertension with the development of esophageal varices, the possibility of a digestive hemorrhage and worsening of hepatic insufficiency. It is important to identify causal predictive or aggravating factors and if possible to prevent them. In the last years, it has been observed the association of esophageal motor disorders and gastro-esophageal reflux in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices. To study the prevalence of the esophageal motility disorders and among them, the ineffective esophageal motility, in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and esophageal varices, without previous endoscopic therapeutic and the predictive factors. Prospectively, it has been evaluate 74 patients suffering from liver cirrhosis and esophagic varices, without previous endoscopic treatment. All of them were submitted to a clinical protocol, esophageal manometry and 55 patients also held the ambulatory esophageal pHmetry. Esophageal motility disorders have been found in 44 patients (60%). The most prevalent was the ineffective esophageal motility, observed in 28%. The abnormal reflux disease was diagnosed through the pHmetry in 35% of the patients. There were no correlation between the manometrical abnormality in general and the ineffective esophageal motility in particular and the esophageal or gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, the abnormal reflux, the disease seriousness, the ascites presence and the gauge of the varices. The majority of cirrhotic patients with non-treated esophageal varices present esophageal motor disorders. No predictive factor was found. The clinical relevance of these findings need more researches in the scope to define the real meaning of theses abnormalities.

  2. Inter-observer agreement for diagnostic classification of esophageal motility disorders defined in high-resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Fox, M R; Pandolfino, J E; Sweis, R; Sauter, M; Abreu Y Abreu, A T; Anggiansah, A; Bogte, A; Bredenoord, A J; Dengler, W; Elvevi, A; Fruehauf, H; Gellersen, S; Ghosh, S; Gyawali, C P; Heinrich, H; Hemmink, M; Jafari, J; Kaufman, E; Kessing, K; Kwiatek, M; Lubomyr, B; Banasiuk, M; Mion, F; Pérez-de-la-Serna, J; Remes-Troche, J M; Rohof, W; Roman, S; Ruiz-de-León, A; Tutuian, R; Uscinowicz, M; Valdovinos, M A; Vardar, R; Velosa, M; Waśko-Czopnik, D; Weijenborg, P; Wilshire, C; Wright, J; Zerbib, F; Menne, D

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) is a recent development used in the evaluation of esophageal function. Our aim was to assess the inter-observer agreement for diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders using this technology. Practitioners registered on the HRM Working Group website were invited to review and classify (i) 147 individual water swallows and (ii) 40 diagnostic studies comprising 10 swallows using a drop-down menu that followed the Chicago Classification system. Data were presented using a standardized format with pressure contours without a summary of HRM metrics. The sequence of swallows was fixed for each user but randomized between users to avoid sequence bias. Participants were blinded to other entries. (i) Individual swallows were assessed by 18 practitioners (13 institutions). Consensus agreement (≤ 2/18 dissenters) was present for most cases of normal peristalsis and achalasia but not for cases of peristaltic dysmotility. (ii) Diagnostic studies were assessed by 36 practitioners (28 institutions). Overall inter-observer agreement was 'moderate' (kappa 0.51) being 'substantial' (kappa > 0.7) for achalasia type I/II and no lower than 'fair-moderate' (kappa >0.34) for any diagnosis. Overall agreement was somewhat higher among those that had performed >400 studies (n = 9; kappa 0.55) and 'substantial' among experts involved in development of the Chicago Classification system (n = 4; kappa 0.66). This prospective, randomized, and blinded study reports an acceptable level of inter-observer agreement for HRM diagnoses across the full spectrum of esophageal motility disorders for a large group of clinicians working in a range of medical institutions. Suboptimal agreement for diagnosis of peristaltic motility disorders highlights contribution of objective HRM metrics. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  3. Botulinum toxin injection for hypercontractile or spastic esophageal motility disorders: may high-resolution manometry help to select cases?

    PubMed

    Marjoux, S; Brochard, C; Roman, S; Gincul, R; Pagenault, M; Ponchon, T; Ropert, A; Mion, F

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic injections of botulinum toxin in the cardia or distal esophagus have been advocated to treat achalasia and spastic esophageal motility disorders. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate whether manometric diagnosis using the Chicago classification in high-resolution manometry (HRM) would be predictive of the clinical response. Charts of patients with spastic and hypertensive motility disorders diagnosed with HRM and treated with botulinum toxin were retrospectively reviewed at two centers. HRM recordings were systematically reanalyzed, and a patient's phone survey was conducted. Forty-five patients treated between 2008 and 2013 were included. Most patients had achalasia type 3 (22 cases). Other diagnoses were jackhammer esophagus (8 cases), distal esophageal spasm (7 cases), esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (5 cases), nutcracker esophagus (1 case), and 2 unclassified cases. Botulinum toxin injections were performed into the cardia only in 9 cases, into the wall of the distal esophagus in 19 cases, and in both locations (cardia and distal esophagus) in 17 cases. No complication occurred in 31 cases. Chest pain was noticed for less than 7 days in 13 cases. One death related to mediastinitis occurred 3 weeks after botulinum toxin injection. Efficacy was assessed in 42 patients: 71% were significantly improved 2 months after botulinum toxin, and 57% remained satisfied for more than 6 months. No clear difference was observed in terms of response according to manometric diagnosis; however, type 3 achalasia previously dilated and with normal integrated relaxation pressure (4s-integrated relaxation pressure < 15 mmHg) had the worst outcome: none of these patients responded to the endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin. Endoscopic injections of botulinum toxin may be effective in some patients with spastic or hypercontractile esophageal motility disorders. The manometric Chicago classification diagnosis does not seem to predict the results

  4. Esophageal hypermotility: cause or effect?

    PubMed

    Crespin, O M; Tatum, R P; Yates, R B; Sahin, M; Coskun, K; Martin, A V; Wright, A; Oelschlager, B K; Pellegrini, C A

    2016-07-01

    Nutcracker esophagus (NE), Jackhammer esophagus (JHE), distal esophageal spasm (DES), and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES) are defined by esophageal manometric findings. Some patients with these esophageal motility disorders also have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. It is unclear to what extent these patients' symptoms are caused by the motility disorder, the acid reflux, or both. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) on esophageal motility disorders, gastroesophageal reflux, and patient symptoms. Between 2007 and 2013, we performed high-resolution esophageal manometry on 3400 patients, and 221 patients were found to have a spastic esophageal motility disorder. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine the manometric abnormality, presence of gastroesophageal symptoms, and amount of esophageal acid exposure. In those patients that underwent LNF, we compared pre- and postoperative esophageal motility, gastroesophageal symptom severity, and esophageal acid exposure. Of the 221 patients with spastic motility disorders, 77 had NE, 2 had JHE, 30 had DES, and 112 had HTLES. The most frequently reported primary and secondary symptoms among all patients were: heartburn and/or regurgitation, 69.2%; respiratory, 39.8%; dysphagia, 35.7%; and chest pain, 22.6%. Of the 221 patients, 192 underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 103 demonstrated abnormal distal esophageal acid exposure. Abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring was detected in 62% of patients with heartburn and regurgitation, 49% of patients with respiratory symptoms, 36.8 % of patients with dysphagia, and 32.6% of patients with chest pain. Sixty-six of the 103 patients with abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring underwent LNF. Thirty-eight (13NE, 2JHE, 6 DES, and 17 HTLES) of these 66 patients had a minimum of 6-month postoperative follow-up that included clinical evaluation, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour pH monitoring

  5. Multiple huge epiphrenic esophageal diverticula with motility disease treated with video-assisted thoracoscopic and hand-assisted laparoscopic esophagectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Higashi, Shigeyoshi; Tanaka, Koji; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Makoto; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-12-01

    Epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum is a rare condition that is often associated with a concomitant esophageal motor disorder. Some patients have the chief complaints of swallowing difficulty and gastroesophageal reflux; traditionally, such diverticula have been resected via right thoracotomy. Here, we describe a case with huge multiple epiphrenic diverticula with motility disorder, which were successfully resected using a video-assisted thoracic and laparoscopic procedure. A 63-year-old man was admitted due to dysphagia, heartburn, and vomiting. An esophagogram demonstrated an S-shaped lower esophagus with multiple epiphrenic diverticula (75 × 55 mm and 30 × 30 mm) and obstruction by the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Esophageal manometry showed normal peristaltic contractions in the esophageal body, whereas the LES pressure was high (98.6 mmHg). The pressure vector volume of LES was 23,972 mmHg 2  cm. Based on these findings, we diagnosed huge multiple epiphrenic diverticula with a hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter and judged that resection might be required. We performed lower esophagectomy with gastric conduit reconstruction using a video-assisted thoracic and hand-assisted laparoscopic procedure. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the esophagogram demonstrated good passage, with no leakage, stenosis, or diverticula. The most common causes of mid-esophageal and epiphrenic diverticula are motility disorders of the esophageal body; appropriate treatment should be considered based on the morphological and motility findings.

  6. Abnormal cerebral functional connectivity in esophageal cancer patients with theory of mind deficits in resting state.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Xiang, JianBo; Qian, Nong; Sun, SuPing; Hu, LiJun; Yuan, YongGui

    2015-01-01

    To explore the function of the default mode network (DMN) in the psychopathological mechanisms of theory of mind deficits in patients with an esophageal cancer concomitant with depression in resting the state. Twenty-five cases of esophageal cancer with theory of mind deficits (test group) that meet the diagnostic criteria of esophageal cancer and neuropsychological tests, including Beck depression inventory, reading the mind in the eyes, and Faux pas, were included, Another 25 cases of esophageal cancer patients but without theory of mind deficits (control group) were enrolled. Each patient completed a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. The functional connectivity intensities within the cerebral regions in the DMN of all the enrolled patients were analyzed. The results of each group were compared. The functional connectivity of the bilateral prefrontal central region with the precuneus, bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus and bilateral ventral anterior cingulate gyrus in the patients of the test group were all reduced significantly (P < 0.05). In the resting state, the functional connectivity is abnormal in the cerebral regions in the DMN of esophageal cancer patients with theory of mind deficits. The theory of mind deficits might have an important function in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer.

  7. [Esophageal motility characteristics of refractory heartburn: a study based on high resolution manometry and 24 hour pH-impedance monitoring].

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Duan, Liping; Xia, Zhiwei; Xu, Zhijie; Ge, Ying

    2014-09-16

    To analyze the esophageal motility characteristics of refractory heartburn with different reflux patterns and preliminarily clarify the roles of esophageal disorder in refractory heartburn. A total of 176 refractory heartburn patients were enrolled from 2009 to 2013. After gastroscopy and 24 hour pH-impedance monitoring, they were divided into 4 groups of reflux esophagitis (RE, n = 29), non-erosive reflux disease with acid reflux (NERD-acid, n = 51), NERD with weakly acidic reflux (NERD-weakly acid, n = 51) and non-reflux associated heartburn (n = 45). All subjects undertake high resolution manometry test and their esophageal motility functions were analyzed by the Chicago classification criteria 2012. Among them, 60.23% (106/176) patients presented esophageal motility disorders. And 42.61% (75/176) fulfilled the criteria of weak peristalsis, 7.39% (13/176) distal esophageal spasm, 4.55% (8/176) rapid contraction, 3.98% (7/176) EGJ outflow obstruction, 1.14% (2/176) hiatus hernia and 1 Jackhammer esophagus. The detection rates of esophageal motility disorder were similar among 4 groups and weak peristalsis was the most common disorder in all groups (41.38% in RE, 37.25% in NERD-acid patients, 54.90% in NERD-weakly acid and 35.56% in non-reflux associated heartburn patients). However, hypertensive motility disorders in non-reflux associated heartburn group (31.11%, 14/45) were more than GERD subgroups (11.45%, 15/131) (P < 0.05) . The relax ratio of low esophagus sphincter (LES) in GERD subgroups were higher than that in non-reflux associated heartburn patients. And the relax ratio of NERD-weakly acid was significantly higher than that in non-reflux associated heartburn patients (65% (50%-80%) vs 58% (42%-67%) , P < 0.05). The integrated relaxation pressure in GERD subgroups were lower than that of non-reflux associated heartburn patients without significant differences (P > 0.05). Esophageal weak peristalsis is one of the most common motility disorders in

  8. Esophageal Motility and Rikkunshito Treatment for Proton Pump Inhibitor-Refractory Nonerosive Reflux Disease: A Prospective, Uncontrolled, Open-Label Pilot Study Trial.

    PubMed

    Odaka, Takeo; Yamato, Shigeru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Only a few reports focused on esophageal motility in patients with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) and there has been no established strategy for treatment. To clarify the characteristics of esophageal motility in patients with PPI-refractory NERD, we evaluated esophageal function using combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal manometry (MII-EM). In addition, we evaluated the efficacy of rikkunshito (RKT), which is a gastrointestinal prokinetic agent. Thirty patients with NERD were enrolled and underwent MII-EM. After 8 weeks of RKT (7.5 g/d) treatment, MII-EM was repeated on patients with PPI-refractory NERD. Symptoms were assessed by the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. In patients with PPI-refractory NERD, measures of complete bolus transit, peristaltic contractions, and residual pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter during swallowing deviated from the standard values and esophageal clearance was found to be deteriorated. RKT significantly improved the peristaltic contractions ( P < 0.05), the complete bolus transit ( P < 0.01), and the residual pressure of lower esophageal sphincter ( P < 0.05) in these patients. The overall score ( P < 0.01) and the subscale scores of acid reflux syndrome ( P < 0.05), abdominal pain ( P < 0.05), and indigestion syndrome ( P < 0.01) in the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale were significantly improved by the 8-week RKT treatment. In the pilot study, patients with PPI-refractory NERD had disorders of esophageal and lower esophageal sphincter motility that were improved by RKT. Further studies examining esophageal motor activity of RKT in PPI-refractory NERD are required. University hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) Clinical Trial Registry identifier: UMIN000003092.

  9. High-Resolution Manometry Improves the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders in Patients With Dysphagia: A Randomized Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sabine; Huot, Laure; Zerbib, Frank; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Coffin, Benoit; Ropert, Alain; Roux, Adeline; Mion, François

    2016-03-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) might be superior to conventional manometry (CM) to diagnose esophageal motility disorders. We aimed to compare the diagnosis performed with HRM and CM and confirmed at 6 months in a multicenter randomized trial. Patients with unexplained dysphagia were randomized to undergo either CM or HRM. Motility disorders were diagnosed using the Castell and Spechler classification for CM and the Chicago classification for HRM. Diagnosis confirmation was based on clinical outcome and response to treatment after 6-month follow-up. The initial diagnosis and percentage of confirmed diagnoses were compared between the two arms (CM and HRM). In total, 247 patients were randomized and 245 analyzed: 122 in the CM arm and 123 in the HRM arm. A manometric diagnosis was more frequently initially achieved with HRM than with CM (97% vs. 84%; P<0.01). Achalasia was more frequent in the HRM arm (26% vs. 12% in the CM arm; P<0.01) while normal examinations were more frequent in the CM arm (52% vs. 28% in the HRM arm; P<0.05). After follow-up, the initial diagnosis was confirmed in 89% of patients in the HRM arm vs. 81% in the CM arm (P=0.07). Finally, overall procedure tolerance was better with CM than with HRM (P<0.01). This randomized trial demonstrated an improved diagnostic yield for achalasia with HRM compared with CM. Diagnoses tended to be more frequently confirmed in patients who underwent HRM, suggesting that esophageal motility disorders could be identified earlier with HRM than with CM (ClinicalTrial.gov, NCT01284894).

  10. Esophageal motor disorders in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Moawad, Fouad J; Maydonovitch, Corinne L; Veerappan, Ganesh R; Bassett, John T; Lake, Jason M; Wong, Roy K H

    2011-05-01

    An association between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and esophageal motility disorders has been described in small studies. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of esophageal motor disorders in a large cohort of adults with EoE and examine whether an association exists between esophageal dysmotility and dysphagia. A retrospective review of esophageal manometry studies in adult EoE patients was performed. Tracings were reviewed for abnormalities including nutcracker esophagus and ineffective swallows, defined as low amplitude peristalsis (<30 mmHg) or non-propagating contractions. Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) was categorized as mild (30-40% ineffective swallows), moderate (50-60% ineffective swallows), and severe (≥70% ineffective swallows). Dysphagia was graded on a 0-3 scale for frequency and severity. Seventy-five tracings from EoE patients were reviewed (85% male, mean age 41 ± 12 years). IEM was identified in 25 patients and categorized as mild (n = 13), moderate (n = 6), and severe (n = 6). Nutcracker esophagus was found in three patients. There was no significant difference in eosinophil count among the motility groups: normal 46.5 ± 3.1, mild IEM 56.9 ± 36.9, moderate IEM 45.5 ± 23.7, severe IEM 34.3 ± 12.6 (P = 0.157). In this cohort of EoE patients, the majority had normal esophageal motility studies, although a subset of these patients had some esophageal dysmotility. It is unlikely that esophageal dysmotility is a major contributing factor to dysphagia, although it is reasonable to consider esophageal manometry testing in EoE patients to identify potential abnormalities of the smooth muscle esophagus.

  11. Certain aspects of normal and abnormal motility of sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Coelho, J C; Moody, F G

    1987-01-01

    Applications of electromyographic and endoscopic manometric techniques in experimental and clinical studies have enhanced our knowledge of the normal physiology and motility disturbances of the sphincter of Oddi. The sphincter of Oddi has an active role in coordinating the time and rate of secretion of biliopancreatic juice into the duodenum. In the opossum, the sphincter of Oddi exhibits spontaneous contractions that migrate distally along the sphincter and expels its contents into the duodenum. Although the motor activity of the sphincter of Oddi is independent from that of the duodenum, there is a correlation between the frequency of bursts of spike potentials in the sphincter of Oddi and the migrating motor complex phases in the duodenum. Abnormal motility of the sphincter of Oddi has been reported during endoscopic manometric evaluation of patients with choledocholithiasis and sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia. Patients with common bile duct stones have an increase in the frequency of retrograde propagation of phasic waves. Elevation of basal pressure as well as an increase in the frequency and amplitude of sphincter of Oddi phasic waves and the common bile duct-duodenum gradient pressure may occur in patients with sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia. Endoscopic manometric studies of the sphincter of Oddi may become an important method to diagnose sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia.

  12. Hypertrophy of the muscularis propria of the lower esophageal sphincter and the body of the esophagus in patients with primary motility disorders of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Kassab, Ghassan; Puckett, James L; Liu, Jianmin

    2003-08-01

    Patients with diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) and nutcracker esophagus/high amplitude esophageal contraction (HAEC) have a thicker esophageal muscularis propria than do healthy subjects. The goals of this study were to determine the esophageal muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA), a measure of muscle mass, in patients with achalasia of the esophagus; and to compare it with that in patients with DES, patients with HAEC, and normal subjects. Using a high-frequency ultrasound probe catheter, concurrent manometry and ultrasound images of the esophagus were recorded in four subject groups: normal volunteers, patients with HAEC, patients with DES, and patients with achalasia of the esophagus. Recordings were obtained from the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and multiple sites in the esophagus 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 cm above the LES. The LES and esophageal muscle thickness as well as esophageal MCSA were greater in all three patient groups than in the normal subject group. Muscle thickness and MCSA were observed to be greatest in patients with achalasia, which were greater than in patients with DES, which were greater than in those with HAEC, which in turn were greater than in normal subjects. We propose that an increase in the MCSA is an important feature of patients with primary motility disorders of the esophagus. The degree of increase in muscle mass may be an important determinant of the type and the severity of esophageal motor dysfunction.

  13. Structural airway abnormalities contribute to dysphagia in children with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Katherine J; Baxter, Lauren M; Landry, April M; Wulkan, Mark L; Bhatia, Amina M

    2018-01-31

    Long-term dysphagia occurs in up to 50% of repaired esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) patients. The underlying factors are unclear and may include stricture, esophageal dysmotility, or associated anomalies. Our purpose was to determine whether structural airway abnormalities (SAA) are associated with dysphagia in EA/TEF. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children who underwent EA/TEF repair in our hospital system from 2007 to 2016. Children with identified SAA (oropharyngeal abnormalities, laryngeal clefts, laryngomalacia, vocal cord paralysis, and tracheomalacia) were compared to those without airway abnormalities. Dysphagia outcomes were determined by the need for tube feeding and the modified pediatric Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) at 1 year. SAA was diagnosed in 55/145 (37.9%) patients with EA/TEF. Oropharyngeal aspiration was more common in children with SAA (58.3% vs. 36.4%, p=0.028). Children with SAA were more likely to require tube feeding both at discharge (79.6% vs. 48.3%, p<0.001) and at 1 year (52.7% vs. 13.6%, p<0.001) and had lower mean FOIS (4.18 vs. 6.21, p<0.001). In the logistic regression model adjusting for gestational age, long gap EA, and esophageal stricture, the presence of SAA remained a significant risk factor for dysphagia (OR 4.17 (95% CI 1.58-11.03)). SAA are common in children with EA/TEF and are associated with dysphagia, even after accounting for gestational age, esophageal gap and stricture. This study highlights the need for a multidisciplinary approach, including early laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy, in the evaluation of the EA/TEF child with dysphagia. Level II retrospective prognostic study. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Esophageal Motor Abnormalities in Patients With Scleroderma: Heterogeneity, Risk Factors, and Effects on Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Michael D; Umar, Sarah B; Griffing, W Leroy; DiBaise, John K; Lacy, Brian E; Vela, Marcelo F

    2017-02-01

    Systemic scleroderma (SSc) is associated with esophageal aperistalsis and hypotensive esophagogastric junction pressure, although there could be a gradation in esophageal motor dysfunction. We characterized esophageal motor function by high-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) and assessed associations between SSc severity, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and HRM findings in patients. We performed a prospective study of 200 patients with SSc and 102 patients without SSc (controls) who underwent HRM at Mayo Clinic Arizona from May 2006 through January 2015. We used data on integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, and distal latency to classify esophageal motility disorders according to the Chicago Classification v 3.0. A subset of subjects (n = 122) completed SSc-specific gastrointestinal symptom and HRQOL questionnaires. HRM findings, symptoms, and HRQOL data were compared among diffuse SSc, limited SSc, and control subjects. Categorical variables were compared by using the χ 2 or Fisher exact test; continuous variables were compared by using Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis test. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between severity of esophageal dysmotility and baseline clinical factors. Among patients with SSc, 83 had diffuse SSc (42%), and 117 had limited SSc (58%). Absent contractility was more frequent in patients with SSc than in controls (56% vs 13%; P < .001). HRM findings varied among the patients; absent contractility (56%) was the most frequent diagnosis, followed by normal motility (26%) and ineffective esophageal motility (10%). Classic scleroderma esophagus (esophagogastric junction pressure with absent contractility) was only observed in 33% of patients (34% with diffuse SSc vs 32% limited SSc) (P = .880). Severe esophageal dysmotility was associated with disease duration, interstitial lung disease, and higher gastrointestinal symptom scores (P < .001). HRQOL was decreased in patients

  15. A mutation in Ccdc39 causes neonatal hydrocephalus with abnormal motile cilia development in mice.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamed, Zakia; Vuong, Shawn M; Hill, Lauren; Shula, Crystal; Timms, Andrew; Beier, David; Campbell, Kenneth; Mangano, Francesco T; Stottmann, Rolf W; Goto, June

    2018-01-09

    Pediatric hydrocephalus is characterized by an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and is one of the most common congenital brain abnormalities. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating CSF flow in the developing brain. Through whole-genome sequencing analysis, we report that a homozygous splice site mutation in coiled-coil domain containing 39 ( Ccdc39 ) is responsible for early postnatal hydrocephalus in the progressive hydrocephal us ( prh ) mouse mutant. Ccdc39 is selectively expressed in embryonic choroid plexus and ependymal cells on the medial wall of the forebrain ventricle, and the protein is localized to the axoneme of motile cilia. The Ccdc39 prh/prh ependymal cells develop shorter cilia with disorganized microtubules lacking the axonemal inner arm dynein. Using high-speed video microscopy, we show that an orchestrated ependymal ciliary beating pattern controls unidirectional CSF flow on the ventricular surface, which generates bulk CSF flow in the developing brain. Collectively, our data provide the first evidence for involvement of Ccdc39 in hydrocephalus and suggest that the proper development of medial wall ependymal cilia is crucial for normal mouse brain development. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Effects of laparoscopic myotomy on the esophageal motility pattern of esophageal achalasia as measured by high-resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Renato; Savarino, Edoardo; Pesenti, Elisa; Spadotto, Lorenzo; Voltarel, Guerrino; Capovilla, Giovanni; Cavallin, Francesco; Nicoletti, Loredana; Valmasoni, Michele; Ruol, Alberto; Merigliano, Stefano; Costantini, Mario

    2017-09-01

    Esophageal achalasia can be classified on the grounds of three distinct manometric patterns that correlate well with final outcome after laparoscopic Heller-Dor myotomy (LHM). No analytical data are available, however, on the postoperative picture and its possible correlation with final outcome. The aims of this study were: (a) to investigate whether manometric patterns change after LHM for achalasia; (b) to ascertain whether postoperative patterns and/or changes can predict final outcome; and (c) to test the hypothesis that the three known patterns represent different stages in the evolution of the disease. During the study period, we prospectively enlisted 206 consecutive achalasia patients who were assessed using high-resolution manometry (HRM) before undergoing LHM. Symptoms were scored using a detailed questionnaire. Barium swallow, endoscopy and HRM were performed, before and again 6 months after surgery. Preoperative HRM revealed the three known patterns with statistically different esophageal diameters (pattern I having the largest), and patients with pattern I had the highest symptom scores. The surgical treatment failed in 10 cases (4.9%). The only predictor of final outcome was the preoperative manometric pattern (p = 0.01). All patients with pattern I preoperatively had the same pattern afterward, whereas nearly 50% of patients with pattern III before LHM had patterns I or II after surgery. There were no cases showing the opposite trend. Neither a change of manometric pattern after surgery nor a patient's postoperative pattern was a predictor of final outcome, whereas preoperative pattern confirmed its prognostic significance. The three manometric patterns distinguishable in achalasia may represent different stages in the disease's evolution, pattern III and pattern I coinciding with the early and final stages of the disease, respectively.

  17. Upper esophageal sphincter motility in gastroesophageal reflux disease in the light of the high-resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Nadaleto, B F; Herbella, F A M; Pinna, B R; Patti, M G

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) motility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as compared to healthy volunteers. We retrospectively studied the HRM tests of 44 patients (median age: 61 years, 54% females) under evaluation for GERD. The manometric UES parameters of these patients were compared to 40 healthy volunteers (median age: 27 years, 50% females). Almost half of the patients had a short and hypotonic UES. Patients with extraesophageal symptoms had a higher proportion of hypotonic UES as compared to patients with esophageal symptoms. Reflux pattern did not influence manometric parameters. Proximal reflux (any number of episodes) was present in 37(84%) patients (median number of proximal episodes = 6). Manometric parameters are similar in the presence or absence of proximal reflux. There is not a correlation between the UES length and UES basal pressure. In conclusion, our results show that: (1) the manometric profile of the UES in patients with GERD is characterized by a short and hypotonic UES in half of the patients; (2) this profile is more pronounced in patients with extraesophageal symptoms; and (3) neither the presence of proximal reflux nor reflux pattern bring a different manometric profile. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. In this case, the patient's symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. High resolution manometry findings in patients with esophageal epiphrenic diverticula.

    PubMed

    Vicentine, Fernando P P; Herbella, Fernando A M; Silva, Luciana C; Patti, Marco G

    2011-12-01

    The pathophysiology of esophageal epiphrenic diverticula is still uncertain even though a concomitant motility disorder is found in the majority of patients in different series. High resolution manometry may allow detection of motor abnormalities in a higher number of patients with esophageal epiphrenic diverticula compared with conventional manometry. This study aims to evaluate the high resolution manometry findings in patients with esophageal epiphrenic diverticula. Nine individuals (mean age 63 ± 10 years, 4 females) with esophageal epiphrenic diverticula underwent high resolution manometry. A single diverticulum was observed in eight patients and multiple diverticula in one. Visual analysis of conventional tracings and color pressure plots for identification of segmental abnormalities was performed by two researchers experienced in high resolution manometry. Upper esophageal sphincter was normal in all patients. Esophageal body was abnormal in eight patients; lower esophageal sphincter was abnormal in seven patients. Named esophageal motility disorders were found in seven patients: achalasia in six, diffuse esophageal spasm in one. In one patient, a segmental hypercontractile zone was noticed with pressure of 196 mm Hg. High resolution manometry demonstrated motor abnormalities in all patients with esophageal epiphrenic diverticula.

  20. The Role of Esophageal Hypersensitivity in Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Ruffle, James K; Aziz, Qasim

    2017-02-01

    The Rome IV diagnostic criteria delineates 5 functional esophageal disorders which include functional chest pain, functional heartburn, reflux hypersensitivity, globus, and functional dysphagia. These are a heterogenous group of disorders which, despite having characteristic symptom profiles attributable to esophageal pathology, fail to demonstrate any structural, motility or inflammatory abnormalities on standard clinical testing. These disorders are associated with a marked reduction in patient quality of life, not least considerable healthcare resources. Furthermore, the pathophysiology of these disorders is incompletely understood. In this narrative review we provide the reader with an introductory primer to the structure and function of esophageal perception, including nociception that forms the basis of the putative mechanisms that may give rise to symptoms in functional esophageal disorders. We also discuss the provocative techniques and outcome measures by which esophageal hypersensitivity can be established.

  1. Esophageal abnormalities in juvenile localized scleroderma: is it associated with other extracutaneous manifestations?

    PubMed

    Valões, Clarissa C M; Novak, Glaucia V; Brunelli, Juliana B; Kozu, Katia T; Toma, Ricardo K; Silva, Clovis A

    To assess esophageal involvement (EI) in juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS) population and the possible association between this gastrointestinal manifestation and demographic data, clinical features, laboratory exams, treatments and outcomes. For a period of 30 years, 5881 patients with rheumatic diseases were followed in our Pediatric Rheumatology Division. EI was defined by the presence of symptoms (solid/liquid dysphagia, heartburn, esophageal regurgitation, nausea/vomiting and epigastralgia) and confirmed by at least one EI exam abnormality: barium contrast radiography, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 24-hour esophageal pH-monitoring. JLS was observed in 56/5881 patients (0.9%), mainly linear morphea subtype. EI was observed in 23/56(41%) of JLS patients. Eight(35%) of 23 EI patients with JLS were symptomatic and presented heartburn(5/8), solid and liquid dysphagia(3/8), nausea and epigastralgia(1/8). The frequency of any cumulative extracutaneous manifestations (calcinosis, arthritis/arthralgia, central nervous system, interstitial pneumonitis, mesangial nephritis and/or arrhythmia) was significantly higher in JLS patients with EI compared to those without this complication (56% vs. 24%, p=0.024). No differences were evidenced in demographic data, JLS subtypes and in each extracutaneous manifestation in both groups (p>0.05). The frequency of methotrexate use was significantly higher in JLS patients with EI compared to those without (52% vs. 12%, p=0.002). Autoantibody profile (antinuclear antibodies, anti-SCL-70, rheumatoid factor, anticentromere, anti-cardiolipin, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB) was similar in both groups (p>0.05). Our study demonstrated that EI was frequently observed in JLS patients, mainly in asymptomatic patients with linear subtype. EI occurred in JLS patients with other extracutaneous manifestations and required methotrexate therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  2. Abnormal intermediate filament organization alters mitochondrial motility in giant axonal neuropathy fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jason; Jain, Nikhil; Kuczmarski, Edward R.; Mahammad, Saleemulla; Goldman, Anne; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Opal, Puneet; Goldman, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GAN gene, which encodes gigaxonin, an E3 ligase adapter that targets intermediate filament (IF) proteins for degradation in numerous cell types, including neurons and fibroblasts. The cellular hallmark of GAN pathology is the formation of large aggregates and bundles of IFs. In this study, we show that both the distribution and motility of mitochondria are altered in GAN fibroblasts and this is attributable to their association with vimentin IF aggregates and bundles. Transient expression of wild-type gigaxonin in GAN fibroblasts reduces the number of IF aggregates and bundles, restoring mitochondrial motility. Conversely, silencing the expression of gigaxonin in control fibroblasts leads to changes in IF organization similar to that of GAN patient fibroblasts and a coincident loss of mitochondrial motility. The inhibition of mitochondrial motility in GAN fibroblasts is not due to a global inhibition of organelle translocation, as lysosome motility is normal. Our findings demonstrate that it is the pathological changes in IF organization that cause the loss of mitochondrial motility. PMID:26700320

  3. Botulinum toxin reduces Dysphagia in patients with nonachalasia primary esophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Bisschops, Raf; Farré, Ricard; Pauwels, Ans; Holvoet, Lieselot; Arts, Joris; Caenepeel, Philip; De Wulf, Dominiek; Mimidis, Kostas; Rommel, Nathalie; Tack, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin (BTX) has shown benefits for patients with diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) and nutcracker esophagus (NE) in small uncontrolled trials. We investigated the effect of BTX on symptoms of patients with DES or NE and assessed manometry findings in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled study. We assessed 22 patients with dysphagia-predominant, manometry-confirmed DES or NE (6 men; age, 63 ± 2 y) at a tertiary care medical center. Patients were given injections of BTX (8 × 12.5 U) or saline (8 × 0.5 mL) in 4 quadrants, at 2 and 7 cm above the esophagogastric junction. After 1 month, patients crossed over between groups and received endoscopic injections of BTX or saline. When the study began and 4 weeks after each injection, the patients were assessed by esophageal manometry and completed a symptom questionnaire (to determine solid and liquid dysphagia, chest pain, and regurgitation and heartburn; all scored 0-4). Responders were defined based on modified Vantrappen criteria for achalasia. After BTX injections, patients had significant decreases in total symptom scores (sum of solid and liquid dysphagia and chest pain; from 7.6 ± 0.7 to 4.8 ± 0.8; P = .01); this decrease was not observed in patients who received saline injections. Moreover, BTX injection stabilized unintentional weight loss (weight gain of 0.3 ± 0.3 after BTX injection vs further weight loss of 1.6 ± 0.5 kg after saline injection; P = .01). Fifty percent of patients had a response 1 month after BTX injection, compared with 10% after saline injection (P = .04); 30% still had a response 1 year after BTX injection. BTX injection also caused a significant decrease in the mean esophagogastric junction pressure, compared with baseline (15.8 ± 1.7 vs 24.0 ± 2.8 mm Hg; P = .02). In a prospective controlled study of patients with DES and NE, injections of BTX reduced symptoms and stabilized unintentional weight loss. http://www.targid.eu, ML2669, ML6294

  4. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... which irritates the tissue. This problem is called gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). An autoimmune disorder called eosinophilic esophagitis also causes ... Barrett esophagus (BE) can develop after years of GERD. Rarely, BE may lead to cancer of the ...

  5. Effects of viscosity and volume on the patterns of esophageal motility in healthy adults using high-resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Lee, H; Rhee, P-L; Park, J H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), viscosity, and volume on esophageal motility using high-resolution manometry (HRM). Manometric studies were performed on 60 asymptomatic volunteers (27 men and 33 women, age: 19-56 years) while in a supine position. Manometric protocol included 10 water swallows (5 cc), 10 jelly swallows (5 cc), and 1 water swallow (20 cc). Evaluation of HRM parameters including length of proximal pressure trough (PPT length), distal latency (DL), contractile front velocity (CFV), distal contractile integral (DCI), and 4-second integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) was performed using MATLAB. Significant differences were noted in median IRP between water 5 cc (median 7.2 mmHg [range 5.5-9.6]), jelly 5 cc (median 6.0 mmHg [range 3.8-8.0]), and water 20 cc {(Median 4.8 mmHg [range 3.3-7.4]), P < 0.01}. DL were significantly different between water 5 cc, jelly 5 cc, and water 20 cc (P < 0.01), and in terms of PPT, proportions of small (2 cm ≤ < 5 cm) and large (5 cm≤) break for jelly 5 cc were significantly higher than those for the water 5 cc swallow (P < 0.05). Furthermore, DCI increased with age for water 5 cc, and a significant negative correlation was noticed between proportions of small break and BMI for water 5 cc. Manometric measurements vary depending on age, BMI, viscosity, and volume. These findings need to be taken into account in the interpretation of manometry results. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  6. Abnormal intrinsic esophageal innervation in congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a likely cause of motor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pederiva, Federica; Rodriguez, Jose I; Ruiz-Bravo, Elena; Martinez, Leopoldo; Tovar, Juan A

    2009-03-01

    Patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often have dilated esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux. Sparse intrinsic esophageal innervation has been described in rats with CDH, but this issue has not been investigated in patients with CDH. The present study tests the hypothesis that innervatory anomalies could account for motor dysfunction in human CDH. The esophagi of CDH (n = 6) and control babies dead of other causes (n = 6) were included in paraffin, transversally sectioned, and immunostained with antineurofilament and anti-S-100 antibodies. The proportion of the section surface occupied by neural structures, the ganglionar surface, and the number of neurons per ganglion were measured in 2 to 5 low-power fields from the proximal and distal esophagus with the assistance of image analysis software. Mann-Whitney tests were used for comparing the results using a threshold of significance of P < .05. The percentage of neural/muscle surface was similar in the upper esophagus in both groups, but it was significantly decreased in the lower esophagus of patients with CDH in comparison with controls. There was a relative scarcity of neural tissue in the intermuscular plexus of the lower esophagus. On the other hand, the ganglionar surface and the number of neurons per ganglion were identical in both groups. These results were similar with both immunostainings. Intrinsic innervation of the lower esophagus in CDH is abnormal in terms of decreased density of neural structures in the intermuscular plexus. These neural crest-derived anomalies could explain in part the esophageal dysfunction in survivors of CDH.

  7. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover-style trial of buspirone in functional dysphagia and ineffective esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Nitin; Thota, Prashanthi Nagavenkata; Lopez, Rocio; Gabbard, Scott

    2018-02-01

    Studies suggest that Ineffective Esophageal Motility (IEM) is the manometric correlate of Functional Dysphagia (FD). Currently, there is no accepted therapy for either condition. Buspirone is a serotonin modulating medication and has been shown to augment esophageal peristaltic amplitude in healthy volunteers. We aimed to determine if buspirone improves manometric parameters and symptoms in patients with overlapping IEM/FD. We performed a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-style trial of 10 patients with IEM/FD. The study consisted of two 2-week treatment arms with a 2-week washout period. Outcomes measured at baseline, end of week 2, and week 6 include high resolution esophageal manometry (HREM), the Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire-14 (MDQ-14), and the GERD-HRQL. The mean age of our 10 patients was 53 ± 9 years and 70% were female. After treatment with buspirone, 30% of patients had normalization of IEM on manometry; however, there was 30% normalization in the placebo group as well. Comparing buspirone to placebo, there was no statistically significant difference in the HREM parameters measured. There was also no statistically significant difference in symptom outcomes for buspirone compared to placebo. Of note, patients had a statistically significant decrease in the total GERD-HRQL total score when treated with placebo compared to baseline levels. Despite previous data demonstrating improved esophageal motility in healthy volunteers, our study shows no difference in terms of HREM parameters or symptom scores in IEM/FD patients treated with buspirone compared to placebo. Further research is necessary to identify novel agents for this condition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Esophageal motor dysfunction plays a key role in GERD with globus sensation--analysis of factors promoting resistance to PPI therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Hideaki; Manabe, Noriaki; Uno, Masako; Imamura, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tomoari; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Shiotani, Akiko; Hata, Jiro; Harada, Tamotsu; Haruma, Ken

    2012-09-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) also have various extra-esophageal symptoms. Laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD) is a subtype of GERD associated with globus sensation, but proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy achieves disappointing results. This study investigated esophageal motility in GERD patients with globus sensation who were resistant to PPI therapy. The subjects were 350 patients with globus sensation. All patients underwent both laryngoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy to exclude organic disease. After 4 weeks of treatment with rabeprazole sodium (20 mg daily), the patients were divided into PPI-responsive and PPI-resistant groups. Then we investigated esophageal motility in the PPI-resistant group by a multichannel intraluminal impedance and manometry study. A total of 119 patients (55.6%) were resistant to PPI therapy, among whom 57 patients (47.9%) had abnormal esophageal motility. They included 36 patients (66.4%) with ineffective esophageal motility, 9 patients (14.4%) with achalasia, 6 patients (9.6%) with diffuse esophageal spasm, 5 patients (8%) with nutcracker esophagus, and 1 patient (1.6%) with hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter. There were significant differences of upper esophageal sphincter pressure and esophageal body peristalsis between the patients with PPI-resistant LPRD and healthy controls matched for age and sex. Among patients with PPI-resistant LPRD, 47.9% had abnormal esophageal motility.

  9. The clinical implications of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients with esophageal or lung cancer after chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Gayed, Isis; Gohar, Salman; Liao, Zhongxing; McAleer, Mary; Bassett, Roland; Yusuf, Syed Wamique

    2009-06-01

    This study aims to identify the clinical implications of myocardial perfusion defects after chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with esophageal and lung cancer. We retrospectively compared myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) results before and after CRT in 16 patients with esophageal cancer and 24 patients with lung cancer. New MPI defects in the radiation therapy (RT) fields were considered related to RT. Follow-up to evaluate for cardiac complications and their relation with the results of MPI was performed. Statistical analysis identified predictors of cardiac morbidities. Eleven females and twenty nine males at a mean age of 66.7 years were included. Five patients (31%) with esophageal cancer and seven patients (29%) with lung cancer developed myocardial ischemia in the RT field at mean intervals of 7.0 and 8.4 months after RT. The patients were followed-up for mean intervals of 15 and 23 months in the esophageal and lung cancer groups, respectively. Seven patients in each of the esophageal (44%) and lung (29%) cancer patients (P = 0.5) developed cardiac complications of which one patient with esophageal cancer died of complete heart block. Six out of the fourteen patients (43%) with cardiac complication had new ischemia on MPI after CRT of which only one developed angina. The remaining eight patients with cardiac complications had normal MPI results. MPI result was not a statistically significant predictor of future cardiac complications after CRT. A history of congestive heart failure (CHF) (P = 0.003) or arrhythmia (P = 0.003) is a significant predictor of cardiac morbidity after CRT in univariate analysis but marginal predictors when multivariate analysis was performed (P = 0.06 and 0.06 for CHF and arrhythmia, respectively). Cardiac complications after CRT are more common in esophageal than lung cancer patients but the difference is not statistically significant. MPI abnormalities are frequently seen after CRT but are not predictive of future cardiac

  10. Trends in diagnoses after implementation of the Chicago classification for esophageal motility disorders (V3.0) for high-resolution manometry studies.

    PubMed

    Laing, P; Bress, A P; Fang, J; Peterson, K; Adler, D G; Gawron, A J

    2017-12-01

    To determine trends in the diagnostic distribution of esophageal motility disorders after implementation of the Chicago Classification Version 3.0 (CC V3.0) for interpretation of high-resolution manometry (HRM) studies compared to non-Chicago Classification criteria. Retrospective trends analysis of patients with an HRM study conducted at a single center from January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2015. The implementation of the CC V3.0 for manometry interpretation occurred in September 2014. Patient charts were manually reviewed for data collection including demographics and HRM diagnoses. The prevalence and relative risks (RR) of CC V3.0 diagnostic categories (i.e. normal, indeterminate, achalasia, and EGJ outflow obstruction [EJGOO], and major and minor motility disorders) were calculated before and after CC V3.0 implementation. Four hundred sixty-five HRM studies were included in the study including 268 before and 179 after CC V3.0 implementation. The mean ± SD age was 54 ± 15.4 years and 59.8% were female (n = 278). The percentage with indeterminate diagnosis decreased from 35.3% before CC V3.0 implementation to 16.8% after implementation (adjusted RR 0.5, 95%CI 0.30-0.70, p < 0.001). The percentage with a major motility disorders decreased from 13.9% to 7.3% (adjusted RR 0.5, 95%CI 0.2-1.0, p < 0.001). The percentage with EJGOO and minor diagnoses increased from 1.4% to 14.5% and 11.9% to 22.9%, respectively. The percentage with achalasia and normal diagnosis did not change over the study period. Implementation of CCV3.0 was associated with changes in the distribution of esophageal motility diagnoses in clinical practice. The percentage of indeterminate and major diagnosis decreased and EGJOO and minor diagnoses increased. The decrease in the number of indeterminate studies suggests that the CC V3.0 may clarify the criteria for the interpreting physician. The increase in studies with a diagnosis of EGJ outflow obstruction may reflect the heterogeneity of

  11. Preinduced intestinal HSP70 improves visceral hypersensitivity and abnormal intestinal motility in PI-IBS mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lan, Cheng; Sun, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Xu-Chun; Yang, Bo; Huang, Bai-Li; Deng, Tao-Zhi; He, Zhou-Tao; Han, Xiang-Yang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the impact of the preinduced intestinal heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on the visceral hypersensitivity and abnormal intestinal motility in a post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) mouse model. Eighty-four female C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to four groups: control group (n = 21) and induction + PI-IBS group (n = 21), PI-IBS group (n = 21) and induction group (n = 21). The mice in PI-IBS group were infected in vivo with Trichinella spiralis by oral administration. The visceral hypersensitivity and intestinal motility were evaluated respectively with abdominal withdrawal reflex and colon transportation test. The intestinal HSP70 protein and mRNA level was measured by Western blot and real-time PCR. Meanwhile, the intestinal proinflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TNF-α level was detected by ELISA. Compared with their counterparts in PI-IBS group, the animals in the Induction + PI-IBS group show significantly increased intestinal level of HSP70 and obviously ameliorative clinical figures, including abdominal withdrawal reflex score, intestine transportation time and Bristol scores (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the intestinal post-inflammatory cytokines remarkably changed, including increased IL-10 level and decreased TNF-α level (P < 0.05). Intestinal HSP70 may play a potential protective role through improving the imbalance between the intestinal post-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in PI-IBS. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural abnormalities in spermatids together with reduced sperm counts and motility underlie the reproductive defect in HIP1-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Khatchadourian, Karine; Smith, Charles E; Metzler, Martina; Gregory, Mary; Hayden, Michael R; Cyr, Daniel G; Hermo, Louis

    2007-03-01

    Huntingtin interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is an endocytic adaptor protein with clathrin assembly activity that binds to cytoplasmic proteins, such as F-actin, tubulin, and huntingtin (htt). To gain insight into diverse functions of HIP1, we characterized the male reproductive defect of HIP1(-/-) mice from 7 to 30 weeks of age. High levels of HIP1 protein were expressed in the testis of wild-type mice as seen by Western blots and as a reaction over Sertoli cells and elongating spermatids as visualized by immunocytochemistry. Accordingly, major structural abnormalities were evident in HIP1(-/-) mice with vacuolation of seminiferous tubules caused by an apparent loss of postmeiotic spermatids and a significant reduction in mean profile area. Remaining spermatids revealed deformations of their heads, flagella, and/or acrosomes. In some Sertoli cells, ectoplasmic specializations (ES) were absent or altered in appearance accounting for the presence of spherical germ cells in the epididymal lumen. Quantitative analyses of sperm counts from the cauda epididymidis demonstrated a significant decrease in HIP1(-/-) mice compared to wild-type littermates. In addition, computer-assisted sperm analyses indicated that velocities, amplitude of lateral head displacements (ALH), and numbers and percentages of sperm in the motile, rapid, and progressive categories were all significantly reduced in HIP1(-/-) mice, while the numbers and percentages of sperm in the static category were greatly increased. Taken together, these various abnormalities corroborate reduced fertility levels in HIP1(-/-) mice and suggest a role for HIP1 in stabilizing actin and microtubules, which are important cytoskeletal elements enabling normal spermatid and Sertoli cell morphology and function. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. [Marshmallow for investigating functional disturbances of the esophageal body].

    PubMed

    Keren, S; Argaman, E

    1992-09-01

    Manometric studies using water boluses do not always demonstrate disturbances in esophageal motility. We tested the use of a marshmallow bolus to induce abnormal manometric patterns in patients with dysphagia in whom manometric studies using water boluses were normal or nearly so. The study group included 12 normal volunteers and 22 patients with dysphagia and nearly normal manometric studies. Pressure was recorded along the esophageal body using 10 "wet" swallows followed by 10 "solid" swallows of marshmallow. In normal subjects there were fewer abnormal contractions after solid swallows than after wet swallows. In 15 patients solid swallows induced abnormal motility patterns which were not observed after wet swallows. The probability of inducing abnormal contractions in patients after solid swallows is significantly greater than after wet swallows (p < 0.0001). Solid swallowing is therefore useful in evaluating functional disturbances of the esophagus in patients with dysphagia.

  14. Esophageal Achalasia: Pathophysiology, Clinical Presentation, and Diagnostic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Neto, Rafael M L; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2018-04-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax in response to swallowing. These abnormalities lead to impaired emptying of food from the esophagus into the stomach with resulting food stasis. Most patients experience severe dysphagia, and regurgitation can lead to aspiration and respiratory problems. Consequently, the quality of life of patients affected by achalasia is severely impacted. A thorough evaluation with upper endoscopy, barium swallow, and esophageal manometry is mandatory to establish the diagnosis and plan the optimal treatment. In selected patients, an ambulatory pH monitoring is recommended to distinguish between gastroesophageal reflux disease and achalasia.

  15. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Santander, Cecilio; Chavarría-Herbozo, Carlos M; Becerro-González, Irene; Burgos-Santamaría, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  16. Long-term Outcomes of Patients With Normal or Minor Motor Function Abnormalities Detected by High-resolution Esophageal Manometry.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Friesen, Laurel; Issaka, Rachel; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2015-08-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) expands recognition of minor esophageal motor abnormalities, but the clinical significance of these is unclear. We aimed to determine the outcomes of minor esophageal motor abnormalities. We reviewed HRM tracings from patients who underwent esophageal manometry at Northwestern Memorial Hospital from July 2004 through October 2005 by using the Chicago classification (version 2.0). We identified 301 patients with normal findings or minor manometric abnormalities (weak peristalsis, hypertensive peristalsis, frequent failed peristalsis, or rapid contractions with normal latency). Ninety-eight patients participated in a phone survey in which they were asked questions from the impact dysphagia questionnaire (mean follow-up period, 6 years 5 months). Of 301 patients assessed, 166 had normal findings from HRM, 82 had weak peristalsis, 34 had hypertensive peristalsis, 17 had frequent failed peristalsis, and 2 had rapid contractions with normal latency. The primary indications for HRM of dysphagia (44%) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (63%) were unrelated to manometric findings. There were no endoscopic or videofluoroscopic differences between patients with minor manometric abnormalities. Of 98 patients with follow-up, findings from HRM were normal in 63, weak peristalsis was observed in 23, hypertensive peristalsis was observed in 10, and frequent failed peristalsis was observed in 2. No patients underwent surgical myotomy, pneumatic dilation, or botulinum toxin injection. Use of proton pump inhibitors and rates of fundoplication were similar, regardless of manometric findings. Sixteen patients (16%) had significant dysphagia at follow-up; hypertensive peristalsis was the most likely to be symptomatic. Patients with normal and minor esophageal motor abnormalities report minimal symptoms and have few medical interventions related to esophageal dysfunction during long-term follow-up. Therefore, identification of normal and minor motor

  17. Diagnosis and management of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Parkman, Henry P

    2016-09-13

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is usually idiopathic in origin. It is characterized by dysphagia, and patients often have chest pain, regurgitation, weight loss, and an abnormal barium radiograph showing esophageal dilation with narrowing at the gastroesophageal junction. Abnormal or absent esophageal peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are typically seen on esophageal manometry. The advent of high resolution manometry (HRM) has allowed more precise diagnosis of achalasia, subtype designation, and differentiation from other esophageal motor disorders with an initial seminal publication in 2008 followed by further refinements of what has been termed the Chicago classification. Potential treatments include drugs, endoscopic botulinum toxin injection, balloon dilation, traditional surgery (usually laparoscopic Heller myotomy; LHM), and a novel, less invasive, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy termed peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first human POEM was performed in 2008, with the first publication appearing in 2010 and evidence now rapidly accumulating showing POEM to be comparable to traditional surgery in terms of clinical success and radiologic and manometric post-therapy outcomes. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of achalasia with particular emphasis on the recent developments of HRM and POEM, which arguably represent the most important advances in the field since the advent of laparoscopic Heller myotomy in the 1990s. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Esophagogastric junction and esophageal body contraction metrics on high-resolution manometry predict esophageal acid burden.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, A; Bolkhir, A; Gor, P; Wang, D; Munigala, S; Gyawali, C P

    2018-05-01

    Distal contractile integral (DCI) and esophagogastric junction contractile integral (EGJ-CI) are high-resolution manometry (HRM) software metrics assessing esophageal motor function in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients undergoing HRM and ambulatory pH monitoring off antisecretory therapy prospectively completed symptom questionnaires assessing symptom burden and a global symptom score (GSS) at baseline and after GERD therapy. DCI<450 mm Hg/cm/s in ≥5 swallows diagnosed ineffective esophageal motility (IEM); proportions of failed (DCI<100 mm Hg/cm/s) and weak (DCI 100-450 mm Hg/cm/s) sequences were separately assessed. EGJ-CI assessed vigor of the EGJ barrier. Univariate and multivariate analyses addressed performance of esophageal body and EGJ metrics in predicting abnormal esophageal reflux burden, and symptom outcome from antireflux therapy. Of 188 patients (55.2 ± 0.9 year, 64% F), 42.6% had low EGJ-CI, and 25.0% had IEM. While low EGJ-CI was associated with abnormal reflux burden (P = 0.003), IEM alone was not (P = 0.2). Increasing proportions of failed swallows predicted abnormal AET better than the current IEM definition. Combined low EGJ-CI and IEM segregated abnormal total and supine acid burden compared to patients with normal EGJ-CI and no IEM (P ≤ 0.007 for each comparison). Medical therapy and surgical antireflux therapy were similarly effective in improving symptom burden; surgery resulted in better outcomes with low EGJ-CI (P ≤ 0.04), especially with intact esophageal body motor function (P = 0.02). While abnormal EGJ and esophageal body metrics are collectively associated with elevated esophageal reflux burden, increasing proportions of failed swallows are better predictors of reflux burden and outcome compared to the current IEM definition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and certain...

  20. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and certain...

  1. Advances in esophageal motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Smout, André Jpm

    2008-07-01

    Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. A number of studies have addressed the issue of heterogeneity in achalasia, the best defined esophageal motility disorder. The spastic esophageal motility disorders nutcracker esophagus and diffuse esophageal spasm may coexist with gastroesophageal reflux disease, which has consequences for the management of patients with these disorders. The entity labelled ineffective esophageal motility is associated with reflux esophagitis, but also with morbid obesity. For the detection of disordered transit caused by ineffective esophageal motility, application of intraluminal impedance monitoring in conjunction with manometry leads to improved diagnosis. New data on the effect of Nissen fundoplication on esophageal motility were published during the last year. Recent knowledge on the heterogeneity of achalasia and the association of spastic esophageal motor disorders and ineffective motility with reflux disease will help the clinician in the management of patients with these disorders.

  2. Esophageal motor disorders in subjects with incidentally discovered Chagas disease: a study using high-resolution manometry and the Chicago classification.

    PubMed

    Remes-Troche, J M; Torres-Aguilera, M; Antonio-Cruz, K A; Vazquez-Jimenez, G; De-La-Cruz-Patiño, E

    2014-08-01

    In patients with chronic indeterminate Chagas disease, conventional manometry has shown that 25-48% had esophageal motor disorders. Recently, esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) has revolutionized the assessment of esophageal motor function. In this study, we performed esophageal HRM in a group of subjects with incidentally positive serological findings for Trypanosoma cruzi. In this prospective observational study, we evaluated subjects who had positive serological tests for Chagas disease detected during a screening evaluation for blood donation. All subjects underwent symptomatic evaluation and esophageal HRM with a 36 solid-state catheter. Esophageal abnormalities were classified using the Chicago classification. Forty-two healthy subjects (38 males) aged 18-61 years (mean age, 40.7 years) were included. When specific symptoms questionnaire was applied, 14 (33%) subjects had esophageal symptoms. Esophageal high-resolution manometry revealed that 28 (66%) of the subjects had an esophageal motility disorder according to the Chicago classification. Most common findings were hypocontractile disorders in 18 subjects (43%) and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) outflow obstruction in 6 (15%). Esophageal high-resolution manometry reveals that up to two thirds of the subjects with an incidental diagnosis of Chagas disease have esophageal abnormalities. This technology increases the detection and allows a more complete assessment of esophageal motor function in subjects infected with T. cruzi even in the early stages of the disease. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  3. Motility Disorders in Children.

    PubMed

    Nurko, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal motility disorders in the pediatric population are common and can range from benign processes to more serious disorders. Performing and interpreting motility evaluations in children present unique challenges. There are primary motility disorders but abnormal motility may be secondary due to other disease processes. Diagnostic studies include radiographic scintigraphic and manometry studies. Although recent advances in the genetics, biology, and technical aspects are having an important impact and have allowed for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and therapy for gastrointestinal motility disorders in children, further research is needed to be done to have better understanding of the pathophysiology and for better therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation between the radiological observation of isolated tertiary waves on an esophagram and findings on high-resolution esophageal manometry.

    PubMed

    Halland, M; Ravi, K; Barlow, J; Arora, A

    2016-01-01

    Barium esophagrams are a frequently performed test, and radiological observations about potential abnormal esophageal motility, such as tertiary contractions, are commonly reported. We sought to assess the correlation between tertiary waves, and in particular isolated tertiary waves, on esophagrams and findings on non-synchronous high-resolution esophageal manometry. We retrospectively reviewed reports of esophagrams performed at a tertiary referral center and identified patients in whom tertiary waves were observed and a high-resolution esophageal manometry had been performed. We defined two groups; group 1 was defined as patients with isolated tertiary waves, whereas group 2 had tertiary waves and evidence of achalasia or an obstructing structural abnormality on the esophagram. We collected data on demographics, dysphagia score, associated findings on esophagram, and need for intervention. We reviewed the reports of 2100 esophagrams of which tertiary waves were noted as an isolated abnormality in 92, and in association with achalasia or a structural obstruction in 61. High-resolution manometry was performed in 17 patients in group 1, and five had evidence of a significant esophageal motility disorder and 4 required any intervention. Twenty-one patients in group 2 underwent manometry, and 18 had a significant esophageal motility disorder. An isolated finding of tertiary waves on an esophagram is rarely associated with a significant esophageal motility disorder that requires intervention. All patients with isolated tertiary waves who required intervention had a dysphagia to liquids. Tertiary contractions, in the absence of dysphagia to liquids, indicate no significant esophageal motility disorder. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  5. Do large hiatal hernias affect esophageal peristalsis?

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J; Kia, Leila; Luger, Daniel; Soper, Nathaniel; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aim Large hiatal hernias can be associated with a shortened or tortuous esophagus. We hypothesized that these anatomic changes may alter esophageal pressure topography (EPT) measurements made during high-resolution manometry (HRM). Our aim was to compare EPT measures of esophageal motility in patients with large hiatal hernias to those of patients without hernia. Methods Among 2000 consecutive clinical EPT, we identified 90 patients with large (>5 cm) hiatal hernias on endoscopy and at least 7 evaluable swallows on EPT. Within the same database a control group without hernia was selected. EPT was analyzed for lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, Distal Contractile Integral (DCI), contraction amplitude, Contractile Front Velocity (CFV) and Distal Latency time (DL). Esophageal length was measured on EPT from the distal border of upper esophageal sphincter to the proximal border of the LES. EPT diagnosis was based on the Chicago Classification. Results The manometry catheter was coiled in the hernia and did not traverse the crural diaphragm in 44 patients (49%) with large hernia. Patients with large hernias had lower average LES pressures, lower DCI, slower CFV and shorter DL than patients without hernia. They also exhibited a shorter mean esophageal length. However, the distribution of peristaltic abnormalities was not different in patients with and without large hernia. Conclusions Patients with large hernias had an alteration of EPT measurements as a consequence of the associated shortened esophagus. However, the distribution of peristaltic disorders was unaffected by the presence of hernia. PMID:22508779

  6. [Motility disorders of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Bruder, E; Rougemont, A-L; Furlano, R I; Schneider, J F; Mayr, J; Haecker, F-M; Beier, K; Schneider, J; Weber, P; Berberich, T; Cathomas, G; Meier-Ruge, W A

    2013-03-01

    Motility disorders of the esophagus comprise a heterogeneous spectrum of diseases. Primary malformations of the esophagus are now amenable to improved surgical and gastroenterological therapies; however, they often lead to persistent long-term esophageal dysmotility. Achalasia originates from impaired relaxation of the gastroesophageal sphincter apparatus. Systemic diseases may give rise to secondary disorders of esophageal motility. A number of visceral neuromuscular disorders show an esophageal manifestation but aganglionosis rarely extends into the esophagus. The growing group of myopathies includes metabolic and mitochondrial disorders with increasing levels of genetic characterization and incipient emergence of therapeutic strategies. Esophagitis with an infectious etiology causes severe dysmotility particularly in immunocompromised patients. Immunologically mediated inflammatory processes involving the esophagus are increasingly better understood. Finally, rare tumors and tumor-like lesions may impair esophageal motor function.

  7. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  8. Practice guidelines on the use of esophageal manometry - A GISMAD-SIGE-AIGO medical position statement.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; de Bortoli, Nicola; Bellini, Massimo; Galeazzi, Francesca; Ribolsi, Mentore; Salvador, Renato; Savarino, Vincenzo; Penagini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Patients with esophageal symptoms potentially associated to esophageal motor disorders such as dysphagia, chest pain, heartburn and regurgitation, represent one of the most frequent reasons for referral to gastroenterological evaluation. The utility of esophageal manometry in clinical practice is: (1) to accurately define esophageal motor function, (2) to identify abnormal motor function, and (3) to establish a treatment plan based on motor abnormalities. With this in mind, in the last decade, investigations and technical advances, with the introduction of high-resolution esophageal manometry, have enhanced our understanding and management of esophageal motility disorders. The following recommendations were developed to assist physicians in the appropriate use of esophageal manometry in modern patient care. They were discussed and approved after a comprehensive review of the medical literature pertaining to manometric techniques and their recent application. This position statement created under the auspices of the Gruppo Italiano di Studio per la Motilità dell'Apparato Digerente (GISMAD), Società Italiana di Gastroenterologia ed Endoscopia Digestiva (SIGE) and Associazione Italiana Gastroenterologi ed Endoscopisti Digestivi Ospedalieri (AIGO) is intended to help clinicians in applying manometric studies in the most fruitful manner within the context of their patients with esophageal symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance is associated with severity of acid reflux and epithelial structural abnormalities in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chanjuan; Duan, Liping; Wang, Kun; Xu, Zhijie; Ge, Ying; Yang, Changqing; Han, Yajing

    2013-05-01

    The esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance may be used to evaluate the status of mucosa integrity. Esophageal acid exposure decreases the baseline impedance. We aimed to compare baseline impedance in patients with various reflux events and with different acid-related parameters, and investigate the relationships between epithelial histopathologic abnormalities and baseline impedance. A total of 229 GERD patients and 34 controls underwent 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring (MII-pH monitoring), gastroendoscopy, and completed a GERD questionnaire (GerdQ). We quantified epithelial intercellular spaces (ICSs) and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins by histologic techniques. Mean baseline values in reflux esophagitis (RE) (1752 ± 1018 Ω) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) (2640 ± 1143 Ω) were significantly lower than in controls (3360 ± 1258 Ω; p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Among NERD subgroups, mean baselines in the acid reflux group (2510 ± 1239 Ω) and mixed acid/weakly acidic reflux group (2393 ± 1009 Ω) were much lower than in controls (3360 ± 1258 Ω; p = 0.020 and p < 0.001, respectively). The mean baseline in severe RE patients was significantly lower than in mild RE patients (LA-C/D vs. LA-A/B: 970 ± 505 Ω vs. 1921 ± 1024 Ω, p < 0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between baseline value and acid exposure time (AET) (r = -0.41, p < 0.001), and a weak but significant correlation (r = -0.20, p = 0.007) between baseline value and weakly AET. Negative correlations were observed between ICS and the baseline impedance (r = -0.637, p < 0.001) and claudin-1 and the baseline impedance (r = -0.648, p < 0.001). Patients with dominant acid reflux events and with longer AET have low baseline impedance. Baseline values are correlated with esophageal mucosal histopathologic changes such as dilated ICS and TJ alteration.

  10. Does Chicago Classification address Symptom Correlation with High-resolution Esophageal Manometry?

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Melpakkam; Bawane, Piyush; Venkataraman, Jayanthi

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To assess the correlation of symptoms with findings on esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) in Indian patients. Materials and methods: Prospective data collection of all patients undergoing esophageal manometry was done at two centers in India—Indore and Chennai—over a period of 18 months. Symptom profile of the study group was divided into four: Motor dysphagia, noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and esophageal belchers. The symptoms were correlated with manometric findings. Results: Of the study group (154), 35.71% patients had a normal study, while major and minor peristaltic disorders were noted in 31.16 and 33.76% respectively. In patients with symptoms of dysphagia, achalasia cardia was the commonest cause (45.1%), followed by ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) (22.53%) and normal study (19.71%). In patients with NCCP, normal peristalsis (50%) and ineffective motility (31.25%) formed the major diagnosis. Of the 56 patients with GER symptoms, 26 (46.4%) had normal manometry. An equal number had ineffective motility. Of the 11 esophageal belchers, 7 (63.6%) of these had a normal study and 3 had major motility disorder. Dysphagia was the only symptom to have a high likelihood ratio and positive predictive value to pick up major motility disorder. Conclusion: Dysphagia correlates with high chance to pick up a major peristaltic abnormality in motor dysphagia. The role of manometry in other symptoms in Indian setting needs to be ascertained by larger studies. Clinical significance: The present study highlights lack of symptom correlation with manometry findings in Indian patients. How to cite this article: Jain M, Srinivas M, Bawane P, Venkataraman J. Does Chicago Classification address Symptom Correlation with High-resolution Esophageal Manometry? Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2017;7(2):122-125. PMID:29201792

  11. Does Chicago Classification address Symptom Correlation with High-resolution Esophageal Manometry?

    PubMed

    Jain, Mayank; Srinivas, Melpakkam; Bawane, Piyush; Venkataraman, Jayanthi

    2017-01-01

    To assess the correlation of symptoms with findings on esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) in Indian patients. Prospective data collection of all patients undergoing esophageal manometry was done at two centers in India-Indore and Chennai-over a period of 18 months. Symptom profile of the study group was divided into four: Motor dysphagia, noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and esophageal belchers. The symptoms were correlated with manometric findings. Of the study group (154), 35.71% patients had a normal study, while major and minor peristaltic disorders were noted in 31.16 and 33.76% respectively. In patients with symptoms of dysphagia, achalasia cardia was the commonest cause (45.1%), followed by ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) (22.53%) and normal study (19.71%). In patients with NCCP, normal peristalsis (50%) and ineffective motility (31.25%) formed the major diagnosis. Of the 56 patients with GER symptoms, 26 (46.4%) had normal manometry. An equal number had ineffective motility. Of the 11 esophageal belchers, 7 (63.6%) of these had a normal study and 3 had major motility disorder. Dysphagia was the only symptom to have a high likelihood ratio and positive predictive value to pick up major motility disorder. Dysphagia correlates with high chance to pick up a major peristaltic abnormality in motor dysphagia. The role of manometry in other symptoms in Indian setting needs to be ascertained by larger studies. The present study highlights lack of symptom correlation with manometry findings in Indian patients. How to cite this article: Jain M, Srinivas M, Bawane P, Venkataraman J. Does Chicago Classification address Symptom Correlation with High-resolution Esophageal Manometry? Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2017;7(2):122-125.

  12. Fiber-enriched diet helps to control symptoms and improves esophageal motility in patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Sergey; Isakov, Vasily; Konovalova, Mariya

    2018-06-07

    To investigate the effect of dietary fiber on symptoms and esophageal function testing parameters in non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (NERD) patients. Thirty-six NERD patients with low (< 20 g/d) dietary fiber intake were enrolled in the study. They were examined with the use of symptom questionnaire (GERD-Q), high-resolution esophageal manometry, 24-h esophageal pH-impedance examinations, and food frequency questionnaire before and after 10 d of usual diet supplemented by psyllium 5.0 g TID. Complete data of 30 patients were available to the final analysis. The obtained results were analyzed with the use of non-parametric statistics (Wilcoxon matched pairs test). The number of patients experiencing heartburn was less (93.3% at baseline vs 40% at the end of the study, P < 0.001) and the GERD-Q score decreased (mean ± SD: 10.9 ± 1.7 vs 6.0 ± 2.3, P < 0.001) after the treatment period. Minimal resting lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure increased from 5.41 ± 10.1 to 11.3 ± 9.4 mmHg ( P = 0.023), but no change in residual LES pressure and mean resting pressure was found. Total number of gastroesophageal refluxes (GER) decreased from 67.9 ± 17.7 to 42.4 ± 13.5 ( P < 0.001) predominantly by acid and weak acid types of GERs. No significant change in mean esophageal pH and % of time pH < 4 was registered. Maximal reflux time decreased from 10.6 ± 12.0 min to 5.3 ± 3.7 min ( P < 0.05). Fiber-enriched diet led to a significant increase of minimal lower esophageal sphincter resting pressure, a decrease of number of gastroesophageal refluxes, and a decrease of heartburn frequency per week in NERD.

  13. Catheter-based high-frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging is a powerful tool to study esophageal dysmotility patients.

    PubMed

    Santander, Cecilio; Perea, Elena; Caldas, María; Clave, Pere

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) is currently the most important diagnostic test for esophageal motility disorders, providing information on the contraction pattern of the circular muscle layer, which helps classify these esophageal motor diseases. However, with the increasing development of ultrasound, other techniques, such as high-frequency intraluminal ultrasound (HFIUS), have gained importance. This technique uses a flexible shaft with a central wire integrated into a standard endoscope, which facilitates real-time sonography. Its main utility is to provide anatomical information on the structure of the esophageal wall, including both the circular and longitudinal layers that constitute the esophageal muscularis propria. Increasing knowledge about these motility disorders has led to the hypothesis that, in addition to an abnormal contraction pattern of the circular muscle, an overall increased muscle thickness and an abnormal longitudinal muscle contraction could be added as pathophysiological factors. The increase in muscle thickness could be an important indicator of the severity of diseases, such as achalasia, distal esophageal spasm, or hypercontractile esophagus. More studies are required before definitive conclusions can be reached, but HFIUS employed simultaneously with HRM could provide a more complete and precise evaluation of these esophageal motor disorders. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Disruption of the A-Kinase Anchoring Domain in Flagellar Radial Spoke Protein 3 Results in Unregulated Axonemal cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase Activity and Abnormal Flagellar Motility

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Anne R.; Fox, Laura A.; Rhea, Jeanne M.; Craige, Branch

    2006-01-01

    Biochemical studies of Chlamydomonas flagellar axonemes revealed that radial spoke protein (RSP) 3 is an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP). To determine the physiological role of PKA anchoring in the axoneme, an RSP3 mutant, pf14, was transformed with an RSP3 gene containing a mutation in the PKA-binding domain. Analysis of several independent transformants revealed that the transformed cells exhibit an unusual phenotype: a fraction of the cells swim normally; the remainder of the cells twitch feebly or are paralyzed. The abnormal/paralyzed motility is not due to an obvious deficiency of radial spoke assembly, and the phenotype cosegregates with the mutant RSP3. We postulated that paralysis was due to failure in targeting and regulation of axonemal cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). To test this, reactivation experiments of demembranated cells were performed in the absence or presence of PKA inhibitors. Importantly, motility in reactivated cell models mimicked the live cell phenotype with nearly equal fractions of motile and paralyzed cells. PKA inhibitors resulted in a twofold increase in the number of motile cells, rescuing paralysis. These results confirm that flagellar RSP3 is an AKAP and reveal that a mutation in the PKA binding domain results in unregulated axonemal PKA activity and inhibition of normal motility. PMID:16571668

  15. The vagus and recurrent laryngeal nerves in the rodent experimental model of esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Qi, B Q; Merei, J; Farmer, P; Hasthorpe, S; Myers, N A; Beasley, S W; Hutson, J M

    1997-11-01

    After surgical correction of their esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA-TEF), many patients exhibit evidence of esophageal dysmotility. Controversy exists as to whether the esophageal motility disorders result from denervation caused by surgery or from an inherent abnormal innervation of the esophagus. The present study used an Adriamycin-induced EA-TEF fetal rat model to trace the course and branching of both the vagus and recurrent laryngeal nerves. Abnormalities observed in EA-TEF rat fetuses include: (1) fewer branches from both recurrent laryngeal nerves; (2) deviation of the left vagus from its normal course below the aorta, passing behind the fistula to approach and join with the right vagus to form a single nerve trunk on the right side of the esophagus; (3) relatively few branches from the single vagal nerve trunk (composed of fibers of the left and the right vagus) on the surface of the lower esophagus. Fetuses affected by EA-TEF have inherent abnormalities in the course and branching pattern of the vagus nerves as they descend through the thorax, culminating in a deficient extrinsic nerve fiber plexus in the lower esophagus. These observations may account for the esophageal motility disorders seen in patients who have EA-TEF even before surgical intervention.

  16. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  17. The Chicago classification of motility disorders: an update.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sabine; Gyawali, C Prakash; Xiao, Yinglian; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    The Chicago Classification defines esophageal motility disorders in high resolution manometry. This is based on individual scoring of 10 swallows performed in supine position. Disorders of esophago-gastric junction (EGJ) outflow obstruction are defined by a median integrated relaxation pressure above the limit of normal and divided into 3 achalasia subtypes and EGJ outflow obstruction. Major motility disorders (aperistalsis, distal esophageal spasm, and hypercontractile esophagus) are patterns not encountered in controls in the context of normal EGJ relaxation. Finally with the latest version of the Chicago Classification, only two minor motor disorders are considered: ineffective esophageal motility and fragmented peristalsis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Indications and interpretation of esophageal function testing.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, C Prakash; de Bortoli, Nicola; Clarke, John; Marinelli, Carla; Tolone, Salvatore; Roman, Sabine; Savarino, Edoardo

    2018-05-12

    Esophageal symptoms are common, and can arise from mucosal, motor, functional, and neoplastic processes, among others. Judicious use of diagnostic testing can help define the etiology of symptoms and can direct management. Endoscopy, esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM), ambulatory pH or pH-impedance manometry, and barium radiography are commonly used for esophageal function testing; functional lumen imaging probe is an emerging option. Recent consensus guidelines have provided direction in using test findings toward defining mechanisms of esophageal symptoms. The Chicago Classification describes hierarchical steps in diagnosing esophageal motility disorders. The Lyon Consensus characterizes conclusive evidence on esophageal testing for a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and establishes a motor classification of GERD. Taking these recent advances into consideration, our discussion focuses primarily on the indications, technique, equipment, and interpretation of esophageal HRM and ambulatory reflux monitoring in the evaluation of esophageal symptoms, and describes indications for alternative esophageal tests. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. The Role of Esophageal Hypersensitivity in Functional Heartburn.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takashi; Miwa, Hiroto

    2017-08-01

    Functional heartburn (FH) is defined as a functional esophageal disorder characterized by symptoms of chronic heartburn with no apparent correlation to acid or nonacid reflux. In addition, its symptoms persist despite the lack of organic abnormalities or inflammation, esophageal motility disorders, or metabolic disorders. Although conditions presenting with esophageal symptoms without endoscopic abnormalities were previously categorized as nonerosive reflux disease, such conditions are now classified into 3 categories under Rome IV criteria: nonerosive reflux disease, reflux hypersensitivity, and FH. Although many aspects of FH remain unclear, its onset mechanism is considered to be strongly associated with peripheral or central sensitization, given the fact that its symptoms seem to be unrelated to gastroesophageal reflux. In addition, the cause of such hypersensitivity is an interesting topic in itself, and psychological factors, such as stress followed by increasing esophageal permeability are gaining attention as factors that can potentially influence this condition. There is a great unmet clinical need for therapeutic drugs that can be used to treat FH, and the development of novel drugs, diagnostic tests and biomarkers is eagerly awaited.

  20. Use of radioisotopic esophageal transit in the assessment of patients with symptoms of reflux and non-specific esophageal motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Iascone, C; Di Giulio, E; Maffi, C; Ruperto, M

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the esophageal clearance of a radioisotopic bolus in patients with symptoms of reflux and evaluate the impact of manometric abnormalities on scintigraphic esophageal transit. Esophageal clearance was assessed in a supine position and indicated by the retained radioactivity in the esophagus at 10, 20, 30 and 40 s after the ingestion of a liquid bolus labeled with 2 mCi 99 mTc-SC. The study included 214 consecutive patients with symptoms of reflux and 11 normal controls. The results were compared to the motility findings detected on manometry performed on a separate occasion. Esophageal manometry was normal in 93 patients. Nonspecific esophageal motor disorders were identified in 121 patients and were classified into: 'predominantly nonpropagated activity', 'predominantly low-amplitude peristaltic contractions' and 'miscellaneous disorders' diagnosed in 27, 47 and 47 patients, respectively. The radionuclide clearance was significantly delayed in the overall group of patients compared with that of normal controls (P < 0.001); in patients with reflux symptoms and nonspecific esophageal motor disorders compared with patients with reflux symptoms and 'normal manometry' (P < 0.01 at 20 s); and in patients with reflux symptoms and 'normal manometry' compared with the control group (P < 0.01 at 20 s). Abnormal radioisotope clearances were detected in 88% of patients with 'predominantly nonpropagated activity', in 70% of patients with 'predominantly low-amplitude peristaltic contractions' and in 57% of patients with 'miscellaneous disorders'. Radioisotopic esophageal clearance abnormalities are frequently observed in patients with reflux symptoms and are more likely to be associated to hypomotility disorders, i.e. nonpropagated motor activity or low-amplitude contractions.

  1. Esophageal motor activity in children with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Chitkara, Denesh K; Fortunato, Christine; Nurko, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate esophageal body motor contractions occurring during esophageal reflux in pediatric patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Patients referred for the evaluation of GERD who were evaluated with combined 24-hour pH probe and esophageal manometry test (MP24) were included. Patients were separated into the following groups: Group C -- normal pH probe and normal EGD; Group 1 -- abnormal pH probe and normal EGD; and Group 2 -- abnormal pH probe and EGD with histologic esophagitis. Esophageal motor function during reflux episodes was analyzed. Twenty-five patients were included. All had a normal stationary esophageal manometry. Patients in Groups 1 and 2 had significantly more gastroesophageal reflux by pH probe than Group C (P < 0.01). During the MP24, patients in Group 1 and 2 had significantly fewer contractions per minute pre-, during, and post-GER (P < 0.05). There were significant differences in the number of isolated and prolonged contractions (>7 sec) during prolonged GERD episodes >5 minutes (P < 0.05). Children with GERD have a decreased number and abnormal esophageal body contractions with esophageal reflux. This suggests that children with GERD with and without esophagitis have impaired esophageal body acid clearance.

  2. Distribution of Esophageal Motor Disorders in Diabetic Patients With Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    George, Nina S; Rangan, Vikram; Geng, Zhuo; Khan, Freeha; Kichler, Adam; Gabbard, Scott; Ganocy, Stephen; Fass, Ronnie

    Diabetes mellitus can cause various gastrointestinal symptoms. Assessment of esophageal dysmotility in diabetic patients has been scarcely studied. The aim of this study was to determine the esophageal motor characteristics of diabetic versus nondiabetic patients who present with dysphagia. High-resolution esophageal manometries (HREMs) of 83 diabetic patients and 83 age and gender-matched nondiabetic patients with dysphagia from 2 medical centers were included in this study. Demographic information, medical comorbidities, and medication usage were recorded for each patient in a single registry. HREM of each patient was evaluated and the different functional parameters were recorded. Overall, 46% of diabetic patients were found to have an esophageal motor disorder. Diabetic patients with dysphagia were more likely to have failed swallows on HREM (50.6% vs. 33.7%; P=0.03) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Among diabetic patients, those being treated with insulin were more likely to have failed (69.0% vs. 40.7%; P=0.01) and weak (65.5% vs. 33.3%; P=0.005) swallows as compared with diabetic patients not on insulin. Among diabetic patients, those with abnormal manometry were more likely to demonstrate diabetic retinopathy (27.0% vs. 8.7%; P=0.04). There was a trend toward increased incidence of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction in diabetic patients (10.8% vs. 2.4%; P=0.057) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Nearly half of diabetic patients with dysphagia have some type of an esophageal motility disorder. Diabetic retinopathy and the use of insulin are predictive of esophageal motor abnormalities among diabetic patients.

  3. A Tissue Systems Pathology Test Detects Abnormalities Associated with Prevalent High-Grade Dysplasia and Esophageal Cancer in Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Critchley-Thorne, Rebecca J; Davison, Jon M; Prichard, Jeffrey W; Reese, Lia M; Zhang, Yi; Repa, Kathleen; Li, Jinhong; Diehl, David L; Jhala, Nirag C; Ginsberg, Gregory G; DeMarshall, Maureen; Foxwell, Tyler; Jobe, Blair A; Zaidi, Ali H; Duits, Lucas C; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; Rustgi, Anil; Falk, Gary W

    2017-02-01

    There is a need for improved tools to detect high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in patients with Barrett's esophagus. In previous work, we demonstrated that a 3-tier classifier predicted risk of incident progression in Barrett's esophagus. Our aim was to determine whether this risk classifier could detect a field effect in nondysplastic (ND), indefinite for dysplasia (IND), or low-grade dysplasia (LGD) biopsies from Barrett's esophagus patients with prevalent HGD/EAC. We performed a multi-institutional case-control study to evaluate a previously developed risk classifier that is based upon quantitative image features derived from 9 biomarkers and morphology, and predicts risk for HGD/EAC in Barrett's esophagus patients. The risk classifier was evaluated in ND, IND, and LGD biopsies from Barrett's esophagus patients diagnosed with HGD/EAC on repeat endoscopy (prevalent cases, n = 30, median time to HGD/EAC diagnosis 140.5 days) and nonprogressors (controls, n = 145, median HGD/EAC-free surveillance time 2,015 days). The risk classifier stratified prevalent cases and non-progressor patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk classes [OR, 46.0; 95% confidence interval, 14.86-169 (high-risk vs. low-risk); P < 0.0001]. The classifier also provided independent prognostic information that outperformed the subspecialist and generalist diagnosis. A tissue systems pathology test better predicts prevalent HGD/EAC in Barrett's esophagus patients than pathologic variables. The results indicate that molecular and cellular changes associated with malignant transformation in Barrett's esophagus may be detectable as a field effect using the test. A tissue systems pathology test may provide an objective method to facilitate earlier identification of Barrett's esophagus patients requiring therapeutic intervention. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(2); 240-8. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGFβ1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  5. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Rhonda F.

    2016-01-01

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hedgehog signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hedgehog signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-κB activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage, and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-κB activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention. PMID:27331918

  6. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rhonda F

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hh signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hh signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-x03BA;B activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-x03BA;B activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Assessment of esophageal involvement in systemic sclerosis and morphea (localized scleroderma) by clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pH metric features: a prospective comparative hospital based study.

    PubMed

    Arif, Tasleem; Masood, Qazi; Singh, Jaswinder; Hassan, Iffat

    2015-02-15

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a generalized disorder of unknown etiology affecting the connective tissue of the body. It affects the skin and various internal organs. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is seen in almost 90% of the patients. Esophagus is the most frequently affected part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal motility disturbance classically manifests as a reduced lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and loss of distal esophageal body peristalsis. Consequently, SSc patients may be complicated by erosive esophagitis and eventually by Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Morphea, also known as localized scleroderma, is characterized by predominant skin involvement, with occasional involvement of subjacent muscles and usually sparing the internal organs. The involvement of esophagus in morphea has been studied very scarcely. The proposed study will investigate the esophageal involvement in the two forms of scleroderma (systemic and localized), compare the same and address any need of upper gastrointestinal evaluation in morphea (localized scleroderma) patients. 56 and 31 newly and already diagnosed cases of SSc and morphea respectively were taken up for the study. All the patients were inquired about the dyspeptic symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation and/or dysphagia). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring were done in 52, 47 and 41 patients of SSc; and 28, 25 and 20 patients of morphea respectively. Esophageal symptoms were present in 39 cases (69.6%) of SSc which were mild in 22 (39.3%), moderate in 14 (25%), severe in three (5.3%); while only four cases (7.1%) of morphea had esophageal symptoms all of which were mild in severity. Reflux esophagitis was seen in 17 cases (32.7%) of SSc and only two cases (7.14%) of morphea. Manometric abnormalities were seen in 32 cases (68.1%) of SSc and none in morphea. Ambulatory 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring documented abnormal reflux in

  8. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and esophageal motor response.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Joachim H; Küper, Markus A; Königsrainer, Alfred; Brücher, Björn L D M

    2010-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is caused by transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in healthy individuals and in most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Refluxate is normally propelled by pharyngeally induced swallowing events, but TLESRs may also be accompanied by retrograde esophageal motor responses (EMRs). These contractions have not previously been investigated and their effect on esophageal clearance is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of EMRs after TLESR in healthy individuals and GERD patients and to develop an animal model for further investigation of EMRs. The frequency of TLESRs and esophageal body contractions after TLESRs was assessed using ambulatory manometry in five healthy individuals and five GERD patients. An animal model was developed for reproducible provocation of TLESRs and subsequent EMRs. Patients with GERD have significantly more TLESRs than healthy individuals. However, post-TLESR EMRs were not more frequent in the GERD group. All post-TLESR EMRs presented as simultaneous contractions of the esophagus. The feline model allowed reproducible initiation of the esophageal motor response after TLESR, showing that EMRs can be induced by external mechanoreceptor stimulation simultaneously with LES relaxation. This experimental design imitates the conditions after fundoplication in humans. The study demonstrated that GERD patients have significantly more TLESRs in comparison with healthy individuals, but these were only incidental to EMRs. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of esophageal motility disorders. The animal model presented offers a feasible tool for investigating TLESR-induced esophageal motility.

  9. Esophageal spasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods if you get esophageal spasms. Alternative Names Diffuse esophageal spasm; Spasm of the esophagus; Distal esophageal spasm Images Digestive system Throat anatomy Esophagus References Falk GW, Katzka DA. ...

  10. Nuclear Scintigraphy in Practice: Gastrointestinal Motility.

    PubMed

    Solnes, Lilja B; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Ziessman, Harvey A

    2018-05-29

    The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical utility of state-of-theart gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy, including the standardized esophageal transit, solid and liquid gastric emptying, small-bowel transit, colon transit, and whole-gut transit scintigraphy, with an emphasis on procedure performance. Radionuclide gastrointestinal motility studies are noninvasive, quantitative, and physiologic diagnostic tools for evaluating patients with gastrointestinal complaints.

  11. Evaluation and Management of Neonatal Dysphagia: Impact of Pharyngoesophageal Motility Studies and Multidisciplinary Feeding Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R.; Stoner, Erin; Gupta, Alankar; Bates, D. Gregory; Fernandez, Soledad; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Linscheid, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Abnormal swallowing (dysphagia) among neonates is commonly evaluated using the videofluoroscopic swallow study (VSS). Radiological findings considered high risk for administration of oral feeding include nasopharyngeal reflux, laryngeal penetration, aspiration, or pooling. Our aims were to determine pharyngoesophageal motility correlates in neonates with dysphagia and the impact of multidisciplinary feeding strategy. Methods Twenty dysphagic neonates (mean gestation ± standard deviation [SD] = 30.9 ± 4.9 weeks; median 31.1 weeks; range = 23.7–38.6 weeks) with abnormal VSS results were evaluated at 49.9 ± 16.5 weeks (median 41.36 weeks) postmenstrual age. The subjects underwent a swallow-integrated pharyngoesophageal motility assessment of basal and adaptive swallowing reflexes using a micromanometry catheter and pneumohydraulic water perfusion system. Based on observations during the motility study, multidisciplinary feeding strategies were applied and included postural adaptation, sensory modification, hunger manipulation, and operant conditioning methods. To discriminate pharyngoesophageal manometry correlates between oral feeders and tube feeders, data were stratified based on the primary feeding method at discharge, oral feeding versus tube feeding. Results At discharge, 15 of 20 dysphagic neonates achieved oral feeding success, and the rest required chronic tube feeding. Pharyngoesophageal manometry correlates were significantly different (P <0.05) between the primary oral feeders versus the chronic tube feeders for swallow frequency, swallow propagation, presence of adaptive peristaltic reflexes, oral feeding challenge test results, and upper esophageal sphincter tone. VSS results or disease characteristics had little effect on the feeding outcomes (P = NS). Conclusions Swallow-integrated esophageal motility studies permit prolonged evaluation of swallowing reflexes and responses to stimuli under controlled conditions at

  12. Comparison of bolus transit patterns identified by esophageal impedance to barium esophagram in patients with dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y K; Choi, M-G; Oh, S N; Baik, C N; Park, J M; Lee, I S; Kim, S W; Choi, K Y; Chung, I-S

    2012-01-01

    Bolus transit through the esophagus has not been validated by videoesophagram in patients with dysphagia and changes in impedance with abnormal barium transit have not been described in those patients. The aim of this study was to compare esophageal impedance findings with barium esophagram measurements in patients with dysphagia. The consecutive patients with dysphagia underwent conventional multichannel esophageal impedance manometry, after which a barium videoesophagram was performed simultaneously with multichannel esophageal impedance manometry using a mean of three swallows of barium. Esophageal emptying patterns shown in the esophagogram were classified by the degree of intraesophageal stasis and presence of intraesophageal reflux. Bolus transit patterns in impedance were classified as complete and incomplete transit. Sixteen patients (M : F = 8 : 8, mean age, 47 years) were enrolled. Their manometric diagnosis were normal (n= 6), ineffective esophageal motility (n= 1), diffuse esophageal spasm (DES; n= 2), and achalasia (n= 7). Sixty-three swallows were analyzed. According to impedance analysis, 21/22 swallows with normal barium emptying showed complete transit (96%) and 31/32 swallows with severe stasis showed incomplete transit (97%). Nine swallows with mild stasis showed either complete or incomplete transit patterns in impedance. Swallows with mild barium stasis and complete transit in impedance were observed in patients who had received treatment (two patients with achalasia with history of esophageal balloonplasty and a patient with DES after nifedipine administration). Impedance reflected severe stasis with retrograde barium movement and described typical bolus transit patterns in patients with achalasia and DES. In conclusion, impedance-barium esophagram concordance is high for swallows with normal esophageal emptying and for severe barium stasis in patients with dysphagia. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley

  13. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Nagammapudur S; Peters, Jeffrey H

    2002-08-01

    Laparoscopic Heller myotomy has emerged as an excellent primary treatment for patients with dysphagia secondary to achalasia. A laparoscopic rather than thoracoscopic approach has stood the test of time. An antireflux procedure combined with the myotomy is crucial to the maintenance of the antireflux barrier. Thoracoscopic long myotomy offers effective relief for spastic disorders of the esophagus. Endoscopic stapled diverticulotomy is a safe and effective procedure for Zenker's diverticulum and has potential advantages over the open approach.

  14. Fluoroscopic study of the normal gastrointestinal motility and measurements in the Hispaniolan Amazon parrot (Amazona ventralis).

    PubMed

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Nevarez, Javier; Taylor, W Michael; Jankowski, Gwendolyn; Rademacher, Nathalie; Gaschen, Lorrie; Pariaut, Romain; Tully, Thomas N

    2010-01-01

    Contrast fluoroscopy is a valuable tool to examine avian gastrointestinal motility. However, the lack of a standardized examination protocol and reference ranges prevents the objective interpretation of motility disorders and other gastrointestinal abnormalities. Our goals were to evaluate gastrointestinal motility in 20 Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) by contrast fluoroscopy. Each parrot was crop-fed an equal part mixture of barium sulfate and hand-feeding formula and placed in a cardboard box for fluoroscopy. Over a 3-h period, 1.5 minute segments of lateral and ventrodorsal fluoroscopy were recorded every 30 min. The gastric cycle and patterns of intestinal motility were described. The frequency of crop contractions, esophageal boluses, and gastric cycles were determined in lateral and ventrodorsal views. A range of 3.4-6.6 gastric cycles/min was noted on the lateral view and 3.0-6.6 gastric cycles/min on the ventrodorsal view. Circular measurements of the proventriculus diameter, ventriculus width, and length were obtained using the midshaft femoral diameter as a standard reference unit. The upper limits of the reference ranges were 3.6 and 4.7 femoral units for the proventriculus diameter in the lateral and ventrodorsal view, respectively. Two consecutive measurements were obtained and the measurement technique was found to have high reproducibility. In this study, we established a standardized protocol for contrast fluoroscopic examination of the gastrointestinal tract and a reliable measurement method of the proventriculus and ventriculus using femoral units in the Hispaniolan Amazon parrot.

  15. A multi-targeted natural flavonoid myricetin impedes abnormal glioblastoma cell motility and invasiveness via suppressing lamellipodia and focal adhesions formation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua-Fu; Wang, Gang; Wu, Chang-Peng; Zhou, Xiu-Ming; Wang, Jing; Chen, Zhong-Ping; To, Shing-Shun Tony; Li, Wei-Ping

    2018-06-10

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and malignant primary brain tumor characterized by rapid growth and extensive infiltration to neighboring normal brain parenchyma, which contribute to tumor recurrence and poor prognosis. Myricetin is a natural flavonoid with potent anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities, which may serve as a potential and harmless agent for GBM treatment. To investigate the anti-glioblastoma effects of myricetin, GBM cells were treated with myricetin alone or in combination with temozolomide. Its effects on GBM cell motility and cytoskeletal structures including lamellipodia, focal adhesions and membrane ruffles were also evaluated. We showed that myricetin alone inhibited glioblastoma U-87 MG cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas combination of myricetin and temozolomide did not exhibit any synergistic effect. The inhibitory effect on GBM cell proliferation is independent of PTEN status. Moreover, myricetin showed less cytotoxicity to normal astrocytes than GBM cells. Formation of lamellipodia, focal adhesions, membrane ruffles and vasculogenic mimicry were blocked by myricetin though suppressing ROCK2, paxillin and cortactin phosphorylation. In addition, myricetin could bind to a series of kinases and scaffold proteins including PI3K catalytic isoforms (p110α, p110β and p110δ), PDK1, JNK, c-Jun, ROCK2, paxillin, vinculin and VE-cadherin, leading to inactivation of PI3K/Akt and JNK signaling. In conclusion, myricetin is a multi-targeted drug that has potent anti-migratory and anti-invasive effects on GBM cells via suppressing formation of lamellipodia and focal adhesions, suggesting that it may serve as an alternative option for GBM treatment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Asian motility studies in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Oh Young

    2010-04-01

    Altered motility remains one of the important pathophysiologic factors in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who commonly complain of abdominal pain and stool changes such as diarrhea and constipation. The prevalence of IBS has increased among Asian populations these days. Gastrointestinal (GI) physiology may vary between Asian and Western populations because of differences in diets, socio-cultural backgrounds, and genetic factors. The characteristics and differences of GI dysmotility in Asian IBS patients were reviewed. MEDLINE search work was performed including following terms, 'IBS,' 'motility,' 'transit time,' 'esophageal motility,' 'gastric motility,' 'small intestinal motility,' 'colonic motility,' 'anorectal function,' and 'gallbladder motility' and over 100 articles were categorized under 'esophagus,' 'stomach,' 'small intestine,' 'colon,' 'anorectum,' 'gallbladder,' 'transit,' 'motor pattern,' and 'effect of stressors.' Delayed gastric emptying, slow tansit in constipation predominant IBS patients, rapid transit in diarrhea predominant IBS patients, accelerated motility responses to various stressors such as meals, mental stress, or corticotrophin releasing hormones, and altered rectal compliance and altered rectal accomodation were reported in many Asian studies regarding IBS. Many conflicting results were found among these studies and there are still controversies to conclude these as unique features of Asian IBS patients. Multinational and multicenter studies are needed to be performed vigorously in order to elaborate characteristics as well as differences of altered motililty in Asian patients with IBS.

  17. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types look different from each other under the microscope. Squamous cell esophageal cancer is linked to smoking and drinking too much ...

  18. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  19. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003764.htm Esophageal culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Esophageal culture is a laboratory test that checks for infection- ...

  20. Novel disposable transnasal endoscopy for assessment of esophageal motor function.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Baeg, Myong-Ki; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2014-01-01

    A novel disposable transnasal endoscopy (DTE) with a portable system has been developed to provide unsedated esophagoscopy by modifying capsule endoscopy. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DTE to evaluate esophageal motor function. Patients with or suspected esophageal motility disorders and healthy volunteers were enrolled. Participants underwent esophageal high-resolution manometry and DTE in random order on different days. Motility was observed with DTE at 1, 8, and 16 cm above the gastroesophageal junction. Twenty healthy volunteers and 20 symptomatic subjects participated (8 achalasia, 5 scleroderma, 3 diffuse esophageal spasm, 1 hypertensive peristalsis, 1 peristaltic dysfunction, and 22 normal esophageal function). The normal findings on DTE were as follows. As the subject swallowed water, swallow-induced relaxation with elevation of the lower esophageal sphincter caused the endoscope to cross the Z-line into the gastric lumen. After the passage of water and air, complete closure of the lower esophageal sphincter occurred, with the return of the endoscope to its previous position. During the resting stage of the esophageal body, an air bubble could be seen in the center of the radially wrinkled and occluded lumen. The endoscopic diagnosis was in agreement with the clinical diagnosis in all but 2. Most of the participants reported acceptable discomfort during DTE and 62.5% of the subjects preferred DTE to manometry. DTE can accurately characterize normal esophageal motor function, allowing the diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders. DTE has potential widespread applications, especially in outpatient clinics.

  1. Indications of 24-h esophageal pH monitoring, capsule pH monitoring, combined pH monitoring with multichannel impedance, esophageal manometry, radiology and scintigraphy in gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    PubMed

    Vardar, Rukiye; Keskin, Muharrem

    2017-12-01

    Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring is an essential method in patients exhibiting signs of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) to make an objective diagnosis. Intra-esophageal pH monitoring is important in patients who are non-responsive to medications and in those with extraesophageal symptoms, particularly in NERD, before surgical interventions. With the help of the wireless capsule pH monitoring, measurements can be made under more physiological conditions as well as longer recordings can be performed because the investigation can be better tolerated by patients. Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring can be detected within normal limits in 17%-31.4% of the patients with endoscopic esophagitis; therefore, normal pH monitoring cannot exclude the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Multi-channel intraluminal impedance pH (MII-pH) technology have been developed and currently the most sensitive tool to evaluate patients with both typical and atypical reflux symptoms. The sensitivity of a pH catheter test is 58% for the detection of acid reflux compared with MII-pH monitoring; further, its sensitivity is 28% for the detection of weak acid reflux compared with MII-pH monitoring. By adding impedance to pH catheter in patients with reflux symptoms, particularly in those receiving PPIs, it has been demonstrated that higher rates of diagnoses and symptom analyses can be obtained than those using only pH catheter. Esophageal manometry is used in the evaluation of patients with functional dysphagia and unexplained noncardiac chest pain and prior to antireflux surgery. The use of esophageal manometry is suitable for the detection of esophageal motor patterns and extreme motor abnormalities (e.g., achalasia and extreme hypomotility). Esophageal manometry and ambulatory pH monitoring are often used in assessments prior to laparoscopic antireflux surgery and in patients with reflux symptoms refractory to medical treatment. Although the esophageal motility is

  2. Esophageal motor disorders are frequent during pre and post lung transplantation. Can they influence lung rejection?

    PubMed

    Ciriza de Los Ríos, Constanza; Canga Rodríguez-Valcárcel, Fernando; de Pablo Gafas, Alicia; Castel de Lucas, Isabel; Lora Pablos, David; Castellano Tortajada, Gregorio

    2018-06-01

    lung transplantation (LTx) is a viable option for most patients with end-stage lung diseases. Esophageal motor disorders (EMD) are frequent in candidates for LTx, but there is very little data about changes in esophageal motility post-LTx. the aim of our study was to assess esophageal motor disorders by high resolution manometry (HRM) both pre-LTx and six months post-LTx in patients with and without organ rejection. HRM (Manoscan®) was performed in 57 patients both pre-LTx and six months post-LTx. HRM plots were analyzed according to the Chicago classification 3.0. EMD were found in 33.3% and in 49.1% of patients pre-LTx and post-LTx, respectively, and abnormal peristalsis was more frequently found post-LTx (p = 0.018). Hypercontractile esophagus was frequently found post-LTx (1.8% and 19.3% pre-LTx and post-LTx, respectively). Esophagogastric junction (EGJ) morphology changed significantly pre-LTx and post-LTx; type I (normal) was more frequent post-LTx (63-2% and 82.5% respectively, p = 0.007). EMD were more frequent post-LTx in both the non-rejection and rejection group, although particularly in the rejection group (43.2% and 69.2% respectively, p = 0.09). EMD such as distal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus and EGJ outflow obstruction were also observed more frequently post-LTx in the rejection group. significant changes in esophageal motility were observed pre-LTx and particularly post-LTx; hypercontractile esophagus was a frequent EMD found post-LTx. EMD were more frequent in the group of patients that experienced organ rejection compared to the non-rejection group. EMD leading to an impaired esophageal clearance should be considered as an additional factor that contributes to LTx failure.

  3. About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us Learn About GI Motility Digestive Tract Disorders of the Esophagus Disorders ... Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact Search About GI Motility Twitter Facebook YouTube Search Search ... About Us ...

  4. Learn About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us Learn About GI Motility Digestive Tract Disorders of the Esophagus Disorders ... Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact Search About GI Motility Twitter Facebook YouTube Search Search ... About Us ...

  5. Impaired Upper Esophageal Sphincter Reflexes in Patients with Supra-Esophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Arash; Venu, Mukund; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Gonzaga, Jason; Lang, Ivan; Massey, Benson; Jadcherla, Sudarshan; Shaker, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Normal responses of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and esophageal body to liquid reflux events prevent esophagopharyngeal reflux and its complications, but abnormal responses have not been characterized. We investigated whether patients with supra-esophageal reflux disease (SERD) have impaired UES and esophageal body responses to simulated reflux events. Methods We performed a prospective study of 25 patients with SERD (19–82 y old, 13 female) and complaints of regurgitation and supra-esophageal manifestations of reflux. We also included 10 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD; 32–60 y old, 7 female) without troublesome regurgitation and supra-esophageal symptoms and 24 healthy asymptomatic individuals (controls; 19–49 y old, 13 female). UES and esophageal body pressure responses, along with luminal distribution of infusate during esophageal rapid and slow infusion of air or liquid, were monitored by concurrent high-resolution manometry and intraluminal impedance. Results A significantly smaller proportion of patients with SERD had UES contractile reflexes in response to slow esophageal infusion of acid than controls or patients with GERD. Only patients with SERD had abnormal UES relaxation responses to rapid distension with saline. Diminished esophageal peristaltic contractions resulted in esophageal stasis in patients with GERD or SERD. Conclusions Patients with SERD and complaints of regurgitation have impaired UES and esophageal responses to simulated liquid reflux events. These patterns could predispose them to esophagopharyngeal reflux. PMID:26188682

  6. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Boeckxstaens, G E; Gullo, R; Patti, M G; Pandolfino, J E; Kahrilas, P J; Duranceau, A; Jamieson, G; Zaninotto, G

    2012-05-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed in a symposium that took place in Kagoshima, Japan, in September 2010 under the auspices of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  7. High resolution vs conventional esophageal manometry in the assessment of esophageal motor disorders in patients with non-cardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Akinsiku, O; Yamasaki, T; Brunner, S; Ganocy, S; Fass, R

    2018-06-01

    High-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) has become a leading tool in the assessment of esophageal motor disorders, replacing conventional manometry. However, there is limited data about the contribution of HREM as compared with conventional manometry to the assessment of esophageal motor disorders in patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). The aim of the study was to compare the distribution of esophageal motor disorders in patients with NCCP using HREM as compared with conventional manometry and to determine if HREM improved diagnosis of these disorders. In this study, we included 300 consecutive patients with NCCP who underwent either HREM or conventional manometry over a period of 10 years. A total of 150 patients had conventional manometry and the other 150 patients HREM. The Chicago 3.0 classification and the Castell and Spechler classification were used to determine the esophageal motor disorder of NCCP patients undergoing HREM and conventional manometry, respectively. In both HREM and the conventional manometry groups, normal esophageal motility was the most frequent finding (47% and 36%; respectively, P = .054). Hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter was the most common motility disorder identified by conventional manometry (27.3%), while ineffective esophageal motility was the most common esophageal motor disorder identified by HREM (25.3%). There is a discrepancy in the type of esophageal motor disorders identified by HREM as compared with conventional manometry in NCCP patients. Hypotensive motility disorders are the most commonly diagnosed by both manometric techniques. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Evaluation of Esophageal Motor Function With High-resolution Manometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For several decades esophageal manometry has been the test of choice to evaluate disorders of esophageal motor function. The recent introduction of high-resolution manometry for the study of esophageal motor function simplified performance of esophageal manometry, and revealed previously unidentified patterns of normal and abnormal esophageal motor function. Presentation of pressure data as color contour plots or esophageal pressure topography led to the development of new tools for analyzing and classifying esophageal motor patterns. The current standard and still developing approach to do this is the Chicago classification. While this methodical approach is improving our diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders, it currently does not address all motor abnormalities. We will explore the Chicago classification and disorders that it does not address. PMID:23875094

  9. Clinical and manometric characteristics of patients with Parkinson's disease and esophageal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Su, A; Gandhy, R; Barlow, C; Triadafilopoulos, G

    2017-04-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD); its etiology is multifactorial and its management is challenging. In this retrospective cohort analysis using prospectively collected data, we aimed to objectively characterize dysphagia and/or other esophageal symptoms in patients with PD, assess the prevalence of outflow obstruction as well as major or minor disorders of esophageal peristalsis leading to impaired esophageal clearance and highlight objective parameters that can help in the current management algorithm. Thirty-three consecutive patients with PD presenting with dysphagia, odynophagia, heartburn, regurgitation, chest pain, and weight loss underwent clinical and functional evaluation by high-resolution manometry (HRM). Esophagogastric junction (EGJ) outflow obstruction and major as well as minor disorders of peristalsis were then assessed using the Chicago classification (v3). Thirty-three PD patients with esophageal symptoms were enrolled in the study; 12 of them reported weight loss that was considered as potentially reflecting underlying esophageal dysfunction. The median age of the patients was 70 years (range: 53-89 years), 24 (75%) were men. The majority (62%) experienced dysphagia, likely contributing to weight loss in 41% of patients. Odynophagia was rare (6%) while GER symptoms, such as heartburn, regurgitation, and chest pain were noted in 37%, 31%, and 28% of patients, respectively. Using the hierarchy of the Chicago classification, 12 patients (39%) exhibited EGJ outflow obstruction, 16 (48%) diffuse esophageal spasm (DES), 18 (55%), ineffective esophageal peristalsis (IEM), 16 (48%) fragmented peristalsis, and only 2 patients (6%) had normal HRM tracings. There were no patients with HRM features of achalasia. Dysphagia is common in patients with PD and is associated with a high prevalence of underlying motility disturbances as identified by HRM. The exact impact of these motility abnormalities on symptom induction

  10. Age and gender affect likely manometric diagnosis: Audit of a tertiary referral hospital clinical esophageal manometry service.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jane M; Heddle, Richard; Hebbard, Geoffrey S; Checklin, Helen; Besanko, Laura; Fraser, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Awareness of patient demographics, common diagnoses and associations between these may improve the use and interpretation of manometric investigations. The aim of the present study therefore was to determine whether age and/or gender affect manometric diagnosis in a clinical motility service. An audit of all 452 clinical manometry reports issued from December 2003 to July 2005 with respect to age, gender and diagnosis was carried out. Patients were divided by age (17-24 years n = 14, 25-44 years n = 87, 45-64 years n = 216 and >or=65 years n = 135), and gender and data compared using contingency tables. Women were more commonly referred overall (59%) and in each age bracket except <25 years (64% male). Men were more likely to have 'hypotensive' motor problems P = 0.01. With aging, normal motor function became less common (P = 0.013), with non-specific motor disorder, ineffective/hypotensive peristalsis and 'achalasia-like' conditions each more common (individual P = NS). Increasing age showed a trend for increased spastic motor disorders (P = 0.06). Gender did not, however, influence whether motility was abnormal (P = 0.5), spastic (P = 0.7) or whether a non-specific motor disorder was present (P = 0.1). In the total cohort, the principal manometric diagnoses were: non-specific motor disorder 33%, normal motility 29%, low basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure 18%, hypotensive/ineffective peristalsis 10%, achalasia/achalasia-like 6%, diffuse esophageal spasm 3% and other 1%. Aging leads to increasing esophageal motor abnormalities. Men and women have similar rates of dysfunction, although 'low-pressure problems' were more common in men.

  11. Esophageal manometry findings and degree of acid exposure in short and long Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Helman, Laura; Biccas, Beatriz Nunes; Lemme, Eponina M O; Novais, Paula; Fittipaldi, Viviane

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is characterized by intestinal metaplasia in the distal esophagus and is classified as short-segment (<3 cm - SSBE) or long-segment (>3 cm - LSSBE). It is suggested that LSSBE is associated with more severe esophageal motor abnormalities and increased acid exposure time than SSBE. To evaluate the prevalence of esophageal manometriy abnormalities and acid exposure times in patients with SSBE and LSSBE. Barrett's esophagus patients identified by upper endoscopy and confirmed by histopathology were, retrospectively, reviewed and divided into two groups: SSBE and LSBE. Demographic data, symptom duration, prevalence of hiatal hernia, lower esophagus sphincter basal pressure, prevalence of esophageal body abnormalities and acid exposure times were evaluated. Forty-six patients with SSBE (24 males - 52.2%, mean age of 55.2 years) and 28 patients with LSBE (18 males - 64.3%, mean age of 50.5 years). Mean symptom duration was 9.9 years for SSBE and 12.9 years for LSSBE. Hiatal hernia was present in 84.2% of SSBE, 96.3% of LSBE; average lower esophagus sphincter pressure in SSBE 9.15 mm Hg, in LSBE 6.99 mm Hg; lower esophagus sphincter hypotension in SSBE was 65.9%, in LSSBE 82.1%; aperistalsis in SSBE 6.5%, LSSBE 3.6%; mild/moderate ineffective esophageal motility in SSBE 34.8%, LSBE 46.4%; severe moderate ineffective esophageal motility in SSBE 10.9%, LSBE 7,1%; nutcracker esophagus/segmental nutcracker esophagus in SSBE 8.6%, LSBE 0%; normal body in SSBE 39.1%, in LSBE 42.9%, no statistical difference for any of these values (P<0.05). Average % total time pH<4 in SSBE 9.12, LSBE 17.27 (P<0.000); % time pH<4 upright in SSBE 11.91; LSBE 24.29 (P=0.003); % time pH<4 supine in SSBE 10.86, LSBE 33.26 (P = 0.000). There was no difference between the prevalence of motor disorders in patients with SSBE and LSSBE. Acid reflux in upright and supine positions was more intense in LSBE.

  12. Esophageal motor disorders: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Ibrahim; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight literature published during the last year in the context of previous knowledge. A number of novel techniques - high-resolution manometry, esophageal electrical impedance and intra-luminal ultrasound imaging - have improved our understanding of esophageal function in health and disease. Several studies address the function of longitudinal muscle layer of the esophagus in normal subjects and patients with motor disorders of the esophagus. Esophageal electrical impedance recordings reveal abnormal transit in patients with diffuse esophageal spasm, achalasia and patients with normal manometry. Loss of the mammalian Sprouty2 gene leads to enteric neuronal hyperplasia and esophageal achalasia. Several studies showed excellent long-term results of medical and surgical treatment of achalasia of the esophagus. For the first time, mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients are reported. Novel pharmacologic strategies in the treatment of reflux disease are highlighted. Several novel techniques, perfected during recent years, have improved our understanding of esophageal function and dysfunction. A number of important observations, reviewed here, provide important insight into the pathogenesis of esophageal motor disorders and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  13. Morphofunctional analysis of experimental model of esophageal achalasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Sabirov, A G; Raginov, I S; Burmistrov, M V; Chelyshev, Y A; Khasanov, R Sh; Moroshek, A A; Grigoriev, P N; Zefirov, A L; Mukhamedyarov, M A

    2010-10-01

    We carried out a detailed analysis of rat model of esophageal achalasia previously developed by us. Manifest morphological and functional disorders were observed in experimental achalasia: hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium, reduced number of nerve fibers, excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue in the esophageal wall, high contractile activity of the lower esophageal sphincter, and reduced motility of the longitudinal muscle layer. Changes in rat esophagus observed in experimental achalasia largely correlate with those in esophageal achalasia in humans. Hence, our experimental model can be used for the development of new methods of disease treatment.

  14. Esophageal Dysmotility in Patients following Total Laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Teng; Maclean, Julia; Szczesniak, Michal; Bertrand, Paul P; Quon, Harry; Tsang, Raymond K; Wu, Peter I; Graham, Peter; Cook, Ian J

    2018-02-01

    Objectives Dysphagia is common in total laryngectomees, with some symptoms suggesting esophageal dysmotility. Tracheoesophageal (TE) phonation requires effective esophagopharyngeal air passage. Hence, esophageal dysmotility may affect deglutition or TE phonation. This study aimed to determine (1) the characteristics of esophageal dysmotility in laryngectomees, (2) whether clinical history is sensitive in detecting esophageal dysmotility, and (3) the relationship between esophageal dysmotility and TE prosthesis dysfunction. Study Design Multidisciplinary cross-sectional study. Setting Tertiary academic hospital. Subjects and Methods For 31 participants undergone total laryngectomy 1 to 12 years prior, clinical histories were taken by a gastroenterologist and a speech pathologist experienced in managing dysphagia. Esophageal high-resolution manometry was performed and analyzed using Chicago Classification v3.0. Results Interpretable manometric studies were obtained in 23 (1 normal manometry). Esophageal dysmotility patterns included achalasia, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, diffuse esophageal spasm, and other major (30%) and minor (50%) peristaltic disorders. The sensitivity of predicting any esophageal dysmotility was 28%, but it is noteworthy that patients with achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) were predicted. Two of 4 participants with TE puncture leakage had poor esophageal clearance. Of 20 TE speakers, 12 had voice problems, no correlation between poor voice, and any dysmotility pattern. Conclusions Peristaltic and lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction are common in laryngectomees. Clinical history, while not predictive of minor motor abnormalities, predicted correctly cases with treatable spastic motor disorders. Dysmotility was not associated with poor phonation, although TE puncture leakage might be linked to poor esophageal clearance. Esophageal dysmotility should be considered in the laryngectomees with persisting dysphagia or

  15. Etiology of esophageal food impactions in children.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Christine Waasdorp; Furuta, Glenn T; Kramer, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure clinicopathological features of children presenting to a tertiary care emergency department with esophageal food impaction. A retrospective chart review of children with esophageal food impaction seen between January 1, 2005 and June 30, 2009, including all patients from age 1 month to 18 years with esophageal food impaction at a pediatric emergency department, was performed. Initial screening of International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, discharge diagnosis identified 698 children with an esophageal foreign body. Of this group, 72 esophageal food impaction events were identified in 65 children (69% boys), 49 of whom required endoscopic intervention. Endoscopic appearances of the esophageal mucosa were abnormal in 40 (82%), revealing evidence of esophagitis (55%) or stricture (27%). Twenty-four of the subjects had biopsies taken at the time of endoscopy. Inflammation, described as increased eosinophils, basilar hyperplasia, rete peg elongation, and/or microabscess, was present in 76% of mucosal samples. Follow-up endoscopy in 12 children identified an etiology in 9, five of whom were found to have eosinophilic esophagitis. The majority of children with esophageal food impaction who underwent endoscopic evaluation and biopsy have an underlying potentially treatable cause. We therefore recommend that all of the children with esophageal food impaction have mucosal biopsies at the time of endoscopic disimpaction with appropriate follow-up to allow for diagnosis and management of the underlying etiology.

  16. Esophageal dysmotility in children with eosinophilic esophagitis: a study using prolonged esophageal manometry.

    PubMed

    Nurko, Samuel; Rosen, Rachel; Furuta, Glenn T

    2009-12-01

    The pathophysiology of dysphagia in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is unknown but may be related to abnormal esophageal motor function. Symptoms rarely occur during stationary esophageal manometry, so it has been difficult to establish an association between symptoms and motor events. Our aim was to evaluate esophageal motor function in children with EoE with the use of stationary manometry and ambulatory prolonged esophageal manometry and pH-metry (PEMP). PEMP was performed in children with EoE and compared with controls and children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Peristalsis was considered effective when the esophageal contractions had a normal amplitude and propagation. Results are expressed as mean+/-s.e. Seventeen patients with EoE, 13 with GERD, and 11 controls were studied. Values are expressed as mean+/-s.e. Stationary manometry identified abnormal peristalsis in 41% of children with EoE. During PEMP, children with EoE had an increased number of isolated (16.7+/-3.8 vs. 9.5+/-1.6 vs. 6.5+/-1.1; P<0.03) and high-amplitude contractions (4.1+/-1.2 vs. 1.8+/-0.8 vs. 0.1+/-0.1; P<0.03), and higher percentage ineffective peristalsis both during fasting (70.5%+/-2.5 vs. 57.8%+/-3.0 vs. 53.8%+/-1.9; P<0.05) and during meals (68.4+/-3.4 vs. 55.3+/-2.8 vs. 48.1+/-2.8; P<0.05) when compared with children with GERD and controls. Thirteen patients with EoE experienced 21 episodes of dysphagia, and all correlated with simultaneous abnormal motor function. PEMP allowed the detection of ineffective peristalsis in children with EoE. Symptoms observed in children with EoE may be related to esophageal motor dysfunction.

  17. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Dietary therapy and nutrition management of eosinophilic esophagitis: ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract . 2017;5(2): ...

  18. Esophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Coran, Arnold G

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on esophageal replacement as a surgical option for pediatric patients with end-stage esophageal disease. While it is obvious that the patient׳s own esophagus is the best esophagus, persisting with attempts to retain a native esophagus with no function and at all costs are futile and usually detrimental to the overall well-being of the child. In such cases, the esophagus should be abandoned, and the appropriate esophageal replacement is chosen for definitive reconstruction. We review the various types of conduits used for esophageal replacement and discuss the unique advantages and disadvantages that are relevant for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Esophageal function testing: Billing and coding update.

    PubMed

    Khan, A; Massey, B; Rao, S; Pandolfino, J

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal function testing is being increasingly utilized in diagnosis and management of esophageal disorders. There have been several recent technological advances in the field to allow practitioners the ability to more accurately assess and treat such conditions, but there has been a relative lack of education in the literature regarding the associated Common Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes and methods of reimbursement. This review, commissioned and supported by the American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society Council, aims to summarize each of the CPT codes for esophageal function testing and show the trends of associated reimbursement, as well as recommend coding methods in a practical context. We also aim to encourage many of these codes to be reviewed on a gastrointestinal (GI) societal level, by providing evidence of both discrepancies in coding definitions and inadequate reimbursement in this new era of esophageal function testing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Esophageal achalasia: current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2018-05-27

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unknown origin, characterized by lack of peristalsis and by incomplete or absent relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing. The goal of treatment is to eliminate the functional obstruction at the level of the gastroesophageal junction Areas covered: This comprehensive review will evaluate the current literature, illustrating the diagnostic evaluation and providing an evidence-based treatment algorithm for this disease Expert commentary: Today we have three very effective therapeutic modalities to treat patients with achalasia - pneumatic dilatation, per-oral endoscopic myotomy and laparoscopic Heller myotomy with fundoplication. Treatment should be tailored to the individual patient, in centers where a multidisciplinary approach is available. Esophageal resection should be considered as a last resort for patients who have failed prior therapeutic attempts.

  1. Pressure-flow characteristics of normal and disordered esophageal motor patterns.

    PubMed

    Singendonk, Maartje M J; Kritas, Stamatiki; Cock, Charles; Ferris, Lara F; McCall, Lisa; Rommel, Nathalie; van Wijk, Michiel P; Benninga, Marc A; Moore, David; Omari, Taher I

    2015-03-01

    To perform pressure-flow analysis (PFA) in a cohort of pediatric patients who were referred for diagnostic manometric investigation. PFA was performed using purpose designed Matlab-based software. The pressure-flow index (PFI), a composite measure of bolus pressurization relative to flow and the impedance ratio, a measure of the extent of bolus clearance failure were calculated. Tracings of 76 pediatric patients (32 males; 9.1 ± 0.7 years) and 25 healthy adult controls (7 males; 36.1 ± 2.2 years) were analyzed. Patients mostly had normal motility (50%) or a category 4 disorder and usually weak peristalsis (31.5%) according to the Chicago Classification. PFA of healthy controls defined reference ranges for PFI ≤142 and impedance ratio ≤0.49. Pediatric patients with pressure-flow (PF) characteristics within these limits had normal motility (62%), most patients with PF characteristics outside these limits also had an abnormal Chicago Classification (61%). Patients with high PFI and disordered motor patterns all had esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Disordered PF characteristics are associated with disordered esophageal motor patterns. By defining the degree of over-pressurization and/or extent of clearance failure, PFA may be a useful adjunct to esophageal pressure topography-based classification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The usefulness of videomanometry for studying pediatric esophageal motor disease.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Kubota, Akio; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Oue, Takaharu; Tazuke, Yuko; Okada, Akira

    2004-12-01

    Abnormalities in esophageal motor function underlie various symptoms in the pediatric population. Manometry remains an important tool for studying esophageal motor function, whereas its analyses have been conducted with considerable subjective interpretation. The usefulness of videomanometry with topographic analysis was examined in the current study. Videomanometry was conducted in 5 patients with primary gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), 4 with postoperative esophageal atresia (EA), 1 with congenital esophageal stenosis (CES), and 1 with diffuse esophageal spasms (DES). Digitized videofluoroscopic images were recorded synchronously with manometric digital data in a personal computer. Manometric analysis was conducted with a view of concurrent esophageal contour and bolus transit. Primary GERD patients showed esophageal flow proceeding into the stomach during peristaltic contractions recorded manometrically, whereas patients with EA/CES frequently showed impaired esophageal transit during defective esophageal peristaltic contractions. A characteristic corkscrew appearance and esophageal flow in a to-and-fro fashion were seen with high-amplitude synchronous esophageal contractions in a DES patient. The topographic analysis showed distinctive images characteristic of each pathological condition. Videomanometry is helpful in interpreting manometric data by analyzing concurrent fluoroscopic images. Topographic analyses provide characteristic images reflecting motor abnormalities in pediatric esophageal disease.

  3. [Thyroid-intestinal motility interactions summary].

    PubMed

    Pustorino, S; Foti, M; Calipari, G; Pustorino, E; Ferraro, R; Guerrisi, O; Germanotta, G

    2004-12-01

    Thyroid diseases may be related to gastrointestinal motility symptoms. Such symptoms can vary in degree and, sometimes, are the only clue of a thyroid disease or, at least, the first. The mechanism by which the thyroid hormones can influence gastrointestinal motility, even if not still completely elucidated, can be found in a synergism between a direct effect of the thyronins and an indirect effect mediated by cathecolamines on the muscle cell receptors. Neck discomfort and dysphagia are common findings in patients with thyroid diseases. Hyper- and hypothyroidism can impair esophageal motility, modifying pharyngo-esophageal structure and/or muscular function and interacting with the neuro-humoral regulation of the esophageal peristalsis. Oesophageal motility alterations, observed in patients affected by small non-toxic goiter, are less understandable. At the gastro-duodenal level, basic and postprandial electric rhythm alterations have been observed in hyperthyroid patients, often associated with delayed gastric emptying, too. In such patients, the autonomous nervous system dysfunction may even modify the neuro-hormonal mutual regulation (vagal influence decrease) of the gastro-duodenal myoelectric activity. Hypothyroidism may cause a delay of the gastric emptying too, but such pattern may also be related to an associated autoimmune disease or to an independent chronic modification of the gastric mucosa. Diarrhoea and malabsorption are common findings together with hyperthyroidism, whereas constipation is frequently observed in hypothyroidism. The clinically most demanding situation is certainly the secondary chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction syndrome, which involves the bowel in most cases, but may also show up by means of a mega-small bowel or a mega-duodenum, or even all of the above. In conclusion it may be stated that: 1) thyroid diseases may be related to symptoms due to digestive motility dysfunction. 2) Any segment of the gastrointestinal trait may be

  4. Nonspecific motility disorders, irritable esophagus, and chest pain.

    PubMed

    Krarup, Anne Lund; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Hejazi, Reza A; McCallum, Richard W; Vega, Kenneth J; Frazzoni, Marzio; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Clarke, John O; Achem, Sami R

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents commentaries on whether Starling's law applies to the esophagus; whether erythromycin affects esophageal motility; the relationship between hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter and vigorous achalasia; whether ethnic- and gender-based norms affect diagnosis and treatment of esophageal motor disorders; health care and epidemiology of chest pain; whether normal pH excludes esophageal pain; the role of high-resolution manometry in noncardiac chest pain; whether pH-impedance should be included in the evaluation of noncardiac chest pain; whether there are there alternative therapeutic options to PPI for treating noncardiac chest pain; and the usefulness of psychological treatment and alternative medicine in noncardiac chest pain. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Motility alterations in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gut motility is complex and involves neuromuscular, immune and environmental mechanisms. It is well established that patients with celiac disease (CD) often display gut dysmotility. Studies have shown the presence of disturbed esophageal motility, altered gastric emptying, and dysmotility of the small intestine, gallbladder and colon in untreated CD. Most of these motor abnormalities resolve after a strict gluten-free diet, suggesting that mechanisms related to the inflammatory condition and disease process are responsible for the motor dysfunction. Motility abnormalities are also a hallmark of functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where it has been proposed as underlying mechanism for symptom generation (diarrhea, constipation, bloating). Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a poorly defined entity, mostly self-diagnosed, that presents clinically with IBS symptoms in the absence of specific celiac markers. Patients with NCGS are believed to react symptomatically to wheat components, and some studies have proposed the presence of low-grade inflammation in these patients. There is little information regarding the functional characterization of these patients before and after a gluten-free diet. A study suggested the presence of altered gastrointestinal transit in NCGS patients who also have a high prevalence of nonspecific anti-gliadin antibodies. Results of an ongoing clinical study in NCGS patients with positive anti-gliadin antibodies before and after a gluten-free diet will be discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms for symptom generation in NCGS patients is important to find new therapeutic alternatives to the burden of imposing a strict gluten-free diet in patients who do not have CD. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormalmore » smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.« less

  7. [Esophageal motor function of gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Tian, Yuan; Ding, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To study the relationship between esophageal motor functional disorder [decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP)and ineffective motility (IEM)] and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Totally 89 patients with GERD were enrolled in this study. All of them underwent 24-hour pH monitoring with dual-channel probe and stationary esophageal manometry. In addition, 77 of these patients underwent upper endoscopy. IEM and LES, 10 mmHg were common disturbances in patients with GERD (54% and 48%, respectively). The number of the acid reflux events of distal esophagus and prevalence of moderate or severe erosive esophagitis (EE) were significantly higher in patients with low LESP and IEM than patients without low LESP ( P<0.05). The number of the acid reflux events in distal esophagus was significantly correlated with the severity of esophagitis, distal esophagus amplitude, and LESP, while no such correlation was found between IEM and degree of esophageal acid exposure or esophagitis. The pathophysiology of GERD is probably multifactorial. Lower LESP or IEM is not a independent pathophysiological factor for GERD. However,one single factor is insufficient to explain all the pathogenic mechanism of GERD.

  8. Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Short, Matthew W; Burgers, Kristina G; Fry, Vincent T

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal cancer has a poor prognosis and high mortality rate, with an estimated 16,910 new cases and 15,910 deaths projected in 2016 in the United States. Squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma account for more than 95% of esophageal cancers. Squamous cell carcinoma is more common in nonindustrialized countries, and important risk factors include smoking, alcohol use, and achalasia. Adenocarcinoma is the predominant esophageal cancer in developed nations, and important risk factors include chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity, and smoking. Dysphagia alone or with unintentional weight loss is the most common presenting symptom, although esophageal cancer is often asymptomatic in early stages. Physicians should have a low threshold for evaluation with endoscopy if any symptoms are present. If cancer is confirmed, integrated positron emission tomography and computed tomography should be used for initial staging. If no distant metastases are found, endoscopic ultrasonography should be performed to determine tumor depth and evaluate for nodal involvement. Localized tumors can be treated with endoscopic mucosal resection, whereas regional tumors are treated with esophagectomy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy, or a combination of modalities. Nonresectable tumors or tumors with distant metastases are treated with palliative interventions. Specific prevention strategies have not been proven, and there are no recommendations for esophageal cancer screening.

  9. Congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    McCann, F; Michaud, L; Aspirot, A; Levesque, D; Gottrand, F; Faure, C

    2015-04-01

    Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) is a rare clinical condition but is frequently associated with esophageal atresia (EA). The aim of this study is to report the diagnosis, management, and outcome of CES associated with EA. Medical charts of CES-EA patients from Lille University Hospital, Sainte-Justine Hospital, and Montreal Children's Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Seventeen patients (13 boys) were included. The incidence of CES in patients with EA was 3.6%. Fifteen patients had a type C EA, one had a type A EA, and one had an isolated tracheoesophageal fistula. Seven patients had associated additional malformations. The mean age at diagnosis was 11.6 months. All but two patients had non-specific symptoms such as regurgitations or dysphagia. One CES was diagnosed at the time of surgical repair of EA. In 12 patients, CES was suspected based on abnormal barium swallow. In the remaining four, the diagnostic was confirmed by esophagoscopy. Eleven patients were treated by dilation only (1-3 dilations/patient). Six patients underwent surgery (resection and anastomosis) because of failure of attempted dilations (1-7 dilations/patient). Esophageal perforation was encountered in three patients (18%). Three patients had histologically proven tracheobronchial remnants. CES associated with EA is frequent. A high index of suspicion for CES must remain in the presence of EA. Dilatation may be effective to treat some of them, but perforation is frequent. Surgery may be required, especially in CES secondary to ectopic tracheobronchial remnants. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  10. Classification of esophageal motor findings in gastro-esophageal reflux disease: Conclusions from an international consensus group.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, C P; Roman, S; Bredenoord, A J; Fox, M; Keller, J; Pandolfino, J E; Sifrim, D; Tatum, R; Yadlapati, R; Savarino, E

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has resulted in new revelations regarding the pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The impact of new HRM motor paradigms on reflux burden needs further definition, leading to a modern approach to motor testing in GERD. Focused literature searches were conducted, evaluating pathophysiology of GERD with emphasis on HRM. The results were discussed with an international group of experts to develop a consensus on the role of HRM in GERD. A proposed classification system for esophageal motor abnormalities associated with GERD was generated. Physiologic gastro-esophageal reflux is inherent in all humans, resulting from transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations that allow venting of gastric air in the form of a belch. In pathological gastro-esophageal reflux, transient LES relaxations are accompanied by reflux of gastric contents. Structural disruption of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) barrier, and incomplete clearance of the refluxate can contribute to abnormally high esophageal reflux burden that defines GERD. Esophageal HRM localizes the LES for pH and pH-impedance probe placement, and assesses esophageal body peristaltic performance prior to invasive antireflux therapies and antireflux surgery. Furthermore, HRM can assess EGJ and esophageal body mechanisms contributing to reflux, and exclude conditions that mimic GERD. Structural and motor EGJ and esophageal processes contribute to the pathophysiology of GERD. A classification scheme is proposed incorporating EGJ and esophageal motor findings, and contraction reserve on provocative tests during HRM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Esophageal peristaltic defects in adults with functional dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ratuapli, Shiva K; Hansel, Stephanie L; Umar, Sarah B; Burdick, George E; Ramirez, Francisco C; Fleischer, David E; Harris, Lucinda A; Lacy, Brian E; DiBaise, John K; Crowell, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    Functional dysphagia (FD) is characterized by the presence of dysphagia without evidence of mechanical esophageal obstruction, GERD, and histopathology-based esophageal motor disorders. Dysphagia is common in older patients; however, there is a paucity of information regarding the type and frequency of peristaltic abnormalities compared to younger patients. Based on recently validated criteria for classification of weak peristalsis using high-resolution manometry (HRM), we hypothesized that older patients with FD would have more peristaltic defects detected by HRM compared to younger FD patients. A retrospective review of our motility database yielded 65 patients that met inclusion criteria. Patients were divided into two groups based on age (younger: <70 years; older: ≥70 years). Patients were interviewed, completed a quality-of-life questionnaire, and underwent solid-state HRM. The two groups differed in age but in no other demographic characteristics, severity of dysphagia, or quality of life. Dyspeptic symptoms, including nausea (p < 0.001), early satiety (p = 0.01), bloating (p = 0.02), and belching (p = 0.01), were also more prevalent in younger FD patients. Older age was associated with weak peristalsis involving frequent failed peristalsis, small proximal peristaltic defects (2-5 cm), and large proximal peristaltic defects (>5 cm) (p < 0.001). The mean contraction amplitude was also lower in the older group (p < 0.05). These data support the hypothesis that older patients with FD have a higher frequency of peristaltic abnormalities on HRM compared to younger patients. Older age was associated with increased frequency of weak peristalsis with small and large peristaltic defects.

  12. Esophageal perforation

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus into the space around the lungs. Collapsed lung. X-rays taken after you drink a non-harmful dye can help pinpoint the location of the perforation. You may also have chest CT scan look for an abscess in the chest or esophageal cancer.

  13. Feeding Difficulties in Children with Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Lisa; Rosen, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    The current available literature evaluating feeding difficulties in children with esophageal atresia was reviewed. The published literature was searched through PubMed using a pre-defined search strategy. Feeding difficulties are commonly encountered in children and adults with repaired esophageal atresia [EA]. The mechanism for abnormal feeding includes both esophageal and oropharyngeal dysphagia. Esophageal dysphagia is commonly reported in patients with EA and causes include dysmotility, anatomic lesions, esophageal outlet obstruction and esophageal inflammation. Endoscopic evaluation, esophageal manometry and esophograms can be useful studies to evaluate for causes of esophageal dysphagia. Oropharyngeal dysfunction and aspiration are also important mechanisms for feeding difficulties in patients with EA. These patients often present with respiratory symptoms. Videofluoroscopic swallow study, salivagram, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and high-resolution manometry can all be helpful tools to identify aspiration. Once diagnosed, management goals include reduction of aspiration during swallowing, reducing full column reflux into the oropharynx and continuation of oral feeding to maintain skills. We review specific strategies which can be used to reduce aspiration of gastric contents, including thickening feeds, changing feeding schedule, switching formula, trialing transpyloric feeds and fundoplication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Congenital esophageal stenosis: the differential diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Jones, Douglas W; Kunisaki, Shaun M; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spigland, Nitsana A; Coran, Arnold G

    2010-05-01

    Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) is a rare congenital abnormality that is difficult to diagnose and often masquerades as other types of structural esophageal disease. We report three cases of CES with different presenting symptoms. We advocate for balloon dilation as the preferred first approach to therapeutic intervention. CES is an important clinical entity in the evaluation of pediatric esophageal disorders and should be suspected in young infants with dysphagia.

  15. Distal Esophageal Duplication Cyst with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease: A Rare Association and a Management Challenge.

    PubMed

    Jan, Iftikhar Ahmad; Al Nuaimi, Asma; Al Hamoudi, Basma; Al Naqbi, Khalid; Bilal, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal duplication cysts are rare congenital abnormalities of the foregut and may be associated with other conditions. Association of esophageal duplication with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) has not been reported in children. We are reporting a case of a 16 months baby who had antenatal diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia. Postnatal CTchest, however, suggested a distal esophageal duplication cyst and a contrast esophagogram showed grade-IV GER. A thoracoscopy in another hospital excluded esophageal duplication at that time. Later, he presented with hematemesis in our department and was re-evaluated. Repeat CTconfirmed a persistent 2.5 x 1.3 cm cyst in distal esophagus. Upper GI endoscopy suggested grade-II esophagitis with a wide patent gastro-esophageal junction. The child was treated with left thoracotomy, excision of the duplication cyst and thoracic fundoplication. He had an uneventful post-operative recovery and is doing well at 6 months follow-up.

  16. Non-surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Annese, Vito; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is an infrequent motility disorder characterized by a progressive stasis and dilation of the oesophagus; with subsequent risk of aspiration, weight loss, and malnutrition. Although the treatment of achalasia has been traditionally based on a surgical approach, especially with the introduction of laparoscopic techniques, there is still some space for a medical approach. The present article reviews the non-surgical therapeutic options for achalasia. PMID:17007039

  17. [Esophageal motor disorders in asymptomatic subjects with Trypanosoma cruzi infection].

    PubMed

    Torres-Aguilera, M; Remes-Troche, J M; Roesch-Dietlen, F; Vázquez-Jiménez, J G; De la Cruz-Patiño, E; Grube-Pagola, P; Ruiz-Juárez, I

    2011-01-01

    The indeterminate chronic or "asymptomatic" phase of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' disease) infection is characterized by the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms, and has an estimated duration of 20 to 30 years. However, the intramural denervation that induces dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract is progressive. Recently, epidemiological studies have shown that the seroprevalence for this infection in our area ranges between 2% and 3% of the population. To detect the presence of esophageal motor disorders in asymptomatic individuals chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi using standard esophageal manometry. A cross sectional study in 28 asymptomatic subjects (27 men, age 40.39 ± 10.79) with serological evidence of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi was performed. In all cases demographic characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms and esophageal motility disorders using conventional manometry were analyzed. In this study 54% (n = 15) of asymptomatic subjects had an esophageal motor disorder: 5 (18%) had nutcracker esophagus, 5 (18%) nonspecific esophageal motor disorders, 3 (11%) hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (LES), 1 (4%) an incomplete relaxation of the LES and 1 (4%) had chagasic achalasia. More than half of patients that course with Chagas' disease in the indeterminate phase and that are apparently asymptomatic have impaired esophageal motility. Presence of hypertensive LES raises the possibility that this alteration represents an early stage in the development of chagasic achalasia.

  18. Effect of aging on the esophageal motor functions.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, N; Hongo, M; Yamada, M; Kawakami, H; Ueno, M; Okuno, Y; Toyota, T

    1996-04-01

    To clarify the changes of esophageal motility along with age, we performed esophageal manometry on 47 healthy volunteers, and compared the values of four groups under 49 years old (n = 11), 50 to 59 (n = 15), 60 to 69 (n = 11), and over 70 years old (n = 10). Resting lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure in the group over 70 years old showed the tendency of decrease, but not statistically significant. Nadir LES pressure on swallow-induced relaxation was not statistically different among 4 groups. On esophageal body testing, percentage of non-conduction sequence in the group 60 to 69 and over 70 years old was statistically higher compared with that of the group under 49 years old (p < 0.05) but spared in some elderly subjects. Percentage of simultaneous contractions was not statistically different among 4 groups. Peristaltic contraction amplitude in the group over 70 years old was significantly lower than that of the group under 49 years old both at the level of 5 cm above (p < 0.01) and 10 cm above LES (p < 0.05). We speculate that the influence of aging on esophageal motility is the reduced transmission sequence of peristalsis and contractility of esophageal body. This alteration along with age may differ from the pathological condition of scleroderma or diffuse esophageal spasm.

  19. Esophageal manometric characteristics and outcomes for laparoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy, myotomy, and partial fundoplication for epiphrenic diverticula.

    PubMed

    Melman, Lora; Quinlan, Jessica; Robertson, Brian; Brunt, L M; Halpin, Valerie J; Eagon, J C; Frisella, Margaret M; Matthews, Brent D

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the esophageal motor and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) abnormalities associated with epiphrenic esophageal diverticula and analyze outcomes for laparoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy, myotomy, and partial fundoplication. The endoscopic, radiographic, manometric, and perioperative records for patients undergoing laparoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy, anterior esophageal myotomy, and partial fundoplication from 8/99 until 9/06 were reviewed from an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved outcomes database. Data are given as mean +/- standard deviation (SD). An esophageal body motor disorder and/or LES abnormalities were present in 11 patients with epiphrenic diverticula; three patients were characterized as achalasia, one had vigorous achalasia, two had diffuse esophageal spasm, and five had a nonspecific motor disorder. Presenting symptoms included dysphagia (13/13), regurgitation (7/13), and chest pain (4/13). Three patients had previous Botox injections and three patients had esophageal dilatations. Laparoscopic epiphrenic diverticulectomy with an anterior esophageal myotomy was completed in 13 patients (M:F; 3:10) with a mean age of 67.6 +/- 4.2 years, body mass index (BMI) of 28.1 +/- 1.9 kg/m2 and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 2.2 +/- 0.1. Partial fundoplication was performed in 12/13 patients (Dor, n = 2; Toupet, n = 10). Four patients had a type I and one patient had a type III hiatal hernia requiring repair. Mean operative time was 210 +/- 15.1 min and mean length of stay (LOS) was 2.8 +/- 0.4 days. Two grade II or higher complications occurred, including one patient who was readmitted on postoperative day 4 with a leak requiring a thoracotomy. After a mean follow-up of 13.6 +/- 3.0 months (range 3-36 months), two patients complained of mild solid food dysphagia and one patient required proton pump inhibitor (PPI) for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. The majority of patients

  20. Recent developments in esophageal motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Hanneke; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2007-07-01

    Every year more insight into the pathogenesis and treatment of esophageal motor disorders is obtained. This review highlights some interesting literature published in this area during the last year. Longitudinal and circular muscle contractions act in a well coordinated fashion to allow normal peristalsis. Techniques such as intraluminal impedance, high-resolution manometry and intraluminal ultrasound provide useful additional information on esophageal function both in the normal and abnormal situation. The dynamics of the gastroesophageal junction can be studied with a newly developed probe, and the mechanism behind transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations is still being unravelled. New manometric criteria for nutcracker esophagus have been proposed, whereas further evidence is reported supporting an association between diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease and esophageal dysmotility and spasm, respectively. Finally, several long-term follow-up results of surgical myotomy and pneumodilatation have been reported. Due to the perfection of esophageal measuring techniques, our knowledge of esophageal function continues to increase. The studies reviewed here provide interesting information on the pathogenesis and treatment of several esophageal motor disorders.

  1. Medical and surgical management of esophageal and gastric motor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Awad, R A

    2012-09-01

    he occurrence of esophageal and gastric motor dysfunctions happens, when the software of the esophagus and the stomach is injured. This is really a program previously established in the enteric nervous system as a constituent of the newly called neurogastroenterology. The enteric nervous system is composed of small aggregations of nerve cells, enteric ganglia, the neural connections between these ganglia, and nerve fibers that supply effectors tissues, including the muscle of the gut wall. The wide range of enteric neuropathies that includes esophageal achalasia and gastroparesis highlights the importance of the enteric nervous system. A classification of functional gastrointestinal disorders based on symptoms has received attention. However, a classification based solely in symptoms and consensus may lack an integral approach of disease. As an alternative to the Rome classification, an international working team in Bangkok presented a classification of motility disorders as a physiology-based diagnosis. Besides, the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high-resolution esophageal pressure topography studies. This review covers exclusively the medical and surgical management of the esophageal and gastric motor dysfunction using evidence from well-designed studies. Motor control of the esophagus and the stomach, motor esophageal and gastric alterations, treatment failure, side effects of PPIs, overlap of gastrointestinal symptoms, predictors of treatment, burden of GERD medical management, data related to conservative treatment vs. antireflux surgery, and postsurgical esophagus and gastric motor dysfunction are also taken into account.

  2. Impact of Weight Loss Surgery on Esophageal Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Rishi D.; Choksi, Yash A.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has come to the forefront of weight loss treatment due to its complex interactions via anatomic, physiologic, and neurohormonal changes leading to sustained weight loss. Unlike lifestyle and pharmacologic options, which fail to show long-term sustained weight loss, bariatric surgery has been shown to decrease overall mortality and morbidity. Bariatric surgery can be purely restrictive, such as laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), or restrictive-malabsorptive, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). These surgeries cause specific anatomic changes that promote weight loss; however, they also have unintended effects on the esophagus, particularly in terms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal motility. Via restrictive surgery, LAGB has been widely reported to cause significant weight loss, although studies have also shown an increase and worsening of GERD as well as elevated rates of esophageal dilation, aperistalsis, and alterations in lower esophageal sphincter pressure. Along with LAGB, LSG has shown not only a worsening of GERD, but also the formation of de novo GERD in patients who were asymptomatic before the operation. In a restrictive-malabsorptive approach, RYGB has been reported to improve GERD and preserve esophageal motility. Bariatric surgery is a burgeoning field with immense implications on overall mortality. Future randomized, controlled trials are needed to better understand which patients should undergo particular surgeries, with greater emphasis on esophageal health and prevention of GERD and esophageal dysmotility. PMID:27134597

  3. Recovery of normal esophageal function in a kitten with diffuse megaesophagus and an occult lower esophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jaycie; Ames, Marisa; DiCicco, Michael; Savage, Mason; Atkins, Clarke; Wood, Michael; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    An 8-week-old male domestic shorthair was presented to the Internal Medicine Service at North Carolina State University for regurgitation. Radiographic diagnosis of generalized esophageal dilation and failure of esophageal peristalsis were compatible with diagnosis of congenital megaesophagus. Endoscopic examination of the esophagus revealed a fibrous stricture just orad to the lower esophageal sphincter. Conservative management to increase the body condition and size of the kitten consisted of feeding through a gastrostomy tube, during which time the esophagus regained normal peristaltic function, the stricture orifice widened in size and successful balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. Esophageal endoscopy should be considered to rule out a stricture near the lower esophageal sphincter in kittens with radiographic findings suggestive of congenital megaesophagus. Management of such kittens by means of gastrostomy tube feeding may be associated with a return of normal esophageal motility and widening of the esophageal stricture, and facilitate subsequent success of interventional dilation of the esophageal stricture. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  4. Esophageal dysmotility in scleroderma: a prospective study of 183 cases.

    PubMed

    Lahcene, M; Oumnia, N; Matougui, N; Boudjella, M; Tebaibia, A; Touchene, B

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of esophageal motor disorders in systemic sclerosis. In 183 consecutive cases of scleroderma, as diagnosed by American College of Rheumatology criteria (1980). Patients' mean age was 40.6+/-13.3 years, the gender ratio was 0.13 and the average duration of disease was 6.8+/-7.5 years. A localized, cutaneous form was observed in 148 patients (81%) and a diffuse form in 35 (19%). All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and standard esophageal manometry. Esophageal symptoms and reflux esophagitis were found in 108 (59%) and 68 (37%) of patients, respectively. Esophageal motor disorders were present in 148 patients (81%), and were associated with a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter in 114 (62%). The presence of these motor abnormalities was not related to age, gender, skin extension or duration of disease. Esophageal motor disorders were present in almost all patients with esophageal symptoms or esophagitis, and were also found in 48 (64%) of the asymptomatic patients. Esophageal motor disorders are frequently seen in scleroderma, especially in cases with clinical symptoms, but are not associated with a specific form of the disease.

  5. Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Motility Disorders in Women, Gastroparesis, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Zia, Jasmine K; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the sex differences in upper gastrointestinal (GI) motility for both healthy and common dysmotility conditions. It focuses on gastroesophageal reflux disease and other esophageal motor disorders for the esophagus and on gastroparesis and accelerated gastric emptying for the stomach. It also describes differences in upper GI motility signs and symptoms during each female hormonal stage (ie, menstrual cycle, pregnancy, perimenopause, menopause) for both healthy participants and those suffering from one of the aforementioned upper GI dysmotility conditions. More research still needs to be conducted to better understand sex differences in upper GI motility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High resolution esophageal manometry--the switch from "intuitive" visual interpretation to Chicago classification.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, M; Balakumaran, T A; Palaniappan, S; Srinivasan, Vijaya; Batcha, M; Venkataraman, Jayanthi

    2014-03-01

    High resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) has been interpreted all along by visual interpretation of color plots until the recent introduction of Chicago classification which categorises HREM using objective measurements. It compares HREM diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders by visual interpretation and Chicago classification. Using software Trace 1.2v, 77 consecutive tracings diagnosed by visual interpretation were re-analyzed by Chicago classification and findings compared for concordance between the two systems of interpretation. Kappa agreement rate between the two observations was determined. There were 57 males (74 %) and cohort median age was 41 years (range: 14-83 years). Majority of the referrals were for gastroesophageal reflux disease, dysphagia and achalasia. By "intuitive" visual interpretation, the tracing were reported as normal in 45 (58.4 %), achalasia 14 (18.2 %), ineffective esophageal motility 3 (3.9 %), nutcracker esophagus 11 (14.3 %) and nonspecific motility changes 4 (5.2 %). By Chicago classification, there was 100 % agreement (Kappa 1) for achalasia (type 1: 9; type 2: 5) and ineffective esophageal motility ("failed peristalsis" on visual interpretation). Normal esophageal motility, nutcracker esophagus and nonspecific motility disorder on visual interpretation were reclassified as rapid contraction and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) outflow obstruction by Chicago classification. Chicago classification identified distinct clinical phenotypes including EGJ outflow obstruction not identified by visual interpretation. A significant number of unclassified HREM by visual interpretation were also classified by it.

  7. Esophageal manometry

    MedlinePlus

    ... have symptoms of: Heartburn or nausea after eating ( gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD ) Problems swallowing (feeling like food is stuck behind ... stomach ( achalasia ) A weak LES, which causes heartburn (GERD) Abnormal contractions of the esophagus muscles that do ...

  8. Comparison of orbital prosthesis motility following enucleation or evisceration with sclerotomy with or without a motility coupling post in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yi, Na Young; Park, Shin Ae; Jeong, Man Bok; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Se Eun; Kim, Ji Youn; Chae, Je Min; Jang, Kyoung Jin; Seong, Je Kyung; Seo, Kang Moon

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate motility of silicone orbital implants and corneoscleral prostheses, with and without use of a motility coupling post (MCP) in dogs. Eighteen mixed-breed dogs. The motility of an orbital silicone implant and corneoscleral prosthesis after enucleation (n = 6), evisceration (n = 6), or use of a MCP with evisceration (n = 6) in dogs were compared. One eye from each dog had surgery whereas the opposite eye was used as a control. Clinical evaluations were performed three times a week. Histopathology of the orbital tissues was performed 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. Implant motility in dogs with evisceration (vertical movement [VM] 8.04 +/- 2.13; horizontal movement [HM] 11 +/- 3.05) and evisceration with MCP (VM 9.61 +/- 1.59); HM was significantly greater than the enucleation group (VM 0.51 +/- 0.5; HM 1.22 +/- 0.68) (P < 0.01). Prosthetic motility in dogs with evisceration with MCP was significantly greater than in dogs with evisceration; dogs with evisceration had significantly greater motility than dogs with enucleation (P < 0.01). No postoperative complications were observed in any of the groups. No significant abnormalities were noted on histopathology. MCP placement in silicone orbital implants significantly enhanced the prosthetic motility in dogs. This study supports the use of MCP in silicone orbital implants to enhance corneoscleral prosthesis motility and cosmetics in dogs.

  9. Systematic review: Eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Oshima, Naoki; Ishihara, Shunji

    2015-07-21

    To investigate the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of Asian patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed and Web of Science databases for original studies, case series, and individual case reports of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries published from January 1980 to January 2015. We found 66 and 80 articles in the PubMed and Web of Science databases, respectively; 24 duplicate articles were removed. After excluding animal studies, articles not written in English, and meeting abstracts, 25 articles containing 217 patients were selected for analysis. Sample size-weighted mean values were determined for all pooled prevalence data and clinical characteristics. The mean age of the adult patients with eosinophilic esophagitis was approximately 50 years, and 73% of these patients were male. They frequently presented with allergic diseases including bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Bronchial asthma was the most frequent comorbid allergic disease, occurring in 24% of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Dysphagia was the primary symptom reported; 44% of the patients complained of dysphagia. Although laboratory blood tests are not adequately sensitive for an accurate diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, endoscopic examinations revealed abnormal findings typical of this disease, including longitudinal furrows and concentric rings, in 82% of the cases. One-third of the cases responded to proton pump inhibitor administration. The characteristics of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian patients were similar to those reported in Western patients, indicating that this disease displays a similar pathogenesis between Western and Asian patients.

  10. Esophageal stricture - benign

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal stricture can be caused by: Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). Eosinophilic esophagitis. Injuries caused by an endoscope . Long-term use of a nasogastric (NG) tube (tube through the nose into the ...

  11. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  12. Cell motility assays.

    PubMed

    Hague, Angela; Jones, Gareth E

    2008-10-01

    This report summarises practical aspects to measuring cell motility in culture. The methods described here were discussed at a 1-day European Tissue Culture Society (ETCS-UK) workshop organised by John Masters and Gareth E Jones that was held at University College London on 19th April 2007.

  13. Esophageal hypomotility and spastic motor disorders: current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Valdovinos, Miguel A; Zavala-Solares, Monica R; Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Esophageal hypomotility (EH) is characterized by abnormal esophageal peristalsis, either from a reduction or absence of contractions, whereas spastic motor disorders (SMD) are characterized by an increase in the vigor and/or propagation velocity of esophageal body contractions. Their pathophysiology is not clearly known. The reduced excitation of the smooth muscle contraction mediated by cholinergic neurons and the impairment of inhibitory ganglion neuronal function mediated by nitric oxide are likely mechanisms of the peristaltic abnormalities seen in EH and SMD, respectively. Dysphagia and chest pain are the most frequent clinical manifestations for both of these dysfunctions, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is commonly associated with these motor disorders. The introduction of high-resolution manometry (HRM) and esophageal pressure topography (EPT) has significantly enhanced the ability to diagnose EH and SMD. Novel EPT metrics in particular the development of the Chicago Classification of esophageal motor disorders has enabled improved characterization of these abnormalities. The first step in the management of EH and SMD is to treat GERD, especially when esophageal testing shows pathologic reflux. Smooth muscle relaxants (nitrates, calcium channel blockers, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors) and pain modulators may be useful in the management of dysphagia or pain in SMD. Endoscopic Botox injection and pneumatic dilation are the second-line therapies. Extended myotomy of the esophageal body or peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may be considered in highly selected cases but lack evidence.

  14. Advances in the Evaluation and Management of Esophageal Disease of Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dustin A.; Hinchcliff, Monique; Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of heartburn and dysphagia, as well as objective findings of abnormal esophageal acid exposure and esophageal dysmotility are common in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Treatments for SSc esophageal disease are generally limited to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) treatment with proton pump inhibitors. Progresses made in esophageal diagnostic testing offer the potential for improved clinical characterization of esophageal disease in SSc that may help direct management decisions. In addition to reviewing GERD management in patients with SSc, present and potential uses of endoscopy, reflux monitoring, manometry, impedance planimetry, and endoscopic ultrasound are discussed. PMID:25475597

  15. Gastric Transposition for Esophageal Replacement in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Yardeni, Dani; Oldham, Keith; Sherman, Neil; Siplovich, Leo; Gross, Eitan; Udassin, Raphael; Cohen, Zehavi; Nagar, Hagith; Geiger, James D.; Coran, Arnold G.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the authors’ experience with gastric transposition as a method of esophageal replacement in children with congenital or acquired abnormalities of the esophagus. Summary Background Data Esophageal replacement in children is almost always done for benign disease and thus requires a conduit that will last more than 70 years. The organ most commonly used in the past has been colon; however, most series have been fraught with major complications and conduit loss. For these reasons, in 1985 the authors switched from using colon interpositions to gastric transpositions for esophageal replacement in infants and children. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 41 patients with the diagnoses of esophageal atresia (n = 26), corrosive injury (n = 8), leiomyomatosis (n = 5), and refractory gastroesophageal reflux (n = 2) who underwent gastric transposition for esophageal replacement. Results Mean ± SE age at the time of gastric transposition was 3.3 ± 0.6 years. All but two transpositions were performed through the posterior mediastinum without mortality or loss of the gastric conduit despite previous surgery on the gastric fundus in 8 (20%), previous esophageal operations in 15 (37%), and previous esophageal perforations in 6 (15%) patients. Complications included esophagogastric anastomotic leak (n = 15, 36%), which uniformly resolved without intervention; stricture formation (n = 20, 49%), all of which no longer require dilation; and feeding intolerance necessitating jejunal feeding (n = 8, 20%) due to delayed gastric emptying (n = 3), feeding aversion related to the underlying anomaly (n = 1), or severe neurological impairment (n = 4). No redo anastomoses were required. Conclusions Gastric transposition reestablishes effective gastrointestinal continuity with few complications. Oral feeding and appropriate weight gain are achieved in most children. Therefore, gastric transposition is an appropriate alternative for esophageal

  16. Frequency of motor alterations detected through manometry in patients with esophageal symptoms and scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Pérez Y López, N; Lugo-Zamudio, G; Barbosa-Cobos, R E; Wong-Lam, A; Torres-López, E

    Scleroderma can present with esophageal involvement causing important morbidity. To describe the manometric findings and clinical characteristics of patients with scleroderma and esophageal symptoms. Patients with scleroderma and esophageal symptoms were evaluated through esophageal manometry within the time frame of one year. Descriptive statistics were carried out and the continuous variables were expressed as means and standard deviation. Frequencies were expressed as percentages. The study included 24 female patients with a mean age of 53.5 years and mean disease progression of 7.84 years. The most frequent findings were short and hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (mean length 1.58cm and mean tone 9.49mmHg) and ineffective esophageal motility (mean non-transmitted waves 92.91%, mean effective primary peristalsis 40.05%, and mean amplitude 13.11mmHg). The most frequent symptom was dysphagia. Scleroderma is associated with lower esophageal sphincter alterations and symptomatic ineffective esophageal motility. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanisms for the development of esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Orford, J; Manglick, P; Cass, D T; Tam, P P

    2001-07-01

    There is no universally accepted theory to explain esophageal embryology and the abnormal development that produces esophageal atresia. The impact of Adriamycin administration on the pathogenesis of esophageal atresia was studied in the rat model of VATER association, from embryonic day (ED) 10 to ED 13. Tissues in the ED10 Adriamycin-exposed embryos displayed less cell proliferation as shown by the reduced population of MIB-5-labelled cells. Cell apoptosis that is characteristic of the normal ED 12 lateral epithelial folds of the foregut (the prospective site of tracheoesophageal septation) was absent in the foregut of the Adriamycin-exposed embryo. Histologic examination of the ED 11-exposed embryo showed the presence of abnormal notochord that was stretched, split, or tethered to the foregut. This contrasts with the normal embryo in which the notochord was localized in close vicinity of the ventral part of the neural tube and separated from the foregut by ample amount of mesenchyme. The abnormal localization of the notochord was accompanied by the lack of down-regulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) activity in the prospective site of future tracheoesophageal separation in the exposed ED 12 embryo. The authors proposed that the ectopic location of the notochord leads to the disruption in Shh signalling that may underpin the development of esophageal atresia. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  18. Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Trappey, A Francois; Hirose, Shinjiro

    2017-04-01

    Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) may represent diseases with common embryologic etiologies, namely, faulty tracheoesophageal separation and differentiation. Here, we will re-enforce definitions for these diseases as well as review their embryology, diagnosis, and treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Acotiamide Has No Effects on Esophageal Motor Activity or Esophagogastric Junction Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Hironobu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Okada, Mayumi; Izumi, Daisuke; Okimoto, Eiko; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2018-01-01

    Background/Aims The novel prokinetic drug acotiamide is used for treatment of functional dyspepsia. It is still unclear how acotiamide has effects on esophageal motor function. Esophageal peristalsis and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) compliance has an important role for prevention of esophageal mucosal damage caused by gastroesophageal reflux, however, few studies have analyzed the effects of acotiamide on those former activities and none have investigated its effects on EGJ compliance. The aim of our research was to examine the effects of acotiamide on esophageal motility and EGJ compliance. Methods We enrolled 3 gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients as well as 9 healthy volunteers. Using high-resolution manometry, we examined esophageal motor activity parameters, including esophageal body contractions and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure. While, EGJ compliance was evaluated using a functional lumen imaging probe. Following determination of baseline values for esophageal motor activities and EGJ compliance, acotiamide at a standard dose of 300 mg/day was administered for 3 days. All measurements were performed again 2 hours after the last acotiamide administration. Results In the healthy volunteers, as compared with the baseline values, acotiamide administration did not significantly change esophageal body contractions and LES pressure. And EGJ distensibility was not significantly changed (distensibility index in 40-mL distension: 3.5 ± 0.4 vs 3.3 ± 0.5 mm2/mmHg). Similarly in the GERD patients, there were no differences in either esophageal motility or EGJ compliance between before and after acotiamide administration (distensibility index in 40-mL distension: 6.2 ± 0.5 vs 6.5 ± 1.1 mm2/mmHg). Conclusion In both healthy individuals and GERD patients, standard dose acotiamide dose does not have significant effects on esophageal motor activities or EGJ compliance. PMID:29605979

  20. Acotiamide Has No Effects on Esophageal Motor Activity or Esophagogastric Junction Compliance.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Hironobu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Okada, Mayumi; Izumi, Daisuke; Okimoto, Eiko; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2018-04-30

    The novel prokinetic drug acotiamide is used for treatment of functional dyspepsia. It is still unclear how acotiamide has effects on esophageal motor function. Esophageal peristalsis and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) compliance has an important role for prevention of esophageal mucosal damage caused by gastroesophageal reflux, however, few studies have analyzed the effects of acotiamide on those former activities and none have investigated its effects on EGJ compliance. The aim of our research was to examine the effects of acotiamide on esophageal motility and EGJ compliance. We enrolled 3 gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients as well as 9 healthy volunteers. Using high-resolution manometry, we examined esophageal motor activity parameters, including esophageal body contractions and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure. While, EGJ compliance was evaluated using a functional lumen imaging probe. Following determination of baseline values for esophageal motor activities and EGJ compliance, acotiamide at a standard dose of 300 mg/day was administered for 3 days. All measurements were performed again 2 hours after the last acotiamide administration. In the healthy volunteers, as compared with the baseline values, acotiamide administration did not significantly change esophageal body contractions and LES pressure. And EGJ distensibility was not significantly changed (distensibility index in 40-mL distension: 3.5 ± 0.4 vs 3.3 ± 0.5 mm²/mmHg). Similarly in the GERD patients, there were no differences in either esophageal motility or EGJ compliance between before and after acotiamide administration (distensibility index in 40-mL distension: 6.2 ± 0.5 vs 6.5 ± 1.1 mm²/mmHg). In both healthy individuals and GERD patients, standard dose acotiamide dose does not have significant effects on esophageal motor activities or EGJ compliance.

  1. New Endoscopic Indicator of Esophageal Achalasia: “Pinstripe Pattern”

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Hitomi; Isomoto, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yasutoshi; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Aims Endoscopic diagnosis of esophageal achalasia lacking typical endoscopic features can be extremely difficult. The aim of this study was to identify simple and reliable early indicator of esophageal achalasia. Patients and Methods This single-center retrospective study included 56 cases of esophageal achalasia without previous treatment. As a control, 60 non-achalasia subjects including reflux esophagitis and superficial esophageal cancer were also included in this study. Endoscopic findings were evaluated according to Descriptive Rules for Achalasia of the Esophagus as follows: (1) esophageal dilatation, (2) abnormal retention of liquid and/or food, (3) whitish change of the mucosal surface, (4) functional stenosis of the esophago-gastric junction, and (5) abnormal contraction. Additionally, the presence of the longitudinal superficial wrinkles of esophageal mucosa, “pinstripe pattern (PSP)” was evaluated endoscopically. Then, inter-observer diagnostic agreement was assessed for each finding. Results The prevalence rates of the above-mentioned findings (1–5) were 41.1%, 41.1%, 16.1%, 94.6%, and 43.9%, respectively. PSP was observed in 60.7% of achalasia, while none of the control showed positivity for PSP. PSP was observed in 26 (62.5%) of 35 cases with shorter history < 10 years, which usually lacks typical findings such as severe esophageal dilation and tortuosity. Inter-observer agreement level was substantial for food/liquid remnant (k = 0.6861) and PSP (k = 0.6098), and was fair for abnormal contraction and white change. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for achalasia were 83.8%, 64.7%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusion “Pinstripe pattern” could be a reliable indicator for early discrimination of primary esophageal achalasia. PMID:25664812

  2. New endoscopic indicator of esophageal achalasia: "pinstripe pattern".

    PubMed

    Minami, Hitomi; Isomoto, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yasutoshi; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Inoue, Haruhiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic diagnosis of esophageal achalasia lacking typical endoscopic features can be extremely difficult. The aim of this study was to identify simple and reliable early indicator of esophageal achalasia. This single-center retrospective study included 56 cases of esophageal achalasia without previous treatment. As a control, 60 non-achalasia subjects including reflux esophagitis and superficial esophageal cancer were also included in this study. Endoscopic findings were evaluated according to Descriptive Rules for Achalasia of the Esophagus as follows: (1) esophageal dilatation, (2) abnormal retention of liquid and/or food, (3) whitish change of the mucosal surface, (4) functional stenosis of the esophago-gastric junction, and (5) abnormal contraction. Additionally, the presence of the longitudinal superficial wrinkles of esophageal mucosa, "pinstripe pattern (PSP)" was evaluated endoscopically. Then, inter-observer diagnostic agreement was assessed for each finding. The prevalence rates of the above-mentioned findings (1-5) were 41.1%, 41.1%, 16.1%, 94.6%, and 43.9%, respectively. PSP was observed in 60.7% of achalasia, while none of the control showed positivity for PSP. PSP was observed in 26 (62.5%) of 35 cases with shorter history < 10 years, which usually lacks typical findings such as severe esophageal dilation and tortuosity. Inter-observer agreement level was substantial for food/liquid remnant (k = 0.6861) and PSP (k = 0.6098), and was fair for abnormal contraction and white change. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for achalasia were 83.8%, 64.7%, and 100%, respectively. "Pinstripe pattern" could be a reliable indicator for early discrimination of primary esophageal achalasia.

  3. Witnessed and unwitnessed esophageal foreign bodies in children.

    PubMed

    Louie, Jeffrey P; Alpern, Elizabeth R; Windreich, Randy M

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical presentation of children with either an unwitnessed or witnessed esophageal foreign body. Retrospective chart review was performed. Patients were identified using ICD-9 code for esophageal foreign body. Clinical data and management techniques, along with complications were abstracted. For the 5-year period of review, 255 patients were identified with an esophageal foreign body. 214 children had a witnessed ingestion. The mean age of the unwitnessed ingestion group was 2.3 years, compared to 4.6 years for a witnessed ingestion. In both groups, males and females were distributed equally and the most common ingested object was a coin. Bivariate, unadjusted analysis revealed that history of wheeze (OR, 4.35) and fever (OR, 11.15) had the largest association with patients who had an unwitnessed ingestion. Multivariate analysis indicated that any physical findings of wheeze, rhonchi, stridor, or retractions were associated significantly with a diagnosis of an unwitnessed foreign body. Children less than 2 years of age and with a documented fever are also predictive of an unwitnessed ingestion. Eleven children (4.3%) with esophageal abnormalities were also noted to have foreign bodies. Children who present to the emergency department two years old and younger, who have a documented fever and with respiratory findings should be considered at risk for having a retained esophageal foreign body. Children with esophageal abnormalities may also be at risk for retained esophageal foreign bodies.

  4. Treatment implications of high-resolution manometry findings: options for patients with esophageal dysmotility.

    PubMed

    Bolkhir, Ahmed; Gyawali, C Prakash

    2014-03-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has significantly impacted diagnosis and management of achalasia in particular, and has improved characterization of other motor disorders. Achalasia, the most profound esophageal motor disorder, is characterized by esophageal outflow obstruction from abnormal relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) during swallowing, and presents with transit symptoms (dysphagia, regurgitation). Esophageal body motor disorders include both inhibitory nerve dysfunction associated with hypermotility or spasm, and hypomotility disorders with poor contraction. The implications of hypermotility disorders are both perceptive and obstructive. On the other hand, hypomotility disorders have reflux implications because of abnormal barrier function at the LES, and abnormal bolus clearance. Esophageal outflow obstruction in achalasia responds favorably to disruption of the LES, and outcome may be predicted by HRM subtyping of achalasia. Identification of dominant (perceptive vs. obstructive) mechanisms of symptom generation help direct therapy of hypermotility disorders, while hypomotility disorders typically require management of concurrent reflux disease.

  5. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  6. Current and future treatment of chest pain of presumed esophageal origin.

    PubMed

    Schmulson, Max J; Valdovinos, Miguel Angel

    2004-03-01

    Patients with chest pain of presumed esophageal origin should be reassured and should undergo an esophageal manometry study. In patients with spastic esophageal disorders, a trial with calcium channel blockers or low-dose antidepressants used as visceral analgesics is the best approach. Inpatients with non GERD-related, nonspastic esophageal motility disorder, low-dose antidepressants seem reasonable. Anxiolytics are useful in patients with panic disorders, and psychological interventions (eg, cognitive-behavioral therapy) are also valuable, mainly in patients in whom reassurance is not sufficient to avoid the misinterpretation of their symptoms. In the future, visceral sensitivity modifying agents such as serotoninergic agonists or antagonists may become the cornerstone of therapy in patients with chest pain of presumed esophageal origin. Combinations of different approaches, such as proton pump inhibitors and psychotropic or antinociceptive agents, should also be evaluated in clinical trials.

  7. Spirochete motility and morpholgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, Nyles

    2004-03-01

    Spirochetes have a unique structure, and as a result their motility is different from that of other bacteria. These organisms can swim in a highly viscous, gel-like medium, such as that found in connective tissue, that inhibits the motility of most other bacteria. In spirochetes, the organelles for motility, the periplasmic flagella, reside inside the cell within the periplasmic space. A given periplasmic flagellum is attached only at one end of the cell, and depending on the species, may or may not overlap in the center of the cell. The number of periplasmic flagella varies from species to species. These structures have been shown to be directly involved in motility and function by rotating within the periplasmic space (1). The present talk focuses on the spirochete that causes Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi. In many bacterial species, cell shape is usually dictated by the peptidoyglycan layer of the cell wall. In the first part of the talk, results will be presented that the morphology of B. burgdorferi is the result of a complex interaction between the cell cylinder and the internal periplasmic flagella resulting in a cell with a flat-wave morphology. Backward moving, propagating waves enable these bacteria to swim and translate in a given direction. Using targeted mutagenesis, we inactivated the gene encoding the major periplasmic flagellar filament protein FlaB. The resulting flaB mutants not only were non-motile, but were rod-shaped (2). Western blot analysis indicated that flaB was no longer synthesized, and electron microscopy revealed that the mutants were completely deficient in periplasmic flagella. Our results indicate that the periplasmic flagella of B. burgdorferi have a skeletal function. These organelles dynamically interact with the rod-shaped cell cylinder to enable the cell to swim, and to confer in part its flat-wave morphology The latter part of the talk concerns the basis for asymmetrical rotation of the periplasmic flagella of B

  8. Esophageal lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis.

  9. Characterization of Esophageal Physiology Using Mechanical State Analysis.

    PubMed

    Leibbrandt, Richard E; Dinning, Phil G; Costa, Marcello; Cock, Charles; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Wang, Guangsong; Tack, Jan; van Beckevoort, Dirk; Rommel, Nathalie; Omari, Taher I

    2016-01-01

    The esophagus functions to transport swallowed fluids and food from the pharynx to the stomach. The esophageal muscles governing bolus transport comprise circular striated muscle of the proximal esophagus and circular smooth muscle of the distal esophagus. Longitudinal smooth muscle contraction provides a mechanical advantage to bolus transit during circular smooth muscle contraction. Esophageal striated muscle is directly controlled by neural circuits originating in the central nervous system, resulting in coordinated contractions. In contrast, the esophageal smooth muscle is controlled by enteric circuits modulated by extrinsic central neural connections resulting in neural relaxation and contraction. The esophageal muscles are modulated by sensory information arising from within the lumen. Contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to identify the "mechanical states" of the circular muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle has been difficult and as the current interpretation of esophageal motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during peristalsis can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the esophageal circular muscles and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern esophageal peristalsis. To achieve this we analyzed barium swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of

  10. Esophageal leiomyoma in a dog causing esophageal distension and treated by transcardial placement of a self-expanding, covered, nitinol esophageal stent.

    PubMed

    Robin, Elisabeth M; Pey, Pascaline B; de Fornel-Thibaud, Pauline; Moissonnier, Pierre H M; Freiche, Valérie

    2018-02-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 10-year-old spayed female Rottweiler was referred for evaluation because of a 2-month history of regurgitation and weight loss, despite no apparent change in appetite. The dog had received antiemetic and antacid treatment, without improvement. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination revealed a low body condition score (2/5), but other findings were unremarkable. Diffuse, global esophageal dilatation was noted on plain thoracic radiographs, and normal motility was confirmed through videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing. Transhepatic ultrasonographic and CT examination revealed a circumferential, intraparietal lesion in the distal portion of the esophagus causing distal esophageal or cardial subobstruction and no metastases. Incisional biopsy of the lesion was performed, and findings of histologic examination supported a diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME In view of numerous possible complications associated with esophageal surgery, the decision was made to palliatively treat the dog by transcardial placement of a self-expanding, covered, nitinol esophageal stent under endoscopic guidance. Two weeks after stent placement, radiography revealed complete migration of the stent into the gastric lumen. Gastrotomy was performed, and the stent was replaced and fixed in place. Twenty-four months after initial stent placement, the dog had a healthy body condition and remained free of previous clinical signs. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Diffuse benign muscular neoplasia should be considered as a differential diagnosis for acquired esophageal dilatation in adult and elderly dogs. In the dog of this report, transcardial stent placement resulted in resolution of the clinical signs, with no apparent adverse effect on digestive function. The described procedure could be beneficial for nonsurgical treatment of benign esophageal tumors in dogs.

  11. Esophageal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... decrease the risk of dying from cancer. Scientists study screening tests to find those with the fewest risks and ... stage . There is no standard or routine screening test for esophageal cancer. Screening for esophageal cancer is under study with screening clinical trials taking place in many ...

  12. Systematic review: Eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Oshima, Naoki; Ishihara, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of Asian patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed and Web of Science databases for original studies, case series, and individual case reports of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries published from January 1980 to January 2015. We found 66 and 80 articles in the PubMed and Web of Science databases, respectively; 24 duplicate articles were removed. After excluding animal studies, articles not written in English, and meeting abstracts, 25 articles containing 217 patients were selected for analysis. RESULTS: Sample size-weighted mean values were determined for all pooled prevalence data and clinical characteristics. The mean age of the adult patients with eosinophilic esophagitis was approximately 50 years, and 73% of these patients were male. They frequently presented with allergic diseases including bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Bronchial asthma was the most frequent comorbid allergic disease, occurring in 24% of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Dysphagia was the primary symptom reported; 44% of the patients complained of dysphagia. Although laboratory blood tests are not adequately sensitive for an accurate diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, endoscopic examinations revealed abnormal findings typical of this disease, including longitudinal furrows and concentric rings, in 82% of the cases. One-third of the cases responded to proton pump inhibitor administration. CONCLUSION: The characteristics of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian patients were similar to those reported in Western patients, indicating that this disease displays a similar pathogenesis between Western and Asian patients. PMID:26217096

  13. Effect of peroral esophageal myotomy for achalasia treatment: A Chinese study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng; Hu, Yue; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Shuo; Cai, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety and feasibility of peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM) in patients with achalasia. METHODS: From January 2012 to March 2014, 50 patients (28 men, 22 women; mean age: 42.8 years, range: 14-70 years) underwent POEM. Pre- and postoperative symptoms were quantified using the Eckardt scoring system. Barium swallow and esophagogastroscopy were performed before and after POEM, respectively. Esophageal motility was evaluated in all patients, both preoperatively and one month after POEM treatment, using a high-resolution manometry system. Manometry data, Eckardt scores, lower esophageal sphincter pressure and barium swallow results were used to evaluate the effect of the procedure. RESULTS: POEM was successfully completed for all patients. The mean procedure time was 55.4 ± 17.3 min and the mean total length of myotomy of the circular esophagus was 10.5 ± 2.6 cm. No specific complications occurred, with the exception of two patients that developed asymptomatic pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema. Clinical improvement in symptoms was achieved in all patients. Approximately 77.5% of patients experienced weight gain 6 mo after POEM, with an average of 4.78 kg (range: 2-15 kg). The lower esophageal sphincter resting pressure, four second integrated relaxation pressure and Eckardt scores were all significantly reduced after POEM (Ps < 0.05). A small segment of proximal esophageal peristalsis appeared postoperatively in two patients, but without normal esophageal peristalsis. The average diameter of the esophageal lumen decreased significantly from 4.39 to 3.09 cm (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: POEM can relieve achalasia symptoms, improve gastroesophageal junction relaxation and restore esophageal body motility function, but not normal esophageal peristalsis. PMID:25987787

  14. Effect of peroral esophageal myotomy for achalasia treatment: A Chinese study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng; Hu, Yue; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Shuo; Cai, Li-Jun

    2015-05-14

    To assess the safety and feasibility of peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM) in patients with achalasia. From January 2012 to March 2014, 50 patients (28 men, 22 women; mean age: 42.8 years, range: 14-70 years) underwent POEM. Pre- and postoperative symptoms were quantified using the Eckardt scoring system. Barium swallow and esophagogastroscopy were performed before and after POEM, respectively. Esophageal motility was evaluated in all patients, both preoperatively and one month after POEM treatment, using a high-resolution manometry system. Manometry data, Eckardt scores, lower esophageal sphincter pressure and barium swallow results were used to evaluate the effect of the procedure. POEM was successfully completed for all patients. The mean procedure time was 55.4 ± 17.3 min and the mean total length of myotomy of the circular esophagus was 10.5 ± 2.6 cm. No specific complications occurred, with the exception of two patients that developed asymptomatic pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema. Clinical improvement in symptoms was achieved in all patients. Approximately 77.5% of patients experienced weight gain 6 mo after POEM, with an average of 4.78 kg (range: 2-15 kg). The lower esophageal sphincter resting pressure, four second integrated relaxation pressure and Eckardt scores were all significantly reduced after POEM (Ps < 0.05). A small segment of proximal esophageal peristalsis appeared postoperatively in two patients, but without normal esophageal peristalsis. The average diameter of the esophageal lumen decreased significantly from 4.39 to 3.09 cm (P < 0.01). POEM can relieve achalasia symptoms, improve gastroesophageal junction relaxation and restore esophageal body motility function, but not normal esophageal peristalsis.

  15. Laparoscopic Transhiatal Treatment of Large Epiphrenic Esophageal Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Recchia, Carlo Luigi; Bianchi, Ermanno; Lomartire, Nazzareno

    2008-01-01

    Background: Epiphrenic diverticulum is an uncommon disorder of the distal third of the esophagus. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman with a large symptomatic esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum, diffuse nonspecific esophageal dysmotility, and a hiatal hernia. Methods: Surgery was indicated by the patient's symptoms, the size of the diverticulum (maximum diameter 10 cm), and the associated esophageal motor disorder. Preoperative study included barium swallow, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and esophageal manometry. A laparoscopic transhiatal diverticulectomy associated with a Heller myotomy, hiatoplasty, and a Dor's fundoplication was carried out. The overall operative time was 230 minutes. Results: No intraoperative complications occurred. Gastrografin swallow performed on postoperative day 4 did not show any signs of leakage from the staple line. The postoperative hospital stay was 5 days. The patient was readmitted 10 days after discharge complaining of fever and chest pain. A new Gastrografin swallow demonstrated a small leak from the staple line successfully treated with 3 weeks of total enteral nutrition. Conclusion: The laparoscopic approach to epiphrenic diverticulum is feasible. Postoperative Gastrografin swallow is not 100% sensitive in detecting small suture-line leaks if a preexisting esophageal motility disorder is present. In case of late postoperative fever and pleural effusion, a suture-line leak should be suspected. Conservative management of the small suture-line leak should be considered as an effective therapeutic option. PMID:18402751

  16. Esophageal Transit, Contraction and Perception of Transit After Swallows of Two Viscous Boluses

    PubMed Central

    Dalmazo, Jucileia; Aprile, Lilian Rose Otoboni; Dantas, Roberto Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Background There have been results showing the influence of bolus viscosities and consistency on esophageal motility and transit. However, there is no description about the influence of two different viscous boluses on esophageal contractions, bolus transit and perception of transit. Our objective in this investigation was to evaluate the esophageal transit and contraction after swallows of two viscous boluses. Methods By impedance and manometric methods, we measured the esophageal transit and contraction after swallows of two viscous boluses of 5 mL volume, 100% barium sulfate and yogurt, swallowed in duplicate in the supine and upright positions. The bolus transit, esophageal contractions and the perception of bolus transit through the esophagus were evaluated in both positions. Impedance and contraction were measured at 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm from the lower esophageal sphincter. After each swallow, the volunteers were asked about the sensation of bolus transit through the esophagus. Results In supine position, the yogurt had a less frequent complete bolus transit than barium. Also in the supine position, the esophageal transit was longer with yogurt than with barium. Esophageal contractions after swallows were similar between barium and yogurt boluses. There was no difference in perception of transit between the two boluses. Conclusion Although both 100% barium sulfate and yogurt are viscous boluses and have similar viscosities, the transit through the esophagus is slower with yogurt bolus than with barium bolus, which suggests that viscosity may be not the sole factor to determine transit. PMID:27785308

  17. Role of peripheral reflexes in the initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Medda, Bidyut K.; Babaei, Arash; Shaker, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of peripheral reflexes in initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing. In 10 decerebrate cats, we recorded electromyographic responses from the pharynx, larynx, and esophagus and manometric data from the esophagus. Water (1–5 ml) was injected into the nasopharynx to stimulate swallowing, and the timing of the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing was quantified. The effects of transection or stimulation of nerves innervating the esophagus on swallowing and esophageal motility were tested. We found that the percent occurrence of the esophageal phase was significantly related to the bolus size. While the time delays between the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing were not related to the bolus size, they were significantly more variable than the time delays between activation of muscles within the pharyngeal phase. Transection of the sensory innervation of the proximal cervical esophagus blocked or significantly inhibited activation of the esophageal phase in the proximal cervical esophagus. Peripheral electrical stimulation of the pharyngoesophageal nerve activated the proximal cervical esophagus, peripheral electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve activated the distal cervical esophagus, and peripheral electrical stimulation the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) had no effect on the esophagus. Centripetal electrical stimulation of the SLN activated the cervical component of the esophageal phase of swallowing before initiation of the pharyngeal phase. Therefore, we concluded that initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing depends on feedback from peripheral reflexes acting through the SLN, rather than a central program. PMID:24557762

  18. A safe treatment option for esophageal bezoars

    PubMed Central

    Yaqub, Sheraz; Shafique, Muhammad; Kjæstad, Erik; Thorsen, Yngve; Lie, Erik S.; Dahl, Vegard; Bakka, Njål; Røkke, Ola

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bezoar in the esophagus is a rare condition and associated with structural or functional abnormalities of the esophagus. Endoscopy is the main tool for diagnosis and treatment for bezoar in the esophagus. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here we present a case where an endoscopic evacuation of an esophageal bezoar was unsuccessful. We treated the bezoar through a nasogastric tube using a cocktail composed of pancreatic enzymes dissolved in Coca-Cola. DISCUSSION Endoscopy is regarded as the mainstay for the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal bezoars. However, when this approach fails, other treatment options include dissolution therapy, and surgical exploration and removal of the bezoar. Surgical removal of an esophageal bezoar is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. We advocate that dissolving therapy should be the first choice of treatment when endoscopic evacuation is not possible. CONCLUSION This is the first report describing a successful treatment of an esophageal bezoar with a cocktail of Coca-Cola and pancreatic enzymes. It is an effective, inexpensive, and worldwide available treatment and should be considered when endoscopic evacuation fails. PMID:22609703

  19. Apprenticeship-based training in neurogastroenterology and motility.

    PubMed

    Vasant, Dipesh H; Sharma, Amol; Bhagatwala, Jigar; Viswanathan, Lavanya; Rao, Satish S C

    2018-03-01

    Although neurogastroenterology and motility (NGM) disorders affect 50% of patients seen in clinics, many gastroenterologists receive limited NGM training. One-month apprenticeship-based NGM training has been provided at ten centers in the USA for a decade, however, outcomes of this training are unclear. Our goal was to describe the effectiveness of this program from a trainees perspective. Areas covered: We describe the training model, learning experiences, and outcomes of one-month apprenticeship-based training in NGM at a center of excellence, using a detailed individual observer account and data from 12 consecutive trainees that completed the program. During a one-month training period, 302 procedures including; breath tests (BT) n = 132, anorectal manometry (ARM) n = 29 and esophageal manometry (EM) n = 28, were performed. Post-training, all trainees (n = 12) knew indications for motility tests, and the majority achieved independence in basic interpretation of BT, EM and ARM. Additionally, in a multiple-choice NGM written-test paper, trainees achieved significant improvements in test scores post-training (P = 0.003). Expert commentary: One-month training at a high-volume center can facilitate rapid learning of NGM and the indications, basic interpretation and utility of motility tests. Trainees demonstrate significant independence, and this training model provides an ideal platform for those interested in sub-specialty NGM.

  20. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  1. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies.

  2. Mathematical models of cell motility.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Brendan; McGarry, J P; McHugh, P E

    2007-01-01

    Cell motility is an essential biological action in the creation, operation and maintenance of our bodies. Developing mathematical models elucidating cell motility will greatly advance our understanding of this fundamental biological process. With accurate models it is possible to explore many permutations of the same event and concisely investigate their outcome. While great advancements have been made in experimental studies of cell motility, it now has somewhat fallen on mathematical models to taking a leading role in future developments. The obvious reason for this is the complexity of cell motility. Employing the processing power of today's computers will give researches the ability to run complex biophysical and biochemical scenarios, without the inherent difficulty and time associated with in vitro investigations. Before any great advancement can be made, the basics of cell motility will have to be well-defined. Without this, complicated mathematical models will be hindered by their inherent conjecture. This review will look at current mathematical investigations of cell motility, explore the reasoning behind such work and conclude with how best to advance this interesting and challenging research area.

  3. Major regulatory mechanisms involved in sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rute; Sá, Rosália; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The genetic bases and molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly and function of the flagellum components as well as in the regulation of the flagellar movement are not fully understood, especially in humans. There are several causes for sperm immotility, of which some can be avoided and corrected, whereas other are related to genetic defects and deserve full investigation to give a diagnosis to patients. This review was performed after an extensive literature search on the online databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Here, we review the involvement of regulatory pathways responsible for sperm motility, indicating possible causes for sperm immotility. These included the calcium pathway, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, the importance of kinases and phosphatases, the function of reactive oxygen species, and how the regulation of cell volume and osmolarity are also fundamental components. We then discuss main gene defects associated with specific morphological abnormalities. Finally, we slightly discuss some preventive and treatments approaches to avoid development of conditions that are associated with unspecified sperm immotility. We believe that in the near future, with the development of more powerful techniques, the genetic causes of sperm immotility and the regulatory mechanisms of sperm motility will be better understand, thus enabling to perform a full diagnosis and uncover new therapies. PMID:26680031

  4. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Feeding Problems and Their Underlying Mechanisms in the Esophageal Atresia–Tracheoesophageal Fistula Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Lisa; Rosen, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Feeding difficulties such as dysphagia, coughing, choking, or vomiting during meals, slow eating, oral aversion, food refusal, and stressful mealtimes are common in children with repaired esophageal atresia (EA) and the reasons for this are often multifactorial. The aim of this review is to describe the possible underlying mechanisms contributing to feeding difficulties in patients with EA and approaches to management. Underlying mechanisms for these feeding difficulties include esophageal dysphagia, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aspiration, and aversions related to prolonged gastrostomy tube feeding. The initial diagnostic evaluation for feeding difficulties in a patient with EA may involve an esophagram, videofluoroscopic imaging or fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation during swallowing, upper endoscopy with biopsies, pH-impedance testing, and/or esophageal motility studies. The main goal of management is to reduce the factors contributing to feeding difficulties and may include reducing esophageal stasis, maximizing reflux therapies, treating underlying lung disease, dilating strictures, and altering feeding methods, routes, or schedules. PMID:28620597

  7. Causes and treatments of achalasia, and primary disorders of the esophageal body.

    PubMed

    Felix, Valter Nilton; DeVault, Kenneth; Penagini, Roberto; Elvevi, Alessandra; Swanstrom, Lee; Wassenaar, Eelco; Crespin, Oscar M; Pellegrini, Carlos A; Wong, Roy

    2013-10-01

    The following on achalasia and disorders of the esophageal body includes commentaries on controversies regarding whether patients with complete lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation can be considered to exhibit early achalasia; the roles of different mucle components of the LES in achalasia; sensory neural pathways impaired in achalasia; indications for peroral endoscopic myotomy and advantages of the technique over laparoscopic and thorascopic myotomy; factors contributing to the success of surgical therapy for achalasia; modifications to the classification of esophageal body primary motility disorders in the advent of high-resolution manometry (HRM); analysis of the LES in differentiating between achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm (DES); and appropriate treatment for DES, nutcracker esophagus (NE), and hypertensive LES (HTLES). © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by severe esophagitis: a unique clinical syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guntipalli, Prathima; Chason, Rebecca; Elliott, Alan; Rockey, Don C

    2014-12-01

    We have recognized a unique clinical syndrome in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who are found to have severe esophagitis. We aimed to more clearly describe the clinical entity of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with severe esophagitis. We conducted a retrospective matched case-control study designed to investigate clinical features in patients with carefully defined upper gastrointestinal bleeding and severe esophagitis. Patient data were captured prospectively via a Gastrointestinal Bleeding Healthcare Registry, which collects data on all patients admitted with gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients with endoscopically documented esophagitis (cases) were matched with randomly selected controls that had upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by other lesions. Epidemiologic features in patients with esophagitis were similar to those with other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, hematemesis was more common in patients with esophagitis 86% (102/119) than in controls 55% (196/357) (p < 0.0001), while melena was less common in patients with esophagitis 38% (45/119) than in controls 68% (244/357) (p < 0.0001). Additionally, the more severe the esophagitis, the more frequent was melena. Patients with esophagitis had less abnormal vital signs, lesser decreases in hematocrit, and lesser increases in BUN. Both pre- and postRockall scores were lower in patients with esophagitis compared with controls (p = 0.01, and p < 0.0001, respectively). Length of hospital stay (p = 0.002), rebleeding rate at 42 days (p = 0.0007), and mortality were less in patients with esophagitis than controls. Finally, analysis of patients with esophagitis and cirrhosis suggested that this group of patients had more severe bleeding than those without cirrhosis. We have described a unique clinical syndrome in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who have erosive esophagitis. This syndrome is manifest by typical clinical features and is associated with

  9. Associated anomalies in cases with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Alembik, Yves; Dott, Beatrice; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2017-08-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is a common type of congenital anomaly. The etiology of esophageal atresia is unclear and its pathogenesis is controversial. Infants with esophageal atresia often have other non-EA associated congenital anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of these associated anomalies in a defined population. The associated anomalies in cases with EA were collected in all livebirths, stillbirths, and terminations of pregnancy during 29 years in 387,067 consecutive births in the area covered by our population-based registry of congenital malformations. Of the 116 cases with esophageal atresia, representing a prevalence of 2.99 per 10,000, 54 (46.6%) had associated anomalies. There were 9 (7.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 6 trisomies 18, and 20 (17.2%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions including 12 cases with VACTERL association and 2 cases with CHARGE syndrome. Twenty five (21.6%) of the cases had multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the cardiovascular, the digestive, the urogenital, the musculoskeletal, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. The anomalies associated with esophageal atresia could be classified into a recognizable malformation syndrome or pattern in 29 out of 54 cases (53.7%). This study included special strengths: each affected child was examined by a geneticist, all elective terminations were ascertained, and the surveillance for anomalies was continued until 2 years of age. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was close to one in two cases, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with EA. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with EA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Recording In Vivo Human Colonic Motility: What Have We Learnt Over the Past 100 Years?

    PubMed

    Dinning, Phil G

    To understand the abnormalities that underpin functional gut disorders we must first gain insight into the normal patterns of gut motility. While detailed information continually builds on the motor patterns (and mechanisms that control them) of the human esophagus and anorectum, our knowledge of normal and abnormal motility in the more inaccessible regions of the gut remains poor. This particularly true of the human colon. Investigation of in vivo colonic motor patterns is achieved through measures of transit (radiology, scintigraphy and, more recently, "smart pills") or by direct real-time recording of colonic contractility (intraluminal manometry). This short review will provide an overview of findings from the past and present and attempt to piece together the complex nature of colonic motor patterns. In doing so it will build a profile of human colonic motility and determine the likely mechanisms that control this motility.

  11. A PICTORIAL PRESENTATION OF ESOPHAGEAL HIGH RESOLUTION MANOMETRY CURRENT PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    Lafraia, Fernanda M; Herbella, Fernando A M; Kalluf, Julia R; Patti, Marco G

    2017-01-01

    High resolution manometry is the current technology used to the study of esophageal motility and is replacing conventional manometry in important centers for esophageal motility with parameters used on esophageal motility, following the Chicago Classification. This classification unifies high resolution manometry interpretation and classifies esophageal disorders. This review shows, in a pictorial presentation, the new parameters established by the Chicago Classification, version 3.0, aimed to allow an easy comprehension and interpretation of high resolution manometry. Esophageal manometries performed by the authors were reviewed to select illustrative tracings representing Chicago Classification parameters. The parameters are: Esophagogastric Morphology, that classifies this junction according to its physiology and anatomy; Integrated Relaxation Pressure, that measures the lower esophageal sphincter relaxation; Distal Contractile Integral, that evaluates the contraction vigor of each wave; and, Distal Latency, that measures the peristalsis velocity from the beginning of the swallow to the epiphrenic ampulla. Clinical applications of these new concepts is still under evaluation. Mostrar, de forma pictórica, os novos parâmetros compilados na versão 3.0 da Classificação de Chicago, buscando facilitar a compreensão e interpretação da manometria de alta resolução. Foram revistas as manometrias da casuística dos autores e selecionados os traçados representativos dos parâmetros da Classificação de Chicago. Entre os parâmetros apresentados foram considerados a Morfologia da Transição Gastroesofágica, que classifica o segmento de acordo com sua fisiologia e anatomia; a Integral da Pressão de Relaxamento, que mede o relaxamento do esfíncter esofagiano inferior; a Integral Contrátil Distal, que avalia o vigor contrátil da onda peristáltica; e, a Latência Distal, que mede o tempo da peristalse, desde o início da deglutição até a ampola epifr

  12. The role of Heller myotomy and POEM for nonachalasia motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Schlottmann, F; Shaheen, N J; Madanick, R D; Patti, M G

    2017-04-01

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders such as Diffuse Esophageal Spasm (DES), Nutcracker Esophagus (NE) and the Hypertensive Lower Esophageal Sphincter (HTN-LES). Most patients with DES and HTN-LES who complain of dysphagia improve after a myotomy. Patients with NE whose main complaint is chest pain, often do not have relief of the pain and can even develop dysphagia as a consequence of the myotomy. POEM is a relatively new procedure, and there are no studies with long-term follow-up and no prospective and randomized trials comparing it to surgical myotomy. Overall, the key to success is based on a complete evaluation and a careful patient selection. The best results, regardless of the technique, are in fact obtained in patients with outflow obstruction and impaired esophageal emptying, a picture similar to achalasia. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the stomach. It is a test for gastroesophageal reflux disease ( GERD ). In infants, this test is also ... to: Barrett esophagus Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) Esophageal scarring Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) Heartburn Reflux esophagitis You may need ...

  14. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Esophageal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. RNA editing is induced by type I interferon in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinyao; Chen, Zhaoli; Tang, Zefang; Huang, Jianbing; Hu, Xueda; He, Jie

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, abnormal RNA editing has been shown to play an important role in the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, as such abnormal editing is catalyzed by ADAR (adenosine deaminases acting on RNA). However, the regulatory mechanism of ADAR1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ADAR1 expression and its association with RNA editing in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas. RNA sequencing applied to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma clinical samples showed that ADAR1 expression was correlated with the expression of STAT1, STAT2, and IRF9. In vitro experiments showed that the abundance of ADAR1 protein was associated with the induced activation of the JAK/STAT pathway by type I interferon. RNA sequencing results showed that treatment with type I interferon caused an increase in the number and degree of RNA editing in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. In conclusion, the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway is a regulatory mechanism of ADAR1 expression and causes abnormal RNA editing profile in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. This mechanism may serve as a new target for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma therapy.

  16. Laparogastroscopy and Esophageal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sabău, Alexandru-Dan; Hassan, Noor; Smarandache, Cătălin Gabriel; Miheţiu, Alin; Ţîţu, Ștefan; Sabău, Dan

    2018-01-01

    An original technique using laparoscopic instruments in a gastric endocavitary work chamber with potential for esophagus, stomach and D1 vizualisation. The main purpose of laparagastroscopy is to improve the quality of life of the patient disabling by the esophageal tumor. This method has several advantages: providing physiological feeding, harvesting materials for histopathological examination, solving eso-tracheal fistulas concurrently with the proposed operation and hemostatic role through compression, low energy and plastic consumption, rapid socio-economic reintegration, mental psychological care of the patient. Patients and Methods: The paper deals with 162 cases with different tumors of the esophagus, patients with different grades of esophageal stenosis, different stages of esophageal neoplasm. Both the patients with eso-tracheal fistulas and those with gastro- or jejunostoma were included. Results: From 162 cases, 33 cases (20%) with cervical esophageal neoplasm, 66 (41%) cases with thoracic esophageal neoplasm and 63 (39%) cases with abdominal esophageal neoplasm. The histopathological type is 37% adenocarcinomas and 63% squamous carcinomas. From total number of cases, 87 (54%) had no metastasis, and 75 (46%) had secondary determinations. The most frequent localization of metastasis was pulmonary, followed by liver (Fig. 1) and bone. The analysis of this intervention has shown that complications have been much lower both in terms of their numerical value and their severity, a longer survival time with a much higher satisfaction index is ensured. Esophageal endoprosthesis (EPE) through laparagastroscopic approach should be a a reserve procedure instead of a disabling gastrostomy or jejunostomy. EPE is an extremely effective procedure specially by keeping the physiology of food bowl. The approach is minimally invasive with minimal attack on the body with significant plastic and aesthetic reductions. This procedure allows the prosthesis to be viewed both

  17. Esophageal Lichen Planus: Clinical and Radiographic Findings in Eight Patients.

    PubMed

    Rauschecker, Andreas M; Levine, Marc S; Whitson, Matthew J; Tondon, Rashmi; Rubesin, Stephen E; Furth, Emma E; Metz, David C

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the clinical and radiographic findings of esophageal lichen planus. A search of computerized medical records identified 15 patients with pathologic findings of esophageal lichen planus on endoscopic biopsy specimens. Three other patients had presumed esophageal lichen planus, although no biopsy specimens were obtained. Twelve of these 18 patients (67%) had double-contrast esophagography performed at our institution; for eight of the 12 patients (67%), the studies revealed abnormalities in the esophagus. These eight patients constituted our study group. The barium esophagrams and medical records of these eight patients were reviewed to determine the clinical, radiographic, and endoscopic findings of esophageal lichen planus as well as the treatment and patient outcome. All eight patients were women (median age, 66.5 years), and all eight presented with dysphagia (mean duration, 3.2 years). Four patients had previous lichen planus that involved the skin (n = 1), the oral cavity (n = 2), or both (n = 1), and one patient later had lichen planus that involved the vagina. Five patients had a small-caliber esophagus with diffuse esophageal narrowing. The remaining three patients had segmental strictures in the cervical (n = 1), upper thoracic (n = 1), and distal thoracic (n = 1) esophagus. Esophageal lichen planus typically occurs in older women with longstanding dysphagia and often develops in the absence of extraesophageal disease. Barium esophagrams may reveal a small-caliber esophagus or, less commonly, segmental esophageal strictures. Greater awareness of the radiographic findings of esophageal lichen planus hopefully will lead to earlier diagnosis and better management of this condition.

  18. Esophageal involvement and interstitial lung disease in mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, M N; Caleiro, M T C; Navarro-Rodriguez, T; Baldi, B G; Kavakama, J; Salge, J M; Kairalla, R; Carvalho, C R R

    2009-06-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease is a systemic inflammatory disorder that results in both pulmonary and esophageal manifestations. We sought to evaluate the relationship between esophageal dysfunction and interstitial lung disease in patients with mixed connective tissue disease. We correlated the pulmonary function data and the high-resolution computed tomography findings of interstitial lung disease with the results of esophageal evaluation in manometry, 24-hour intraesophageal pH measurements, and the presence of esophageal dilatation on computed tomography scan. Fifty consecutive patients with mixed connective tissue disease, according to Kasukawa's classification criteria, were included in this prospective study. High-resolution computed tomography parenchymal abnormalities were present in 39 of 50 patients. Esophageal dilatation, gastroesophageal reflux, and esophageal motor impairment were also very prevalent (28 of 50, 18 of 36, and 30 of 36, respectively). The presence of interstitial lung disease on computed tomography was significantly higher among patients with esophageal dilatation (92% vs. 45%; p<0.01) and among patients with severe motor dysfunction (90% vs. 35%; p<0.001). Although we were not able to prove a causal relationship between esophageal and pulmonary involvement, our series revealed a strong association between esophageal motor dysfunction and interstitial lung disease in patients with mixed connective tissue disease.

  19. Esophageal Epithelial Resistance and Lower Esophageal Sphincter Muscle Contraction Increase in a Chronic Diabetic Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Capanoglu, Doga; Coskunsever, Deniz; Olukman, Murat; Ülker, Sibel; Bor, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders and possibly gastroesophageal reflux disease are common in patients with diabetes mellitus. We aimed to investigate both the electrophysiological characteristics of the esophageal epithelium and the contractility of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) muscle in alloxane-induced diabetic rabbits. Electrophysiological properties were measured using an Ussing chamber method. An acid-pepsin model was employed with pH 1.7 or weakly acidic (pH 4) Ringer and/or pepsin. Smooth muscle strips of the LES were mounted in an isolated organ bath. Contractile responses to an electrical field stimulation and cumulative concentrations of acetylcholine were recorded. Contractility of the muscle strips were tested in the presence of Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y-27632) and nonspecific nitric oxide inhibitor (L-NAME). The resistance of diabetic tissue perfused in the pH 1.7 Ringer decreased 17 %; pepsin addition decreased it by 49 %. The same concentrations caused a more distinct loss of resistance in the control tissues (22 and 76 %, p < 0.05). The perfusion of tissues in increased concentrations of luminal and serosal glucose did not change the tissue resistance and voltage. Diabetes significantly increased both the electrical field stimulation and acetylcholine-induced contractions in the LES muscle strips (p < 0.01). Incubation with Y-27632 significantly decreased the acetylcholine-induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.01). The acid-pepsin model in the diabetic rabbit esophageal tissue had less injury compared with the control. The diabetic rabbit LES muscle had higher contractility, possibly because of the activation of the Rho-Rhokinase pathway. Our results show that in a chronic diabetic rabbit model the esophagus resists reflux by activating mechanisms of mucosal defense and increasing the contractility of the LES.

  20. Esophageal Cancer—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    The most common types of esophageal cancer are adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. These forms of esophageal cancer develop in some parts of the esophagus and are driven by genetic changes. Start here to find information on esophageal cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  1. The association between systemic sclerosis disease manifestations and esophageal high-resolution manometry parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Jessica N.; Carlson, Dustin A.; Hinchcliff, Monique; Carns, Mary A.; Aren, Kathleen A; Lee, Jungwha; Pandolfino, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims We aimed to evaluate the associations between SSc-related systemic manifestations and esophageal function using high-resolution manometry (HRM). Methods Patients with SSc that had undergone HRM between 1/2004 and 9/2014 were identified and HRMs were analyzed according to the Chicago Classification. Clinical characteristics were identified via retrospective chart review and compared among motility diagnoses while adjusting for age, gender, race, and SSc-disease duration. Results 79 patients (85% female, ages 25–77) were included. Clinical characteristics were compared between patients with absent contractility (AC, n = 40), ineffective esophageal motility (IEM; n = 15), and normal motility (n = 19); the 5 remaining patients met criteria for other motility diagnoses. Groups differed in severity of skin involvement measured by the modified Rodnan skin score (0–51): AC (adjusted mean 12.6), IEM (4.4), normal (4.3), p = 0.043. Pulmonary function tests [percent predicted FVC and DLCO) were lower in AC (adjusted mean, FVC: 70.3, DLCO 51.1), than IEM (FVC: 92.0; DLCO: 76.9) and normal motility (FVC: 80.0; DLCO: 67.2), p-values 0.057 (FVC) and 0.007 (DLCO). Groups did not differ by SSc-disease duration, autoantibodies, or reported symptoms of dysphagia or reflux. Conclusions In patients with SSc, absent esophageal contractility on HRM was associated with increased skin disease severity and worse lung function. Obtaining HRM to identify SSc patients with more severe esophageal dysfunction could be considered to enable implementation of management strategies in patients potentially at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:26921101

  2. Current Therapeutic Options for Esophageal Motor Disorders as Defined by the Chicago Classification.

    PubMed

    Zerbib, Frank; Roman, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    With the development of high-resolution manometry and specific metrics to characterize esophageal motility, the Chicago Classification has become the gold standard for the diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders. Major and significant disorders, that is, never observed in healthy subjects, are achalasia, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, distal esophageal spasm, absent peristalsis, and hypercontractile (Jackhammer) esophagus. Achalasia subtyping is relevant to predict the response to endoscopic and surgical therapies as several studies suggest that, pneumatic dilation is less effective than Heller myotomy, in type III achalasia. Peroral endoscopic myotomy, initially developed in expert centers, is a promising technique for the treatment of achalasia. The medical therapeutic options for distal esophageal spasm and hypercontractile esophagus are smooth muscle relaxants and pain modulators. Intraesophageal injection of botulinum toxin might be an interesting option for treatment of these disorders but further studies are required to determine the optimal injection protocol and the best candidates based on manometric patterns. The treatment of hypotensive motility disorders is disappointing and relies mainly on dietary and lifestyle changes as no effective esophageal prokinetic is currently available.

  3. Esophageal smooth muscle hypertrophy causing regurgitation in a rabbit

    PubMed Central

    PARKINSON, Lily; KUZMA, Carrie; WUENSCHMANN, Arno; MANS, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    A five-year-old rabbit was evaluated for a 7 to 8 month history of regurgitation, weight loss, and hyporexia. Previously performed whole body radiographs, plasma biochemistry results and complete blood count revealed had no significant abnormalities. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a circumferential caudal esophageal thickening. The animal received supportive care until euthanasia was performed 6 weeks later. Caudal esophageal smooth muscle hypertrophy was diagnosed on necropsy. This case indicates that regurgitation can occur in rabbits and advanced imaging can investigate the underlying cause. PMID:28966232

  4. [Clinical and pathogenetic features of esophageal spasm].

    PubMed

    Firsova, L D; Pichugina, I M; Yanova, O B; Berezina, O I; Bordin, D S

    2015-01-01

    To comparatively analyze clinical manifestations in patients with primary esophageal spasm (ES) and its concurrence with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the results of their instrumental examinations and psychodiagnostic tests. A total of 104 patients with the clinical and manometric signs of ES were examined and divided into two groups: 1) 42 patients with primary ES; 2) 62 patients with ES concurrent with GERD. The examination encompassed esophageal manometry, esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 24-hour pH metry, and an interview using a questionnaire to identify autonomic disorders, and the Mini-Mult test. The patients with primary ES compared to those with ES concurrent with GERD significantly more frequently showed severe pain syndrome (p = 0.009) and a paradoxical dysphagia pattern (p = 0.03); manometry revealed an incoordination in the motility of the entire esophagus (p = 0.001). Comparison of the statistical series of values for contraction amplitude and duration in the distal esophagus found no significant difference in the patients of both groups. Autonomic disturbances were detected in 76.0% of the patients with ES; but the intergroup differences were insignificant. Mental maladaptation was observed in 81.7% of the patients in the absence of intergroup differences. The etiopathogenetic factor of ES is a psychoautonomic response to chronic stress in both primary ES and its concurrence with GERD. The reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus does not appear to be one of the leading causes of ES. In primary ES, esophageal motor function is generally impaired to a much greater extent than that in ES concurrent with GERD. The degree of motor disorders is embodied in the specific clinical features of the disease.

  5. Social Motility in African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    McLelland, Bryce T.; Hill, Kent L.

    2010-01-01

    African trypanosomes are devastating human and animal pathogens that cause significant human mortality and limit economic development in sub-Saharan Africa. Studies of trypanosome biology generally consider these protozoan parasites as individual cells in suspension cultures or in animal models of infection. Here we report that the procyclic form of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei engages in social behavior when cultivated on semisolid agarose surfaces. This behavior is characterized by trypanosomes assembling into multicellular communities that engage in polarized migrations across the agarose surface and cooperate to divert their movements in response to external signals. These cooperative movements are flagellum-mediated, since they do not occur in trypanin knockdown parasites that lack normal flagellum motility. We term this behavior social motility based on features shared with social motility and other types of surface-induced social behavior in bacteria. Social motility represents a novel and unexpected aspect of trypanosome biology and offers new paradigms for considering host-parasite interactions. PMID:20126443

  6. Assessing esophageal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Danielle

    2014-05-01

    Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common problem. Although most cases are attributable to benign disease processes, dysphagia is also a key symptom in several malignancies, making it an important symptom to evaluate. The differential diagnosis of dysphagia requires an understanding of deglutition, in particular the oropharyngeal versus esophageal stages. Stroke is the leading cause of oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is common in older adults and frequently presents as part of a broader complex of clinical manifestations. In esophageal dysphagia, difficulty swallowing is often the main complaint and is caused by localized neuromuscular disorders or obstructive lesions.

  7. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Wen; Du, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow's relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  8. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow’s relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:27499977

  9. [Association between acid reflux and esophageal dysmotility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhi-hui; Feng, Li; Wen, Mao-yao; Liu, Jian-rong; Yang, Li

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the association between esophageal motility and acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 94 patients with typical reflux symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation and chest pain, whose score (Sc) of reflux diagnostic questionnaire (RDQ) was greater than or equal to 12 were enrolled in the study. Each participant was evaluated by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, high resolution manometry (HRM) of esophagus and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. The participants were divided into groups of reflux esophagitis (RE) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) on the basis of endoscopy findings. The 24 h esophageal pH monitoring categorized participants into physiologic reflux (pH) and pathologic reflux (pH+). The characteristics of esophageal motility and acid reflux were compared between the two groups of participants. Lower but non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in pressure of lower esophageal sphincter (LESP), length of lower esophageal sphincter (LESL), esophageal contraction amplitude (CA), distal contractile integral (DCI) and effective peristalsis proportion (EPP) in the participants in the RE group compared with those in the NERD group. Participants in the RE group had significantly higher prevalence of reduced LESP (63.0% vs. 31.7%, P < 0.01) and hiatus hernia (HH) (37.0% vs. 14.3%, P < 0.05) than those in the NERD group, pH+ was more prevalent in the RE group than in the NERD group (63.0% vs. 17.5%, P < 0.01). Indicators of 24 h esophageal pH monitoring were significantly higher in participants in the RE group compared with those in the NERD group (P < 0.05). Participants with pH+ had significantly lower LESP, CA and higher HH and prevalence of reduced LESP compared with those with pH (P < 0.05). LESL, DCI and EPP were lower in those with pH+ compared with those with pH-, but without statistical significance (P > 0.05). RE is closely associated with acid reflux and hiatus hernia. Esophageal

  10. A Cyanobacterium Capable of Swimming Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterbury, John B.; Willey, Joanne M.; Franks, Diana G.; Valois, Frederica W.; Watson, Stanley W.

    1985-10-01

    A novel cyanobacterium capable of swimming motility wass isolated in pure culture from several locations in the Atlantic Ocean. It is a small unicellular form, assignable to the genus Synechococcus, that is capable of swimming through liquids at speeds of 25 micrometers per second. Light microscopy revealed that the motile cells display many features characteristic of bacterial flagellar motility. However, electron microscopy failed to reveal flagella and shearing did not arrest motility, indicating that the cyanobacterium may be propelled by a novel mechanism.

  11. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  12. Postoperative esophageal leak management with the Polyflex esophageal stent.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Richard K; Ascioti, Anthony J; Wozniak, Thomas C

    2007-02-01

    Leak after esophageal anastomosis or perforation repair prolongs hospitalization, prevents oral hydration and nutrition, and can produce localized infection or sepsis. This investigation reviews our experience treating postoperative esophageal leaks with the Polyflex esophageal stent (Boston Scientific, Natick, Mass). Over a 30-month period, patients with a postoperative esophageal leak were treated with the Polyflex stent for leak occlusion. Leak occlusion was confirmed by means of esophagraphy. Patients were followed until their stent was removed and their esophageal leak had resolved. Twenty-one patients had 27 stents placed for leak occlusion after esophagectomy (n = 5), esophageal perforation (n = 5), surgical (n = 4) or endoscopic (n = 2) antireflux procedure, and esophageal diverticulectomy (n = 3) or myotomy (n = 2). The mean interval between surgical intervention and stent placement was 12 +/- 8 days (range, 3-31 days). Occlusion of the leak occurred in 20 patients. One patient experienced a dehiscence of the surgical esophageal perforation repair requiring esophageal diversion. Stent migration requiring repositioning (n = 3) or replacement (n = 4) occurred in 5 (24%) patients. Twenty (95%) stents were removed without residual leak (mean, 51 +/- 43 days; range, 15-175 days). One patient had a stricture after stent removal that required endoscopic dilatation. One patient in this series died. The Polyflex esophageal stent is an effective method for occluding a postoperative esophageal leak. It rapidly eliminates contamination of the mediastinum, pleura, and peritoneum; allows oral hydration and nutrition; and is easily removable. These stents also offer an appealing alternative to traditional esophageal diversion and subsequent reconstruction in patients with a persistent esophageal leak.

  13. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-01-16

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  14. The relationship between gastrointestinal motility and gastric dilatation-volvulus in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, Krista M; Nelson, Laura L

    2014-09-01

    Gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) is a devastating disease that most commonly affects large and giant-breed dogs. Though a number of risk factors have been associated with the development of GDV, the etiology of GDV remains unclear. Abnormal gastric motility patterns and delayed gastric emptying have been previously described in dogs following GDV. Work evaluating the effects of gastropexy procedures and changes to gastric motility after experimental GDV has not found the same changes as those found in dogs with naturally occurring GDV. Although the role of abnormal gastric motility in dogs with GDV will need to be clarified with additional research, such study is likely to be facilitated by improved access to and development of noninvasive measurement techniques for the evaluation of gastric emptying and other motility parameters. In particular, the availability of Food and Drug Administration-approved wireless motility devices for the evaluation of gastrointestinal motility is particularly promising in the study of GDV and other functional gastrointestinal diseases of large and giant-breed dogs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Role of the lower esophageal sphincter on esophageal acid exposure - a review of over 2000 patients.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Kazuto; Hoshino, Masato; Sundaram, Abhishek; Yano, Fumiaki; Mittal, Sumeet K

    2012-01-01

    Three lower esophageal sphincter (LES) characteristics associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are, LES pressure = 6 mmHg, abdominal length (AL) <1 cm and overall length (OL) <2 cm. The objective of this study was to validate this relationship and evaluate the extent of impact various LES characteristics have on the degree of distal esophageal acid exposure. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database identified patients who underwent esophageal manometry and pH studies at Creighton University Medical Center between 1984 and 2008. Patients with esophageal body dysmotility, prior foregut surgery, missing data, no documented symptoms or no pH study, were excluded. Study subjects were categorized as follows: (1) normal LES (N-LES): patients with LES pressure of 6-26 mmHg, AL = 1.0 cm and OL = 2 cm; (2) incompetent LES (Inc-LES): patients with LES pressure <6.0 mmHg orAL <1 cm or OL <2 cm; and (3) hypertensive LES (HTN-LES): patients with LES pressure >26.0 mmHg with AL = 1 cm and OL = 2 cm. The DeMeester score was used to compare differences in acid exposure between different groups. Two thousand and twenty patients satisfied study criteria. Distal esophageal acid exposure as reflected by the DeMeester score in patients with Inc-LES (median=20.05) was significantly higher than in patients with an N-LES (median=9.5), which in turn was significantly higher than in patients with an HTN-LES. Increasing LES pressure and AL provided protection against acid exposure in a graded fashion. Increasing number of inadequate LES characteristics were associated with an increase both in the percentage of patients with abnormal DeMeester score and the degree of acid exposure. LES pressure (=6 mmHg) and AL (<1 cm) are associated with increased lower esophageal acid exposure, and need to be addressed for definitive management of GERD.

  16. Long telomere length predicts poor clinical outcome in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yanyan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Xinru; Ren, Xiaojuan; Wang, Meichen; Tian, Sijia; Hou, Peng; Shi, Bingyin; Yang, Qi

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal telomere length is widely reported in various human cancers, and it is considered to be an important hallmark of cancer. However, there is remarkably little consensus on the value of telomere length in the prognostic evaluation of esophageal cancers. Here, we attempted to determine the association of variable telomere length with clinical outcome of esophageal cancer patients. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we examined relative telomere lengths (RTL) in a cohort of esophageal cancer and normal esophageal tissues, and statistically investigated the association between RTL and clinical outcomes of esophageal cancer patients. The majority of esophageal cancers in this study had longer RTLs as compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues. Enhanced tumor RTL was associated with smoking habit, poor differentiation, advanced tumor stage, lymph node metastasis and cancer related death. In particular, a close relationship between longer RTL and poor survival was fully demonstrated by using cox regression and Kaplan-Maier survival curves. We found frequent telomere elongation in esophageal cancer tissues, and demonstrated longer RTL may be an independent poor prognostic factor for esophageal cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Measuring Borrelia burgdorferi Motility and Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Li, Chunhao

    2018-01-01

    Swimming plate, cell motion tracking, and capillary tube assays are very useful tools to quantitatively measure bacterial motility and chemotaxis. These methods were modified and applied to study Borrelia burgdorferi motility and chemotaxis. By using these methods, numerous motility and chemotaxis mutants have been characterized and several chemoattractants were identified. With the assistance of these tools, the role of motility and chemotaxis in the pathogenicity of B. burgdorferi has been established. In addition, these tools also facilitate the study of motility and chemotaxis in other spirochetes.

  18. Progression of diffuse esophageal spasm to achalasia: incidence and predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Fontes, L H S; Herbella, F A M; Rodriguez, T N; Trivino, T; Farah, J F M

    2013-07-01

    The progression of certain primary esophageal motor disorders to achalasia has been documented; however, the true incidence of this decay is still elusive. This study aims to evaluate: (i) the incidence of the progression of diffuse esophageal spasm to achalasia, and (ii) predictive factors to this progression. Thirty-five patients (mean age 53 years, 80% females) with a manometric picture of diffuse esophageal spasm were followed for at least 1 year. Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease confirmed by pH monitoring or systemic diseases that may affect esophageal motility were excluded. Esophageal manometry was repeated in all patients. Five (14%) of the patients progressed to achalasia at a mean follow-up of 2.1 (range 1-4) years. Demographic characteristics were not predictive of transition to achalasia, while dysphagia (P= 0.005) as the main symptom and the wave amplitude of simultaneous waves less than 50 mmHg (P= 0.003) were statistically significant. In conclusion, the transition of diffuse esophageal spasm to achalasia is not frequent at a 2-year follow-up. Dysphagia and simultaneous waves with low amplitude are predictive factors for this degeneration. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  19. The prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease and esophageal dysmotility in Chinese patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Hobson, Anthony Robert; Shang, Zhan Min; Pei, Yan Xiang; Gao, Yan; Wang, Jian Xin; Huang, Wan Nong

    2015-02-19

    The cause of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains unknown, yet gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is highly prevalent in this population. GERD prevalence was studied, and esophageal function tests (EFT) were assessed in Chinese IPF patients. We prospectively studied 69 IPF patients who undertook both stationary High Resolution esophageal Manometry/Impedance (HRiM) and 24-hour esophageal Multi-Channel Intraluminal Impedance with pH Recordings (MII/pH). Patients were divided into GERD+ and GERD- groups according to pH results. Controls were HRiM treated healthy volunteers, and patients without IPF received HRiM and MII/pH diagnosed with GERD. 69 IPF patients, 62 healthy volunteers, and 88 IPF negative GERD patients were selected. GERD prevalence in IPF was 43/69 (62.3%), and 58.1% of patients presented with at least one typical symptom. Symptoms had a sensitivity of 58.1%, a specificity of 61.6%, a positive predictive value of 71.4% and a negative predictive of 47.1%. Compared with healthy volunteers, IPF patients had significantly decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP), upper esophageal sphincter pressure (UESP) and complete bolus transit rate (CBTR). By contrast, IPF patients had increased total bolus transit time and prevalence of weak peristalsis. MII/pH showed that one third of IPF patients had abnormal distal and proximal reflux, especially non-acid reflux. Compared with GERD patients without IPF, GERD patients with IPF had significantly decreased CBTR and UESP with increased bolus exposure time. GERD prevalence in IPF was high, but symptoms alone were an unreliable predictor of reflux. IPF patients had lower LESP and UESP, impaired esophageal peristalsis and bolus clearance function with more proximal reflux events.

  20. A Microbial Drugstore for Motility.

    PubMed

    Cryan, John F; Clarke, Gerard; Dinan, Timothy G; Schellekens, Harriet

    2018-06-13

    While there is growing appreciation that the microbiome regulates gut-brain signaling, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Bhattarai et al. (2018) identify bacteria-derived tryptamine as a ligand for the gut-epithelium-expressed GPCR 5-HT4 receptor, thereby functioning as a regulator of gastrointestinal motility. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Self-organized cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xinxin; Doubrovinski, Konstantin

    2011-03-01

    Cell migration plays a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena, such as morphogenesis, chemotaxis, and wound healing. Cell locomotion relies on the cytoskeleton, a meshwork of filamentous proteins, intrinsically out of thermodynamic equilibrium and cross-linked by molecular motors, proteins that turn chemical energy into mechanical work. In the course of locomotion, cells remain polarized, i.e. they retain a single direction of motion in the absence of external cues. Traditionally, polarization has been attributed to intracellular signaling. However, recent experiments show that polarization may be a consequence of self-organized cytoskeletal dynamics. Our aim is to elucidate the mechanisms by which persistent unidirectional locomotion may arise through simple mechanical interactions of the cytoskeletal proteins. To this end, we develop a simple physical description of cytoskeletal dynamics. We find that the proposed description accounts for a range of phenomena associated with cell motility, including spontaneous polarization, persistent unidirectional motion, and the co-existence of motile and non-motile states.

  2. Reproducibility patterns of multiple rapid swallows during high resolution esophageal manometry provide insights into esophageal pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Price, L H; Li, Y; Patel, A; Gyawali, C Prakash

    2014-05-01

    Multiple rapid swallows (MRS) during esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM) assess esophageal neuromuscular integrity by evaluating postdeglutitive inhibition and rebound contraction, but most reports performed only a single MRS sequence. We assessed patterns of MRS reproducibility during clinical HRM in comparison to a normal cohort. Consecutive clinical HRM studies were included if two separate MRS sequences (four to six rapid swallows ≤4 s apart) were successfully performed. Chicago Classification diagnoses were identified; contraction wave abnormalities were additionally recorded. MRS-induced inhibition (contraction ≤3 cm during inhibition phase) and rebound contraction was assessed, and findings compared to 18 controls (28.0 ± 0.7 year, 50.0% female). Reproducibility consisted of similar inhibition and contraction responses with both sequences; discordance was segregated into inhibition and contraction phases. Multiple rapid swallows were successfully performed in 89.3% patients and all controls; 225 subjects (56.2 ± 0.9 year, 62.7% female) met study inclusion criteria. Multiple rapid swallows were reproducible in 76.9% patients and 94.4% controls (inhibition phase: 88.0% vs 94.4%, contraction phase 86.7% vs 100%, respectively, p = ns). A gradient of reproducibility was noted, highest in well-developed motor disorders (achalasia spectrum, hypermotility disorders, and aperistalsis, 91.7-100%, p = ns compared to controls); and lower in lesser motor disorders (contraction wave abnormalities, esophageal body hypomotility) or normal studies (62.2-70.8%, p < 0.0001 compared to well-developed motor disorders). Inhibition phase was most discordant in contraction wave abnormalities, while contraction phase was most discordant when studies were designated normal. Multiple rapid swallows are highly reproducible, especially in well-developed motor disorders, and complement the standard wet swallow manometry protocol. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Targeted therapy in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Ma, Jiaojiao; Han, Yu; Liu, Jinqiang; Zhou, Wei; Hong, Liu; Fan, Daiming

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are diagnosed with esophageal cancer at an advanced stages, and only a small group of them can benefit from the traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. So far, multiple monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed, alone or in combination with traditional therapy, to improve the prognosis of patients with advanced esophageal cancer. This review summarizes the recent advances of targeted therapies against EGFR, HER2, VEGFR and c-MET in esophageal cancer. More clinical trials should be performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of various targeted therapy regimens. Future basic research should focus on investigating the molecular mechanisms of therapeutic targets in esophageal cancer.

  4. Fruit Consumption Reduces the Risk of Esophageal Cancer in Yanting, People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingkun; Zhao, Lin; Li, Jun; Ren, Jun

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of fruit and family history to esophageal cancer, among residents with abnormal esophagus discovered in screening. The study was a frequency-matched case-control design in groups of normal esophagus, abnormal esophagus but not carcinoma, and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Odds ratio (OR) was estimated by unconditional logistic regression. Fruit intake (OR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.06-0.56) and positive family history of esophageal cancer (OR = 3.87, 95% CI = 1.41-10.63) were associated with esophageal cancer compared to individuals with abnormal conditions of the esophagus. In individuals who consumed fruits at least once per week, the OR for family cancer history is reduced to a nonsignificant level (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.07-15.91). In the individuals with abnormal esophagus at screening, fruit intake was possibly protective against esophageal cancer, even in the ones with positive family history. Local public health strategies should focus on the improvement in fruit intake. © 2014 APJPH.

  5. Esophageal motor disease and reflux patterns in patients with advanced pulmonary disease undergoing lung transplant evaluation.

    PubMed

    Seccombe, J; Mirza, F; Hachem, R; Gyawali, C P

    2013-08-01

    Advanced pulmonary disorders are linked to esophageal hypomotility and reflux disease. However, characterization of esophageal function using high resolution manometry (HRM) and ambulatory pH monitoring, segregation by pulmonary pathology, and comparison to traditional reflux disease are all limited in the literature. Over a 4 year period, 73 patients (55.2 ± 1.3 years, 44F) were identified who underwent esophageal function testing as part of lung transplant evaluation for advanced pulmonary disease (interstitial lung disease, ILD = 47, obstructive lung disease, OLD = 24, other = 2). Proportions of patients with motor dysfunction (≥ 80% failed sequences = severe hypomotility) and/or abnormal reflux parameters (acid exposure time, AET ≥ 4%) were determined, and compared to a cohort of 1081 patients (48.4 ± 0.4 years, 613F) referred for esophageal function testing prior to antireflux surgery (ARS). The proportion of esophageal body hypomotility was significantly higher within advanced pulmonary disease categories (35.6%), particularly ILD (44.7%), compared to ARS patients (12.1%, P < 0.0001). Abnormal AET was noted in 56.5%, and was similar between ILD and OLD, but less frequent than in the ARS group (P = 0.04). Post-transplant chronic rejection trended towards association with pretransplant elevated AET in OLD (P = 0.08) but not ILD. Mortality was not predicted by esophageal motor pattern or reflux evidence. Interstitial lung disease has a highly significant association with esophageal body hypomotility. Consequently, prevalence of abnormal esophageal acid exposure is high, but implications for post lung transplant chronic rejection remain unclear. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Samuel T; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal placentation poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge for all providers caring for pregnant women. As one of the leading causes of postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation involves the attachment of placental villi directly to the myometrium with potentially deeper invasion into the uterine wall or surrounding organs. Surgical procedures that disrupt the integrity of uterus, including cesarean section, dilatation and curettage, and myomectomy, have been implicated as key risk factors for placenta accreta. The diagnosis is typically made by gray-scale ultrasound and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, which may better delineate the extent of placental invasion. It is critical to make the diagnosis before delivery because preoperative planning can significantly decrease blood loss and avoid substantial morbidity associated with placenta accreta. Aggressive management of hemorrhage through the use of uterotonics, fluid resuscitation, blood products, planned hysterectomy, and surgical hemostatic agents can be life-saving for these patients. Conservative management, including the use of uterine and placental preservation and subsequent methotrexate therapy or pelvic artery embolization, may be considered when a focal accreta is suspected; however, surgical management remains the current standard of care.

  7. Sponge Sampling with Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization as a Screening Tool for the Early Detection of Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Haisley, Kelly R; Dolan, James P; Olson, Susan B; Toledo-Valdovinos, Sergio A; Hart, Kyle D; Bakis, Gene; Enestvedt, Brintha K; Hunter, John G

    2017-02-01

    Sponge cytology is a novel screening tool for esophageal cancer but has been unable to be validated for widespread use. Our aim was to apply fluorescent in situ hybridization to sponge cytology samples in order to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this modality in screening for esophageal cancer. At a single, multidisciplinary, NCI-designated cancer center, patients completed sponge cytology sampling prior to upper endoscopy. Samples were analyzed by p53 fluorescent in situ hybridization, and results were compared to the endoscopic diagnosis. Fifty patients were enrolled (96 % Caucasian, 68 % male, median age of 67). All patients successfully swallowed the capsule. No complications (string breakage, bleeding, mucosal injury) occurred. Endoscopy revealed that 38 % had normal esophageal mucosa and 62 % had an esophageal mucosal abnormality. In total, six samples demonstrated p53 loss (94 % specificity for any abnormality). The sensitivity of the p53 fluorescent in situ hybridization probe was13.3 % for any abnormality, 10 % for intestinal metaplasia, and 0 % for dysplasia or esophageal cancer. Esophageal sponge cytology is a promising, safe, and tolerable method for collecting esophageal cell samples. However, our data suggest that p53 fluorescent in situ hybridization does not improve the sensitivity for detecting cancer in these samples.

  8. Reoperations for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Omura, Nobuo; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yano, Fumiaki; Tsuboi, Kazuto; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2012-11-01

    To define the factors predisposing to recurrence and evaluate the results of reoperations for achalasia. We reviewed the medical records of ten patients (4 men and 6 women; mean age, 51.5 ± 11.0 years), who underwent reoperations for achalasia between August 1994 and August 2010. The primary surgical procedures were Heller-Dor (HD) cardioplasty in nine patients and Heller myotomy in one patient. The factors contributing to failure of the primary operation included inadequate myotomy (n = 2), recurrent adhesion after myotomy (n = 2), reflux esophagitis (n = 2), difficulty in passage caused by tortuosity of the esophagus (n = 2), difficulty in passage through the thoracic esophagus (n = 1), and severe chest pain (n = 1). The reoperations included repeated HD procedures (n = 4), repair of an esophageal hiatal hernia (n = 2), thoracic esophageal myotomy (n = 2), straightening of the lower esophagus with gastropexy (n = 1), and subtotal esophagectomy (n = 1). The success rate of the reoperations for resolving symptoms was 90 % (9 patients). Selecting surgical procedures based on the causes and conditions of recurrence led to symptomatic improvement and acceptable outcomes.

  9. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome.

  10. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Megan E.; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms—visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  11. Treatment of esophageal achalasia in children: Today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Caldaro, Tamara; Familiari, Pietro; Romeo, Erminia Francesca; Gigante, Giovanni; Marchese, Michele; Contini, Anna Chiara Iolanda; Federici di Abriola, Giovanni; Cucchiara, Salvatore; De Angelis, Paola; Torroni, Filippo; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Costamagna, Guido

    2015-05-01

    Esophageal achalasia (EA) is a rare esophageal motility disorder in children. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) represents the treatment of choice in young patients. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is becoming an alternative to LHM. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness, safety, and outcomes of POEM vs LHM in treatment of children with EA. Data of pediatric patients with EA, who underwent LHM and POEM from February 2009 to December 2013 in two centers, were collected. Eighteen patients (9 male, mean age: 11.6 years; range: 2-17 years) were included. Nine patients (6 male, mean age: 10.7 years; range: 2-16 years) underwent LHM, and the other 9 (3 males, mean age: 12.2 years; range: 6-17 years) underwent POEM procedure. Mean operation time was shorter in POEM group compared with LHM group (62/149 minutes). Myotomy was longer in POEM group than in LHM group (11/7 cm). One major complication occurred after LHM (esophageal perforation). No clinical and manometric differences were observed between LHM and POEM in follow-up. The incidence of iatrogenic gastroesophageal reflux disease was low (1 patient in both groups). Results of a midterm follow-up show that LHM and POEM are safe and effective treatments also in children. Besides, POEM is a mini-invasive technique with an inferior execution timing compared to LHM. A skilled endoscopic team is mandatory to perform this procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Intracellular Motility Based on Optical Flow Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of cell mobility is a key issue for abnormality identification and classification in cell biology research. However, since cell deformation induced by various biological processes is random and cell protrusion is irregular, it is difficult to measure cell morphology and motility in microscopic images. To address this dilemma, we propose an improved variation optical flow model for quantitative analysis of intracellular motility, which not only extracts intracellular motion fields effectively but also deals with optical flow computation problem at the border by taking advantages of the formulation based on L1 and L2 norm, respectively. In the energy functional of our proposed optical flow model, the data term is in the form of L2 norm; the smoothness of the data changes with regional features through an adaptive parameter, using L1 norm near the edge of the cell and L2 norm away from the edge. We further extract histograms of oriented optical flow (HOOF) after optical flow field of intracellular motion is computed. Then distances of different HOOFs are calculated as the intracellular motion features to grade the intracellular motion. Experimental results show that the features extracted from HOOFs provide new insights into the relationship between the cell motility and the special pathological conditions. PMID:29065574

  13. Deletion of murine choline dehydrogenase results in diminished sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy R.; Craciunescu, Corneliu N.; Guo, Zhong; Teng, Ya-Wen; Thresher, Randy J.; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    Choline dehydrogenase (CHDH) catalyzes the conversion of choline to betaine, an important methyl donor and organic osmolyte. We have previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human CHDH gene that, when present, seem to alter the activity of the CHDH enzyme. These SNPs occur frequently in humans. We created a Chdh−/− mouse to determine the functional effects of mutations that result in decreased CHDH activity. Chdh deletion did not affect fetal viability or alter growth or survival of these mice. Only one of eleven Chdh−/− males was able to reproduce. Loss of CHDH activity resulted in decreased testicular betaine and increased choline and PCho concentrations. Chdh+/+ and Chdh−/− mice produced comparable amounts of sperm; the impaired fertility was due to diminished sperm motility in the Chdh−/− males. Transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormal mitochondrial morphology in Chdh−/− sperm. ATP content, total mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity and inner mitochondrial membrane polarization were all significantly reduced in sperm from Chdh−/− animals. Mitochondrial changes were also detected in liver, kidney, heart, and testis tissues. We suggest that men who have SNPs in CHDH that decrease the activity of the CHDH enzyme could have decreased sperm motility and fertility.—Johnson, A. R., Craciunescu, C. N., Guo, Z., Teng, Y.-W., Thresher, R. J., Blusztajn, J. K., Zeisel, S. H. Deletion of murine choline dehydrogenase results in diminished sperm motility. PMID:20371614

  14. Evaluation of Esophageal Functions by Manometry in Iron Deficiency Anemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Kubilay, Pinar; Doganay, Beyza; Bektas, Mehmet

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether any esophageal motor dysfunction exists in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). The study included 39 patients (34 women, mean age: 44.17 ± 14.21 years) who met WHO diagnostic criteria for IDA. An additional 30 functional dyspepsia patients were also included as a control group. Esophageal motility testing was performed; esophagus contraction amplitude, peak velocity, contraction time, lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure, LES relaxation, and LES relaxation duration were assessed. A majority (76.4%) of patients had at least one IDA symptom, such as reflux, chest pain, or dysphagia. Manometric findings in IDA patients vs. controls were as follows: mean LES resting pressure (mm Hg): 25.41 ± 11.67 vs. 19.96 ± 6.58 (P = 0.025); mean esophageal contraction amplitude (mm Hg): 61.61 ± 24.21 vs. 63.23 ± 18.86 (P = 0.764); mean LES relaxation duration (s, x ± SD): 5.33 ± 1.61 vs. 8.75 ± 1.86 (P = 0.000); mean LES relaxation (%): 93.30 ± 9.88 vs. 95.53 ± 5.81 (P = 0.278); mean peak velocity (cm/s): 12.67 ± 37.95 vs. 3.50 ± 1.63 (P = 0.191). Esophageal dysmotility was found in 11 (28.2%) IDA patients. Non-specific esophageal motor disorder was found in three patients, hypomotility of the esophagus was found in three patients, achalasia was found in two patients, hypertensive LES was found in two patients, and hypotensive LES was found in one patient. LES resting pressure was higher and LES relaxation duration was shorter in patients with IDA. Esophageal dysmotility was present in 28.2% of the patients with IDA A little more than half of patients had dysphagia symptoms. IDA may contribute to esophageal motility dysfunction and esophageal symptoms.

  15. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... decrease the risk of dying from cancer. Scientists study screening tests to find those with the fewest risks and ... stage . There is no standard or routine screening test for esophageal cancer. Screening for esophageal cancer is under study with screening clinical trials taking place in many ...

  16. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  17. Dysphagia among adult patients who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth.

    PubMed

    Huynh Trudeau, Valérie; Maynard, Stéphanie; Terzic, Tatjana; Soucy, Geneviève; Bouin, Mickeal

    2015-03-01

    Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and⁄or anatomical anomalies. To determine the motor and anatomical causes of dysphagia. A total of 41 adults, followed at the Esophageal Atresia Clinic at Hôpital Saint-Luc (Montreal, Quebec), were approached to particpate in the present prospective study. Evaluation was completed using upper endoscopy, manometry and barium swallow for the participants who consented. The medical charts of respondents were systematically reviewed from the neonatal period to 18 years of age to assess medical and surgical history. All 41 patients followed at the clinic consented and were included in the study. Dysphagia was present in 73% of patients. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in 32 patients: hiatal hernia was present in 62% (n=20); esophageal diverticulum in 13% (n=4); macroscopic Barrett esophagus in 31% (n=10); and esophagitis in 19% (n=6). Histological esophagitis was present in 20% and intestinal metaplasia in 10%. There were no cases of dysplagia or adenocarcinoma. Esophageal manometry was performed on 56% of the patients (n=23). Manometry revealed hypomotility in 100% of patients and included an insufficient number of peristaltic waves in 96%, nonpropagating peristalsis in 78% and low-wave amplitude in 95%. Complete aperistalsis was present in 78%. The lower esophageal sphincter was abnormal in 12 (52%) patients, with incomplete relaxation the most common anomaly. Of the 41 patients, 29 (71%) consented to a barium swallow, which was abnormal in 13 (45%). The anomalies found were short esophageal dilation in 28%, delay in esophageal emptying in 14%, diverticula in 14% and stenosis in 7

  18. Dysphagia among adult patients who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Trudeau, Valérie; Maynard, Stéphanie; Terzic, Tatjana; Soucy, Geneviève; Bouin, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies. OBJECTIVE: To determine the motor and anatomical causes of dysphagia. METHODS: A total of 41 adults, followed at the Esophageal Atresia Clinic at Hôpital Saint-Luc (Montreal, Quebec), were approached to particpate in the present prospective study. Evaluation was completed using upper endoscopy, manometry and barium swallow for the participants who consented. The medical charts of respondents were systematically reviewed from the neonatal period to 18 years of age to assess medical and surgical history. RESULTS: All 41 patients followed at the clinic consented and were included in the study. Dysphagia was present in 73% of patients. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in 32 patients: hiatal hernia was present in 62% (n=20); esophageal diverticulum in 13% (n=4); macroscopic Barrett esophagus in 31% (n=10); and esophagitis in 19% (n=6). Histological esophagitis was present in 20% and intestinal metaplasia in 10%. There were no cases of dysplagia or adenocarcinoma. Esophageal manometry was performed on 56% of the patients (n=23). Manometry revealed hypomotility in 100% of patients and included an insufficient number of peristaltic waves in 96%, non-propagating peristalsis in 78% and low-wave amplitude in 95%. Complete aperistalsis was present in 78%. The lower esophageal sphincter was abnormal in 12 (52%) patients, with incomplete relaxation the most common anomaly. Of the 41 patients, 29 (71%) consented to a barium swallow, which was abnormal in 13 (45%). The anomalies found were short esophageal dilation in 28%, delay in esophageal emptying in 14

  19. Staging resection of multiple primary esophageal cancer by endoscopic submucosal dissection and esophagectomy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yufeng; Wu, Yimin; Chai, Ying

    2018-05-01

    Multiple primary esophageal cancer pose great risks to patients and are always challenging to resect surgically. In order to reduce the risk of postoperative complication and meet the needs of minimally invasive and precision medicine, new treatment plans have been always developed for patients with multiple primary esophageal cancer. A 75-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for aggravated dysphagia. No significant abnormalities were identified on physical examination. Endoscopic examination detected 3 masses in the esophagus and biopsy confirmed multiple primary esophageal cancer. The patient received a new staging treatment procedure firstly and an innovative single-position, minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy in our hospital. This patient discharged one week after the surgery and enjoyed a good health during our follow up for 30 month. We believe our procedure provides a beneficial new alternative approach for patients with multiple primary esophageal cancer.

  20. Impact of thoracic surgery on esophageal motor function—Evaluation by high resolution manometry

    PubMed Central

    Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter; Riedel, Sandra; Zardo, Patrick; Hachenberg, Thomas; Schreiber, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Background Alteration of esophageal function is a potential risk factor for postoperative complications in thoracic surgery. This prospective study investigates esophageal motility and function during and after thoracic procedures via high resolution manometry (HRM) and impedance technology with spatiotemporal representation of pressure data. Methods Twelve consecutive patients eligible for elective thoracic surgery underwent preoperative and postoperative (48 hours and 7 days) esophageal HRM. Swallowing acts were carried out with 5 mL of water, 10 mL of water and 1 cm3 bread in physiological posture to evaluate distal contraction integral (DCI). Length and location of contractile integrity breaks were measured by investigators blinded to the form of surgical intervention. The impact of surgical procedures on esophageal motility was quantified according to current Chicago Classification (CC) criteria. Pre-, intra- and postoperative 24-hour multi-channel impedance pH–metry (MII-pH) was performed to further analyze gastroesophageal reflux patterns. Results All patients were investigated 48 hours prior to and 7 days after thoracic procedures, with a total of n=675 swallowing acts being included in our study. Increased motility patterns of the tubular esophagus occurred temporally 48 hours postoperatively. DCI 48 hours after surgery increased significantly (5 mL, P=0.049; solid, P=0.014) and returned to baseline values after seven days (5 mL, P=0.039; solid, P=0.039). Break length was significantly reduced 48 hours postoperatively, especially in the proximal esophageal segment (transition zone). Follow-up measurements after another week were comparable to preoperative baseline findings. The perioperative MII-pH measurement showed numerous artifacts caused by intubation and ventilation during surgery also with increasing short and frequent acidic reflux episodes. Conclusions Thoracic procedures cause a transient modulation of esophageal peristalsis with postoperative

  1. Impact of thoracic surgery on esophageal motor function-Evaluation by high resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Wäsche, Anja; Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter; Riedel, Sandra; Zardo, Patrick; Hachenberg, Thomas; Schreiber, Jens

    2017-06-01

    Alteration of esophageal function is a potential risk factor for postoperative complications in thoracic surgery. This prospective study investigates esophageal motility and function during and after thoracic procedures via high resolution manometry (HRM) and impedance technology with spatiotemporal representation of pressure data. Twelve consecutive patients eligible for elective thoracic surgery underwent preoperative and postoperative (48 hours and 7 days) esophageal HRM. Swallowing acts were carried out with 5 mL of water, 10 mL of water and 1 cm 3 bread in physiological posture to evaluate distal contraction integral (DCI). Length and location of contractile integrity breaks were measured by investigators blinded to the form of surgical intervention. The impact of surgical procedures on esophageal motility was quantified according to current Chicago Classification (CC) criteria. Pre-, intra- and postoperative 24-hour multi-channel impedance pH-metry (MII-pH) was performed to further analyze gastroesophageal reflux patterns. All patients were investigated 48 hours prior to and 7 days after thoracic procedures, with a total of n=675 swallowing acts being included in our study. Increased motility patterns of the tubular esophagus occurred temporally 48 hours postoperatively. DCI 48 hours after surgery increased significantly (5 mL, P=0.049; solid, P=0.014) and returned to baseline values after seven days (5 mL, P=0.039; solid, P=0.039). Break length was significantly reduced 48 hours postoperatively, especially in the proximal esophageal segment (transition zone). Follow-up measurements after another week were comparable to preoperative baseline findings. The perioperative MII-pH measurement showed numerous artifacts caused by intubation and ventilation during surgery also with increasing short and frequent acidic reflux episodes. Thoracic procedures cause a transient modulation of esophageal peristalsis with postoperative increased contractility of the tubular

  2. The spectrum of motor function abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Ang, D; Blondeau, K; Sifrim, D; Tack, J

    2009-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has traditionally been regarded as the most severe end of the spectrum of gastroesophageal reflux disease and is of great clinical importance in view of the association with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Studies have documented high levels of esophageal acid exposure in Barrett's esophagus. Various pathogenetic mechanisms underlie this phenomenon. These include abnormalities in esophageal peristalsis, defective lower esophageal sphincter pressures, gastric dysmotility and bile reflux. Whilst these factors provide evidence for an acquired cause of Barrett's esophagus, an underlying genetic predisposition cannot be ruled out. Although the past decade has brought about many new discoveries in the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus, it has also added further controversy to this complex disorder. A detailed analysis of the gastrointestinal motor abnormalities occurring in Barrett's esophagus follows, with a review of the currently available literature and an update on this condition that continues to be of interest to the gastroenterologist.

  3. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.

    1985-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99mmore » sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis.« less

  4. Esophageal diverticula and cancer.

    PubMed

    Herbella, F A M; Dubecz, A; Patti, M G

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal diverticula are rare. The association of cancer and diverticula has been described. Some authors adopt a conservative non-surgical approach in selected patients with diverticula whereas others treat the symptoms by diverticulopexy or myotomy only, leaving the diverticulum in situ. However, the risk of malignant degeneration should be may be taken in account if the diverticulum is not resected. The correct evaluation of the possible risk factors for malignancy may help in the decision making process. We performed a literature review of esophageal diverticula and cancer. The incidence of cancer in a diverticulum is 0.3-7, 1.8, and 0.6% for pharyngoesophageal, midesophageal, and epiphrenic diverticula, respectively. Symptoms may mimic those of the diverticulum or underlying motor disorder. Progressive dysphagia, unintentional weight loss, the presence of blood in the regurgitated material, regurgitation of peaces of the tumor, odynophagia, melena, hemathemesis, and hemoptysis are key symptoms. Risk factors for malignancy are old age, male gender, long-standing history, and larger diverticula. A carcinoma may develop in treated diverticula, even after resection. Outcomes are usually quoted as dismal because of a delayed diagnosis but several cases of superficial carcinoma have been described. The treatment follows the same principals as the therapy for esophageal cancer; however, diverticulectomy is enough in cases of superficial carcinomas. Patients must be carefully evaluated before therapy and a long-term follow-up is advisable. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  5. Longitudinal muscle of the esophagus: its role in esophageal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2013-07-01

    The muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. The function of the longitudinal muscle and its role in bolus propulsion are not clear. The goal of this review is to summarize what is known of the role of the longitudinal muscle in health, as well as in sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging reveal that, during peristalsis, the two muscle layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the contrary, during transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation, longitudinal muscle contracts independent of the circular muscle. Recent studies have provided novel insights into the role of the longitudinal muscle in LES relaxation and descending relaxation of the esophagus. In certain diseases (e.g. some motility disorders of the esophagus), there is discoordination between the two muscle layers, which likely plays an important role in the genesis of dysphagia and delayed esophageal emptying. There is close temporal correlation between prolonged contractions of the longitudinal muscles of the esophagus and esophageal 'angina-like' pain. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are reviewed. Longitudinal muscles of the esophagus play a key role in the physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Neuro-pharmacologic controls of circular and longitudinal muscle are different, which provides an opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies in the treatment of esophageal sensory and motor disorders.

  6. The role of the superior laryngeal nerve in esophageal reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Medda, B. K.; Jadcherla, S.; Shaker, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in the following esophageal reflexes: esophago-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex (EUCR), esophago-lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation reflex (ELIR), secondary peristalsis, pharyngeal swallowing, and belch. Cats (N = 43) were decerebrated and instrumented to record EMG of the cricopharyngeus, thyrohyoideus, geniohyoideus, and cricothyroideus; esophageal pressure; and motility of LES. Reflexes were activated by stimulation of the esophagus via slow balloon or rapid air distension at 1 to 16 cm distal to the UES. Slow balloon distension consistently activated EUCR and ELIR from all areas of the esophagus, but the distal esophagus was more sensitive than the proximal esophagus. Transection of SLN or proximal recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN) blocked EUCR and ELIR generated from the cervical esophagus. Distal RLN transection blocked EUCR from the distal cervical esophagus. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus except the most proximal few centimeters activated secondary peristalsis, and SLN transection had no effect on secondary peristalsis. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus inconsistently activated pharyngeal swallows, and SLN transection blocked generation of pharyngeal swallows from all levels of the esophagus. Slow distension of the esophagus inconsistently activated belching, but rapid air distension consistently activated belching from all areas of the esophagus. SLN transection did not block initiation of belch but blocked one aspect of belch, i.e., inhibition of cricopharyngeus EMG. Vagotomy blocked all aspects of belch generated from all areas of esophagus and blocked all responses of all reflexes not blocked by SLN or RLN transection. In conclusion, the SLN mediates all aspects of the pharyngeal swallow, no portion of the secondary peristalsis, and the EUCR and ELIR generated from the proximal esophagus. Considering that SLN is not

  7. Esophageal cancer in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Odera, Joab Otieno; Odera, Elizabeth; Githang’a, Jessie; Walong, Edwin Oloo; Li, Fang; Xiong, Zhaohui; Chen, Xiaoxin Luke

    2017-01-01

    Kenya belongs to a high incidence region known as Africa’s esophageal cancer (EC) corridor. It has one of the highest incidence rates of EC worldwide, but research on EC in Kenya has gone highly unnoticed. EC in Kenya is unique in its high percentage of young cases (< 30 years of age). In this review, we show the current status of EC in the country. We mainly focus on significant risk factors such as alcohol drinking, genetic factors, malnutrition and hot food/drink. Future directions in the study and prevention of EC in Kenya are also discussed. PMID:29082268

  8. Reconfigurable engineered motile semiconductor microparticles.

    PubMed

    Ohiri, Ugonna; Shields, C Wyatt; Han, Koohee; Tyler, Talmage; Velev, Orlin D; Jokerst, Nan

    2018-05-03

    Locally energized particles form the basis for emerging classes of active matter. The design of active particles has led to their controlled locomotion and assembly. The next generation of particles should demonstrate robust control over their active assembly, disassembly, and reconfiguration. Here we introduce a class of semiconductor microparticles that can be comprehensively designed (in size, shape, electric polarizability, and patterned coatings) using standard microfabrication tools. These custom silicon particles draw energy from external electric fields to actively propel, while interacting hydrodynamically, and sequentially assemble and disassemble on demand. We show that a number of electrokinetic effects, such as dielectrophoresis, induced charge electrophoresis, and diode propulsion, can selectively power the microparticle motions and interactions. The ability to achieve on-demand locomotion, tractable fluid flows, synchronized motility, and reversible assembly using engineered silicon microparticles may enable advanced applications that include remotely powered microsensors, artificial muscles, reconfigurable neural networks and computational systems.

  9. Effects of acotiamide on esophageal motor function and gastroesophageal reflux in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ishimura, Norihisa; Mori, Mami; Mikami, Hironobu; Shimura, Shino; Uno, Goichi; Aimi, Masahito; Oshima, Naoki; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2015-09-11

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been increasing worldwide, with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration the current mainstay therapy for affected individuals. However, PPI efficacy is insufficient especially for non-erosive reflux disease. Although it has been reported that prokinetic drugs improve GERD, their effects on esophageal function remain to be clearly investigated. In the present study, we evaluated the direct effects of acotiamide, a novel prokinetic agent for the treatment of functional dyspepsia, on esophageal motor function and gastroesophageal reflux. Ten adult healthy volunteers (average age 24 years, range 20-36 years; 7 males, 3 females) were enrolled. Esophageal body peristaltic contractions and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure with and without acotiamide administration were recorded using high resolution manometry using a cross-over protocol. Total and acidic reflux levels for 24 h and during the postprandial period were also recorded using a multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring system. Data were analyzed blind by one observer. Acotiamide at a standard dose of 300 mg/day did not significantly stimulate esophageal motor function. Although the frequency of swallows with weak contraction tended to decrease with acotiamide administration, the difference as compared to no administration was not statistically significant. In addition, the drug neither decreased total or postprandial gastroesophageal acid/non-acid reflux events nor accelerated esophageal clearance time. Acotiamide, a novel gastrointestinal motility modulator, at a standard dose did not significantly affect esophageal motor functions or gastroesophageal reflux in healthy adults. Additional investigations with GERD patients are necessary to elucidate its clinical significance. This study was registered on 1st August 2013 with the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) clinical trials registry, as number: UMIN

  10. Traction esophageal diverticulum: a rare cause of gastro-intestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ballehaninna, Umashankar K; Shaw, Jason P; Brichkov, Igor

    2012-12-01

    Esophageal diverticula are uncommon lesions that are usually classified according to their location (cervical, thoracic, or epiphrenic), or underlying pathogenesis (pulsion or traction), and their morphology (true or false).The majority of esophageal diverticula are acquired lesions that occur predominantly in elderly adults. Pulsion, or false, diverticula are the most commonly encountered type of esophageal diverticula noticed at the level of cricopharyngeus muscle, occur as a localized outpouchings that lacks a muscular coat, and as such their wall is formed entirely by mucosa and submucosa. True, or traction, esophageal diverticulum (TED) is seen in the middle one third of the thoracic esophagus in a peribronchial location, occurs secondary to mediastinal inflammatory lesions such as tuberculosis or histoplasmosis. The resultant desmoplastic reaction in the paraesophageal tissue causes full thickness pinching on the esophageal wall, producing a conical, broad-mouthed true diverticulum. They often project to the right side because subcarinal lymph nodes in this area are closely associated with the right anterior wall of the esophagus. TED usually presents with symptoms such as dysphagia, postural regurgitation, belching, retrosternal pain, heartburn, and epigastric pain. As in patients with pharyngoesophageal (Zenker's) diverticula, pulmonary symptoms are often present but underestimated in TED patients. These symptoms range from mild nocturnal cough to life-threatening massive aspiration. In this particular report we describe a rare case of TED presenting as a symptomatic upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnostic evaluation of TED includes chest X-ray, barium esophagogram and manometry. A significant proportion of lower esophageal diverticula are associated with motility disorders. Management of TED include treating the underlying cause sometimes a surgical resection of diverticulum along with esophageal myotomy is necessitated in symptomatic patients.

  11. Esophageal stenosis in a child presenting a de novo 7q terminal deletion.

    PubMed

    Zen, Paulo R G; Riegel, Mariluce; Rosa, Rafael F M; Pinto, Louise L C; Graziadio, Carla; Schwartz, Ida V D; Paskulin, Giorgio A

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first case of a child with a de novo 7q terminal deletion [46,XX,del(7)(q35 → qter)] presenting esophageal stenosis. This cytogenetic abnormality was confirmed by FISH, using subtelomeric probes, and by a whole-genome array-CGH assay. The child also had phenotypic features previously described in patients with a similar deletion, as growth retardation, microcephaly, coloboma of papilla, ptosis, hearing loss, urinary tract anomalies, partial agenesis of sacrum, hypotonia and neuropsychomotor delay. The odontoid hypoplasia identified, in similarity with the esophageal stenosis, represents an uncommon finding. This report is also the first clinical description of a patient with an abnormality involving the sonic hedgehog gene and an esophageal alteration. It is discussed the possibility of a specific association between them, according to some results observed in studies with animal models. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  13. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  14. Chicago Classification normative metrics in a healthy Indian cohort for a 16-channel water-perfused high-resolution esophageal manometry system.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, M; Jain, M; Bawane, P; Jayanthi, V

    2018-06-01

    High-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) interpretation by the Chicago Classification (CC) derives its normal values from western volunteers using solid-state catheters. There is no normative data for the 16-channel water-perfused HREM system commonly used in India. To determine normal values for a 16-channel water-perfused HREM catheter in supine posture using healthy volunteers and substitute these normal values (if different from CC values) in the CC v3.0 algorithm. After ethics approval and informed consent, 53 volunteers (31 men) with no gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms or medications affecting GI motility underwent HREM by standard protocol. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and manometry parameters analyzed using Trace 1.3.3 software were collected. The median, range, and 5, 10, 75, and 95 percentiles (where applicable) were obtained for all HREM metrics. Normal value percentiles were defined as 95th (integrated relaxation pressure [IRP]), 10th-100th (distal contractile integral [DCI]), and minimum (distal latency [DL]). The mean age was 30 years and the BMI was 24.2 kg m -2 . Compared to CC, our normal metrics were lower for IRP (13 mm Hg) and DCI (350-4500 mm Hg s cm). DCI >4500 and <70 (<5th percentile) were defined as hypercontractile and failed contraction, respectively. Abnormal DL (<4.5 s) and peristaltic break size (>5 cm) were similar to CC metrics. Applying these metrics, CC diagnoses changed in 15% (8/53) with downgrading of ineffective motility to fragmented peristalsis or normal, due to lower DCI cutoff used. This is the first report of normative data for the 16-channel water-perfused system in supine posture. It revealed lower IRP and DCI, necessitating modification of CC cutoffs for this system. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Esophageal tissue engineering: a new approach for esophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-12-21

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  16. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-22

    Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer AJCC v7

  17. Measuring Cell Free DNA During the Course of Treatment for Esophageal Cancer as a Marker of Response and Recurrence

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-09

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Neoplasms Malignancy Unspecified; Esophageal Neoplasms Malignant; Cancer of Esophagus; Cancer of the Esophagus; Esophageal Cancer; Esophagus Cancer; Neoplasm, Esophageal

  18. Validation of criteria for the definition of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations using high-resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Roman, S; Holloway, R; Keller, J; Herbella, F; Zerbib, F; Xiao, Y; Bernard, L; Bredenoord, A J; Bruley des Varannes, S; Chen, M; Fox, M; Kahrilas, P J; Mittal, R K; Penagini, R; Savarino, E; Sifrim, D; Wu, J; Decullier, E; Pandolfino, J E; Mion, F

    2017-02-01

    Criteria for transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are well-defined for Dentsleeve manometry. As high-resolution manometry (HRM) is now the gold standard to assess esophageal motility, our aim was to propose a consensus definition of TLESRs using HRM. Postprandial esophageal HRM combined with impedance was performed in 10 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations identification was performed by 17 experts using a Delphi process. Four investigators then characterized TLESR candidates that achieved 100% agreement (TLESR events) and those that achieved less than 25% agreement (non-events) after the third round. Logistic regression and decision tree analysis were used to define optimal diagnostic criteria. All diagnostic criteria were more frequently encountered in the 57 TLESR events than in the 52 non-events. Crural diaphragm (CD) inhibition and LES relaxation duration >10 seconds had the highest predictive value to identify TLESR. Based on decision tree analysis, reflux on impedance, esophageal shortening, common cavity, upper esophageal sphincter relaxation without swallow and secondary peristalsis were alternate diagnostic criteria. Using HRM, TLESR might be defined as LES relaxation occurring in absence of swallowing, lasting more than 10 seconds and associated with CD inhibition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Pharyngeal swallowing and oesophageal motility during a solid meal test: a prospective study in healthy volunteers and patients with major motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, Michael; Thwaites, Philip; Bütikofer, Simon; Heinrich, Henriette; Sauter, Matthias; Ulmer, Irina; Pohl, Daniel; Ang, Daphne; Eberli, Daniel; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Distler, Oliver; Fox, Mark; Misselwitz, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    The factors that determine how people eat when they are healthy or have disease have not been defined. We used high resolution manometry (HRM) to assess pharyngeal swallowing and oesophageal motility during ingestion of a solid test meal (STM) in healthy volunteers and patients with motility disorders. This study was based at University Hospital Zurich (Zürich, Switzerland). Healthy volunteers who responded to an advertisement completed HRM with ten single water swallows (SWS) in recumbent and upright positions followed by a 200 g rice STM in the upright position. Healthy volunteers were stratified for age and sex to ensure a representative population. For comparison, consecutive patients with major motility disorders on SWS and patients with dysphagia but no major motility disorders on SWS (disease controls) were selected from a database that was assembled prospectively; the rice meal data were analysed retrospectively. During STM, pharyngeal swallows were timed and oesophageal contractions were classified as representing normal motility or different types of abnormal motility in accordance with established metrics. Factors that could potentially be associated with eating speed were investigated, including age, sex, body-mass index, and presence of motility disorder. We compared diagnoses based on SWS findings, assessed with the Chicago Classification v3.0, with those based on STM findings, assessed with the Chicago Classification adapted for solids. These studies are registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, numbers NCT02407938 and NCT02397616. Between April 2, 2014, and May 13, 2015, 72 healthy volunteers were recruited and underwent HRM. Additionally, we analysed data from 54 consecutive patients with major motility disorders and 53 with dysphagia but no major motility disorders recruited between April 2, 2013, and Dec 18, 2014. We found important variations in oesophageal motility and eating speed during meal ingestion in healthy volunteers and patients. Increased

  1. Esophageal manometry in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michael; Gyawali, C Prakash

    2014-03-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) allows nuanced evaluation of esophageal motor function, and more accurate evaluation of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function, in comparison with conventional manometry. Pathophysiologic correlates of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal peristaltic performance are well addressed by this technique. HRM may alter the surgical decision by assessment of esophageal peristaltic function and exclusion of esophageal outflow obstruction before antireflux surgery. Provocative testing during HRM may assess esophageal smooth muscle peristaltic reserve and help predict the likelihood of transit symptoms following antireflux surgery. HRM represents a continuously evolving new technology that compliments the evaluation and management of GERD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of separate and combined exposure of selenium and diazinon on rat sperm motility by computer assisted semen analysis.

    PubMed

    Toman, Robert; Hluchy, Svatoslav; Cabaj, Michal; Massanyi, Peter; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Tunegova, Martina

    2016-12-01

    Effects of selenium (Se) and diazinon (DZN) on sperm motility parameters in rats were investigated. Male rats received a separate dose of Se (2mgkg -1 b.w., intraperitoneally, 5mgL -1 , per os in drinking water), diazinon (20mgkg -1 b.w., intraperitoneally, 40mgL -1 , per os in drinking water), and in combination (Se+DZN) with the same dosage as in the separate administration. 36h an intraperitoneal (i.p.) and after 90days of per oral (p.o.) exposure, thirteen parameters of sperm motility were evaluated using a Computer Assisted Sperm Analyzer (CASA). Almost all the evaluated sperm motility parameters significantly decreased in Se p.o. exposed groups. In the Se i.p. group decrease was noted only in beat cross frequency (BCF) and progressive motility. Significant decline in the sperm motility, progressive motility, BCF and increase in amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH) were recorded after DZN i.p. administration. In DZN p.o. group, significant increase in ALH, velocity average path (VAP) and curvilinear velocity (VCL) but decrease in progressive motility and BCF was detected. Se+DZN i.p. administration caused a significant decrease in motility, progressive motility and BCF. Per oral administration of Se+DZN decreased all motility parameters except LIN, WOB and ALH. Sperm abnormalities increased in all experimental conditions. Se and DZN negatively affected sperm structure and function in separate doses or in combination. No protective effect of Se was observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary habits and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Palladino-Davis, A G; Mendez, B M; Fisichella, P M; Davis, C S

    2015-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is an underestimated, poorly understood, and changing disease. Its overall 5-year survival is less than 20%, even in the United States, which is largely a function of a delay in diagnosis until its more advanced stages. Additionally, the epidemiologic complexities of esophageal cancer are vast, rendering screening and prevention limited at best. First, the prevalence of esophageal cancer is unevenly distributed throughout the world. Second, the two histological forms (squamous cell and adenocarcinoma) vary in terms of their geographic prevalence and associated risk factors. Third, some populations appear at particular risk for esophageal cancer. And fourth, the incidence of esophageal cancer is in continuous flux among groups. Despite the varied prevalence and risks among populations, some factors have emerged as consistent associations while others are only now becoming more fully recognized. The most prominent, scientifically supported, and long-regarded risk factors for esophageal cancer are tobacco, alcohol, and reflux esophagitis. Inasmuch as the above are regarded as important risk factors for esophageal cancer, they are not the sole contributors. Dietary habits, nutrition, local customs, and the environment may be contributory. Along these lines, vitamins, minerals, fruits, vegetables, meats, fats, salted foods, nitrogen compounds, carcinogens, mycotoxins, and even the temperature of what we consume are increasingly regarded as potential etiologies for this deadly although potentially preventable disease. The goal of this review is to shed light on the less known role of nutrition and dietary habits in esophageal cancer. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  4. Endoscopic therapeutic esophageal interventions.

    PubMed

    Schembre, D B; Kozarek, R A

    2000-07-01

    At the close of the 20th century, therapeutic endoscopy in the esophagus has expanded to encompass a broad array of interventions. As the number of procedures grows, emphasis in the medical literature has begun to shift to analyses of which procedures should be performed. Many studies published in 1999 on topics ranging from endoscopic treatment of benign and malignant strictures, to variceal bleeding, to Barrett esophagus have focused on which of several methods provides the best long-term response with the fewest interventions. This is a review of the major published studies of endoscopic interventions in the esophagus as well as selected abstracts. The conclusions of these studies and reports of new endoscopic therapies draw a clear map of where nonoperative esophageal therapeutics are headed in the next several years.

  5. Genetics of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kottyan, LC; Rothenberg, ME

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, allergic disease associated with marked mucosal eosinophil accumulation. EoE disease risk is multifactorial and includes environmental and genetic factors. This review will focus on the contribution of genetic variation to EoE risk, as well as the experimental tools and statistical methodology used to identify EoE risk loci. Specific disease-risk loci that are shared between EoE and other allergic diseases (TSLP, LRRC32) or unique to EoE (CAPN14), as well as Mendellian Disorders associated with EoE, will be reviewed in the context of the insight that they provide into the molecular pathoetiology of EoE. We will also discuss the clinical opportunities that genetic analyses provide in the form of decision support tools, molecular diagnostics, and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:28224995

  6. Genetics of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kottyan, L C; Rothenberg, M E

    2017-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, allergic disease associated with marked mucosal eosinophil accumulation. EoE disease risk is multifactorial and includes environmental and genetic factors. This review will focus on the contribution of genetic variation to EoE risk, as well as the experimental tools and statistical methodology used to identify EoE risk loci. Specific disease-risk loci that are shared between EoE and other allergic diseases (TSLP, LRRC32) or unique to EoE (CAPN14), as well as Mendellian Disorders associated with EoE, will be reviewed in the context of the insight that they provide into the molecular pathoetiology of EoE. We will also discuss the clinical opportunities that genetic analyses provide in the form of decision support tools, molecular diagnostics, and novel therapeutic approaches.

  7. Prucalopride decreases esophageal acid exposure and accelerates gastric emptying in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kessing, B F; Smout, A J P M; Bennink, R J; Kraaijpoel, N; Oors, J M; Bredenoord, A J

    2014-08-01

    The 5-HT4 receptor agonist prucalopride is a prokinetic drug which improves colonic motility. Animal data and in vitro studies suggest that prucalopride also affects gastric and esophageal motor function. We aimed to assess the effect of prucalopride on gastric emptying, esophageal motility, and gastro-esophageal reflux in man. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover study, we included 21 healthy volunteers who received 4 mg prucalopride or placebo per day for 6 days. We performed high-resolution manometry (HRM) followed by 120-min HRM-pH-impedance monitoring after a standardized meal, ambulatory 24-h pH-impedance monitoring, and gastric emptying for solids. Prucalopride decreased (median [IQR]) total acid exposure time (3.4 [2.5-5.6] vs 1.7 [0.8-3.5] %, p < 0.05). The total number of reflux events was unaffected by prucalopride, however, the number of reflux events extending to the proximal esophagus was reduced by prucalopride (15.5 [9.8-25.5] vs 10.5 [5.3-17.5], p < 0.05). Furthermore, prucalopride improved acid clearance time (77.5 [47.8-108.8] vs 44.0 [30.0-67.8] s, p < 0.05). Prucalopride did not affect the number of transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations or their association with reflux events. Esophageal motility and basal pressure of the LES were not affected by prucalopride. Prucalopride increased gastric emptying (T1/2 ; 32.7 [27.9-44.6] vs 49.8 [37.7-55.0] min, p < 0.05) and decreased residue after 120 min (8.8 [4.4-14.8] vs 2.7 [1.3-5.4] %, p < 0.05). Prucalopride reduces esophageal acid exposure and accelerates gastric emptying in healthy male volunteers. These findings suggest that the drug could be effective for treatment of patients with reflux disease and functional dyspepsia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Motility-Induced Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Michael E.; Tailleur, Julien

    2015-03-01

    Self-propelled particles include both self-phoretic synthetic colloids and various microorganisms. By continually consuming energy, they bypass the laws of equilibrium thermodynamics. These laws enforce the Boltzmann distribution in thermal equilibrium: The steady state is then independent of kinetic parameters. In contrast, self-propelled particles tend to accumulate where they move more slowly. They may also slow down at high density for either biochemical or steric reasons. This creates positive feedback, which can lead to motility-induced phase separation (MIPS) between dense and dilute fluid phases. At leading order in gradients, a mapping relates variable-speed, self-propelled particles to passive particles with attractions. This deep link to equilibrium phase separation is confirmed by simulations but generally breaks down at higher order in gradients: New effects, with no equilibrium counterpart, then emerge. We give a selective overview of the fast-developing field of MIPS, focusing on theory and simulation but including a brief speculative survey of its experimental implications.

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms are not sufficient to guide esophageal function testing in lung transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    Posner, S; Zheng, J; Wood, R K; Shimpi, R A; Hartwig, M G; Chow, S-C; Leiman, D A

    2018-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophageal dysmotility are prevalent in patients with advanced lung disease and are associated with graft dysfunction following lung transplantation. As a result, many transplant centers perform esophageal function testing as part of the wait-listing process but guidelines for testing in this population are lacking. The aim of this study is to describe whether symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux correlate with abnormal results on pH-metry and high-resolution manometry and can be used to identify those who require testing. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 226 lung transplant candidates referred for high-resolution manometry and pH-metry over a 12-month period in 2015. Demographic data, results of a standard symptom questionnaire and details of esophageal function testing were obtained. Associations between the presence of symptoms and test results were analyzed using Fisher's exact tests and multivariable logistic regression. The most common lung disease diagnosis was interstitial lung disease (N = 131, 58%). Abnormal pH-metry was seen in 116 (51%) patients and the presence of symptoms was significantly associated with an abnormal study (p < 0.01). Dysmotility was found in 98 (43%) patients, with major peristaltic or esophageal outflow disorders in 45 (20%) patients. Symptoms were not correlated with findings on esophageal high-resolution manometry. Fifteen of 25 (60%) asymptomatic patients had an abnormal manometry or pH-metry. These results demonstrate that in patients with advanced lung disease, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux increase the likelihood of elevated acid exposure on pH-metry but were not associated with dysmotility. Given the proportion of asymptomatic patients with abnormal studies and associated post-transplant risks, a practice of universal high-resolution manometry and pH-metry testing in this population is justifiable.

  10. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Wesley R.; Malarkey, Erik B.; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Pasek, Raymond C.; Porath, Jonathan D.; Birket, Susan E.; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Leigh, Margaret W.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Drummond, Iain A.; Parant, John M.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or ‘primary’ cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400). While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8). GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC) protein 4 (DRC4) where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR) to generate one of these human missense variants

  11. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Wesley R; Malarkey, Erik B; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Pasek, Raymond C; Porath, Jonathan D; Birket, Susan E; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Challa, Anil K; Kesterson, Robert A; Rowe, Steven M; Drummond, Iain A; Parant, John M; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Porter, Mary E; Yoder, Bradley K; Berbari, Nicolas F

    2016-07-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or 'primary' cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400). While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8). GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC) protein 4 (DRC4) where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR) to generate one of these human missense variants in

  12. Measurement of anal pressure and motility.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, B D

    1976-01-01

    A fine open perfused system and a closed balloon system for the measurement of anal pressure and motility have been compared. Measurements were made in 40 normal subjects and 84 patients with haemorrhoids. The rate of perfusion had a marked effect on the recorded pressure and motility details. The motility pattern was seen most clearly with the balloon probe and the pressure recorded was reproducible and easy to measure, making this a convenient method for recording activity of the internal anal sphincter. Anal motility in normal subjects was characterised by slow pressure waves (10-20/min). The frequency was fastest in the distal anal canal and this frequency gradient may represent a normal mechanism to keep the anal canal empty. Ultra slow pressure waves (0-6-1-9/min) were seen in 42% of patients with haemorrhoids and 5% of normal subjects and arose from a synchronous contraction of the whole internal sphincter. Images Fig. 1 PMID:976803

  13. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  14. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding is any heavy or unusual bleeding from the uterus (through your ... one symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding. Having extremely heavy bleeding during your period can also be considered ...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class II...

  16. Esophageal Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    The incidence of esophageal cancer has risen in recent decades, coinciding with a shift in histologic type and primary tumor location. Find evidence-based information on esophageal cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  17. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Esophagitis (EoE) (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology) Also in Spanish Latest News Eosinophilic Esophagitis May ... Pediatric and Adolescent Patients (American College of Gastroenterology) Topic Image Related Health Topics Eosinophilic Disorders Esophagus Disorders ...

  18. Targeting ion channels for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Beyder, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) functional and motility disorders are highly prevalent and responsible for long-term morbidity and sometimes mortality in the affected patients. It is estimated that one in three persons has a GI functional or motility disorder. However, diagnosis and treatment of these widespread conditions remains challenging. This partly stems from the multisystem pathophysiology, including processing abnormalities in the central and peripheral (enteric) nervous systems and motor dysfunction in the GI wall. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are central to the generation and propagation of the cyclical electrical activity and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are responsible for electromechanical coupling. In these and other excitable cells voltage-sensitive ion channels (VSICs) are the main molecular units that generate and regulate electrical activity. Thus, VSICs are potential targets for intervention in GI motility disorders. Research in this area has flourished with advances in the experimental methods in molecular and structural biology and electrophysiology. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the complex and variable electrical behavior of ICCs and SMCs remains incomplete. In this review, we focus on the slow waves and action potentials in ICCs and SMCs. We describe the constituent VSICs, which include voltage-gated sodium (NaV), calcium (CaV), potassium (KV, KCa), chloride (Cl–) and nonselective ion channels (transient receptor potentials [TRPs]). VSICs have significant structural homology and common functional mechanisms. We outline the approaches and limitations and provide examples of targeting VSICs at the pores, voltage sensors and alternatively spliced sites. Rational drug design can come from an integrated view of the structure and mechanisms of gating and activation by voltage or mechanical stress. PMID:22282704

  19. Esophageal Helicobacter pylori colonization aggravates esophageal injury caused by reflux

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yun-Xiang; Wang, Wei-Hong; Dai, Yun; Teng, Gui-Gen; Wang, Shu-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate esophageal Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization on esophageal injury caused by reflux and the related mechanisms. METHODS: An esophagitis model, with acid and bile reflux, was surgically produced in male rats. The rats were randomly divided into either: (1) an esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis (EGDA) group; (2) an EGDA with H. pylori infection group; (3) a pseudo-operation with H. pylori infection group; or (4) a pseudo-operation group. All rats were kept for 36 wk. Based on the location of H. pylori colonization, the EGDA rats with H. pylori infection were subdivided into those with concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization or those with only gastric H. pylori colonization. The esophageal injuries were evaluated grossly and microscopically. The expressions of CDX2 and MUC2 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of cyclin D1, c-Myc, Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by RT-PCR. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method. RESULTS: Esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) developed in rats that underwent EGDA. When comparing rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization to EGDA-only rats, the severity of injury (87.9 ± 5.2 vs 77.2 ± 8.6, macroscopically, 92.5 ± 8.0 vs 83.8 ± 5.5, microscopically, both P < 0.05) and the incidences of BE (80.0% vs 33.3%, P = 0.055) and EAC (60.0% vs 11.1%, P < 0.05) were increased. These increases were associated with upregulation of CDX2 and MUC2 mRNA (10.1 ± 5.4 vs 3.0 ± 2.9, 8.4 ± 4.6 vs 2.0 ± 3.2, respectively, Ps < 0.01) and protein (8.1 ± 2.3 vs 3.3 ± 3.1, 7.3 ± 4.0 vs 1.8 ± 2.7, respectively, all P < 0.05). The expression of Ki-67 (8.9 ± 0.7 vs 6.0 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) and the presence of apoptotic cells (8.3 ± 1.1 vs 5.3 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) were also increased

  20. Prevention and Treatment of Esophageal Stenosis after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Lu, Zhongsheng; Liu, Qingsen

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for the treatment of esophageal mucosal lesions is associated with a risk of esophageal stenosis, especially for near-circumferential or circumferential esophageal mucosal defects. Here, we review historic and modern studies on the prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after ESD. These methods include prevention via pharmacological treatment, endoscopic autologous cell transplantation, endoscopic esophageal dilatation, and stent placement. This short review will focus on direct prevention and treatment, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:25386186

  1. Toward the reconstitution of synthetic cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Siton-Mendelson, Orit; Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellular motility is a fundamental process essential for embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and tissues development. Cells are mostly moving by crawling on external, or inside, substrates which can differ in their surface composition, geometry, and dimensionality. Cells can adopt different migration phenotypes, e.g., bleb-based and protrusion-based, depending on myosin contractility, surface adhesion, and cell confinement. In the few past decades, research on cell motility has focused on uncovering the major molecular players and their order of events. Despite major progresses, our ability to infer on the collective behavior from the molecular properties remains a major challenge, especially because cell migration integrates numerous chemical and mechanical processes that are coupled via feedbacks that span over large range of time and length scales. For this reason, reconstituted model systems were developed. These systems allow for full control of the molecular constituents and various system parameters, thereby providing insight into their individual roles and functions. In this review we describe the various reconstituted model systems that were developed in the past decades. Because of the multiple steps involved in cell motility and the complexity of the overall process, most of the model systems focus on very specific aspects of the individual steps of cell motility. Here we describe the main advancement in cell motility reconstitution and discuss the main challenges toward the realization of a synthetic motile cell. PMID:27019160

  2. Characterizing motility dynamics in human RPE cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Furu; Miller, Donald T.

    2017-02-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, however, are often compromised in ageing and ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, but while in vivo biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. Recently we addressed this problem by using organelle motility as a novel contrast agent to enhance the RPE cell in conjunction with 3D resolution of adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) to section the RPE layer. In this study, we expand on the central novelty of our method - organelle motility - by characterizing the dynamics of the motility in individual RPE cells, important because of its direct link to RPE physiology. To do this, AO-OCT videos of the same retinal patch were acquired at approximately 1 min intervals or less, time stamped, and registered in 3D with sub-cellular accuracy. Motility was quantified by an exponential decay time constant, the time for motility to decorrelate the speckle field across an RPE cell. In two normal subjects, we found the decay time constant to be just 3 seconds, thus indicating rapid motility in normal RPE cells.

  3. Novel mechanisms power bacterial gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Nan, Beiyan; Zusman, David R

    2016-07-01

    For many bacteria, motility is essential for survival, growth, virulence, biofilm formation and intra/interspecies interactions. Since natural environments differ, bacteria have evolved remarkable motility systems to adapt, including swimming in aqueous media, and swarming, twitching and gliding on solid and semi-solid surfaces. Although tremendous advances have been achieved in understanding swimming and swarming motilities powered by flagella, and twitching motility powered by Type IV pili, little is known about gliding motility. Bacterial gliders are a heterogeneous group containing diverse bacteria that utilize surface motilities that do not depend on traditional flagella or pili, but are powered by mechanisms that are less well understood. Recently, advances in our understanding of the molecular machineries for several gliding bacteria revealed the roles of modified ion channels, secretion systems and unique machinery for surface movements. These novel mechanisms provide rich source materials for studying the function and evolution of complex microbial nanomachines. In this review, we summarize recent findings made on the gliding mechanisms of the myxobacteria, flavobacteria and mycoplasmas. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Esophageal and anorectal involvement in systemic sclerosis: a systematic assessment with high resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Laure; Granel, Brigitte; Bernit, Emmanuelle; Harle, Jean-Robert; Baumstarck, Karine; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Bouvier, Michel; Vitton, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    In systemic sclerosis (SSc), esophageal and anorectal involvements are frequent and often associated with each other. In clinical practice, esophageal explorations are often prescribed, while anorectal explorations are rarely proposed and therefore, under-recognised. However, it is well documented in the literature that early detection of anorectal dysfunction could delay and/or prevent the onset of symptoms such as fecal incontinence (FI). The main objective was the systematic evaluation and detection of esophageal and anorectal involvements in SSc patients. In this monocentric retrospective study, all patients with SSc addressed in the Department of Functional Digestive Explorations, North Hospital, Marseille for esophageal and anorectal explorations were included. Self-Questionnaires, evaluating the symptoms and quality of life, were filled by patients during their visit. Explorations were performed on the same day: high resolution esophageal manometry (EHRM), 3 Dimensional high resolution anorectal manometry (3DHRARM) and endo anal sonography (EUS). 44 patients (41 women), mean age 59.8±12 years, were included. With regard to the symptoms, 45.5% of patients had gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), 66.9% dysphagia, 65.9% constipation and 77.3% FI. The incidence of esophageal dismotility was 65.9%, anorectal and both upper and lower dysfunction were 43.2%. More than 89% patients with abnormal explorations (EHRM, 3DHRARM or both) were symptomatic. Duration of SSc and altered quality of life was correlated with the severity of digestive involvement. Anorectal dysfunction appears to be closely linked to esophageal involvement in SSc. Their routine screening is undoubtedly essential to limit the occurrence of severe symptoms such as FI.

  5. Deletion of murine choline dehydrogenase results in diminished sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy R; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Guo, Zhong; Teng, Ya-Wen; Thresher, Randy J; Blusztajn, Jan K; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-08-01

    Choline dehydrogenase (CHDH) catalyzes the conversion of choline to betaine, an important methyl donor and organic osmolyte. We have previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human CHDH gene that, when present, seem to alter the activity of the CHDH enzyme. These SNPs occur frequently in humans. We created a Chdh(-/-) mouse to determine the functional effects of mutations that result in decreased CHDH activity. Chdh deletion did not affect fetal viability or alter growth or survival of these mice. Only one of eleven Chdh(-/-) males was able to reproduce. Loss of CHDH activity resulted in decreased testicular betaine and increased choline and PCho concentrations. Chdh(+/+) and Chdh(-/-) mice produced comparable amounts of sperm; the impaired fertility was due to diminished sperm motility in the Chdh(-/-) males. Transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormal mitochondrial morphology in Chdh(-/-) sperm. ATP content, total mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity and inner mitochondrial membrane polarization were all significantly reduced in sperm from Chdh(-/-) animals. Mitochondrial changes were also detected in liver, kidney, heart, and testis tissues. We suggest that men who have SNPs in CHDH that decrease the activity of the CHDH enzyme could have decreased sperm motility and fertility.

  6. Relationship between symptom response and esophageal pH level on standard dose of esomeprazole treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sui; Xiong, Li-shou; Xiao, Ying-lian; Wang, An-jiang; Lin, Jin-kun; Hu, Pin-jin; Chen, Min-hu

    2010-08-05

    The relationship between symptom elimination and normalization of esophageal acid level of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) on proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy has been questioned. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between symptom response and gastro-esophageal acidity control in Chinese patients with GERD on esomeprazole therapy, and to assess the role of 24-hour esophageal pH-metry after therapy in GERD patients. GERD patients with typical reflux symptoms were enrolled and received esomeprazole 40 mg once daily for 4 weeks. Patients with positive baseline 24-hour esophageal pH-metry were divided into two groups depending on an additional dual-channel 24-hour pH-metry after treatment. The pH- group achieved normalization of esophageal pH level whereas the pH+ group did not. Of the 80 patients studied, 76 had abnormal baseline esophageal pH levels. Of these, 90% (52/58) of symptom-free patients and 67% (12/18) of symptom-persistent patients achieved esophageal pH normalization after therapy (P = 0.030). The mean post-therapy gastric nocturnal percent time of pH < 4.0 was significantly higher in pH+ group than that in pH- group (P < 0.001) after therapy. The multivariate regression analysis identified hiatus hernia (P < 0.001) and persistent reflux symptom (P = 0.004) were two independent factors predicting the low post-therapy esophageal pH level. Symptom elimination is not always accompanied by esophageal pH normalization, and vice verse. Esophageal pH-metry is recommended for GERD patients with hiatus hernia or with persistent reflux symptoms after PPI therapy.

  7. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope is a nonpowered device that is inserted into a patient's esophagus to...

  8. [Esophageal complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease: consequences or defensive reactions?

    PubMed

    Horváth, Örs Péter; Bognár, Laura; Papp, András; Vereczkei, András

    2017-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease affects more than 10% of the adult population. Most patients can be effectively treated with lifestyle changes and adequate acid-reducing therapy. However, about 10% of the patients remain symptomatic despite treatment and severe complications may develop. Interestingly, some of these complications seem to be a sort of defensive mechanism that may either alleviate the patient's symptoms or prevent developing further complications. In Barrett's esophagus, which can be unambigously considered as a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease, reflux symptoms ruining the quality of life may significantly improve, since the metaplastic Barrett epithelium is much more resistent to gastric acid, than the normal epithelial lining of the esophagus. Furthermore, the motility disorders (hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, achalasia, cricopharyngeal achalasia) and structural changes (Schatzki's ring, esophageal stricture, subglottic trachea stenosis), which develop as a complication of reflux may help to prevent aspiration that can cause new complaints and may lead to further complications. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(20): 763-769.

  9. Esophageal symptoms and their lack of association with high-resolution manometry in systemic sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Arana-Guajardo, Ana Cecilia; Barrera-Torres, Gustavo; Villarreal-Alarcón, Miguel Ángel; Vega-Morales, David; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge Antonio

    2017-12-16

    The esophageal involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) causes impact in the morbidity and mortality. High resolution manometry assesses esophageal involvement. Our aim was to categorize esophageal motor disorder in patients with SSc by HRM. We carried out an observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study. All patients underwent HRM as well as semi-structured interviews to assess frequency and severity of upper GI symptoms. Patients also completed the gastroesophageal reflux questionnaire (Carlsson-Dent). We included 19 patients with SSc, 1 with morphea, and 1 with scleroderma sine scleroderma. Dysphagia and heartburn were the most frequent symptoms (61% each). We found an abnormal HRM in 15 (71.4%) patients. We found no statistically significant association between clinical or demographic variables and an abnormal HRM, or between any upper GI symptom and HRM findings. We observed a high prevalence of esophageal symptoms and of HRM abnormalities. However, there was no clear association between symptomatology and HRM findings. HRM does not seem to accurately predict upper GI symptomatology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. Eosinophilic esophagitis in an octogenarian

    PubMed Central

    Trifan, Anca; Stoica, Oana; Chihaia, Catalin-Alexandru; Danciu, Mihai; Stanciu, Carol; Singeap, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated disease characterized clinically by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by a marked eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophageal mucosa. What was once considered a rare disease has nowadays become one of the most frequent esophageal diseases in the Western countries, occupying a place just next to the gastroesophageal reflux disease. EoE etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown, although most studies consider that allergic and genetic factors play the most important role. Methods: We report the case of EoE in an elderly male (octogenarian), giving a brief review of the current data related to epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. Results: Dysphagia to solid foods was the leading symptom, and endoscopic findings included white exudates, longitudinal furrows, and concentric mucosal rings, all suggestive for EoE. Diagnosis relied on histological findings in esophageal mucosal biopsies (>30 eosinophils per high power field). He was treated with topical steroids for 8 weeks, symptoms improved gradually and the patient remained in remission at the 8-month follow-up. Conclusion: This case emphasizes that EoE may occur in very old patients and gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion of this disorder in any elderly with dysphagia and endoscopic relevant features. PMID:27741150

  11. New endoscopic classification of the cardiac orifice in esophageal achalasia: Champagne glass sign.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Kuniyo; Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Bechara, Robert; Sato, Chiaki; Ito, Hiroaki; Onimaru, Manabu; Kitamura, Yohei; Suzuki, Michitaka; Nakamura, Jun; Hata, Yoshitaka; Maruyama, Shota; Sumi, Kazuya; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopy, barium esophagram and manometry are used in the diagnosis of achalasia. In the case of early achalasia, characteristic endoscopic findings are difficult to recognize. As a result, the diagnosis of achalasia is often made several years after symptom onset. Therefore, we examined the endoscopic findings of the cardiac orifice in achalasia and propose a new classification. A total of 400 patients with spastic esophageal motility disorders who underwent peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) at our hospital between March 2014 and August 2015 were screened for this study. Champagne glass sign (CG) was defined as when the distal end of the lower esophageal sphincter relaxation failure (LESRF) was proximal to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) and the SCJ was dilated in the retroflex view. Specifically, CG-1 was defined as a distance from the SCJ to the lower end of LESRF of <1 cm, and CG-2 was defined as a distance ≥1 cm. CG-0 was seen in 73 patients (28.0%), whereas the CG sign was seen in 186 patients (71.3%), of whom 170 (65.1%) were CG-1 and 16 (6.1%) were CG-2. The CG sign is often observed in esophageal achalasia patients. CG-0 (equal to Maki-tsuki) was observed in 28.0% of achalasia patients only. Its absence with dilated SCJ cannot be used to rule out achalasia. Barium esophagram and manometry should be done if esophageal achalasia is strongly suspected. © 2016 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  12. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    PubMed Central

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly sug- gest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  13. The effect of water bolus temperature on esophageal motor function as measured by high-resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y J; Park, M I; Park, S J; Moon, W; Kim, S E; Kwon, H J; Kim, J H; Jeon, W S

    2014-11-01

    Ingestion of cold fluids may induce pain in patients with esophageal motility disorders. Hot fluids, on the other hand, may help to relieve pain. We studied changes in esophageal motility as a variable of water bolus temperature using high-resolution manometry (HRM) in healthy human. Thirty-two healthy subjects were recruited at Kosin University Hospital. HRM was performed in a sitting position, with room temperature (RT, 25 °C), hot (45 °C), and cold (2 °C) water swallowed in that order. This exam included single swallowing (10 swallows of 5 mL water, 30 s intervals) and multiple water swallows (MWS; 100 mL water within 30 s). In the single swallowing, hot water caused a decrease in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) residual pressure (5.87 ± 4.20 mmHg vs 7.45 ± 4.17 mmHg (RT), p = 0.001) and duration of esophageal body (EB) contraction (3.01 ± 0.80 s vs 3.15 ± 1.16 s (RT), p = 0.009). Cold water caused an increase in the duration of EB contraction (3.52 ± 0.87 s vs 3.15 ± 1.16 s (RT), p = 0.001) and a decrease in contractile front velocity (CFV) (4.43 ± 1.50 cm/s vs 4.90 ± 2.53 cm/s (RT), p = 0.007). Similarly, in the MWS, hot water caused a decrease in the duration of EB contraction (12.95 ± 5.02 s vs 16.33 ± 5.94 s (RT), p = 0.024) and an increase in the amplitude of EB contraction (114.27 ± 83.36 mmHg vs 82.70 ± 46.77 mmHg (RT), p = 0.007). Cold water caused an increase in the duration of EB contraction (27.38 ± 2.89 s vs 16.33 ± 5.94 s (RT), p = 0.03) and a decrease in the amplitude of EB contraction (51.68 ± 33.94 mmHg vs 82.70 ± 46.77 mmHg (RT), p = 0.001). This study showed changes in esophageal motility to be dependent on water temperature. Especially, MWS showed clear changes in esophageal motility at different temperatures of water. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Curriculum for neurogastroenterology and motility training: A report from the joint ANMS-ESNM task force.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, C P; Savarino, E; Lazarescu, A; Bor, S; Patel, A; Dickman, R; Pressman, A; Drewes, A M; Rosen, J; Drug, V; Saps, M; Novais, L; Vazquez-Roque, M; Pohl, D; van Tilburg, M A L; Smout, A; Yoon, S; Pandolfino, J; Farrugia, G; Barbara, G; Roman, S

    2018-03-25

    Although neurogastroenterology and motility (NGM) disorders are some of the most frequent disorders encountered by practicing gastroenterologists, a structured competency-based training curriculum developed by NGM experts is lacking. The American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society (ANMS) and the European Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility (ESNM) jointly evaluated the components of NGM training in North America and Europe. Eleven training domains were identified within NGM, consisting of functional gastrointestinal disorders, visceral hypersensitivity and pain pathways, motor disorders within anatomic areas (esophagus, stomach, small bowel and colon, anorectum), mucosal disorders (gastro-esophageal reflux disease, other mucosal disorders), consequences of systemic disease, consequences of therapy (surgery, endoscopic intervention, medications, other therapy), and transition of pediatric patients into adult practice. A 3-tiered training curriculum covering these domains is proposed here and endorsed by all NGM societies. Tier 1 NGM knowledge and training is expected of all gastroenterology trainees and practicing gastroenterologists. Tier 2 knowledge and training is appropriate for trainees who anticipate NGM disorder management and NGM function test interpretation being an important part of their careers, which may require competency assessment and credentialing of test interpretation skills. Tier 3 knowledge and training is undertaken by trainees interested in a dedicated NGM career and may be restricted to specific domains within the broad NGM field. The joint ANMS and ESNM task force anticipates that the NGM curriculum will streamline NGM training in North America and Europe and will lead to better identification of centers of excellence where Tier 2 and Tier 3 training can be accomplished. © 2018 The Authors. Neurogastroenterology & Motility Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Lung Transplant Outcomes in Systemic Sclerosis with Significant Esophageal Dysfunction. A Comprehensive Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Kristin; Saggar, Rajeev; Duffy, Erin; Elashoff, David; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Weigt, Sam; Charan, Deepshikha; Abtin, Fereidoun; Johannes, Jimmy; Derhovanessian, Ariss; Conklin, Jeffrey; Ghassemi, Kevin; Khanna, Dinesh; Siddiqui, Osama; Ardehali, Abbas; Hunter, Curtis; Kwon, Murray; Biniwale, Reshma; Lo, Michelle; Volkmann, Elizabeth; Torres Barba, David; Belperio, John A.; Mahrer, Thomas; Furst, Daniel E.; Kafaja, Suzanne; Clements, Philip; Shino, Michael; Gregson, Aric; Kubak, Bernard; Lynch, Joseph P.; Ross, David

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Consideration of lung transplantation in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) remains guarded, often due to the concern for esophageal dysfunction and the associated potential for allograft injury and suboptimal post–lung transplantation outcomes. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to systematically report our single-center experience regarding lung transplantation in the setting of SSc, with a particular focus on esophageal dysfunction. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all lung transplants at our center from January 1, 2000 through August 31, 2012 (n = 562), comparing the SSc group (n = 35) to the following lung transplant diagnostic subsets: all non-SSc (n = 527), non-SSc diffuse fibrotic lung disease (n = 264), and a non-SSc matched group (n = 109). We evaluated post–lung transplant outcomes, including survival, primary graft dysfunction, acute rejection, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, and microbiology of respiratory isolates. In addition, we defined severe esophageal dysfunction using esophageal manometry and esophageal morphometry criteria on the basis of chest computed tomography images. For patients with SSc referred for lung transplant but subsequently denied (n = 36), we queried the reason(s) for denial with respect to the concern for esophageal dysfunction. Measurements and Main Results: The 1-, 3-, and 5-year post–lung transplant survival for SSc was 94, 77, and 70%, respectively, and similar to the other groups. The remaining post–lung transplant outcomes evaluated were also similar between SSc and the other groups. Approximately 60% of the SSc group had severe esophageal dysfunction. Pre–lung transplant chest computed tomography imaging demonstrated significantly abnormal esophageal morphometry for SSc when compared with the matched group. Importantly, esophageal dysfunction was the sole reason for lung transplant denial in a single case. Conclusions: Relative to other lung transplant

  16. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in subgroups of infertile men.

    PubMed

    Dul, E C; Groen, H; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C M A; Dijkhuizen, T; van Echten-Arends, J; Land, J A

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities is assumed to be higher in infertile men and inversely correlated with sperm concentration. Although guidelines advise karyotyping infertile men, karyotyping is costly, therefore it would be of benefit to identify men with the highest risk of chromosomal abnormalities, possibly by using parameters other than sperm concentration. The aim of this study was to evaluate several clinical parameters in azoospermic and non-azoospermic men, in order to assess the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in different subgroups of infertile men. In a retrospective cohort of 1223 azoospermic men and men eligible for ICSI treatment, we studied sperm parameters, hormone levels and medical history for an association with chromosomal abnormalities. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in the cohort was 3.1%. No association was found between chromosomal abnormalities and sperm volume, concentration, progressive motility or total motile sperm count. Azoospermia was significantly associated with the presence of a chromosomal abnormality [15.2%, odds ratio (OR) 7.70, P < 0.001]. High gonadotrophin levels were also associated with an increased prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities (OR 2.96, P = 0.013). Azoospermic men with a positive andrologic history had a lower prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities than azoospermic men with an uneventful history (OR 0.28, P = 0.047). In non-azoospermic men, we found that none of the studied variables were associated with the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities. We show that the highest prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities is found in hypergonadotrophic azoospermic men with an uneventful andrologic history.

  17. Congenital esophageal stenosis: a rare case of dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Eva; Santos, Alexandra; Gaivao, Ana; Tavares, Ana; Ferreira, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) is a rare anomaly, resulting from incomplete separation of the respiratory tract from the primitive foregut at the 25th day of life. First clinical signs are abnormalities of the swallowing mechanism caused by the intrinsic narrowing of the esophagus. Diagnosis is usually delayed, requiring an accurate history and high level of suspicion, alongside with an esophagogram. Definite diagnosis is only confirmed by histological examination. Treatment usually involves surgery, depending on the severity, location and type of stenosis. We report the case of an 18 months old toddler diagnosed with CES. The characteristic radiographic and CT features are presented as well as the histology. PMID:22470735

  18. Esophageal achalasia compressing left atrium diagnosed by echocardiography using a liquid containing carbon dioxide in a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Man Je; Song, Bong Gun; Lee, Hyoun Soo; Kim, Ki Hoon; Ok, Hea Sung; Kim, Byeong Ki; Park, Yong Hwan; Kang, Gu Hyun; Chun, Woo Jung; Oh, Ju Hyeon

    2012-01-01

    Extrinsic compression of the left atrium by the esophagus, the stomach, or both is an uncommon but important cause of hemodynamic compromise. Achalasia is a motility disorder characterized by impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and dilatation of the distal two thirds of the esophagus. Echocardiographic imaging after oral ingestion of liquid containing carbon dioxide allowed for differentiation between a compressive vascular structure and the esophagus. We report a rare case of esophageal achalasia compressing the left atrium diagnosed by echocardiography using a liquid containing carbon dioxide in a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Barrett's esophagus: photodynamic therapy for ablation of dysplasia, reduction of specialized mucosa and treatment of superficial esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Bergein F.; Panjehpour, Masoud

    1995-03-01

    Fifteen patients with Barrett's esophagus and dysplasia were treated with photodynamic therapy. Four patients also had early, superficial esophageal cancers and 5 had esophageal polyps. Light was delivered via a standard diffuser or a centering esophageal balloon. Eight patients maintained on omeprazole and followed for 6 - 54 months are the subject of this report. Photodynamic therapy ablated dysplastic or malignant mucosa in patients with superficial cancer. Healing and partial replacement of Barrett's mucosa with normal squamous epithelium occurred in all patients and complete replacement with squamous epithelium was found in two. Side effects included photosensitivity and mild-moderate chest pain and dysphagia for 5 - 7 days. In three patients with extensive circumferential mucosal ablation in the proximal esophagus, healing was associated with esophageal strictures which were treated successfully by esophageal dilation. Strictures were not found in the distal esophagus. Photodynamic therapy combined with long-term acid inhibition provides effective endoscopic therapy of Barrett's mucosal dysplasia and superficial (Tis-T1) esophageal cancer. The windowed centering balloon improves delivery of photodynamic therapy to diffusely abnormal esophageal mucosa.

  20. Cellular Motility--Experiments on Contractile and Motile Mechanisms in the Slime Mould, Physarum Polycephalum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, R. P.; Stewart, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    Actin and myosin have now been demonstrated to be important constituents of many eukaryotic cells. Their role is primarily that of a contractile system underlying all aspects of cellular motility. Described here is a simple experimental system to demonstrate quantitatively aspects of motility and its regulation in a slime mold. (Author/MA)

  1. [Hodgkin's disease with esophageal involvement].

    PubMed

    Njeh, M; Yengui, N; Tahri, N; Kchaou, M; Sellami, A; Jlidi, R; Krichen, M S

    2000-10-01

    Esophageal involvement in Hodgkin's disease, commonly known as a belated localization of the advanced forms, has been seldom reported (3 to 5% in post-mortem series and 0.7% in clinical series). We report the case of a 61-year-old man who had an esophagus localization revealing Hodgkin's disease stage IV EBb of Ann Arbor classification. The originality of this case was represented by: the revelation mode of the esophageal involvement such as dysphagia and upper gastrointestinal bleeding; the localization at the distal third of the esophagus with contiguous involvement of the gastric fundus; the absence of mediastinal nodes showing the primitive character of the esophageal injury. This observation incites us to consider Hodgkin's disease in the list of differential diagnoses of tumoral dysphagia, even if there was no ganglionic and/or visceral localization of the disease.

  2. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allum, William H.; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.; Parry, Kevin; Preston, Shaun R.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Schaheen, Lara W.; Tatum, Roger P.; Turkin, Igor N.; van der Horst, Sylvia; van der Peet, Donald L.; van der Sluis, Peter C.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Wormald, Justin C.R.; Wu, Peter C.; Zonderhuis, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the optimal approach to manage thoracic esophageal leak after esophagectomy; the choice for operational approach in surgery of cardioesophageal crossing; the advantages of robot esophagectomy; the place of open esophagectomy; the advantages of esophagectomy compared to definitive chemoradiotherapy; the pathologist report in the resected specimen; the best way to manage patients with unsuspected positive microscopic margin after ER; enhanced recovery after surgery for ER: expedited care protocols; and long-term quality of life in patients following esophagectomy. PMID:25266029

  3. Radiation techniques for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minsi; Wu, Abraham J

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy plays a crucial role in the curative management of localized esophageal cancer, both as definitive and preoperative therapy. For definitive therapy, the standard radiation dose is 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions and should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy. Chemoradiotherapy also has a wellestablished benefit in the preoperative setting, as established in the CROSS randomized trial. Radiation fields are typically generous, to account for subclinical extension of disease along the esophagus and to regional nodes. Three-dimensional conformal radiation is the current standard technique for esophageal cancer, though intensity-modulated radiation therapy is increasingly utilized and may improve the outcomes of esophageal radiotherapy by reducing radiation dose to critical normal tissues.

  4. Variation in esophageal physiology testing in clinical practice: Results from an international survey.

    PubMed

    Sweis, R; Heinrich, H; Fox, M

    2018-03-01

    Advances in clinical measurement of esophageal motility and function have improved the assessment of swallowing disorders and reflux symptoms. Variation in data acquisition, analysis, and reporting exists and impacts on diagnosis and management. This study examined variation in esophageal manometry methodology between institutions to establish the status in current practice. A structured survey was distributed through international NGM societies using an Internet-based platform. Questions explored infrastructure, technology, analysis, and reporting. Responses were received from 91 centers from 29 countries. Eighteen (20%) centers used "conventional" manometry, 75 (82%) high-resolution manometry, and 53 (58%) HR impedance manometry. All centers documented motility for single water swallows. The Chicago Classification was applied by 65 (71.4%) centers. In contrast, analysis of EGJ morphology varied widely. Adjunctive testing was often applied: multiple rapid swallows (77%), rapid drink challenge (77%), single solid swallows (63%), and a standard test meal (18%). Of 86 (94.5%) units that offered pH impedance (pH-Z) studies, approximately half (53.5%) performed tests on acid-suppressant medication in patients with a high pretest probability (eg, erosive esophagitis). Most (75.6%) centers manually reviewed every reflux event. Others examined pH-Z data only prior to symptoms. To assess symptom association with reflux events, 73.6% centers analyzed each symptom separately, whereas 29.7% centers pooled symptoms. There is marked variation in the data acquisition, analysis, and reporting of esophageal manometry studies. Further efforts to improve quality and uniformity in testing and reporting are required. This survey provides information upon which best-practice guidelines can be developed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Phenotypes and clinical context of hypercontractility in high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT)

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Pandolfino, John E; Chen, Joan; Boris, Lubomyr; Luger, Daniel; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds & Aims This study aimed to refine the criteria for esophageal hypercontractility in high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) and examine the clinical context in which it occurs. Subjects & Methods 72 control subjects were used to define the threshold for hypercontractility as a distal contractile integral (DCI) greater than observed in normals. 2,000 consecutive EPT studies were reviewed to find patients exceeding this threshold. Concomitant EPT and clinical variables were explored. Results The greatest DCI value observed in any swallow among the control subjects was 7,732 mmHg-s-cm; the threshold for hypercontractility was established as a swallow with DCI >8,000 mmHg-s-cm. 44 patients were identified with a median maximal DCI of 11,077 mmHg-s-cm, all with normal contractile propagation and normal distal contractile latency, thereby excluding achalasia and distal esophageal spasm. Hypercontractility was associated with multipeaked contractions in 82% of instances leading to the name Jackhammer Esophagus . Dysphagia was the dominant symptom although subsets of patients had hypercontractility in the context of EGJ outflow obstruction, reflux disease, or as an apparent primary motility disorder. Conclusion We describe an extreme phenotype of hypercontractility characterized in EPT by the occurrence of at least a single contraction with DCI > 8,000 mmHg-s-cm, a value not encountered in control subjects. This phenomenon, branded Jackhammer Esophagus was usually accompanied by dysphagia and occurred both in association with other esophageal pathology (EGJ outflow obstruction, reflux disease) or as an isolated motility disturbance. Further studies are required to define the pathophysiology and treatment of this disorder. PMID:21931377

  6. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction.

    PubMed

    Truskaite, Kotryna; Dlugosz, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17-96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI.

  7. Hydropneumothorax Due to Esophageal Rupture.

    PubMed

    Shiber, Joseph R; Fontane, Emily; Ra, Jin H; Kerwin, Andrew J

    2017-06-01

    A brief review of the historical aspects of esophageal rupture is presented along with a case and current recommendations for diagnostic evaluation and treatment. A 97-year-old woman complained of acute dyspnea without prior vomiting. Chest x-ray study showed a large right pneumothorax with associated effusion. A thoracostomy tube was placed with return of > 1 L turbid fluid with polymicrobial culture and elevated pleural fluid amylase level. Chest computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated overt leakage of oral contrast into the right pleural space. She was treated with ongoing pleural evacuation, antibiotics, antifungals, and total parenteral nutrition. The patient and family declined surgical resection as well as endoscopic stent placement. In 1724, Boerhaave described spontaneous rupture of the esophagus postmortem; Boerhaave syndrome remains the name for complete disruption of the esophageal wall in the absence of pre-existing pathology typically occurring after vomiting. It most commonly occurs in the distal left posterolateral thoracic esophagus. Contrast esophagram is considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing esophageal rupture although CT esophagography also shows good diagnostic performance. Treatment includes nil per os status, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and drainage of the pleural space. Surgical repair of the esophageal perforation should be done early if the patient is deemed a good candidate, and esophageal stenting is also an option. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Esophageal perforation should be suspected in patients with new pleural effusion, often with overt pneumothorax, that is polymicrobial with elevated amylase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  9. Sporadic ganglioneuromatosis of esophagogastric junction in a patient with gastro-esophageal reflux disorder and intestinal metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Siderits, Richard; Hanna, Iman; Baig, Zahid; Godyn, Janusz-J

    2006-12-28

    A 58-year-old female with a recurrent history of upper abdominal pain and intermittent dysphagia underwent endoscopic evaluation that demonstrated an irregular and nodular esophago-gastric (EG) junction and grade I erosive esophagitis. Biopsies showed prominent intestinal metaplasia of Barrett's type without dysplasia, chronic inflammation and multiple aggregates of large cells within the mucosal lamina propria, some with spindle shaped nuclei. Immunohistochemistry stains for keratins AE-1/AE-3 were negative, while S-100 and NSE were positive. This, together with routine stains, was diagnostic for mucosal ganglioneuromatosis. The background of chronic inflammation with intestinal type metaplasia was consistent with long-term reflux esophagitis. No evidence of achalasia was seen. Biopsies of gastric antrum and fundus were unremarkable, without ganglioneural proliferation. Colonoscopy was unremarkable. No genetic syndromes were identified in the patient including familial adenomatous polyposis and multiple endocrine neoplasia type IIb (MEN IIb). Iansoprazole (Prevacid) was started by oral administration each day with partial relief of symptoms. Subsequent esophagogastroscopy repeated at 4 mo showed normal appearing EG junction. Esophageal manometry revealed a mild non-specific lower esophageal motility disorder. Mild motor dysfunction is seen with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) and we feel that the demonstration of localized ganglioneuromatosis was not likely related etiologically. In the absence of findings that might suggest neural hypertrophy, such as achalasia, the nodular mucosal irregularity seen with this instance of ganglioneuromatosis may, however, have exacerbated the patient's reflux.

  10. Andrographis paniculata elicits anti-invasion activities by suppressing TM4SF3 gene expression and by anoikis-sensitization in esophageal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Li, Lin; Chan, Kar-Man; Wong, Eric Chun-Wai; Chan, Judy Yuet-Wah; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Lui, Vivian Wai Yan; Chiu, Philip Wai-Yan; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the sixth most common cancer in male causing death worldwide. It is usually diagnosed at advanced stage with high postoperative recurrence and systemic metastasis, which leads to poor prognosis. The potential inhibitory effect of herbal medicines on metastasis of esophageal cancer has drawn researchers’ great attention. In the present study, the anti-invasion activities of Andrographis paniculata (AP) have been evaluated in two esophageal cancer cell lines, EC-109 and KYSE-520, as well as human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). The anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of AP were also evaluated in human esophageal xenograft-bearing mouse models. Our results demonstrated for the first time that aqueous extract of AP inhibited the motility and invasion of esophageal cancer cells, which is the initial step of metastasis, without cytotoxicity. Anoikis resistance has also been reversed in AP-treated cancer cells. Besides, the expression of metastasis-related gene TM4SF3 in EC-109 cells was significantly decreased in AP extract-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the anti-tumor and anti-metastatic efficacies in subcutaneous and intraperitoneal esophageal xenograft-bearing mice were demonstrated after oral administration of AP aqueous extract for 3 weeks. Last but not least, the active component, isoandrographolide, responsible for the anti-migratory activity was firstly revealed here. In conclusion, the AP aqueous extract exerted inhibitory activities on the migration and anoikis resistance of esophageal cancer cells EC-109 and KYSE-520, as well as suppressed the proliferation and motility of endothelial cells. Combining the mentioned effects may account for the anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of AP aqueous extract in xenograft-bearing mice. The findings in the present study further enhance the understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of the herb AP, which may lead to clinical applications. PMID

  11. Imaging and Clinicopathologic Features of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Abbey J.; Gollub, Marc J.; Shia, Jinru; Antonescu, Christina; Bains, Manjit S.; Levine, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging and clinicopathologic characteristics of esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and to emphasize the features that differentiate esophageal GISTs from esophageal leiomyomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS A pathology database search identified all surgically resected or biopsied esophageal GISTs, esophageal leiomyomas, and esophageal leiomyosarcomas from 1994 to 2012. Esophageal GISTs were included only if imaging studies (including CT, fluoroscopic, or 18F-FDG PET/CT scans) and clinical data were available. RESULTS Nineteen esophageal mesenchymal tumors were identified, including eight esophageal GISTs (42%), 10 esophageal leiomyomas (53%), and one esophageal leiomyosarcoma (5%). Four patients (50%) with esophageal GIST had symptoms, including dysphagia in three (38%), cough in one (13%), and chest pain in one (13%). One esophageal GIST appeared on barium study as a smooth submucosal mass. All esophageal GISTs appeared on CT as well-marginated predominantly distal lesions, isoattenuating to muscle, that moderately enhanced after IV contrast agent administration. Compared with esophageal leiomyomas, esophageal GISTs tended to be more distal, larger, and more heterogeneous and showed greater IV enhancement on CT. All esophageal GISTs showed marked avidity (mean maximum standardized uptake value, 16) on PET scans. All esophageal GISTs were positive for c-KIT (a cell-surface transmembrane tyrosine kinase also known as CD117) and CD34. On histopathology, six esophageal GISTs (75%) were of the spindle pattern and two (25%) were of a mixed spindle and epithelioid pattern. Five esophageal GISTs had exon 11 mutations (with imatinib sensitivity). Clinical outcome correlated with treatment strategy (resection plus adjuvant therapy or resection alone) rather than risk stratification. CONCLUSION Esophageal GISTs are unusual but clinically important mesenchymal neoplasms. Although esophageal GISTs and

  12. Motility of the oesophagus and small bowel in adults treated for Hirschsprung's disease during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Medhus, A W; Bjørnland, K; Emblem, R; Husebye, E

    2010-02-01

    Dysmotility of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract has been reported in children with Hirschsprung's disease (HD). In the present study, motility of the oesophagus and the small bowel was studied in adults treated for HD during early childhood to elucidate whether there are alterations in motility of the upper GI tract in this patient group. [Correction added after online publication 15 Sep: The preceding sentence has been rephrased for better clarity.] Ambulatory small bowel manometry with recording sites in duodenum/jejunum was performed in 16 adult patients with surgically treated HD and 17 healthy controls. In addition, oesophageal manometry was performed with station pull-through technique. The essential patterns of small bowel motility were recognized in all patients and controls. During fasting, phase III of the migrating motor complex (MMC) was more prominent in patients with HD than in controls when accounting for duration and propagation velocity (P = 0.006). Phase I of the MMC was of shorter duration (P = 0.008), and phase II tended to be of longer duration (P = 0.05) in the patients. During daytime fasting, propagated clustered contractions (PCCs) were more frequent in the patients (P = 0.01). Postprandially, the patients demonstrated a higher contractile frequency (P = 0.02), a shorter duration of contractions (P = 0.008) and more frequent PCCs (P < 0.001). The patients had normal oesophageal motility. This study demonstrates that adult patients with HD have preserved essential patterns of oesophageal and small bowel motility. However, abnormalities mainly characterized by increased contractile activity of the small bowel during fasting and postprandially are evident. These findings indicate alterations in neuronal control of motility and persistent involvement of the upper GI tract in this disease.

  13. [Congenital abnormalities of the aorta in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, J G; Ley, S

    2007-11-01

    Aortic abnormalities are common cardiovascular malformations accounting for 15-20% of all congenital heart disease. Ultrafast CT and MR imaging are noninvasive, accurate and robust techniques that can be used in the diagnosis of aortic malformations. While their sensitivity in detecting vascular abnormalities seems to be as good as that of conventional catheter angiocardiography, at over 90%, they are superior in the diagnosis of potentially life-threatening complications, such as tracheal, bronchial, or esophageal compression. It has been shown that more than 80% of small children with aortic abnormalities benefit directly from the use of noninvasive imaging: either cardiac catheterization is no longer necessary or radiation doses and periods of general anesthesia for interventional catheterization procedures can be much reduced. The most important congenital abnormalities of the aorta in children and adolescents are presented with reference to examples, and the value of CT and MR angiography is documented.

  14. Causes and Outcomes of Esophageal Perforation in Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Runge, Thomas M; Eluri, Swathi; Cotton, Cary C; Burk, Caitlin M; Woosley, John T; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Dellon, Evan S

    2017-10-01

    To characterize patients who suffer perforation in the context of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and to identify predictors of perforation. Esophageal perforation is a serious complication of EoE. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of the University of North Carolina EoE clinicopathologic database from 2001 to 2014. Subjects were included if they had an incident diagnosis of EoE and met consensus guidelines, including nonresponse to a PPI trial. Patients with EoE who had suffered perforation at any point during their course were identified, and compared with EoE cases without perforation. Multiple logistic regression was performed to determine predictors of perforation. Out of 511 subjects with EoE, 10 (2.0%) had experienced an esophageal perforation. Although those who perforated tended to have a longer duration of symptoms before diagnosis (11.4 vs. 7.0 y, P=0.13), a history of food impaction (odds ratio, 14.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-129.2) and the presence of a focal stricture (odds ratio, 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-19.7) were the only factors independently associated with perforation. Most perforations (80%) occurred after a prolonged food bolus impaction, and only half of individuals (5/10) carried a diagnosis of EoE at the time of perforation; none occurred after dilation. Six patients (60%) were treated with nonoperative management, and 4 (40%) required surgical repair. Esophageal perforation is a rare but serious complication of eosinophilic esophagitis, occurring in ∼2% of cases. Most episodes are due to food bolus impaction or strictures, suggesting that patients with fibrostenotic disease due to longer duration of symptoms are at increased risk.

  15. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-12-21

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE.

  16. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-02-22

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  17. Effect of methylnaltrexone and naloxone on esophageal motor function in man.

    PubMed

    Scarpellini, E; Pauwels, A; Vos, R; Rommel, N; Tack, J

    2017-03-01

    Endogenous opioids (EO) acting on μ-opiod receptors in central and enteric nervous system (ENS) control gastrointestinal motility but it is still unclear whether EO in ENS may control esophageal function in man, thus we will study the effects of methylnaltrexone (MNTX), a peripherally selective, and naloxone (NA), a non-selective μ-opiod receptor antagonist, on esophageal motility in healthy subjects. Fifteen HV (6 M; 34.1 ± 0.6 years; BMI: 22.1 ± 0.1 kg/m 2 ) underwent three esophageal high-resolution manometry impedance (HRiM) studies with 10 saline swallows administered every 30 minutes: drug was administered after 30 minutes (MNTX subcutaneously/NA or saline intravenously), a solid meal after 90 minutes; measurements continued for 120 minutes postprandially. Methylnaltrexone did not significantly decrease the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) percentage of relaxation preprandially (72.5 ± 5 vs 66.9 ± 4.6 and 73 ± 3.8%, ANOVA between placebo, MNTX and NA, P=NS) and postprandially (60 minutes: 68.2 ± 5.6 vs 61 ± 5.5 and 67.1 ± 5.6%; 120 minutes: 68 ± 5.9 vs 59.3 ± 5.2 and 67.7 ± 4.7%; ANOVA between placebo, MNTX and NA, P=NS). MNTX and NA did not significantly alter preprandial and postprandial LES resting pressures and integrated relaxation pressure (ANOVA between placebo, MNTX and NA, all P=NS). Peak front velocity and distal contractile integral were not altered pre- and postprandially by MNTX and NA (ANOVA between placebo, MNTX and NA, P=NS). Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs') number was not altered by MNTX and NA (ANOVA between placebo, MNTX and NA, all P=NS). The peripheral selective and non-selective μ-opioid receptor antagonists MNTX and NA, respectively, do not alter TLESRs occurrence and esophageal peristalsis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Clinical significance of the correlation between PLCE 1 and PRKCA in esophageal inflammation and esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhang, Yongmeng; Yuan, Ming; Liu, Bing; Yang, Yiqiong; Cui, Wen; Ansong, Emmanuel; Dong, Huali; Macias, Virgilia; Yang, Wancai

    2017-01-01

    Esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus are linked to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, respectively. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. This study analyzed the expression levels of and correlation between PLCE1 and PRKCA in human esophagitis, carcinogen NMBA-induced rat esophagus, PLCE1 genetic deficient mouse esophageal epithelial tissues and human esophageal cancer cell line, integrated with Online oncology data sets. We found that the expression levels of both PLCE1 and PRKCA were significantly elevated in human esophagitis, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and in NMBA-treated rat esophageal epithelia. However, PRKCA and cytokines were significantly downregulated in PLCE1-deficient mouse esophageal epithelia, and knockdown of PLCE1 in human esophageal cancer cells led to reduction of PRKCA and cytokines. Finally, high expression of both PLCE1 and PRKCA is significantly associated with poor outcomes of the patients with esophageal cancers. In conclusion, this study defined the initiation and progression of esophageal inflammation and malignant transformation, in which the positive correlation of PLCE1 and PRKCA exhibits critical clinical significance. PMID:28402280

  19. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  20. Esophageal manifestations of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, A J

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may often be associated with various motor disorders affecting the different segments of the digestive tract, including the esophagus. Although it has not been universally reported, some available evidences indicate that pediatric and adult celiac patients could manifest a higher frequency of esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms compared to nonceliac patients. In addition, several published studies have consistently shown the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in rapidly controlling esophageal symptoms and in preventing their recurrence. Since the participation of gluten in the esophageal symptoms of CD seems clear, its intimate mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, and several hypothesis have been proposed, including the specific immune alterations characterizing CD, the reduction in nutrient absorption determining the arrival of intact gluten to distal gastrointestinal segments, and various dysregulations in the function of gastrointestinal hormones and peptides. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a possible relationship between CD and eosinophilic esophagitis, which should be more deeply investigated. © 2011 Copyright the Author. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  1. Novel methylene blue staining technique for localizing small esophageal leiomyomas during thoracoscopic enucleation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Ai, B; Liao, Y; Liu, L; Liu, M

    2016-11-01

    The treatment of choice for leiomyoma, the most common benign esophageal tumor, is thoracoscopic enucleation. One of the most difficult aspects of thoracoscopic enucleation is the precise localization of small tumors (≤1.5 cm) and tumors without external protrusion. No simple, feasible solutions to this problem are available. We developed a novel methylene blue staining technique to localize small esophageal leiomyomas and evaluated the feasibility of our technique. Between January 2013 and July 2014, eight patients with small esophageal leiomyomas (≤1.5 cm) underwent thoracoscopic enucleation in Tongji Hospital. Preoperative endoscopic ultrasonography was performed in all patients. The leiomyomas were located in the middle (n = 5) and lower (n = 3) thirds of the esophagus. We preoperatively injected 0.5-1.0 mL methylene blue in the submucosa adjacent to the tumors under standard gastroscope guidance. The entire staining process took about 10 minutes. Staining was successful in all patients. The unstained tumor was exposed after the blue-stained mediastinal pleura, and overlying muscle were incised longitudinally. All procedures were successfully completed without conversion to open surgery. No abnormalities were detected in the esophageal mucosa. The median operating time was 60 minutes (range, 40-90 minutes). Postoperative histopathology confirmed leiomyoma in all patients. The median postoperative hospital stay was 6 days (range, 5-7 days). No major complications, such as esophageal leakage or esophageal diverticulum, occurred. Endoscopic methylene blue staining is safe and feasible for localizing small esophageal leiomyomas during thoracoscopic enucleation. This method will enable precise and easy enucleation. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  2. Simulation studies of circular muscle contraction, longitudinal muscle shortening, and their coordination in esophageal transport.

    PubMed

    Kou, Wenjun; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2015-08-15

    On the basis of a fully coupled active musculomechanical model for esophageal transport, we aimed to find the roles of circular muscle (CM) contraction and longitudinal muscle (LM) shortening in esophageal transport, and the influence of their coordination. Two groups of studies were conducted using a computational model. In the first group, bolus transport with only CM contraction, only LM shortening, or both was simulated. Overall features and detailed information on pressure and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of mucosal and the two muscle layers were analyzed. In the second group, bolus transport with varying delay in CM contraction or LM shortening was simulated. The effect of delay on esophageal transport was studied. For cases showing abnormal transport, pressure and CSA were further analyzed. CM contraction by itself was sufficient to transport bolus, but LM shortening by itself was not. CM contraction decreased the CSA and the radius of the muscle layer locally, but LM shortening increased the CSA. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening led to overlapping of muscle CSA and pressure peaks. Advancing LM shortening adversely influenced bolus transport, whereas lagging LM shortening was irrelevant to bolus transport. In conclusion, CM contraction generates high squeezing pressure, which plays a primary role in esophageal transport. LM shortening increases muscle CSA, which helps to strengthen CM contraction. Advancing LM shortening decreases esophageal distensibility in the bolus region. Lagging LM shortening no longer helps esophageal transport. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening seems to be most effective for esophageal transport. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Low Prevalence of Biopsy-Proven Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Patients with Esophageal Food Impaction in Mexican Population.

    PubMed

    García-Compeán, Diego; González-González, José A; Duran-Castro, José J; Herrera-Quiñones, Gilberto; Borjas-Almaguer, Omar D; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor J

    2018-06-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is the most common cause of dysphagia and esophageal food impaction (EFI) in the USA, Western Europe, and Australia. In Mexico, the uncomplicated form of this disease is infrequent, and prevalence in patients with EFI is unknown. To determine the prevalence and causes of EFI, endoscopic and therapeutic aspects, and establish the prevalence of biopsy-proven EoE in patients with EFI. Diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy reports from January 2011 to December 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with therapeutic procedures, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, or non-food foreign body impaction were excluded. The number of patients with EFI was determined. Additionally, patients with esophageal biopsy were retained for EoE prevalence calculation. The diagnosis of EoE was defined with the presence of eosinophil infiltration count ≥ 15/high-power field with or without typical endoscopic abnormalities. A total of 4700 reports of the same number of patients were selected; 2209 were males (47%) with a mean age of 57.6 ± 12.3 years (range 14-93). We identified 36 patients with EFI (0.76, 95% CI 0.51-1.01), 16 males (44.4%) with a mean age of 54.9 ± 19.7 (range 22-92). Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 17/36 (47.2%) cases. The diagnosis of EoE was confirmed in 2 patients (11.7%). Peptic stenosis was the most frequent cause of EFI. EoE is an infrequent cause of EFI in the Mexican population (11.7%). EoE had the lowest prevalence compared to that reported in Caucasian populations. The prevalence of EFI was also low.

  4. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shoukat H; P, Madhu Vijay; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-30

    Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in patients of primary hypothyroidism using the technique of radionuclide esophageal transit scintigraphy. Thirty-one patients of primary hypothyroidism and 15 euthyroid healthy controls were evaluated for esophageal transit time using 15-20 MBq of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid diluted in 10-15 mL of drinking water. Time activity curve was generated for each study and esophageal transit time was calculated as time taken for clearance of 90% radioactive bolus from the region of interest encompassing the esophagus. Esophageal transit time of more than 10 seconds was considered as prolonged. Patients of primary hypothyroidism had a significantly increased mean esophageal transit time of 19.35 ± 20.02 seconds in comparison to the mean time of 8.25 ± 1.71 seconds in healthy controls ( P < 0.05). Esophageal transit time improved and in some patients even normalized after treatment with thyroxine. A positive correlation ( r = 0.39, P < 0.05) albeit weak existed between the serum thyroid stimulating hormone and the observed esophageal transit time. A significant number of patients with primary hypothyroidism may have subclinical esophageal dysmotility with prolonged esophageal transit time which can be reversible by thyroxine treatment. Prolonged esophageal transit time in primary hypothyroidism may correlate with serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels.

  5. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  6. Rigid Esophagoscopy for Head and Neck Cancer Staging and the Incidence of Synchronous Esophageal Malignant Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    McGarey, Patrick O; O'Rourke, Ashli K; Owen, Scott R; Shonka, David C; Reibel, James F; Levine, Paul A; Jameson, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Rigid esophagoscopy (RE) was once an essential part of the evaluation of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) due to the high likelihood of identifying a synchronous malignant neoplasm in the esophagus. Given recent advances in imaging and endoscopic techniques and changes in the incidence of esophageal cancer, the current role for RE in HNSCC staging is unclear. To analyze the current role of RE in evaluating patients with HNSCC, and to determine the incidence of synchronous esophageal malignant neoplasms in patients with HNSCC. In this retrospective study performed at an academic tertiary care center, 582 patients were studied who had undergone RE for HNSCC staging from July 1, 2004, through October 31, 2012. To assess the incidence of synchronous esophageal malignant neoplasms, a literature review was performed, and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data set was queried. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of synchronous esophageal malignant neoplasms, as measured by retrospective review at our institution, SEER data set analysis, and literature review. Secondary outcome measures were RE complications and nonmalignant findings during RE. A total of 601 staging REs were performed in 582 patients. The mean age was 60.2 years and 454 (78.0%) were men. There were 9 complications (1.5%), including 1 esophageal perforation (0.2%). Rigid esophagoscopy was aborted in 50 cases. Of the 551 completed REs, no abnormal findings were noted in 523 patients (94.9%), and nonmalignant pathologic findings were identified in 28 patients (5.1%). No synchronous primary esophageal carcinomas were detected. The incidence of synchronous esophageal malignant neoplasms found on screening endoscopy based on literature review and on SEER data set analysis was very low and has decreased from 1980 to 2010 in North America. The incidence reported in South America and Asia was relatively high. Rigid esophagoscopy

  7. Esophageal replacement by hydroxylated bacterial cellulose patch in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changlai; Liu, Fang; Qian, Wenbo; Wang, Yingjie; You, Qingsheng; Zhang, Tianyi; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    To repair esophageal defects by hydroxylated and kombucha-synthesized bacterial cellulose (HKBC) patch in a rabbit model. Semicircular esophageal defects 1 cm in length of the cervical esophagus were initially created in 18 Japanese big-ear rabbits and then repaired with HKBC patch grafts. The clinical outcomes including survival rate, weight change, food intake, and hematological and radiologic evaluation were observed. After X-ray evaluation, the rabbits were sacrificed sequentially at 1, 3, and 6 months for histopathologic analysis with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Survival rate during the first month was 88.9% (n = 16). Two rabbits died from anastomotic leakage during the entire follow-up. Postoperatively, feeding function and body weight were gradually restored in the surviving animals. No hematological abnormalities were found, and no obvious anastomotic leakage, stenosis, or obstruction was observed under X-ray examination. The histopathologic results showed a progressive regeneration of the esophagus in the graft area, where the neo-esophagus tissue had characteristics similar to native esophageal tissue after 3 months of surgery. HKBC is beneficial for esophageal tissue regeneration and may be a promising material for esophageal reconstruction.

  8. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  9. Improvement of gastric motility by hemodialysis in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Hirako, Makoto; Misu, Naoko; Kobayashi, Yuka; Shikano, Michiko; Matsuhisa, Eriko; Kataoka, Hiromi; Sasaki, Makoto; Ohara, Hirotaka; Nakao, Haruhisa; Orito, Etsuro; Joh, Takashi

    2007-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). We have previously demonstrated that patients with predialysis end-stage renal disease showed a high prevalence of GI symptoms and gastric hypomotility, and that gastric hypomotility appears to be an important factor in generating GI symptoms. However, it is not clear whether impaired gastric motor function would improve after hemodialytic treatment. To examine the relationship between gastric motor function and GI symptoms in CRF patients on hemodialysis. The study was performed in 19 patients with CRF treated with hemodialysis for more than six months and in 12 matched healthy controls. GI symptom severity was quantified in all patients. Gastric motility was evaluated with cutaneously recorded electrogastrography (EGG) and gastric emptying of semi-solid meals using the (13)C-acetic acid breath test. Six patients had no symptoms, and 11 had slight GI symptoms with a total symptom score of less than 5. Compared with controls, CRF patients revealed no differences in gastric motility parameters, with the exception of a lower percentage of normogastria in EGG at fasting state. Eleven patients had normal gastric motor function (Group A), and eight showed abnormalities of either gastric myoelectrical activity or gastric emptying (Group B). There was no difference in symptom score between Group A and Group B. More than half of the patients with CRF on hemodialysis demonstrated normal gastric motility, and no or slight GI symptoms. Hemodialytic treatment may improve impaired gastric motility and reduce GI symptoms in patients with CRF.

  10. Effect of a muscarinic M3 receptor agonist on gastric motility.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Toshimi; Kudara, Norihiko; Sato, Masaki; Inomata, Masaaki; Orii, Seishi; Suzuki, Kazuyuki

    2007-11-01

    Muscarinic M3 receptors exist in the gastrointestinal wall in humans and the muscarinic M3 agonist cevimeline hydrochloride (Evoxac) is a candidate therapeutic agent for the treatment of xerostomia in Sjögren's syndrome. However, M3 receptor agonists are not known to show efficacy for diseases associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motility. Herein the effects are reported of cevimeline on gastric motility in two patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. The patients both received long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy for 6 months, but their symptoms persisted. Then cevimeline was administered orally for 8 weeks at 30 mg three times daily (90 mg/day) and their dyspepsia symptoms improved. Electrogastrography was performed to examine gastric motility before and after administration of the M3 agonist. The fasting or nocturnal wave rate was significantly increased after administration compared with before administration, but no significant postprandial changes were seen. No adverse effects of cevimeline were observed. This drug might be a candidate therapeutic agent for non-ulcer dyspepsia. Because its postprandial effects on gastrointestinal motility are unclear, a dose-finding clinical study should be performed in the future.

  11. The motility and motion duration of jatimbulan tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) spermatozoa in different salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triastuti, J.; Kintani, D.; Luqman, E. M.; Pujiastuti, D. Y.

    2018-04-01

    Tilapia hatchery is still conducted in freshwater and seeds are death simultaneousy when cultivated in high salinity due to the acclimatization process. An alternative method to implement hatchery at high salinity is required. This study aims to determine the salinity of activation medium that provides the best Jatimbulan Tilapia sperm motility and motion duration at high salinity. The study applies completely randomized design (CRD), which consists of 5 treatments (0 ppt, 4 ppt, 9 ppt, 14 ppt and 19 ppt) and 4 repetitions. The parameters consists of sperm motility, motion duration, fresh sperm data (volume, color, odor, pH, consistency, and the concentration of sperm) and sperm abnormalities. The results exhibited that salinity significantly (p < 0.05). Influeneed the sperm motility and motion duration. Motility reaches its best at 0 ppt and 4 ppt (93.4 % and 87.8 %). For motion duration, best condition was in 0 ppt and 4 ppt treatments, totaling 2128 seconds and 1961.5 seconds. Meanwhile, sperm did not move when treated in waters with 9 ppt, 14 ppt and 19 ppt salinities.

  12. Swallowing and pharyngo-esophageal manometry in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luciana Almeida Moreira da Paz; Fontes, Luiz Henrique de Souza; Cahali, Michel Burihan

    2015-01-01

    Upper airway nerve and muscle damage associated with obstructive sleep apnea may impair the strength and dynamics of pharyngeal and esophageal contractions during swallowing. To evaluate the presence of alterations in pharyngoesophageal manometry in patients with obstructive sleep apnea with and without oropharyngeal dysphagia. This study prospectively evaluated 22 patients with obstructive sleep apnea without spontaneous complaints of dysphagia, using a questionnaire, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, and pharyngoesophageal manometry, including measurement of the upper and lower esophageal sphincter pressures and mean pharyngeal pressures at three levels during swallowing. The dysphagia group consisted of 17 patients (77.3%) in whom swallowing abnormalities were detected on fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (n=15; 68.2%) and/or in the questionnaire (n=7; 31.8%). The five remaining cases comprised a control group without oropharyngeal dysphagia. In all cases of abnormalities on fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, there was premature bolus leakage into the pharynx. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding any of the pharyngoesophageal manometry measurements, age, or severity of obstructive sleep apnea. Pharyngoesophageal manometry detected no statistically significant difference between the groups with and without oropharyngeal dysphagia. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. PP-8 ESOPHAGEAL HIGH RESOLUTION MANOMETRY IN NEUROLOGICALLLY IMPAIRED CHILDREN AND GASTRO-OESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Turco, R; Ummarino, D; Miele, E; Terrone, G; Del Giudice, E; Staiano, A

    2015-10-01

    Mechanism underlying the occurrence of Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in neurologically impaired children (NIC) is poorly understood. We sought to characterize, by Esophageal High Resolution Manometry (EHRM), alterations of esophageal motility associated with GERD in NIC and to compare with a group with a suspicion of GERD and normal psychomotor development (NDP). EHRM and multichannel intraluminal impedance/pH-metry (MII/pH) were conducted in 7 NIC and 9 patients with suspicion of GERD and NPD. Esophagogastric junction relaxation (EGJr), the presence/pressure troughs of the oesophageal segments, the distal contractile integral adjusted for esophageal length (DCIa) and the pressurization frontal velocity (PFV) were analyzed by EHRM. Three out of 7 NIC (42.8%) and 4 out of 9 patients with NPD (44.4%) resulted positive to MII/pH (p = 1). No statistical differences were observed for EGJr and PFV between NIC and NPD patients. DCIa was significantly lower in NIC subjects respect to NPD patients (p < 0.01). Comparing NIC with GERD and patients with GERD and NPD we found that third segment was absent in 2/3 (66,6 %) of NIC respect to NPD patients (p < 0.05) and that the third pressure trough was significantly lower in NIC respect to NPD patients (p < 0.05). There were no statistical differences with respect to the first and second pressure trough between NIC and NDP patients. NIC have esophageal motor dysfunction that can be detected by EHRM. Some esophageal manometric alterations could be predictive of GERD in NIC and could explain a different pathogenesis of GERD in NIC and in patients with NPD.

  14. Waist to hip ratio is a better predictor of esophageal acid exposure than body mass index.

    PubMed

    Ringhofer, C; Lenglinger, J; Riegler, M; Kristo, I; Kainz, A; Schoppmann, S F

    2017-07-01

    Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are major health problems showing an inconstant relationship in the literature. Therefore, anthropometric parameters which are predictive and can simply be assessed at first patient presentation may lead to a better patient selection for ambulatory reflux monitoring. We aimed to examine the association of body mass index (BMI) and waist to hip ratio (WHR) with gastroesophageal reflux activity during 24 hour-pH-impedance monitoring. Seven hundred and seventy-one patients with GERD symptoms underwent 24 hour-pH-impedance monitoring and high resolution manometry off proton pump inhibitors. Patients with known primary motility disorders of the esophagus and pre-existing endoscopic or operative procedure on esophagus or stomach were excluded from the study. Reflux parameters and anthropometric and demographic data from our prospectively gathered database were analyzed. We performed univariate and multivariate regression analysis to evaluate the associations of BMI and WHR with reflux parameters measured with 24 hour-pH-impedance monitoring. WHR showed a significantly stronger association with esophageal acid exposure than BMI (P<.001). Our data show that 6.9% of the percentage of endoluminal pH<4 in the distal esophagus is attributable to WHR. Furthermore, an association of WHR with impaired esophageal acid clearance was observed. Additionally, we observed an inverse relationship between lower esophageal sphincter integrity (P=.05) and esophageal acid exposure. WHR is a better predictor for esophageal acid exposure than BMI. Biomechanical and metabolic mechanisms of central fat distribution may influence reflux parameters in 24 hour pH impedance monitoring, which may affect patient selection for ambulatory reflux monitoring. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Transverse loop colostomy and colonic motility.

    PubMed

    Pucciani, F; Ringressi, M N; Maltinti, G; Bechi, P

    2014-11-01

    The motility of the defunctionalized colon, distal to transverse loop colostomy, has never been studied "in vivo." The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of transverse loop colostomy on colonic motility. Thirteen patients were examined before stoma closure by means of clinical evaluation and colonic manometry; we studied both the right and distal colon in both fasting and fed patients in order to detect motor activity. Quantitative and qualitative manometric analyses showed that the diverted colon had motor activity even if no regular colonic motor pattern was observed. The spreading of aboral propagated contractions (PCs) was sometimes recorded from the right colon to the distal colon. The response of the proximal and distal colon to a standard meal, when compared to fasting values, increased more than 40 and 35 %, respectively. Stool and gas ejections from the colostomy were never related to a particular type of colonic motility: Motor quiescence such as PCs was chaotically related to stool escape. In conclusion, motility of the defunctionalized colon is preserved in patients with transverse loop colostomy.

  16. Semiautomated Motility Assay For Determining Toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    Improved method of assessing toxicities of various substances based on observation of effects of those substances on motilities of manageably small number of cells of protozoan species Tetrahema pyriformis. Provides repeatable, standardized tests with minimal handling by technicians and with minimal exposure of technicians to chemicals. Rapid and economical alternative to Draize test.

  17. Targeting tumor cell motility to prevent metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Trenis D.; Ashby, William J.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries

    2011-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity in patients with solid tumors invariably results from the disruption of normal biological function caused by disseminating tumor cells. Tumor cell migration is under intense investigation as the underlying cause of cancer metastasis. The need for tumor cell motility in the progression of metastasis has been established experimentally and is supported empirically by basic and clinical research implicating a large collection of migration-related genes. However, there are few clinical interventions designed to specifically target the motility of tumor cells and adjuvant therapy to specifically prevent cancer cell dissemination is severely limited. In an attempt to define motility targets suitable for treating metastasis, we have parsed the molecular determinants of tumor cell motility into five underlying principles including cell autonomous ability, soluble communication, cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix adhesion, and integrating these determinants of migration on molecular scaffolds. The current challenge is to implement meaningful and sustainable inhibition of metastasis by developing clinically viable disruption of molecular targets that control these fundamental capabilities. PMID:21664937

  18. Actin motility: formin a SCAry tail.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Art; Way, Michael

    2011-01-11

    A new biochemical analysis has revealed that the Rickettsia bacterial protein Sca2--recently shown to be essential for virulence and actin-dependent motility--assembles actin filaments using a mechanism that functionally resembles the processive elongation tactics used by formins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Flagellar motility of the pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens are often classified by their toxicity and invasiveness. The invasiveness of a given bacterium is determined by how capable the bacterium is at invading a broad range of tissues in its host. Of mammalian pathogens, some of the most invasive come from a group of bacteria known as the spirochetes, which cause diseases such as syphilis, Lyme disease, relapsing fever and leptospirosis. Most of the spirochetes are characterized by their distinct shapes and unique motility. They are long, thin bacteria that can be shaped like flat-waves, helices, or have more irregular morphologies. Like many other bacteria, the spirochetes use long, helical appendages known as flagella to move; however, the spirochetes enclose their flagella in the periplasm, the narrow space between the inner and outer membranes. Rotation of the flagella in the periplasm causes the entire cell body to rotate and/or undulate. These deformations of the bacterium produce the force that drives the motility of these organisms, and it is this unique motility that likely allows these bacteria to be highly invasive in mammals. This review will describe the current state of knowledge on the motility and biophysics of these organisms and provide evidence on how this knowledge can inform our understanding of spirochetal diseases. PMID:26481969

  20. Esophageal cancer diagnosed by high-resolution manometry of the esophagus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIU, RONGBEI; CHU, HUA; XU, FEI; CHEN, SHUJIE

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old female who presented with a history of dysphagia for 5 months and regurgitation for 1 week was referred to the Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital (Hangzhou, China) for further evaluation, since the gastroscopy and endoscopic ultrasound performed in local hospitals did not reveal the presence of cancer. High-resolution manometry (HRM) of the esophagus was performed to determine the patient's condition, and revealed an abnormal high-pressure zone that was located 33 cm from the incisor and did not relax upon swallowing. Synchronous waves were observed, and the pressure of the esophageal lumen was found to increase with secondary synchronous peristaltic waves. The lower esophageal sphincter was 39 cm from the incisor and relaxed upon swallowing. The abnormal high-pressure zone could have been caused by an obstruction, and therefore an upper gastrointestinal series (barium swallow) test and gastroscopy were recommended to further pinpoint the cause. Following the two examinations, mid-esophageal cancer was considered as a possible diagnosis. A biopsy was performed and the final diagnosis was that of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. The findings of the present study suggest that, for patients with evident symptoms of esophageal motor dysfunction without significant gastroscopy findings, HRM is recommended. PMID:27123076

  1. Engineering bacterial motility towards hydrogen-peroxide.

    PubMed

    Virgile, Chelsea; Hauk, Pricila; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Shang, Wu; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic biologists construct innovative genetic/biological systems to treat environmental, energy, and health problems. Many systems employ rewired cells for non-native product synthesis, while a few have employed the rewired cells as 'smart' devices with programmable function. Building on the latter, we developed a genetic construct to control and direct bacterial motility towards hydrogen peroxide, one of the body's immune response signaling molecules. A motivation for this work is the creation of cells that can target and autonomously treat disease, the latter signaled by hydrogen peroxide release. Bacteria naturally move towards a variety of molecular cues (e.g., nutrients) in the process of chemotaxis. In this work, we engineered bacteria to recognize and move towards hydrogen peroxide, a non-native chemoattractant and potential toxin. Our system exploits oxyRS, the native oxidative stress regulon of E. coli. We first demonstrated H2O2-mediated upregulation motility regulator, CheZ. Using transwell assays, we showed a two-fold increase in net motility towards H2O2. Then, using a 2D cell tracking system, we quantified bacterial motility descriptors including velocity, % running (of tumble/run motions), and a dynamic net directionality towards the molecular cue. In CheZ mutants, we found that increased H2O2 concentration (0-200 μM) and induction time resulted in increased running speeds, ultimately reaching the native E. coli wild-type speed of ~22 μm/s with a ~45-65% ratio of running to tumbling. Finally, using a microfluidic device with stable H2O2 gradients, we characterized responses and the potential for "programmed" directionality towards H2O2 in quiescent fluids. Overall, the synthetic biology framework and tracking analysis in this work will provide a framework for investigating controlled motility of E. coli and other 'smart' probiotics for signal-directed treatment.

  2. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher’s equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase–a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics. PMID:27362260

  3. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production.

    PubMed

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2016-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher's equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase-a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics.

  4. Esophageal motor function: technical aspects of manometry.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, C Prakash; Patel, Amit

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has advanced the understanding of esophageal peristaltic mechanisms and has simplified esophageal motor testing. In this article the technical aspects of HRM are addressed, focusing on test protocols, in addition to concerns and pitfalls in performing esophageal motor studies. Specifically, catheter positioning, equipment-related artifacts, basal data acquisition, adequate swallows, and provocative maneuvers are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a device used to measure peristalic activity or pressure in the stomach or esophagus by means of a probe...

  6. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved. PMID:27957030

  7. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Bonavina, Luigi

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is the most commonly diagnosed primary esophageal motor disorder and the second most common functional esophageal disorder. Current therapy of achalasia is directed toward elimination of the outflow resistance caused by failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax completely upon swallowing. The advent of minimally invasive surgery has nearly replaced endoscopic pneumatic dilation as the first-line therapeutic approach. In this editorial, the rationale and the evidence supporting the use of laparoscopic Heller myotomy combined with fundoplication as a primary treatment of achalasia are reviewed. PMID:17009388

  8. Pediatric esophageal scintigraphy. Results of 200 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Guillet, J.; Wynchank, S.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.

    1983-09-01

    Esophageal transit of a small volume of watery liquid has been observed scintigraphically in 200 studies performed on patients aged between 6 days and 16 years. Qualitative information concerning esophageal morphology and function in the various phases of deglutition, and scintigraphic features of achalasia, stenosis, and other pathologies are described. Measured esophageal transit time and its normal variation, its relevance to the diagnosis of esophagitis, and the monitoring of treatment are discussed. This technique observing distinct deglutitions has proven a useful diagnostic tool. Its advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with other methods.

  9. [Esophageal bronchogenic cyst: an uncommon cause of dysphagia in adults. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Ceniceros-Cabrales, Ana P; Sánchez-Fernández, Patricio

    2018-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts result from abnormal budding of the primitive tracheobronchial tube and are rare congenital cystic lesions. The location of the cyst depends on the embryological stage of abnormal budding. Although periesophageal bronchogenic cysts have been frequently reported, a completely intramural cyst is very rare. A 42-year-old female patient, a three-month course with retrosternal pain associated with food intake, accompanied by intermittent dysphagia to solids. Esophagogram, high resolution thoracic tomography and endoscopic ultrasound are performed, concluding a probable esophageal bronchogenic cyst. Resection is performed by video-assisted thoracic surgery, without complications. Patient presents with adequate evolution and complete remission of the symptomatology. Bronchogenic cysts of the esophageal wall are extremely uncommon lesions. Its surgical treatment is indicated to be symptomatic; video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery resection is of choice, with excellent long-term results and minimal morbidity. Copyright: © 2018 Permanyer.

  10. A critical role of solute carrier 22a14 in sperm motility and male fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Shin-ya; Ito, Momoe; Ikami, Yuusuke; Okitsu, Yu; Ito, Chizuru; Toshimori, Kiyotaka; Fujii, Wataru; Yogo, Keiichiro

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified solute carrier 22a14 (Slc22a14) as a spermatogenesis-associated transmembrane protein in mice. Although Slc22a14 is a member of the organic anion/cation transporter family, its expression profile and physiological role have not been elucidated. Here, we show that Slc22a14 is crucial for sperm motility and male fertility in mice. Slc22a14 is expressed specifically in male germ cells, and mice lacking the Slc22a14 gene show severe male infertility. Although the overall differentiation of sperm was normal, Slc22a14−/− cauda epididymal spermatozoa showed reduced motility with abnormal flagellar bending. Further, the ability to migrate into the female reproductive tract and fertilise the oocyte were also impaired in Slc22a14−/− spermatozoa. The abnormal flagellar bending was thought to be partly caused by osmotic cell swelling since osmotic challenge or membrane permeabilisation treatment alleviated the tail abnormality. In addition, we found structural abnormalities in Slc22a14−/− sperm cells: the annulus, a ring-like structure at the mid-piece–principal piece junction, was disorganised, and expression and localisation of septin 4, an annulus component protein that is essential for the annulus formation, was also impaired. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Slc22a14 plays a pivotal role in normal flagellar structure, motility and fertility in mouse spermatozoa. PMID:27811987

  11. Esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer: frequency and prediction.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Arimura, Hidetaka; Terashima, Kotaro; Matsuki, Takaomi; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A study of pathophysiological factors associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease in twins discordant for gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Iovino, P; Mohammed, I; Anggiansah, A; Anggiansah, R; Cherkas, L F; Spector, T D; Trudgill, N J

    2013-08-01

    Differences in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and peristaltic function and in transient LES relaxations (TLESR) have been described in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, some of these differences may be the result of chronic GERD rather than being an underlying contributory factor. Twins discordant for GERD symptoms, i.e., only one twin had GERD symptoms, underwent standard LES and esophageal body manometry, and then using a sleeve sensor prolonged LES and pH monitoring, 30 min before and 60 min after a 250 mL 1200 kcal lipid meal. Eight monozygotic and 24 dizygotic female twins were studied. Although there was no difference in preprandial LES pressure (symptomatic 13.2 ± 7.1 mmHg vs asymptomatic 15.1 ± 6.2 mmHg, P = 0.4), LES pressure fell further postprandially in symptomatic twins (LES pressure area under the curve 465 ± 126 vs 331 ± 141 mmHg h, P < 0.01). 12/37 (32%) of acid reflux episodes in symptomatic twins occurred due to low LES pressure or deep inspiration/strain and 0/17 in asymptomatic twins (P = 0.01). There was no difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic twins in: peristaltic amplitude, ineffective esophageal body motility, hiatus hernia prevalence, or LES length. There was also no difference in TLESR frequency preprandially (symptomatic median 1(range 0-2) vs asymptomatic 0(0-2), P = 0.08) or postprandially (2.5(1-8) vs 3(1-6), P = 0.81). Twins with GERD symptoms had lower postprandial LES pressure and given the close genetic link between the twins, it is possible that such differences are caused by GERD. Acid reflux episodes associated with a hypotensive LES were seen in symptomatic, but not in asymptomatic twins. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Total motile sperm count has a superior predictive value over the WHO 2010 cut-off values for the outcomes of intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles.

    PubMed

    Borges, E; Setti, A S; Braga, D P A F; Figueira, R C S; Iaconelli, A

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare (i) the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes among groups with different total motile sperm count ranges, (ii) the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes between groups with normal and abnormal total motile sperm count, and (iii) the predictive values of WHO 2010 cut-off values and pre-wash total motile sperm count for the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes, in couples with male infertility. This study included data from 518 patients undergoing their first intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycle as a result of male infertility. Couples were divided into five groups according to their total motile sperm count: Group I, total motile sperm count <1 × 10(6) ; group II, total motile sperm count 1-5 × 10(6) ; group III, total motile sperm count 5-10 × 10(6) ; group IV, total motile sperm count 10-20 × 10(6) ; and group V, total motile sperm count >20 × 10(6) (which was considered a normal total motile sperm count value). Then, couples were grouped into an abnormal and normal total motile sperm count group. The groups were compared regarding intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes. The predictive values of WHO 2010 cut-off values and total motile sperm count for the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes were also investigated. The fertilization rate was lower in total motile sperm count group I compared to total motile sperm count group V (72.5 ± 17.6 vs. 84.9 ± 14.4, p = 0.011). The normal total motile sperm count group had a higher fertilization rate (84.9 ± 14.4 vs. 81.1 ± 15.8, p = 0.016) and lower miscarriage rate (17.9% vs. 29.5%, p = 0.041) compared to the abnormal total motile sperm count group. The total motile sperm count was the only parameter that demonstrated a predictive value for the formation of high-quality embryos on D2 (OR: 1.18, p = 0.013), formation of high-quality embryos on D3 (OR: 1.12, p = 0.037), formation of blastocysts on D5 (OR: 1.16, p = 0

  14. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Enhanced recovery after esophageal resection.

    PubMed

    Vorwald, Peter; Bruna Esteban, Marcos; Ortega Lucea, Sonia; Ramírez Rodríguez, Jose Manuel

    2018-03-21

    ERAS is a multimodal perioperative care program which replaces traditional practices concerning analgesia, intravenous fluids, nutrition, mobilization as well as a number of other perioperative items, whose implementation is supported by evidence-based best practices. According to the RICA guidelines published in 2015, a review of the literature and the consensus established at a multidisciplinary meeting in 2015, we present a protocol that contains the basic procedures of an ERAS pathway for resective esophageal surgery. The measures involved in this ERAS pathway are structured into 3areas: preoperative, perioperative and postoperative. The consensus document integrates all the analyzed items in a unique time chart. ERAS programs in esophageal resection surgery can reduce postoperative morbidity, mortality, hospitalization and hospital costs. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Esophageal Perforation After Transesophageal Echocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Michael Y.; Hirshberg, Boaz; Agid, Ronit; Zuckerman, Elena; Caraco, Yoseph

    1999-02-01

    Esophageal rupture after transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is a rare but life-threatening complication. Risk factors for perforation include spasm or hypertrophy of the cricopharyngeal sphincter, cervical arthritis, forward and left lateral bending of the distal esophagus, and esophageal disease such as inflammation or neoplasm. We present the case of a 80-year-old woman who developed perforation of her esophagus after TEE. Prior irradiation to the chest due to treatment for breast cancer and subsequent fibrosis probably contributed to this complication. Physicians referring patients for a TEE and physicians performing this procedure should be aware for the risk of perforation. The identification of risk factors and gentle maneuvering of the probe may prevent this severe, life-threatening complication.

  17. Acute Esophageal Necrosis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or “black esophagus” is a rare clinical entity with an unclear etiology. It is diagnosed at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with the presence of strikingly black necrotic esophagus. The treatment is primarily medical, but the prognosis is generally poor due to advanced age and comorbid illnesses in patients who develop AEN. Herein, we discussed the implications of poor glycemic control in regards with AEN and undertook a literature review of this rare diagnosis. PMID:27583242

  18. Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Sameer; Prakash, Mahesh; Kaman, Lileshwar; Bhardwaj, Nidhi; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2011-10-01

    Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula (EPF) is a rare entity. We describe a case in a middle-aged female who presented with severe retrosternal chest pain and shortness of breadth. Chest computed tomography showed right EPF and hydropneumothorax. She was managed conservatively keeping the chest tube drainage and performing feeding jejunostomy. A brief review of the imaging finding and management of EPF is discussed.

  19. Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Sameer; Prakash, Mahesh; Kaman, Lileshwar; Bhardwaj, Nidhi; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula (EPF) is a rare entity. We describe a case in a middle-aged female who presented with severe retrosternal chest pain and shortness of breadth. Chest computed tomography showed right EPF and hydropneumothorax. She was managed conservatively keeping the chest tube drainage and performing feeding jejunostomy. A brief review of the imaging finding and management of EPF is discussed. PMID:22084548

  20. The participation of the nitrergic pathway in increased rate of transitory relaxation of lower esophageal sphincter induced by rectal distension in dogs.

    PubMed

    Palheta, Michel Santos; Graça, José Ronaldo Vasconcelos da; Santos, Armênio Aguiar dos; Lopes, Liziane Hermógenes; Palheta Júnior, Raimundo Campos; Nobre E Souza, Miguel Ângelo

    2014-01-01

    The rectal distension in dogs increases the rate of transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation considered the main factor causing gastroesophageal reflux. The aim of this study was evaluate the participation of the nitrergic pathway in the increased transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation rate induced by rectal distension in anesthetized dogs. Male mongrel dogs (n = 21), weighing 10-15 kg, were fasted for 12 hours, with water ad libitum. Thereafter, they were anesthetized (ketamine 10 mg.Kg-1 + xylazine 20 mg.Kg-1), so as to carry out the esophageal motility evaluation protocol during 120 min. After a 30-minute basal period, the animals were randomly intravenous treated whith: saline solution 0.15M (1ml.Kg-1), L-NAME (3 mg.Kg-1), L-NAME (3 mg.Kg-1) + L-Arginine (200 mg.Kg-1), glibenclamide (1 mg.Kg-1) or methylene blue (3 mg.Kg-1). Forty-five min after these pre-treatments, the rectum was distended (rectal distension, 5 mL.Kg-1) or not (control) with a latex balloon, with changes in the esophageal motility recorded over 45 min. Data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Student Newman-Keuls test. In comparison to the respective control group, rectal distension induces an increase in transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Pre-treatment with L-NAME or methylene blue prevents (P<0.05) this phenomenon, which is reversible by L-Arginine plus L-NAME. However, pretreating with glibenclamide failed to abolish this process. Therefore, these experiments suggested, that rectal distension increases transitory lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in dogs via through nitrergic pathways.

  1. Esophageal tuberculosis presenting with hematemesis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samit S; Somani, Piyush O; Mahey, Rajeshkumar C; Shah, Dharmesh K; Contractor, Qais Q; Rathi, Pravin M

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal tuberculosis is rare, constituting about 0.3% of gastrointestinal tuberculosis. It presents commonly with dysphagia, cough, chest pain in addition to fever and weight loss. Complications may include hemorrhage from the lesion, development of arterioesophageal fistula, esophagocutaneous fistula or tracheoesophageal fistula. There are very few reports of esophageal tuberculosis presenting with hematemesis due to ulceration. We report a patient with hematemesis that was due to the erosion of tuberculous subcarinal lymph nodes into the esophagus. A 15-year-old boy presented with hemetemesis as his only complaint. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed an eccentric ulcerative lesion involving 50% of circumference of the esophagus. Biopsy showed caseating epitheloid granulomas with lymphocytic infiltrates suggestive of tuberculosis. Computerised tomography of the thorax revealed thickening of the mid-esophagus with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes in the subcarinal region compressing the esophagus along with moderate right sided pleural effusion. Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis therapy (Rifampicin, Isoniazid, Pyrazinamide, Ethambutol) for 6 mo. Repeat EGD showed scarring and mucosal tags with complete resolution of the esophageal ulcer. PMID:24255751

  2. Clinical application of oral meglumine diatrizoate esophagogram in screening esophageal fistula during radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lidan; Wu, Rong; Hu, He; Zhao, Yu; Fan, Lingli; Zhao, Zhenhua; Liao, Dongbiao; Li, Musheng; Xiang, Miao; Ma, Ying; Du, Xiaobo

    2018-05-01

    Esophageal fistula is a serious and common complication of radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment is necessary. Because of side effect of barium esophagography, it cannot be used to screening esophageal fistula during radiotherapy. Meglumine diatrizoate is an ionic contrast agent, its adverse reactions were rarely seen when it was used in the body cavity. The purpose of this trial is identified the sensitivity and specificity of oral meglumine diatrizoate in an esophagogram for screening esophageal fistula during radiotherapy. This trial was a prospective, multicenter, diagnostic clinical trial. A total of 105 patients with esophageal cancer will swallowed meglumine diatrizoate and underwent a radiographic examination weekly during radiotherapy, medical personnel observed the esophageal lesions to determine whether an esophageal fistula formed. If an esophageal fistula was observed, esophagofiberoscopy and/or computer tomography was used to further confirm the diagnosis. And the sensitivity and specificity of meglumine diatrizoate should be calculated for screening esophageal fistula during radiotherapy. To our knowledge, this study protocol is the first to identify the sensitivity and specificity of oral meglumine diatrizoate in an esophagogram for screening esophageal fistula during radiotherapy. If oral meglumine diatrizoate can be used to screening esophageal fistula, more patients will benefit from early detection and treatment.

  3. Soft micromachines with programmable motility and morphology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hen-Wei; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Petruska, Andrew J.; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    Nature provides a wide range of inspiration for building mobile micromachines that can navigate through confined heterogenous environments and perform minimally invasive environmental and biomedical operations. For example, microstructures fabricated in the form of bacterial or eukaryotic flagella can act as artificial microswimmers. Due to limitations in their design and material properties, these simple micromachines lack multifunctionality, effective addressability and manoeuvrability in complex environments. Here we develop an origami-inspired rapid prototyping process for building self-folding, magnetically powered micromachines with complex body plans, reconfigurable shape and controllable motility. Selective reprogramming of the mechanical design and magnetic anisotropy of body parts dynamically modulates the swimming characteristics of the micromachines. We find that tail and body morphologies together determine swimming efficiency and, unlike for rigid swimmers, the choice of magnetic field can subtly change the motility of soft microswimmers. PMID:27447088

  4. Soft micromachines with programmable motility and morphology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hen-Wei; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Petruska, Andrew J; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J

    2016-07-22

    Nature provides a wide range of inspiration for building mobile micromachines that can navigate through confined heterogenous environments and perform minimally invasive environmental and biomedical operations. For example, microstructures fabricated in the form of bacterial or eukaryotic flagella can act as artificial microswimmers. Due to limitations in their design and material properties, these simple micromachines lack multifunctionality, effective addressability and manoeuvrability in complex environments. Here we develop an origami-inspired rapid prototyping process for building self-folding, magnetically powered micromachines with complex body plans, reconfigurable shape and controllable motility. Selective reprogramming of the mechanical design and magnetic anisotropy of body parts dynamically modulates the swimming characteristics of the micromachines. We find that tail and body morphologies together determine swimming efficiency and, unlike for rigid swimmers, the choice of magnetic field can subtly change the motility of soft microswimmers.

  5. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use a simply analytic model in conjuction with computational experiments to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. Of particlar interest are stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which may be used to aid in cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, flow waves, adhesion, and locomotive forces in an attempt to characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  6. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use both analytic and computational models to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. In both models, of we are specifically interested in stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which act in the direction of cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, low waves and locomotive forces, and attempt characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  7. Automated measurement of cell motility and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bahnson, Alfred; Athanassiou, Charalambos; Koebler, Douglas; Qian, Lei; Shun, Tongying; Shields, Donna; Yu, Hui; Wang, Hong; Goff, Julie; Cheng, Tao; Houck, Raymond; Cowsert, Lex

    2005-01-01

    Background Time-lapse microscopic imaging provides a powerful approach for following changes in cell phenotype over time. Visible responses of whole cells can yield insight into functional changes that underlie physiological processes in health and disease. For example, features of cell motility accompany molecular changes that are central to the immune response, to carcinogenesis and metastasis, to wound healing and tissue regeneration, and to the myriad developmental processes that generate an organism. Previously reported image processing methods for motility analysis required custom viewing devices and manual interactions that may introduce bias, that slow throughput, and that constrain the scope of experiments in terms of the number of treatment variables, time period of observation, replication and statistical options. Here we describe a fully automated system in which images are acquired 24/7 from 384 well plates and are automatically processed to yield high-content motility and morphological data. Results We have applied this technology to study the effects of different extracellular matrix compounds on human osteoblast-like cell lines to explore functional changes that may underlie processes involved in bone formation and maintenance. We show dose-response and kinetic data for induction of increased motility by laminin and collagen type I without significant effects on growth rate. Differential motility response was evident within 4 hours of plating cells; long-term responses differed depending upon cell type and surface coating. Average velocities were increased approximately 0.1 um/min by ten-fold increases in laminin coating concentration in some cases. Comparison with manual tracking demonstrated the accuracy of the automated method and highlighted the comparative imprecision of human tracking for analysis of cell motility data. Quality statistics are reported that associate with stage noise, interference by non-cell objects, and uncertainty in the

  8. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  9. Endocytic reawakening of motility in jammed epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinverno, Chiara; Corallino, Salvatore; Giavazzi, Fabio; Bergert, Martin; Li, Qingsen; Leoni, Marco; Disanza, Andrea; Frittoli, Emanuela; Oldani, Amanda; Martini, Emanuele; Lendenmann, Tobias; Deflorian, Gianluca; Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ong, Kok Haur; Uroz, Marina; Trepat, Xavier; Parazzoli, Dario; Maiuri, Paolo; Yu, Weimiao; Ferrari, Aldo; Cerbino, Roberto; Scita, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    Dynamics of epithelial monolayers has recently been interpreted in terms of a jamming or rigidity transition. How cells control such phase transitions is, however, unknown. Here we show that RAB5A, a key endocytic protein, is sufficient to induce large-scale, coordinated motility over tens of cells, and ballistic motion in otherwise kinetically arrested monolayers. This is linked to increased traction forces and to the extension of cell protrusions, which align with local velocity. Molecularly, impairing endocytosis, macropinocytosis or increasing fluid efflux abrogates RAB5A-induced collective motility. A simple model based on mechanical junctional tension and an active cell reorientation mechanism for the velocity of self-propelled cells identifies regimes of monolayer dynamics that explain endocytic reawakening of locomotion in terms of a combination of large-scale directed migration and local unjamming. These changes in multicellular dynamics enable collectives to migrate under physical constraints and may be exploited by tumours for interstitial dissemination.

  10. Systematic analysis of esophageal pressure topography in high-resolution manometry of 68 normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Niebisch, S; Wilshire, C L; Peters, J H

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of high-resolution manometry (HRM) has been a significant advance in esophageal diagnostics. Normative values however are currently based upon a single set of published reference values, and multiple new metrics have been added over the past several years. Our goal was to provide a second set of 'normal-values' and to include all current metrics suggested by the 2012 Chicago classification. Sixty-eight subjects without foregut symptoms or previous surgery (median age 25.5 years, ranging from 20-58 years, 53% female) underwent esophageal motility assessment via an established standardized protocol. Normative thresholds were calculated for esophago-gastric junction (EGJ) characteristics (resting, relaxation, intrabolus pressure, and lengths) as well as for esophageal body strength (contraction amplitudes at multiple levels, distal contractile integral, integrity of peristalsis) and wave propagation (contractile front velocity, distal latency). Overall, our findings where strikingly similar to the previously described metrics derived from 75 control subjects of the Northwestern group. This suggests a high degree of reproducibility of HRM. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  11. Mechanisms of repetitive retrograde contractions in response to sustained esophageal distension: a study evaluating patients with postfundoplication dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Dustin A; Kahrilas, Peter J; Ritter, Katherine; Lin, Zhiyue; Pandolfino, John E

    2018-03-01

    Repetitive retrograde contractions (RRCs) in response to sustained esophageal distension are a distinct contractility pattern observed with functional luminal imaging probe (FLIP) panometry that are common in type III (spastic) achalasia. RRCs are hypothesized to be indicative of either impaired inhibitory innervation or esophageal outflow obstruction. We aimed to apply FLIP panometry to patients with postfundoplication dysphagia (a model of esophageal obstruction) to explore mechanisms behind RRCs. Adult patients with dysphagia after Nissen fundoplication ( n = 32) or type III achalasia ( n = 25) were evaluated with high-resolution manometry (HRM) and upper endoscopy with FLIP. HRM studies were assessed for outflow obstruction and spastic features: premature contractility, hypercontractility, and impaired deglutitive inhibition during multiple-rapid swallows. FLIP studies were analyzed to determine the esophagogastric junction (EGJ)-distensibility index and contractility pattern, including RRCs. Barium esophagram was evaluated when available. RRCs were present in 8/32 (25%) fundoplication and 19/25 (76%) achalasia patients ( P < 0.001). EGJ outflow obstruction was detected in 21 (67%) fundoplication patients by HRM, FLIP, or esophagram [6 (29%) had RRCs]. On HRM, none of the fundoplication patients had premature contractility, whereas 3/4 with defective inhibition on multiple-rapid swallows and 2/4 with hypercontractility had RRCs. Regression analysis demonstrated HRM with spastic features, but not esophageal outflow obstruction, as a predictor for RRCs. RRCs in response to sustained esophageal distension appear to be a manifestation of spastic esophageal motility. Although future study to further clarify the significance of RRCs is needed, RRCs on FLIP panometry should prompt evaluation for a major motor disorder. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Repetitive retrograde contractions (RRCs) are a common response to sustained esophageal distension among spastic achalasia patients

  12. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Nanxi; Massoudieh, Arash; Liang, Xiaomeng

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation pointmore » flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.« less

  13. Surface Topography Hinders Bacterial Surface Motility.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yow-Ren; Weeks, Eric R; Ducker, William A

    2018-03-21

    We demonstrate that the surface motility of the bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is hindered by a crystalline hemispherical topography with wavelength in the range of 2-8 μm. The motility was determined by the analysis of time-lapse microscopy images of cells in a flowing growth medium maintained at 37 °C. The net displacement of bacteria over 5 min is much lower on surfaces containing 2-8 μm hemispheres than on flat topography, but displacement on the 1 μm hemispheres is not lower. That is, there is a threshold between 1 and 2 μm for response to the topography. Cells on the 4 μm hemispheres were more likely to travel parallel to the local crystal axis than in other directions. Cells on the 8 μm topography were less likely to travel across the crowns of the hemispheres and were also more likely to make 30°-50° turns than on flat surfaces. These results show that surface topography can act as a significant barrier to surface motility and may therefore hinder surface exploration by bacteria. Because surface exploration can be a part of the process whereby bacteria form colonies and seek nutrients, these results help to elucidate the mechanism by which surface topography hinders biofilm formation.

  14. Laparoscopic surgery for gastro-esophageal acid reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Schijven, Marlies P; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I

    2014-02-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a troublesome disease for many patients, severely affecting their quality of life. Choice of treatment depends on a combination of patient characteristics and preferences, esophageal motility and damage of reflux, symptom severity and symptom correlation to acid reflux and physician preferences. Success of treatment depends on tailoring treatment modalities to the individual patient and adequate selection of treatment choice. PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) were searched for systematic reviews with an abstract, publication date within the last five years, in humans only, on key terms (laparosc* OR laparoscopy*) AND (fundoplication OR reflux* OR GORD OR GERD OR nissen OR toupet) NOT (achal* OR pediat*). Last search was performed on July 23nd and in total 54 articles were evaluated as relevant from this search. The laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication is the therapy of choice for normal-weight GERD patients qualifying for laparoscopic surgery. No better pharmaceutical, endoluminal or surgical alternatives are present to date. No firm conclusion can be stated on its cost-effectiveness. Results have to be awaited comparing the laparoscopic 180-degree anterior fundoplication with the Toupet fundoplication to be a possible better surgical alternative. Division of the short gastric vessels is not to be recommended, nor is the use of a bougie or a mesh in the vast majority of GERD patients undergoing surgery. The use of a robot is not recommended. Anti-reflux surgery is to be considered expert surgery, but there is no clear consensus what is to be called an 'expert surgeon'. As for setting, ambulatory settings seem promising although high-level evidence is lacking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  16. Intramural esophageal bleeding in a hemodialysis patient

    PubMed Central

    Lien, J. W. K.; Dufresne, L. R.; Daly, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    A case of intramural esophageal hemorrhage in a hemodialysis patient is described. The hemorrhage followed an episode of vomiting and violent retching. Spontaneous resolution occurred with conservative management. The clinical course resembled that of previous case reports of intramural esophageal hemorrhage, whether or not associated with chronic renal failure and intermittent hemodialysis. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:4434294

  17. Esophageal diverticula in Parma wallabies (Macropus parma).

    PubMed

    Okeson, Danelle M; Esterline, Meredith L; Coke, Rob L

    2009-03-01

    Four adult, wild caught Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) presented with intermittent, postprandial, midcervical swellings. Esophageal diverticula were discovered in the four animals. One of two wallabies was managed successfully with surgery. A third animal died of other causes. The fourth animal died with possible complications from the diverticulum. This is the first published report of esophageal diverticula in macropods.

  18. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal dilator. 876.5365 Section 876.5365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator. (a...

  19. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis...

  20. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis...

  1. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis...

  2. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis...

  3. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis...

  4. [Effect of nasogastric tube on esophageal mucosa].

    PubMed

    Barinagarrementeria, R; Blancas Valencia, J M; Teramoto Matsubara, O; de la Garza González, S

    1991-01-01

    We studied 30 patients. 20 were males and 10 females. Mean age was 48 year old. Esophageal disease was not present neither gastro-esophageal reflux. Biopsy was taken between 24 hours and 25 days after nasogastric tube (NG) was put into place. Endoscopic findings were: hyperemic mucosa, submucosal hemorrhage, clots, erosions and ulcers near Esophago-gastric junction. Intraepithelial edema, vessel congestion, polymorphonuclear infiltration, fibrin thrombosis of submucosal vessels, ischemia, epithelial regeneration and ulcer were common histologic findings. All endoscopic and histologic alterations were related to the length of time of NG tube contact with the esophageal mucosa. We concluded that NG tube damages the esophageal mucosa by two mechanisms: a) Local irritation that favors b) gastric reflux by decreasing lower esophageal sphincter pressure.

  5. Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Children.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Anna; Pesce, Marcella; Thapar, Nikhil; Borrelli, Osvaldo

    2017-08-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) is common in infants and children and has a varied clinical presentation: from infants with innocent regurgitation to infants and children with severe esophageal and extra-esophageal complications that define pathological gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although the pathophysiology is similar to that of adults, symptoms of GERD in infants and children are often distinct from classic ones such as heartburn. The passage of gastric contents into the esophagus is a normal phenomenon occurring many times a day both in adults and children, but, in infants, several factors contribute to exacerbate this phenomenon, including a liquid milk-based diet, recumbent position and both structural and functional immaturity of the gastro-esophageal junction. This article focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of GERD that occurs in infants and children, based on available and current guidelines.

  6. Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pesce, Marcella; Thapar, Nikhil; Borrelli, Osvaldo

    2017-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) is common in infants and children and has a varied clinical presentation: from infants with innocent regurgitation to infants and children with severe esophageal and extra-esophageal complications that define pathological gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although the pathophysiology is similar to that of adults, symptoms of GERD in infants and children are often distinct from classic ones such as heartburn. The passage of gastric contents into the esophagus is a normal phenomenon occurring many times a day both in adults and children, but, in infants, several factors contribute to exacerbate this phenomenon, including a liquid milk-based diet, recumbent position and both structural and functional immaturity of the gastro-esophageal junction. This article focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of GERD that occurs in infants and children, based on available and current guidelines. PMID:28763023

  7. Long Esophageal Stricture in a Brittle Diabetic

    PubMed Central

    Darr, Umar; Alastal, Yaseen; Yoon, Youngsook

    2017-01-01

    Aim: We report a case of atypical esophageal stricture in a young diabetic woman. Background: Diabetes mellitus and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are two common disorders in modern society. Case report: A young diabetic woman developed a 6-cm-long esophageal stricture. This stricture was refractory to multiple esophageal dilation procedures. She underwent subtotal esophagectomy and had excellent treatment outcome. Conclusion: Gastroesophageal reflux disease can cause severe long esophageal stricture in a brittle diabetic. Clinical significance: Improving the awareness of their association between diabetes and GERD would greatly benefit the day-to-day practice of medicine. How to cite this article: Pak SC, Darr U, Alastal Y, Yoon Y. Long Esophageal Stricture in a Brittle Diabetic. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2017;7(2):191-192. PMID:29201809

  8. Endoscopic Management of Benign Esophageal Strictures.

    PubMed

    Ravich, William J

    2017-08-24

    This paper presents the author's approach to esophageal dilation. It offers a tailored approach to the application of dilation to specific types of esophageal stenotic lesions. In patients with inflammatory stricture, recent studies confirm the importance of treating the underlying inflammatory condition in order to decrease the rate of recurrence. The paper reviews some of the novel techniques that have been suggested for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures, including incisional therapy, stenting, or the injection steroids or antifibrotic agents. The endoscopist who treats esophageal strictures must be familiar with the tools of the dilation and how they are best applied to specific types of stenotic lesions. If inflammation is present, effective management requires treatment of the inflammatory process in addition to mechanical dilation of the stenotic lesion. Controlled trials of novel approaches to treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures are limited and will be necessary to determine efficacy.

  9. Motile and non-motile sperm diagnostic manipulation using optoelectronic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Aaron T; Garcia, Maurice; Valley, Justin K; Banie, Lia; Hsu, Hsan-Yin; Jamshidi, Arash; Neale, Steven L; Lue, Tom; Wu, Ming C

    2010-12-07

    Optoelectronic tweezers was used to manipulate human spermatozoa to determine whether their response to OET predicts sperm viability among non-motile sperm. We review the electro-physical basis for how live and dead human spermatozoa respond to OET. The maximal velocity that non-motile spermatozoa could be induced to move by attraction or repulsion to a moving OET field was measured. Viable sperm are attracted to OET fields and can be induced to move at an average maximal velocity of 8.8 ± 4.2 µm s(-1), while non-viable sperm are repelled to OET, and are induced to move at an average maximal velocity of -0.8 ± 1.0 µm s(-1). Manipulation of the sperm using OET does not appear to result in increased DNA fragmentation, making this a potential method by which to identify viable non-motile sperm for assisted reproductive technologies.

  10. The Wireless Motility Capsule: a One-Stop Shop for the Evaluation of GI Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    Saad, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    The wireless motility and pH capsule (WMC) provides an office-based test to simultaneously assess both regional and whole gut transit. Ingestion of this non-digestible capsule capable of measuring temperature, pH, and the pressure of its immediate surroundings allows for the measurement of gastric, small bowel, and colonic transit times in an ambulatory setting. Approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the evaluation of suspected conditions of delayed gastric emptying and the evaluation of colonic transit in chronic idiopathic constipation, WMC should be considered in suspected gastrointestinal motility disorders as it provides a single study capable of simultaneously assessing for regional, multiregional, or generalized motility disorders. Specific indications for testing with the WMC should include the evaluation of suspect cases of gastroparesis, small bowel dysmotility, and slow transit constipation, as well as symptom syndromes suggestive of a multiregional or generalized gastrointestinal transit delay.

  11. Motility versus fluctuations in mixtures of self-motile and passive agents.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Denis F; Panchenko, Alexander; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Fried, Eliot

    2014-12-07

    Many biological systems consist of self-motile and passive agents both of which contribute to overall functionality. However, little is known about the properties of such mixtures. Here we formulate a model for mixtures of self-motile and passive agents and show that the model gives rise to three different dynamical phases: a disordered mesoturbulent phase, a polar flocking phase, and a vortical phase characterized by large-scale counter rotating vortices. We use numerical simulations to construct a phase diagram and compare the statistical properties of the different phases with observed features of self-motile bacterial suspensions. Our findings afford specific insights regarding the interaction of microorganisms and passive particles and provide novel strategic guidance for efficient technological realizations of artificial active matter.

  12. Progress in Mathematical Modeling of Gastrointestinal Slow Wave Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Du, Peng; Calder, Stefan; Angeli, Timothy R.; Sathar, Shameer; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; O'Grady, Gregory; Cheng, Leo K.

    2018-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility is regulated in part by electrophysiological events called slow waves, which are generated by the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Slow waves propagate by a process of “entrainment,” which occurs over a decreasing gradient of intrinsic frequencies in the antegrade direction across much of the GI tract. Abnormal initiation and conduction of slow waves have been demonstrated in, and linked to, a number of GI motility disorders. A range of mathematical models have been developed to study abnormal slow waves and applied to propose novel methods for non-invasive detection and therapy. This review provides a general outline of GI slow wave abnormalities and their recent classification using multi-electrode (high-resolution) mapping methods, with a particular emphasis on the spatial patterns of these abnormal activities. The recently-developed mathematical models are introduced in order of their biophysical scale from cellular to whole-organ levels. The modeling techniques, main findings from the simulations, and potential future directions arising from notable studies are discussed. PMID:29379448

  13. [Non-neoplastic esophageal stenosis: not always so benign].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Julie; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuilleumier, Henri; Schwab, Marcos

    2013-10-02

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis is a rare pathology whose etiology is unknown, but which is frequently associated with three highly prevalent entities: esophageal reflux disease, esophageal candidosis and alcoholic esophagitis. With conservative treatment the course of these pathologies is usually benign. However, some severe cases are resistant to conservative treatment and may require more aggressive management. We here present the case of patient suffering from a severe esophagitis complicated by chronic mediastinitis with life-threatening repercussions, requiring esophagectomy as treatment.

  14. The potential therapeutic effect of melatonin in Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Kandil, Tharwat S; Mousa, Amany A; El-Gendy, Ahmed A; Abbas, Amr M

    2010-01-18

    Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) defined as a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. Many drugs are used for the treatment of GERD such as omeprazole (a proton pump inhibitor) which is a widely used antiulcer drug demonstrated to protect against esophageal mucosal injury. Melatonin has been found to protect the gastrointestinal mucosa from oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species in different experimental ulcer models. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of exogenous melatonin in the treatment of reflux disease in humans either alone or in combination with omeprazole therapy. 36 persons were divided into 4 groups (control subjects, patients with reflux disease treated with melatonin alone, omeprazole alone and a combination of melatonin and omeprazole for 4 and 8 weeks) Each group consisted of 9 persons. Persons were subjected to thorough history taking, clinical examination, and investigations including laboratory, endoscopic, record of esophageal motility, pH-metry, basal acid output and serum gastrin. Melatonin has a role in the improvement of Gastro-esophageal reflux disease when used alone or in combination with omeprazole. Meanwhile, omeprazole alone is better used in the treatment of GERD than melatonin alone. The present study showed that oral melatonin is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of GERD. It is an effective line of treatment in relieving epigastric pain and heartburn. However, further studies are required to confirm the efficacy and long-term safety of melatonin before being recommended for routine clinical use. QA13NCT00915616.

  15. Incidence of Achalasia in South Australia Based on Esophageal Manometry Findings.

    PubMed

    Duffield, Jaime A; Hamer, Peter W; Heddle, Richard; Holloway, Richard H; Myers, Jennifer C; Thompson, Sarah K

    2017-03-01

    Achalasia is a disorder of esophageal motility with a reported incidence of 0.5 to 1.6 per 100,000 persons per year in Europe, Asia, Canada, and America. However, estimates of incidence values have been derived predominantly from retrospective searches of databases of hospital discharge codes and personal communications with gastroenterologists, and are likely to be incorrect. We performed a cohort study based on esophageal manometry findings to determine the incidence of achalasia in South Australia. We collected data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics on the South Australian population. Cases of achalasia diagnosed by esophageal manometry were identified from the 3 adult manometry laboratory databases in South Australia. Endoscopy reports and case notes were reviewed for correlations with diagnoses. The annual incidence of achalasia in the South Australian population was calculated for the decade 2004 to 2013. Findings were standardized to those of the European Standard Population based on age. The annual incidence of achalasia in South Australia ranged from 2.3 to 2.8 per 100,000 persons. The mean age at diagnosis was 62.1 ± 18.1 years. The incidence of achalasia increased with age (Spearman rho, 0.95; P < .01). The age-standardized incidence ranged from 2.1 (95% CI, 1.8-2.3) to 2.5 (95% CI, 2.2-2.7). Based on a cohort study of esophageal manometry, we determined the incidence of achalasia in South Australia to be 2.3 to 2.8 per 100,000 persons and to increase with age. South Australia's relative geographic isolation and the population's access to manometry allowed for more accurate identification of cases than hospital code analyses, with a low probability of missed cases. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi Detection in Colombian Patients with a Diagnosis of Esophageal Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Panesso-Gómez, Santiago; Pavia, Paula; Rodríguez-Mantilla, Iván Enrique; Lasso, Paola; Orozco, Luis A; Cuellar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción J; Mendoza de Molano, Belén; González, John M

    2018-03-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus that might be secondary to a chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Several studies have investigated esophageal achalasia in patients with Chagas disease (CD) in Latin America, but no related studies have been performed in Colombia. The goals of the present study were to determine the presence of anti- T. cruzi antibodies in patients with esophageal achalasia who visited a referral hospital in Bogotá, Colombia, and to detect the presence of the parasite and its discrete typing units (DTUs). This cross-sectional study was conducted in adult patients (18-65 years old) who were previously diagnosed with esophageal achalasia and from whom blood was drawn to assess antibodies against T. cruzi using four different serological tests. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was detected by conventional polymerase chain reaction (cPCR) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). In total, 38 patients, with an average age of 46.6 years (standard deviation of ±16.2) and comprising 16 men and 22 women, were enrolled. Five (13.15%) patients were found to be positive for anti- T. cruzi antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA), and two patients who were negative according to IFA were reactive by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot (5.3%). Parasite DNA was detected in two of these seven patients by cPCR and in one of these by qPCR. The parasite DTU obtained was TcI. In summary, this study identified T. cruzi in Colombian patients with esophageal achalasia, indicating that digestive compromise could also be present in patients with chronic CD.

  17. Esophagectomy for Superficial Esophageal Neoplasia.