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Sample records for abnormal expression localization

  1. Prognostic Value of Abnormal p53 Expression in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated With Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy: A Study Based on RTOG 9202

    SciTech Connect

    Che Mingxin; DeSilvio, Michelle; Pollack, Alan

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to verify the significance of p53 as a prognostic factor in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9202, which compared short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) with radiation therapy (RT) to long-term androgen deprivation + RT in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (Pca). Methods and Materials: Tumor tissue was sufficient for p53 analysis in 777 cases. p53 status was determined by immunohistochemistry. Abnormal p53 expression was defined as 20% or more tumor cells with positive nuclei. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationships of p53 status to patient outcomes. Results:more » Abnormal p53 was detected in 168 of 777 (21.6%) cases, and was significantly associated with cause-specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 - 3.14; p = 0.014) and distant metastasis (adjusted HR = 1.72; 95% CI 1.13-2.62; p = 0.013). When patients were divided into subgroups according to assigned treatment, only the subgroup of patients who underwent STAD + RT showed significant correlation between p53 status and cause-specific mortality (adjusted HR = 2.43; 95% CI = 1.32-4.49; p = 0.0044). When patients were divided into subgroups according to p53 status, only the subgroup of patients with abnormal p53 showed significant association between assigned treatment and cause-specific mortality (adjusted HR = 3.81; 95% CI 1.40-10.37; p = 0.0087). Conclusions: Abnormal p53 is a significant prognostic factor for patients with prostate cancer who undergo short-term androgen deprivation and radiotherapy. Long-term androgen deprivation may significantly improve the cause-specific survival for those with abnormal p53.« less

  2. Abnormal global and local event detection in compressive sensing domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tian; Qiao, Meina; Chen, Jie; Wang, Chuanyun; Zhang, Wenjia; Snoussi, Hichem

    2018-05-01

    Abnormal event detection, also known as anomaly detection, is one challenging task in security video surveillance. It is important to develop effective and robust movement representation models for global and local abnormal event detection to fight against factors such as occlusion and illumination change. In this paper, a new algorithm is proposed. It can locate the abnormal events on one frame, and detect the global abnormal frame. The proposed algorithm employs a sparse measurement matrix designed to represent the movement feature based on optical flow efficiently. Then, the abnormal detection mission is constructed as a one-class classification task via merely learning from the training normal samples. Experiments demonstrate that our algorithm performs well on the benchmark abnormal detection datasets against state-of-the-art methods.

  3. Intranuclear inclusions of meningioma associated with abnormal cytoskeletal protein expression.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T; Hirato, J; Sasaki, A; Yokoo, H; Nakazato, Y; Kurachi, H

    1999-01-01

    We describe a case of meningothelial meningioma with a large number of intranuclear inclusions. Morphologically, these are divided into cytoplasmic inclusions and nuclear vacuoles. The cytoplasmic inclusion has a limiting membrane with cell organelles and filaments. Inclusions of this type are generally eosinophilic, like the cytoplasm. However, there are many inclusions that are more eosinophilic than the cytoplasm or that have a ground-glass appearance. Some of them may contain fine or coarse granules. On the other hand, the nuclear vacuole lacks a limiting membrane and appears empty. In most of the inclusions of this type, there is a faintly basophilic substance in the margin. Generally, the cytoplasmic inclusions are as immunopositive as cytoplasm with vimentin, but some of these cytoplasmic inclusions are more reactive. Under the electron microscope, abnormal aggregation of intermediate filaments is recognized in the cytoplasmic inclusions. It is considered that a strong reaction of cytoplasmic inclusions with vimentin immunostaining is due to abnormal aggregation of intermediate filaments. The present study distinctly demonstrates abnormal localization of intermediate filaments in the cytoplasmic inclusions, and it is suggested that the cytoskeleton participates in the evolution of the cytoplasmic inclusions.

  4. GPER and ERα expression in abnormal endometrial proliferations.

    PubMed

    Tica, Andrei Adrian; Tica, Oana Sorina; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Pirici, Daniel; Bogdan, Maria; Ciurea, Tudorel; Mogoantă, Stelian ŞtefăniŢă; Georgescu, Corneliu Cristian; Comănescu, Alexandru Cristian; Bălşeanu, Tudor Adrian; Ciurea, Raluca Niculina; Osiac, Eugen; Buga, Ana Maria; Ciurea, Marius Eugen

    2016-01-01

    G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER), a particular extranuclear estrogen receptor (ER), seems not to be significantly involved in normal female phenotype development but especially associated with severe genital malignancies. This study investigated the GPER expression in different types of normal and abnormal proliferative endometrium, and the correlation with the presence of ERα. GPER was much highly expressed in cytoplasm (than onto cell membrane), contrary to ERα, which was almost exclusively located in the nucleus. Both ERs' densities were higher in columnar epithelial then in stromal cells, according with higher estrogen-sensitivity of epithelial cells. GPER and ERα density decreased as follows: complex endometrial hyperplasia (CEH) > simple endometrial hyperplasia (SHE) > normal proliferative endometrium (NPE) > atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH), ERα' density being constantly higher. In endometrial adenocarcinomas, both ERs were significant lower expressed, and widely varied, but GPER÷ERα ratio was significantly increased in high-grade lesions. The nuclear ERα is responsible for the genomic (the most important) mechanism of action of estrogens, involved in cell growth and multiplication. In normal and benign proliferations, ERα expression is increased as an evidence of its effects on cells with conserved architecture, in atypical and especially in malignant cells ERα's (and GPER's) density being much lower. Cytoplasmic GPER probably interfere with different tyrosine÷protein kinases signaling pathways, also involved in cell growth and proliferation. In benign endometrial lesions, GPER's presence is, at least partially, the result of an inductor effect of ERα on GPER gene transcription. In high-grade lesions, GPER÷ERα ratio was increased, demonstrating that GPER is involved per se in malignant endometrial proliferations.

  5. Localized Hotspots Drive Continental Geography of Abnormal Amphibians on U.S. Wildlife Refuges

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Mari K.; Medley, Kimberly A.; Pinkney, Alfred E.; Holyoak, Marcel; Johnson, Pieter T. J.; Lannoo, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians with missing, misshapen, and extra limbs have garnered public and scientific attention for two decades, yet the extent of the phenomenon remains poorly understood. Despite progress in identifying the causes of abnormalities in some regions, a lack of knowledge about their broader spatial distribution and temporal dynamics has hindered efforts to understand their implications for amphibian population declines and environmental quality. To address this data gap, we conducted a nationwide, 10-year assessment of 62,947 amphibians on U.S. National Wildlife Refuges. Analysis of a core dataset of 48,081 individuals revealed that consistent with expected background frequencies, an average of 2% were abnormal, but abnormalities exhibited marked spatial variation with a maximum prevalence of 40%. Variance partitioning analysis demonstrated that factors associated with space (rather than species or year sampled) captured 97% of the variation in abnormalities, and the amount of partitioned variance decreased with increasing spatial scale (from site to refuge to region). Consistent with this, abnormalities occurred in local to regional hotspots, clustering at scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers. We detected such hotspot clusters of high-abnormality sites in the Mississippi River Valley, California, and Alaska. Abnormality frequency was more variable within than outside of hotspot clusters. This is consistent with dynamic phenomena such as disturbance or natural enemies (pathogens or predators), whereas similarity of abnormality frequencies at scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers suggests involvement of factors that are spatially consistent at a regional scale. Our characterization of the spatial and temporal variation inherent in continent-wide amphibian abnormalities demonstrates the disproportionate contribution of local factors in predicting hotspots, and the episodic nature of their occurrence. PMID:24260103

  6. Abnormal Image Detection in Endoscopy Videos Using a Filter Bank and Local Binary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Nawarathna, Ruwan; Oh, JungHwan; Muthukudage, Jayantha; Tavanapong, Wallapak; Wong, Johnny; de Groen, Piet C.; Tang, Shou Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Finding mucosal abnormalities (e.g., erythema, blood, ulcer, erosion, and polyp) is one of the most essential tasks during endoscopy video review. Since these abnormalities typically appear in a small number of frames (around 5% of the total frame number), automated detection of frames with an abnormality can save physician’s time significantly. In this paper, we propose a new multi-texture analysis method that effectively discerns images showing mucosal abnormalities from the ones without any abnormality since most abnormalities in endoscopy images have textures that are clearly distinguishable from normal textures using an advanced image texture analysis method. The method uses a “texton histogram” of an image block as features. The histogram captures the distribution of different “textons” representing various textures in an endoscopy image. The textons are representative response vectors of an application of a combination of Leung and Malik (LM) filter bank (i.e., a set of image filters) and a set of Local Binary Patterns on the image. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed method achieves 92% recall and 91.8% specificity on wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) images and 91% recall and 90.8% specificity on colonoscopy images. PMID:25132723

  7. Abnormal expression of leiomyoma cytoskeletal proteins involved in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ura, Blendi; Scrimin, Federica; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Aloisio, Michelangelo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Ricci, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are monoclonal tumors. Several factors are involved in the neoplastic transformation of the myometrium. In our study we focused on dysregulated cytoskeletal proteins in the leiomyoma as compared to the myometrium. Paired tissue samples of ten leiomyomas and adjacent myometria were obtained and analyzed by two‑dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass spectrometry was used for protein identification, and western blotting for 2-DE data validation. The values of ten cytoskeletal proteins were found to be significantly different: eight proteins were upregulated in the leiomyoma and two proteins were downregulated. Three of the upregulated proteins (myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9, four and a half LIM domains protein 1 and LIM and SH3 domain protein 1) are involved in cell migration, while downregulated protein transgelin is involved in replicative senescence. Myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9) was further validated by western blotting because it is considered to be a cell migration marker in several cancers and could play a key role in leiomyoma development. Our data demonstrate significant alterations in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins involved in leiomyoma growth. A better understanding of the involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in leiomyoma pathogenesis may contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new pharmacological approaches.

  8. Association of abnormal morphology and altered gene expression in human preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Wells, Dagan; Bermúdez, Mercedes G; Steuerwald, Nury; Malter, Henry E; Thornhill, Alan R; Cohen, Jacques

    2005-08-01

    We set out to characterize the expression of nine genes in human preimplantation embryos and determine whether abnormal morphology is associated with altered gene activity. Reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to quantify the expression of multiple genes in each embryo. The genes studied have various important cellular roles (e.g., cell cycle regulation, DNA repair, and apoptosis). Research laboratory working closely with a clinical IVF practice. Over 50 embryos were donated by infertile patients (various etiologies). Among these, all major stages of preimplantation development and a variety of common morphologic abnormalities were represented. None. Quantification of mRNA transcripts. We detected an association between certain forms of abnormal morphology and disturbances of gene activity. Cellular fragmentation was associated with altered expression of several genes, including TP53, suggesting that fragmenting blastomeres are suffering stress of a type monitored by p53, possibly as a consequence of suboptimal culture conditions. Appropriate gene expression is vital for the regulation of metabolic pathways and key developmental events. Our data indicates a possible causal relationship between changes in gene expression and the formation of clinically relevant abnormal embryo morphologies. We hypothesize that embryos with expression profiles characteristic of good morphology and appropriate for their developmental stage have the greatest potential for implantation. If confirmed, this could lead to a new generation of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) tests for assessing embryo viability and predicting implantation potential.

  9. Impaired coupling of local and global functional feedbacks underlies abnormal synchronization and negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kyungchul; Shin, Kyung Soon; Shin, Dongkwan; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, June Sic; Jang, Joon Hwan; Chung, Chun Kee; Kwon, Jun Soo; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2013-04-10

    Abnormal synchronization of brain oscillations is found to be associated with various core symptoms of schizophrenia. However, the underlying mechanism of this association remains yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that coupled local and global feedback (CLGF) circuits in the cortical functional network are related to the abnormal synchronization and also correlated to the negative symptom of schizophrenia. Analysis of the magnetoencephalography data obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia during rest revealed an increase in beta band synchronization and a reduction in gamma band power compared to healthy controls. Using a feedback identification method based on non-causal impulse responses, we constructed functional feedback networks and found that CLGF circuits were significantly reduced in schizophrenia. From computational analysis on the basis of the Wilson-Cowan model, we unraveled that the CLGF circuits are critically involved in the abnormal synchronization and the dynamical switching between beta and gamma bands power in schizophrenia. Moreover, we found that the abundance of CLGF circuits was negatively correlated with the development of negative symptoms of schizophrenia, suggesting that the negative symptom is closely related to the impairment of this circuit. Our study implicates that patients with schizophrenia might have the impaired coupling of inter- and intra-regional functional feedbacks and that the CLGF circuit might serve as a critical bridge between abnormal synchronization and the negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  10. Expression of human PQBP-1 in Drosophila impairs long-term memory and induces abnormal courtship.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Natsue; Horiuchi, Daisuke; Shibata, Masao; Saitoe, Minoru; Qi, Mei-Ling; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2006-04-17

    Frame shift mutations of the polyglutamine binding protein-1 (PQBP1) gene lead to total or partial truncation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) and cause mental retardation in human patients. Interestingly, normal Drosophila homologue of PQBP-1 lacks CTD. As a model to analyze the molecular network of PQBP-1 affecting intelligence, we generated transgenic flies expressing human PQBP-1 with CTD. Pavlovian olfactory conditioning revealed that the transgenic flies showed disturbance of long-term memory. In addition, they showed abnormal courtship that male flies follow male flies. Abnormal functions of PQBP-1 or its binding partner might be linked to these symptoms.

  11. CAFE: an R package for the detection of gross chromosomal abnormalities from gene expression microarray data.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Sander; Leddin, Mathias; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Mah, Nancy

    2014-05-15

    The current methods available to detect chromosomal abnormalities from DNA microarray expression data are cumbersome and inflexible. CAFE has been developed to alleviate these issues. It is implemented as an R package that analyzes Affymetrix *.CEL files and comes with flexible plotting functions, easing visualization of chromosomal abnormalities. CAFE is available from https://bitbucket.org/cob87icW6z/cafe/ as both source and compiled packages for Linux and Windows. It is released under the GPL version 3 license. CAFE will also be freely available from Bioconductor. sander.h.bollen@gmail.com or nancy.mah@mdc-berlin.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Correlation between CD34 expression and chromosomal abnormalities but not clinical outcome in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fruchart, C; Lenormand, B; Bastard, C; Boulet, D; Lesesve, J F; Callat, M P; Stamatoullas, A; Monconduit, M; Tilly, H

    1996-11-01

    The hemopoietic stem cell marker CD34 has been reported to be a useful predictor of treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previous data suggested that CD34 expression may be associated with other poor prognosis factors in AML such as undifferentiated leukemia, secondary AML (SAML), and clonal abnormalities involving chromosome 5 and 7. In order to analyze the correlations between the clinicopathologic features, cytogenetic and CD34 expression in AML, we retrospectively investigated 99 patients with newly diagnosed AML: 85 with de novo disease and 14 with secondary AML (SAML). Eighty-six patients who received the same induction chemotherapy were available for clinical outcome. Defining a case as positive when > or = 20% of bone marrow cells collected at diagnosis expressed the CD34 antigen, forty-five patients were included in the CD34 positive group. Ninety patients had adequate cytogenetic analysis. Thirty-two patients (72%) with CD34 positive AML exhibited an abnormal karyotype whereas 15 patients (28%) with CD34 negative AML had abnormal metaphases (P < 0.01). Monosomy 7/7q- or monosomy 5/5q- occurred in 10 patients and 8 of them expressed the CD34 antigen (P < 0.05). All patients with t(8;21) which is considered as a favorable factor in AML had levels of CD34 >/= 20% (P < 0.05). We did not find any association between CD34 expression and attainment of complete remission, overall survival, or disease-free survival. In conclusion, the variations of CD34 expression in AML are correlated with cytogenetic abnormalities associated both with poor and favorable outcome. The evaluation of the correlations between CD34 antigen and clinical outcome in AML should take into account the results of pretreatment karyotype.

  13. Abnormal expression of ephrin-A5 affects brain development of congenital hypothyroidism rats.

    PubMed

    Suo, Guihai; Shen, Feifei; Sun, Baolan; Song, Honghua; Xu, Meiyu; Wu, Youjia

    2018-05-14

    EphA5 and its ligand ephrin-A5 interaction can trigger synaptogenesis during early hippocampus development. We have previously reported that abnormal EphA5 expression can result in synaptogenesis disorder in congenital hypothyroidism (CH) rats. To better understand its precise molecular mechanism, we further analyzed the characteristics of ephrin-A5 expression in the hippocampus of CH rats. Our study revealed that ephrin-A5 expression was downregulated by thyroid hormone deficiency in the developing hippocampus and hippocampal neurons in rats. Thyroxine treatment for hypothyroid hippocampus and triiodothyronine treatment for hypothyroid hippocampal neurons significantly improved ephrin-A5 expression but could not restore its expression to control levels. Hypothyroid hippocampal neurons in-vitro showed synaptogenesis disorder characterized by a reduction in the number and length of neurites. Furthermore, the synaptogenesis-associated molecular expressions of NMDAR-1 (NR1), PSD95 and CaMKII were all downregulated correspondingly. These results suggest that ephrin-A5 expression may be decreased in CH, and abnormal activation of ephrin-A5/EphA5 signaling affects synaptogenesis during brain development. Such findings provide an important basis for exploring the pathogenesis of CH genetically.

  14. The Association of PTSD Symptom Severity with Localized Hippocampus and Amygdala Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Akiki, Teddy J.; Averill, Christopher L.; Wrocklage, Kristen M.; Schweinsburg, Brian; Scott, J. Cobb; Martini, Brenda; Averill, Lynnette A.; Southwick, Steven M.; Krystal, John H.; Abdallah, Chadi G.

    2017-01-01

    Background The hippocampus and amygdala have been repeatedly implicated in the psychopathology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While numerous structural neuroimaging studies examined these two structures in PTSD, these analyses have largely been limited to volumetric measures. Recent advances in vertex-based neuroimaging methods have made it possible to identify specific locations of subtle morphometric changes within a structure of interest. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging to examine the relationship between PTSD symptomatology, as measured using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale for the DSM-IV (CAPS), and structural shape of the hippocampus and amygdala using vertex-wise shape analyses in a group of combat-exposed US Veterans (N = 69). Results Following correction for multiple comparisons and controlling for age and cranial volume, we found that participants with more severe PTSD symptoms showed an indentation in the anterior half of the right hippocampus and an indentation in the dorsal region of the right amygdala (corresponding to the centromedial amygdala). Post hoc analysis using stepwise regression suggest that among PTSD symptom clusters, arousal symptoms explain most of the variance in the hippocampal abnormality, whereas re-experiencing symptoms explain most of the variance in the amygdala abnormality. Conclusion The results provide evidence of localized abnormalities in the anterior hippocampus and centromedial amygdala in combat-exposed US Veterans suffering from PTSD symptoms. This novel finding provides a more fine-grained analysis of structural abnormalities in PTSD and may be informative for understanding the neurobiology of the disorder. PMID:28825050

  15. Expression of Mutant Human DISC1 in Mice Supports Abnormalities in Differentiation of Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Katsel, Pavel; Tan, Weilun; Abazyan, Bagrat; Davis, Kenneth L; Ross, Christopher; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Haroutunian, Vahram

    2011-01-01

    Abnormalities in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and OLG gene expression deficit have been described in schizophrenia (SZ). Recent studies revealed a critical requirement for Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) in neural development. Transgenic mice with forebrain restricted expression of mutant human DISC1 (ΔhDISC1) are characterized by neuroanatomical and behavioral abnormalities reminiscent of some features of SZ. We sought to determine whether the expression of ΔhDISC1 may influence the development of OLGs in this mouse model. OLG- and cell cycle-associated gene and protein expression were characterized in the forebrain of ΔhDISC1 mice during different stages of neurodevelopment (E15 and P1 days) and in adulthood. The results suggest that the expression of ΔhDISC1 exerts a significant influence on oligodendrocyte differentiation and function, evidenced by premature OLG differentiation and increased proliferation of their progenitors. Additional findings showed that neuregulin 1 and its receptors may be contributing factors to the observed upregulation of OLG genes. Thus, OLG function may be perturbed by mutant hDISC1 in a model system that provides new avenues for studying aspects of the pathogenesis of SZ. PMID:21605958

  16. Altered localization, abnormal modification and loss of function of Sigma receptor-1 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prause, J; Goswami, A; Katona, I; Roos, A; Schnizler, M; Bushuven, E; Dreier, A; Buchkremer, S; Johann, S; Beyer, C; Deschauer, M; Troost, D; Weis, J

    2013-04-15

    Intracellular accumulations of mutant, misfolded proteins are major pathological hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and related disorders. Recently, mutations in Sigma receptor 1 (SigR1) have been found to cause a form of ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Our goal was to pinpoint alterations and modifications of SigR1 in ALS and to determine how these changes contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS. In the present study, we found that levels of the SigR1 protein were reduced in lumbar ALS patient spinal cord. SigR1 was abnormally accumulated in enlarged C-terminals and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) structures of alpha motor neurons. These accumulations co-localized with the 20s proteasome subunit. SigR1 accumulations were also observed in SOD1 transgenic mice, cultured ALS-8 patient's fibroblasts with the P56S-VAPB mutation and in neuronal cell culture models. Along with the accumulation of SigR1 and several other proteins involved in protein quality control, severe disturbances in the unfolded protein response and impairment of protein degradation pathways were detected in the above-mentioned cell culture systems. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of SigR1 lead to deranged calcium signaling and caused abnormalities in ER and Golgi structures in cultured NSC-34 cells. Finally, pharmacological activation of SigR1 induced the clearance of mutant protein aggregates in these cells. Our results support the notion that SigR1 is abnormally modified and contributes to the pathogenesis of ALS.

  17. Abnormal functional global and local brain connectivity in female patients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Daniel; Borchardt, Viola; Lord, Anton R.; Boehm, Ilka; Ritschel, Franziska; Zwipp, Johannes; Clas, Sabine; King, Joseph A.; Wolff-Stephan, Silvia; Roessner, Veit; Walter, Martin; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous resting-state functional connectivity studies in patients with anorexia nervosa used independent component analysis or seed-based connectivity analysis to probe specific brain networks. Instead, modelling the entire brain as a complex network allows determination of graph-theoretical metrics, which describe global and local properties of how brain networks are organized and how they interact. Methods To determine differences in network properties between female patients with acute anorexia nervosa and pairwise matched healthy controls, we used resting-state fMRI and computed well-established global and local graph metrics across a range of network densities. Results Our analyses included 35 patients and 35 controls. We found that the global functional network structure in patients with anorexia nervosa is characterized by increases in both characteristic path length (longer average routes between nodes) and assortativity (more nodes with a similar connectedness link together). Accordingly, we found locally decreased connectivity strength and increased path length in the posterior insula and thalamus. Limitations The present results may be limited to the methods applied during preprocessing and network construction. Conclusion We demonstrated anorexia nervosa–related changes in the network configuration for, to our knowledge, the first time using resting-state fMRI and graph-theoretical measures. Our findings revealed an altered global brain network architecture accompanied by local degradations indicating wide-scale disturbance in information flow across brain networks in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Reduced local network efficiency in the thalamus and posterior insula may reflect a mechanism that helps explain the impaired integration of visuospatial and homeostatic signals in patients with this disorder, which is thought to be linked to abnormal representations of body size and hunger. PMID:26252451

  18. Abnormal functional global and local brain connectivity in female patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Daniel; Borchardt, Viola; Lord, Anton R; Boehm, Ilka; Ritschel, Franziska; Zwipp, Johannes; Clas, Sabine; King, Joseph A; Wolff-Stephan, Silvia; Roessner, Veit; Walter, Martin; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Previous resting-state functional connectivity studies in patients with anorexia nervosa used independent component analysis or seed-based connectivity analysis to probe specific brain networks. Instead, modelling the entire brain as a complex network allows determination of graph-theoretical metrics, which describe global and local properties of how brain networks are organized and how they interact. To determine differences in network properties between female patients with acute anorexia nervosa and pairwise matched healthy controls, we used resting-state fMRI and computed well-established global and local graph metrics across a range of network densities. Our analyses included 35 patients and 35 controls. We found that the global functional network structure in patients with anorexia nervosa is characterized by increases in both characteristic path length (longer average routes between nodes) and assortativity (more nodes with a similar connectedness link together). Accordingly, we found locally decreased connectivity strength and increased path length in the posterior insula and thalamus. The present results may be limited to the methods applied during preprocessing and network construction. We demonstrated anorexia nervosa-related changes in the network configuration for, to our knowledge, the first time using resting-state fMRI and graph-theoretical measures. Our findings revealed an altered global brain network architecture accompanied by local degradations indicating wide-scale disturbance in information flow across brain networks in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Reduced local network efficiency in the thalamus and posterior insula may reflect a mechanism that helps explain the impaired integration of visuospatial and homeostatic signals in patients with this disorder, which is thought to be linked to abnormal representations of body size and hunger.

  19. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Is Associated With Increased BMP7 Expression in Human Endometrium.

    PubMed

    Richards, Elliott G; El-Nashar, Sherif A; Schoolmeester, John K; Keeney, Gary L; Mariani, Andrea; Hopkins, Matthew R; Dowdy, Sean C; Daftary, Gaurang S; Famuyide, Abimbola O

    2017-05-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB), a common health concern of women, is a heterogeneous clinical entity that is traditionally categorized into organic and nonorganic causes. Despite varied pharmacologic treatments, few offer sustained efficacy, as most are empiric, unfocused, and do not directly address underlying dysregulated molecular mechanisms. Characterization of such molecular derangements affords the opportunity to develop and use novel, more successful treatments for AUB. Given its implication in other organ systems, we hypothesized that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) expression is altered in patients with AUB and hence comprehensively investigated dysregulation of BMP signaling pathways by systematically screening 489 samples from 365 patients for differences in the expression of BMP2, 4, 6, and 7 ligands, BMPR1A and B receptors, and downstream SMAD4, 6, and 7 proteins. Expression analysis was correlated clinically with data abstracted from medical records, including bleeding history, age at procedure, ethnicity, body mass index, hormone treatment, and histological diagnosis of fibroids, polyps, adenomyosis, hyperplasia, and cancer. Expression of BMP7 ligand was significantly increased in patients with AUB (H-score: 18.0 vs 26.7; P < .0001). Patients reporting heavy menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia) as their specific AUB pattern demonstrated significantly higher BMP7 expression. Significantly, no differences in the expression of any other BMP ligands, receptors, or SMAD proteins were observed in this large patient cohort. However, expression of BMPR1A, BMPR1B, and SMAD4 was significantly decreased in cancer compared to benign samples. Our study demonstrates that BMP7 is a promising target for future investigation and pharmacologic treatment of AUB.

  20. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes in endometrium of women with abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Grzechocinska, Barbara; Dabrowski, Filip A; Chlebus, Marcin; Gondek, Agata; Czarzasta, Katarzyna; Michalowski, Lukasz; Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka; Wielgos, Miroslaw

    2018-02-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is caused by derangement of physiological processes of tissue growth, shedding and regeneration. It is known that interplay between metalloproteinases (MMP's) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP's) may play a crucial role in its occurrence. To define if expression of proMMP-2, MMP-2 and TIMP-1 in endometrium of women with AUB is dependent on steroid sex hormone concentration and histopathological picture. Endometrial scraps were taken from 21 women with AUB and 19 controls. Samples were evaluated in light microscopy by a certified pathologist. Activity of proMMP-2 and MMP-2 proteins levels were evaluated by gelatin zymography and TIMP-1 by reversed zymography. The results has been correlated with serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations in linear regression model. Expression: of proMMP-2 in endometrium of women with AUB is correlated with estradiol concentration and inversely correlated with progesterone levels. It was significantly higher in women with dysfunctional endometrium (p<0.001). Expression of MMP-2 was highest in women with endometrial polyps and longer bleeding (p<0.01), while expression of TIMP-1 was independent from hormone concentration. Lack of correlation between proMMP-2 and MMP-2 levels suggest different pathway of their activation in AUB. ProMMP-2 is up regulated by estradiol and down regulated by progesterone while MMP-2 levels increase with the length of bleeding.

  1. BILLBOARD EXPRESSING LOCAL HUMOR CONCERNING FLOOD DAMAGE TO WALNUT STREET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BILLBOARD EXPRESSING LOCAL HUMOR CONCERNING FLOOD DAMAGE TO WALNUT STREET BRIDGE, I-83 SOUTHBOUND, LOOKING WEST. BILLBOARD EXPRESSING LOCAL HUMOR CONCERNING FLOOD DAMAGE TO WALNUT STREET BRIDGE, I-83 SOUTHBOUND, LOOKING WEST. - Walnut Street Bridge, Spanning Susquehanna River at Walnut Street (State Route 3034), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  2. Impaired leptin expression and abnormal response to fasting in corticotropin-releasing hormone-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Sakihara, Satoru; Widmaier, Eric P; Majzoub, Joseph A

    2004-07-01

    Leptin has been postulated to comprise part of an adipostat, whereby during states of excessive energy storage, elevated levels of the hormone prevent further weight gain by inhibiting appetite. A physiological role for leptin in this regard remains unclear because the presence of excessive food, and therefore the need to restrain overeating under natural conditions, is doubtful. We have previously shown that CRH-deficient (Crh(-/-)) mice have glucocorticoid insufficiency and lack the fasting-induced increase in glucocorticoid, a hormone important in stimulating leptin synthesis and secretion. We hypothesized that these mice might have low circulating leptin. Indeed, Crh(-/-) mice exhibited no diurnal variation of leptin, whereas normal littermates showed a clear rhythm, and their leptin levels were lower than their counterparts. A continuous peripheral CRH infusion to Crh(-/-) mice not only restored corticosterone levels, but it also increased leptin expression to normal. Surprisingly, 36 h of fasting elevated leptin levels in Crh(-/-) mice, rather than falling as in normal mice. This abnormal leptin change during fasting in Crh(-/-) mice was corrected by corticosterone replacement. Furthermore, Crh(-/-) mice lost less body weight during 24 h of fasting and ate less food during refeeding than normal littermates. Taken together, we conclude that glucocorticoid insufficiency in Crh(-/-) mice results in impaired leptin production as well as an abnormal increase in leptin during fasting, and propose that the fast-induced physiological reduction in leptin may play an important role to stimulate food intake during the recovery from fasting.

  3. Gene expression during skeletal development in three osteopetrotic rat mutations. Evidence for osteoblast abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Shalhoub, V; Jackson, M E; Lian, J B; Stein, G S; Marks, S C

    1991-05-25

    Osteopetrosis is a group of metabolic bone diseases characterized by reductions in osteoclast development and/or function. These aspects of osteoclast biology are known to be influenced by osteoblasts and their products. To ascertain whether osteoblast dysfunction contributes to aberrations in the structural and functional properties of osteoclasts in osteopetrosis, we systematically examined gene expression as reflected by mRNA levels for a series of cell growth- and tissue-related genes associated with the osteoblast phenotype during skeletal development in normal and mutant rats of three different osteopetrotic stocks. We show that the methods used permit the reproducible isolation of undegraded total cellular RNA from bone and that mRNA levels can be reliably quantitated in these preparations. Each osteopetrotic mutation exhibits a distinct aberrant pattern of osteoblast gene expression that may be correlated with and explain some abnormalities in extracellular matrix composition, mineralization, osteoclast development, and effects of elevated serum levels of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, depending upon the mutation. Normal rats show minor variations in gene expression that reflect the genetic background (stock). This, the first comprehensive molecular analysis of osteoblast gene expression in osteopetrosis, suggests that some osteopetroses, particularly in the toothless rat, are associated with and potentially related to mechanisms associated with aberrations in osteoblast function. More generally, the present studies demonstrate alterations in gene expression as reflected by mRNA levels that are associated with functional properties of the osteoblast, particularly those contributing to the recruitment and/or differentiation of osteoclasts, thereby influencing skeletal modeling.

  4. Gene expression abnormalities in histologically normal breast epithelium from patients with luminal type of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zubor, Pavol; Hatok, Jozef; Moricova, Petra; Kajo, Karol; Kapustova, Ivana; Mendelova, Andrea; Racay, Peter; Danko, Jan

    2015-05-01

    The gene expression profile of breast cancer has been described as a great breakthrough on the way to comprehend differences in cancer origin, behavior and therapy. However, gene expression profile in histologically normal epithelium (HNEpi) which could harbor genetic abnormalities predisposing breast tissue to develop malignancy was minor scope for scientists in the past. Thus, we aimed to analyze gene expressions in HNEpi and breast cancer tissue (BCTis) in order to establish its value as potential diagnostic marker for cancer development. We evaluated a panel of disease-specific genes in luminal type (A/B) of breast cancer and tumor surrounding HNEpi by qRT-PCR Array in 32 microdissected samples. There was 20.2 and 2.4% deregulation rate in genes with at least 2-fold or 5-fold over-expression between luminal (A/B) type breast carcinomas and tumor surrounding HNEpi, respectively. The high-grade luminal carcinomas showed higher number of deregulated genes compared to low-grade cases (50.6 vs. 23.8% with at least 2-fold deregulation rate). The main overexpressed genes in HNEpi were KLK5, SCGB1D2, GSN, EGFR and NGFR. The significant differences in gene expression between BCTis and HNEpi samples were revealed for BAG1, C3, CCNA2, CD44, FGF1, FOSL1, ID2, IL6R, NGFB, NGFR, PAPPA, PLAU, SERPINB5, THBS1 and TP53 gene (p < 0.05) and BCL2L2, CTSB, ITGB4, JUN, KIT, KLF5, SCGB1D2, SCGB2A1, SERPINE1 (p < 0.01), and EGFR, GABRP, GSN, MAP2K7 and THBS2 (p < 0.001), and GSN, KLK5 (p < 0.0001). The ontological gene analyses revealed high deregulations in gene group directly associated with breast cancer prognosis and origin.

  5. Abnormal structural luteolysis in ovaries of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM): expression of Fas ligand/Fas-mediated apoptosis signaling molecules in luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Minako; Manabe, Noboru; Komatsu, Kohji; Shimabe, Munetake; Miyamoto, Hajime

    2003-12-01

    Senescence accelerated mouse-prone (SAMP) mice with a shortened life span show accelerated changes in many of the signs of aging and a shorter reproductive life span than SAM-resistant (SAMR) controls. We previously showed that functional regression (progesterone dissimilation) occurs in abnormally accumulated luteal bodies (aaLBs) of SAMP mice, but structural regression of luteal cells in aaLB is inhibited. A deficiency of luteal cell apoptosis causes the abnormal accumulation of LBs in SAMP ovaries. In the present study, to show the abnormality of Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas-mediated apoptosis signal transducing factors in the aaLBs of the SAMP ovaries, we assessed the changes in the expression of FasL, Fas, caspase-8 and caspase-3 mRNAs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and in the expression and localization of FasL, Fas and activated caspase-3 proteins by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively, during the estrus cycle/luteolysis. These mRNAs and proteins were expressed in normal LBs of both SAMP and SAMR ovaries, but not at all or only in trace amounts in aaLBs of SAMP, indicating that structural regression is inhibited by blockage of the expression of these transducing factors in luteal cells of aaLBs in SAMP mice.

  6. Esophageal abnormalities in juvenile localized scleroderma: is it associated with other extracutaneous manifestations?

    PubMed

    Valões, Clarissa C M; Novak, Glaucia V; Brunelli, Juliana B; Kozu, Katia T; Toma, Ricardo K; Silva, Clovis A

    To assess esophageal involvement (EI) in juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS) population and the possible association between this gastrointestinal manifestation and demographic data, clinical features, laboratory exams, treatments and outcomes. For a period of 30 years, 5881 patients with rheumatic diseases were followed in our Pediatric Rheumatology Division. EI was defined by the presence of symptoms (solid/liquid dysphagia, heartburn, esophageal regurgitation, nausea/vomiting and epigastralgia) and confirmed by at least one EI exam abnormality: barium contrast radiography, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 24-hour esophageal pH-monitoring. JLS was observed in 56/5881 patients (0.9%), mainly linear morphea subtype. EI was observed in 23/56(41%) of JLS patients. Eight(35%) of 23 EI patients with JLS were symptomatic and presented heartburn(5/8), solid and liquid dysphagia(3/8), nausea and epigastralgia(1/8). The frequency of any cumulative extracutaneous manifestations (calcinosis, arthritis/arthralgia, central nervous system, interstitial pneumonitis, mesangial nephritis and/or arrhythmia) was significantly higher in JLS patients with EI compared to those without this complication (56% vs. 24%, p=0.024). No differences were evidenced in demographic data, JLS subtypes and in each extracutaneous manifestation in both groups (p>0.05). The frequency of methotrexate use was significantly higher in JLS patients with EI compared to those without (52% vs. 12%, p=0.002). Autoantibody profile (antinuclear antibodies, anti-SCL-70, rheumatoid factor, anticentromere, anti-cardiolipin, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB) was similar in both groups (p>0.05). Our study demonstrated that EI was frequently observed in JLS patients, mainly in asymptomatic patients with linear subtype. EI occurred in JLS patients with other extracutaneous manifestations and required methotrexate therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  7. Elevated stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 expression in skeletal muscle contributes to abnormal fatty acid partitioning in obese humans.

    PubMed

    Hulver, Matthew W; Berggren, Jason R; Carper, Michael J; Miyazaki, Makoto; Ntambi, James M; Hoffman, Eric P; Thyfault, John P; Stevens, Robert; Dohm, G Lynis; Houmard, Joseph A; Muoio, Deborah M

    2005-10-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are strongly associated with abnormal lipid metabolism and accumulation of intramyocellular triacylglycerol, but the underlying cause of these perturbations are yet unknown. Herein, we show that the lipogenic gene, stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), is robustly up-regulated in skeletal muscle from extremely obese humans. High expression and activity of SCD1, an enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, corresponded with low rates of fatty acid oxidation, increased triacylglycerol synthesis and increased monounsaturation of muscle lipids. Elevated SCD1 expression and abnormal lipid partitioning were retained in primary skeletal myocytes derived from obese compared to lean donors, implying that these traits might be driven by epigenetic and/or heritable mechanisms. Overexpression of human SCD1 in myotubes from lean subjects was sufficient to mimic the obese phenotype. These results suggest that elevated expression of SCD1 in skeletal muscle contributes to abnormal lipid metabolism and progression of obesity.

  8. Prenatal exposure to phencyclidine produces abnormal behaviour and NMDA receptor expression in postpubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingling; Mamiya, Takayoshi; Lu, Ping; Toriumi, Kazuya; Mouri, Akihiro; Hiramatsu, Masayuki; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Zou, Li-Bo; Nagai, Taku; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2010-08-01

    Several studies have shown the disruptive effects of non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists on neurobehavioural development. Based on the neurodevelopment hypothesis of schizophrenia, there is growing interest in animal models treated with NMDA antagonists at developing stages to investigate the pathogenesis of psychological disturbances in humans. Previous studies have reported that perinatal treatment with phencyclidine (PCP) impairs the development of neuronal systems and induces schizophrenia-like behaviour. However, the adverse effects of prenatal exposure to PCP on behaviour and the function of NMDA receptors are not well understood. This study investigated the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to PCP in mice. The prenatal PCP-treated mice showed hypersensitivity to a low dose of PCP in locomotor activity and impairment of recognition memory in the novel object recognition test at age 7 wk. Meanwhile, the prenatal exposure reduced the phosphorylation of NR1, although it increased the expression of NR1 itself. Furthermore, these behavioural changes were attenuated by atypical antipsychotic treatment. Taken together, prenatal exposure to PCP produced long-lasting behavioural deficits, accompanied by the abnormal expression and dysfunction of NMDA receptors in postpubertal mice. It is worth investigating the influences of disrupted NMDA receptors during the prenatal period on behaviour in later life.

  9. Meta-analysis of the prognostic value of abnormally expressed lncRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhen; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Yin, Chang-Qing; Guan, Qing; Chen, Hao; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Many long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to be abnormally expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and may have the potential to serve as prognostic markers. In this study, a meta-analysis was conducted to systematically evaluate the prognostic value of various lncRNAs in HCC. Eligible literatures were systematically collected from PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library (up to December 30, 2015). The main outcomes including overall survival, relapse-free survival, and disease-free survival were analyzed. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using random- or fixed-effects models. A total of 2,991 patients with HCC in People's Republic of China from 27 studies were included in the analysis. The level of lncRNAs showed a significant association with clinical outcomes. Abnormally elevated lncRNA transcription level predicted poor overall survival (HR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.20-2.34, P=0.002; I (2)=75.5%, P=0.000) and relapse-free survival (HR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.65-2.61, P<0.001; I (2)=24.0%, P=0.215), while no association was observed with disease-free survival of HCC patients (HR: 1.39, 95% CI: 0.51-3.78, P=0.524; I (2)=81.3%, P=0.005). Subgroup analysis further showed that lncRNA transcription level was significantly associated with tumor size (relative risk [RR]: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.01-1.39, P=0.035), microvascular invasion (RR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.10-1.89, P=0.009), and portal vein tumor thrombus (RR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.03-2.20, P=0.036). Publication bias and sensitivity analysis further confirmed the stability of our results. Our present meta-analysis indicates that abnormal lncRNA transcription level may serve as a promising indicator for prognostic evaluation of patients with HCC in People's Republic of China.

  10. Expression of EGFP and NPTII protein is not associated with organ abnormalities in deceased transgenic cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Qian; Cui, Huiting; Li, Qinghe; Zhao, Yiqiang; Luo, Juan; Liu, Qiuyue; Sun, Xiuzhu; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2008-12-01

    Both enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase type II enzyme (NPTII) are widely used in transgenic studies, but their side effects have not been extensively investigated. In this study, we evaluated the expression profiles of the two marker genes and the relationship between their expression and organ abnormalities. Eight transgenic cloned cattle were studied, four harboring both EGFP and NPTII, and four harboring only the NPTII gene. Four age-matched cloned cattle were used as controls. EGFP and NPTII expression were measured and detected by Q-PCR, Western blot, ELISA, and RIA in heart, liver, and lungs, and the values ranged from 0.3 to 5 microg/g. The expression profiles exhibited differential or mosaic pattern between the organs, the pathologic symptoms of which were identified, but were similar to those of age-matched cloned cattle. All data indicated that the expression of EGFP and NPTII is not associated with organ abnormalities in transgenic cloned cattle.

  11. Leptospira interrogans induces uterine inflammatory responses and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Guo, Mengyao; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), a worldwide zoonosis, infect humans and animals. In dogs, four syndromes caused by leptospirosis have been identified: icteric, hemorrhagic, uremic (Stuttgart disease) and reproductive (abortion and premature or weak pups), and also it caused inflammation. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of matrix molecules that is crucial to the reproduction. Both inflammatory response and ECM are closed relative to reproductive. The aim of this study was to clarify how L. interrogans affected the uterus of dogs, by focusing on the inflammatory responses, and ECM expression in dogs uterine tissue infected by L. interrogans. In the present study, 27 dogs were divided into 3 groups, intrauterine infusion with L. interrogans, to make uterine infection, sterile EMJH, and normal saline as a control, respectively. The uteruses were removed by surgical operation in 10, 20, and 30 days, respectively. The methods of histopathological analysis, ELISA, Western blot and qPCR were used. The results showed that L. interrogans induced significantly inflammatory responses, which were characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltration and high expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in uterine tissue of these dogs. Furthermore, L. interrogans strongly down-regulated the expression of ECM (collagens (CL) IV, fibronectins (FN) and laminins (LN)) in mRNA and protein levels. These data indicated that strongly inflammatory responses, and abnormal regulation of ECM might contribute to the proliferation of dogs infected by L. interrogans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Localization of burn mark under an abnormal topography on MOSFET chip surface using liquid crystal and emission microscopy tools.

    PubMed

    Lau, C K; Sim, K S; Tso, C P

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the localization of burn mark in MOSFET and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) inspection on the defect location. When a suspect abnormal topography is shown on the die surface, further methods to pin-point the defect location is necessary. Fault localization analysis becomes important because an abnormal spot on the chip surface may and may not have a defect underneath it. The chip surface topography can change due to the catastrophic damage occurred at layers under the chip surface, but it could also be due to inconsistency during metal deposition in the wafer fabrication process. Two localization techniques, liquid crystal thermography and emission microscopy, were performed to confirm that the abnormal topography spot is the actual defect location. The tiny burn mark was surfaced by performing a surface decoration at the defect location using hot hydrochloric acid. SEM imaging, which has the high magnification and three-dimensional capabilities, was used to capture the images of the burn mark. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Reduced expression of the NMDA receptor-interacting protein SynGAP causes behavioral abnormalities that model symptoms of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaochuan; Hamilton, Peter J; Reish, Nicholas J; Sweatt, J David; Miller, Courtney A; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2009-06-01

    Abnormal function of NMDA receptors is believed to be a contributing factor to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. NMDAR subunits and postsynaptic-interacting proteins of these channels are abnormally expressed in some patients with this illness. In mice, reduced NMDAR expression leads to behaviors analogous to symptoms of schizophrenia, but reports of animals with mutations in core postsynaptic density proteins having similar a phenotype have yet to be reported. Here we show that reduced expression of the neuronal RasGAP and NMDAR-associated protein, SynGAP, results in abnormal behaviors strikingly similar to that reported in mice with reduced NMDAR function. SynGAP mutant mice exhibited nonhabituating and persistent hyperactivity that was ameliorated by the antipsychotic clozapine. An NMDAR antagonist, MK-801, induced hyperactivity in normal mice but SynGAP mutants were less responsive, suggesting that NMDAR hypofunction contributes to this behavioral abnormality. SynGAP mutants exhibited enhanced startle reactivity and impaired sensory-motor gating. These mice also displayed a complete lack of social memory and a propensity toward social isolation. Finally, SynGAP mutants had deficits in cued fear conditioning and working memory, indicating abnormal function of circuits that control emotion and choice. Our results demonstrate that SynGAP mutant mice have gross neurological deficits similar to other mouse models of schizophrenia. Because SynGAP interacts with NMDARs, and the signaling activity of this protein is regulated by these channels, our data in dicate that SynGAP lies downstream of NMDARs and is a required intermediate for normal neural circuit function and behavior. Taken together, these data support the idea that schizophrenia may arise from abnormal signaling pathways that are mediated by NMDA receptors.

  14. Abnormal expression of Nrf2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Du, Baoying; Zhou, Hao; Shen, Fengxian; Li, Juan; Xie, Zhenwei

    2017-01-01

    To explore the expression level of Nrf2 in adenomyosis and study the mechanism of abnormal expression of Nrf2 in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. Western blot, immunohistochemistry(IHC) and real time PCR were used to measure Nrf2 expression levels in tissue and cell samples. Knockdown and overexpression of Nrf2 were used to investigate the variation of migration ability of endometrial glandular cells as well as the regulatory mechanism. Nrf2 protein levels were significantly higher in the eutopic and ectopic endometrial glands when compared with control cases using IHC and western blot methods. (p< 0.05). However, there was no statistical difference in Nrf2 mRNA expression levels between the adenomyosis and control groups. Using an agonist and Nrf2 siRNA, we regulated the Nrf2 protein levels of primary cultured endometrial glandular cells. With increased expression of Nrf2, cell scratch assay showed that the agonist-treated group migrated significantly faster than the control group, with MMP9 protein level markedly elevated. In contrast, Nrf2 siRNA-treated group migrated slower than the control group, with decreased expression of MMP9 protein. All of the scratching healing spaces and protein levels between the treated and control groups were statistically significant (p< 0.05). Abnormal expression of Nrf2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of adenomyosis. Specified reduction of Nrf2 expression could prove to be a new therapeutic target in the clinical treatment of adenomyosis.

  15. Preserved local but disrupted contextual figure-ground influences in an individual with abnormal function of intermediate visual areas

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Joseph L.; Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Rees, Geraint; Bentin, Shlomo; Driver, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Visual perception depends not only on local stimulus features but also on their relationship to the surrounding stimulus context, as evident in both local and contextual influences on figure-ground segmentation. Intermediate visual areas may play a role in such contextual influences, as we tested here by examining LG, a rare case of developmental visual agnosia. LG has no evident abnormality of brain structure and functional neuroimaging showed relatively normal V1 function, but his intermediate visual areas (V2/V3) function abnormally. We found that contextual influences on figure-ground organization were selectively disrupted in LG, while local sources of figure-ground influences were preserved. Effects of object knowledge and familiarity on figure-ground organization were also significantly diminished. Our results suggest that the mechanisms mediating contextual and familiarity influences on figure-ground organization are dissociable from those mediating local influences on figure-ground assignment. The disruption of contextual processing in intermediate visual areas may play a role in the substantial object recognition difficulties experienced by LG. PMID:22947116

  16. Machine learning based brain tumour segmentation on limited data using local texture and abnormality.

    PubMed

    Bonte, Stijn; Goethals, Ingeborg; Van Holen, Roel

    2018-05-07

    Brain tumour segmentation in medical images is a very challenging task due to the large variety in tumour shape, position, appearance, scanning modalities and scanning parameters. Most existing segmentation algorithms use information from four different MRI-sequences, but since this is often not available, there is need for a method able to delineate the different tumour tissues based on a minimal amount of data. We present a novel approach using a Random Forests model combining voxelwise texture and abnormality features on a contrast-enhanced T1 and FLAIR MRI. We transform the two scans into 275 feature maps. A random forest model next calculates the probability to belong to 4 tumour classes or 5 normal classes. Afterwards, a dedicated voxel clustering algorithm provides the final tumour segmentation. We trained our method on the BraTS 2013 database and validated it on the larger BraTS 2017 dataset. We achieve median Dice scores of 40.9% (low-grade glioma) and 75.0% (high-grade glioma) to delineate the active tumour, and 68.4%/80.1% for the total abnormal region including edema. Our fully automated brain tumour segmentation algorithm is able to delineate contrast enhancing tissue and oedema with high accuracy based only on post-contrast T1-weighted and FLAIR MRI, whereas for non-enhancing tumour tissue and necrosis only moderate results are obtained. This makes the method especially suitable for high-grade glioma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Abnormal levels of expression of plasma microRNA-33 in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, S; Arias-Santiago, S; Orgaz-Molina, J; Magro-Checa, C; Valenzuela, I; Navarro, P; Naranjo-Sintes, R; Sancho, J; Zubiaur, M

    2014-06-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNA) are involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of genes associated with lipid metabolism (miRNA-33) and vascular function and angiogenesis (miRNA-126). The objective of this exploratory study was to measure plasma levels of miRNA-33 and miRNA-126 in patients with plaque psoriasis and evaluate their association with clinical parameters. We studied 11 patients with plaque psoriasis. The median Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) was 13 (interquartile range [IQR], 9-14) and body surface area involvement was 12 (IQR, 11-15). Eleven healthy controls matched for age and sex were also included. We analyzed cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical carotid atheromatosis. Plasma miRNAs were evaluated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Carotid intima-media thickness was greater in patients (0.57mm; IQR, 0.54-0.61; n=11) than in controls (0.50mm; IQR, 0.48-0.54; data available for 9 controls) (P=.0055, Mann-Whitney). Expression of miRNA-33 in patients (5.34; IQR, 3.12-7.96; n=11) was significantly higher than in controls (2.33; IQR, 1.71-2.84; only detected in 7 of 11 controls) (P=.0049, Wilcoxon signed rank). No differences in miRNA-126 levels were observed between patients and controls. In patients (n=11), we observed a positive correlation between miRNA-33 and insulin levels (r=0.7289, P=.0109) and a negative correlation between miRNA-126 and carotid intima-media thickness (r=-0.6181, P=.0426). In psoriasis patients plasma levels of lipid and glucose metabolism-related miRNA-33 are increased and correlated with insulin. The study of circulating miRNA-33 in psoriasis may provide new insights about the associated systemic inflammatory abnormalities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  18. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system.

  19. Elevated stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 expression in skeletal muscle contributes to abnormal fatty acid partitioning in obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Hulver, Matthew W.; Berggren, Jason R.; Carper, Michael J.; Miyazaki, Makoto; Ntambi, James M.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Thyfault, John P.; Stevens, Robert; Dohm, G. Lynis; Houmard, Joseph A.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Obesity and type 2 diabetes are strongly associated with abnormal lipid metabolism and accumulation of intramyocellular triacylglycerol, but the underlying cause of these perturbations are yet unknown. Herein, we show that the lipogenic gene, stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), is robustly up-regulated in skeletal muscle from extremely obese humans. High expression and activity of SCD1, an enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, corresponded with low rates of fatty acid oxidation, increased triacylglycerol synthesis and increased monounsaturation of muscle lipids. Elevated SCD1 expression and abnormal lipid partitioning were retained in primary skeletal myocytes derived from obese compared to lean donors, implying that these traits might be driven by epigenetic and/or heritable mechanisms. Overexpression of human SCD1 in myotubes from lean subjects was sufficient to mimic the obese phenotype. These results suggest that elevated expression of SCD1 in skeletal muscle contributes to abnormal lipid metabolism and progression of obesity. PMID:16213227

  20. Abnormal expression of Nrf2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of adenomyosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Shen, Fengxian; Li, Juan; Xie, Zhenwei

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression level of Nrf2 in adenomyosis and study the mechanism of abnormal expression of Nrf2 in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. Methods Western blot, immunohistochemistry(IHC) and real time PCR were used to measure Nrf2 expression levels in tissue and cell samples. Knockdown and overexpression of Nrf2 were used to investigate the variation of migration ability of endometrial glandular cells as well as the regulatory mechanism. Results Nrf2 protein levels were significantly higher in the eutopic and ectopic endometrial glands when compared with control cases using IHC and western blot methods. (p< 0.05). However, there was no statistical difference in Nrf2 mRNA expression levels between the adenomyosis and control groups. Using an agonist and Nrf2 siRNA, we regulated the Nrf2 protein levels of primary cultured endometrial glandular cells. With increased expression of Nrf2, cell scratch assay showed that the agonist-treated group migrated significantly faster than the control group, with MMP9 protein level markedly elevated. In contrast, Nrf2 siRNA-treated group migrated slower than the control group, with decreased expression of MMP9 protein. All of the scratching healing spaces and protein levels between the treated and control groups were statistically significant (p< 0.05). Conclusions Abnormal expression of Nrf2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of adenomyosis. Specified reduction of Nrf2 expression could prove to be a new therapeutic target in the clinical treatment of adenomyosis. PMID:28817677

  1. Sex differences in white matter abnormalities after mild traumatic brain injury: localization and correlation with outcome.

    PubMed

    Fakhran, Saeed; Yaeger, Karl; Collins, Michael; Alhilali, Lea

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate sex differences in diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) white matter abnormalities after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and to compare associated clinical outcomes. The institutional review board approved this study, with waiver of informed consent. DTI in 69 patients with mTBI (47 male and 22 female patients) and 21 control subjects (10 male and 11 female subjects) with normal conventional magnetic resonance (MR) images were retrospectively reviewed. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were generated as a measure of white matter integrity. Patients with mTBI underwent serial neurocognitive testing with Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT). Correlation between sex, white matter FA values, ImPACT scores, and time to symptom resolution (TSR) were analyzed with multivariate analysis and TBSS. No significant difference in age was seen between males and females (control subjects, P = .3; patients with mTBI, P = .34). No significant difference was seen in initial ImPACT symptom scores (P = .33) between male and female patients with mTBI. Male patients with mTBI had significantly decreased FA values in the uncinate fasciculus (UF) bilaterally (mean FA, 0.425; 95% confidence interval: 0.375, 0.476) compared with female patients with mTBI and control subjects (P < .05), with a significantly longer TSR (P = .04). Multivariate analysis showed sex and UF FA values independently correlated with TSR longer than 3 months (adjusted odds ratios, 2.27 and 2.38; P = .04 and P < .001, respectively), but initial symptom severity did not (adjusted odds ratio, 1.15; P = .35). Relative sparing of the UF is seen in female compared with male patients after mTBI, with sex and UF FA values as stronger predictors of TSR than initial symptom severity.

  2. Global gene expression profiling related to temperature-sensitive growth abnormalities in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Kouhei; Ohno, Ryoko; Yoshida, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    Triploid wheat hybrids between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii sometimes show abnormal growth phenotypes, and the growth abnormalities inhibit generation of wheat synthetic hexaploids. In type II necrosis, one of the growth abnormalities, necrotic cell death accompanied by marked growth repression occurs only under low temperature conditions. At normal temperature, the type II necrosis lines show grass-clump dwarfism with no necrotic symptoms, excess tillers, severe dwarfism and delayed flowering. Here, we report comparative expression analyses to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the temperature-dependent phenotypic plasticity in the triploid wheat hybrids. We compared gene and small RNA expression profiles in crown tissues to characterize the temperature-dependent phenotypic plasticity. No up-regulation of defense-related genes was observed under the normal temperature, and down-regulation of wheat APETALA1-like MADS-box genes, considered to act as flowering promoters, was found in the grass-clump dwarf lines. Some microRNAs, including miR156, were up-regulated, whereas the levels of transcripts of the miR156 target genes SPLs, known to inhibit tiller and branch number, were reduced in crown tissues of the grass-clump dwarf lines at the normal temperature. Unusual expression of the miR156/SPLs module could explain the grass-clump dwarf phenotype. Dramatic alteration of gene expression profiles, including miRNA levels, in crown tissues is associated with the temperature-dependent phenotypic plasticity in type II necrosis/grass-clump dwarf wheat hybrids. PMID:28463975

  3. Individualized Gaussian process-based prediction and detection of local and global gray matter abnormalities in elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, G; Ridgway, G R; Dahnke, R; Gaser, C

    2014-08-15

    Structural imaging based on MRI is an integral component of the clinical assessment of patients with potential dementia. We here propose an individualized Gaussian process-based inference scheme for clinical decision support in healthy and pathological aging elderly subjects using MRI. The approach aims at quantitative and transparent support for clinicians who aim to detect structural abnormalities in patients at risk of Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. Firstly, we introduce a generative model incorporating our knowledge about normative decline of local and global gray matter volume across the brain in elderly. By supposing smooth structural trajectories the models account for the general course of age-related structural decline as well as late-life accelerated loss. Considering healthy subjects' demography and global brain parameters as informative about normal brain aging variability affords individualized predictions in single cases. Using Gaussian process models as a normative reference, we predict new subjects' brain scans and quantify the local gray matter abnormalities in terms of Normative Probability Maps (NPM) and global z-scores. By integrating the observed expectation error and the predictive uncertainty, the local maps and global scores exploit the advantages of Bayesian inference for clinical decisions and provide a valuable extension of diagnostic information about pathological aging. We validate the approach in simulated data and real MRI data. We train the GP framework using 1238 healthy subjects with ages 18-94 years, and predict in 415 independent test subjects diagnosed as healthy controls, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Individualized Gaussian process-based prediction and detection of local and global gray matter abnormalities in elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, G.; Ridgway, G.R.; Dahnke, R.; Gaser, C.

    2014-01-01

    Structural imaging based on MRI is an integral component of the clinical assessment of patients with potential dementia. We here propose an individualized Gaussian process-based inference scheme for clinical decision support in healthy and pathological aging elderly subjects using MRI. The approach aims at quantitative and transparent support for clinicians who aim to detect structural abnormalities in patients at risk of Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. Firstly, we introduce a generative model incorporating our knowledge about normative decline of local and global gray matter volume across the brain in elderly. By supposing smooth structural trajectories the models account for the general course of age-related structural decline as well as late-life accelerated loss. Considering healthy subjects' demography and global brain parameters as informative about normal brain aging variability affords individualized predictions in single cases. Using Gaussian process models as a normative reference, we predict new subjects' brain scans and quantify the local gray matter abnormalities in terms of Normative Probability Maps (NPM) and global z-scores. By integrating the observed expectation error and the predictive uncertainty, the local maps and global scores exploit the advantages of Bayesian inference for clinical decisions and provide a valuable extension of diagnostic information about pathological aging. We validate the approach in simulated data and real MRI data. We train the GP framework using 1238 healthy subjects with ages 18–94 years, and predict in 415 independent test subjects diagnosed as healthy controls, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24742919

  5. Expression and subcellular localization of a novel nuclear acetylcholinesterase protein.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana Constantino Rosa; Vala, Inês; Miguel, Cláudia; Barata, João T; Garção, Pedro; Agostinho, Paula; Mendes, Marta; Coelho, Ana V; Calado, Angelo; Oliveira, Catarina R; e Silva, João Martins; Saldanha, Carlota

    2007-08-31

    Acetylcholine is found in the nervous system and also in other cell types (endothelium, lymphocytes, and epithelial and blood cells), which are globally termed the non-neuronal cholinergic system. In this study we investigated the expression and subcellular localization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in endothelial cells. Our results show the expression of the 70-kDa AChE in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. We also describe, for the first time, a nuclear and cytoskeleton-bound AChE isoform with approximately 55 kDa detected in endothelial cells. This novel isoform is decreased in response to vascular endothelial growth factor via the proteosomes pathway, and it is down-regulated in human leukemic T-cells as compared with normal T-cells, suggesting that the decreased expression of the 55-kDa AChE protein may contribute to an angiogenic response and associate with tumorigenesis. Importantly, we show that its nuclear expression is not endothelial cell-specific but also evidenced in non-neuronal and neuronal cells. Concerning neuronal cells, we can distinguish an exclusively nuclear expression in postnatal neurons in contrast to a cytoplasmic and nuclear expression in embryonic neurons, suggesting that the cell compartmentalization of this new AChE isoform is changed during the development of nervous system. Overall, our studies suggest that the 55-kDa AChE may be involved in different biological processes such as neural development, tumor progression, and angiogenesis.

  6. In vivo cell-autonomous transcriptional abnormalities revealed in mice expressing mutant huntingtin in striatal but not cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth A; Coppola, Giovanni; Tang, Bin; Kuhn, Alexandre; Kim, SoongHo; Geschwind, Daniel H; Brown, Timothy B; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2011-03-15

    Huntington's disease (HD), caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene, is characterized by abnormal protein aggregates and motor and cognitive dysfunction. Htt protein is ubiquitously expressed, but the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) is most susceptible to dysfunction and death. Abnormal gene expression represents a core pathogenic feature of HD, but the relative roles of cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous effects on transcription remain unclear. To determine the extent of cell-autonomous dysregulation in the striatum in vivo, we examined genome-wide RNA expression in symptomatic D9-N171-98Q (a.k.a. DE5) transgenic mice in which the forebrain expression of the first 171 amino acids of human Htt with a 98Q repeat expansion is limited to MSNs. Microarray data generated from these mice were compared with those generated on the identical array platform from a pan-neuronal HD mouse model, R6/2, carrying two different CAG repeat lengths, and a relatively high degree of overlap of changes in gene expression was revealed. We further focused on known canonical pathways associated with excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, dopamine signaling and trophic support. While genes related to excitotoxicity, dopamine signaling and trophic support were altered in both DE5 and R6/2 mice, which may be either cell autonomous or non-cell autonomous, genes related to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor are primarily affected in DE5 transgenic mice, indicating cell-autonomous mechanisms. Overall, HD-induced dysregulation of the striatal transcriptome can be largely attributed to intrinsic effects of mutant Htt, in the absence of expression in cortical neurons.

  7. G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor (GPER) Expression in Normal and Abnormal Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Lessey, Bruce A.; Taylor, Robert N.; Wang, Wei; Bagchi, Milan K.; Yuan, Lingwen; Scotchie, Jessica; Fritz, Marc A.; Young, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid estrogen effects are mediated by membrane receptors, and evidence suggests a role for both a membrane-associated form of estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1; ERα) and G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPER; GPR30). Considering estrogen’s importance in endometrial physiology and endometriosis pathophysiology, we hypothesized that GPER could be involved in both cyclic changes in endometrial estrogen action and that aberrant expression might be seen in the eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis. Using real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analysis of normal endometrium, endometrial samples demonstrated cycle-regulated expression of GPER, with maximal expression in the proliferative phase. Eutopic and ectopic endometrium from women with endometriosis overexpressed GPER as compared to eutopic endometrium of normal participants. Ishikawa cells, an adenocarcinoma cell line, expressed GPER, with increased expression upon treatment with estrogen or an ESR1 agonist, but not with a GPER-specific agonist. Decreased expression was seen in Ishikawa cells stably transfected with progesterone receptor A. Together, these data suggest that normal endometrial GPER expression is cyclic and regulated by nuclear estrogen and progesterone receptors, while expression is dysregulated in endometriosis. PMID:22378861

  8. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) expression in normal and abnormal endometrium.

    PubMed

    Plante, Beth J; Lessey, Bruce A; Taylor, Robert N; Wang, Wei; Bagchi, Milan K; Yuan, Lingwen; Scotchie, Jessica; Fritz, Marc A; Young, Steven L

    2012-07-01

    Rapid estrogen effects are mediated by membrane receptors, and evidence suggests a role for both a membrane-associated form of estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1; ERα) and G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPER; GPR30). Considering estrogen's importance in endometrial physiology and endometriosis pathophysiology, we hypothesized that GPER could be involved in both cyclic changes in endometrial estrogen action and that aberrant expression might be seen in the eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis. Using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analysis of normal endometrium, endometrial samples demonstrated cycle-regulated expression of GPER, with maximal expression in the proliferative phase. Eutopic and ectopic endometrium from women with endometriosis overexpressed GPER as compared to eutopic endometrium of normal participants. Ishikawa cells, an adenocarcinoma cell line, expressed GPER, with increased expression upon treatment with estrogen or an ESR1 agonist, but not with a GPER-specific agonist. Decreased expression was seen in Ishikawa cells stably transfected with progesterone receptor A. Together, these data suggest that normal endometrial GPER expression is cyclic and regulated by nuclear estrogen and progesterone receptors, while expression is dysregulated in endometriosis.

  9. Expression profile of doublesex/male abnormal-3-related transcription factor-1 during gonadal sex change in the protogynous wrasse, Halichoeres trimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Nozu, Ryo; Horiguchi, Ryo; Kobayashi, Yasuhisa; Nakamura, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Sex change in fish involves a dramatic transformation of gonadal tissue and a switch in gametogenesis. Doublesex/male abnormal-3-related transcription factor-1 (DMRT1), encoded by the DMRT1 gene, is involved in testicular differentiation in a wide range of vertebrates as well as in sexual differentiation and gonadal sex change. In the present study, we investigated changes in the expression of dmrt1 during artificial gonadal sex change in the three-spot wrasse, Halichoeres trimaculatus, by real-time quantitative PCR and immunolocalization, using an anti-wrasse-Dmrt1 antibody that we prepared. We found that dmrt1 expression was predominantly observed in the testes, and that Dmrt1 was expressed in Sertoli cells of testes and a few granulosa cells surrounding vitellogenic oocytes of the ovary. Additionally, the upregulation of dmrt1 expression was consistent with an increase in spermatogenic cyst quantity rather than proliferation of presumptive spermatogonia, suggesting that dmrt1 is involved in the progression of spermatogenesis during sex change. Changes in the localization of Dmrt1 during gonadal sex change further implied that Sertoli cells originate from somatic cells adjacent to gonial germ cells during testicular formation in the three-spot wrasse. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pericellular innervation of neurons expressing abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampal formation of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Defelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered.

  11. MET expression and amplification in patients with localized gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Tang, Laura H.; Coit, Daniel G.; Kelsen, David P.; Francone, Todd D.; Weiser, Martin R.; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Shah, Manish A.

    2013-01-01

    Background MET, the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor has been proposed as a therapeutic target in gastric cancer. This study assessed the incidence of MET expression and gene amplification in tumors of Western patients with gastric cancer. Methods Tumor specimens from patients enrolled on a preoperative chemotherapy study (NCI 5700) were examined for presence of MET gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), MET mRNA expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, MET overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and for evidence of MET pathway activation by p-MET IHC. Results Although high-level of MET protein and mRNA were commonly encountered (in 63% and 50% of resected tumor specimens, respectively), none of these tumors had MET gene amplification by FISH, and only 6.6% had evidence of MET tyrosine kinase activity by p-MET IHC. Conclusions In this cohort of patients with localized gastric cancer, the presence of high MET protein and RNA expression does not correlate with MET gene amplification or pathway activation as evidenced by the absence of amplification by FISH and negative p-MET IHC analysis. Impact This paper demonstrates a lack of MET amplification and pathway activation in a cohort of 38 patients with localized gastric cancer, suggesting that MET-driven gastric cancers are relatively rare in Western patients. PMID:21393565

  12. [Abnormality of TOP2A expression and its gene copy number variations in neuroblastic tumors].

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Zhou, C J; Ma, X L; Guan, D D; Yang, L Y; Yue, P; Gong, L P

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To detect TOP2A protein expression and gene copy number alterations, and to analyze related clinical and pathological implications in pediatric neuroblastic tumors (NT). Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to detect TOP2A protein expression. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to detect numerical aberrations of TOP2A. Results: TOP2A protein was expressed in 59.1%(52/88) of cases, which was associated with differentiation ( P =0.006), Ki-67 index ( P <0.01) and MKI ( P =0.001). Twenty-eight cases (35.0%, 28/88) showed TOP2A gene amplification, which was correlated with the age ( P <0.01), clinical stage ( P =0.028), high risk group ( P =0.001), Ki-67 index ( P =0.040) and differentiation ( P =0.014). Survival analysis showed that TOP2A expression was related to survival rate. Multivariate analyses showed that TOP2A expression was an independent predictor for poor prognosis ( P =0.010). Conclusions: More than half of the cases show TOP2A expression, which is more likely associated with NB, high Ki-67 index and high MKI. Cases with TOP2A expression have shorter survivals and poorer prognosis. TOP2A amplification is seen in 35% and likely occurs in patients older than 18 months and at advanced INSS stages (Ⅲ and Ⅳ). As a target of the anthracycline-based adjuvant drugs, TOP2A test can be used to select patient with NT for the therapy.

  13. Three-Dimensional Photoactivated Localization Microscopy with Genetically Expressed Probes

    PubMed Central

    Temprine, Kelsey; York, Andrew G.; Shroff, Hari

    2017-01-01

    Photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and related single-molecule imaging techniques enable biological image acquisition at ~20 nm lateral and ~50–100 nm axial resolution. Although such techniques were originally demonstrated on single imaging planes close to the coverslip surface, recent technical developments now enable the 3D imaging of whole fixed cells. We describe methods for converting a 2D PALM into a system capable of acquiring such 3D images, with a particular emphasis on instrumentation that is compatible with choosing relatively dim, genetically expressed photoactivatable fluorescent proteins (PA-FPs) as PALM probes. After reviewing the basics of 2D PALM, we detail astigmatic and multiphoton imaging approaches well suited to working with PA-FPs. We also discuss the use of open-source localization software appropriate for 3D PALM. PMID:25391803

  14. Abnormal gene expression profiles in human ovaries from polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Erik; Laven, Joop S E; Dommerholt, Henri B R; Polman, Jan; van Rijt, Cindy; van den Hurk, Caroline; Westland, Jolanda; Mosselman, Sietse; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2004-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) represents the most common cause of anovulatory infertility and affects 5-10% of women of reproductive age. The etiology of PCOS is still unknown. The current study is the first to describe consistent differences in gene expression profiles in human ovaries comparing PCOS patients vs. healthy normoovulatory individuals. The microarray analysis of PCOS vs. normal ovaries identifies dysregulated expression of genes encoding components of several biological pathways or systems such as Wnt signaling, extracellular matrix components, and immunological factors. Resulting data may provide novel clues for ovarian dysfunction in PCOS. Intriguingly, the gene expression profiles of ovaries from (long-term) androgen-treated female-to-male transsexuals (TSX) show considerable overlap with PCOS. This observation provides supportive evidence that androgens play a key role in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Presented data may contribute to a better understanding of dysregulated pathways in PCOS, which might ultimately reveal novel leads for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Abnormal Amygdala and Prefrontal Cortex Activation to Facial Expressions in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Amy S.; Reiss, Allan L.; Howe, Meghan E.; Kelley, Ryan G.; Singh, Manpreet K.; Adleman, Nancy E.; Karchemskiy, Asya; Chang, Kiki D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in pediatric bipolar disorder (BD) have reported greater amygdala and less dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation to facial expressions compared to healthy controls. The current study investigates whether these differences are associated with the early or late…

  16. Study on the relationship between the expression of IGF-1 in umbilical cord blood and abnormal glucose metabolism during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Wu, H-Y; Xu, Y-H

    2017-02-01

    To explore the relationship between the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in neonatal umbilical cord blood and abnormal glucose metabolism during pregnancy. We have selected 63 cases of delivery randomly, term birth and maternal from January 2015 to January 2016 in our hospital, gestational diabetes mellitus for Group A, abnormal gestational glucose tolerance for Group B and normal for Group C with 21 cases in each group. The venous blood samples were collected from all the pregnant females 2 weeks before delivery, and the levels of HbA1c in serum were detected by Elisa method. During the delivery, the umbilical cord blood was collected and the levels of IGF-1 were measured by double site immune enzyme analysis. The neonatal weight was recorded and the correlation analysis was made in respect of the measurement results. The level of HbA1c in Group A was significantly higher than that in Group C (p < 0.05); IGF-1 level and neonatal weight of Group B were significantly higher than that of Group C (p < 0.05), IGF-1 has a significant correlation with neonatal weight in Group C, and HbA1c and IGF-1 were positively correlated (p < 0.05); IGF-1 was positively correlated with neonatal weight in Group A and Group B (p < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the IGF-1 level of neonatal umbilical cord blood and the neonatal weight (p < 0.05). Also, the level of HbA1c was positively correlated with the level of IGF-1 in neonatal umbilical cord blood at the end of pregnancy (p < 0.05). The expression level of IGF-1 in the final stage of pregnant females can be detected to predict the expression level of IGF-1 in newborn infants and then the growth status of the fetus can be obtained.

  17. Localization of BDNF expression in the developing brain of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, E; Porreca, I; Alleva, E; De Girolamo, P; Ambrosino, C; Ciriaco, E; Germanà, A; Sordino, P

    2014-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene is expressed in differentiating and post-mitotic neurons of the zebrafish embryo, where it has been implicated in Huntington's disease. Little is known, however, about the full complement of neuronal cell types that express BDNF in this important vertebrate model. Here, we further explored the transcriptional profiles during the first week of development using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH). RT-qPCR results revealed a high level of maternal contribution followed by a steady increase of zygotic transcription, consistent with the notion of a prominent role of BDNF in neuronal maturation and maintenance. Based on WISH, we demonstrate for the first time that BDNF expression in the developing brain of zebrafish is structure specific. Anatomical criteria and co-staining with genetic markers (shh, pax2a, emx1, krox20, lhx2b and lhx9) visualized major topological domains of BDNF-positive cells in the pallium, hypothalamus, posterior tuberculum and optic tectum. Moreover, the relative timing of BDNF transcription in the eye and tectum may illustrate a mechanism for coordinated development of the retinotectal system. Taken together, our results are compatible with a local delivery and early role of BDNF in the developing brain of zebrafish, adding basic knowledge to the study of neurotrophin functions in neural development and disease. PMID:24588510

  18. Localization of BDNF expression in the developing brain of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    De Felice, E; Porreca, I; Alleva, E; De Girolamo, P; Ambrosino, C; Ciriaco, E; Germanà, A; Sordino, P

    2014-05-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene is expressed in differentiating and post-mitotic neurons of the zebrafish embryo, where it has been implicated in Huntington's disease. Little is known, however, about the full complement of neuronal cell types that express BDNF in this important vertebrate model. Here, we further explored the transcriptional profiles during the first week of development using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH). RT-qPCR results revealed a high level of maternal contribution followed by a steady increase of zygotic transcription, consistent with the notion of a prominent role of BDNF in neuronal maturation and maintenance. Based on WISH, we demonstrate for the first time that BDNF expression in the developing brain of zebrafish is structure specific. Anatomical criteria and co-staining with genetic markers (shh, pax2a, emx1, krox20, lhx2b and lhx9) visualized major topological domains of BDNF-positive cells in the pallium, hypothalamus, posterior tuberculum and optic tectum. Moreover, the relative timing of BDNF transcription in the eye and tectum may illustrate a mechanism for coordinated development of the retinotectal system. Taken together, our results are compatible with a local delivery and early role of BDNF in the developing brain of zebrafish, adding basic knowledge to the study of neurotrophin functions in neural development and disease. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  19. AP4M1 is abnormally expressed in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Cheng, X Y; Sheng, G Y

    2014-03-20

    AP4M1 mutations have been suggested to be associated with autosomal recessive cerebral palsy syndrome. But the pathogenic mechanism remains uncertain. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether and how AP4M1 expression is changed in injured neurons. Primary cultured hippocampal neurons were prepared for this experiment. They were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) leading to apoptosis, mimicking brain ischemia. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) was labeled immunofluorescently to confirm that the purity of neuron was higher than 90%. Real-time PCR and western blotting were performed to measure the gene expression. AP4M1 was labeled with MAP2 or Tau-1 to observe the distribution. We found that the AP4M1 protein levels immediately after the procedure were similar between the OGD group and the sham group. However, down-regulation was observed 12h after the reperfusion, and became more notable at 24h. The real-time PCR showed similar results, except that the down-regulation of mRNA was able to be detected immediately after the OGD. Immunofluorescent labeling revealed AP4M1 distributed in the dendrites of normal neurons, but it redistributed to the axons after the OGD procedure. In conclusion, AP4M1 is not only down-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels, but also redistributed from dendrites to axons in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluid shear stress as a regulator of gene expression in vascular cells: possible correlations with diabetic abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Eskin, S. G.; Ruef, J.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased frequency, severity and more rapid progression of cardiovascular diseases. Metabolic perturbations from hyperglycemia result in disturbed endothelium-dependent relaxation, activation of coagulation pathways, depressed fibrinolysis, and other abnormalities in vascular homeostasis. Atherosclerosis is localized mainly at areas of geometric irregularity at which blood vessels branch, curve and change diameter, and where blood is subjected to sudden changes in velocity and/or direction of flow. Shear stress resulting from blood flow is a well known modulator of vascular cell function. This paper presents what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for signal transduction and gene regulation in vascular cells exposed to shear stress. Considering the importance of the hemodynamic environment of vascular cells might be vital to increasing our understanding of diabetes.

  1. Common idiotypes expressed on human, monoclonal, abnormal immunoglobulins and cryoglobulins with polyreactive autoantibody activities.

    PubMed Central

    Barbouche, M R; Guilbert, B; Makni, S; Gorgi, Y; Ayed, K; Avrameas, S

    1993-01-01

    Several human monoclonal immunoglobulins with the same autoantibody activity have been shown to have cross-reactive idiotypes (CRI). In this study, using polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies, we found that 28% of human monoclonal immunoglobulins with polyreactive autoantibody activity from myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia and cryoglobulinaemia patients shared common idiotype(s). Furthermore, the latter were expressed on human and murine natural MoAbs (respectively in 12% and 22% of the clones tested) and on human IgG preparations used for therapeutic intravenous injections (IVIg) and which contain natural antibodies. These findings suggest that monoclonal immunoglobulins could arise from the proliferation of a clone that normally produces a natural antibody. The existence of common idiotype(s) between monoclonal immunoglobulins and IVIg could be relevant to the improvement noted after treatment with IVIg in patients suffering from peripheral neuropathies associated with monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:8428386

  2. Expression and Localization of Plant Protein Disulfide Isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Shorrosh, B. S.; Subramaniam, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Dixon, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a putative protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, EC 5.3.4.1) from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and an antiserum was raised against the expressed PDI-active protein. The antiserum recognized a protein of approximately 60 kD in extracts from alfalfa, soybean, and tobacco roots and stems. Levels of this protein remained relatively constant on exposure of alfalfa cell suspension cultures to the protein glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin, whereas a slightly lower molecular mass form, also detected by the antiserum, was induced by this treatment. A lower molecular mass form of PDI was also observed in roots of alfalfa seedlings during the first 5 weeks after germination. PDI levels increased in developing soybean seeds up to 17 d after fertilization and then declined. Tissue print immunoblots revealed highest levels of PDI protein in the cambial tissues of soybean stems and petioles and in epidermal, subepidermal, cortical, and pith tissues of stems of alfalfa and tobacco. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the localization of PDI to the endoplasmic reticulum in soybean root nodules. PMID:12231974

  3. Abnormal Expressions of DNA Glycosylase Genes NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 Are Associated with Somatic Mutation Loads in Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Kato, Hisami; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Igarashi, Hisaki; Goto, Masanori; Tao, Hong; Inoue, Yusuke; Nakamura, Satoki; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Mineta, Hiroyuki; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of abnormalities in the DNA glycosylases NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 on human cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this paper, we found that the median somatic total mutation loads and the median somatic single nucleotide mutation loads exhibited significant inverse correlations with the median NEIL1 and NEIL2 expression levels and a significant positive correlation with the median NEIL3 expression level using data for 13 cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. A subset of the cancer types exhibited reduced NEIL1 and NEIL2 expressions and elevated NEIL3 expression, and such abnormal expressions of NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 were also significantly associated with the mutation loads in cancer. As a mechanism underlying the reduced expression of NEIL1 in cancer, the epigenetic silencing of NEIL1 through promoter hypermethylation was found. Finally, we investigated the reason why an elevated NEIL3 expression level was associated with an increased number of somatic mutations in cancer and found that NEIL3 expression was positively correlated with the expression of APOBEC3B, a potent inducer of mutations, in diverse cancers. These results suggested that the abnormal expressions of NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 are involved in cancer through their association with the somatic mutation load.

  4. Correlation of plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and inducible nitric oxide gene expression among women with cervical abnormalities and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sowjanya, A Pavani; Rao, Meera; Vedantham, Haripriya; Kalpana, Basany; Poli, Usha Rani; Marks, Morgan A; Sujatha, M

    2016-01-30

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a soluble factor involved in chronic inflammation, may modulate cervical cancer risk among HPV infected women. The aim of the study was to measure and correlate plasma nitrite/nitrate levels with tissue specific expression of iNOS mRNA among women with different grades of cervical lesions and cervical cancer. Tissue biopsy and plasma specimens were collected from 120 women with cervical neoplasia or cancer (ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and invasive cancer) and 35 women without cervical abnormalities. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA from biopsy and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels of the same study subjects were measured. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed on the promoter region and Ser608Leu (rs2297518) in exon 16 of the iNOS gene. Differences in iNOS gene expression and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels were compared across disease stage using linear and logistic regression analysis. Compared to normal controls, women diagnosed with HSIL or invasive cancer had a significantly higher concentration of plasma nitrite/nitrate and a higher median fold-change in iNOS mRNA gene expression. Genotyping of the promoter region showed three different variations: A pentanucleotide repeat (CCTTT) n, -1026T > G (rs2779249) and a novel variant -1153T > A. These variants were associated with increased levels of plasma nitrite/nitrate across all disease stages. The higher expression of iNOS mRNA and plasma nitrite/nitrate among women with pre-cancerous lesions suggests a role for nitric oxide in the natural history of cervical cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Over-expression of a grape stilbene synthase gene in tomato induces parthenocarpy and causes abnormal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, Ilaria; Bonsegna, Stefania; De Domenico, Stefania; Laddomada, Barbara; Blando, Federica; Santino, Angelo; Giovinazzo, Giovanna

    2011-10-01

    A novel strategy to induce parthenocarpy in tomato fruits by the induction of resveratrol biosynthesis in flower tissues was exploited. Two transgenic tomato lines were considered: a higher resveratrol-producing (35SS) line, constitutively expressing a grape stilbene synthase cDNA, and a lower resveratrol-producing (LoxS) line, expressing stilbene synthase under a fruit-specific promoter. The expression of the stilbene synthase gene affected flavonoid metabolism in a different manner in the transgenic lines, and in one of these, the 35SS line, resulted in complete male sterility. Resveratrol was synthesised either in 35SS or LoxS tomato flowers, at an even higher extent (about 8-10 times) in the former line. We further investigated whether stilbene synthase expression may have resulted in impaired naringenin accumulation during flower development. In the 35SS flowers, naringenin was significantly impaired by about 50%, probably due to metabolic competition. Conversely, the amount of glycosylated flavonols increased in transgenic flowers, thereby excluding the diminished production of flavonols as a reason for parthenocarpy in tomato. We further investigated whether resveratrol synthesis may have resulted changes to pollen structure. Microscopic observations revealed the presence of few and abnormal flake-like pollen grains in 35SS flowers with no germination capability. Finally, the analysis of coumaric and ferulic acids, the precursors of lignin and sporopollenin biosynthesis, revealed significant depletion of these compounds, therefore suggesting an impairment in structural compounds as a reason for pollen ablation. These overall outcomes, to the best of our knowledge, reveal for the first time the major role displayed by resveratrol synthesis on parthenocarpy in tomato fruits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prostate cancer cell response to paclitaxel is affected by abnormally expressed securin PTTG1.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Carolina; Flores, M Luz; Medina, Rafael; Pérez-Valderrama, Begoña; Romero, Francisco; Tortolero, María; Japón, Miguel A; Sáez, Carmen

    2014-10-01

    PTTG1 protein, the human securin, has a central role in sister chromatid separation during mitosis, and its altered expression has been reported in many tumor types. Paclitaxel is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, whose mechanism of action is related to its ability to arrest cells in mitosis and the subsequent induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. By using two prostate cancer cell lines with different responses to paclitaxel treatment, we have identified two situations in which PTTG1 influences cell fate differentially. In slippage-prone PC3 cells, both PTTG1 downregulation and overexpression induce an increase in mitotic cells that is associated with diminished apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. In LNCaP cells, however, PTTG1 downregulation prevents mitotic entry and, subsequently, inhibits mitosis-associated, paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, PTTG1 overexpression induces an increase in mitotic cells and apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. We have also identified a role for Mcl-1 protein in preventing apoptosis during mitosis in PC3 cells, as simultaneous PTTG1 and Mcl-1 silencing enhances mitosis-associated apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. The finding that a more efficient mitotic arrest alone in PC3 cells is not enough to increase apoptosis was also confirmed with the observation that a selected paclitaxel-resistant PC3 cell line showed an apoptosis-resistant phenotype associated with increased mitosis upon paclitaxel treatment. These findings could contribute to identify putative responsive and nonresponsive cells and help us to approach incomplete responses to paclitaxel in the clinical setting. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Trivalent dimethylarsenic compound induces histone H3 phosphorylation and abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshihide, E-mail: toshi-su@pharm.teikyo-u.ac.j; Miyazaki, Koichi; Kita, Kayoko

    2009-12-15

    Trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] has been shown to induce mitotic abnormalities, such as centrosome abnormality, multipolar spindles, multipolar division, and aneuploidy, in several cell lines. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these mitotic abnormalities, we investigated DMA(III)-mediated changes in histone H3 phosphorylation and localization of Aurora B kinase, which is a key molecule in cell mitosis. DMA(III) caused the phosphorylation of histone H3 (ser10) and was distributed predominantly in mitotic cells, especially in prometaphase cells. By contrast, most of the phospho-histone H3 was found to be localized in interphase cells after treatment with inorganic arsenite [iAs(III)], suggesting the involvementmore » of a different pathway in phosphorylation. DMA(III) activated Aurora B kinase and slightly activated ERK MAP kinase. Phosphorylation of histone H3 by DMA(III) was effectively reduced by ZM447439 (Aurora kinase inhibitor) and slightly reduced by U0126 (MEK inhibitor). By contrast, iAs(III)-dependent histone H3 phosphorylation was markedly reduced by U0126. Aurora B kinase is generally localized in the midbody during telophase and plays an important role in cytokinesis. However, in some cells treated with DMA(III), Aurora B was not localized in the midbody of telophase cells. These findings suggested that DMA(III) induced a spindle abnormality, thereby activating the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) through the Aurora B kinase pathway. In addition, cytokinesis was not completed because of the abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase by DMA(III), thereby resulting in the generation of multinucleated cells. These results provide insight into the mechanism of arsenic tumorigenesis.« less

  8. Correlation between dopamine receptor D2 expression and presence of abnormal involuntary movements in Wistar rats with hemiparkinsonism and dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Caro Aponte, P A; Otálora, C A; Guzmán, J C; Turner, L F; Alcázar, J P; Mayorga, E L

    2018-03-07

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by motor alterations, which are commonly treated with L-DOPA. However, long-term L-DOPA use may cause dyskinesia. Although the pathogenic mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is unclear, the condition has been associated with alterations in dopamine receptors, among which D2 receptors (D2R) have received little attention. This study aims to: (i)develop and standardise an experimental model of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rats with hemiparkinsonism; and (ii)evaluate the correlation between D2R expression and presence of abnormal involuntary movements (AIM). We allocated 21 male Wistar rats into 3 groups: intact controls, lesioned rats (with neurotoxin 6-OHDA), and dyskinetic rats (injected with L-DOPA for 19 days). Sensorimotor impairment was assessed with behavioural tests. Dyskinetic rats gradually developed AIMs during the treatment period; front leg AIMs were more severe and locomotor AIMs less severe (P<.05). All AIMs were significantly evident from day 5 and persisted until the last day of injection. D2R density was greater in the striatum and the medial anterior brain of the lesioned and dyskinetic rats than in those of controls. Our results suggest an association between D2R expression and locomotor AIMs. We conclude that RD2 is involved in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression and subcellular localization of ORC1 in Leishmania major

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Diwakar; Mukherji, Agnideep; Saha, Swati

    2008-10-10

    The mechanism of DNA replication is highly conserved in eukaryotes, with the process being preceded by the ordered assembly of pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs). Pre-RC formation is triggered by the association of the origin replication complex (ORC) with chromatin. Leishmania major appears to have only one ORC ortholog, ORC1. ORC1 in other eukaryotes is the largest of the ORC subunits and is believed to play a significant role in modulating replication initiation. Here we report for the first time, the cloning of ORC1 from L. major, and the analysis of its expression in L. major promastigotes. In human cells ORC1 levelsmore » have been found to be upregulated in G1 and subsequently degraded, thus playing a role in controlling replication initiation. We examine the subcellular localization of L. major ORC1 in relation to the different stages of the cell cycle. Our results show that, unlike what is widely believed to be the case with ORC1 in human cells, ORC1 in L. major is nuclear at all stages of the cell cycle.« less

  10. Increased mitochondrial calcium sensitivity and abnormal expression of innate immunity genes precede dopaminergic defects in Pink1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Akundi, Ravi S; Huang, Zhenyu; Eason, Joshua; Pandya, Jignesh D; Zhi, Lianteng; Cass, Wayne A; Sullivan, Patrick G; Büeler, Hansruedi

    2011-01-13

    PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) is linked to recessive Parkinsonism (EOPD). Pink1 deletion results in impaired dopamine (DA) release and decreased mitochondrial respiration in the striatum of mice. To reveal additional mechanisms of Pink1-related dopaminergic dysfunction, we studied Ca²+ vulnerability of purified brain mitochondria, DA levels and metabolism and whether signaling pathways implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) display altered activity in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice. Purified brain mitochondria of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice showed impaired Ca²+ storage capacity, resulting in increased Ca²+ induced mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) that was rescued by cyclosporine A. A subpopulation of neurons in the substantia nigra of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice accumulated phospho-c-Jun, showing that Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity is increased. Pink1⁻/⁻ mice 6 months and older displayed reduced DA levels associated with increased DA turnover. Moreover, Pink1⁻/⁻ mice had increased levels of IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-10 in the striatum after peripheral challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and Pink1⁻/⁻ embryonic fibroblasts showed decreased basal and inflammatory cytokine-induced nuclear factor kappa-β (NF-κB) activity. Quantitative transcriptional profiling in the striatum revealed that Pink1⁻/⁻ mice differentially express genes that (i) are upregulated in animals with experimentally induced dopaminergic lesions, (ii) regulate innate immune responses and/or apoptosis and (iii) promote axonal regeneration and sprouting. Increased mitochondrial Ca²+ sensitivity and JNK activity are early defects in Pink1⁻/⁻ mice that precede reduced DA levels and abnormal DA homeostasis and may contribute to neuronal dysfunction in familial PD. Differential gene expression in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice supports early dopaminergic dysfunction and shows that Pink1 deletion causes aberrant expression of genes that regulate innate

  11. Increased Mitochondrial Calcium Sensitivity and Abnormal Expression of Innate Immunity Genes Precede Dopaminergic Defects in Pink1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Akundi, Ravi S.; Huang, Zhenyu; Eason, Joshua; Pandya, Jignesh D.; Zhi, Lianteng; Cass, Wayne A.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Büeler, Hansruedi

    2011-01-01

    Background PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) is linked to recessive Parkinsonism (EOPD). Pink1 deletion results in impaired dopamine (DA) release and decreased mitochondrial respiration in the striatum of mice. To reveal additional mechanisms of Pink1-related dopaminergic dysfunction, we studied Ca2+ vulnerability of purified brain mitochondria, DA levels and metabolism and whether signaling pathways implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) display altered activity in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1−/− mice. Methods and Findings Purified brain mitochondria of Pink1−/− mice showed impaired Ca2+ storage capacity, resulting in increased Ca2+ induced mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) that was rescued by cyclosporine A. A subpopulation of neurons in the substantia nigra of Pink1−/− mice accumulated phospho-c-Jun, showing that Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity is increased. Pink1−/− mice 6 months and older displayed reduced DA levels associated with increased DA turnover. Moreover, Pink1−/− mice had increased levels of IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-10 in the striatum after peripheral challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and Pink1−/− embryonic fibroblasts showed decreased basal and inflammatory cytokine-induced nuclear factor kappa-β (NF-κB) activity. Quantitative transcriptional profiling in the striatum revealed that Pink1−/− mice differentially express genes that (i) are upregulated in animals with experimentally induced dopaminergic lesions, (ii) regulate innate immune responses and/or apoptosis and (iii) promote axonal regeneration and sprouting. Conclusions Increased mitochondrial Ca2+ sensitivity and JNK activity are early defects in Pink1−/− mice that precede reduced DA levels and abnormal DA homeostasis and may contribute to neuronal dysfunction in familial PD. Differential gene expression in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1−/− mice supports early dopaminergic dysfunction and shows that Pink1 deletion causes aberrant

  12. Tomato Flower Abnormalities Induced by Low Temperatures Are Associated with Changes of Expression of MADS-Box Genes1

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Rafael; Angosto, Trinidad; Gómez, Pedro; Payán, Carmen; Capel, Juan; Huijser, Peter; Salinas, Julio; Martínez-Zapater, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Flower and fruit development in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were severely affected when plants were grown at low temperatures, displaying homeotic and meristic transformations and alterations in the fusion pattern of the organs. Most of these homeotic transformations modified the identity of stamens and carpels, giving rise to intermediate organs. Complete homeotic transformations were rarely found and always affected organs of the reproductive whorls. Meristic transformations were also commonly observed in the reproductive whorls, which developed with an excessive number of organs. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that meristic transformations take place very early in the development of the flower and are related to a significant increase in the floral meristem size. However, homeotic transformations should occur later during the development of the organ primordia. Steady-state levels of transcripts corresponding to tomato MADS-box genes TM4, TM5, TM6, and TAG1 were greatly increased by low temperatures and could be related to these flower abnormalities. Moreover, in situ hybridization analyses showed that low temperatures also altered the stage-specific expression of TM4. PMID:9576778

  13. Abnormal circadian locomotor rhythms and Per gene expression in six-month-old triple transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meina; Zhou, Fang; Cao, Xiuli; Yang, Junting; Bai, Yu; Yan, Xudong; Cao, Jimin; Qi, Jinshun

    2018-05-29

    Circadian rhythm disturbance (CRD) is one of the iconic manifestations in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a disease tightly associated with age, but the characteristics and gender difference of CRD occurred in AD have not been well demonstrated. Using 6-month-old triple transgenic AD mouse model (3xTg-AD) without obvious brain pathological changes, we demonstrated the gender difference of CRD at this age. We further showed abnormal Per gene expression in the central clock suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the 3xTg-AD mice. Specifically, compared with the wide type (WT) mice, the 3xTg-AD mice showed disrupted circadian locomotor rhythms both at LD (light-dark 12 h:12 h) and DD (constant dark) conditions, such as increased activities in the resting phase, decreased and scattered activities in the active phase, decreased overall activity intensities, amplitude, robustness, and increased intradaily variability. We further observed that 3xTg-AD female mice showed obviously less CRD compared with the 3xTg-AD male mice, and female mice of both WT and 3xTg-AD were more active in locomotor activity. Accordingly, 3xTg-AD mice showed a phase delay in the expression of Per1 and Per2 mRNA in the SCN, with the levels of Per1 and Per2 mRNA were significantly lower than that of WT mice at specific time points. We conclude that 3xTg-AD mice exhibit behavioral CRD at the age of six months with male gender preference, and these phenomena are at least partly associated with the alteration of Per1 and Per2 transcription patterns in the SCN. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Proteins associated with critical sperm functions and sperm head shape are differentially expressed in morphologically abnormal bovine sperm induced by scrotal insulation.

    PubMed

    Shojaei Saadi, Habib A; van Riemsdijk, Evine; Dance, Alysha L; Rajamanickam, Gayathri D; Kastelic, John P; Thundathil, Jacob C

    2013-04-26

    The objective was to investigate expression patterns of proteins in pyriform sperm, a common morphological abnormality in bull sperm. Ejaculates were collected from sexually mature Holstein bulls (n=3) twice weekly for 10 weeks (pre-thermal insult samples). Testicular temperature was elevated in all bulls by scrotal insulation for 72 consecutive hours during week 2. Total sperm proteins were extracted from pre- and post-thermal insult sperm samples and subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Among the protein spots detected, 131 spots were significantly expressed (False Detection Rate <0.01) with ≥ 2 fold changes between normal and pyriform sperm. Among them, 25 spots with ≥ 4 fold difference in expression patterns were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Expression of several proteins involved in sperm capacitation, sperm-egg interaction and sperm cytoskeletal structure was decreased in pyriform sperm, whereas proteins regulating antioxidant activity, apoptosis and metabolic activity were increased. Contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitinated proteins were higher in pyriform sperm. In addition to understanding the molecular basis of functional deficiencies in sperm with specific morphological abnormalities, comparing normal versus morphologically abnormal sperm appeared to be a suitable experimental model for identifying important sperm functional proteins. To our knowledge, this study is the first report on differential expression of proteins in pyriform bovine sperm versus morphologically normal sperm. We report that expression of several proteins involved in sperm capacitation, sperm-egg interaction and sperm cytoskeletal structure was decreased in pyriform sperm, whereas proteins which regulate antioxidant activity, apoptosis and metabolic activity were increased. Contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitinated proteins were higher in pyriform sperm. In addition to understanding

  15. MicroRNA-122 Influences the Development of Sperm Abnormalities from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Regulating TNP2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongyi; Liu, Jianjun; Zhao, Yanhui; Jiang, Lizhen; Huang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Sperm abnormalities are one of the main factors responsible for male infertility; however, their pathogenesis remains unclear. The role of microRNAs in the development of sperm abnormalities in infertile men has not yet been investigated. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate the influence of miR-122 expression on the differentiation of these cells into spermatozoa-like cells in vitro. After induction, mutant miR-122-transfected cells formed spermatozoa-like cells. Flow cytometry of DNA content revealed a significant increase in the haploid cell population in spermatozoa-like cells derived from mutant miR-122-transfected cells as compared to those derived from miR-122-transfected cells. During induction, TNP2 and protamine mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in mutant miR-122-transfected cells than in miR-122-transfected cells. High-throughput isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification were used to identify and quantify the different protein expression levels in miR-122- and mutant miR-122-transfected cells. Among all the proteins analyzed, the expression of lipoproteins, for example, APOB and APOA1, showed the most significant difference between the two groups. This study illustrates that miR-122 expression is associated with abnormal sperm development. MiR-122 may influence spermatozoa-like cells by suppressing TNP2 expression and inhibiting the expression of proteins associated with sperm development. PMID:23327642

  16. Transient expression and cellular localization of recombinant proteins in cultured insect cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heterologous protein expression systems are used for production of recombinant proteins, interpretation of cellular trafficking/localization, and for the determination of biochemical function of proteins at the sub-organismal level. Although baculovirus expression systems are increasingly used for ...

  17. Abnormal subcellular localization of AQP5 and downregulated AQP5 protein in parotid glands of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Yuan, Zhenfang; Inoue, Noriko; Cho, Gota; Shono, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Yasuko

    2011-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying diabetic xerostomia have not been clarified in relation with aquaporin-5 (AQP5) subcellular localization in salivary glands. Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunocytochemistry were used to analyse AQP5 protein levels and mRNA expression. AQP5 protein levels were measured in the apical plasma membrane (APM) and detergent-insoluble fraction prepared from streptozotocin-diabetic rat parotid glands. Despite an increase in AQP5 mRNA, AQP5 protein levels were decreased in diabetic parotid glands compared with controls. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that AQP5, under unstimulated conditions, colocalised with flotillin-2 and GM1 with a diffuse pattern in the apical cytoplasm of acinar and duct cells in both control and diabetic rats. Ten minutes after intravenous injection of muscarinic agonist cevimeline, AQP5 was dramatically increased together with flotillin-2 and GM1 in the APM of parotid acinar and duct cells of control but not diabetic rats. Sixty minutes after injection, AQP5 was located in a diffuse pattern in the apical cytoplasm in both rats. Treatment of the parotid tissues with cevimeline for 10min increased the Triton X-100 solubility of AQP5 in control but not diabetic rats. Administration of insulin to diabetic rats tended to restore the cevimeline-induced translocation of AQP5. Lack of AQP5 translocation in the salivary gland in response to a muscarinic agonist and downregulation of AQP5 protein might lead to diabetic xerostomia. Cevimeline is useful to cure diabetic xerostomia under insulin administration. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics reveals local white matter abnormalities in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Anjari, Mustafa; Srinivasan, Latha; Allsop, Joanna M; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rutherford, Mary A; Edwards, A David; Counsell, Serena J

    2007-04-15

    Infants born preterm have a high incidence of neurodevelopmental impairment in later childhood, often associated with poorly defined cerebral white matter abnormalities. Diffusion tensor imaging quantifies the diffusion of water within tissues and can assess microstructural abnormalities in the developing preterm brain. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) is an automated observer-independent method of aligning fractional anisotropy (FA) images from multiple subjects to allow groupwise comparisons of diffusion tensor imaging data. We applied TBSS to test the hypothesis that preterm infants have reduced fractional anisotropy in specific regions of white matter compared to term-born controls. We studied 26 preterm infants with no evidence of focal lesions on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at term equivalent age and 6 healthy term-born control infants. We found that the centrum semiovale, frontal white matter and the genu of the corpus callosum showed significantly lower FA in the preterm group. Infants born at less than or equal to 28 weeks gestational age (n=11) displayed additional reductions in FA in the external capsule, the posterior aspect of the posterior limb of the internal capsule and the isthmus and middle portion of the body of the corpus callosum. This study demonstrates that TBSS provides an observer-independent method of identifying white matter abnormalities in the preterm brain at term equivalent age in the absence of focal lesions.

  19. Abnormal mRNA Expression Levels of Telomere-Binding Proteins Represent Biomarkers in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoshan; Yan, Rongdi; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Bin; Sun, Hu; Cui, Xing

    2017-08-02

    As evidence was shown that abnormal shortening of telomeres begins to accumulate in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients, this study was conducted to determine the relationship between the mRNA expression levels of telomere-binding proteins (TRF1/TRF2/TIN2/TPP1/POT1/RAP1) and the risk level in MDS. There were 40 patients with MDS and 40 normal controls in this study. Methods including telomere content assays and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to examine the mRNA levels of TRF1/TRF2/TIN2/TPP1/POT1/RAP1 in patients with MDS. Compared to the normal group used as a control, the mRNA expression levels of RAP1/POT1/TPP1 of the patients with MDS were decreased, whereas their levels of TRF1/TRF2 and TIN2 were increased. A positive correlation was found between the TRF1, TRF2, and TIN2 mRNA expression levels and the risk level of the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the World Health Organization Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) criteria; however, a negative correlation was found between RAP1/POT1/TPP1 mRNA expression levels and the risk levels of IPSS and WPSS criteria. Because the reduction of TRF1/TRF2/TIN2 mRNA expression and the increase of RAP1/POT1/TPP1 mRNA expression are closely related to the risk levels of the IPSS and WPSS criteria in MDS, it is thought that these telomere-binding proteins could lead to abnormal telomere length and function, which cause chromosomal abnormalities in MDS. With this evidence, we suggest that those proteins' mRNA expressions could be used as biomarkers for the assessment of the risk degree of MDS patients.

  20. Genomic imprinting as a probable explanation for variable intrafamilial phenotypic expression of an unusual chromosome 3 abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Fryburg, J.S.; Shashi, V.; Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    We present a 4 generation family in which an abnormal chromosome 3 with dup(3)(q25) segregated from great-grandmother to grandmother to son without phenotypic effect. The son`s 2 daughters have dysmorphic features, mild developmental delays and congenital heart disease. Both girls have the abnormal chr. 3 but are the only family members with the abnormality to have phenotypic effects. An unaffected son of the father has normal chromosomes. FISH with whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 14, 18, and 22 excluded these as the origin of the extra material. Chromosome 3-specific paint revealed a uniform pattern, suggestingmore » that the extra material is from chromosome 3. Comparative genomic hybridization and DNA studies are pending. Possible explanations for the discordance in phenotypes between the 4th generation offspring and the first 3 generations include: an undetected rearrangement in the previous generations that is unbalanced in the two affected individuals; the chromosome abnormality may be a benign variant and unrelated to the phenotype; or, most likely, genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is suggested by the observation that a phenotypic effect was only seen after the chromosome was inherited from the father. The mothers in the first two generations appear to have passed the abnormal chr. 3 on without effect. This is an opportunity to delineate a region of the human genome affected by paternal imprinting.« less

  1. High levels of bcl-2 protein expression do not correlate with genetic abnormalities but predict worse prognosis in patients with lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yajun; Pan, Yi; Meng, Bin; Guan, Bingxin; Fu, Kai; Sun, Baocun; Zheng, Fang

    2013-06-01

    We aimed to investigate bcl-2, bcl-6, and c-myc rearrangements in patients with lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL), especially focus on the correlation of protein expression with genetic abnormalities. Moreover, their prognostic significance was further analyzed in LBL. Protein expression and genetic abnormalities of bcl-2, bcl-6, and c-myc were investigated in microarrayed tumors from 33 cases of T cell LBL and eight cases of B cell lineage. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed to evaluate protein expression, including bcl-2, bcl-6, c-myc, TdT, CD1α, CD34, Ki-67, PAX-5, CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD20. Genetic abnormalities of bcl-2, bcl-6, and c-myc were detected by dual color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Bcl-2 protein was positive in 51.2 % (21/41) of the patients, bcl-6 protein in 7.3 % (three out of 41), and c-myc protein in 78.0 % (32/41). Bcl-2 breakpoint was found in two cases by FISH analysis. There was no evidence of bcl-6 or c-myc rearrangement in patients with LBL. However, both gene gain and loss events occurred in bcl-2, bcl-6, and c-myc. A univariate analysis showed that stage III or IV, elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and positivity for bcl-2 protein were associated with shorter survival (p<0.05). Enhanced protein expression and detectable genetic abnormalities of bcl-2, bcl-6, and c-myc were observed in patients with LBL. No statistical correlation was found between IHC results and cytogenetic findings. Stage III or IV, elevated LDH, and positivity for bcl-2 protein were identified as adverse prognostic factors. The patients with more adverse factors would have increasingly worse prognosis.

  2. Modeling pulmonary fibrosis by abnormal expression of telomerase/apoptosis/collagen V in experimental usual interstitial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Parra, E.R.; Pincelli, M.S.; Teodoro, W.R.; Velosa, A.P.P.; Martins, V.; Rangel, M.P.; Barbas-Filho, J.V.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2014-01-01

    Limitations on tissue proliferation capacity determined by telomerase/apoptosis balance have been implicated in pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, collagen V shows promise as an inductor of apoptosis. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between the telomerase/apoptosis index, collagen V synthesis, and epithelial/fibroblast replication in mice exposed to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) at high oxygen concentration. Two groups of mice were analyzed: 20 mice received BHT, and 10 control mice received corn oil. Telomerase expression, apoptosis, collagen I, III, and V fibers, and hydroxyproline were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ detection of apoptosis, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and histomorphometry. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of increased alveolar epithelial cells type 1 (AEC1) in apoptosis. Immunostaining showed increased nuclear expression of telomerase in AEC type 2 (AEC2) between normal and chronic scarring areas of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Control lungs and normal areas from UIP lungs showed weak green birefringence of type I and III collagens in the alveolar wall and type V collagen in the basement membrane of alveolar capillaries. The increase in collagen V was greater than collagens I and III in scarring areas of UIP. A significant direct association was found between collagen V and AEC2 apoptosis. We concluded that telomerase, collagen V fiber density, and apoptosis evaluation in experimental UIP offers the potential to control reepithelization of alveolar septa and fibroblast proliferation. Strategies aimed at preventing high rates of collagen V synthesis, or local responses to high rates of cell apoptosis, may have a significant impact in pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24919172

  3. Raman Scattering Signature of a Localized-to-Delocalized Transition at the Inception of a Dilute Abnormal GaAs1-xNx Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mialitsin, Aleksej V.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2013-05-01

    We identify the signature of a localized-to-delocalized transition in the resonant Raman scattering spectra from GaAs1-xNx. Our measurements in the ultradilute nitrogen doping concentrations demonstrate an energy shift in the line width resonance of the LO phonon. With decreasing nitrogen concentration, the EW line width resonance energy reduces abruptly by ca. 47 meV at x≈0.35%. This value corresponds to the concentration at which GaAs1-xNx has been recently shown to transition from an impurity regime to an alloy regime. Our study elucidates the evolution of dilute abnormal alloys and their Raman response.

  4. Synovial joint formation requires local Ext1 expression and heparan sulfate production in developing mouse embryo limbs and spine.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Christina; Yasuda, Tadashi; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2011-03-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) regulate a number of major developmental processes, but their roles in synovial joint formation remain unknown. Here we created conditional mouse embryo mutants lacking Ext1 in developing joints by mating Ext1(f/f) and Gdf5-Cre mice. Ext1 encodes a subunit of the Ext1/Ext2 Golgi-associated protein complex responsible for heparan sulfate (HS) synthesis. The proximal limb joints did form in the Gdf5-Cre;Ext1(f/f) mutants, but contained an uneven articulating superficial zone that expressed very low lubricin levels. The underlying cartilaginous epiphysis was deranged as well and displayed random patterns of cell proliferation and matrillin-1 and collagen IIA expression, indicative of an aberrant phenotypic definition of the epiphysis itself. Digit joints were even more affected, lacked a distinct mesenchymal interzone and were often fused likely as a result of local abnormal BMP and hedgehog activity and signaling. Interestingly, overall growth and lengthening of long bones were also delayed in the mutants. To test whether Ext1 function is needed for joint formation at other sites, we examined the spine. Indeed, entire intervertebral discs, normally composed by nucleus pulposus surrounded by the annulus fibrosus, were often missing in Gdf5-Cre;Ext1(f/f) mice. When disc remnants were present, they displayed aberrant organization and defective joint marker expression. Similar intervertebral joint defects and fusions occurred in Col2-Cre;β-catenin(f/f) mutants. The study provides novel evidence that local Ext1 expression and HS production are needed to maintain the phenotype and function of joint-forming cells and coordinate local signaling by BMP, hedgehog and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. The data indicate also that defects in joint formation reverberate on, and delay, overall long bone growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Population-based prevalence of abnormal cervical cytology findings and local risk factors in Ibadan, Nigeria: implications for cervical cancer control programs and human papilloma virus immunization.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J O; Ojemakinde, K O; Ajayi, I O; Omigbodun, A O; Fawole, O I; Oladepo, O

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of abnormal cervical cytological findings and local risk factors in Ibadan, Nigeria. All women aged ≥15 years in each household in Idikan, Ibadan, were invited to participate in a population-based study. Structured questionnaires were administered to all consenting women. Conventional cervical Papanicolaou smears obtained from sexually active women were classified using the 2001 Bethesda system. The diagnoses were correlated with sociodemographic data and risk factors. Of 2,870 women aged ≥15 years estimated to live in Idikan, 1,204 sexually active women consented to pelvic examination and cervical smears. Results were available for 1,104 women (mean age: 39.8 years). Mean ages at menarche, first sexual intercourse and first pregnancy were 16.1, 20.3 and 20.7 years, respectively. Cytological results were categorized into atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and atypical glandular cells 22 (1.99%); low-grade 43 (3.89%) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) 17 (1.54%); invasive cancer 2 (0.18%) and normal 593 (53.8%) and reactive changes 427 (38.7%). The prevalence of epithelial abnormalities is 7.6%. Significant host-related factors in those with HSIL and invasive cancer included older age (mean 56.2 years), high parity and gravidity, lack of formal education and being divorced (p < 0.05). This study provides prevalence data and local risk factors for abnormal cervical cytology in a Nigerian population, which will be useful for planning future cervical cancer control programs. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Tualang Honey Protects against BPA-Induced Morphological Abnormalities and Disruption of ERα, ERβ, and C3 mRNA and Protein Expressions in the Uterus of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Zaid, Siti Sarah; Kassim, Normadiah M.; Othman, Shatrah

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that can disrupt the normal functions of the reproductive system. The objective of the study is to investigate the potential protective effects of Tualang honey against BPA-induced uterine toxicity in pubertal rats. The rats were administered with BPA by oral gavage over a period of six weeks. Uterine toxicity in BPA-exposed rats was determined by the degree of the morphological abnormalities, increased lipid peroxidation, and dysregulated expression and distribution of ERα, ERβ, and C3 as compared to the control rats. Concurrent treatment of rats with BPA and Tualang honey significantly improved the uterine morphological abnormalities, reduced lipid peroxidation, and normalized ERα, ERβ, and C3 expressions and distribution. There were no abnormal changes observed in rats treated with Tualang honey alone, comparable with the control rats. In conclusion, Tualang honey has potential roles in protecting the uterus from BPA-induced toxicity, possibly accounted for by its phytochemical properties. PMID:26788107

  7. Grey Matter Alterations Co-Localize with Functional Abnormalities in Developmental Dyslexia: An ALE Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Linkersdörfer, Janosch; Lonnemann, Jan; Lindberg, Sven; Hasselhorn, Marcus; Fiebach, Christian J.

    2012-01-01

    The neural correlates of developmental dyslexia have been investigated intensively over the last two decades and reliable evidence for a dysfunction of left-hemispheric reading systems in dyslexic readers has been found in functional neuroimaging studies. In addition, structural imaging studies using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) demonstrated grey matter reductions in dyslexics in several brain regions. To objectively assess the consistency of these findings, we performed activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis on nine published VBM studies reporting 62 foci of grey matter reduction in dyslexic readers. We found six significant clusters of convergence in bilateral temporo-parietal and left occipito-temporal cortical regions and in the cerebellum bilaterally. To identify possible overlaps between structural and functional deviations in dyslexic readers, we conducted additional ALE meta-analyses of imaging studies reporting functional underactivations (125 foci from 24 studies) or overactivations (95 foci from 11 studies ) in dyslexics. Subsequent conjunction analyses revealed overlaps between the results of the VBM meta-analysis and the meta-analysis of functional underactivations in the fusiform and supramarginal gyri of the left hemisphere. An overlap between VBM results and the meta-analysis of functional overactivations was found in the left cerebellum. The results of our study provide evidence for consistent grey matter variations bilaterally in the dyslexic brain and substantial overlap of these structural variations with functional abnormalities in left hemispheric regions. PMID:22916214

  8. Ectopic Expression of Nolz-1 in Neural Progenitors Promotes Cell Cycle Exit/Premature Neuronal Differentiation Accompanying with Abnormal Apoptosis in the Developing Mouse Telencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Chen, Shih-Yun; Huang, Huai-Huei; Ko, Hsin-An; Liu, Pei-Tsen; Liu, Ya-Chi; Chen, Ping-Hau; Liu, Fu-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Nolz-1, as a murine member of the NET zinc-finger protein family, is expressed in post-mitotic differentiating neurons of striatum during development. To explore the function of Nolz-1 in regulating the neurogenesis of forebrain, we studied the effects of ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors. We generated the Cre-loxP dependent conditional transgenic mice in which Nolz-1 was ectopically expressed in proliferative neural progenitors. Ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors by intercrossing the Nolz-1 conditional transgenic mice with the nestin-Cre mice resulted in hypoplasia of telencephalon in double transgenic mice. Decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells were found in the telencephalon, as evidenced by the reduction of BrdU−, Ki67− and phospho-histone 3-positive cells in E11.5–12.5 germinal zone of telencephalon. Transgenic Nolz-1 also promoted cell cycle exit and as a consequence might facilitate premature differentiation of progenitors, because TuJ1-positive neurons were ectopically found in the ventricular zone and there was a general increase of TuJ1 immunoreactivity in the telencephalon. Moreover, clusters of strong TuJ1-expressing neurons were present in E12.5 germinal zone. Some of these strong TuJ1-positive clusters, however, contained apoptotic condensed DNA, suggesting that inappropriate premature differentiation may lead to abnormal apoptosis in some progenitor cells. Consistent with the transgenic mouse analysis in vivo, similar effects of Nozl-1 over-expression in induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of neuronal differentiation were also observed in three different N18, ST14A and N2A neural cell lines in vitro. Taken together, our study indicates that ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation and induces abnormal apoptosis in the developing telencephalon. PMID:24073229

  9. Ectopic expression of nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation accompanying with abnormal apoptosis in the developing mouse telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Chen, Shih-Yun; Huang, Huai-Huei; Ko, Hsin-An; Liu, Pei-Tsen; Liu, Ya-Chi; Chen, Ping-Hau; Liu, Fu-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Nolz-1, as a murine member of the NET zinc-finger protein family, is expressed in post-mitotic differentiating neurons of striatum during development. To explore the function of Nolz-1 in regulating the neurogenesis of forebrain, we studied the effects of ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors. We generated the Cre-loxP dependent conditional transgenic mice in which Nolz-1 was ectopically expressed in proliferative neural progenitors. Ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors by intercrossing the Nolz-1 conditional transgenic mice with the nestin-Cre mice resulted in hypoplasia of telencephalon in double transgenic mice. Decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells were found in the telencephalon, as evidenced by the reduction of BrdU-, Ki67- and phospho-histone 3-positive cells in E11.5-12.5 germinal zone of telencephalon. Transgenic Nolz-1 also promoted cell cycle exit and as a consequence might facilitate premature differentiation of progenitors, because TuJ1-positive neurons were ectopically found in the ventricular zone and there was a general increase of TuJ1 immunoreactivity in the telencephalon. Moreover, clusters of strong TuJ1-expressing neurons were present in E12.5 germinal zone. Some of these strong TuJ1-positive clusters, however, contained apoptotic condensed DNA, suggesting that inappropriate premature differentiation may lead to abnormal apoptosis in some progenitor cells. Consistent with the transgenic mouse analysis in vivo, similar effects of Nozl-1 over-expression in induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of neuronal differentiation were also observed in three different N18, ST14A and N2A neural cell lines in vitro. Taken together, our study indicates that ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation and induces abnormal apoptosis in the developing telencephalon.

  10. Regulation of expression, activity and localization of fungal chitin synthases

    PubMed Central

    Rogg, Luise E.; Fortwendel, Jarrod R.; Juvvadi, Praveen R.; Steinbach, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The fungal cell wall represents an attractive target for pharmacologic inhibition, as many of the components are fungal-specific. Though targeted inhibition of β-glucan synthesis is effective treatment for certain fungal infections, the ability of the cell wall to dynamically compensate via the cell wall integrity pathway may limit overall efficacy. To date, chitin synthesis inhibitors have not been successfully deployed in the clinical setting. Fungal chitin synthesis is a complex and highly regulated process. Regulation of chitin synthesis occurs on multiple levels, thus targeting of these regulatory pathways may represent an exciting alternative approach. A variety of signaling pathways have been implicated in chitin synthase regulation, at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Recent research suggests that localization of chitin synthases likely represents a major regulatory mechanism. However, much of the regulatory machinery is not necessarily shared among different chitin synthases. Thus, an in depth understanding of the precise roles of each protein in cell wall maintenance and repair will be essential to identifying the most likely therapeutic targets. PMID:21526913

  11. Disruption of the midkine gene (Mdk) resulted in altered expression of a calcium binding protein in the hippocampus of infant mice and their abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, E; Kadomatsu, K; Yuasa, S; Muramatsu, H; Mamiya, T; Nabeshima, T; Fan, Q W; Ishiguro, K; Igakura, T; Matsubara, S; Kaname, T; Horiba, M; Saito, H; Muramatsu, T

    1998-12-01

    Midkine (MK) is a growth factor implicated in the development and repair of various tissues, especially neural tissues. However, its in vivo function has not been clarified. Knockout mice lacking the MK gene (Mdk) showed no gross abnormalities. We closely analysed postnatal brain development in Mdk(-/-) mice using calcium binding proteins as markers to distinguish neuronal subpopulations. Intense and prolonged calretinin expression was found in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer of the hippocampus of infant Mdk(-/-) mice. In infant Mdk(+/+) mice, calretinin expression in the granule cell layer was weaker, and had disappeared by 4 weeks after birth, when calretinin expression still persisted in Mdk(-/-) mice. Furthermore, 4 weeks after birth, Mdk(-/-) mice showed a deficit in their working memory, as revealed by a Y-maze test, and had an increased anxiety, as demonstrated by the elevated plus-maze test. Midkine plays an important role in the regulation of postnatal development of the hippocampus.

  12. Abnormal proliferation of CD4- CD8+ gammadelta+ T cells with chromosome 6 anomaly: role of Fas ligand expression in spontaneous regression of the cells.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, N; Kitano, K; Ito, T; Nakazawa, T; Shimodaira, S; Ishida, F; Kiyosawa, K

    1999-04-01

    We report a case of granular lymphocyte proliferative disorder accompanied with hemolytic anemia and neutropenia. Phenotypes of the cells were T cell receptor gammadelta+ CD3+ CD4- CD8+ CD16+ CD56- CD57-. Southern blot analysis of T cell receptor beta and gamma chains demonstrated rearranged bands in both. Chromosomal analysis after IL-2 stimulation showed deletion of chromosome 6. Sorted gammadelta+ T cells showed an increase in Fas ligand expression compared with the levels in sorted alphabeta+ T cells. The expression of Fas ligand on these gammadelta+ T cells increased after IL-2 stimulation. The patient's anemia improved along with a decrease in granular lymphocyte count and disappearance of the abnormal karyotype without treatment. The expression of Fas ligand may be involved in spontaneous regression of granular lymphocyte proliferation with hemolytic anemia.

  13. Facial expression recognition based on improved local ternary pattern and stacked auto-encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yao; Qiu, Weigen

    2017-08-01

    In order to enhance the robustness of facial expression recognition, we propose a method of facial expression recognition based on improved Local Ternary Pattern (LTP) combined with Stacked Auto-Encoder (SAE). This method uses the improved LTP extraction feature, and then uses the improved depth belief network as the detector and classifier to extract the LTP feature. The combination of LTP and improved deep belief network is realized in facial expression recognition. The recognition rate on CK+ databases has improved significantly.

  14. Machine learning to design integral membrane channelrhodopsins for efficient eukaryotic expression and plasma membrane localization.

    PubMed

    Bedbrook, Claire N; Yang, Kevin K; Rice, Austin J; Gradinaru, Viviana; Arnold, Frances H

    2017-10-01

    There is growing interest in studying and engineering integral membrane proteins (MPs) that play key roles in sensing and regulating cellular response to diverse external signals. A MP must be expressed, correctly inserted and folded in a lipid bilayer, and trafficked to the proper cellular location in order to function. The sequence and structural determinants of these processes are complex and highly constrained. Here we describe a predictive, machine-learning approach that captures this complexity to facilitate successful MP engineering and design. Machine learning on carefully-chosen training sequences made by structure-guided SCHEMA recombination has enabled us to accurately predict the rare sequences in a diverse library of channelrhodopsins (ChRs) that express and localize to the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. These light-gated channel proteins of microbial origin are of interest for neuroscience applications, where expression and localization to the plasma membrane is a prerequisite for function. We trained Gaussian process (GP) classification and regression models with expression and localization data from 218 ChR chimeras chosen from a 118,098-variant library designed by SCHEMA recombination of three parent ChRs. We use these GP models to identify ChRs that express and localize well and show that our models can elucidate sequence and structure elements important for these processes. We also used the predictive models to convert a naturally occurring ChR incapable of mammalian localization into one that localizes well.

  15. Machine learning to design integral membrane channelrhodopsins for efficient eukaryotic expression and plasma membrane localization

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Austin J.; Gradinaru, Viviana; Arnold, Frances H.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in studying and engineering integral membrane proteins (MPs) that play key roles in sensing and regulating cellular response to diverse external signals. A MP must be expressed, correctly inserted and folded in a lipid bilayer, and trafficked to the proper cellular location in order to function. The sequence and structural determinants of these processes are complex and highly constrained. Here we describe a predictive, machine-learning approach that captures this complexity to facilitate successful MP engineering and design. Machine learning on carefully-chosen training sequences made by structure-guided SCHEMA recombination has enabled us to accurately predict the rare sequences in a diverse library of channelrhodopsins (ChRs) that express and localize to the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. These light-gated channel proteins of microbial origin are of interest for neuroscience applications, where expression and localization to the plasma membrane is a prerequisite for function. We trained Gaussian process (GP) classification and regression models with expression and localization data from 218 ChR chimeras chosen from a 118,098-variant library designed by SCHEMA recombination of three parent ChRs. We use these GP models to identify ChRs that express and localize well and show that our models can elucidate sequence and structure elements important for these processes. We also used the predictive models to convert a naturally occurring ChR incapable of mammalian localization into one that localizes well. PMID:29059183

  16. Neurological abnormalities in localized scleroderma of the face and head: a case series study for evaluation of imaging findings and clinical course.

    PubMed

    Lis-Święty, Anna; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia; Arasiewicz, Hubert

    2017-09-01

    Localized scleroderma (LoS) of the face and head is often associated with neurological manifestations and/or imaging abnormalities in the central nervous system (CNS). We present an analysis of 20 cases of LoS affecting the face and head. The CNS symptoms and/or abnormalities in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were observed in 12 patients (60%). In addition to the mild and unspecific disorders (e.g. headaches), serious neurological complications probably in the course of vasculitis were revealed: epilepsy (in two patients), epilepsy and pyramidal sings (in one patient). Neurological disorders and LoS occurred at the same time (in three patients) or at the course of the disease (nine patients) and no later than 29 years since the onset of the disease. No link between neurological disorders and the LoS clinical morphology, immunological and other laboratory parameters has been established. CNS involvement is not correlated with the clinical course of the facial and head LoS and may occur years after the disease initial symptomatology. Imaging follow-up is not required if there is not any emerging neurological symptom. In some cases, however, both HRCT and MRI are useful for monitoring disease evolution and addressing therapeutic choices.

  17. Duplication of the EFNB1 Gene in Familial Hypertelorism: Imbalance in Ephrin-B1 Expression and Abnormal Phenotypes in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Babbs, Christian; Stewart, Helen S; Williams, Louise J; Connell, Lyndsey; Goriely, Anne; Twigg, Stephen RF; Smith, Kim; Lester, Tracy; Wilkie, Andrew OM

    2011-01-01

    Familial hypertelorism, characterized by widely spaced eyes, classically shows autosomal dominant inheritance (Teebi type), but some pedigrees are compatible with X-linkage. No mechanism has been described previously, but clinical similarity has been noted to craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), which is caused by mutations in the X-linked EFNB1 gene. Here we report a family in which females in three generations presented with hypertelorism, but lacked either craniosynostosis or a grooved nasal tip, excluding CFNS. DNA sequencing of EFNB1 was normal, but further analysis revealed a duplication of 937 kb including EFNB1 and two flanking genes: PJA1 and STARD8. We found that the X chromosome bearing the duplication produces ∼1.6-fold more EFNB1 transcript than the normal X chromosome and propose that, in the context of X-inactivation, this difference in expression level of EFNB1 results in abnormal cell sorting leading to hypertelorism. To support this hypothesis, we provide evidence from a mouse model carrying a targeted human EFNB1 cDNA, that abnormal cell sorting occurs in the cranial region. Hence, we propose that X-linked cases resembling Teebi hypertelorism may have a similar mechanism to CFNS, and that cellular mosaicism for different levels of ephrin-B1 (as well as simple presence/absence) leads to craniofacial abnormalities. Hum Mutat 32:1–9, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21542058

  18. Inflammation-induced abnormalities in the subcellular localization and trafficking of the neurokinin 1 receptor in the enteric nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, TinaMarie; Pelayo, Juan Carlos; Eriksson, Emily M.; Veldhuis, Nicholas A.; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    Activated G protein-coupled receptors traffic to endosomes and are sorted to recycling or degradative pathways. Endosomes are also a site of receptor signaling of sustained and pathophysiologically important processes, including inflammation. However, the mechanisms of endosomal sorting of receptors and the impact of disease on trafficking have not been fully defined. We examined the effects of inflammation on the subcellular distribution and trafficking of the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) in enteric neurons. We studied NK1R trafficking in enteric neurons of the mouse colon using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The impact of inflammation was studied in IL10−/−-piroxicam and trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid colitis models. NK1R was localized to the plasma membrane of myenteric and submucosal neurons of the uninflamed colon. SP evoked NK1R endocytosis and recycling. Deletion of β-arrestin2, which associates with the activated NK1R, accelerated recycling. Inhibition of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1), which degrades endosomal SP, prevented recycling. Inflammation was associated with NK1R endocytosis in myenteric but not submucosal neurons. Whereas the NK1R in uninflamed neurons recycled within 60 min, NK1R recycling in inflamed neurons was delayed for >120 min, suggesting defective recycling machinery. Inflammation was associated with β-arrestin2 upregulation and ECE-1 downregulation, which may contribute to the defective NK1R recycling. We conclude that inflammation evokes redistribution of NK1R from the plasma membrane to endosomes of myenteric neurons through enhanced SP release and defective NK1R recycling. Defective recycling may be secondary to upregulation of β-arrestin2 and downregulation of ECE-1. Internalized NK1R may generate sustained proinflammatory signals that disrupt normal neuronal functions. PMID:26138465

  19. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Abnormal expression of p27kip1 protein in levator ani muscle of aging women with pelvic floor disorders – a relationship to the cellular differentiation and degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Copas, Pleas; Caudle, Michael R; Cekanova, Maria; Dassanayake, Tamara; Asbury, Bridgett; Van Meter, Stuart E; Elder, Robert F; Brown, Jeffrey B; Cross, Stephanie B

    2001-01-01

    Background Pelvic floor disorders affect almost 50% of aging women. An important role in the pelvic floor support belongs to the levator ani muscle. The p27/kip1 (p27) protein, multifunctional cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, shows changing expression in differentiating skeletal muscle cells during development, and relatively high levels of p27 RNA were detected in the normal human skeletal muscles. Methods Biopsy samples of levator ani muscle were obtained from 22 symptomatic patients with stress urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and overlaps (age range 38–74), and nine asymptomatic women (age 31–49). Cryostat sections were investigated for p27 protein expression and type I (slow twitch) and type II (fast twitch) fibers. Results All fibers exhibited strong plasma membrane (and nuclear) p27 protein expression. cytoplasmic p27 expression was virtually absent in asymptomatic women. In perimenopausal symptomatic patients (ages 38–55), muscle fibers showed hypertrophy and moderate cytoplasmic p27 staining accompanied by diminution of type II fibers. Older symptomatic patients (ages 57–74) showed cytoplasmic p27 overexpression accompanied by shrinking, cytoplasmic vacuolization and fragmentation of muscle cells. The plasma membrane and cytoplasmic p27 expression was not unique to the muscle cells. Under certain circumstances, it was also detected in other cell types (epithelium of ectocervix and luteal cells). Conclusions This is the first report on the unusual (plasma membrane and cytoplasmic) expression of p27 protein in normal and abnormal human striated muscle cells in vivo. Our data indicate that pelvic floor disorders are in perimenopausal patients associated with an appearance of moderate cytoplasmic p27 expression, accompanying hypertrophy and transition of type II into type I fibers. The patients in advanced postmenopause show shrinking and fragmentation of muscle fibers associated with strong cytoplasmic p27 expression. PMID:11696252

  1. Inactivation of Bmp4 from the Tbx1 Expression Domain Causes Abnormal Pharyngeal Arch Artery and Cardiac Outflow Tract Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xuguang; Brown, Christopher B.; Wang, Qin; Jiao, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Maldevelopment of outflow tract and aortic arch arteries is among the most common forms of human congenital heart diseases. Both Bmp4 and Tbx1 are known to play critical roles during cardiovascular development. Expression of these two genes partially overlaps in pharyngeal arch areas in mouse embryos. In this study, we applied a conditional gene inactivation approach to test the hypothesis that Bmp4 expressed from the Tbx1 expression domain plays a critical role for normal development of outflow tract and pharyngeal arch arteries. We showed that inactivation of Bmp4 from Tbx1-expressing cells leads to the spectrum of deformities resembling the cardiovascular defects observed in human DiGeorge syndrome patients. Inactivation of Bmp4 from the Tbx1 expression domain did not cause patterning defects, but affected remodeling of outflow tract and pharyngeal arch arteries. Our further examination revealed that Bmp4 is required for normal recruitment/differentiation of smooth muscle cells surrounding the PAA4 and survival of outflow tract cushion mesenchymal cells. PMID:21123999

  2. Differences in MYB expression and gene abnormalities further confirm that salivary cribriform basal cell tumors and adenoid cystic carcinoma are two distinct tumor entities.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Lei; Zhang, Chun-Ye; Gu, Ting; Li, Jiang

    2016-10-01

    In practices, some cases of salivary basal cell tumors that consist mainly of cribriform growth pattern are difficult to differentiate from adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC). Identification of reliable molecular biomarkers for the differential diagnosis between them is required. Twenty-two cases of cribriform salivary basal cell tumors (at least 10% cribriform pattern present in each tumor) comprising 18 cases of basal cell adenoma (BCA) and four cases of basal cell adenocarcinoma (BcAC) were collected between 1985 and 2008. Twenty cases of cribriform AdCC were retrieved from our archives. MYB protein expression and gene abnormalities were detected in all cases by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, respectively. Neither MYB protein nor split genes were detected in any of the cases of cribriform basal cell tumors, while 55% (11/20) of cases of cribriform AdCC had MYB protein expression. High MYB expression was detected in 81.8% (9/11) cases, while low expression was found in the remaining cases. FISH analysis indicated that nine AdCC tumors with high MYB protein expression were split gene-positive, while MYB gene splitting was not detected in the 11 cases with low or absent MYB protein expression. The molecular changes in AdCC differ from those associated with cribriform basal cell tumors, which further confirms that cribriform basal cell tumors and AdCC are two distinct tumor entities. Simultaneous detection of MYB protein expression and the associated molecular changes could be beneficial in differentiating salivary cribriform basal cell tumors from AdCC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Activation of the hexosamine pathway causes oxidative stress and abnormal embryo gene expression: involvement in diabetic teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horal, Melissa; Zhang, Zhiquan; Stanton, Robert; Virkamäki, Antti; Loeken, Mary R

    2004-08-01

    Oxidative stress is critical to the teratogenic effects of diabetic pregnancy, yet the specific biochemical pathways responsible for oxidative stress have not been fully elucidated. The hexosamine pathway is activated in many tissues during diabetes and could contribute to oxidative stress by inhibiting the pentose shunt pathway, thereby diminishing production of the cellular antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH). To test the hypothesis that activation of the hexosamine pathway might contribute to the teratogenic effects of diabetic pregnancy, pregnant mice were injected with glucose, to induce hyperglycemia, or glucosamine, to directly activate the hexosamine pathway. Embryo tissue fragments were also cultured in physiological glucose, high glucose, or physiological glucose plus glucosamine, to test effects on oxidative stress and embryo gene expression. Glucosamine increased hexosamine synthesis and inhibited pentose shunt activity. There was a trend for transient hyperglycemia to have the same effects, but they did not reach statistical significance. However, both glucose and glucosamine significantly decreased GSH, and increased oxidative stress, as indicated by 2',7'-dichloro-dihydrofluorescein fluorescence. Glucose and glucosamine inhibited expression of Pax-3, a gene required for neural tube closure both in vivo and in vitro, and increased neural tube defects (NTDs) in vivo; these effects were prevented by GSH ethyl ester. High glucose and glucosamine inhibited Pax-3 expression by embryo culture, but culture in glutamine-free media to block the hexosamine pathway prevented the inhibition of Pax-3 expression by high glucose. Activation of the hexosamine pathway causes oxidative stress through depletion of GSH and consequent disruption of embryo gene expression. Activation of this pathway may contribute to diabetic teratogenesis.

  4. Abnormality of autophagic function and cathepsin expression in the liver from patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Fukuo, Yuka; Yamashina, Shunhei; Sonoue, Hiroshi; Arakawa, Atsushi; Nakadera, Eisuke; Aoyama, Tomonori; Uchiyama, Akira; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Ikejima, Kenichi; Watanabe, Sumio

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidences indicate that hepatic steatosis suppresses autophagic proteolysis. The present study evaluated the correlation between autophagic function and cathepsin expression in the liver from patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Liver biopsy specimens were obtained from patients with chronic liver diseases (chronic hepatitis C [CHC; n = 20], chronic hepatitis B [CHB; n = 16], primary biliary cirrhosis [PBC; n = 23], NAFLD [n = 22] and control [n = 14]). The number of autophagic vesicles in hepatocytes was counted by using transmission electron microscopy. Expression of cathepsin B, D, L and p62 in the liver section was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining. The histological severity of NAFLD is assessed by NAFLD activity score (NAS). The number of autophagic vesicles in hepatocytes was significantly increased in both CHC and NAFLD groups, but not CHB and PBC, more than control. Although hepatocytes with aggregation of p62 were observed in less than 15% of CHC, p62 aggregation was detected in approximately 65% of NAFLD. Cathepsin B, D and L expression was significantly suppressed in the liver from NAFLD patients. Suppression of cathepsin B, D and L expression was not observed in CHB, CHC and PBC. In NAFLD patients, p62 aggregation was correlated with serum alanine aminotransferase value and inflammatory activity by NAS. These results indicate that a decrease in hepatic cathepsin expression in NAFLD is associated with autophagic dysfunction. Hepatic inflammation correlates with autophagic dysfunction in NAFLD. These findings indicate that the suppression of autophagic proteolysis by hepatic steatosis is involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. © 2013 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  5. The effects of abnormalities of glucose homeostasis on the expression and binding of muscarinic receptors in cerebral cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Sherin, Antony; Peeyush, Kumar T; Naijil, George; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Jayanarayanan, Sadanandan; Jes, Paul; Paulose, Cheramadathikudiyil Skaria

    2011-01-25

    Glucose homeostasis in humans is an important factor for the functioning of nervous system. Both hypo and hyperglycemia contributes to neuronal functional deficit. In the present study, effect of insulin induced hypoglycemia and streptozotocin induced diabetes on muscarinic receptor binding, cholinergic enzymes; AChE, ChAT expression and GLUT3 in the cerebral cortex of experimental rats were analysed. Total muscarinic, muscarinic M(1) receptor showed a significant decrease and muscarinic M(3) receptor subtype showed a significant increased binding in the cerebral cortex of hypoglycemic rats compared to diabetic and control. Real-Time PCR analysis of muscarinic M(1), M(3) receptor subtypes confirmed the receptor binding studies. Immunohistochemistry of muscarinic M(1), M(3) receptors using specific antibodies were also carried out. AChE and GLUT3 expression up regulated and ChAT expression down regulated in hypoglycemic rats compared to diabetic and control rats. Our results showed that hypo/hyperglycemia caused impaired glucose transport in neuronal cells as shown by altered expression of GLUT3. Increased AChE and decreased ChAT expression is suggested to alter cortical acetylcholine metabolism in experimental rats along with altered muscarinic receptor binding in hypo/hyperglycemic rats, impair cholinergic transmission, which subsequently lead to cholinergic dysfunction thereby causing learning and memory deficits. We observed a prominent cholinergic functional disturbance in hypoglycemic condition than in hyperglycemia. Hypoglycemia exacerbated the neurochemical changes in cerebral cortex induced by hyperglycemia. These findings have implications for both therapy and identification of causes contributing to neuronal dysfunction in diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Complement factor H: spatial and temporal expression and localization in the eye.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Md Nawajes A; Ayyagari, Radha

    2006-09-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a component of the mammalian complement system, which regulates the alternative pathway of complement activation and protects the host cell from inappropriate complement activation. CFH is a key regulator of innate immunity, and CFH deficiency leads to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II. A variation in human CFH, Y402H, has been shown to be associated with an increased risk for age-related macular degeneration. The authors describe studies on the spatial and temporal expression of the CFH gene and localization of this protein in ocular tissues to gain insight into its role in the eye. CFH expression in human and mouse tissues was studied by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, and localization of CFH was studied by immunohistochemical analysis followed by fluorescence microscopy. In human and mouse, CFH expression was found to be similar to the highest level of expression in the liver. In ocular tissue, CFH was detected in the distalmost optic nerve (3 mm) cut from the scleral surface of the eyeball, sclera, RPE-choroid, retina, lens, and ciliary body. In mouse, Cfh expression was observed from early embryonic stages, and in the eye its expression increased with age. A significant level of CFH expression is maintained in different ocular tissues during development and aging. Sustained high levels of CFH expression in eye tissues suggest that this protein may play a role in protecting these tissues from indiscriminate complement activation and inflammatory insult.

  7. A novel mechanism of protamine expression deregulation highlighted by abnormal protamine transcript retention in infertile human males with sperm protamine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aoki, V W; Liu, L; Carrell, D T

    2006-01-01

    Sperm protamine deficiency has been associated with human male infertility. However, the aetiology of deregulated protamine expression remains elusive. The objective of this study was to evaluate the underlying aetiology of protamine deficiency in male infertility patients with deregulated protamine expression. Protamine-1 (P1) and protamine-2 (P2) protein concentrations were compared against P1 and P2 mRNA levels in the sperm of 166 male infertility patients and 27 men of known fertility. Protamine protein concentrations were quantified by nuclear protein extraction, gel electrophoresis and densitometry analysis. Semi-quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to quantify P1 and P2 mRNA levels. P1 mRNA concentrations were significantly increased in patients underexpressing P1 protein versus those with normal and increased P1 levels. In patients with an abnormally low ratio of P1 to P2 (P1/P2 <0.8), there was a significant increase in P1 mRNA retention. Patients underexpressing P2 also had significantly increased mean P2 mRNA levels, although the majority of these P2-deficient patients showed an increased frequency of significantly reduced P2 mRNA levels. This is the first study to concomitantly evaluate P1 and P2 protein and mRNA levels in mature human sperm. Abnormally elevated protamine mRNA retention appears to be associated with aberrant protamine expression in infertile human males. These data suggest that defects in protamine translation regulation may contribute to protamine deficiency in infertile males.

  8. Abnormal histopathology, fat percent and hepatic apolipoprotein A I and apolipoprotein B100 mRNA expression in fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome and their improvement by soybean lecithin.

    PubMed

    Song, Yalu; Ruan, Jiming; Luo, Junrong; Wang, Tiancheng; Yang, Fei; Cao, Huabin; Huang, Jianzhen; Hu, Guoliang

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the etiopathogenesis of fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS) and the protective effects of soybean lecithin against FLHS in laying hens, 135 healthy 300-day-old Hyline laying hens were randomly divided into groups: control (group 1), diseased (group 2), and protected (group 3). Each group contained 45 layers with 3 replicates. The birds in these 3 groups were fed a control diet, a high-energy/low-protein (HELP) diet or the HELP diet supplemented with 3% soybean lecithin instead of maize. The fat percent in the liver was calculated. Histopathological changes in the liver were determined by staining, and the mRNA expression levels of apolipoproteinA I (apoA I) and apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) in the liver were determined by RT-PCR. The results showed that the fat percent in the liver of group 2 was much higher (P < 0.01) than that of group 1 and group 2 on d 30 and 60. The histology of the liver in group 2 on d 30 and 60 displayed various degrees of liver lesions, while the hepatocytes showed a normal structure in group 3 with mild microvesicular steatosis in the liver cell on d 30 and 60. The mRNA expression levels of apoA I and apoB100 in the livers were variable throughout the experiment. The expression level of apoA I in group 2 significantly decreased on d 60 (P < 0.05); the expression level of apoB100 slightly increased on d 30 in group 2, while it sharply decreased on d 60. Compared to group 1, the expression level of apoB100 showed no significant difference in group 3 (P < 0.05). This study indicated that FLHS induced pathological changes and abnormal expression of apoA I and apoB100 in the livers of laying hens and that soybean lecithin alleviated these abnormal changes. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  9. Developmental pattern of ANF gene expression reveals a strict localization of cardiac chamber formation in chicken.

    PubMed

    Houweling, Arjan C; Somi, Semir; Van Den Hoff, Maurice J B; Moorman, Antoon F M; Christoffels, Vincent M

    2002-02-01

    In mouse, atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) gene expression was shown to be a marker for chamber formation within the embryonic heart. To gain insight into the process of chamber formation in the chicken embryonic heart, we analyzed the expression pattern of cANF during development. We found cANF to be specifically expressed in the myocardium of the morphologically distinguishable atrial and ventricular chambers, similar to ANF in mouse. cANF expression was never detected in the myocardium of the atrioventricular canal (AVC), inner curvature, and outflow tract (OFT), which is lined by endocardial cushions. Expression was strictly excluded from the interventricular myocardium and most proximal part of the bundle branches, as identified by the expression of Msx-2, whereas the rest of the bundle branches, trabeculae, and surrounding working myocardium did express cANF. The myocardium that forms de novo within the cushions after looping did not express cANF. At HH9 cANF expression was first observed in a subset of cardiomyocytes, which was localized ventrally in the fused heart tube and laterally in the unfused cardiac sheets. Together, these results show that cANF expression can be used to distinguish differentiated chamber (working) myocardium, including the peripheral ventricular conduction system, from embryonic myocardium. We conclude that differentiation of chamber myocardium takes place already at HH9 at the ventral side of the linear heart tube, possibly preceded by latero-medial signals in the unfused cardiac sheets. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Abnormal expression and functional characteristics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein in postmortem brain of suicide subjects.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Yogesh; Rao, Jagadeesh Sridhara; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Kotowski, Jacek; Conley, Robert R; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Tamminga, Carol A; Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2003-03-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) is a transcription factor that, on phosphorylation by protein kinases, is activated, and in response, regulates the transcription of many neuronally expressed genes. In view of the recent observations that catalytic properties and/or expression of many kinases that mediate their physiological responses through the activation of CREB are altered in the postmortem brain of subjects who commit suicide (hereafter referred to as suicide subjects), we examined the status of CREB in suicidal behavior. These studies were performed in Brodmann area (BA) 9 and hippocampus obtained from 26 suicide subjects and 20 nonpsychiatric healthy control subjects. Messenger RNA levels of CREB and neuron-specific enolase were determined in total RNA by means of quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Protein levels and the functional characteristics of CREB were determined in nuclear fractions by means of Western blot and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element (CRE)-DNA binding activity, respectively. In the same nuclear fraction, we determined the catalytic activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-stimulated protein kinase A by means of enzymatic assay. We observed a significant reduction in messenger RNA and protein levels of CREB, CRE-DNA binding activity, and basal and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-stimulated protein kinase A activity in BA 9 and hippocampus of suicide subjects, without any change in messenger RNA levels of neuron-specific enolase in BA 9. Except for protein kinase A activity, changes in CREB expression and CRE-DNA binding activity were present in all suicide subjects, irrespective of diagnosis. These changes were unrelated to postmortem intervals, age, sex, or antidepressant treatment. Given the significance of CREB in mediating various physiological functions through gene transcription, our results of decreased expression and functional characteristics of CREB

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor-induced psoriasiform dermatitis resembles psoriasis with regard to abnormal cytokine expression and epidermal activation.

    PubMed

    Mössner, R; Beckmann, I; Hallermann, C; Neumann, C; Reich, K

    2004-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder characterized by accumulation of Th1-type T cells and neutrophils, regenerative keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, and enhanced epidermal production of antimicrobial peptides. The underlying cause is unknown, but there are some similarities with the immunologic defense program against bacteria. Development of psoriasiform skin lesions has been reported after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine induced in monocytes by bacterial antigens. To further investigate the relation between this type of cytokine-induced dermatitis and psoriasis, we analyzed the cutaneous cytokine profile [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-12p35 and p40, and IL-8] and expression of markers of epidermal activation [Ki-67, cytokeratin-16, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)] in a patient who developed G-CSF-induced psoriasiform dermatitis by using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistology. The histologic picture resembled psoriasis with regard to epidermal hyperparakeratosis and the accumulation of lymphocytes in the upper corium. CD8(+) T cells were found to infiltrate the epidermis which was associated with an aberrant expression of Ki-67, cytokeratin-16, MHC class II, and ICAM-1 on adjacent keratinocytes. As compared to normal skin (n = 7), there was an increased expression of TNF-alpha, IL-12p40, and IL-8, a decreased expression of TGF-beta1, and a lack of IL-10, similar to the findings in active psoriasis (n = 8). Therefore, G-CSF may cause a lymphocytic dermatitis that, similar to psoriasis, is characterized by a pro-inflammatory Th1-type cytokine milieu and an epidermal phenotype indicative of aberrant maturation and acquisition of non-professional immune functions.

  12. Abnormally high expression of POLD1, MCM2, and PLK4 promotes relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Wang, Chengzhong; Wang, Weikai; Liu, Weidong; Zhang, Guiqin

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to explore the underlying mechanism of relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).Datasets of GSE28460 and GSE18497 were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between diagnostic and relapsed ALL samples were identified using Limma package in R, and a Venn diagram was drawn. Next, functional enrichment analyses of co-regulated DEGs were performed. Based on the String database, protein-protein interaction network and module analyses were also conducted. Moreover, transcription factors and miRNAs targeting co-regulated DEGs were predicted using the WebGestalt online tool.A total of 71 co-regulated DEGs were identified, including 56 co-upregulated genes and 15 co-downregulated genes. Functional enrichment analyses showed that upregulated DEGs were significantly enriched in the cell cycle, and DNA replication, and repair related pathways. POLD1, MCM2, and PLK4 were hub proteins in both protein-protein interaction network and module, and might be potential targets of E2F. Additionally, POLD1 and MCM2 were found to be regulated by miR-520H via E2F1.High expression of POLD1, MCM2, and PLK4 might play positive roles in the recurrence of ALL, and could serve as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of relapsed ALL.

  13. Abnormal MicroRNA Expression in Ts65Dn Hippocampus and Whole Blood: Contributions to Down Syndrome Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Keck-Wherley, Jennifer; Grover, Deepak; Bhattacharyya, Sharmistha; Xu, Xiufen; Holman, Derek; Lombardini, Eric D.; Verma, Ranjana; Biswas, Roopa; Galdzicki, Zygmunt

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS; trisomy 21) is one of the most common genetic causes of intellectual disability, which is attributed to triplication of genes located on chromosome 21. Elevated levels of several microRNAs (miRNAs) located on chromosome 21 have been reported in human DS heart and brain tissues. The Ts65Dn mouse model is the most investigated DS model with a triplicated segment of mouse chromosome 16 harboring genes orthologous to those on human chromosome 21. Using ABI TaqMan miRNA arrays, we found a set of miRNAs that were significantly up- or downregulated in the Ts65Dn hippocampus compared to euploid controls. Furthermore, miR-155 and miR-802 showed significant overexpression in the Ts65Dn hippocampus, thereby confirming results of previous studies. Interestingly, miR-155 and miR-802 were also overexpressed in the Ts65Dn whole blood but not in lung tissue. We also found overexpression of the miR-155 precursors, pri- and pre-miR-155 derived from the miR-155 host gene, known as B cell integration cluster, suggesting enhanced biogenesis of miR-155. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that neurodevelopment, differentiation of neuroglia, apoptosis, cell cycle, and signaling pathways including ERK/MAPK, protein kinase C, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, m-TOR and calcium signaling are likely targets of these miRNAs. We selected some of these potential gene targets and found downregulation of mRNA encoding Ship1, Mecp2 and Ezh2 in Ts65Dn hippocampus. Interestingly, the miR-155 target gene Ship1 (inositol phosphatase) was also downregulated in Ts65Dn whole blood but not in lung tissue. Our findings provide insights into miRNA-mediated gene regulation in Ts65Dn mice and their potential contribution to impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis, as well as hemopoietic abnormalities observed in DS. PMID:22042248

  14. [Expression and localization of transmembrane protein CMTM2 in human testis and sperm].

    PubMed

    Zhang, X W; Lan, K; Yang, W B; Li, Q; Zhao, Y P; Yin, H Q; Kite, B; Bai, W J; Xu, T

    2017-08-18

    To study the expression of transmembrane protein CMTM2 in the testis and sperm of adult males and to approach the potential function of the protein in the male reproductive system. The expression of CMTM2 in human testis and sperm was confirmed by Western blot. Immunohistochemical staining was used for detecting CMTM2 localization in the testis tissue, TRITC-CMTM2 and FITC-Hoechst double immunofluorescence staining was performed to examine the subcellular localization of CMTM2 in the human sperm before and after acrosome reaction, that is, immunofluorescent staining was used for detecting CMTM2 localization in both the testis and sperm before and after the acrosome reaction. CMTM2 was presented in both human testis and sperm. In the testis, CMTM2 immunoreactive particles were observed mainly in the membrane of the different stages of spermatogenic cells. In the human sperm, its immunoreactivity was restrictively localized to the posterior head where sperm-egg fusion occurred, and the CMTM2 localization was not affected by sperm acrosome reaction. CMTM2 was widely expressed in seminiferous tubules of the human testis, mainly in the cell membranes of spermatogenic cells, which was consistent with the previous reports. The immunofluorescence performed on frozen human testis slides showed similar findings with immunohistochemistry, which gave weight to the localization of CMTM2 in the cell membranes of spermatogenic cells at different stages. TRITC-CMTM2 and FITC-Hoechst double immunofluorescence staining was performed to examine the subcellular localization of CMTM2 in the human sperm before and after acrosome reaction. CMTM2 was localized at the posterior head of sperm before and after acrosome reaction. The localization and expression of CMTM2 were not affected by sperm acrosome reaction. Expression of CMTM2 in the male reproductive system of the adult human exhibits cell- and region-specific patterns, which suggests that they may play an important role in

  15. [Prokaryotic expression and histological localization of the Taenia solium CDC37 gene].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiang; Li, Bo; Dai, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Ai-Hua

    2013-02-01

    To express Taenia solium gene encoding cell division cycle 37 protein (TsCDC37) and investigate its antigenicity and localization in adults of Taenia solium. The complete coding sequence of TsCDC37 was amplified by PCR based on the recombinant plasmid clone from the cDNA library of adult Taenia solium. The PCR product was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a (+). The recombinant expression plasmid was identified by PCR, double endonuclease digestion and sequencing. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21/DE3 and followed by expression of the protein induced by IPTG. The mice were immunized subcutaneously with purified recombinant TsCDC37 formulated in Freund's adjuvant. The antigenicity of the recombinant protein was examined by Western blotting. The localization of TsCDC37 in adult worms was demonstrated by immunofluorescent technique. The recombinant expression vector was constructed successfully. The recombinant protein was about M(r) 52 000, it was then purified and specifically recognized by immuno sera of SD rats and sera from patients infected with Taenia solium, Taenia saginata or Taenia asiatica. The immunofluorescence assay revealed that TsCDC37 located at the tegument of T. solium adult and the eggs. TsCDC37 gene has been expressed with immunoreactivity. The recombinant protein is mainly expressed in tegument and egg, and is a common antigen of the three human taenia cestodes.

  16. Dysregulated RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) Assembly within CNS Corresponds with Abnormal miRNA Expression during Autoimmune Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Lewkowicz, Przemysław; Cwiklińska, Hanna; Mycko, Marcin P; Cichalewska, Maria; Domowicz, Małgorzata; Lewkowicz, Natalia; Jurewicz, Anna; Selmaj, Krzysztof W

    2015-05-13

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) associate with Argonaute (Ago), GW182, and FXR1 proteins to form RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs). RISCs represent a critical checkpoint in the regulation and bioavailability of miRNAs. Recent studies have revealed dysregulation of miRNAs in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE); however, the function of RISCs in EAE and MS is largely unknown. Here, we examined the expression of Ago, GW182, and FXR1 in CNS tissue, oligodendrocytes (OLs), brain-infiltrating T lymphocytes, and CD3(+)splenocytes (SCs) of EAE mic, and found that global RISC protein levels were significantly dysregulated. Specifically, Ago2 and FXR1 levels were decreased in OLs and brain-infiltrating T cells in EAE mice. Accordingly, assembly of Ago2/GW182/FXR1 complexes in EAE brain tissues was disrupted, as confirmed by immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel with alterations in RISC complex content in OLs, we found downregulation of miRNAs essential for differentiation and survival of OLs and myelin synthesis. In brain-infiltrating T lymphocytes, aberrant RISC formation contributed to miRNA-dependent proinflammatory helper T-cell polarization. In CD3(+) SCs, we found increased expression of both Ago2 and FXR1 in EAE compared with nonimmunized mice. Therefore, our results demonstrate a gradient in expression of miRNA between primary activated T cells in the periphery and polarized CNS-infiltrating T cells. These results suggest that, in polarized autoreactive effector T cells, miRNA synthesis is inhibited in response to dysregulated RISC assembly, allowing these cells to maintain a highly specific proinflammatory program. Therefore, our findings may provide a mechanism that leads to miRNA dysregulation in EAE/MS. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357521-17$15.00/0.

  17. Localization of the expression of complement component 3 in the human endometrium by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sayegh, R.A.; Tao, Xiao Jing; Awwad, J.T.

    C3 production by the human endometrium has been previously described. The objective of the current study was to localize the site of expression and regulation of the third component of complement, C3, in the endometrium. Eight secretory and eight proliferative archival endometrial samples from hysterectomy and endometrial biopsy specimens were used for in situ hybridization analysis. This analysis was performed with a radiolabeled riboprobe synthesized from a 736-bp template representing sequence 1944-2680 of the human C3 complementary DNA. Duplicate sections were hybridized with sense and antisense riboprobes. Resultant autoradiograms were analyzed qualitatively by light- and darkfield microscopy. In proliferative endometrium,more » minimal expression of C3 was observed and was limited to a few stromal patches and glands throughout the section. In the secretory samples, prominent C3 expression was observed in both the glands and stroma of the basalis layer. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3. Endometrial stromal and glandular cells express the C3 gene. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3, but other nondistinct lymphoid elements scattered in the stroma may be expressing C3. There was a visibly more intense expression of C3 in the basalis layer of the secretory endometrium than in proliferative endometrium. The spatial and temporal pattern of C3 expression may have implications in normal menstrual physiology and in the immunological response of the endometrium to the invading trophoblast during placentation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less

  18. Comparison of DNA aneuploidy, chromosome 1 abnormalities, MYCN amplification and CD44 expression as prognostic factors in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, H; Sahin, K; Berthold, F; Hero, B; Terpe, H J; Lampert, F

    1995-01-01

    A comparison of the prognostic impact of five molecular variables in a large series was made, including tests of their nonrandom association and multivariate analysis. Molecular data were available for 377 patients and MYCN amplification, cytogenetic chromosome 1p deletion, loss of chromosome 1p heterozygosity, DNA ploidy and CD44 expression were investigated. Their interdependence and influence on event-free survival was tested uni- and multivariately using Pearson's chi 2-test, Kaplan-Meier estimates, log rank tests and the Cox's regression model. MYCN amplification was present in 18% (58/322) of cases and predicted poorer prognosis in localised (P < 0.001), metastatic (P = 0.002) and even 4S (P = 0.040) disease. CD44 expression was found in 86% (127/148) of cases, and was a marker for favourable outcome in patients with neuroblastoma stages 1-3 (P = 0.003) and 4 (P = 0.017). Chromosome 1p deletion was cytogenetically detected in 51% (28/55), and indicated reduced event-free survival in localised neuroblastoma (P = 0.020). DNA ploidy and loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 1p were of less prognostic value. Most factors of prognostic significance were associated with each other. By multivariate analysis, MYCN was selected as the only relevant factor. Risk estimation of high discriminating power is, therefore, possible for patients with localised and metastatic neuroblastoma using stage and MYCN.

  19. Abnormal iron metabolism and oxidative stress in mice expressing a mutant form of the ferritin light polypeptide gene

    PubMed Central

    Barbeito, Ana G.; Garringer, Holly J.; Baraibar, Martin A.; Gao, Xiaoying; Arredondo, Miguel; Núñez, Marco T.; Smith, Mark A.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Insertional mutations in exon 4 of the ferritin light chain (FTL) gene are associated with hereditary ferritinopathy (HF) or neuroferritinopathy, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive impairment of motor and cognitive functions. To determine the pathogenic mechanisms by which mutations in FTL lead to neurodegeneration, we investigated iron metabolism and markers of oxidative stress in the brain of transgenic (Tg) mice that express the mutant human FTL498-499InsTC cDNA. Compared with wild-type mice, brain extracts from Tg (FTL-Tg) mice showed an increase in the cytoplasmic levels of both FTL and ferritin heavy chain polypeptides, a decrease in the protein and mRNA levels of transferrin receptor-1, and a significant increase in iron levels. Transgenic mice also showed the presence of markers for lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, and nitrone–protein adducts in the brain. However, gene expression analysis of iron management proteins in the liver of Tg mice indicates that the FTL-Tg mouse liver is iron deficient. Our data suggest that disruption of iron metabolism in the brain has a primary role in the process of neurodegeneration in HF and that the pathogenesis of HF is likely to result from a combination of reduction in iron storage function and enhanced toxicity associated with iron-induced ferritin aggregates in the brain. PMID:19519778

  20. Abnormal expression and mutation of p53 in cervical cancer--a study at protein, RNA and DNA levels.

    PubMed

    Ngan, H Y; Tsao, S W; Liu, S S; Stanley, M

    1997-02-01

    The objectives of this study are to document the status of p53 expression and mutation in cervical cancer at protein, RNA and DNA levels and to relate this to the presence of HPV. Biopsy specimens from one hundred and three squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix and histologically normal ectocervix were analysed. Fresh tissues were extracted for protein, RNA and DNA and flash frozen tissue cryostat sectioned for immunohistochemical staining. HPV DNA status was determined by PCR using L1 consensus primers and typed for HPV 16 and 18 with E6 specific primers. p53 expression was determined at the protein level by Western blotting on protein extracts and at RNA level by Northern blotting. There was no p53 overexpression or mutation detectable in the protein extracts. Three of 65 (4.6%) of the carcinomas were positive for p53 by immunostaining with the polyclonal antibody CM1. Overexpression at the RNA level was detected in 2 of 32 (6.3%) carcinomas. p53 mutation was screened for by PCR/SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism) followed by sequencing to define the site of mutation. Two of the cervical cancers (2.0%) showed mutation in p53 in exons 7 or 8. The mutation rate in HPV positive tumours was 1.2% (1/81) and in HPV negative tumours was 5.2% (1/19). p53 overexpression or mutation does not seem to play a significant role in cervical carcinomas.

  1. Heat exposure in female rats elicits abnormal fear expression and cellular changes in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gruene, Tina M; Lipps, Jennifer; Rey, Colin D; Bouck, Anna; Shansky, Rebecca M

    2014-11-01

    Despite a twofold higher prevalence of fear-related disorders in women, the neurobiological factors that modulate and drive fear expression are rarely studied in female animals. Fear conditioning and extinction are useful tools for dissecting these mechanisms, and here we tested the effects of environmental manipulations - four days of exposure to 31°C temperatures in the animal housing facility - on fear learning and memory exclusively in female rats. We found that heat exposure disrupted freezing to tone during fear conditioning, and elicited enhanced freezing during extinction and extinction retrieval. We also performed immunohistochemistry for c-fos expression in the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PL) regions of the prefrontal cortex during extinction retrieval, and found that heat exposure induced a switch from IL-dominated activity to PL-dominated activity. Finally, morphological analysis of spines in hippocampal CA3 neurons revealed an increase in spine head diameter in heat-exposed animals, which may partly underlie the persistent freezing observed in these animals. Together, our data show that heat exposure can induce changes at behavioral, physiological, and structural levels, and add to a woefully lacking body of literature on fear processes in female animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Abnormal expression of genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, E S; Zinovieva, O L; Oparina, N Yu; Prokofjeva, M M; Spirin, P V; Favorskaya, I A; Zborovskaya, I B; Lisitsyn, N A; Prassolov, V S; Mashkova, T D

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids are signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes and possess antitumor activity. This work presents a comprehensive description of changes in the expression of 23 genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer tumors compared to adjacent normal tissues obtained using RT-PCR. Even at early stages of malignant transformation, a significant decrease in ADH1B, ADH3, RDHL, and RALDH1 mRNA levels was observed in 82, 79, 73, and 64% of tumor specimens, respectively, and a considerable increase in AKR1B10 mRNA content was observed in 80% of tumors. Dramatic changes in the levels of these mRNAs can impair the synthesis of all-trans retinoic acid, a key natural regulatory retinoid. Apart from that, it was found that mRNA levels of nuclear retinoid receptor genes RXRγ, RARα, RXRα, and gene RDH11 were significantly decreased in 80, 67, 57, and 66% of tumor specimens, respectively. Thus, neoplastic transformation of lung tissue cells is accompanied with deregulated expression of key genes of retinoid metabolism and function.

  3. Stability-driven nonnegative matrix factorization to interpret spatial gene expression and build local gene networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siqi; Joseph, Antony; Hammonds, Ann S; Celniker, Susan E; Yu, Bin; Frise, Erwin

    2016-04-19

    Spatial gene expression patterns enable the detection of local covariability and are extremely useful for identifying local gene interactions during normal development. The abundance of spatial expression data in recent years has led to the modeling and analysis of regulatory networks. The inherent complexity of such data makes it a challenge to extract biological information. We developed staNMF, a method that combines a scalable implementation of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) with a new stability-driven model selection criterion. When applied to a set ofDrosophilaearly embryonic spatial gene expression images, one of the largest datasets of its kind, staNMF identified 21 principal patterns (PP). Providing a compact yet biologically interpretable representation ofDrosophilaexpression patterns, PP are comparable to a fate map generated experimentally by laser ablation and show exceptional promise as a data-driven alternative to manual annotations. Our analysis mapped genes to cell-fate programs and assigned putative biological roles to uncharacterized genes. Finally, we used the PP to generate local transcription factor regulatory networks. Spatially local correlation networks were constructed for six PP that span along the embryonic anterior-posterior axis. Using a two-tail 5% cutoff on correlation, we reproduced 10 of the 11 links in the well-studied gap gene network. The performance of PP with theDrosophiladata suggests that staNMF provides informative decompositions and constitutes a useful computational lens through which to extract biological insight from complex and often noisy gene expression data.

  4. Dysregulation of gene expression in the striatum of BACHD rats expressing full-length mutant huntingtin and associated abnormalities on molecular and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Yu-Taeger, Libo; Bonin, Michael; Stricker-Shaver, Janice; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Hoa Huu Phuc

    2017-05-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the gene coding for the huntingtin protein (HTT). Mutant HTT (mHTT) has been proposed to cause neuronal dysfunction and neuronal loss through multiple mechanisms. Transcriptional changes may be a core pathogenic feature of HD. Utilizing the Affymetrix platform we performed a genome-wide RNA expression analysis in two BACHD transgenic rat lines (TG5 and TG9) at 12 months of age, both of which carry full-length human mHTT but with different expression levels. By defining the threshold of significance at p < 0.01, we found 1608 genes and 871 genes differentially expressed in both TG5 and TG9 rats when compared to the wild type littermates, respectively. We only chose the highly up-/down-regulated genes for further analysis by setting an additional threshold of 1.5 fold change. Comparing gene expression profiles of human HD brains and BACHD rats revealed a high concordance in both functional and IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) canonical pathways relevant to HD. In addition, we investigated the causes leading to gene expression changes at molecular and protein levels in BACHD rats including the involvement of polyQ-containing transcription factors TATA box-binding protein (TBP), Sp1 and CBP as well as the chromatin structure. We demonstrate that the BACHD rat model recapitulates the gene expression changes of the human disease supporting its role as a preclinical research animal model. We also show for the first time that TFIID complex formation is reduced, while soluble TBP is increased in an HD model. This finding suggests that mHTT is a competitor instead of a recruiter of polyQ-containing transcription factors in the transcription process in HD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Transient Expression and Cellular Localization of Recombinant Proteins in Cultured Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Hull, J Joe

    2017-04-20

    Heterologous protein expression systems are used for the production of recombinant proteins, the interpretation of cellular trafficking/localization, and the determination of the biochemical function of proteins at the sub-organismal level. Although baculovirus expression systems are increasingly used for protein production in numerous biotechnological, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications, nonlytic systems that do not involve viral infection have clear benefits but are often overlooked and underutilized. Here, we describe a method for generating nonlytic expression vectors and transient recombinant protein expression. This protocol allows for the efficient cellular localization of recombinant proteins and can be used to rapidly discern protein trafficking within the cell. We show the expression of four recombinant proteins in a commercially available insect cell line, including two aquaporin proteins from the insect Bemisia tabaci, as well as subcellular marker proteins specific for the cell plasma membrane and for intracellular lysosomes. All recombinant proteins were produced as chimeras with fluorescent protein markers at their carboxyl termini, which allows for the direct detection of the recombinant proteins. The double transfection of cells with plasmids harboring constructs for the genes of interest and a known subcellular marker allows for live cell imaging and improved validation of cellular protein localization.

  6. Suppression of abnormal morphology and extracytoplasmic function sigma activity in Bacillus subtilis ugtP mutant cells by expression of heterologous glucolipid synthases from Acholeplasma laidlawii.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Satoshi; Seki, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Kouji; Hara, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Glucolipids in Bacillus subtilis are synthesized by UgtP processively transferring glucose from UDP-glucose to diacylglycerol. Here we conclude that the abnormal morphology of a ugtP mutant is caused by lack of glucolipids, since the same morphology arises after abolition of glucolipid production by disruption of pgcA and gtaB, which are involved in UDP-glucose synthesis. Conversely, expression of a monoglucosyldiacylglycerol (MGlcDG) produced by 1,2-diacylglycerol 3-glucosyltransferase from Acholeplasma laidlawii (alMGS) almost completely suppressed the ugtP disruptant phenotype. Activation of extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigmas (SigM, SigV, and SigX) in the ugtP mutant was decreased by alMGS expression, and was suppressed to low levels by MgSO 4 addition. When alMGS and alDGS (A. laidlawii 1,2-diacylglycerol-3-glucose (1-2)-glucosyltransferase producing diglucosyldiacylglycerol (DGlcDG)) were simultaneously expressed, SigX activation was repressed to wild type level. These observations suggest that MGlcDG molecules are required for maintenance of B. subtilis cell shape and regulation of ECF sigmas, and DGlcDG regulates SigX activity.

  7. Expression of Human Complement Factor H Prevents Age-Related Macular Degeneration–Like Retina Damage and Kidney Abnormalities in Aged Cfh Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jin-Dong; Kelly, Una; Landowski, Michael; Toomey, Christopher B.; Groelle, Marybeth; Miller, Chelsey; Smith, Stephanie G.; Klingeborn, Mikael; Singhapricha, Terry; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulatory protein in the alternative pathway of the complement system, and CFH polymorphisms increase the genetic risk of age-related macular degeneration dramatically. These same human CFH variants have also been associated with dense deposit disease. To mechanistically study the function of CFH in the pathogenesis of these diseases, we created transgenic mouse lines using human CFH bacterial artificial chromosomes expressing full-length human CFH variants and crossed these to Cfh knockout (Cfh−/−) mice. Human CFH protein inhibited cleavage of mouse complement component 3 and factor B in plasma and in retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera, establishing that human CFH regulates activation of the mouse alternative pathway. One of the mouse lines, which express relatively higher levels of CFH, demonstrated functional and structural protection of the retina owing to the Cfh deletion. Impaired visual function, detected as a deficit in the scotopic electroretinographic response, was improved in this transgenic mouse line compared with Cfh−/− mice, and transgenics had a thicker outer nuclear layer and less sub–retinal pigment epithelium deposit accumulation. In addition, expression of human CFH also completely protected the mice from developing kidney abnormalities associated with loss of CFH. These humanized CFH mice present a valuable model for study of the molecular mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease and for testing therapeutic targets. PMID:25447048

  8. [Cloning, subcellular localization, and heterologous expression of ApNAC1 gene from Andrographis paniculata].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Qi, Meng-Die; Guo, Juan; Shen, Ye; Lin, Hui-Xin; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2017-03-01

    Andrographis paniculata is widely used as medicinal herb in China for a long time and andrographolide is its main medicinal constituent. To investigate the underlying andrographolide biosynthesis mechanisms, RNA-seq for A. paniculata leaves with MeJA treatment was performed. In A. paniculata transcriptomic data, the expression pattern of one member of NAC transcription factor family (ApNAC1) matched with andrographolide accumulation. The coding sequence of ApNAC1 was cloned by RT-PCR, and GenBank accession number was KY196416. The analysis of bioinformatics showed that the gene encodes a peptide of 323 amino acids, with a predicted relative molecular weight of 35.9 kDa and isoelectric point of 6.14. To confirm the subcellular localization, ApNAC1-GFP was transiently expressed in A. paniculata protoplast. The results indicated that ApNAC1 is a nucleus-localized protein. The analysis of real-time quantitative PCR revealed that ApNAC1 gene predominantly expresses in leaves. Compared with control sample, its expression abundance sharply increased with methyl jasmonate treatment. Based on its expression pattern, ApNAC1 gene might involve in andrographolide biosynthesis. ApNAC1 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and recombinant protein was purified by Ni-NTA agarose. Further study will help us to understand the function of ApNAC1 in andrographolide biosynthesis. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  9. Small reduction of neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex area induces abnormal breathing periods in awake goats.

    PubMed

    Wenninger, J M; Pan, L G; Klum, L; Leekley, T; Bastastic, J; Hodges, M R; Feroah, T; Davis, S; Forster, H V

    2004-11-01

    In awake rats, >80% bilateral reduction of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R)-expressing neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötzC) resulted in hypoventilation and an "ataxic" breathing pattern (Gray PA, Rekling JC, Bocchiaro CM, Feldman JL, Science 286: 1566-1568, 1999). Accordingly, the present study was designed to gain further insight into the role of the pre-BötzC area NK1R-expressing neurons in the control of breathing during physiological conditions. Microtubules were chronically implanted bilaterally into the medulla of adult goats. After recovery from surgery, the neurotoxin saporin conjugated to substance P, specific for NK1R-expressing neurons, was bilaterally injected (50 pM in 10 microl) into the pre-BötzC area during the awake state (n = 8). In unoperated goats, 34 +/- 0.01% of the pre-BötzC area neurons are immunoreactive for the NK1R, but, in goats after bilateral injection of SP-SAP into the pre-BötzC area, NK1R immunoreactivity was reduced to 22.5 +/- 2.5% (29% decrease, P < 0.01). Ten to fourteen days after the injection, the frequency of abnormal breathing periods was sixfold greater than before injection (107.8 +/- 21.8/h, P < 0.001). Fifty-six percent of these periods were breaths of varying duration and volume with an altered respiratory muscle activation pattern, whereas the remaining were rapid, complete breaths with coordinated inspiratory-expiratory cycles. The rate of occurrence and characteristics of abnormal breathing periods were not altered during a CO2 inhalation-induced hyperpnea. Pathological breathing patterns were eliminated during non-rapid eye movement sleep in seven of eight goats, but they frequently occurred on arousal from non-rapid eye movement sleep. We conclude that a moderate reduction in pre-BötzC NK1R-expressing neurons results in state-dependent transient changes in respiratory rhythm and/or eupneic respiratory muscle activation patterns.

  10. Decreased SAP expression in T cells from patients with SLE contributes to early signaling abnormalities and reduced IL-2 production

    PubMed Central

    Karampetsou, Maria P.; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2016-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of functions including increased early signaling events following engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR). Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family (SLAMF) cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating immune response. Here we present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and 3 men with SLE independently of disease activity. In SLE T cells the SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by a caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells simultaneously heightened IL-2 production, calcium (Ca2+) responses and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR antibodies, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype. PMID:27183584

  11. Phenotype, effector function, and tissue localization of PD-1-expressing human follicular helper T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is well established that PD-1 is expressed by follicular T cells but its function in regulation of human T helper cells has been unclear. We investigated the expression modality and function of PD-1 expressed by human T cells specialized in helping B cells. Results We found that PD-1-expressing T cells are heterogeneous in PD-1 expression. We identified three different PD-1-expressing memory T cell subsets (i.e. PD-1low (+), PD-1medium (++), and PD-1high (+++) cells). PD-1+++ T cells expressed CXCR5 and CXCR4 and were localized in the rim of germinal centers. PD-1+ or PD-1++ cells expressed CCR7 and were present mainly in the T cell area or other parts of the B cell follicles. Utilizing a novel antigen density-dependent magnetic sorting (ADD-MS) method, we isolated the three T cell subsets for functional characterization. The germinal center-located PD-1+++ T cells were most efficient in helping B cells and in producing IL-21 and CXCL13. Other PD-1-expressing T cells, enriched with Th1 and Th17 cells, were less efficient than PD-1+++ T cells in these capacities. PD-1+++ T cells highly expressed Ki-67 and therefore appear active in cell activation and proliferation in vivo. IL-2 is a cytokine important for proliferation and survival of the PD-1+++ T cells. In contrast, IL-21, while a major effector cytokine produced by the PD-1-expressing T helper cells, had no function in generation, survival, or proliferation of the PD-1-expressing helper T cells at least in vitro. PD-1 triggering has a suppressive effect on the proliferation and B cell-helping function of PD-1+++ germinal center T cells. Conclusion Our results revealed the phenotype and effector function of PD-1-expressing T helper cell subsets and indicate that PD-1 restrains the B cell-helping function of germinal center-localized T cells to prevent excessive antibody response. PMID:21914188

  12. Three-dimensional localization of abnormal EEG activity in migraine: a low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) study of migraine patients in the pain-free interval.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Béla; Bánk, József; Piros, Pálma; Bessenyei, Mónika; Veto, Sára; Tóth, Márton; Kondákor, István

    2008-09-01

    Investigating the brain of migraine patients in the pain-free interval may shed light on the basic cerebral abnormality of migraine, in other words, the liability of the brain to generate migraine attacks from time to time. Twenty unmedicated "migraine without aura" patients and a matched group of healthy controls were investigated in this explorative study. 19-channel EEG was recorded against the linked ears reference and was on-line digitized. 60 x 2-s epochs of eyes-closed, waking-relaxed activity were subjected to spectral analysis and a source localization method, low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Absolute power was computed for 19 electrodes and four frequency bands (delta: 1.5-3.5 Hz, theta: 4.0-7.5 Hz, alpha: 8.0-12.5 Hz, beta: 13.0-25.0 Hz). LORETA "activity" (=current source density, ampers/meters squared) was computed for 2394 voxels and the above specified frequency bands. Group comparison was carried out for the specified quantitative EEG variables. Activity in the two groups was compared on a voxel-by-voxel basis for each frequency band. Statistically significant (uncorrected P < 0.01) group differences were projected to cortical anatomy. Spectral findings: there was a tendency for more alpha power in the migraine that in the control group in all but two (F4, C3) derivations. However, statistically significant (P < 0.01, Bonferroni-corrected) spectral difference was only found in the right occipital region. The main LORETA-finding was that voxels with P < 0.01 differences were crowded in anatomically contiguous cortical areas. Increased alpha activity was found in a cortical area including part of the precuneus, and the posterior part of the middle temporal gyrus in the right hemisphere. Decreased alpha activity was found bilaterally in medial parts of the frontal cortex including the anterior cingulate and the superior and medial frontal gyri. Neither spectral analysis, nor LORETA revealed statistically significant differences in

  13. Expression, localization and possible functions of aquaporins 3 and 8 in rat digestive system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, G X; Dong, P P; Peng, R; Li, J; Zhang, D Y; Wang, J Y; Shen, X Z; Dong, L; Sun, J Y

    2016-01-01

    Although aquaporins (AQPs) play important roles in transcellular water movement, their precise quantification and localization remains controversial. We investigated expression levels and localizations of AQP3 and AQP8 and their possible functions in the rat digestive system using real-time polymerase chain reactions, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. We investigated the expression levels and localizations of AQP3 and AQP8 in esophagus, forestomach, glandular stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, proximal and distal colon, and liver. AQP3 was expressed in the basolateral membranes of stratified epithelia (esophagus and forestomach) and simple columnar epithelia (glandular stomach, ileum, and proximal and distal colon). Expression was particularly abundant in the esophagus, and proximal and distal colon. AQP8 was found in the subapical compartment of columnar epithelial cells of the jejunum, ileum, proximal colon and liver; the most intense staining occurred in the jejunum. Our results suggest that AQP3 and AQP8 play significant roles in intestinal function and/or fluid homeostasis and may be an important subject for future investigation of disorders that involve disruption of intestinal fluid homeostasis, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

  14. Peripuberty stress leads to abnormal aggression, altered amygdala and orbitofrontal reactivity and increased prefrontal MAOA gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, C; Poirier, G L; Cordero, M I; Larsen, M H; Groner, A; Marquis, J; Magistretti, P J; Trono, D; Sandi, C

    2013-01-01

    Although adverse early life experiences have been found to increase lifetime risk to develop violent behaviors, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these long-term effects remain unclear. We present a novel animal model for pathological aggression induced by peripubertal exposure to stress with face, construct and predictive validity. We show that male rats submitted to fear-induction experiences during the peripubertal period exhibit high and sustained rates of increased aggression at adulthood, even against unthreatening individuals, and increased testosterone/corticosterone ratio. They also exhibit hyperactivity in the amygdala under both basal conditions (evaluated by 2-deoxy-glucose autoradiography) and after a resident–intruder (RI) test (evaluated by c-Fos immunohistochemistry), and hypoactivation of the medial orbitofrontal (MO) cortex after the social challenge. Alterations in the connectivity between the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala were linked to the aggressive phenotype. Increased and sustained expression levels of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene were found in the prefrontal cortex but not in the amygdala of peripubertally stressed animals. They were accompanied by increased activatory acetylation of histone H3, but not H4, at the promoter of the MAOA gene. Treatment with an MAOA inhibitor during adulthood reversed the peripuberty stress-induced antisocial behaviors. Beyond the characterization and validation of the model, we present novel data highlighting changes in the serotonergic system in the prefrontal cortex—and pointing at epigenetic control of the MAOA gene—in the establishment of the link between peripubertal stress and later pathological aggression. Our data emphasize the impact of biological factors triggered by peripubertal adverse experiences on the emergence of violent behaviors. PMID:23321813

  15. Peripuberty stress leads to abnormal aggression, altered amygdala and orbitofrontal reactivity and increased prefrontal MAOA gene expression.

    PubMed

    Márquez, C; Poirier, G L; Cordero, M I; Larsen, M H; Groner, A; Marquis, J; Magistretti, P J; Trono, D; Sandi, C

    2013-01-15

    Although adverse early life experiences have been found to increase lifetime risk to develop violent behaviors, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these long-term effects remain unclear. We present a novel animal model for pathological aggression induced by peripubertal exposure to stress with face, construct and predictive validity. We show that male rats submitted to fear-induction experiences during the peripubertal period exhibit high and sustained rates of increased aggression at adulthood, even against unthreatening individuals, and increased testosterone/corticosterone ratio. They also exhibit hyperactivity in the amygdala under both basal conditions (evaluated by 2-deoxy-glucose autoradiography) and after a resident-intruder (RI) test (evaluated by c-Fos immunohistochemistry), and hypoactivation of the medial orbitofrontal (MO) cortex after the social challenge. Alterations in the connectivity between the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala were linked to the aggressive phenotype. Increased and sustained expression levels of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene were found in the prefrontal cortex but not in the amygdala of peripubertally stressed animals. They were accompanied by increased activatory acetylation of histone H3, but not H4, at the promoter of the MAOA gene. Treatment with an MAOA inhibitor during adulthood reversed the peripuberty stress-induced antisocial behaviors. Beyond the characterization and validation of the model, we present novel data highlighting changes in the serotonergic system in the prefrontal cortex-and pointing at epigenetic control of the MAOA gene-in the establishment of the link between peripubertal stress and later pathological aggression. Our data emphasize the impact of biological factors triggered by peripubertal adverse experiences on the emergence of violent behaviors.

  16. Expression and localization of epithelial stem cell and differentiation markers in equine skin, eye and hoof.

    PubMed

    Linardi, Renata L; Megee, Susan O; Mainardi, Sarah R; Senoo, Makoto; Galantino-Homer, Hannah L

    2015-08-01

    The limited characterization of equine skin, eye and hoof epithelial stem cell (ESC) and differentiation markers impedes the investigation of the physiology and pathophysiology of these tissues. To characterize ESC and differentiation marker expression in epithelial tissues of the equine eye, haired skin and hoof capsule. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting were used to detect expression and tissue localization of keratin (K) isoforms K3, K10, K14 and K124, the transcription factor p63 (a marker of ESCs) and phosphorylated p63 [pp63; a marker of ESC transition to transit-amplifying (TA) cell] in epithelial tissues of the foot (haired skin, hoof coronet and hoof lamellae) and the eye (limbus and cornea). Expression of K14 was restricted to the basal layer of epidermal lamellae and to basal and adjacent suprabasal layers of the haired skin, coronet and corneal limbus. Coronary and lamellar epidermis was negative for both K3 and K10, which were expressed in the cornea/limbus epithelium and haired skin epidermis, respectively. Variable expression of p63 with relatively low to high levels of phosphorylation was detected in individual basal and suprabasal cells of all epithelial tissues examined. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first report of the characterization of tissue-specific keratin marker expression and the localization of putative epithelial progenitor cell populations, including ESCs (high p63 expression with low pp63 levels) and TA cells (high expression of both p63 and pp63), in the horse. These results will aid further investigation of epidermal and corneal epithelial biology and regenerative therapies in horses. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  17. Stability-driven nonnegative matrix factorization to interpret spatial gene expression and build local gene networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Siqi; Joseph, Antony; Hammonds, Ann S.

    Spatial gene expression patterns enable the detection of local covariability and are extremely useful for identifying local gene interactions during normal development. The abundance of spatial expression data in recent years has led to the modeling and analysis of regulatory networks. The inherent complexity of such data makes it a challenge to extract biological information. We developed staNMF, a method that combines a scalable implementation of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) with a new stability-driven model selection criterion. When applied to a set of Drosophila early embryonic spatial gene expression images, one of the largest datasets of its kind, staNMF identifiedmore » 21 principal patterns (PP). Providing a compact yet biologically interpretable representation of Drosophila expression patterns, PP are comparable to a fate map generated experimentally by laser ablation and show exceptional promise as a data-driven alternative to manual annotations. Our analysis mapped genes to cell-fate programs and assigned putative biological roles to uncharacterized genes. Finally, we used the PP to generate local transcription factor regulatory networks. Spatially local correlation networks were constructed for six PP that span along the embryonic anterior-posterior axis. Using a two-tail 5% cutoff on correlation, we reproduced 10 of the 11 links in the well-studied gap gene network. In conclusion, the performance of PP with the Drosophila data suggests that staNMF provides informative decompositions and constitutes a useful computational lens through which to extract biological insight from complex and often noisy gene expression data.« less

  18. Stability-driven nonnegative matrix factorization to interpret spatial gene expression and build local gene networks

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Siqi; Joseph, Antony; Hammonds, Ann S.; ...

    2016-04-06

    Spatial gene expression patterns enable the detection of local covariability and are extremely useful for identifying local gene interactions during normal development. The abundance of spatial expression data in recent years has led to the modeling and analysis of regulatory networks. The inherent complexity of such data makes it a challenge to extract biological information. We developed staNMF, a method that combines a scalable implementation of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) with a new stability-driven model selection criterion. When applied to a set of Drosophila early embryonic spatial gene expression images, one of the largest datasets of its kind, staNMF identifiedmore » 21 principal patterns (PP). Providing a compact yet biologically interpretable representation of Drosophila expression patterns, PP are comparable to a fate map generated experimentally by laser ablation and show exceptional promise as a data-driven alternative to manual annotations. Our analysis mapped genes to cell-fate programs and assigned putative biological roles to uncharacterized genes. Finally, we used the PP to generate local transcription factor regulatory networks. Spatially local correlation networks were constructed for six PP that span along the embryonic anterior-posterior axis. Using a two-tail 5% cutoff on correlation, we reproduced 10 of the 11 links in the well-studied gap gene network. In conclusion, the performance of PP with the Drosophila data suggests that staNMF provides informative decompositions and constitutes a useful computational lens through which to extract biological insight from complex and often noisy gene expression data.« less

  19. Abnormal N-Glycosylation of a Novel Missense Creatine Transporter Mutant, G561R, Associated with Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes Alters Transporter Activity and Localization.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Tatsuki; Ito, Shingo; Ohta, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Wada, Takahito; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes (CCDSs) are caused by loss-of-function mutations in creatine transporter (CRT, SLC6A8), which transports creatine at the blood-brain barrier and into neurons of the central nervous system (CNS). This results in low cerebral creatine levels, and patients exhibit mental retardation, poor language skills and epilepsy. We identified a novel human CRT gene missense mutation (c.1681 G>C, G561R) in Japanese CCDSs patients. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the reduction of creatine transport in G561R-mutant CRT-expressing 293 cells, and to clarify the mechanism of its functional attenuation. G561R-mutant CRT exhibited greatly reduced creatine transport activity compared to wild-type CRT (WT-CRT) when expressed in 293 cells. Also, the mutant protein is localized mainly in intracellular membrane fraction, while WT-CRT is localized in plasma membrane. Western blot analysis revealed a 68 kDa band of WT-CRT protein in plasma membrane fraction, while G561R-mutant CRT protein predominantly showed bands at 55, 110 and 165 kDa in crude membrane fraction. The bands of both WT-CRT and G561R-mutant CRT were shifted to 50 kDa by N-glycosidase treatment. Our results suggest that the functional impairment of G561R-mutant CRT was probably caused by incomplete N-linked glycosylation due to misfolding during protein maturation, leading to oligomer formation and changes of cellular localization.

  20. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Local Gene Expression Induced by Magnetic Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Sandre, Olivier; Genevois, Coralie; Garaio, Eneko; Adumeau, Laurent; Mornet, Stéphane; Couillaud, Franck

    2017-01-01

    The present work aims to demonstrate that colloidal dispersions of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dextran macromolecules placed in an alternating magnetic field can not only produce heat, but also that these particles could be used in vivo for local and noninvasive deposition of a thermal dose sufficient to trigger thermo-induced gene expression. Iron oxide nanoparticles were first characterized in vitro on a bio-inspired setup, and then they were assayed in vivo using a transgenic mouse strain expressing the luciferase reporter gene under transcriptional control of a thermosensitive promoter. Iron oxide nanoparticles dispersions were applied topically on the mouse skin or injected subcutaneously with Matrigel™ to generate so-called pseudotumors. Temperature was monitored continuously with a feedback loop to control the power of the magnetic field generator and to avoid overheating. Thermo-induced luciferase expression was followed by bioluminescence imaging 6 h after heating. We showed that dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle dispersions were able to induce in vivo mild hyperthermia compatible with thermo-induced gene expression in surrounding tissues and without impairing cell viability. These data open new therapeutic perspectives for using mild magnetic hyperthermia as noninvasive modulation of tumor microenvironment by local thermo-induced gene expression or drug release. PMID:28208731

  2. VGluT2 expression in painful Achilles and patellar tendinosis: evidence of local glutamate release by tenocytes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alexander; Alfredson, Håkan; Forsgren, Sture

    2008-05-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic tendinopathy is unclear. We have previously measured high intratendinous levels of glutamate in patients with tendinosis, suggesting potential roles of glutamate in the modulation of pain, vascular function, and degenerative changes including apoptosis of tenocytes. However, the origin of free glutamate found in tendon tissue is completely unknown. Surgical biopsies of pain-free normal tendons and tendinosis tendons (Achilles and patellar) were examined immunohistochemically using antibodies against vesicular glutamate transporters (VGluT1 and VGluT2), as indirect markers of glutamate release. In situ hybridization for VGluT2 mRNA was also conducted. Specific immunoreactions for VGluT2, but not VGluT1, could be consistently detected in tenocytes. However, there were interindividual variations in the levels of immunoreactivity. The level of immunoreaction for VGluT2 was higher in tendinosis tendons compared to normal tendons (p < 0.05). In situ hybridization of VGluT2 demonstrated that mRNA was localized in a similar pattern as the protein, with marked expression by certain tenocytes, particularly those showing abnormal appearances. Reactivity for VGluT1 and -2 was absent from nerves and vessel structures in both normal and painful tendons. The current data demonstrate that tenocytes may be involved in the regulation of extracellular glutamate levels in tendons. Specifically, the observations suggest that free glutamate may be locally produced and released by tenocytes, rather than by peripheral neurons. Excessive free glutamate is expected to impact a variety of autocrine and paracrine functions important in the development of tendinosis, including tenocyte proliferation and apoptosis, extracellular matrix metabolism, nociception, and blood flow. (c) 2007 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Genetic modification of neurons to express bevacizumab for local anti-angiogenesis treatment of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Martin J; Funato, Kosuke; Wang, Lan; Aronowitz, Eric; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ballon, Douglas J; Havlicek, David F; Frenk, Esther Z; De, Bishnu P; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Sondhi, Dolan; Hackett, Neil R; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Tabar, Viviane; Crystal, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    The median survival of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is approximately 1 year. Following surgical removal, systemic therapies are limited by the blood-brain barrier. To circumvent this, we developed a method to modify neurons with the genetic sequence for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies using adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vectors, directing persistent, local expression in the tumor milieu. The human U87MG GBM cell line or patient-derived early passage GBM cells were administered to the striatum of NOD/SCID immunodeficient mice. AAVrh.10BevMab, an AAVrh.10-based vector coding for bevacizumab (Avastin), an anti-human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monoclonal antibody, was delivered to the area of the GBM xenograft. Localized expression of bevacizumab was demonstrated by quantitative PCR, ELISA and western blotting. Immunohistochemistry showed that bevacizumab was expressed in neurons. Concurrent administration of AAVrh.10BevMab with the U87MG tumor reduced tumor blood vessel density and tumor volume, and increased survival. Administration of AAVrh.10BevMab 1 week after U87MG xenograft reduced growth and increased survival. Studies with patient-derived early passage GBM primary cells showed a reduction in primary tumor burden with an increased survival. These data support the strategy of AAV-mediated central nervous system gene therapy to treat GBM, overcoming the blood-brain barrier through local, persistent delivery of an anti-angiogenesis monoclonal antibody.

  4. Expression and subcellular localization of NHE3 in the human gallbladder epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongsheng; Kong, Jing; Wu, Shuodong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Enhanced gallbladder concentrating function is an important factor for the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstone disease (CGD), but the mechanism is unknown. Potential candidates for regulation of gallbladder ion absorption are suggested to be Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3). In this study, we investigated the expression and subcellular localization of NHE3 in both acalculous and calculous human gallbladders. Methods: Adult human gallbladder tissue was obtained from 23 patients (7 men, 16 women) who had undergone cholecystectomy. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A (acalculous group) and Group B (calculous group). Gene expression of NHE3 was quantitatively estimated by real-time PCR. Protein expression was studied by Western blotting assays. Furthermore, expression of immunoreactive NHE3 was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: There was no significant difference in the NHE3 mRNA expression between calculous and acalculous human gallbladders. NHE3 protein expression in gallbladders from patients with cholelithiasis is increased compared to those without gallstones. Immunohistochemistry studies prove that NHE3 is located both on the apical plasma membrane and in the intracellular pool in human GBECs. Conclusions: NHE3 may play a role in the pathogenesis of human CGD. Additional studies are required to further delineate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25674247

  5. Localization and expression of peroxiredoxin II in the mouse ovary, oviduct, uterus, and preimplantation embryo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shie; Huang, Weiquan; Shi, Hexiu; Lin, Cuiying; Xie, Meirong; Wang, Jianxin

    2010-02-01

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) II belongs to a recently discovered family of peroxidases that play important roles in antioxidation and signal transduction. In this study, we aimed to study the localization and expression of Prx II in the mouse ovary, oviduct, and uterus, and preimplantation embryos. Immunohistochemical staining analysis showed that, in the ovary, Prx II was expressed in the oocyte cytoplasm of the primary follicle, the secondary follicle, and the premature follicle; Prx II was expressed in germinal vesicle-intact oocytes (GV oocytes) and metaphase II eggs (MII eggs), as well as at various stages in early embryos. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results indicated that the Prx II mRNA was expressed at a high level in GV eggs, slightly lower levels in MII eggs, and had no detectable expression in four-cell embryos and early blastocysts. In the oviduct, Prx II was expressed in the epithelia, while in the uterus Prx II was mainly distributed in the endometrial stroma. Taken together, our results suggest that Prx II plays a key antioxidation role in the maturation of oocytes and development of early embryos, thus providing crucial experimental evidence for further exploring the function of Prx II in the development of oocytes and preimplantation embryos. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Local oxytocin expression and oxytocin receptor binding in the male rat brain is associated with aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Calcagnoli, Federica; de Boer, Sietse F; Beiderbeck, Daniela I; Althaus, Monika; Koolhaas, Jaap M; Neumann, Inga D

    2014-03-15

    We recently demonstrated in male wild-type Groningen rats that enhancing brain oxytocin (OXT) levels acutely produces marked pro-social explorative and anti-aggressive effects. Moreover, these pharmacologically-induced changes are moderated by the individual's aggressive phenotype, suggesting an inverse relationship between aggressiveness and tonic endogenous OXT signaling properties. Aim of the present study was to verify the hypothesis that variations in OXT expression and/or OXT receptor (OXTR) binding in selected brain regions are associated with different levels or forms of aggression. To this end, male resident wild-type Groningen rats that repeatedly contested and dominated intruder conspecifics were categorized as being low aggressive, highly aggressive or excessively aggressive. Their brains were subsequently collected and quantified for OXT mRNA expression and OXTR binding levels. Our results showed that OXT mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), but not in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), negatively correlates with the level of offensiveness. In particular, the excessively aggressive group showed a significantly lower OXT mRNA expression in the PVN as compared to both low and highly aggressive groups. Further, the excessively aggressive animals showed the highest OXTR binding in the central amygdala (CeA) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). These findings demonstrate that male rats with excessively high levels and abnormal forms of aggressive behavior have diminished OXT transcription and enhanced OXTR binding capacities in specific nodes of the social behavioral brain circuitry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression and localization of CXCL16 and CXCR6 in ovarian endometriotic tissues.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Shuichi; Iwase, Akira; Goto, Maki; Kobayashi, Hiroharu; Takikawa, Sachiko; Nagatomo, Yoshinari; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Bayasula; Nakamura, Tomoko; Hirokawa, Wakana; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2011-12-01

    Inflammatory mediators, including chemokines, may play crucial roles in the development of endometriosis. Therefore, we investigated the expression and localization of CXCL16 and its receptor, CXCR6, in ovarian endometriotic tissues. We also examined whether CXCL16 induces IL-8 production in endometriotic stromal cells. We performed immunohistochemical and Western blotting analyses of in vivo and in vitro samples. IL-8 production was assayed using an ELISA. Both CXCL16 and CXCR6 were expressed by endometriotic epithelial cells and stromal cells, but not normal ovarian stroma. A Western blotting analysis using primary cultured endometriotic stromal cells showed a constant expression of CXCL16 and CXCR6 in the proliferative phase, secretory phase and during gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist therapy. CXCL16 induced IL-8 production in several endometriotic stromal cells in vitro. CXCL16 and CXCR6 might be involved in the pathophysiology of endometriosis through regulation of the inflammatory response.

  8. Facial expression recognition based on weber local descriptor and sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Yan

    2018-03-01

    Automatic facial expression recognition has been one of the research hotspots in the area of computer vision for nearly ten years. During the decade, many state-of-the-art methods have been proposed which perform very high accurate rate based on the face images without any interference. Nowadays, many researchers begin to challenge the task of classifying the facial expression images with corruptions and occlusions and the Sparse Representation based Classification framework has been wildly used because it can robust to the corruptions and occlusions. Therefore, this paper proposed a novel facial expression recognition method based on Weber local descriptor (WLD) and Sparse representation. The method includes three parts: firstly the face images are divided into many local patches, and then the WLD histograms of each patch are extracted, finally all the WLD histograms features are composed into a vector and combined with SRC to classify the facial expressions. The experiment results on the Cohn-Kanade database show that the proposed method is robust to occlusions and corruptions.

  9. Dynamic texture recognition using local binary patterns with an application to facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoying; Pietikäinen, Matti

    2007-06-01

    Dynamic texture (DT) is an extension of texture to the temporal domain. Description and recognition of DTs have attracted growing attention. In this paper, a novel approach for recognizing DTs is proposed and its simplifications and extensions to facial image analysis are also considered. First, the textures are modeled with volume local binary patterns (VLBP), which are an extension of the LBP operator widely used in ordinary texture analysis, combining motion and appearance. To make the approach computationally simple and easy to extend, only the co-occurrences of the local binary patterns on three orthogonal planes (LBP-TOP) are then considered. A block-based method is also proposed to deal with specific dynamic events such as facial expressions in which local information and its spatial locations should also be taken into account. In experiments with two DT databases, DynTex and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), both the VLBP and LBP-TOP clearly outperformed the earlier approaches. The proposed block-based method was evaluated with the Cohn-Kanade facial expression database with excellent results. The advantages of our approach include local processing, robustness to monotonic gray-scale changes, and simple computation.

  10. Facial expression recognition under partial occlusion based on fusion of global and local features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Xia, Chen; Hu, Min; Ren, Fuji

    2018-04-01

    Facial expression recognition under partial occlusion is a challenging research. This paper proposes a novel framework for facial expression recognition under occlusion by fusing the global and local features. In global aspect, first, information entropy are employed to locate the occluded region. Second, principal Component Analysis (PCA) method is adopted to reconstruct the occlusion region of image. After that, a replace strategy is applied to reconstruct image by replacing the occluded region with the corresponding region of the best matched image in training set, Pyramid Weber Local Descriptor (PWLD) feature is then extracted. At last, the outputs of SVM are fitted to the probabilities of the target class by using sigmoid function. For the local aspect, an overlapping block-based method is adopted to extract WLD features, and each block is weighted adaptively by information entropy, Chi-square distance and similar block summation methods are then applied to obtain the probabilities which emotion belongs to. Finally, fusion at the decision level is employed for the data fusion of the global and local features based on Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence. Experimental results on the Cohn-Kanade and JAFFE databases demonstrate the effectiveness and fault tolerance of this method.

  11. Progestins Upregulate FKBP51 Expression in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells to Induce Functional Progesterone and Glucocorticoid Withdrawal: Implications for Contraceptive- Associated Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Guzeloglu Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit A; Basar, Murat; Semerci, Nihan; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Use of long-acting progestin only contraceptives (LAPCs) offers a discrete and highly effective family planning method. Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the major side effect of, and cause for, discontinuation of LAPCs. The endometria of LAPC-treated women display abnormally enlarged, fragile blood vessels, decreased endometrial blood flow and oxidative stress. To understanding to mechanisms underlying AUB, we propose to identify LAPC-modulated unique gene cluster(s) in human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). Protein and RNA isolated from cultured HESCs treated 7 days with estradiol (E2) or E2+ medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) or E2+ etonogestrel (ETO) or E2+ progesterone (P4) were analyzed by quantitative Real-time (q)-PCR and immunoblotting. HSCORES were determined for immunostained-paired endometria of pre-and 3 months post-Depot MPA (DMPA) treated women and ovariectomized guinea pigs (GPs) treated with placebo or E2 or MPA or E2+MPA for 21 days. In HESCs, whole genome analysis identified a 67 gene group regulated by all three progestins, whereas a 235 gene group was regulated by E2+ETO and E2+MPA, but not E2+P4. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation as one of upstream regulators of the 235 MPA and ETO-specific genes. Among these, microarray results demonstrated significant enhancement of FKBP51, a repressor of PR/GR transcriptional activity, by both MPA and ETO. q-PCR and immunoblot analysis confirmed the microarray results. In endometria of post-DMPA versus pre-DMPA administered women, FKBP51 expression was significantly increased in endometrial stromal and glandular cells. In GPs, E2+MPA or MPA significantly increased FKBP51 immunoreactivity in endometrial stromal and glandular cells versus placebo- and E2-administered groups. MPA or ETO administration activates GR signaling and increases endometrial FKBP51 expression, which could be one of the mechanisms causing AUB by inhibiting PR and GR-mediated transcription

  12. Time-Dependent Effects of Localized Inflammation on Peripheral Clock Gene Expression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Susan; Aguilar-Valles, Argel; Mongrain, Valérie; Luheshi, Giamal N.; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of the immune system, including circulating cytokine levels as well as counts and function of various immune cell types, present circadian rhythms. Notably, the mortality rate of animals subjected to high doses of lipopolysaccharide is dependent on the time of treatment. In addition, the severity of symptoms of various inflammatory conditions follows a daily rhythmic pattern. The mechanisms behind the crosstalk between the circadian and immune systems remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that localized inflammation induced by turpentine oil (TURP) causes a time-dependent induction of interleukin (IL)-6 and has time-, gene- and tissue-specific effects on clock gene expression. More precisely, TURP blunts the peak of Per1 and Per2 expression in the liver while in other tissues, the expression nadir is elevated. In contrast, Rev-erbα expression remains relatively unaffected by TURP treatment. Co-treatment with the anti-inflammatory agent IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) did not alter the response of Per2 to TURP treatment in liver, despite the reduced induction of fever and IL-6 serum levels. This indicates that the TURP-mediated changes of Per2 in the liver might be due to factors other than systemic IL-6 and fever. Accordingly, IL-6 treatment had no effect on clock gene expression in HepG2 liver carcinoma cells. Altogether, we show that localized inflammation causes significant time-dependent changes in peripheral circadian clock gene expression, via a mechanism likely involving mediators independent from IL-6 and fever. PMID:23527270

  13. Adaptive weighted local textural features for illumination, expression, and occlusion invariant face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chen; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2014-03-01

    Biometric features such as fingerprints, iris patterns, and face features help to identify people and restrict access to secure areas by performing advanced pattern analysis and matching. Face recognition is one of the most promising biometric methodologies for human identification in a non-cooperative security environment. However, the recognition results obtained by face recognition systems are a affected by several variations that may happen to the patterns in an unrestricted environment. As a result, several algorithms have been developed for extracting different facial features for face recognition. Due to the various possible challenges of data captured at different lighting conditions, viewing angles, facial expressions, and partial occlusions in natural environmental conditions, automatic facial recognition still remains as a difficult issue that needs to be resolved. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to tackling some of these issues by analyzing the local textural descriptions for facial feature representation. The textural information is extracted by an enhanced local binary pattern (ELBP) description of all the local regions of the face. The relationship of each pixel with respect to its neighborhood is extracted and employed to calculate the new representation. ELBP reconstructs a much better textural feature extraction vector from an original gray level image in different lighting conditions. The dimensionality of the texture image is reduced by principal component analysis performed on each local face region. Each low dimensional vector representing a local region is now weighted based on the significance of the sub-region. The weight of each sub-region is determined by employing the local variance estimate of the respective region, which represents the significance of the region. The final facial textural feature vector is obtained by concatenating the reduced dimensional weight sets of all the modules (sub-regions) of the face image

  14. Rab11 family expression in the human placenta: Localization at the maternal-fetal interface

    PubMed Central

    Artemiuk, Patrycja A.; Hanscom, Sara R.; Lindsay, Andrew J.; Wuebbolt, Danielle; Breathnach, Fionnuala M.; Tully, Elizabeth C.; Khan, Amir R.; McCaffrey, Mary W.

    2017-01-01

    Rab proteins are a family of small GTPases involved in a variety of cellular processes. The Rab11 subfamily in particular directs key steps of intracellular functions involving vesicle trafficking of the endosomal recycling pathway. This Rab subfamily works through a series of effector proteins including the Rab11-FIPs (Rab11 Family-Interacting Proteins). While the Rab11 subfamily has been well characterized at the cellular level, its function within human organ systems is still being explored. In an effort to further study these proteins, we conducted a preliminary investigation of a subgroup of endosomal Rab proteins in a range of human cell lines by Western blotting. The results from this analysis indicated that Rab11a, Rab11c(Rab25) and Rab14 were expressed in a wide range of cell lines, including the human placental trophoblastic BeWo cell line. These findings encouraged us to further analyse the localization of these Rabs and their common effector protein, the Rab Coupling Protein (RCP), by immunofluorescence microscopy and to extend this work to normal human placental tissue. The placenta is a highly active exchange interface, facilitating transfer between mother and fetus during pregnancy. As Rab11 proteins are closely involved in transcytosis we hypothesized that the placenta would be an interesting human tissue model system for Rab investigation. By immunofluorescence microscopy, Rab11a, Rab11c(Rab25), Rab14 as well as their common FIP effector RCP showed prominent expression in the placental cell lines. We also identified the expression of these proteins in human placental lysates by Western blot analysis. Further, via fluorescent immunohistochemistry, we noted abundant localization of these proteins within key functional areas of primary human placental tissues, namely the outer syncytial layer of placental villous tissue and the endothelia of fetal blood vessels. Overall these findings highlight the expression of the Rab11 family within the human

  15. Localization of complement factor H gene expression and protein distribution in the mouse outer retina

    PubMed Central

    Smit-McBride, Zeljka; Oltjen, Sharon L.; Radu, Roxana A.; Estep, Jason; Nguyen, Anthony T.; Gong, Qizhi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the localization of complement factor H (Cfh) mRNA and its protein in the mouse outer retina. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was used to determine the expression of Cfh and Cfh-related (Cfhr) transcripts in the RPE/choroid. In situ hybridization (ISH) was performed using the novel RNAscope 2.0 FFPE assay to localize the expression of Cfh mRNA in the mouse outer retina. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to localize Cfh protein expression, and western blots were used to characterize CFH antibodies used for IHC. Results Cfh and Cfhr2 transcripts were detected in the mouse RPE/choroid using qPCR, while Cfhr1, Cfhr3, and Cfhrc (Gm4788) were not detected. ISH showed abundant Cfh mRNA in the RPE of all mouse strains (C57BL/6, BALB/c, 129/Sv) tested, with the exception of the Cfh−/− eye. Surprisingly, the Cfh protein was detected by immunohistochemistry in photoreceptors rather than in RPE cells. The specificity of the CFH antibodies was tested by western blotting. Our CFH antibodies recognized purified mouse Cfh protein, serum Cfh protein in wild-type C57BL/6, BALB/c, and 129/Sv, and showed an absence of the Cfh protein in the serum of Cfh−/− mice. Greatly reduced Cfh protein immunohistological signals in the Cfh−/− eyes also supported the specificity of the Cfh protein distribution results. Conclusions Only Cfh and Cfhr2 genes are expressed in the mouse outer retina. Only Cfh mRNA was detected in the RPE, but no protein. We hypothesize that the steady-state concentration of Cfh protein is low in the cells due to secretion, and therefore is below the detection level for IHC. PMID:25684976

  16. Expression of myogenes in longissimus dorsi muscle during prenatal development in commercial and local Piau pigs.

    PubMed

    Reis, Evelyze Pinheiro Dos; Paixão, Débora Martins; Brustolini, Otávio José Bernardes; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca E; Silva, Walmir; Araújo, Flávio Marcos Gomes de; Salim, Anna Christina de Matos; Oliveira, Guilherme; Guimarães, Simone Eliza Facioni

    2016-01-01

    This study used qRT-PCR to examine variation in the expression of 13 myogenes during muscle development in four prenatal periods (21, 40, 70 and 90 days post-insemination) in commercial (the three-way Duroc, Landrace and Large-White cross) and local Piau pig breeds that differ in muscle mass. There was no variation in the expression of the CHD8, EID2B, HIF1AN, IKBKB, RSPO3, SOX7 and SUFU genes at the various prenatal ages or between breeds. The MAP2K1 and RBM24 genes showed similar expression between commercial and Piau pigs but greater expression (p < 0.05) in at least one prenatal period. Pair-wise comparisons of prenatal periods in each breed showed that only the CSRP3, LEF1, MRAS and MYOG genes had higher expression (p < 0.05) in at least one prenatal period in commercial and Piau pigs. Overall, these results identified the LEF1 gene as a primary candidate to account for differences in muscle mass between the pig breeds since activation of this gene may lead to greater myoblast fusion in the commercial breed compared to Piau pigs. Such fusion could explain the different muscularity between breeds in the postnatal periods.

  17. Expression of myogenes in longissimus dorsi muscle during prenatal development in commercial and local Piau pigs

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Evelyze Pinheiro; Paixão, Débora Martins; Brustolini, Otávio José Bernardes; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca e; Silva, Walmir; de Araújo, Flávio Marcos Gomes; Salim, Anna Christina de Matos; Oliveira, Guilherme; Guimarães, Simone Eliza Facioni

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study used qRT-PCR to examine variation in the expression of 13 myogenes during muscle development in four prenatal periods (21, 40, 70 and 90 days post-insemination) in commercial (the three-way Duroc, Landrace and Large-White cross) and local Piau pig breeds that differ in muscle mass. There was no variation in the expression of the CHD8, EID2B, HIF1AN, IKBKB, RSPO3, SOX7 and SUFU genes at the various prenatal ages or between breeds. The MAP2K1 and RBM24 genes showed similar expression between commercial and Piau pigs but greater expression (p < 0.05) in at least one prenatal period. Pair-wise comparisons of prenatal periods in each breed showed that only the CSRP3, LEF1, MRAS and MYOG genes had higher expression (p < 0.05) in at least one prenatal period in commercial and Piau pigs. Overall, these results identified the LEF1 gene as a primary candidate to account for differences in muscle mass between the pig breeds since activation of this gene may lead to greater myoblast fusion in the commercial breed compared to Piau pigs. Such fusion could explain the different muscularity between breeds in the postnatal periods. PMID:27801482

  18. Dietary Glutamate Supplementation Ameliorates Mycotoxin-Induced Abnormalities in the Intestinal Structure and Expression of Amino Acid Transporters in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miaomiao; Liao, Peng; Deng, Dun; Liu, Gang; Wen, Qingqi; Wang, Yongfei; Qiu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Xingli; Ren, Wenkai; Tan, Bie; Chen, Minghong; Xiao, Hao; Wu, Li; Li, Tiejun; Nyachoti, Charles M.; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with glutamic acid has beneficial effects on growth performance, antioxidant system, intestinal morphology, serum amino acid profile and the gene expression of intestinal amino acid transporters in growing swine fed mold-contaminated feed. Fifteen pigs (Landrace×Large White) with a mean body weight (BW) of 55 kg were randomly divided into control group (basal feed), mycotoxin group (contaminated feed) and glutamate group (2% glutamate+contaminated feed). Compared with control group, mold-contaminated feed decreased average daily gain (ADG) and increased feed conversion rate (FCR). Meanwhile, fed mold-contaminated feed impaired anti-oxidative system and intestinal morphology, as well as modified the serum amino acid profile in growing pigs. However, supplementation with glutamate exhibited potential positive effects on growth performance of pigs fed mold-contaminated feed, ameliorated the imbalance antioxidant system and abnormalities of intestinal structure caused by mycotoxins. In addition, dietary glutamate supplementation to some extent restored changed serum amino acid profile caused by mold-contaminated feed. In conclusion, glutamic acid may be act as a nutritional regulating factor to ameliorate the adverse effects induced by mycotoxins. PMID:25405987

  19. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Skin Electroporation: Effects on Transgene Expression, DNA Persistence and Local Tissue Environment

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Anna-Karin; Eriksson, Fredrik; Timmons, James A.; Gerhardt, Josefine; Nyman, Ulrika; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Bråve, Andreas; Wahren, Britta; Pisa, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Background Electrical pulses have been used to enhance uptake of molecules into living cells for decades. This technique, often referred to as electroporation, has become an increasingly popular method to enhance in vivo DNA delivery for both gene therapy applications as well as for delivery of vaccines against both infectious diseases and cancer. In vivo electrovaccination (gene delivery followed by electroporation) is currently being investigated in several clinical trials, including DNA delivery to healthy volunteers. However, the mode of action at molecular level is not yet fully understood. Methodology/Principal Findings This study investigates intradermal DNA electrovaccination in detail and describes the effects on expression of the vaccine antigen, plasmid persistence and the local tissue environment. Gene profiling of the vaccination site showed that the combination of DNA and electroporation induced a significant up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes. In vivo imaging of luciferase activity after electrovaccination demonstrated a rapid onset (minutes) and a long duration (months) of transgene expression. However, when the more immunogenic prostate specific antigen (PSA) was co-administered, PSA-specific T cells were induced and concurrently the luciferase expression became undetectable. Electroporation did not affect the long-term persistence of the PSA-expressing plasmid. Conclusions/Significance This study provides important insights to how DNA delivery by intradermal electrovaccination affects the local immunological responses of the skin, transgene expression and clearance of the plasmid. As the described vaccination approach is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, the data provided will be of high significance. PMID:19789652

  1. Localization and Regulation of Fluorescence-Labeled Delta Opioid Receptor, Expressed in Enteric Neurons of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Gregory; Evans, Christopher J.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Opioids and opiates inhibit gastrointestinal functions via μ, δ, and κ receptors. Although agonists of the δ opioid receptor (DOR) suppress motility and secretion, little is known about the localization and regulation of DOR in the gastrointestinal tract. Methods We studied mice in which the gene that encodes the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was inserted into Oprd1, which encodes DOR, to express an ~80 kDa product (DOReGFP). We used these mice to examine how agonists of DOR regulate the subcellular distribution of the DOR. Results DOReGFP was expressed in all regions but confined to enteric neurons and fibers within the muscularis externa. In the submucosal plexus, DOReGFP was detected in neuropeptide Y-positive secretomotor and vasodilator neurons of the small intestine, but was rarely observed in the large bowel. In the myenteric plexus of the small intestine, DOReGFP was present in similar proportions of excitatory motoneurons and interneurons that expressed choline acetyltransferase and substance P, and in inhibitory motoneurons and interneurons that contained nitric oxide synthase. DOReGFP was mostly present in nitrergic myenteric neurons of colon. DOReGFP and μ opioid receptors were often co-expressed. DOReGFP-expressing neurons were associated with enkephalin-containing varicosities and enkephalin-induced, clathrin- and dynamin-mediated endocytosis and lysosomal trafficking of DOReGFP. DOReGFP replenishment at the plasma membrane was slow, requiring de novo synthesis, rather than recycling. Conclusions DOR localizes specifically to submucosal and myenteric neurons, which might account for the ability of DOR agonists to inhibit gastrointestinal secretion and motility. Sustained down-regulation of DOReGFP at the plasma membrane of activated could induce long-lasting tolerance to DOR agonists. PMID:21699782

  2. Expression and subcellular localization of estrogen receptors α and β in human fetal brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Ksenija; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Srdic, Biljana; Stokic, Edita; Markelic, Milica; Golic, Igor; Otasevic, Vesna; Stancic, Ana; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Vucetic, Milica; Buzadzic, Biljana; Korac, Bato; Korac, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has the unique ability of generating heat due to the expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). A recent discovery regarding functional BAT in adult humans has increased interest in the molecular pathways of BAT development and functionality. An important role for estrogen in white adipose tissue was shown, but the possible role of estrogen in human fetal BAT (fBAT) is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether human fBAT expresses estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ. In addition, we examined their localization as well as their correlation with crucial proteins involved in BAT differentiation, proliferation, mitochondriogenesis and thermogenesis including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), PPARγ-coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), and UCP1. The fBAT was obtained from 4 human male fetuses aged 15, 17, 20, and 23 weeks gestation. ERα and ERβ expression was assessed using Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunocytochemistry. Possible correlations with PPARγ, PCNA, PGC-1α, and UCP1 were examined by double immunofluorescence. Both ERα and ERβ were expressed in human fBAT, with ERα being dominant. Unlike ERβ, which was present only in mature brown adipocytes, we detected ERα in mature adipocytes, preadipocytes, mesenchymal and endothelial cells. In addition, double immunofluorescence supported the notion that differentiation in fBAT probably involves ERα. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed mitochondrial localization of both receptors. The expression of both ERα and ERβ in human fBAT suggests a role for estrogen in its development, primarily via ERα. In addition, our results indicate that fBAT mitochondria could be targeted by estrogens and pointed out the possible role of both ERs in mitochondriogenesis.

  3. Expression Patterns and Subcellular Localization of Carbonic Anhydrases Are Developmentally Regulated during Tooth Formation

    PubMed Central

    Reibring, Claes-Göran; El Shahawy, Maha; Hallberg, Kristina; Kannius-Janson, Marie; Nilsson, Jeanette; Parkkila, Seppo; Sly, William S.; Waheed, Abdul; Linde, Anders; Gritli-Linde, Amel

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) play fundamental roles in several physiological events, and emerging evidence points at their involvement in an array of disorders, including cancer. The expression of CAs in the different cells of teeth is unknown, let alone their expression patterns during odontogenesis. As a first step towards understanding the role of CAs during odontogenesis, we used immunohistochemistry, histochemistry and in situ hybridization to reveal hitherto unknown dynamic distribution patterns of eight CAs in mice. The most salient findings include expression of CAII/Car2 not only in maturation-stage ameloblasts (MA) but also in the papillary layer, dental papilla mesenchyme, odontoblasts and the epithelial rests of Malassez. We uncovered that the latter form lace-like networks around incisors; hitherto these have been known to occur only in molars. All CAs studied were produced by MA, however CAIV, CAIX and CARPXI proteins were distinctly enriched in the ruffled membrane of the ruffled MA but exhibited a homogeneous distribution in smooth-ended MA. While CAIV, CAVI/Car6, CAIX, CARPXI and CAXIV were produced by all odontoblasts, CAIII distribution displayed a striking asymmetry, in that it was virtually confined to odontoblasts in the root of molars and root analog of incisors. Remarkably, from initiation until near completion of odontogenesis and in several other tissues, CAXIII localized mainly in intracellular punctae/vesicles that we show to overlap with LAMP-1- and LAMP-2-positive vesicles, suggesting that CAXIII localizes within lysosomes. We showed that expression of CAs in developing teeth is not confined to cells involved in biomineralization, pointing at their participation in other biological events. Finally, we uncovered novel sites of CA expression, including the developing brain and eye, the olfactory epithelium, melanoblasts, tongue, notochord, nucleus pulposus and sebaceous glands. Our study provides important information for future single or

  4. Characterization of Aquaporin 4 Protein Expression and Localization in Tissues of the Dogfish (Squalus acanthias)

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Christopher P.; Harmon, Sheena; Walsh, Jonathon; Burch, Kia

    2012-01-01

    The role of aquaporin water channels such as aquaporin 4 (Aqp4) in elasmobranchs such as the dogfish Squalus acanthias is completely unknown. This investigation set out to determine the expression and cellular and sub-cellular localization of Aqp4 protein in dogfish tissues. Two polyclonal antibodies were generated (AQP4/1 and AQP4/2) and these showed somewhat different characteristics in Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Western blots using the AQP4/1 antibody showed two bands (35.5 and 49.5 kDa) in most tissues in a similar fashion to mammals. Liver had an additional band of 57 kDa and rectal gland two further faint bands of 37.5 and 38.5 kDa. However, unlike in mammals, Aqp4 protein was ubiquitously expressed in all tissues including gill and liver. The AQP4/2 antibody appeared much less specific in Western blots. Both antibodies were used in immunohistochemistry and showed similar cellular localizations, although the AQP4/2 antibody had a more restricted sub-cellular distribution compared to AQP4/1 and therefore appeared to be more specific for Aqp4. In kidney a sub-set of tubules were stained which may represent intermediate tubule segments (In-III–In-VI). AQP4/1 and AQP4/2 antibodies localized to the same tubules segments in serial sections although the intensity and sub-cellular distribution were different. AQP4/2 showed a basal or basolateral membrane distribution whereas AQP4/1 was often distributed throughout the whole cell including the nuclear region. In rectal gland and cardiac stomach Aqp4 was localized to secretory tubules but again AQP/1 and AQP/2 exhibited different sub-cellular distributions. In gill, both antibodies stained large cells in the primary filament and secondary lamellae. Again AQP4/1 antibody stained most or all the cell including the nucleus, whereas AQP4/2 had a plasma membrane or plasma membrane and cytoplasmic distribution. Two types of large mitochondrial rich transport cells are known to exist in elasmobranchs

  5. Characterization of Aquaporin 4 Protein Expression and Localization in Tissues of the Dogfish (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Cutler, Christopher P; Harmon, Sheena; Walsh, Jonathon; Burch, Kia

    2012-01-01

    The role of aquaporin water channels such as aquaporin 4 (Aqp4) in elasmobranchs such as the dogfish Squalus acanthias is completely unknown. This investigation set out to determine the expression and cellular and sub-cellular localization of Aqp4 protein in dogfish tissues. Two polyclonal antibodies were generated (AQP4/1 and AQP4/2) and these showed somewhat different characteristics in Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Western blots using the AQP4/1 antibody showed two bands (35.5 and 49.5 kDa) in most tissues in a similar fashion to mammals. Liver had an additional band of 57 kDa and rectal gland two further faint bands of 37.5 and 38.5 kDa. However, unlike in mammals, Aqp4 protein was ubiquitously expressed in all tissues including gill and liver. The AQP4/2 antibody appeared much less specific in Western blots. Both antibodies were used in immunohistochemistry and showed similar cellular localizations, although the AQP4/2 antibody had a more restricted sub-cellular distribution compared to AQP4/1 and therefore appeared to be more specific for Aqp4. In kidney a sub-set of tubules were stained which may represent intermediate tubule segments (In-III-In-VI). AQP4/1 and AQP4/2 antibodies localized to the same tubules segments in serial sections although the intensity and sub-cellular distribution were different. AQP4/2 showed a basal or basolateral membrane distribution whereas AQP4/1 was often distributed throughout the whole cell including the nuclear region. In rectal gland and cardiac stomach Aqp4 was localized to secretory tubules but again AQP/1 and AQP/2 exhibited different sub-cellular distributions. In gill, both antibodies stained large cells in the primary filament and secondary lamellae. Again AQP4/1 antibody stained most or all the cell including the nucleus, whereas AQP4/2 had a plasma membrane or plasma membrane and cytoplasmic distribution. Two types of large mitochondrial rich transport cells are known to exist in elasmobranchs

  6. CD146 expression on primary nonhematopoietic bone marrow stem cells is correlated with in situ localization

    PubMed Central

    Tormin, Ariane; Li, Ou; Brune, Jan Claas; Walsh, Stuart; Schütz, Birgit; Ehinger, Mats; Ditzel, Nicholas; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    Nonhematopoietic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are of central importance for bone marrow stroma and the hematopoietic environment. However, the exact phenotype and anatomical distribution of specified MSC populations in the marrow are unknown. We characterized the phenotype of primary human BM-MSCs and found that all assayable colony-forming units-fibroblast (CFU-Fs) were highly and exclusively enriched not only in the lin−/CD271+/CD45−/CD146+ stem-cell fraction, but also in lin−/CD271+/CD45−/CD146−/low cells. Both populations, regardless of CD146 expression, shared a similar phenotype and genotype, gave rise to typical cultured stromal cells, and formed bone and hematopoietic stroma in vivo. Interestingly, CD146 was up-regulated in normoxia and down-regulated in hypoxia. This was correlated with in situ localization differences, with CD146 coexpressing reticular cells located in perivascular regions, whereas bone-lining MSCs expressed CD271 alone. In both regions, CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells were located in close proximity to MSCs. These novel findings show that the expression of CD146 differentiates between perivascular versus endosteal localization of non-hematopoietic BM-MSC populations, which may be useful for the study of the hematopoietic environment. PMID:21415267

  7. Sodium Channel Expression and Localization at Demyelinated Sites in Painful Human Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Michael A.; Luo, Songjiang; Foley, Benjamin D.; Rzasa, Rachael S.; Johnson, Lonnie R.; Levinson, S. Rock

    2009-01-01

    The expression of sodium channels (NaCh(s)) change after inflammatory and nerve lesions and this change has been implicated in the generation of pain states. Here we examine NaCh expression within nerve fibers from normal and painful extracted human teeth with special emphasis on their localization within large accumulations, like those seen at nodes of Ranvier. Pulpal tissue sections from normal wisdom teeth and from teeth with large carious lesions associated with severe and spontaneous pain were double-stained with pan-specific NaCh antibody and caspr (paranodal protein used to visualize nodes of Ranvier) antibody, while additional sections were triple-stained with NaCh, caspr and myelin basic protein (MBP) antibodies. Z-series of images were obtained with the confocal microscope and evaluated with NIH ImageJ software to quantify the density and size of NaCh accumulations, and to characterize NaCh localization at caspr-identified typical and atypical nodal sites. Although the results showed variability in the overall density and size of NaCh accumulations in painful samples, a common finding included the remodeling of NaChs at atypical nodal sites. This remodeling of NaChs included prominent NaCh expression within nerve regions that showed a selective loss of MBP staining in a pattern consistent with a demyelinating process. PMID:19559391

  8. UGT-29 protein expression and localization during bacterial infection in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rui-Rui; Lee, Song-Hua; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is routinely used as an animal model to delineate complex molecular mechanisms involved in the host response to pathogen infection. Following up on an earlier study on host-pathogen interaction, we constructed a ugt-29::GFP transcriptional fusion transgenic worm strain to examine UGT-29 protein expression and localization upon bacterial infection. UGT-29 orthologs can be found in higher organisms including humans and is proposed as a member of the UDP-Glucoronosyl Transferase family of proteins which are involved in phase II detoxification of compounds detrimental to the host organism. Under uninfected conditions, UGT-29::GFP fusion protein was highly expressed in the C. elegans anterior pharynx and intestine, two major organs involved in detoxification. We further evaluated the localization of the enzyme in worms infected with the bacterial pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei. The infected ugt-29::GFP transgenic strain exhibited increased fluorescence in the pharynx and intestine with pronounced fluorescence also extending to body wall muscle. This transcriptional fusion GFP transgenic worm is a convenient and direct tool to provide information on UGT detoxification enzyme gene expression and could be a useful tool for a number of diverse applications.

  9. Astrocyte-neuron crosstalk regulates the expression and subcellular localization of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mamczur, Piotr; Borsuk, Borys; Paszko, Jadwiga; Sas, Zuzanna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Gizak, Agnieszka; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-02-01

    Astrocytes releasing glucose- and/or glycogen-derived lactate and glutamine play a crucial role in shaping neuronal function and plasticity. Little is known, however, how metabolic functions of astrocytes, e.g., their ability to degrade glucosyl units, are affected by the presence of neurons. To address this issue we carried out experiments which demonstrated that co-culturing of rat hippocampal astrocytes with neurons significantly elevates the level of mRNA and protein for crucial enzymes of glycolysis (phosphofructokinase, aldolase, and pyruvate kinase), glycogen metabolism (glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase), and glutamine synthetase in astrocytes. Simultaneously, the decrease of the capability of neurons to metabolize glucose and glutamine is observed. We provide evidence that neurons alter the expression of astrocytic enzymes by secretion of as yet unknown molecule(s) into the extracellular fluid. Moreover, our data demonstrate that almost all studied enzymes may localize in astrocytic nuclei and this localization is affected by the co-culturing with neurons which also reduces proliferative activity of astrocytes. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that the astrocyte-neuron crosstalk substantially affects the expression of basal metabolic enzymes in the both types of cells and influences their subcellular localization in astrocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. [Developing local actions: allowing individual talents be expressed and utilised within a strategic framework].

    PubMed

    Coruble, Gérard; Vandoorne, Chantal

    2005-01-01

    The Regional Health Programme of Children and Adolescents in Province Alpes Cote d'Azur (PRSJ), developed between March 1998 and May 1999, is characterised by its scope and complexity. It is more a strategic framework for action than an operational programme. To carry out this action, it was adapted to the level of intervention, on the one hand, using instruments at the regional level adapted for professional interventions, and, on the other hand, through the development of territory-based approaches founded on the creation of networks. Evaluations have shown that the actors found the framework proposed by PRSJ positive and adopted it. They expressed their creativity with more spontaneity in the networks with therapeutic objectives, than those responding to health determinants, which needed initial local support. Local communities appeared as the ideal setting for dissemination and sustainability of PRSJ's objectives. PRSJ's strategic framework allowed local actors to express their talent. This mode of action, which accommodates not only programmatic focus within the context of practitioners on the ground, but also, epidemiology and socio-geographic interventions, are pertinent. To go beyond the explicit milestones set by the strategic orientations of the programme, different elements strengthening the framework are highlighted.

  11. Localized expression of a dpp/BMP2/4 ortholog in a coral embryo

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, David C.; Samuel, Gabrielle; Pontynen, Patricia C.; Catmull, Julian; Saint, Robert; Miller, David J.; Ball, Eldon E.

    2002-01-01

    As the closest outgroup to the Bilateria, the Phylum Cnidaria is likely to be critical to understanding the origins and evolution of body axes. Proteins of the decapentaplegic (DPP)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2/4 subfamily are central to the specification of the dorsoventral (D/V) axis in bilateral animals, albeit with an axis inversion between arthropods and chordates. We show that a dpp/BMP2/4 ortholog (bmp2/4-Am) is present in the reef-building scleractinian coral, Acropora millepora (Class Anthozoa) and that it is capable of causing phenotypic effects in Drosophila that mimic those of the endogenous dpp gene. We also show that, during coral embryonic development, bmp2/4-Am expression is localized in an ectodermal region adjacent to the blastopore. Thus, a representative of the DPP/BMP2/4 subfamily of ligands was present in the common ancestor of diploblastic and triploblastic animals where it was probably expressed in a localized fashion during development. A localized source of DPP/BMP2/4 may have already been used in axis formation in this ancestor, or it may have provided a means by which an axis could evolve in triploblastic animals. PMID:12048233

  12. Abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Samuel T; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal placentation poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge for all providers caring for pregnant women. As one of the leading causes of postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation involves the attachment of placental villi directly to the myometrium with potentially deeper invasion into the uterine wall or surrounding organs. Surgical procedures that disrupt the integrity of uterus, including cesarean section, dilatation and curettage, and myomectomy, have been implicated as key risk factors for placenta accreta. The diagnosis is typically made by gray-scale ultrasound and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, which may better delineate the extent of placental invasion. It is critical to make the diagnosis before delivery because preoperative planning can significantly decrease blood loss and avoid substantial morbidity associated with placenta accreta. Aggressive management of hemorrhage through the use of uterotonics, fluid resuscitation, blood products, planned hysterectomy, and surgical hemostatic agents can be life-saving for these patients. Conservative management, including the use of uterine and placental preservation and subsequent methotrexate therapy or pelvic artery embolization, may be considered when a focal accreta is suspected; however, surgical management remains the current standard of care.

  13. Iterative local Gaussian clustering for expressed genes identification linked to malignancy of human colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wasito, Ito; Hashim, Siti Zaiton M; Sukmaningrum, Sri

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression profiling plays an important role in the identification of biological and clinical properties of human solid tumors such as colorectal carcinoma. Profiling is required to reveal underlying molecular features for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. A non-parametric density-estimation-based approach called iterative local Gaussian clustering (ILGC), was used to identify clusters of expressed genes. We used experimental data from a previous study by Muro and others consisting of 1,536 genes in 100 colorectal cancer and 11 normal tissues. In this dataset, the ILGC finds three clusters, two large and one small gene clusters, similar to their results which used Gaussian mixture clustering. The correlation of each cluster of genes and clinical properties of malignancy of human colorectal cancer was analysed for the existence of tumor or normal, the existence of distant metastasis and the existence of lymph node metastasis. PMID:18305825

  14. Iterative local Gaussian clustering for expressed genes identification linked to malignancy of human colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wasito, Ito; Hashim, Siti Zaiton M; Sukmaningrum, Sri

    2007-12-30

    Gene expression profiling plays an important role in the identification of biological and clinical properties of human solid tumors such as colorectal carcinoma. Profiling is required to reveal underlying molecular features for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. A non-parametric density-estimation-based approach called iterative local Gaussian clustering (ILGC), was used to identify clusters of expressed genes. We used experimental data from a previous study by Muro and others consisting of 1,536 genes in 100 colorectal cancer and 11 normal tissues. In this dataset, the ILGC finds three clusters, two large and one small gene clusters, similar to their results which used Gaussian mixture clustering. The correlation of each cluster of genes and clinical properties of malignancy of human colorectal cancer was analysed for the existence of tumor or normal, the existence of distant metastasis and the existence of lymph node metastasis.

  15. From DNA Copy Number to Gene Expression: Local aberrations, Trisomies and Monosomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Tal

    The goal of my PhD research was to study the effect of DNA copy number changes on gene expression. DNA copy number aberrations may be local, encompassing several genes, or on the level of an entire chromosome, such as trisomy and monosomy. The main dataset I studied was of Glioblastoma, obtained in the framework of a collaboration, but I worked also with public datasets of cancer and Down's Syndrome. The molecular basis of expression changes in Glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumors in adults. In collaboration with Prof. Hegi (CHUV, Switzerland), we analyzed a rich Glioblastoma dataset including clinical information, DNA copy number (array CGH) and expression profiles. We explored the correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression at the level of chromosomal arms and local genomic aberrations. We detected known amplification and over expression of oncogenes, as well as deletion and down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. We exploited that information to map alterations of pathways that are known to be disrupted in Glioblastoma, and tried to characterize samples that have no known alteration in any of the studied pathways. Identifying local DNA aberrations of biological significance. Many types of tumors exhibit chromosomal losses or gains and local amplifications and deletions. A region that is aberrant in many tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, is more likely to be clinically relevant, and not just a by-product of genetic instability. We developed a novel method that defines and prioritizes aberrations by formalizing these intuitions. The method scores each aberration by the fraction of patients harboring it, its length and its amplitude, and assesses the significance of the score by comparing it to a null distribution obtained by permutations. This approach detects genetic locations that are significantly aberrant, generating a 'genomic aberration profile' for each sample. The 'genomic

  16. Specimen block counter-staining for localization of GUS expression in transgenic arabidopsis and tobacco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M. K.; Choi, J-W; Jeon, J-H; Franceschi, V. R.; Davin, L. B.; Lewis, N. G.

    2002-01-01

    A simple counter-staining procedure has been developed for comparative beta-glucuronidase (GUS) expression and anatomical localization in transgenic herbaceous arabidopsis and tobacco. This protocol provides good anatomical visualization for monitoring chimeric gene expression at both the organ and tissue levels. It can be used with different histochemical stains and can be extended to the study of woody species. The specimens are paraffin-embedded, the block is trimmed to reveal internal structure, safranin-O staining solution is briefly applied to the surface of the block, then washed off and, after drying, a drop of immersion oil is placed on the stained surface for subsequent photographic work. This gives tissue counter-staining with good structural preservation without loss of GUS staining product; moreover, sample observation is rapid and efficient compared to existing procedures.

  17. Local Adaptation of Sun-Exposure-Dependent Gene Expression Regulation in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Kita, Ryosuke; Fraser, Hunter B

    2016-10-01

    Sun-exposure is a key environmental variable in the study of human evolution. Several skin-pigmentation genes serve as classical examples of positive selection, suggesting that sun-exposure has significantly shaped worldwide genomic variation. Here we investigate the interaction between genetic variation and sun-exposure, and how this impacts gene expression regulation. Using RNA-Seq data from 607 human skin samples, we identified thousands of transcripts that are differentially expressed between sun-exposed skin and non-sun-exposed skin. We then tested whether genetic variants may influence each individual's gene expression response to sun-exposure. Our analysis revealed 10 sun-exposure-dependent gene expression quantitative trait loci (se-eQTLs), including genes involved in skin pigmentation (SLC45A2) and epidermal differentiation (RASSF9). The allele frequencies of the RASSF9 se-eQTL across diverse populations correlate with the magnitude of solar radiation experienced by these populations, suggesting local adaptation to varying levels of sunlight. These results provide the first examples of sun-exposure-dependent regulatory variation and suggest that this variation has contributed to recent human adaptation.

  18. Quantitative Expression and Co-Localization of Wnt Signalling Related Proteins in Feline Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marote, Georgina; Abramo, Francesca; McKay, Jenny; Thomson, Calum; Beltran, Mariana; Millar, Michael; Priestnall, Simon; Dobson, Jane; Costantino-Casas, Fernando; Petrou, Terry; McGonnell, Imelda M.; Davies, Anthony J.; Weetman, Malcolm; Garden, Oliver A.; Masters, John R.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Ahmed, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC) is an aggressive neoplasm in cats. Little is known about the possible molecular mechanisms that may be involved in the initiation, maintenance and progression of FOSCC. Wnt signalling is critical in development and disease, including many mammalian cancers. In this study, we have investigated the expression of Wnt signalling related proteins using quantitative immunohistochemical techniques on tissue arrays. We constructed tissue arrays with 58 individual replicate tissue samples. We tested for the expression of four key Wnt/ß-catenin transcription targets, namely Cyclin D1 (CCND1 or CD1), FRA1, c-Myc and MMP7. All antibodies showed cross reactivity in feline tissue except MMP7. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of single proteins (expressed as area fraction / amount of tissue for normal vs tumor, mean ± SE) showed that the expression of CD1 (3.9 ± 0.5 vs 12.2 ± 0.9), FRA1 (5.5 ± 0.6 vs 16.8 ± 1.1) and c-Myc (5.4 ± 0.5 vs 12.5 ± 0.9) was increased in FOSCC tissue by 2.3 to 3 fold compared to normal controls (p<0.0001). By using a multilabel, quantitative fluorophore technique we further investigated if the co-localization of these proteins (all transcription factors) with each other and in the nucleus (stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, DAPI) was altered in FOSCC compared to normal tissue. The global intersection coefficients, a measure of the proximity of two fluorophore labeled entities, showed that there was a significant change (p < 0.01) in the co-localization for all permutations (e.g. CD1/FRA1 etc), except for the nuclear localization of CD1. Our results show that putative targets of Wnt signalling transcription are up-regulated in FOSCC with alterations in the co-localization of these proteins and could serve as a useful marker for the disease. PMID:27559731

  19. Refrigerated storage of platelets initiates changes in platelet surface marker expression and localization of intracellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ben; Padula, Matthew P; Marks, Denese C; Johnson, Lacey

    2016-10-01

    Platelets (PLTs) are currently stored at room temperature (22°C), which limits their shelf life, primarily due to the risk of bacterial growth. Alternatives to room temperature storage include PLT refrigeration (2-6°C), which inhibits bacterial growth, thus potentially allowing an extension of shelf life. Additionally, refrigerated PLTs appear more hemostatically active than conventional PLTs, which may be beneficial in certain clinical situations. However, the mechanisms responsible for this hemostatic function are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to assess the protein profile of refrigerated PLTs in an effort to understand these functional consequences. Buffy coat PLTs were pooled, split, and stored either at room temperature (20-24°C) or under refrigerated (2-6°C) conditions (n = 8 in each group). PLTs were assessed for changes in external receptor expression and actin filamentation using flow cytometry. Intracellular proteomic changes were assessed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. PLT refrigeration significantly reduced the abundance of glycoproteins (GPIb, GPIX, GPIIb, and GPIV) on the external membrane. However, refrigeration resulted in the increased expression of high-affinity integrins (αIIbβ3 and β1) and activation and apoptosis markers (CD62P, CD63, and phosphatidylserine). PLT refrigeration substantially altered the abundance and localization of several cytoskeletal proteins and resulted in an increase in actin filamentation, as measured by phalloidin staining. Refrigerated storage of PLTs induces significant changes in the expression and localization of both surface-expressed and intracellular proteins. Understanding these proteomic changes may help to identify the mechanisms resulting in the refrigeration-associated alterations in PLT function and clearance. © 2016 AABB.

  20. Cloning, localization and expression analysis of vacuolar sugar transporters in the CAM plant Ananas comosus (pineapple).

    PubMed

    Antony, Edna; Taybi, Tahar; Courbot, Mikaël; Mugford, Sam T; Smith, J Andrew C; Borland, Anne M

    2008-01-01

    In photosynthetic tissues of the CAM plant pineapple (Ananas comosus), storage of soluble sugars in the central vacuole during the daytime and their remobilization at night is required to provide carbon skeletons for nocturnal CO(2) fixation. However, soluble sugars produced photosynthetically must also be exported to support growth processes in heterotrophic tissues. To begin to address how vacuolar sugar storage and assimilate partitioning are regulated in A. comosus, degenerate PCR and cDNA library screening were used to clone three candidate sugar transporters from the leaves of this species. Subcellular localization of the three transporters was investigated via expression of YFP-fusion proteins in tobacco epidermal cells and their co-localization with subcellular markers by confocal microscopy. Using this strategy, a putative hexose transporter (AcMST1) and a putative inositol transporter (AcINT1) were identified that both localized to the tonoplast, whereas a putative sucrose transporter (AcSUT1) was found to localize to prevacuolar compartments. A cDNA (AcMST2) with high similarity to a recently characterized tonoplast hexose transporter in Arabidopsis was also identified from an A. comosus fruit EST database. Analyses of transcript abundance indicated that AcMST1 was more highly expressed in fruits compared to leaves of A. comosus, whilst transcripts of AcINT1, AcSUT1, and AcMST2 were more abundant in leaves. Transcript abundance of AcINT1, the putative inositol transporter, showed day-night changes comparable to those of other CAM-related transcripts described in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. The results are discussed in terms of the role of vacuolar sugar transporters in regulating carbon flow during the diel cycle in CAM plants.

  1. Radial chromatin positioning is shaped by local gene density, not by gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    G- and R-bands of metaphase chromosomes are characterized by profound differences in gene density, CG content, replication timing, and chromatin compaction. The preferential localization of gene-dense, transcriptionally active, and early replicating chromatin in the nuclear interior and of gene-poor, later replicating chromatin at the nuclear envelope has been demonstrated to be evolutionary-conserved in various cell types. Yet, the impact of different local chromatin features on the radial nuclear arrangement of chromatin is still not well understood. In particular, it is not known whether radial chromatin positioning is preferentially shaped by local gene density per se or by other related parameters such as replication timing or transcriptional activity. The interdependence of these distinct chromatin features on the linear deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence precludes a simple dissection of these parameters with respect to their importance for the reorganization of the linear DNA organization into the distinct radial chromatin arrangements observed in the nuclear space. To analyze this problem, we generated probe sets of pooled bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from HSA 11, 12, 18, and 19 representing R/G-band-assigned chromatin, segments with different gene density and gene loci with different expression levels. Using multicolor 3D flourescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and 3D image analysis, we determined their localization in the nucleus and their positions within or outside the corresponding chromosome territory (CT). For each BAC data on local gene density within 2- and 10-Mb windows, as well as GC (guanine and cytosine) content, replication timing and expression levels were determined. A correlation analysis of these parameters with nuclear positioning revealed regional gene density as the decisive parameter determining the radial positioning of chromatin in the nucleus in contrast to band assignment, replication timing, and transcriptional

  2. Expression, subcellular localization and regulation of sigma receptor in retinal Müller cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guoliang; Mysona, Barbara; Dun, Ying; Gnana-Prakasam, Jaya P.; Pabla, Navjotsin; Li, Weiguo; Dong, Zheng; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Sigma receptors (σR) are non-opioid, non-phencyclidine binding sites with robust neuroprotective properties. σR1 is expressed in brain oligodendrocytes, but its expression and binding capacity have not been analyzed in retinal glial cells. This study examined the expression, subcellular localization, binding activity and regulation of σR1 in retinal Müller cells. Methods Primary mouse Müller cells (1°MC) were analyzed by RT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry for the expression of σR1 and data were compared to the rat Müller cell line, rMC-1 and rat ganglion cell line, RGC-5. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the subcellular σR1 location in 1°MC. Membranes prepared from these cells were used for binding assays using [3H]-pentazocine (PTZ). The kinetics of binding, the ability of various σR1 ligands to compete with σR1 binding and the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors on binding were examined. Results σR1 is expressed in 1°MC and is localized to the nuclear and endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Binding assays showed that in 1°MCs, rMC-1 and RGC-5 cells, the binding of PTZ was saturable. [3H]-PTZ bound with high affinity in RGC-5 and rMC-1 cells and the binding was similarly robust in 1°MC. Competition studies showed marked inhibition of [3H]-PTZ binding in the presence of σR1-specific ligands. Incubation of cells with NO and ROS donors markedly increased σR1 binding activity. Conclusions Müller cells express σR1 and demonstrate robust σR1 binding activity, which is inhibited by σR1 ligands and is stimulated during oxidative stress. The potential of Müller cells to bind σR1 ligands may prove beneficial in retinal degenerative diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:17122151

  3. Expression, subcellular localization, and regulation of sigma receptor in retinal muller cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoliang; Mysona, Barbara; Dun, Ying; Gnana-Prakasam, Jaya P; Pabla, Navjotsin; Li, Weiguo; Dong, Zheng; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Smith, Sylvia B

    2006-12-01

    Sigma receptors (sigmaRs) are nonopioid, nonphencyclidine binding sites with robust neuroprotective properties. Type 1 sigmaR1 (sigmaR1) is expressed in brain oligodendrocytes, but its expression and binding capacity have not been analyzed in retinal glial cells. This study examined the expression, subcellular localization, binding activity, and regulation of sigmaR1 in retinal Müller cells. Primary mouse Müller cells (MCs) were analyzed by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunocytochemistry for the expression of sigmaR1, and data were compared with those of the rat Müller cell line (rMC-1) and the rat ganglion cell line (RGC-5). Confocal microscopy was used to determine the subcellular sigmaR1 location in primary mouse MCs. Membranes prepared from these cells were used for binding assays with [3H]-pentazocine (PTZ). The kinetics of binding, the ability of various sigmaR1 ligands to compete with sigmaR1 binding, and the effects of donated nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on binding were examined. sigmaR1 is expressed in primary mouse MCs and is localized to the nuclear and endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Binding assays showed that in primary mouse MCs, rMC-1, and RGC-5, the binding of PTZ was saturable. [3H]-PTZ bound with high affinity in RGC-5 and rMC-1 cells, and the binding was similarly robust in primary mouse MCs. Competition studies showed marked inhibition of [3H]-PTZ binding in the presence of sigmaR1-specific ligands. Incubation of cells with NO and ROS donors markedly increased sigmaR1 binding activity. MCs express sigmaR1 and demonstrate robust sigmaR1 binding activity, which is inhibited by sigmaR1 ligands and is stimulated during oxidative stress. The potential of Müller cells to bind sigmaR1 ligands may prove beneficial in retinal degenerative diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  4. MATER protein expression and intracellular localization throughout folliculogenesis and preimplantation embryo development in the bovine

    PubMed Central

    Pennetier, Sophie; Perreau, Christine; Uzbekova, Svetlana; Thélie, Aurore; Delaleu, Bernadette; Mermillod, Pascal; Dalbiès-Tran, Rozenn

    2006-01-01

    Background Mater (Maternal Antigen that Embryos Require), also known as Nalp5 (NACHT, leucine rich repeat and PYD containing 5), is an oocyte-specific maternal effect gene required for early embryonic development beyond the two-cell stage in mouse. We previously characterized the bovine orthologue MATER as an oocyte marker gene in cattle, and this gene was recently assigned to a QTL region for reproductive traits. Results Here we have analyzed gene expression during folliculogenesis and preimplantation embryo development. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry on bovine ovarian section revealed that both the transcript and protein are restricted to the oocyte from primary follicles onwards, and accumulate in the oocyte cytoplasm during follicle growth. In immature oocytes, cytoplasmic, and more precisely cytosolic localization of MATER was confirmed by immunohistochemistry coupled with confocal microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. By real-time PCR, MATER messenger RNA was observed to decrease strongly during maturation, and progressively during the embryo cleavage stages; it was hardly detected in morulae and blastocysts. The protein persisted after fertilization up until the blastocyst stage, and was mostly degraded after hatching. A similar predominantly cytoplasmic localization was observed in blastomeres from embryos up to 8-cells, with an apparent concentration near the nuclear membrane. Conclusion Altogether, these expression patterns are consistent with bovine MATER protein being an oocyte specific maternal effect factor as in mouse. PMID:16753072

  5. microRNA-7 down-regulation mediates excessive collagen expression in localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Etoh, Mitsuhiko; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Makino, Katsunari; Yamane, Keitaro; Nakayama, Wakana; Aoi, Jun; Honda, Noritoshi; Kajihara, Ikko; Makino, Takamitsu; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (LSc), a connective tissue disorder restricted to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, is characterized by skin fibrosis due to an excessive deposition of types I collagen. The mechanism of such fibrosis is still unknown, but epigenetics may play some roles in the excessive collagen expression. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of fibrosis seen in LSc, focusing on microRNA (miRNA). miRNA expression was determined by PCR array, real-time PCR, and in situ hybridization. The function of miRNA was evaluated using specific inhibitor. Immunoblotting was performed to detect α2(I) collagen protein. PCR array analysis using tissue miRNA demonstrated miR-7 level was significantly decreased in LSc skin as well as keloid tissue compared to normal skin in vivo. In situ hybridization also showed miR-7 expression in dermal fibroblasts was decreased in LSc dermis. The transfection of specific inhibitor for miR-7 into cultured normal dermal fibroblasts resulted in the up-regulation of α2(I) collagen protein in vitro. Also, the serum levels of miR-7 were significantly decreased in LSc patients compared with healthy controls, but serum miR-29a levels not. Systemic or local down-regulation of miR-7 may contribute to the pathogenesis of LSc via the overexpression of α2(I) collagen, and serum miR-7 may be useful as a disease marker. Investigation of the regulatory mechanisms of LSc by miRNA may lead to new treatments by the transfection into the lesional skin of this disease.

  6. Expression, Localization of SUMO-1, and Analyses of Potential SUMOylated Proteins in Bubalus bubalis Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Brohi, Rahim Dad; Wang, Li; Hassine, Najla Ben; Cao, Jing; Talpur, Hira Sajjad; Wu, Di; Huang, Chun-Jie; Rehman, Zia-Ur; Bhattarai, Dinesh; Huo, Li-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Mature spermatozoa have highly condensed DNA that is essentially silent both transcriptionally and translationally. Therefore, post translational modifications are very important for regulating sperm motility, morphology, and for male fertility in general. Protein sumoylation was recently demonstrated in human and rodent spermatozoa, with potential consequences for sperm motility and DNA integrity. We examined the expression and localization of small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1) in the sperm of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) using immunofluorescence analysis. We confirmed the expression of SUMO-1 in the acrosome. We further found that SUMO-1 was lost if the acrosome reaction was induced by calcium ionophore A23187. Proteins modified or conjugated by SUMO-1 in water buffalo sperm were pulled down and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Sixty proteins were identified, including proteins important for sperm morphology and motility, such as relaxin receptors and cytoskeletal proteins, including tubulin chains, actins, and dyneins. Forty-six proteins were predicted as potential sumoylation targets. The expression of SUMO-1 in the acrosome region of water buffalo sperm and the identification of potentially SUMOylated proteins important for sperm function implicates sumoylation as a crucial PTM related to sperm function. PMID:28659810

  7. Local immunotherapy of spontaneous feline fibrosarcomas using recombinant poxviruses expressing interleukin 2 (IL2).

    PubMed

    Jourdier, T-M; Moste, C; Bonnet, M-C; Delisle, F; Tafani, J-P; Devauchelle, P; Tartaglia, J; Moingeon, P

    2003-12-01

    We tested the canarypox virus vector ALVAC and the genetically attenuated vaccinia virus vector NYVAC as vehicles for achieving local immunomodulation in domestic animals bearing spontaneous tumours. Following intratumoral administration of ALVAC-, or NYVAC-luciferase in dogs with melanoma, it was demonstrated that viral recombinants remained localized along the needle track, with no virus detectable in the periphery of the tumour. Given these distribution characteristics and their well-documented safety profile, ALVAC- or NYVAC-based recombinants expressing feline or human IL2, respectively, were administered to domestic cats, in order to prevent the recurrence of spontaneous fibrosarcomas. In the absence of immunotherapy, tumour recurrence was observed in 61% of animals within a 12-month follow-up period after treatment with surgery and iridium-based radiotherapy. In contrast, only 39 and 28% of cats receiving either NYVAC-human IL2 or ALVAC-feline IL2, respectively, exhibited tumour recurrences. Based on such results, and in the context of ongoing clinical studies conducted in humans, we discuss the utilization of ALVAC- or NYVAC-based recombinants as viable therapeutic modalities for local immunotherapy or therapeutic vaccination against cancer, both in humans and companion animals.

  8. The expression, localization and function of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in rat corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Faghir-Ghanesefat, Hedyeh; Rahimi, Nastaran; Yarmohammadi, Fatemeh; Mokhtari, Tahmineh; Abdollahi, Ali Reza; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-12-01

    Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), an emerging pharmacological target for a variety of medical conditions, is expressed in the most mammalian tissues with different effects. So, this study was designed to investigate the expression, localization and effect of α7-nAChR in rat corpus cavernosum (CC). Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that α7-nAChR was expressed in rat CC and double immunofluorescence studies demonstrated the presence of α7-nAChR in corporal neurons. The rat CC segments were mounted in organ bath chambers and contracted with phenylephrine (0.1 μm -300 μm) to investigate the relaxation effect of electrical field stimulation (EFS,10 Hz) assessed in the presence of guanethidine (adrenergic blocker, 5 μm) and atropine (muscarinic cholinergic blocker, 1 μm) to obtain non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) response. Cumulative administration of nicotine significantly potentiated the EFS-induced NANC relaxation (-log EC50 = 7.5 ± 0.057). Whereas, the potentiated NANC relaxation of nicotine was significantly inhibited with different concentrations of methyllycaconitine citrate (α7-nAChR antagonist, P < 0.05) in preincubated strips. L-NAME (non-specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 1 μm) completely blocked the neurogenic relaxation induced by EFS plus nicotine. To conclude α7-nAChR is expressed in rat CC and modulates the neurogenic relaxation response to nicotine. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Subcellular localization and expression pattern of the neurofibromatosis type 2 protein merlin/schwannomin.

    PubMed

    Schmucker, B; Ballhausen, W G; Kressel, M

    1997-01-01

    To elucidate the physiological function of the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor suppressor protein merlin/schwannomin, we studied the expression pattern and subcellular localization in human fibroblasts by Western blot analyses and immunofluorescence using a polyclonal antibody raised against the C-terminus of merlin. Three of the six merlin isoforms identified in this study (75 kDa, 58 kDa, 45 kDa) have been reported earlier and can be explained by alternative splicing. In addition, we detected higher molecular weight bands of about 110 kDa, 100 kDa and 84 kDa. Although the merlin bands of 100 kDa and 110 kDa may represent homo- or heterodimers, oligomerization due to formation of disulfide bonds was excluded. Furthermore, the isoforms of 84 kDa and 58 kDa were quantitatively extractable in Lubrol WX, indicating a localization in or close to the plasma membrane. The 45 kDa band, however, was not soluble in Lubrol WX compatible with a localization of this NF2 isoform in the endoplasmic reticulum. Applying confocal laser scanning microscopy, merlin was shown to be located in four subcellular compartments: (i) perinuclear in a compartment resembling endoplasmic reticulum, (ii) in ruffling membranes and at the leading edges, (iii) in filopodia, and (iv) at cell/substrate adhesion points. Codistribution of merlin and F-actin filaments was found in filopodia, ruffling membranes and at the insertion points of stress fibers at cell/substrate adhesion junctions as shown by phalloidin-rhodamine staining. Double immunofluorescence analyses of merlin and moesin revealed a colocalization in filopodia and ruffling membranes. The localization of merlin in the actin-rich cortical cytoskeleton corresponds to the ezrin-radixin-moesin family of proteins suggesting the NF2 protein to contribute to the regulation of cell growth by interaction with cytoskeleton-associated proteins.

  10. Effects of competition and life history stage on the expression of local adaptation in two native bunchgrasses

    Treesearch

    Rice Kevin J.; Knapp Eric E.

    2008-01-01

    Concerns about the use of genetically appropriate material in restoration often focus on questions of local adaptation. Many reciprocal transplant studies have demonstrated local adaptation in native plant species, but very few have examined how interspecific competition affects the expression of adaptive variation. Our study examined...

  11. Expression and localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and nuclear factor kappaB in normal and lesional psoriatic skin.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Majken; Henningsen, Jeanette; Johansen, Claus; Rasmussen, Sofie; Svendsen, Morten Lyhne; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Staels, Bart; Iversen, Lars; Bolund, Lars; Kragballe, Knud; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2003-11-01

    Abnormal epidermal proliferation and differentiation characterize the inflammatory skin disease psoriasis. Here we demonstrate that expression of PPARdelta mRNA and protein is markedly upregulated in psoriatic lesions and that lipoxygenase products accumulating in psoriatic lesions are potent activators of PPARdelta. The expression levels of NF-kappaB p50 and p65 were not significantly altered in lesional compared with nonlesional psoriatic skin. In the basal layer of normal epidermis both p50 and p65 were sequestered in the cytoplasm, whereas p50, but not p65, localized to nuclei in the suprabasal layers, and this distribution was maintained in lesional psoriatic skin. In normal human keratinocytes PPAR agonists neither impaired IL-1beta-induced translocation of p65 nor IL-1beta-induced NF-kappaB DNA binding. We show that PPARdelta physically interacts with the N-terminal Rel homology domain of p65. Irrespective of the presence of agonists none of the PPAR subtypes decreased p65-mediated transactivation in keratinocytes. In contrast p65, but not p50, was a potent repressor of PPAR-mediated transactivation. The p65-dependent repression of PPARdelta- but not PPARalpha- or PPARgamma-mediated transactivation was partially relieved by forced expression of the coactivators p300 or CBP. We suggest that deficient NF-kappaB activation in chronic psoriatic plaques permitting unabated PPARdelta-mediated transactivation contributes to the pathologic phenotype of psoriasis.

  12. Expression, purification, characterization and subcellular localization of the goose parvovirus rep1 protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongyan; Li, Chuanfeng; Peng, Gaojing; Liu, Guangqing

    2013-07-01

    The goose parvovirus (GPV) Rep1 protein is both essential for viral replication and a potential target for GPV diagnosis, but its protein characterization and intracellular localization is not clear. We constructed a recombinant plasmid, pET28a/GPV-Rep1, and expressed the Rep1 gene in BL21 (DE3) Escherichia coli. A protein approximately 75 kDa in size was obtained from lysates of E. coli cells expressing the recombinant plasmid. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that after induction with 0.6 mM isopropyl β-D-thiogalactosidase (IPTG) at 30°C for 5 h, the Rep1 protein was highly overexpressed. Two methods used to purify proteins, a salinity-gradient elution and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography, were performed. The amount of Rep1 protein obtained by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was 41.23 mg, while 119.9 mg of Rep1 protein was obtained by a salinity-gradient elution from a 1 L E. coli BL21 (DE3) culture. An immunogenicity analysis showed that the protein could significantly elicit a specific antibody response in immunized goslings compared to control groups. Antibody titers peaked to 1:5120 (optical density (OD) 450 = 3.9) on day 28 after immunization but had mean titers of 1:10,240 (OD450 = 4.2) in gosling groups immunized with a commercially available GPV-attenuated vaccine strain. Experiments examining subcellular localization showed that the Rep1 protein appeared to associate predominantly with the nuclear membrane, especially during later times of infection. This work provides a basis for biochemical and structural studies on the GPV Rep1 protein.

  13. Complex expression and localization of inactivating Kv channels in cultured hippocampal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bekar, Lane K; Loewen, Matthew E; Cao, Kun; Sun, Xianfeng; Leis, Jerome; Wang, Rui; Forsyth, George W; Walz, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are well established as critical for setting action potential frequency, membrane potential, and neurotransmitter release in neurons. However, their role in the "nonexcitable" glial cell type is yet to be fully understood. We used whole cell current kinetics, pharmacology, immunocytochemistry, and RT-PCR to characterize A-type current in hippocampal astrocyte cultures to better understand its function. Pharmacological analysis suggests that approximately 70, 10, and <5% of total A current is associated with Kv4, Kv3, and Kv1 channels, respectively. In addition, pharmacology and kinetics provide evidence for a significant contribution of KChIP accessory proteins to astrocytic A-channel composition. Localization of the Shaw Kv3.4 channel to astrocytic processes and the Shal Kv4.3 channel to soma suggest that these channels serve a specific function. Given this complex A-type channel expression pattern, we assessed the role of A currents in membrane voltage oscillations in response to current injections. Although TEA-sensitive delayed-rectifying currents are involved in the extent of repolarization, 4-AP-sensitive A currents serve to increase the rate. As in neurons, this effect may enable astrocytes to respond rapidly to high-frequency synaptic events. Our results indicate that hippocampal astrocytes in vitro express multiple A-type Kv channel alpha-subunits with accessory, possibly Ca(2+)-sensitive, cytoplasmic subunits that appear to be specifically localized to subcellular membrane compartments. Function of these channels remains to be determined in a physiological setting. However, this study suggests that they enable astrocytes to respond rapidly with membrane voltage oscillations to high-frequency incoming signals, possibly synchronizing astrocyte function to neuronal activity.

  14. Expression and localization of exocytic and recycling Rabs from Magnaporthe oryzae in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yaoyao; Marlin, M. Caleb; Liang, Zhimin; Zhang, Dongmei; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Zonghua; Lu, Guodong; Li, Guangpu

    2018-01-01

    Rab GTPases are master regulators of intracellular membrane trafficking along endocytic and exocytic pathways. In this chapter, we began to characterize the exocytic and recycling Rabs from the filamentous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae) that causes the rice blast disease. Among the 11 putative Rabs identified from the M. oryzae genome database (MoRabs), MoRab1, MoRab8, and MoRab11 appear orthologs of mammalian Rab1, Rab8, and Rab11 and likely function in exocytosis and endosomal recycling. To test this contention, we cloned, expressed, and determined intracellular localization of the three MoRabs in mammalian cells, in comparison to their human counterparts (hRabs). The MoRabs were well expressed as GFP fusion proteins and colocalized with the tdTomato-labeled hRabs on exocytic and recycling organelles, as determined by immunoblot analysis and confocal fluorescence microscopy. The colocalization supports the contention that the MoRabs are indeed Rab orthologs and may play important roles in the development and pathogenicity of M. oryzae. PMID:26360026

  15. Coronary Artery Formation Is Driven by Localized Expression of R-spondin3.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Fabio; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Motamedi, Fariba Jian; Massa, Filippo; Basboga, Cem; Morrison, Harris; Wagner, Kay Dietrich; Schedl, Andreas

    2017-08-22

    Coronary arteries are essential to support the heart with oxygen, and coronary heart disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The coronary arteries form at highly stereotyped locations and are derived from the primitive vascular plexus of the heart. How coronary arteries are remodeled and the signaling molecules that govern this process are poorly understood. Here, we have identified the Wnt-signaling modulator Rspo3 as a crucial regulator of coronary artery formation in the developing heart. Rspo3 is specifically expressed around the coronary stems at critical time points in their development. Temporal ablation of Rspo3 at E11.5 leads to decreased β-catenin signaling and a reduction in arterial-specific proliferation. As a result, the coronary stems are defective and the arterial tree does not form properly. These results identify a mechanism through which localized expression of RSPO3 induces proliferation of the coronary arteries at their stems and permits their formation. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The murine ufo receptor: molecular cloning, chromosomal localization and in situ expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Faust, M; Ebensperger, C; Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Hameister, H; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1992-07-01

    We have cloned the mouse homologue of the ufo oncogene. It encodes a novel tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by a unique extracellular domain containing two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats. Comparison of the predicted ufo amino acid sequences of mouse and man revealed an overall identity of 87.6%. The ufo locus maps to mouse chromosome 7A3-B1 and thereby extends the known conserved linkage group between mouse chromosome 7 and human chromosome 19. RNA in situ hybridization analysis established the onset of specific ufo expression in the late embryogenesis at day 12.5 post coitum (p.c.) and localized ufo transcription to distinct substructures of a broad spectrum of developing tissues (e.g. subepidermal cells of the skin, mesenchymal cells of the periosteum). In adult animals ufo is expressed in cells forming organ capsules as well as in connective tissue structures. ufo may function as a signal transducer between specific cell types of mesodermal origin.

  17. Green fluorescent protein as a reporter of gene expression and protein localization.

    PubMed

    Kain, S R; Adams, M; Kondepudi, A; Yang, T T; Ward, W W; Kitts, P

    1995-10-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is rapidly becoming an important reporter molecule for monitoring gene expression and protein localization in vivo, in situ and in real time. GFP emits bright green light (lambda max = 509 nm) when excited with UV or blue light (lambda max = 395 nm, minor peak at 470 nm). The fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of GFP are similar to those of fluorescein, and the conditions used to visualize this fluorophore are also suitable for GFP. Unlike other bioluminescent reporters, the chromophore in GFP is intrinsic to the primary structure of the protein, and GFP fluorescence does not require a substrate or cofactor. GFP fluorescence is stable, species-independent and can be monitored non-invasively in living cells and, in the case of transparent organisms, whole animals. Here we demonstrate GFP fluorescence in bacterial and mammalian cells and introduce our Living Colors line of GFP reporter vectors, GFP protein and anti-GFP antiserum. The reporter vectors for GFP include a promoterless GFP vector for monitoring the expression of cloned promoters/enhancers in mammalian cells and a series of six vectors for creating fusion protein to either the N or C terminus of GFP.

  18. Expression and localization of tubulin cofactors TBCD and TBCE in human gametes.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Moreno, Victoria; Agirregoitia, Ekaitz

    2017-06-01

    The tubulin cofactors TBCD and TBCE play an essential role in regulation of the microtubule dynamics in a wide variety of somatic cells, but little information is known about the expression of these cofactors in human sperm and oocytes. In this study, we focused on the investigation of the presence of, and the differential distribution of, the tubulin cofactors TBCD and TBCE in human sperm and during human oocyte maturation. We performed expression assays for TBCD and TBCE by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot and immunofluorescence and verified the presence of both cofactors in human gametes. TBCD and TBCE were located mainly in the middle region and in the tail of the sperm while in the oocyte the localization was cytosolic. The mRNA of both tubulin cofactors were present in the human oocytes but not in sperm cells. This finding gives a first insight into where TBCD and TBCE could carry out their function in the continuous changes that the cytoskeleton experiences during gametogenesis and also prior to fertilization.

  19. Characterization of the Expression, Localization, and Secretion of PANDER in α–Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carnegie, Jason R.; Robert-Cooperman, Claudia E.; Wu, Jianmei; Young, Robert A.; Wolf, Bryan A.; Burkhardt, Brant R.

    2010-01-01

    The novel islet-specific protein PANcreatic DERived Factor (PANDER; FAM3B) has beenextensively characterized with respect to the β–cell, and these studies suggest a potential function for PANDER in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Little is known regarding PANDER in pancreatic α–cells, which are critically involved in maintaining euglycemia. Here we present the first report elucidating the expression and regulation of PANDER within the α–cell. Pander mRNA and protein aredetected in α–cells, with primary localization to a glucagon-negative granular cytosolic compartment. PANDER secretion from α–cells is nutritionally and hormonally regulated by L-arginine and insulin, demonstrating similarities and differences with glucagon. Signaling via the insulin receptor (IR) through the PI3K and Akt/PKB node is required for insulin-stimulated PANDER release. The separate localization of PANDER and glucagon is consistent with their differential regulation, and the effect of insulin suggests a paracrine/endocrine effect on PANDER release. This provides further insight into the potential glucose-regulatory role of PANDER. PMID:20638985

  20. Characterization of the expression, localization, and secretion of PANDER in alpha-cells.

    PubMed

    Carnegie, Jason R; Robert-Cooperman, Claudia E; Wu, Jianmei; Young, Robert A; Wolf, Bryan A; Burkhardt, Brant R

    2010-08-30

    The novel islet-specific protein PANcreatic DERived Factor (PANDER; FAM3B) has been extensively characterized with respect to the beta-cell, and these studies suggest a potential function for PANDER in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Little is known regarding PANDER in pancreatic -cells, which are critically involved in maintaining euglycemia. Here we present the first report elucidating the expression and regulation of PANDER within the alpha-cell. Pander mRNA and protein are detected in alpha-cells, with primary localization to a glucagon-negative granular cytosolic compartment. PANDER secretion from alpha-cells is nutritionally and hormonally regulated by l-arginine and insulin, demonstrating similarities and differences with glucagon. Signaling via the insulin receptor (IR) through the PI3K and Akt/PKB node is required for insulin-stimulated PANDER release. The separate localization of PANDER and glucagon is consistent with their differential regulation, and the effect of insulin suggests a paracrine/endocrine effect on PANDER release. This provides further insight into the potential glucose-regulatory role of PANDER. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intracellular localization of adeno-associated viral proteins expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Ramírez, Lilí E; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2011-01-01

    Production of vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAVv) in insect cells represents a feasible option for large-scale applications. However, transducing particles yields obtained in this system are low compared with total capsid yields, suggesting the presence of genome encapsidation bottlenecks. Three components are required for AAVv production: viral capsid proteins (VP), the recombinant AAV genome, and Rep proteins for AAV genome replication and encapsidation. Little is known about the interaction between the three components in insect cells, which have intracellular conditions different to those in mammalian cells. In this work, the localization of AAV proteins in insect cells was assessed for the first time with the purpose of finding potential limiting factors. Unassembled VP were located either in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Their transport into the nucleus was dependent on protein concentration. Empty capsids were located in defined subnuclear compartments. Rep proteins expressed individually were efficiently translocated into the nucleus. Their intranuclear distribution was not uniform and differed from VP distribution. While Rep52 distribution and expression levels were not affected by AAV genomes or VP, Rep78 distribution and stability changed during coexpression. Expression of all AAV components modified capsid intranuclear distribution, and assembled VP were found in vesicles located in the nuclear periphery. Such vesicles were related to baculovirus infection, highlighting its role in AAVv production in insect cells. The results obtained in this work suggest that the intracellular distribution of AAV proteins allows their interaction and does not limit vector production in insect cells. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  2. FRET Imaging of Diatoms Expressing a Biosilica-Localized Ribose Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Kathryn E.; Robinson, Errol W.; Hengel, Shawna M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-01-01

    Future materials are envisioned to include bio-assembled, hybrid, three-dimensional nanosystems that incorporate functional proteins. Diatoms are amenable to genetic modification for localization of recombinant proteins in the biosilica cell wall. However, the full range of protein functionalities that can be accommodated by the modified porous biosilica has yet to be described. Our objective was to functionalize diatom biosilica with a reagent-less sensor dependent on ligand-binding and conformational change to drive FRET-based signaling capabilities. A fusion protein designed to confer such properties included a bacterial periplasmic ribose binding protein (R) flanked by CyPet (C) and YPet (Y), cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins that act as a FRET pair. The structure and function of the CRY recombinant chimeric protein was confirmed by expression in E. coli prior to transformation of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Mass spectrometry of the recombinant CRY showed 97% identity with the deduced amino acid sequence. CRY with and without an N-terminal Sil3 tag for biosilica localization exhibited characteristic ribose-dependent changes in FRET, with similar dissociation constants of 123.3 µM and 142.8 µM, respectively. The addition of the Sil3 tag did not alter the affinity of CRY for the ribose substrate. Subsequent transformation of T. pseudonana with a vector encoding Sil3-CRY resulted in fluorescence localization in the biosilica and changes in FRET in both living cells and isolated frustules in response to ribose. This work demonstrated that the nano-architecture of the genetically modified biosilica cell wall was able to support the functionality of the relatively complex Sil3-CyPet-RBP-YPet fusion protein with its requirement for ligand-binding and conformational change for FRET-signal generation. PMID:22470473

  3. FRET imaging of diatoms expressing a biosilica-localized ribose sensor.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kathryn E; Robinson, Errol W; Hengel, Shawna M; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-01-01

    Future materials are envisioned to include bio-assembled, hybrid, three-dimensional nanosystems that incorporate functional proteins. Diatoms are amenable to genetic modification for localization of recombinant proteins in the biosilica cell wall. However, the full range of protein functionalities that can be accommodated by the modified porous biosilica has yet to be described. Our objective was to functionalize diatom biosilica with a reagent-less sensor dependent on ligand-binding and conformational change to drive FRET-based signaling capabilities. A fusion protein designed to confer such properties included a bacterial periplasmic ribose binding protein (R) flanked by CyPet (C) and YPet (Y), cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins that act as a FRET pair. The structure and function of the CRY recombinant chimeric protein was confirmed by expression in E. coli prior to transformation of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Mass spectrometry of the recombinant CRY showed 97% identity with the deduced amino acid sequence. CRY with and without an N-terminal Sil3 tag for biosilica localization exhibited characteristic ribose-dependent changes in FRET, with similar dissociation constants of 123.3 µM and 142.8 µM, respectively. The addition of the Sil3 tag did not alter the affinity of CRY for the ribose substrate. Subsequent transformation of T. pseudonana with a vector encoding Sil3-CRY resulted in fluorescence localization in the biosilica and changes in FRET in both living cells and isolated frustules in response to ribose. This work demonstrated that the nano-architecture of the genetically modified biosilica cell wall was able to support the functionality of the relatively complex Sil3-CyPet-RBP-YPet fusion protein with its requirement for ligand-binding and conformational change for FRET-signal generation.

  4. Learning Parsimonious Classification Rules from Gene Expression Data Using Bayesian Networks with Local Structure.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Jonathan Lyle; Balasubramanian, Jeya Balaji; Visweswaran, Shyam; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi

    2017-03-01

    The comprehensibility of good predictive models learned from high-dimensional gene expression data is attractive because it can lead to biomarker discovery. Several good classifiers provide comparable predictive performance but differ in their abilities to summarize the observed data. We extend a Bayesian Rule Learning (BRL-GSS) algorithm, previously shown to be a significantly better predictor than other classical approaches in this domain. It searches a space of Bayesian networks using a decision tree representation of its parameters with global constraints, and infers a set of IF-THEN rules. The number of parameters and therefore the number of rules are combinatorial to the number of predictor variables in the model. We relax these global constraints to a more generalizable local structure (BRL-LSS). BRL-LSS entails more parsimonious set of rules because it does not have to generate all combinatorial rules. The search space of local structures is much richer than the space of global structures. We design the BRL-LSS with the same worst-case time-complexity as BRL-GSS while exploring a richer and more complex model space. We measure predictive performance using Area Under the ROC curve (AUC) and Accuracy. We measure model parsimony performance by noting the average number of rules and variables needed to describe the observed data. We evaluate the predictive and parsimony performance of BRL-GSS, BRL-LSS and the state-of-the-art C4.5 decision tree algorithm, across 10-fold cross-validation using ten microarray gene-expression diagnostic datasets. In these experiments, we observe that BRL-LSS is similar to BRL-GSS in terms of predictive performance, while generating a much more parsimonious set of rules to explain the same observed data. BRL-LSS also needs fewer variables than C4.5 to explain the data with similar predictive performance. We also conduct a feasibility study to demonstrate the general applicability of our BRL methods on the newer RNA sequencing gene-expression

  5. Mechanisms of Normal and Abnormal Endometrial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of coagulation, is enhanced in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. Progesterone also augments a second HESC hemostatic factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In contrast, progestins inhibit HESC matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, 3 and 9 expression to stabilize endometrial stromal and vascular extracellular matrix. Through these mechanisms decidualized endometrium is rendered both hemostatic and resistant to excess trophoblast invasion in the mid-luteal phase and throughout gestation to prevent hemorrhage and accreta. In non-fertile cycles, progesterone withdrawal results in decreased HESC TF and PAI-expression and increased MMP activity and inflammatory cytokine production promoting the controlled hemorrhage of menstruation and related tissue sloughing. In contrast to these well ordered biochemical processes, unpredictable endometrial bleeding associated with anovulation reflects absence of progestational effects on TF, PAI-1 and MMP activity as well as unrestrained angiogenesis rendering the endometrium non-hemostatic, proteolytic and highly vascular. Abnormal bleeding associated with long-term progestin-only contraceptives results not from impaired hemostasis but from unrestrained angiogenesis leading to large fragile endometrial vessels. This abnormal angiogenesis reflects progestational inhibition of endometrial blood flow promoting local hypoxia and generation of reactive oxygen species that increase production of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in HESCs and Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in endometrial endothelial cells while decreasing HESC expression of angiostatic, Ang-1. The resulting vessel fragility promotes bleeding. Aberrant angiogenesis also underlies abnormal bleeding associated with myomas and endometrial polyps however there are gaps in our understanding of this pathology. PMID:21499503

  6. PLEKHM2 mutation leads to abnormal localization of lysosomes, impaired autophagy flux and associates with recessive dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Emad; Levitas, Aviva; Singh, Sonia R.; Braiman, Alex; Ofir, Rivka; Etzion, Sharon; Sheffield, Val C.; Etzion, Yoram; Carrier, Lucie; Parvari, Ruti

    2015-01-01

    Gene mutations, mostly segregating with a dominant mode of inheritance, are important causes of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a disease characterized by enlarged ventricular dimensions, impaired cardiac function, heart failure and high risk of death. Another myocardial abnormality often linked to gene mutations is left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) characterized by a typical diffuse spongy appearance of the left ventricle. Here, we describe a large Bedouin family presenting with a severe recessive DCM and LVNC. Homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a single gene variant that segregated as expected and was neither reported in databases nor in Bedouin population controls. The PLEKHM2 cDNA2156_2157delAG variant causes the frameshift p.Lys645AlafsTer12 and/or the skipping of exon 11 that results in deletion of 30 highly conserved amino acids. PLEKHM2 is known to interact with several Rabs and with kinesin-1, affecting endosomal trafficking. Accordingly, patients' primary fibroblasts exhibited abnormal subcellular distribution of endosomes marked by Rab5, Rab7 and Rab9, as well as the Golgi apparatus. In addition, lysosomes appeared to be concentrated in the perinuclear region, and autophagy flux was impaired. Transfection of wild-type PLEKHM2 cDNA into patient's fibroblasts corrected the subcellular distribution of the lysosomes, supporting the causal effect of PLEKHM2 mutation. PLEKHM2 joins LAMP-2 and BAG3 as a disease gene altering autophagy resulting in an isolated cardiac phenotype. The association of PLEKHM2 mutation with DCM and LVNC supports the importance of autophagy for normal cardiac function. PMID:26464484

  7. PLEKHM2 mutation leads to abnormal localization of lysosomes, impaired autophagy flux and associates with recessive dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Emad; Levitas, Aviva; Singh, Sonia R; Braiman, Alex; Ofir, Rivka; Etzion, Sharon; Sheffield, Val C; Etzion, Yoram; Carrier, Lucie; Parvari, Ruti

    2015-12-20

    Gene mutations, mostly segregating with a dominant mode of inheritance, are important causes of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a disease characterized by enlarged ventricular dimensions, impaired cardiac function, heart failure and high risk of death. Another myocardial abnormality often linked to gene mutations is left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) characterized by a typical diffuse spongy appearance of the left ventricle. Here, we describe a large Bedouin family presenting with a severe recessive DCM and LVNC. Homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a single gene variant that segregated as expected and was neither reported in databases nor in Bedouin population controls. The PLEKHM2 cDNA2156_2157delAG variant causes the frameshift p.Lys645AlafsTer12 and/or the skipping of exon 11 that results in deletion of 30 highly conserved amino acids. PLEKHM2 is known to interact with several Rabs and with kinesin-1, affecting endosomal trafficking. Accordingly, patients' primary fibroblasts exhibited abnormal subcellular distribution of endosomes marked by Rab5, Rab7 and Rab9, as well as the Golgi apparatus. In addition, lysosomes appeared to be concentrated in the perinuclear region, and autophagy flux was impaired. Transfection of wild-type PLEKHM2 cDNA into patient's fibroblasts corrected the subcellular distribution of the lysosomes, supporting the causal effect of PLEKHM2 mutation. PLEKHM2 joins LAMP-2 and BAG3 as a disease gene altering autophagy resulting in an isolated cardiac phenotype. The association of PLEKHM2 mutation with DCM and LVNC supports the importance of autophagy for normal cardiac function. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Molecular cloning and localization of a novel cotton annexin gene expressed preferentially during fiber development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Ke; Niu, Xiao Wei; Lv, Yan Hui; Zhang, Tian Zhen; Guo, Wang Zhen

    2010-10-01

    Annexins constitute a family of multifunction and structurally related proteins. These proteins are ubiquitous in the plant kingdom, and are important calcium-dependent membrane-binding proteins that participate in the polar development of different plant regions such as rhizoids, root caps, and pollen tube tips. In this study, a novel cotton annexin gene (designated as GhFAnnx) was isolated from a fiber cDNA library of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). The full-length cDNA of GhFAnnx comprises an open reading frame of 945 bp that encodes a 314-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 35.7 kDa and an isoelectric point of 6.49. Genomic GhFAnnx sequences from different cotton species, TM-1, Hai7124 and two diploid progenitor cottons, G. herbaceum (A-genome) and G. raimondii (D-genome) showed that at least two copies of the GhFAnnx gene, each with six exons and five introns in the coding region, were identified in the allotetraploid cotton genome. The GhFAnnx gene cloned from the cDNA library in this study was mapped to the chromosome 10 of the A-subgenome of the tetraploid cotton. Sequence alignment revealed that GhFAnnx contained four repeats of 70 amino acids. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that GhFAnnx is preferentially expressed in different developmental fibers but its expression is low in roots, stems, and leaves. Subcellular localization of GhFAnnx in onion epidermal cells and cotton fibers suggests that this protein is ubiquitous in the epidermal cells of onion, but assembles at the edge and the inner side of the apex of the cotton fiber tips with brilliant spots. In summary, GhFAnnx influences fiber development and is associated with the polar expansion of the cotton fiber during elongation stages.

  9. Isolation, expression, and chromosomal localization of the human mitochondrial capsule selenoprotein gene (MCSP)

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, Hanne; Schwemmer, M.; Tessmann, D.

    1996-03-01

    The mitochondrial capsule selenoprotein (MCS) (HGMW-approved symbol MCSP) is one of three proteins that are important for the maintenance and stabilization of the crescent structure of the sperm mitochondria. We describe here the isolation of a cDNA, the exon-intron organization, the expression, and the chromosomal localization of the human MCS gene. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the human and mouse MCS cDNAs reveals that the 5{prime}- and 3{prime}-untranslated sequences are more conserved (71%) than the coding sequences (59%). The open reading frame encodes a 116-amino-acid protein and lacks the UGA codons, which have been reported to encode the selenocysteines in themore » N-terminal of the deduced mouse protein. The deduced human protein shows a low degree of amino acid sequence identity to the mouse protein. The deduced human protein shows a low degree of amino acid sequence identity to the mouse protein (39%). The most striking homology lies in the dicysteine motifs. Northern and Southern zooblot analyses reveal that the MCS gene in human, baboon, and bovine is more conserved than its counterparts in mouse and rat. The single intron in the human MCS gene is approximately 6 kb and interrupts the 5{prime}-untranslated region at a position equivalent to that in the mouse and rat genes. Northern blot and in situ hybridization experiments demonstrate that the expression of the human MCS gene is restricted to haploid spermatids. The human gene was assigned to q21 of chromosome 1. 30 refs., 9 figs.« less

  10. Expression and Localization of Aquaporin 1a in the Sea-Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) during Ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Giffard-Mena, Ivone; Boulo, Viviane; Abed, Charline; Cramb, Gordon; Charmantier, Guy

    2011-01-01

    The successful establishment of a species in a given habitat depends on the ability of each of its developing stages to adapt to the environment. In order to understand this process we have studied the adaptation of a euryhaline fish, the sea-bass Dicentrarchus labrax, to various salinities during its ontogeny. The expression and localization of Aquaporin 1a (AQP1a) mRNA and protein were determined in different osmoregulatory tissues. In larvae, the sites of AQP1a expression are variable and they shift according to age, implying functional changes. In juveniles after metamorphosis (D32–D48 post-hatch, 15–25 mm) and in pre-adults, an increase in AQP1a transcript abundance was noted in the digestive tract, and the AQP1a location was observed in the intestine. In juveniles (D87–D100 post-hatch, 38–48 mm), the transcript levels of AQP1a in the digestive tract and in the kidney were higher in sea water (SW) than at lower salinity. These observations, in agreement with existing models, suggest that in SW-acclimated fish, the imbibed water is absorbed via AQP1a through the digestive tract, particularly the intestine and the rectum. In addition, AQP1a may play a role in water reabsorption in the kidney. These mechanisms compensate dehydration in SW, and they contribute to the adaptation of juveniles to salinity changes during sea-lagoon migrations. These results contribute to the interpretation of the adaptation of populations to habitats where salinity varies. PMID:21808622

  11. Comparison of two serpins of Clonorchis sinensis by bioinformatics, expression, and localization in metacercaria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yabo; Hu, Dong; Wang, Lexun; Liang, Chi; Hu, Xuchu; Xu, Jin; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-01-01

    Clonorchiasis, which has been an important public health problem in China, is caused by ingestion of raw or undercooked fish contaminated by live metacercaria. Therefore, preventing fish from infecting is of great significance for controlling the disease. SERPINs (serine protease inhibitors) are well known as negative regulators of hemostasis, thrombolysis, and innate immune responses. In the present study, two full-length sequences encoding SERPIN were identified from metacercaria cDNA library of Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) and were denominated as CsSERPIN and CsSERPIN3, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the two sequences shares 35.9% identity to each other. Both of the sequences have SERPIN domain and the greatest difference between the two domains is the reactive centre loop. Transmembrane region was found in CsSERPIN3 while not in CsSERPIN. The expression of the two CsSERPINs was significantly higher at the life stage of metacercaria than that of adult. The transcription levels of CsSERPIN and CsSERPIN3 at metacercaria stage were 3.249- and 11.314-fold of that at adult stage, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of CsSERPIN was 4.32-fold of that of CsSERPIN3 at metacercaria stage. Immunobiochemistry revealed that CsERPIN was dispersed at subtegument and oral sucker of metacercaria, while CsSERPIN3 localized intensely in the tegument of metacercaria of C. sinensis inside of the cyst wall. All these indicated that the CsSERPINs play important roles at metacercaria stage of the parasite. CsSERPIN may take part in regulation of endogenous serine proteinase and CsSERPIN3 may be involved in immune evasion and be a potential candidate for vaccine and drug target for clonorchiasis. PMID:24831344

  12. Comparison of two serpins of Clonorchis sinensis by bioinformatics, expression, and localization in metacercaria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yabo; Hu, Dong; Wang, Lexun; Liang, Chi; Hu, Xuchu; Xu, Jin; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-06-01

    Clonorchiasis, which has been an important public health problem in China, is caused by ingestion of raw or undercooked fish contaminated by live metacercaria. Therefore, preventing fish from infecting is of great significance for controlling the disease. SERPINs (serine protease inhibitors) are well known as negative regulators of hemostasis, thrombolysis, and innate immune responses. In the present study, two full-length sequences encoding SERPIN were identified from metacercaria cDNA library of Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) and were denominated as CsSERPIN and CsSERPIN3, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the two sequences shares 35.9% identity to each other. Both of the sequences have SERPIN domain and the greatest difference between the two domains is the reactive centre loop. Transmembrane region was found in CsSERPIN3 while not in CsSERPIN. The expression of the two CsSERPINs was significantly higher at the life stage of metacercaria than that of adult. The transcription levels of CsSERPIN and CsSERPIN3 at metacercaria stage were 3.249- and 11.314-fold of that at adult stage, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of CsSERPIN was 4.32-fold of that of CsSERPIN3 at metacercaria stage. Immunobiochemistry revealed that CsERPIN was dispersed at subtegument and oral sucker of metacercaria, while CsSERPIN3 localized intensely in the tegument of metacercaria of C. sinensis inside of the cyst wall. All these indicated that the CsSERPINs play important roles at metacercaria stage of the parasite. CsSERPIN may take part in regulation of endogenous serine proteinase and CsSERPIN3 may be involved in immune evasion and be a potential candidate for vaccine and drug target for clonorchiasis.

  13. Local overexpression of the myostatin propeptide increases glucose transporter expression and enhances skeletal muscle glucose disposal.

    PubMed

    Cleasby, M E; Jarmin, S; Eilers, W; Elashry, M; Andersen, D K; Dickson, G; Foster, K

    2014-04-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) in skeletal muscle is a prerequisite for type 2 diabetes and is often associated with obesity. IR also develops alongside muscle atrophy in older individuals in sarcopenic obesity. The molecular defects that underpin this syndrome are not well characterized, and there is no licensed treatment. Deletion of the transforming growth factor-β family member myostatin, or sequestration of the active peptide by overexpression of the myostatin propeptide/latency-associated peptide (ProMyo) results in both muscle hypertrophy and reduced obesity and IR. We aimed to establish whether local myostatin inhibition would have a paracrine/autocrine effect to enhance glucose disposal beyond that simply generated by increased muscle mass, and the mechanisms involved. We directly injected adeno-associated virus expressing ProMyo in right tibialis cranialis/extensor digitorum longus muscles of rats and saline in left muscles and compared the effects after 17 days. Both test muscles were increased in size (by 7 and 11%) and showed increased radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose uptake (26 and 47%) and glycogen storage (28 and 41%) per unit mass during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. This was likely mediated through increased membrane protein levels of GLUT1 (19% higher) and GLUT4 (63% higher). Interestingly, phosphorylation of phosphoinositol 3-kinase signaling intermediates and AMP-activated kinase was slightly decreased, possibly because of reduced expression of insulin-like growth factor-I in these muscles. Thus, myostatin inhibition has direct effects to enhance glucose disposal in muscle beyond that expected of hypertrophy alone, and this approach may offer potential for the therapy of IR syndromes.

  14. Expression and subcellular localization of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin17 in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Lívia A S; Dias, Felipe F; Malta, Kássia K; Amaral, Kátia B; Shamri, Revital; Weller, Peter F; Melo, Rossana C N

    2015-10-01

    SNARE members mediate membrane fusion during intracellular trafficking underlying innate and adaptive immune responses by different cells. However, little is known about the expression and function of these proteins in human eosinophils, cells involved in allergic, inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses. Here, we investigate the expression and distribution of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin17 (STX17) within human eosinophils isolated from the peripheral blood. Flow cytometry and a pre-embedding immunonanogold electron microscopy (EM) technique that combines optimal epitope preservation and secondary Fab-fragments of antibodies linked to 1.4 nm gold particles for optimal access to microdomains, were used to investigate STX17. STX17 was detected within unstimulated eosinophils. Immunogold EM revealed STX17 on secretory granules and on granule-derived vesiculotubular transport carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles-EoSVs). Quantitative EM analyses showed that 77.7% of the granules were positive for STX17 with a mean±SEM of 3.9±0.2 gold particles/granule. Labeling was present on both granule outer membranes and matrices while EoSVs showed clear membrane-associated labeling. STX17 was also present in secretory granules in eosinophils stimulated with the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or the CC-chemokine ligand 11 CCL11 (eotaxin-1), stimuli that induce eosinophil degranulation. The number of secretory granules labeled for STX17 was significantly higher in CCL11 compared with the unstimulated group. The level of cell labeling did not change when unstimulated cells were compared with TNF-α-stimulated eosinophils. The present study clearly shows by immunanonogold EM that STX17 is localized in eosinophil secretory granules and transport vesicles and might be involved in the transport of granule-derived cargos. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression and subcellular localization of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin17 in human eosinophils

    SciTech Connect

    Carmo, Lívia A.S.; Dias, Felipe F.; Malta, Kássia K.

    Background: SNARE members mediate membrane fusion during intracellular trafficking underlying innate and adaptive immune responses by different cells. However, little is known about the expression and function of these proteins in human eosinophils, cells involved in allergic, inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses. Here, we investigate the expression and distribution of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin17 (STX17) within human eosinophils isolated from the peripheral blood. Methods: Flow cytometry and a pre-embedding immunonanogold electron microscopy (EM) technique that combines optimal epitope preservation and secondary Fab-fragments of antibodies linked to 1.4 nm gold particles for optimal access to microdomains, were used to investigate STX17. Results: STX17more » was detected within unstimulated eosinophils. Immunogold EM revealed STX17 on secretory granules and on granule-derived vesiculotubular transport carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles-EoSVs). Quantitative EM analyses showed that 77.7% of the granules were positive for STX17 with a mean±SEM of 3.9±0.2 gold particles/granule. Labeling was present on both granule outer membranes and matrices while EoSVs showed clear membrane-associated labeling. STX17 was also present in secretory granules in eosinophils stimulated with the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or the CC-chemokine ligand 11 CCL11 (eotaxin-1), stimuli that induce eosinophil degranulation. The number of secretory granules labeled for STX17 was significantly higher in CCL11 compared with the unstimulated group. The level of cell labeling did not change when unstimulated cells were compared with TNF-α-stimulated eosinophils. Conclusions: The present study clearly shows by immunanonogold EM that STX17 is localized in eosinophil secretory granules and transport vesicles and might be involved in the transport of granule-derived cargos. - Highlights: • First demonstration of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin-17 (STX17) in human eosinophils.

  16. Changes in Gene Expression Predicting Local Control in Cervical Cancer: Results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0128

    PubMed Central

    Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Li, Shu-Xia; Winter, Kathryn; Ryu, Janice; Jhingran, Anuja; Miller, Bridgette; Dicker, Adam P.; Gaffney, David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the potential of gene expression signatures to predict response to treatment in locally advanced cervical cancer treated with definitive chemotherapy and radiation. Experimental Design Tissue biopsies were collected from patients participating in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0128, a phase II trial evaluating the benefit of celecoxib in addition to cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation for locally advanced cervical cancer. Gene expression profiling was done and signatures of pretreatment, mid-treatment (before the first implant), and “changed” gene expression patterns between pre- and mid-treatment samples were determined. The ability of the gene signatures to predict local control versus local failure was evaluated. Two-group t test was done to identify the initial gene set separating these end points. Supervised classification methods were used to enrich the gene sets. The results were further validated by leave-one-out and 2-fold cross-validation. Results Twenty-two patients had suitable material from pretreatment samples for analysis, and 13 paired pre- and mid-treatment samples were obtained. The changed gene expression signatures between the pre- and mid-treatment biopsies predicted response to treatment, separating patients with local failures from those who achieved local control with a seven-gene signature. The in-sample prediction rate, leave-one-out prediction rate, and 2-fold prediction rate are 100% for this seven-gene signature. This signature was enriched for cell cycle genes. Conclusions Changed gene expression signatures during therapy in cervical cancer can predict outcome as measured by local control. After further validation, such findings could be applied to direct additional therapy for cervical cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation. PMID:19509178

  17. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  18. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding is any heavy or unusual bleeding from the uterus (through your ... one symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding. Having extremely heavy bleeding during your period can also be considered ...

  19. Expression differences of circulating microRNAs in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer and low-risk, localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Han Christine Ngoc; Xie, Wanling; Yang, Ming; Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Drouin, Sarah; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Kantoff, Philip W

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies show that microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, may have potential for monitoring cancer status. We investigated circulating miRNAs in prostate cancer that may be associated with the progression of hormone-sensitive primary tumors to metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after androgen deprivation therapy. Using genome-wide expression profiling by TaqMan Human MicroRNA Arrays (Applied Biosystems) and/or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we compared the expression levels of miRNAs in serum samples from 28 patients of low-risk localized disease, 30 of high-risk localized disease and 26 of metastatic CRPC. We demonstrated that serum samples from patients of low risk, localized prostate cancer and metastatic CRPC patients exhibit distinct circulating miRNA signatures. MiR-375, miR-378*, and miR-141 were significantly over-expressed in serum from CRPC patients compared with serum from low-risk localized patients, while miR-409-3p was significantly under-expressed. In prostate primary tumor samples, miR-375 and miR-141 also had significantly higher expression levels compared with those in normal prostate tissue. Circulating miRNAs, particularly miR-375, miR-141, miR-378*, and miR-409-3p, are differentially expressed in serum samples from prostate cancer patients. In the search for improved minimally invasive methods to follow cancer pathogenesis, the correlation of disease status with the expression patterns of circulating miRNAs may indicate the potential importance of circulating miRNAs as prognostic markers for prostate cancer progression. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Localization and expression of MreB in Vibrio parahaemolyticus under different stresses.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shen-Wen; Chen, Shau-Yan; Wong, Hin-chung

    2008-11-01

    MreB, the homolog of eukaryotic actin, may play a vital role when prokaryotes cope with stress by altering their spatial organization, including their morphology, subcellular architecture, and localization of macromolecules. This study investigates the behavior of MreB in Vibrio parahaemolyticus under various stresses. The behavior of MreB was probed using a yellow fluorescent protein-MreB conjugate in merodiploid strain SC9. Under normal growth conditions, MreB formed helical filaments in exponential-phase cells. The shape of starved or stationary-phase cells changed from rods to small spheroids. The cells differentiated into the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state with small spherical cells via a "swelling-waning" process. In all cases, drastic remodeling of the MreB cytoskeleton was observed. MreB helices typically were loosened and fragmented into short filaments, arcs, and spots in bacteria under these stresses. The disintegrated MreB exhibited a strong tendency to attach to the cytoplasmic membrane. The expression of mreB generally declined in bacteria in the stationary phase and under starvation but was upregulated during the initial periods of cold shock and VBNC state differentiation and decreased afterwards. Our findings demonstrated the behavior of MreB in the morphological changes of V. parahaemolyticus under intrinsic or extrinsic stresses and may have important implications for studying the cellular stress response and aging.

  1. The p75 neurotrophin receptor localization in blood-CSF barrier: expression in choroid plexus epithelium.

    PubMed

    Spuch, Carlos; Carro, Eva

    2011-05-11

    The presence of neurotrophins and their receptors Trk family has been reported in the choroid plexus. High levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and TrkB receptor were detected, while nothing was know about p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In neurons, p75NTR receptor has a dual function: promoting survival together with TrkA in response to NGF, and inducing apoptotic signaling through p75NTR. We postulated that p75NTR may also affect the survival pathways in the choroid plexus and also undergoes regulated proteolysis with metalloproteases. Here, we demonstrated the presence of p75NTR receptor in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. The p75NTR receptor would be involved in cell death mechanisms and in the damaged induced by amyloid beta (Aβ) in the choroid plexus and finally, we propose an essential role of p75NTR in the Aβ transcytosis through out choroid plexus barrier. The presence analysis reveals the new localization of p75NTR in the choroid plexus and, the distribution mainly in the cytoplasm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) side of the epithelial cells. We propose that p75NTR receptor plays a role in the survival pathways and Aβ-induced cell death. These data suggest that p75NTR dysfunction play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. The importance and novelty of this expression expands a new role of p75NTR.

  2. Local IL-23 expression in murine vaginal candidiasis and its relationship with infection and immune status.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Tan, Zhijian; Liu, Zhixiang; Xia, Dechao; Li, Jiawen

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal IL-23 and its role in experimental murine vaginal candidiasis and its relationship with infection and immune status, immuno-competent (group A) and immuno-suppressed (group B) murine models of vaginal candidiasis were established in estrogen-treated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls (group C). The level of IL-23 p19 mRNA in murine vaginal tissue was determined by RT-PCR. Significantly increased levels of IL-23p19mRNA were observed on the 4th, the 7th and 14th day after inoculation in immuno-competent group when compared with that in control group (P<0.01, P<0.05). However, significant increase of IL-23 p19mRNA were only observed on the 7th day and the 14th day after inoculatuon in immuno-suppressed groups (P<0.05). On the 4th and 7th day, the levels of IL-23 p19mRNA were significantly increased in immuno-competent group than those in immuno-suppressed group (P <0.05). Local IL-23 may play a role in the pathogenesis of murine vaginal candidiasis and has a protective function during infection. Low vaginal IL-23 level may correlate with the increased susceptibility to Candida albicans in immuno-suppressed group.

  3. Expression and localization of aquaporin 1b during oocyte development in the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underling hydration during oocyte maturation, we characterized the structure of Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) novel-water selective aquaporin 1 (AQP1b) that thought to be involved in oocyte hydration. The aqp1b cDNA encodes a 263 amino acid protein that includes the six potential transmembrane domains and two Asn-Pro-Ala motifs. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed transcription of Japanese eel aqp1b in ovary and testis but not in the other tissues. In situ hybridization studies with the eel aqp1b cRNA probe revealed intense eel aqp1b signal in the oocytes at the perinucleolus stage and the signals became faint during the process of oocyte development. Light microscopic immunocytochemical analysis of ovary revealed that the Japanese eel AQP1b was expressed in the cytoplasm around the yolk globules which were located in the peripheral region of oocytes during the primary yolk globule stage; thereafter, the immunoreactivity was observed throughout the cytoplasm of oocyte as vitellogenesis progressed. The immunoreactivity became localized around the large membrane-limited yolk masses which were formed by the fusion of yolk globules during the oocyte maturation phase. These results together indicate that AQP1b, which is synthesized in the oocyte during the process of oocyte growth, is essential for mediating water uptake into eel oocytes. PMID:21615964

  4. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, A.H.; Neumann, P.E.; Anderson, M.S.

    1992-01-15

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3,500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain the observation of 3/23 FCMD males with abnormal dystrophin, the authors propose that dystrophin and the FCMD gene product interact and that the earlier onset and greater severity of these patients' phenotype (relative tomore » Duchenne muscular dystrophy) are due to their being heterozygous for the FCMD mutation in addition to being hemizygous for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genotype that is predicted to occur in 1/175,000 Japanese males. This model may help explain the genetic basis for some of the clinical and pathological variability seen among patients with FCMD, and it has potential implications for understanding the inheritance of other autosomal recessive disorders in general. For example, sex ratios for rare autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in proteins that interact with X chromosome-linked gene products may display predictable deviation from 1:1.« less

  5. Cellular localization and changes in expression of prolactin receptor isoforms in sheep ovary throughout the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Picazo, R A; García Ruiz, J P; Santiago Moreno, J; González de Bulnes, A; Muñoz, J; Silván, G; Lorenzo, P L; Illera, J C

    2004-11-01

    The actions of prolactin (PRL) on target cells depend on the type of prolactin receptor (PRLr) predominantly expressed, particularly whether the long PRLr isoform is expressed. The aims of this study were to determine the cellular localization and the changes in expression of long and short PRLr isoforms in sheep ovary throughout the estrous cycle. Long and short PRLrs were localized mostly in the same ovarian cells. Maximum signal intensity, particularly for long PRLrs, was found in stromal cells surrounding primordial and primary follicles, and, for both PRLrs, in granulosa cells of preantral follicles and in luteal cells. Moderate signal intensity for PRLrs was found in theca cells of preantral to ovulatory follicles, and in granulosa cells of antral follicles up to the gonadotropin-dependent stage. Decreasing immunoreactivity to PRLrs was found in granulosa cells of gonadotropin-dependent to ovulatory follicles. For long PRLrs in particular, no signal was found in mural granulosa cells of gonadotropin-dependent follicles; for both isoforms, no signal was found in most granulosa cells of ovulatory follicles. In primordial to gonadotropin-dependent follicles, cellular localization of PRLr was similar on days 0, 10 and 15 of the cycle. Oocytes consistently showed positive immunostaining for PRLrs. Comparative RT-PCR analysis of long and short PRLr expression showed that the short isoform is evenly expressed throughout the estrous cycle, whereas the expression of the long form increases at the time of estrus and decreases at mid-luteal phase and at the onset of the follicular phase. Expression of long PRLrs was greater than that of short PRLrs on day 0 of cycle; expression of both isoforms was similar on day 10 and on day 15, long PRLrs expression was lower than that of short PRLrs. Our results indicate that in sheep ovary, the maximum responsiveness to PRL might occur during the preovulatory phase of the estrous cycle.

  6. Characterization of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) expression in soft tissue sarcomas: distinct prognostic impact of MCT1 sub-cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are a group of neoplasms, which, despite current therapeutic advances, still confer a poor outcome to half of the patients. As other solid tumors, STSs exhibit high glucose consumption rates, associated with worse prognosis and therapeutic response. As highly glycolytic tumors, we hypothesized that sarcomas should present an increased expression of lactate transporters (MCTs). Methods Immunohistochemical expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4 and CD147 was assessed in a series of 86 STSs and the expression profiles were associated with patients’ clinical-pathological parameters. Results MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 were mainly observed in the plasma membrane of cancer cells (around 60% for MCTs and 40% for CD147), while MCT2 was conspicuously found in the cytoplasm (94.2%). Importantly, we observed MCT1 nuclear expression (32.6%). MCT1 and MCT4, alone or co-expressed with CD147 in the plasma membrane, were associated with poor prognostic variables including high tumor grade, disease progression and shorter overall survival. Conversely, we found MCT1 nuclear expression to be associated with low grade tumors and longer overall survival. Conclusions The present work represents the first report of MCTs characterization in STSs. We showed the original finding of MCT1 expression in the nucleus. Importantly, opposite biological roles should be behind the dual sub-cellular localization of MCT1, as plasma membrane expression of MCT1 is associated with worse patients’ prognosis, while nuclear expression is associated with better prognosis. PMID:24885736

  7. Characterization of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) expression in soft tissue sarcomas: distinct prognostic impact of MCT1 sub-cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Céline; Penna, Valter; Morais-Santos, Filipa; Abrahão-Machado, Lucas F; Ribeiro, Guilherme; Curcelli, Emílio C; Olivieri, Marcus V; Morini, Sandra; Valença, Isabel; Ribeiro, Daniela; Schmitt, Fernando C; Reis, Rui M; Baltazar, Fátima

    2014-05-09

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are a group of neoplasms, which, despite current therapeutic advances, still confer a poor outcome to half of the patients. As other solid tumors, STSs exhibit high glucose consumption rates, associated with worse prognosis and therapeutic response. As highly glycolytic tumors, we hypothesized that sarcomas should present an increased expression of lactate transporters (MCTs). Immunohistochemical expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4 and CD147 was assessed in a series of 86 STSs and the expression profiles were associated with patients' clinical-pathological parameters. MCT1, MCT4 and CD147 were mainly observed in the plasma membrane of cancer cells (around 60% for MCTs and 40% for CD147), while MCT2 was conspicuously found in the cytoplasm (94.2%). Importantly, we observed MCT1 nuclear expression (32.6%). MCT1 and MCT4, alone or co-expressed with CD147 in the plasma membrane, were associated with poor prognostic variables including high tumor grade, disease progression and shorter overall survival. Conversely, we found MCT1 nuclear expression to be associated with low grade tumors and longer overall survival. The present work represents the first report of MCTs characterization in STSs. We showed the original finding of MCT1 expression in the nucleus. Importantly, opposite biological roles should be behind the dual sub-cellular localization of MCT1, as plasma membrane expression of MCT1 is associated with worse patients' prognosis, while nuclear expression is associated with better prognosis.

  8. Localization and expression of clarin-1, the Clrn1 gene product, in auditory hair cells and photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Meehan, Daniel T.; Delimont, Duane; Askew, Charles; Garrige, Suneetha; Gratton, Michael Anne; Rothermund-Franklin, Christie A.; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2009-01-01

    The Usher syndrome 3A (CLRN1) gene encodes clarin-1, which is a member of the tetraspanin family of transmembrane proteins. Although identified more than 6 years ago, little is known about its localization or function in the eye and ear. We developed a polyclonal antibody that react with all clarin-1 isoforms and used it to characterize protein expression in cochlea and retina. In the cochlea, we observe clarin-1expression in the stereocilia of P0 mice, and in synaptic terminals present at the base of the auditory hair cells from E18 to P6. In the retina, clarin-1 localizes to the connecting cilia, inner segment of photoreceptors and to the ribbon synapses. RT-PCR from P0 cochlea and P28 retina show mRNAs encoding only isoforms 2 and 3. Western-blots show that only isoform 2 is present in protein extracts from these same tissues. We examined clarin-1 expression in the immortomouse-derived hair cell line UB/OC-1. Only isoform 2 is expressed in UB/OC-1 at both mRNA and protein levels, suggesting this isoform is biologically relevant to hair cell function. The protein co-localizes with microtubules and post-transgolgi vesicles. The sub-cellular localization of clarin-1 in hair cells and photoreceptors suggests it functions at both the basal and apical poles of neurosensoriepithelia. PMID:19539019

  9. The sox gene Dichaete is expressed in local interneurons and functions in development of the Drosophila adult olfactory circuit.

    PubMed

    Melnattur, Krishna V; Berdnik, Daniela; Rusan, Zeid; Ferreira, Christopher J; Nambu, John R

    2013-02-01

    In insects, the primary sites of integration for olfactory sensory input are the glomeruli in the antennal lobes. Here, axons of olfactory receptor neurons synapse with dendrites of the projection neurons that relay olfactory input to higher brain centers, such as the mushroom bodies and lateral horn. Interactions between olfactory receptor neurons and projection neurons are modulated by excitatory and inhibitory input from a group of local interneurons. While significant insight has been gleaned into the differentiation of olfactory receptor and projection neurons, much less is known about the development and function of the local interneurons. We have found that Dichaete, a conserved Sox HMG box gene, is strongly expressed in a cluster of LAAL cells located adjacent to each antennal lobe in the adult brain. Within these clusters, Dichaete protein expression is detected in both cholinergic and GABAergic local interneurons. In contrast, Dichaete expression is not detected in mature or developing projection neurons, or developing olfactory receptor neurons. Analysis of novel viable Dichaete mutant alleles revealed misrouting of specific projection neuron dendrites and axons, and alterations in glomeruli organization. These results suggest noncell autonomous functions of Dichaete in projection neuron differentiation as well as a potential role for Dichaete-expressing local interneurons in development of the adult olfactory circuitry. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Neuronal control of localized inflammation through expressed nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a study carried out in mice.

    PubMed

    Thayabaran, M; Yasawardene, S G

    2015-12-01

    Although the local inflammatory reactions are known to be regulated through cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways, the exact subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors involved in neuroimmune modulation are not well identified. Immunohistochemical localisation of a1 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (a1nAChR) in sites of localised inflammation induced by injecting turpentine to the hind limbs of Balb/C mice. Localised inflammation and subsequent development of sterile abscesses was induced by injecting sterile turpentine subcutaneously into thighs of Balb/C mice. Sterile saline was used in the control.. Skin and muscle tissues of inflammatory sites were recovered from the animals after 48 hours and were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Indirect immunohistochemistry was done using anti-a1nAChR as the primary antibody and biotinylated anti-rat IgG as the secondary antibody. Labeled streptavidin biotin (LSAB) technique was used with diaminobenzedene to detect the immunoreactivity (IR). Intensity of immunostaining was determined based upon a score of 0 - 3+ by qualitative computerised image analysis using FSX 100 Olympus microscope. H and E stained slides showed polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PNL) infiltration at the abscess sites while the saline injected control tissue sections did not show PNL infiltration. A 2+ immunoreactivity (IR) of a1nAChRs was visible at peripheral zones of sterile abscesses where PNL infiltrations were high while the central area with necrotic tissue did not show IR. A subcutaneous lymph node found within the inflammatory region expressed IR of a1nAChR in its capsular sinuses, subcapsular sinuses and trabecular regions. The findings suggest the possible role of controlling localised inflammatory response by parasympathetic cholinergic nerves through a1nAChRs of inflammation sites.

  11. Gender-Specific Gene Expression in Post-Mortem Human Brain: Localization to Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Vawter, Marquis P; Evans, Simon; Choudary, Prabhakara; Tomita, Hiroaki; Meador-Woodruff, Jim; Molnar, Margherita; Li, Jun; Lopez, Juan F; Myers, Rick; Cox, David; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Bunney, William E

    2011-01-01

    Gender differences in brain development and in the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression have been reported. Gender differences in human brain might be related to patterns of gene expression. Microarray technology is one useful method for investigation of gene expression in brain. We investigated gene expression, cell types, and regional expression patterns of differentially expressed sex chromosome genes in brain. We profiled gene expression in male and female dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and cerebellum using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platform. Differentially expressed genes between males and females on the Y chromosome (DBY, SMCY, UTY, RPS4Y, and USP9Y) and X chromosome (XIST) were confirmed using real-time PCR measurements. In situ hybridization confirmed the differential expression of gender-specific genes and neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY in three brain regions examined. The XIST gene, which silences gene expression on regions of the X chromosome, is expressed in a subset of neurons. Since a subset of neurons express gender-specific genes, neural subpopulations may exhibit a subtle sexual dimorphism at the level of differences in gene regulation and function. The distinctive pattern of neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY and other sex chromosome genes in neuronal subpopulations may possibly contribute to gender differences in prevalence noted for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of the protein expression of these sex- chromosome-linked genes in brain tissue are required to address the functional consequences of the observed gene expression differences. PMID:14583743

  12. 2012/13 abnormal cold winter in Japan associated with Large-scale Atmospheric Circulation and Local Sea Surface Temperature over the Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Y.; Ogi, M.; Tachibana, Y.

    2013-12-01

    On Japan, wintertime cold wave has social, economic, psychological and political impacts because of the lack of atomic power stations in the era of post Fukushima world. The colder winter is the more electricity is needed. Wintertime weather of Japan and its prediction has come under the world spotlight. The winter of 2012/13 in Japan was abnormally cold, and such a cold winter has persisted for 3 years. Wintertime climate of Japan is governed by some dominant modes of the large-scale atmospheric circulations. Yasunaka and Hanawa (2008) demonstrated that the two dominant modes - Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Pacific (WP) pattern - account for about 65% of the interannual variation of the wintertime mean surface air temperature of Japan. A negative AO brings about cold winter in Japan. In addition, a negative WP also brings about cold winter in Japan. Looking back to the winter of 2012/13, both the negative AO and negative WP continued from October through December. If the previous studies were correct, it would have been extremely very cold from October through December. In fact, in December, in accordance with previous studies, it was colder than normal. Contrary to the expectation, in October and November, it was, however, warmer than normal. This discrepancy signifies that an additional hidden circumstance that heats Japan overwhelms these large-scale atmospheric circulations that cool Japan. In this study, we therefore seek an additional cause of wintertime climate of Japan particularly focusing 2012 as well as the AO and WP. We found that anomalously warm oceanic temperature surrounding Japan overwhelmed influences of the AO or WP. Unlike the inland climate, the island climate can be strongly influenced by surrounding ocean temperature, suggesting that large-scale atmospheric patterns alone do not determine the climate of islands. (a) Time series of a 5-day running mean AO index (blue) as defined by Ogi et al., (2004), who called it the SVNAM index. For

  13. Expression and localization of taste receptor genes in the vallate papillae of rats: effect of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Atsuo; Sekine, Hiroki; Takao, Kyoichi; Ikeda, Minoru

    2013-09-01

    We found a difference in expression sites between TAS2Rs and ENaC (epithelial sodium channels). The number of TAS2R-positive cells and ENaC-positive cells were decreased in zinc-deficient diet rats. These findings suggest that decreased expression of taste receptor genes may play an important role in the onset of zinc deficiency-associated taste disorder. The present study was aimed at histologically investigating the expression and localization of TAS2Rs and ENaC in the vallate taste buds of rats. Changes in expression of the taste receptor genes in zinc-deficient rats were also investigated. The vallate papillae of five rats fed a normal diet and five rats fed a zinc-deficient diet were used. In situ hybridization was performed to investigate the expression and localization of TAS2Rs and ENaC. TAS2R-positive cells per taste bud were counted, and differences in number between the normal and zinc-deficient diet rats were investigated. In the normal rats, expression of TAS2Rs was observed specifically in the taste bud cells. In contrast, ENaC-positive cells were observed in a part of the taste bud cells and a large number of epithelial cells. Fewer cells were positive for TAS2Rs and ENaC in the zinc-deficient diet rats.

  14. Identification of stably expressed reference genes for RT-qPCR data normalization in defined localizations of cyclic bovine ovaries.

    PubMed

    Schoen, K; Plendl, J; Gabler, C; Kaessmeyer, S

    2015-06-01

    Ovaries are highly complex organs displaying morphological, molecular and functional differences between their cortical zona parenchymatosa and medullary zona vasculosa, and also between the different cyclic luteal stages. Objective of the present study was to validate expression stability of twelve putative reference genes (RGs) in bovine ovaries, considering the intrinsic heterogeneity of bovine ovarian tissue with regard to different luteal stages and intra-ovarian localizations. The focus was on identifying RGs, which are suitable to normalize RT-qPCR results of ovaries collected from clinical healthy cattle, irrespective of localization and the hormonal stage. Expression profiles of twelve potential reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, YWHAZ, HPRT1, SDHA, UBA52, POLR2C, RPS9, ACTG2, H3F3B, RPS18 and RPL19) were analysed. Evaluation of gene expression differences was performed using genorm, normfinder, and bestkeeper software. The most stably expressed genes according to genorm, normfinder and bestkeeper approaches contained the candidates H3F3B, RPS9, YWHAZ, RPS18, POLR2C and UBA52. Of this group, the genes YWHAZ, H3F3B and RPS9 could be recommended as best-suited RGs for normalization purposes on healthy bovine ovaries irrespective of the luteal stage or intra-ovarian localization. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Expression, tissue localization and serodiagnostic potential of Taenia multiceps acidic ribosomal protein P2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xing; Chen, Lin; Yang, Yingdong; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Yu; Lai, Weimin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2015-12-01

    The larval stage of Taenia multiceps, also known as coenurus, is the causative agent of coenurosis, which results in severe health problems in sheep, goats, cattle and other animals that negatively impact on animal husbandry. There is no reliable method to identify coenurus infected goats in the early period of infection. We identified a full-length cDNA that encodes acidic ribosomal protein P2 from the transcriptome of T. multiceps (TmP2). Following cloning, sequencing and structural analyses were performed using bioinformatics tools. Recombinant TmP2 (rTmP2) was prokaryotically expressed and then used to test immunoreactivity and immunogenicity in immunoblotting assays. The native proteins in adult stage and coenurus were located via immunofluorescence assays, while the potential of rTmP2 for indirect ELISA-based serodiagnostics was assessed using native goat sera. In addition, 20 goats were randomly divided into a drug treatment group and a control group. Each goat was orally given mature, viable T. multiceps eggs. The drug treatment group was given 10% praziquantel by intramuscular injection 45 days post-infection (p.i), and all goats were screened for anti-TmP2 antibodies with the indirect ELISA method established here, once a week for 17 weeks p.i. The open reading frame (366 bp) of the target gene encodes a 12.62 kDa protein, which showed high homology to that from Taenia solium (93% identity) and lacked a signal peptide. Immunofluorescence staining showed that TmP2 was highly localized to the parenchymatous zone of both the adult parasite and the coenurus; besides, it was widely distributed in cystic wall of coenurus. Building on good immunogenic properties, rTmP2-based ELISA exhibited a sensitivity of 95.0% (19/20) and a specificity of 96.3% (26/27) in detecting anti-P2 antibodies in the sera of naturally infected goats and sheep. In goats experimentally infected with T. multiceps, anti-TmP2 antibody was detectable in the control group from 3 to 10 weeks

  16. Oral lichen planus may enhance the expression of Th17-associated cytokines in local lesions of chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Han, Qi; Luo, Zhenhua; Xu, Caixia; Liu, Jiajia; Dan, Hongxia; Xu, Yi; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to compare the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 in local periodontal tissues from patients with both chronic periodontitis and oral lichen planus (CP-OLP), patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) only, patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) only, and healthy controls (HC). The periodontal tissues were collected from 15 CP-OLP patients, 15 CP patients, 15 OLP patients, and 10 healthy controls. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to investigate the protein and mRNA expression level of IL-17 and IL-23 in periodontal lesions from these four groups. IHC statistical analysis showed that the expression level of IL-17- and IL-23p19-positive cells significantly increased in CP-OLP group compared with that in CP (P < 0.01) and OLP groups (P < 0.05), showing intense staining reaction in local lamina propria lesions. Meanwhile, qPCR result showed higher IL-17 mRNA level in CP-OLP compared with that in CP and OLP groups and demonstrated a significant increase than OLP group (P < 0.05). Moreover, it was found that IL-17 mRNA expression level in erosive CP-OLP patients was significantly correlated with probing depth and attachment loss (P < 0.05). This study indicated that there was an increased expression level of IL-17 and IL-23 in periodontal tissues from periodontitis patients with oral lichen planus, which might aggravate the inflammatory response in local lesions. Oral lichen planus and chronic periodontitis may have interaction in disease pathogenesis, while IL-17 detection in local lesions may be helpful in identifying the disease severity in periodontitis patients with oral lichen planus.

  17. Abnormal TNF-alpha production in diabetes-prone BB rats: enhanced TNF-alpha expression and defective PGE2 feedback inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, H; Ongören, C; Martin, S; Rösen, P; Kolb, H

    1994-01-01

    Upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peritoneal macrophages from diabetes-prone Bio-Breeding (BB) rats secrete more tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) than macrophages from diabetes-resistant BB or normal Wistar rats. Enhanced transcription was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis and at the single cell level by mRNA: RNA hybridization. Cytofluorometry analysis showed 2-4 times more plasma membrane and total cell-associated TNF-alpha in macrophages of diabetes-prone BB rats. The analysis of fluorescence intensity showed a single peak, and TNF-alpha mRNA was found in > 90% of macrophages. These findings exclude TNF hypersecretion as being due to an abnormal subfraction of cells. TNF-alpha gene hyperexpression in diabetes-prone BB rats was not due to mutations in the regulatory regions of the promoter, which could be shown by cloning and sequencing of the TNF-alpha promoter in the three rat strains. When searching for other regulatory defects we found the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in response to LPS to be up to 10 times lower in macrophages from diabetes-prone BB rats than from Wistar rats. Furthermore, BB rats macrophages required significantly higher concentrations of PGE2 for suppression of TNF-alpha secretion. We conclude that abnormal TNF-alpha production in macrophages from diabetes-prone BB rats is due to enhanced gene transcription and translation and that this is associated with defective PGE2 feedback inhibition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8206514

  18. [Tissue localization and expression difference of endogenous beta-glucosidase in digestive system of Musca domestica third instar larvae].

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Zhang, Shu; Wu, Jian-Wei; Guo, Guo; Fu, Ping

    2013-08-01

    To study the tissue localization and expression difference of endogenous beta-glucosidase in digestive system of Musca domestica third instar larvae. The digestive system of the 3rd instar larvae of Musca domestic was taken for the below tests. Tissue localization of endogenous beta-glucosidase mRNA was identified by in situ hybridization. Cellulase was localized by immunohistochemistry. The enzymatic activity of beta-glucosidase was measured by 3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid(DNS) assay. The relative mRNA expression levels of M. domestica beta-glucosidase gene in these organs were determined by RT-PCR. Beta-glucosidase mRNA, with in situ hybridization, was shown in the epithelial cells of midgut, salivary glands and foregut of the larvae. The immunohistochemical analysis on larvae tissues revealed that cellulase was produced and secreted by the epithelial cells of the midgut, salivary glands and foregut. beta-glucosidase activity in salivary glands, foregut, midgut, and hindgut was (0.80 +/- 0.06), (0.38 +/- 0.02), (1.20 +/- 0.05) and (0.26 +/- 0.02) IU/mg, respectively. There was significant difference in beta-glucosidase activity among these digestive organs (P < 0.05). The activity level of beta-glucosidase was highest in midgut [(45.45 +/- 1.27)%], and lowest in hindgut [(9.85 +/- 0.88)%]. However, beta-glucosidase gene were only expressed in the salivary gland, foregut and midgut. Significant differences in gene expression level of beta-glucosidase was found among these organs (P < 0.05). The relative expression quantity of beta-glucosidase gene in midgut and salivary glands were 5 and 3 times higher than that in foregut. The endogenous beta-glucosidase gene is expressed in the foregut, midgut and salivary glands. The midgut and salivary glands of Musca domestica 3rd instar larvae are the primary organs of this enzyme secretion.

  19. Differential expression of the intermediate filament protein nestin during renal development and its localization in adult podocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Boyle, Scott; Zhao, Min; Su, Wei; Takahashi, Keiko; Davis, Linda; Decaestecker, Mark; Takahashi, Takamune; Breyer, Matthew D; Hao, Chuan-Ming

    2006-05-01

    Nestin, an intermediate filament protein, is widely used as stem cell marker. Nestin has been shown to interact with other cytoskeleton proteins, suggesting a role in regulating cellular cytoskeletal structure. These studies examined renal nestin localization and developmental expression in mice. In developing kidney, anti-nestin antibody revealed strong immunoreactivity in vascular cleft of the S-shaped body and vascular tuft of capillary loop-stage glomerulus. The nestin-positive structures also were labeled by endothelial cell markers FLK1 and CD31 in immature glomeruli. Nestin was not detected in epithelial cells of immature glomeruli. In contrast, in mature glomerular, nestin immunoreactivity was observed only outside laminin-positive glomerular basement membrane, and co-localized with nephrin, consistent with podocyte nestin expression. In adult kidney, podocytes were the only cells that exhibited persistent nestin expression. Nestin was not detected in ureteric bud and its derivatives throughout renal development. Cell lineage studies, using a nestin promoter-driven Cre mouse and a ROSA26 reporter mouse, showed a strong beta-galactosidase activity in intermediate mesoderm in an embryonic day 10 embryo and all of the structures except those that were derived from ureteric bud in embryonic kidney through adult kidney. These studies show that nestin is expressed in progenitors of glomerular endothelial cells and renal progenitors that are derived from metanephric mesenchyme. In the adult kidney, nestin expression is restricted to differentiated podocytes, suggesting that nestin could play an important role in maintaining the structural integrity of the podocytes.

  20. Molecular cloning, expression analysis and transcript localization of testicular orphan nuclear receptor 2 in the male catfish, Clarias batrachus.

    PubMed

    Murugananthkumar, R; Akhila, M V; Rajakumar, A; Mamta, S K; Sudhakumari, C C; Senthilkumaran, B

    2016-12-01

    Testicular receptor 2 (TR2; also known as Nr2c1) is one of the first orphan nuclear receptors identified and known to regulate various physiological process with or without any ligand. In this study, we report the cloning of full length nr2c1 and its expression analysis during gonadal development, seasonal testicular cycle and after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) induction. In addition, in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed to localize nr2c1 transcripts in adult testis and whole catfish (1day post hatch). Tissue distribution and gonadal ontogeny studies revealed high expression of nr2c1 in developing and adult testis. Early embryonic stage-wise expression of nr2c1 seems to emphasize its importance in cellular differentiation and development. Substantial expression of nr2c1 during pre-spawning phase and localization of nr2c1 transcripts in sperm/spermatids were observed. Significant upregulation after hCG induction indicate that nr2c1 is under the regulation of gonadotropins. Whole mount ISH analysis displayed nr2c1 expression in notochord indicating its role in normal vertebrate development. Taken together, our findings suggest that nr2c1 may have a plausible role in the testicular and embryonic development of catfish. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. T cell infiltration into Ewing sarcomas is associated with local expression of immune-inhibitory HLA-G.

    PubMed

    Spurny, Christian; Kailayangiri, Sareetha; Altvater, Bianca; Jamitzky, Silke; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Wardelmann, Eva; Ranft, Andreas; Dirksen, Uta; Amler, Susanne; Hardes, Jendrik; Fluegge, Maike; Meltzer, Jutta; Farwick, Nicole; Greune, Lea; Rossig, Claudia

    2018-01-19

    Ewing sarcoma (EwS) is an aggressive mesenchymal cancer of bones or soft tissues. The mechanisms by which this cancer interacts with the host immune system to induce tolerance are not well understood. We hypothesized that the non-classical, immune-inhibitory HLA-molecule HLA-G contributes to immune escape of EwS. While HLA-G pos suppressor T cells were not increased in the peripheral blood of EwS patients, HLA-G was locally expressed on the tumor cells and/or on infiltrating lymphocytes in 16 of 47 pretherapeutic tumor biopsies and in 4 of 12 relapse tumors. HLA-G expression was not associated with risk-related patient variables or response to standard chemotherapy, but with significantly increased numbers of tumor-infiltrating CD3+ T cells compared to HLA-G neg EwS biopsies. In a mouse model, EwS xenografts after adoptive therapy with tumor antigen-specific CAR T cells strongly expressed HLA-G whereas untreated control tumors were HLA-G neg . IFN-γ stimulation of EwS cell lines in vitro induced expression of HLA-G protein. We conclude that EwS cells respond to tumor-infiltrating T cells by upregulation of HLA-G, a candidate mediator of local immune escape. Strategies that modulate HLA-G expression in the tumor microenvironment may enhance the efficacy of cellular immunotherapeutics in this cancer.

  2. Systematic Localization and Identification of SUMOylation Substrates in Knock-In Mice Expressing Affinity-Tagged SUMO1.

    PubMed

    Tirard, Marilyn; Brose, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Protein SUMOylation is a posttranslational protein modification that is emerging as a key regulatory process in neurobiology. To date, however, SUMOylation in vivo has only been studied cursorily. Knock-in mice expressing His6-HA-SUMO1 from the Sumo1 locus allow for the highly specific localization and identification of endogenous SUMO1 substrates under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. By making use of the HA-tag and using wild-type mice for highly stringent negative control samples, SUMO1 targets can be specifically localized in and purified from cultured mouse nerve cells and mouse tissues.

  3. Ovariectomy modify local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system gene expressions in the heart of ApoE (-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Borges, Celina Carvalho; Penna-de-Carvalho, Aline; Medeiros Junior, Jorge L; Aguila, Marcia Barbosa; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos A

    2017-12-15

    The evaluation of the local Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone system (RAAS) gene expressions in the heart of ovariectomized (OVX) apolipoprotein E deficient mice (ApoE). Four-months old C57BL/6 female mice (wild-type, wt, n=20), and ApoE female mice (n=20), were submitted to OVX or a surgical procedure without ovary removal (SHAM) and formed four groups (n=10/group): SHAM/wt, SHAM/ApoE, OVX/wt, and OVX/ApoE. OVX led to greater body mass, plasma triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol, and resulted in insulin resistance and altered RAAS gene expressions in the heart tissue. The gene expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-2 was lower in OVX/wt than in SHAM/wt (P=0.0004), Mas receptor (MASr) was lower in OVX/wt compared to SHAM/wt (P<0.0001). Also, angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1r) was higher in OVX/wt than in SHAM/wt (P=0.0229), and AT2r was lower in OVX/wt than in SHAM/wt (P=0.0121). OVX and ApoE deficiency showed interaction potentializing the insulin resistance, increasing TG levels and altering ACE and MASr gene expressions. ACE gene expression was higher in OVX/ApoE than in OVX/wt (P<0.0001), and MASr gene expression was lower in OVX/ApoE than in OVX/wt (P<0.0001). The impact of OVX on local RAAS cascade in the heart of ApoE deficient animals, besides the metabolic changes culminating with insulin resistance, involves an upregulation of renin, ACE, and AT1r gene expressions. The findings may contribute to clarify the mechanisms of development of postmenopausal hypertension and the link between RAAS and apolipoprotein E. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression and Localization of CLC Chloride Transport Proteins in the Avian Retina

    PubMed Central

    McMains, Emily; Krishnan, Vijai; Prasad, Sujitha; Gleason, Evanna

    2011-01-01

    Members of the ubiquitously expressed CLC protein family of chloride channels and transporters play important roles in regulating cellular chloride and pH. The CLCs that function as Cl−/H+ antiporters, ClCs 3–7, are essential in particular for the acidification of endosomal compartments and protein degradation. These proteins are broadly expressed in the nervous system, and mutations that disrupt their expression are responsible for several human genetic diseases. Furthermore, knock-out of ClC3 and ClC7 in the mouse result in the degeneration of the hippocampus and the retina. Despite this evidence of their importance in retinal function, the expression patterns of different CLC transporters in different retinal cell types are as yet undescribed. Previous work in our lab has shown that in chicken amacrine cells, internal Cl− can be dynamic. To determine whether CLCs have the potential to participate, we used PCR and immunohistochemical techniques to examine CLC transporter expression in the chicken retina. We observed a high level of variation in the retinal expression levels and patterns among the different CLC proteins examined. These findings, which represent the first systematic investigation of CLC transporter expression in the retina, support diverse functions for the different CLCs in this tissue. PMID:21408174

  5. Exact expression of the t-J model in terms of local spin and fermionic holon operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. R.; Rice, M. J.

    1994-02-01

    An exact expression for the Hamiltonian H of the t-J model in terms of local spin (Si) and fermionic holon (ei) operators is derived which requires no constraint between these operators. The result for the Hamiltonian H is H=-t tsumijeie°j(1/2+2Si.Sj)+(J/2)t smij(1-e°iei)(Si.Sj-1/4)(1-e°je The number of electrons at site i is given by ni=1-e°iei, and the true spin operator S~i, is related to the local spin operator by S~i=(1-e°iei)Si. The expression correctly produces the Nagaoka theorem in the limit J-->0, and preserves the time-reversal symmetry of the original model. For a bipartite lattice, H describes a competition between ferromagnetism, favored by the hopping term, and antiferromagnetism, favored by the Heisenberg term.

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in locally advanced prostate cancer: secondary analysis of radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) 8610.

    PubMed

    Pan, Larry; Baek, Seunghee; Edmonds, Pamela R; Roach, Mack; Wolkov, Harvey; Shah, Satish; Pollack, Alan; Hammond, M Elizabeth; Dicker, Adam P

    2013-04-25

    Angiogenesis is a key element in solid-tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. VEGF is among the most potent angiogenic factor thus far detected. The aim of the present study is to explore the potential of VEGF (also known as VEGF-A) as a prognostic and predictive biomarker among men with locally advanced prostate cancer. The analysis was performed using patients enrolled on RTOG 8610, a phase III randomized control trial of radiation therapy alone (Arm 1) versus short-term neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation and radiation therapy (Arm 2) in men with locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Tissue samples were obtained from the RTOG tissue repository. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were reviewed, and paraffin blocks were immunohistochemically stained for VEGF expression and graded by Intensity score (0-3). Cox or Fine and Gray's proportional hazards models were used. Sufficient pathologic material was available from 103 (23%) of the 456 analyzable patients enrolled in the RTOG 8610 study. There were no statistically significant differences in the pre-treatment characteristics between the patient groups with and without VEGF intensity data. Median follow-up for all surviving patients with VEGF intensity data is 12.2 years. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated no statistically significant correlation between the intensity of VEGF expression and overall survival, distant metastasis, local progression, disease-free survival, or biochemical failure. VEGF expression was also not statistically significantly associated with any of the endpoints when analyzed by treatment arm. This study revealed no statistically significant prognostic or predictive value of VEGF expression for locally advanced prostate cancer. This analysis is among one of the largest sample bases with long-term follow-up in a well-characterized patient population. There is an urgent need to establish multidisciplinary initiatives for coordinating further research in the area of human

  7. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  8. Cloning, expression and nuclear localization of human NPM3, a member of the nucleophosmin/nucleoplasmin family of nuclear chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Shackleford, Gregory M; Ganguly, Amit; MacArthur, Craig A

    2001-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that the related proteins nucleoplasmin and nucleophosmin (also called B23, NO38 or numatrin) are nuclear chaperones that mediate the assembly of nucleosomes and ribosomes, respectively, and that these activities are accomplished through the binding of basic proteins via their acidic domains. Recently discovered and less well characterized members of this family of acidic phosphoproteins include mouse nucleophosmin/nucleoplasmin 3 (Npm3) and Xenopus NO29. Here we report the cloning and initial characterization of the human ortholog of Npm3. Results Human genomic and cDNA clones of NPM3 were isolated and sequenced. NPM3 lies 5.5 kb upstream of FGF8 and thus maps to chromosome 10q24-26. In addition to amino acid similarities, NPM3 shares many physical characteristics with the nucleophosmin/nucleoplasmin family, including an acidic domain, multiple potential phosphorylation sites and a putative nuclear localization signal. Comparative analyses of 14 members of this family from various metazoans suggest that Xenopus NO29 is a candidate ortholog of human and mouse NPM3, and they further group both proteins closer with the nucleoplasmins than with the nucleophosmins. Northern blot analysis revealed that NPM3 was strongly expressed in all 16 human tissues examined, with especially robust expression in pancreas and testis; lung displayed the lowest level of expression. An analysis of subcellular fractions of NIH3T3 cells expressing epitope-tagged NPM3 revealed that NPM3 protein was localized solely in the nucleus. Conclusions Human NPM3 is an abundant and widely expressed protein with primarily nuclear localization. These biological activities, together with its physical relationship to the chaparones nucleoplasmin and nucleophosmin, are consistent with the proposed function of NPM3 as a molecular chaperone functioning in the nucleus. PMID:11722795

  9. Local binary pattern variants-based adaptive texture features analysis for posed and nonposed facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Maryam; Bhatti, Naeem; Javed, Sajid; Jung, Soon Ki

    2017-09-01

    Facial expression recognition (FER) is an important task for various computer vision applications. The task becomes challenging when it requires the detection and encoding of macro- and micropatterns of facial expressions. We present a two-stage texture feature extraction framework based on the local binary pattern (LBP) variants and evaluate its significance in recognizing posed and nonposed facial expressions. We focus on the parametric limitations of the LBP variants and investigate their effects for optimal FER. The size of the local neighborhood is an important parameter of the LBP technique for its extraction in images. To make the LBP adaptive, we exploit the granulometric information of the facial images to find the local neighborhood size for the extraction of center-symmetric LBP (CS-LBP) features. Our two-stage texture representations consist of an LBP variant and the adaptive CS-LBP features. Among the presented two-stage texture feature extractions, the binarized statistical image features and adaptive CS-LBP features were found showing high FER rates. Evaluation of the adaptive texture features shows competitive and higher performance than the nonadaptive features and other state-of-the-art approaches, respectively.

  10. Analyses of expression and localization of two mammalian-type transglutaminases in Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mold.

    PubMed

    Wada, Fumitaka; Ogawa, Atsuko; Hanai, Yuko; Nakamura, Akio; Maki, Masatoshi; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2004-11-01

    Transglutaminase (TGase) is an enzyme that modifies proteins by crosslinking or polyamination. Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mold, is the evolutionally lowest organism that has a mammalian-type transglutaminase. We have cloned a cDNA for Physarum polycephalum TGase (PpTGB), homologous to a previously identified TGase (PpTGA), whose sequence is similar to that of mammalian TGases. PpTGB encodes a primary sequence identical to that of PpTGA except for 11 amino acid residues at the N-terminus. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting analyses showed that both PpTGA and PpTGB are expressed in microplasmodia and macroplasmodia during their life cycle, except for in sporangia. For biochemical characterization, we carried out the ectopical expressions of PpTGA and PpTGB in Dictyostelium discoideum. Subcellular fractionation of these Dictyostelium cells showed that the expressed PpTGA, but not PpTGB, localizes to the membrane fraction. Furthermore, in Physarum, subcellular fractionation and immunostaining indicated specific localization at the plasma membrane in macroplasmodia, while the localization was entirely cytoplasmic in microplasmodia.

  11. Localization of PPARdelta in murine central nervous system: expression in oligodendrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Woods, John W; Tanen, Michael; Figueroa, David J; Biswas, Chhabi; Zycband, Emanuel; Moller, David E; Austin, Christopher P; Berger, Joel P

    2003-06-13

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), PPARdelta, PPARgamma and PPARalpha, comprise a subclass of the supergene family of nuclear receptors. As such they are ligand-regulated transcription factors whose major effects are mediated by altering expression of target genes. PPARdelta has been shown to be ubiquitously expressed in mammals. However, its primary biological role(s) has yet to be defined. Several recent studies have demonstrated that PPARdelta is the most highly expressed PPAR isoform in the central nervous system, but ambiguity still exists as to the specific brain sub-regions and cells in which it is expressed. Here, utilizing novel, isoform-selective PPARdelta riboprobes and an anti-peptide antibody, we performed a series of in situ hybridization and immunolocalization studies to determine the distribution of PPARdelta in the central nervous system (CNS) of mice. We found that PPARdelta mRNA and protein is expressed throughout the brain, with particularly high levels in the entorhinal cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus, and lower levels in the corpus callosum and caudate putamen. At the cellular level, PPARdelta mRNA and protein were found to be expressed in oligodendrocytes and neurons but not astrocytes. Such results suggest a role for PPARdelta in both myelination and neuronal functioning within the CNS.

  12. Exploring local immunological adaptation of two stickleback ecotypes by experimental infection and transcriptome-wide digital gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Tobias L; Eizaguirre, Christophe; Rotter, Björn; Kalbe, Martin; Milinski, Manfred

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the extent of local adaptation in natural populations and the mechanisms that allow individuals to adapt to their native environment is a major avenue in molecular ecology research. Evidence for the frequent occurrence of diverging ecotypes in species that inhabit multiple ecological habitats is accumulating, but experimental approaches to understanding the biological pathways as well as the underlying genetic mechanisms are still rare. Parasites are invoked as one of the major selective forces driving evolution and are themselves dependent on the ecological conditions in a given habitat. Immunological adaptation to local parasite communities is therefore expected to be a key component of local adaptation in natural populations. Here, we use next-generation sequencing technology to compare the transcriptome-wide response of experimentally infected three-spined sticklebacks from a lake and a river population, which are known to evolve under selection by distinct parasite communities. By comparing overall gene expression levels as well as the activation of functional pathways in response to parasite exposure, we identified potential differences between the two stickleback populations at several levels. Our results suggest locally adapted patterns of gene regulation in response to parasite exposure, which may reflect different local optima in the trade-off between the benefits and the disadvantages of mounting an immune response because of quantitative differences of the local parasite communities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Integration of co-localized glandular morphometry and protein biomarker expression in immunofluorescent images for prostate cancer prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Richard; Khan, Faisal M.; Zeineh, Jack; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2015-03-01

    Immunofluorescent (IF) image analysis of tissue pathology has proven to be extremely valuable and robust in developing prognostic assessments of disease, particularly in prostate cancer. There have been significant advances in the literature in quantitative biomarker expression as well as characterization of glandular architectures in discrete gland rings. However, while biomarker and glandular morphometric features have been combined as separate predictors in multivariate models, there is a lack of integrative features for biomarkers co-localized within specific morphological sub-types; for example the evaluation of androgen receptor (AR) expression within Gleason 3 glands only. In this work we propose a novel framework employing multiple techniques to generate integrated metrics of morphology and biomarker expression. We demonstrate the utility of the approaches in predicting clinical disease progression in images from 326 prostate biopsies and 373 prostatectomies. Our proposed integrative approaches yield significant improvements over existing IF image feature metrics. This work presents some of the first algorithms for generating innovative characteristics in tissue diagnostics that integrate co-localized morphometry and protein biomarker expression.

  14. In silico cloning, expression of Rieske-like apoprotein gene and protein subcellular localization in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaocui; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2010-10-01

    Rieske protein gene in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was obtained by in silico cloning for the first time, and its expression profiles and subcellular localization were determined, respectively. The full-length cDNA of Cgisp is 985 bp in length and contains a 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions of 35 and 161 bp, respectively, with an open reading frame of 786 bp encoding a protein of 262 amino acids. The predicted molecular weight of 30 kDa of Cgisp protein was verified by prokaryotic expression. Conserved Rieske [2Fe-2S] cluster binding sites and highly matched-pair tertiary structure with 3CWB_E (Gallus gallus) were revealed by homologous analysis and molecular modeling. Eleven putative SNP sites and two conserved hexapeptide sequences, box I (THLGC) and II (PCHGS), were detected by multiple alignments. Real-time PCR analysis showed that Cgisp is expressed in a wide range of tissues, with adductor muscle exhibiting the top expression level, suggesting its biological function of energy transduction. The GFP tagging Cgisp indicated a mitochondrial localization, further confirming its physiological function.

  15. Local expression of interferon-alpha and interferon receptors in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Tirone, Nelson R; Peghini, Bethanea C; Barcelos, Ana Cristina M; Murta, Eddie F C; Michelin, Marcia A

    2009-12-01

    The present study evaluated mRNA expression of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), IFN-alpha receptor subunits (IFNAR-1 and IFNAR-2) and an IFN-stimulated gene encoding the enzyme 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2'5'OAS) in biopsies on patients with varying grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN I, II and III). Uterine cervix biopsies were collected from women with CIN I, II and III (n = 28) and controls without CIN lesions or human papilloma virus (HPV) infection (n = 17). The presence of high and low-risk HPV DNA was determined using hybrid capture. The mRNA levels of IFNAR-1, IFNAR-2, IFN-alpha and 2'5'OAS were determined by RT-PCR with specific primers. The control group exhibited a greater frequency of IFNAR-1 expression (10/17; 58.3%) than the CIN samples (4/28; 14.2%) (P = 0.0018), while, the expression of IFNAR-2 was also greater in the control samples (11/17; 64.7%) than in the patients with lesions (2/28; 7.1%) (P = 0.0018). Importantly, simultaneous expression of both receptors was observed only in the control group (8/17; 47.0%) (P = 0.0001). Among the CIN samples, there was one case of low expression of mRNA of IFNAR-1 and IFNAR-2. IFN-alpha was present in 14.2% (4/28) of the CIN samples but was not expressed in the control group. mRNA 2'5'OAS were expressed in 28.5% (8/28) of the CIN samples and 11.7% (2/17) of the control samples (not statistically significant). Fifty percent (14/28) of the CIN samples were positive for HPV DNA. Cervical biopsy samples from control women or those without neoplasia or HPV infection displayed higher IFN-alpha receptor expression than those with CIN, while simultaneous expression of both IFN-alpha receptor subunits was found only in the control group. There was no significant difference in mRNA expression of IFN-alpha and 2'5'OAS between the control and CIN groups. Then we concluded that the samples obtained from patients with CIN present low levels of the IFN-alpha receptor mRNA.

  16. Localization and expression of Orexin A and its receptor in mouse testis during different stages of postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deepanshu; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2017-01-15

    Orexin A (OXA), a hypothalamic neuropeptide, is involved in regulation of various biological functions and its actions are mediated through G-protein-coupled receptor, OX1R. This neuropeptide has emerged as a central neuroendocrine modulator of reproductive functions. Both OXA and OX1R have been shown to be expressed in peripheral organs such as gastrointestinal and genital tracts. In the present study, localization and expression of OXA and OX1R in mouse testis during different stages of postnatal development have been investigated. Immunohistochemical results demonstrated localization of OXA and OX1R in both the interstitial and the tubular compartments of the testis throughout the period of postnatal development. In testicular sections on 0day postpartum (dpp), gonocytes, Sertoli cells and foetal Leydig cells showed OXA and OX1R-immunopositive signals. At 10dpp, Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, early spermatocytes and Leydig cells showed immunopositive signals for both, the ligand and the receptor. On 30 and 90dpp, the spermatogonia, Sertoli cells, spermatocytes, spermatids and Leydig cells showed the OXA and OX1R-immunopositive signals. At 90dpp, strong OXA-positive signals were seen in Leydig cells, primary spermatocytes and spermatogonia, while OX1R-immunopositive intense signals were observed in Leydig cells and elongated spermatids. Further, semiquantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses showed that OXA and OX1R were expressed in the testis both at transcript and protein levels during different stages of postnatal development. The expression of OXA and OX1R increased progressively from day of birth (0dpp) until adulthood (90dpp), with maximal expression at 90 dpp. The results suggest that OXA and OX1R are expressed in the testis and that they may help in proliferation and development of germ cells, Leydig cells and Sertoli cells, and in the spermatogenic process and steroidogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clotrimazole ameliorates intestinal inflammation and abnormal angiogenesis by inhibiting interleukin-8 expression through a nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Dinesh; Lee, Jong Suk; Park, Su-Young; Bae, Yun-Hee; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Kwon, Jun Bum; Kim, Kyoung-Jin; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Park, Young-Joon; Choi, Han Gon; Kim, Jung-Ae

    2008-11-01

    Increased interleukin (IL)-8 plays an important role not only in activation and recruitment of neutrophils but also in inducing exaggerated angiogenesis at the inflamed site. In the present study, we investigated the fact that clotrimazole (CLT) inhibits intestinal inflammation, and the inhibitory action is mediated through suppression of IL-8 expression. In the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat colitis model, CLT dose-dependently protected from the TNBS-induced weight loss, colon ulceration, and myeloperoxidase activity increase. In the lesion site, CLT also suppressed the TNBS-induced angiogenesis, IL-8 expression, and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation. In a cellular model of colitis using tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-stimulated HT29 colon epithelial cells, treatment with CLT significantly suppressed TNF-alpha-mediated IL-8 induction and NF-kappaB transcriptional activity revealed by a luciferase reporter gene assay. Furthermore, cotreatment with CLT and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a NF-kappaB inhibitor, synergistically reduced the NF-kappaB transcriptional activity as well as IL-8 expression. In an in vitro angiogenesis assay, CLT suppressed IL-8-induced proliferation, tube formation, and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The in vivo angiogenesis assay using chick chorioallantoic membrane also showed that CLT significantly inhibited the IL-8-induced formation of new blood vessels. Taken together, these results suggest that CLT may prevent the progression of intestinal inflammation by not only down-regulating IL-8 expression but also inhibiting the action of IL-8 in both colon epithelial and vascular endothelial cells during pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation.

  18. Fgf8 expression in the Tbx1 domain causes skeletal abnormalities and modifies the aortic arch but not the outflow tract phenotype of Tbx1 mutants

    PubMed Central

    Vitelli, Francesca; Zhang, Zhen; Huynh, Tuong; Sobotka, Angela; Mupo, Annalisa; Baldini, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Fgf8 and Tbx1 have been shown to interact in patterning the aortic arch, and both genes are required in formation and growth of the outflow tract of the heart. However, the nature of the interaction of the two genes is unclear. We have utilized a novel Tbx1Fgf8 allele which drives Fgf8 expression in Tbx1-positive cells and an inducible Cre-LoxP recombination system to address the role of Fgf8 in Tbx1 positive cells in modulating cardiovascular development. Results support a requirement of Fgf8 in Tbx1 expressing cells to finely control patterning of the aortic arch and great arteries specifically during the pharyngeal arch artery remodeling process and indicate that the endoderm is the most likely site of this interaction. Furthermore, our data suggest that Fgf8 and Tbx1 play independent roles in regulating outflow tract development. This finding is clinically relevant since TBX1 is the candidate for DGS/VCFS, characterized clinically by variable expressivity and reduced penetrance of cardiovascular defects; Fgf8 gene variants may provide molecular clues to this variability. PMID:16696966

  19. Expression and localization of cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3) in the prepubertal and postpubertal male horse.

    PubMed

    Fedorka, C E; Scoggin, K E; Squires, E L; Ball, B A; Troedsson, M H T

    2017-01-01

    The seminal plasma protein, cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3), has been correlated with increased fertility and first-cycle conception rates, and has been suggested to be involved in the modulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophil and phagocytosis of spermatozoa during the inflammatory response to breeding in the horse. Previous research demonstrated that equine CRISP-3 is located in both the ampulla of the vas deferens and the seminal vesicles. However, this was done with nonquantitative laboratory techniques. In humans and rodents, CRISP-3 has been described as an androgen-dependent protein, but the effect of androgens on the expression of CRISP-3 has not been investigated in the horse. The objectives of this study were to (a) confirm and quantify the expression of CRISP-3 in the male equine reproductive tract, (b) describe the localization of CRISP-3 within the specific tissues which express it, and (c) determine if expression of CRISP-3 increases after puberty. We hypothesized that expression of CRISP-3 would be expressed in both the ampulla of the vas deferens and the seminal vesicles, and expression would increase after puberty. Tissues were collected postmortem from three prepubertal colts (<6 months) and six postpubertal stallions (>3 years). Tissue samples were collected from the ampulla of vas deferens, seminal vesicles, bulbourethral gland, prostate gland, testis, as well as the cauda, corpus, and caput aspects of the epididymis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed using an equine-specific CRISP-3 designed primer and monocolonal antibody. A mixed linear additive model was used to compare mRNA expression between age groups, and significance was set to P < 0.05. There was a significant interaction between maturity and tissue type (P < 0.0001). Expression of CRISP-3 mRNA was found primarily in the ampulla of vas deferens with lesser expression in the seminal vesicles. Expression of

  20. Global gene expression profiles in brain regions reflecting abnormal neuronal and glial functions targeting myelin sheaths after 28-day exposure to cuprizone in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hajime

    Both developmental and postpubertal cuprizone (CPZ) exposure impairs hippocampal neurogenesis in rats. We previously found that developmental CPZ exposure alters the expression of genes related to neurogenesis, myelination, and synaptic transmission in specific brain regions of offspring. Here, we examined neuronal and glial toxicity profiles in response to postpubertal CPZ exposure by using expression microarray analysis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, corpus callosum, cerebral cortex, and cerebellar vermis of 5-week-old male rats exposed to 0, 120, and 600 mg/kg CPZ for 28 days. Genes showing transcript upregulation were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis. We found transcript expression alterations at 600 mg/kgmore » for genes related to synaptic transmission, Ache and Prima1, and cell cycle regulation, Tfap4 and Cdkn1a, in the dentate gyrus, which showed aberrant neurogenesis in the subgranular zone. This dose downregulated myelination-related genes in multiple brain regions, whereas KLOTHO{sup +} oligodendrocyte density was decreased only in the corpus callosum. The corpus callosum showed an increase in transcript levels for inflammatory response-related genes and in the number of CD68{sup +} microglia, MT{sup +} astrocytes, and TUNEL{sup +} apoptotic cells. These results suggest that postpubertal CPZ exposure targets synaptic transmission and cell cycle regulation to affect neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. CPZ suppressed myelination in multiple brain regions and KLOTHO-mediated oligodendrocyte maturation only in the corpus callosum. The increased number of CD68{sup +} microglia, MT{sup +} astrocytes, and TUNEL{sup +} apoptotic cells in the corpus callosum may be involved in the induction of KLOTHO{sup +} oligodendrocyte death and be a protective mechanism against myelin damage following CPZ exposure. - Highlights: • Target gene expression profiles were examined in rats after 28-day CPZ exposure. • Multiple brain region-specific global gene

  1. Estradiol increases urethral tone through the local inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Gamé, Xavier; Allard, Julien; Escourrou, Ghislaine; Gourdy, Pierre; Tack, Ivan; Rischmann, Pascal; Arnal, Jean-François; Malavaud, Bernard

    2008-03-01

    Estrogens are known to modulate lower urinary tract (LUT) trophicity and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression in several organs. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of endogenous and supraestrus levels of 17beta-estradiol (E2) on LUT and urethral nNOS expression and function. LUT function and histology and urethral nNOS expression were studied in adult female mice subjected either to sham surgery, surgical castration, or castration plus chronic E2 supplementation (80 microg.kg(-1).day(-1), i.e., pregnancy level). The micturition pattern was profoundly altered by long-term supraestrus levels of E2 with decreased frequency paralleled by increased residual volumes higher than those of ovariectomized mice. Urethral resistance was increased twofold in E2-treated mice, with no structural changes in urethra, supporting a pure tonic mechanism. Acute nNOS inhibition by 7-nitroindazole decreased frequency and increased residual volumes in ovariectomized mice but had no additive effect on the micturition pattern of long-term supraestrus mice, showing that long-term supraestrus E2 levels and acute inhibition of nNOS activity had similar functional effects. Finally, E2 decreased urethral nNOS expression in ovariectomized mice. Long-term supraestrus levels of E2 increased urethral tone through inhibition of nNOS expression, whereas physiological levels of E2 had no effect.

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 ofmore » 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.« less

  3. Expression and localization of c-ros oncogene along the human excurrent duct.

    PubMed

    Légaré, Christine; Sullivan, Robert

    2004-09-01

    Compared to other animals, the anatomy of the human epididymis appears unusual. The caput epididymis is composed mostly of efferent ducts with an undefined initial segment. The present study investigates the regionalization of c-ros in human epididymis by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry studies. C-ros gene encodes a receptor-type protein tyrosine kinase that is expressed in adult mice exclusively in the epithelial cells of the initial segment of the epididymis. Transgenic mice targeted for the c-ros gene lack the initial segment of the epididymis and are infertile. Real-time PCR analysis showed that c-ros mRNA is expressed all along the human epididymis with the exception of the proximal caput epididymidis, where c-ros transcript was undetectable. In situ hydridization revealed that c-ros transcript was strongly expressed by principal cells and to a lower level by basal cells. Immunohistochemical studies showed that c-ros protein distribution was similar to the transcript. These results showed that c-ros expression in the human epididymis differs from that in mice suggesting that the unusual morphology of the human epididymis may reflect species differences in gene expression along the excurrent duct.

  4. Over-expressed maltose transporters in laboratory and lager yeasts: localization and competition with endogenous transporters.

    PubMed

    Vidgren, Virve; Londesborough, John

    2018-05-31

    Plain and fluorescently tagged versions of Agt1, Mtt1 and Malx1 maltose transporters were over-expressed in two laboratory yeasts and one lager yeast. The plain and tagged versions of each transporter supported similar transport activities, indicating that they are similarly trafficked and have similar catalytic activities. When they were expressed under the control of the strong constitutive PGK1 promoter only minor proportions of the fluorescent transporters were associated with the plasma membrane, the rest being found in intracellular structures. Transport activity of each tagged transporter in each host was roughly proportional to the plasma membrane-associated fluorescence. All three transporters were subject to glucose-triggered inactivation when the medium glucose concentration was abruptly raised. Results also suggest competition between endogenous and over-expressed transporters for access to the plasma membrane. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of Local Cytokines in Increased Gastric Expression of the Secretory Component in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstedt, Ingela; Lindholm, Catharina; Lönroth, Hans; Hamlet, Annika; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical staining, we examined the presence of secretory component (SC) on epithelial cells in gastric and duodenal biopsy specimens collected from Helicobacter pylori-infected individuals and healthy controls. Gastric epithelial cells from healthy volunteers expressed low, but detectable, levels of SC. In contrast, significantly higher level of expression of SC (P < 0.001) was observed on epithelial cells in the antra of H. pylori-infected individuals. The antral SC expression correlated with staining for gamma interferon of intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes (rs = 0.76 and 0.69, respectively, P < 0.001) and correlated weakly with production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (rs = 0.43, P < 0.05), but it did not correlate at all with interleukin-4 production. PMID:10456951

  6. Genetic localization and phenotypic expression of X-linked cataract (Xcat) in Mus musculus.

    PubMed

    Favor, J; Pretsch, W

    1990-01-01

    Linkage data relative to the markers tabby and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are presented to locate X-linked cataract (Xcat) in the distal portion of the mouse X-chromosome between jimpy and hypophosphatemia. The human X-linked cataract-dental syndrome, Nance-Horan Syndrome, also maps closely to human hypophosphatemia and would suggest homology between mouse Xcat and human Nance-Horan Syndrome genes. In hemizygous males and homozygous females penetrance is complete with only slight variation in the degree of expression. Phenotypic expression in Xcat heterozygous females ranges from totally clear to totally opaque lenses. The phenotypic expression between the two lenses of a heterozygous individual could also vary between totally clear and totally opaque lenses. However, a correlation in the degree of expression between the eyes of an individual was observed. A variegated pattern of lens opacity was evident in female heterozygotes. Based on these observations, the site of gene action for the Xcat locus is suggested to be endogenous to the lens cells and the precursor cell population of the lens is concluded to be small. The identification of an X-linked cataract locus is an important contribution to the estimate of the number of mutable loci resulting in cataract, an estimate required so that dominant cataract mutagenesis results may be expressed on a per locus basis. The Xcat mutation may be a useful marker for a distal region of the mouse X-chromosome which is relatively sparsely marked and the X-linked cataract mutation may be employed in gene expression and lens development studies.

  7. Systemic distribution, subcellular localization and differential expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors in benign and malignant human tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyi; Mao, Jinghe; Redfield, Samantha; Mo, Yinyuan; Lage, Janice M; Zhou, Xinchun

    2014-10-01

    Five sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PR): S1PR1, S1PR2, S1PR3, S1PR4 and S1PR5 (S1PR1-5) have been shown to be involved in the proliferation and progression of various cancers. However, none of the S1PRs have been systemically investigated. In this study, we performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) for S1PR1-S1PR5 on different tissues, in order to simultaneously determine the systemic distribution, subcellular localization and expression level of all five S1PRs. We constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs) from 384 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks containing 183 benign and 201 malignant tissues from 34 human organs/systems. Then we performed IHC for all five S1PRs simultaneously on these TMA slides. The distribution, subcellular localization and expression of each S1PR were determined for each tissue. The data in benign and malignant tissues from the same organ/tissue were then compared using the Student's t-test. In order to reconfirm the subcellular localization of each S1PR as determined by IHC, immunocytochemistry (ICC) was performed on several malignant cell lines. We found that all five S1PRs are widely distributed in multiple human organs/systems. All S1PRs are expressed in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, except S1PR3, whose IHC signals are only seen in the nucleus. Interestingly, the S1PRs are rarely expressed on cellular membranes. Each S1PR is unique in its organ distribution, subcellular localization and expression level in benign and malignant tissues. Among the five S1PRs, S1PR5 has the highest expression level (in either the nucleus or cytoplasm), with S1PR1, 3, 2 and 4 following in descending order. Strong nuclear expression was seen for S1PR1, S1PR3 and S1PR5, whereas S1PR2 and S1PR4 show only weak staining. Four organs/tissues (adrenal gland, liver, brain and colon) show significant differences in IHC scores for the multiple S1PRs (nuclear and/or cytoplasmic), nine (stomach, lymphoid tissues, lung, ovary, cervix, pancreas, skin, soft

  8. Systemic distribution, subcellular localization and differential expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors in benign and malignant human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyi; Mao, Jinghe; Redfield, Samantha; Mo, Yinyuan; Lage, Janice M.; Zhou, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    Aims Five sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PR): S1PR1, S1PR2, S1PR3, S1PR4 and S1PR5 (S1PR1-5) have been shown to be involved in the proliferation and progression of various cancers. However, none of the S1PRs have been systemically investigated. In this study, we performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) for S1PR1-S1PR5 on different tissues, in order to simultaneously determine the systemic distribution, subcellular localization and expression level of all five S1PRs. Methods We constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs) from 384 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks containing 183 benign and 201 malignant tissues from 34 human organs/systems. Then we performed IHC for all five S1PRs simultaneously on these TMA slides. The distribution, subcellular localization and expression of each S1PR were determined for each tissue. The data were then compared in benign and malignant tissues from the same organ/tissue using the student t-test. In order to reconfirm the subcellular localization of each S1PR as determined by IHC, immunocytochemistry (ICC) was performed on several malignant cell lines. Results We found that all five S1PRs are widely distributed in multiple human organs/systems. All S1PRs are expressed in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, except S1PR3, whose IHC signals are only seen in the nucleus. Interestingly, the S1PRs are rarely expressed on cellular membranes. Each S1PR is unique in its organ distribution, subcellular localization and expression level in benign and malignant tissues. Among the five S1PRs, S1PR5 has the highest expression level (either in nucleus or cytoplasm), with S1PR1, 3, 2 and 4 following in descending order. Strong nuclear expression was seen for S1PR1, S1PR3 and S1PR5, whereas S1PR2 and S1PR4 show only weak staining. Four organs/tissues (adrenal gland, liver, brain and colon) show significant differences in IHC scores for the multiple S1PRs (nuclear and/or cytoplasmic), nine (stomach, lymphoid tissues, lung, ovary, cervix, pancreas

  9. Expression and localization of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β and its ligand pleiotrophin in the submandibular gland of mice.

    PubMed

    Adthapanyawanich, Kannika; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Nakata, Hiroki; Keattikunpairoj, Sunisa; Iseki, Shoichi

    2013-02-01

    The family of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ) is composed of 4 splice variants and thought to play roles in the neural migration and outgrowth. Several ligands including the growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN) bind to RPTPβ and inhibit its phosphatase activity, thereby activating cellular signalling pathways. We examined the expression and localization of RPTPβ and its ligands in the submandibular gland (SMG) of mice, which is known for a prominent sexual dimorphism in the duct system. The homogenates and tissue sections of male and female mouse SMG were analysed with RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. The short receptor type of RPTPβ (RPTPβ-S) was dominantly expressed in the SMG, and the male gland had significantly higher levels of RPTPβ-S expression than the female gland. In the male, RPTPβ-S was localized predominantly in intercalated duct (ID) cells, but was not found in granular convoluted tubule (GCT) cells or acinar cells. In the female, weaker reactivity was demonstrated in both ID and striated duct (SD) cells. Of the known ligands for RPTPβ, PTN was expressed in the SMG, without sexual difference in levels. In the male, PTN was localized in ID cells as well as in cells located in the distal ends of GCT that are in close vicinity to the ID, whereas in the female PTN was colocalized with RPTPβ-S throughout ID and SD cells. These results indicated that the distribution of RPTPβ-S and its ligand PTN has a close relation to the sexual dimorphism in the duct system of mouse SMG. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Abnormal expression of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor and inhibitory effect of its transcription intervention on nude mice xenograft tumor].

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Yan, X D; Cai, Y; Gu, J J; Yang, X L; Pan, L H; Wang, L; Yao, D F

    2016-11-20

    Objective: To investigate the expression of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) in liver cancer and the inhibitory effect of its transcription intervention on nude mice xenograft tumor. Methods: A total of 40 patients with primary liver cancer were enrolled, and 40 samples of cancer lesions, peri-cancerous tissues (with a distance of 2 cm to the margin of cancer lesion), or distal liver tissues (with a distance of 5 cm to the margin of cancer lesion), with a weight of 200 mg, were collected after surgery. Some of these samples were used for pathological examination, and the rest were stored at -85°C. A total of 18 BALB/c nude mice aged 4-6 weeks with a body weight of 18-20 g (9 male and 9 female mice) were randomly divided into control group, negative control group, and co-intervention group, with 6 mice in each group, and fed under specific pathogen-free conditions. The cell line was cultured in the dimethyl sulfoxide complete medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum in a CO 2 incubator at 37°C. When the cell confluence reached 90% after cell inoculation, shRNA was divided into co-intervention group, negative control group, and untreated control group and were transfected to hepatoma cells using PolyJetTM transfection reagent. Stable cell clones obtained by G418 screening and used for the in vivo study. Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time PCR were used to analyze the expression of IGF-IR in the human hepatoma tissue and cell line. The IGF-IR shRNA eukaryotic expression plasmids were established and screened for the most effective sequence; they were transfected to PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells, and the CCK-8 assay was used to analyze the changes in cell proliferation. The stable cell line screened out by G418 was inoculated to establish the subcutaneous xenograft tumor in nude mice. The tumor growth curve was plotted and histological examination was performed. Graphpad Prism 5.0 and SPSS 18.0 were used for plotting and data

  11. Localization and expression of putative circadian clock transcripts in the brain of the nudibranch Melibe leonina.

    PubMed

    Duback, Victoria E; Sabrina Pankey, M; Thomas, Rachel I; Huyck, Taylor L; Mbarani, Izhar M; Bernier, Kyle R; Cook, Geoffrey M; O'Dowd, Colleen A; Newcomb, James M; Watson, Winsor H

    2018-09-01

    The nudibranch, Melibe leonina, expresses a circadian rhythm of locomotion, and we recently determined the sequences of multiple circadian clock transcripts that may play a role in controlling these daily patterns of behavior. In this study, we used these genomic data to help us: 1) identify putative clock neurons using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH); and 2) determine if there is a daily rhythm of expression of clock transcripts in the M. leonina brain, using quantitative PCR. FISH indicated the presence of the clock-related transcripts clock, period, and photoreceptive and non-photoreceptive cryptochrome (pcry and npcry, respectively) in two bilateral neurons in each cerebropleural ganglion and a group of <10 neurons in the anterolateral region of each pedal ganglion. Double-label experiments confirmed colocalization of all four clock transcripts with each other. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that the genes clock, period, pcry and npcry exhibited significant differences in expression levels over 24 h. These data suggest that the putative circadian clock network in M. leonina consists of a small number of identifiable neurons that express circadian genes with a daily rhythm. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Expressive Practices: The Local Enactment of Culture in the Communication Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Karen; Milburn, Trudy; Wilkins, Richard

    2008-01-01

    As students participate in corporate communication classes, they may, on occasion, use the term culture to make sense of their experiences. The authors use Mino's idea of a learning paradigm to shift the emphasis away from teaching traditional theories of culture and use student-centered experiences to teach culture as an expressive practice.…

  13. Reduced expression of conditioned fear in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington’s disease is related to abnormal activity in prelimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Adam G.; Ummel, Jason R.; Rebec, George V.

    2011-01-01

    Prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction is common in patients with Huntington’s disease (HD), a dominantly inherited neurological disorder, and has been linked to cognitive disruption. We previously reported alterations in neuronal firing patterns recorded from PFC of the R6/2 mouse model of HD. To determine if PFC dysfunction results in behavioral impairments, we evaluated performance of wild-type (WT) and R6/2 mice in a fear conditioning and extinction behavioral task. Fear conditioning and extinction retrieval were similar in both genotypes, but R6/2s exhibited less fear during extinction by freezing less than WTs. A fear reinstatement test after extinction retrieval indicated that faster extinction was not due to poor memory for conditioning. During initial extinction and extinction retrieval training, neuronal activity was recorded from prelimbic (PL) cortex, a subregion of PFC known to be important for fear expression. In WTs, a large number of neurons were activated by the conditioned stimulus during initial extinction and this activation was significantly impaired in R6/2s. Notably, there was no genotype difference in PFC activity during extinction retrieval. Thus, altered extinction is likely a result of reduced fear expression due to impairments in PL activation. Collectively, our results suggest that PFC dysfunction may play a key role in R6/2 cognitive impairments. PMID:21515374

  14. GRP78 Protein Expression as Prognostic Values in Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy and Laparoscopic Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Yeon; Jung, Ji-Han; Cho, Hyun-Min; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Kang-Moon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Jong Hoon; Shim, Byoung Yong

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the relationships between biomarkers related to endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins (glucose-regulated protein of molecular mass 78 [GRP78] and Cripto-1 [teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 protein]), pathologic response, and prognosis in locally advanced rectal cancer. All clinical stage II and III rectal cancer patients received 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks, plus 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m(2)/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m(2)/day) bolus on days 1 to 5 and 29 to 33, and surgery was performed at 7 to 10 weeks after completion of all therapies. Expression of GRP78 and Cripto-1 proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry and was assessed in 101 patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). High expression of GRP78 and Cripto-1 proteins was observed in 86 patients (85.1%) and 49 patients (48.5%), respectively. Low expression of GRP78 protein was associated with a significantly high rate of down staging (80.0% vs. 52.3%, respectively; p=0.046) and a significantly low rate of recurrence (0% vs. 33.7%, respectively; p=0.008) compared with high expression of GRP78 protein. Mean recurrence-free survival according to GRP78 expression could not be estimated because the low expression group did not develop recurrence events but showed a significant correlation with time to recurrence, based on the log rank method (p=0.007). GRP78 also showed correlation with overall survival, based on the log rank method (p=0.045). GRP78 expression is a predictive and prognostic factor for down staging, recurrence, and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin neoadjuvant CRT.

  15. Lung Metabolic Activation as an Early Biomarker of the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Local Gene Expression Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Tyler J.; de Prost, Nicolas; Tucci, Mauro; Winkler, Tilo; Baron, Rebecca M.; Filipczak, Piotr; Raby, Benjamin; Chu, Jen-hwa; Harris, R. Scott; Musch, Guido; dos Reis Falcao, Luiz F.; Capelozzi, Vera; Venegas, Jose; Melo, Marcos F. Vidal

    2016-01-01

    Background The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an inflammatory condition comprising diffuse lung edema and alveolar damage. ARDS frequently results from regional injury mechanisms. However, it is unknown whether detectable inflammation precedes lung edema and opacification, and whether topographically differential gene expression consistent with heterogeneous injury occurs in early ARDS. We aimed to determine the temporal relationship between pulmonary metabolic activation and density in a large animal model of early ARDS, and to assess gene expression in differentially activated regions. Methods We produced ARDS in sheep with intravenous LPS (10ng/kg/h) and mechanical ventilation for 20h. Using positron emission tomography, we assessed regional cellular metabolic activation with 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose, perfusion and ventilation with 13NN-saline, and aeration using transmission scans. Species-specific micro-array technology was used to assess regional gene expression. Results Metabolic activation preceded detectable increases in lung density (as required for clinical diagnosis) and correlated with subsequent histological injury, suggesting its predictive value for severity of disease progression. Local time-courses of metabolic activation varied, with highly perfused and less aerated dependent lung regions activated earlier than non-dependent regions. These regions of distinct metabolic trajectories demonstrated differential gene expression for known and potential novel candidates for ARDS pathogenesis. Conclusions Heterogeneous lung metabolic activation precedes increases in lung density in the development of ARDS due to endotoxemia and mechanical ventilation. Local differential gene expression occurs in these early stages and reveals molecular pathways relevant to ARDS biology and of potential use as treatment targets. PMID:27611185

  16. Sucrose Transporter ZmSut1 Expression and Localization Uncover New Insights into Sucrose Phloem Loading1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R. Frank; Leach, Kristen A.; Boyer, Nathanial R.; Skopelitis, Tara; Jackson, David; Braun, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose transporters (SUTs) translocate sucrose (Suc) across cellular membranes, and in eudicots, multiple SUTs are known to function in Suc phloem loading in leaves. In maize (Zea mays), the Sucrose Transporter1 (ZmSut1) gene has been implicated in Suc phloem loading based upon RNA expression in leaves, electrophysiological experiments, and phenotypic analysis of zmsut1 mutant plants. However, no previous studies have examined the cellular expression of ZmSut1 RNA or the subcellular localization of the ZmSUT1 protein to assess the gene’s hypothesized function in Suc phloem loading or to evaluate its potential roles, such as phloem unloading, in nonphotosynthetic tissues. To this end, we performed RNA in situ hybridization experiments, promoter-reporter gene analyses, and ZmSUT1 localization studies to elucidate the cellular expression pattern of the ZmSut1 transcript and protein. These data showed that ZmSut1 was expressed in multiple cell types throughout the plant and indicated that it functions in phloem companion cells to load Suc and also in other cell types to retrieve Suc from the apoplasm to prevent its accumulation and loss to the transpiration stream. Additionally, by comparing a phloem-mobile tracer with ZmSut1 expression, we determined that developing maize leaves dynamically switch from symplasmic to apoplasmic phloem unloading, reconciling previously conflicting reports, and suggest that ZmSut1 does not have an apparent function in either unloading process. A model for the dual roles for ZmSut1 function (phloem loading and apoplasmic recycling), Sut1 evolution, and its possible use to enhance Suc export from leaves in engineering C3 grasses for C4 photosynthesis is discussed. PMID:27621426

  17. Nucleation promoting factors regulate the expression and localization of Arp2/3 complex during meiosis of mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Wang, Fei; Duan, Xing; Dai, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Teng; Liu, Hong-Lin; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The actin nucleation factor Arp2/3 complex is a main regulator of actin assembly and is involved in multiple processes like cell migration and adhesion, endocytosis, and the establishment of cell polarity in mitosis. Our previous work showed that the Arp2/3 complex was involved in the actin-mediated mammalian oocyte asymmetric division. However, the regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathway of Arp2/3 complex in meiosis is still unclear. In the present work, we identified that the nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) JMY and WAVE2 were necessary for the expression and localization of Arp2/3 complex in mouse oocytes. RNAi of both caused the degradation of actin cap intensity, indicating the roles of NPFs in the formation of actin cap. Moreover, JMY and WAVE2 RNAi decreased the expression of ARP2, a key component of Arp2/3 complex. However, knock down of Arp2/3 complex by Arpc2 and Arpc3 siRNA microinjection did not affect the expression and localization of JMY and WAVE2. Our results indicate that the NPFs, JMY and WAVE2, are upstream regulators of Arp2/3 complex in mammalian oocyte asymmetric division.

  18. Nucleation Promoting Factors Regulate the Expression and Localization of Arp2/3 Complex during Meiosis of Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Wang, Fei; Duan, Xing; Dai, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Teng; Liu, Hong-Lin; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The actin nucleation factor Arp2/3 complex is a main regulator of actin assembly and is involved in multiple processes like cell migration and adhesion, endocytosis, and the establishment of cell polarity in mitosis. Our previous work showed that the Arp2/3 complex was involved in the actin-mediated mammalian oocyte asymmetric division. However, the regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathway of Arp2/3 complex in meiosis is still unclear. In the present work, we identified that the nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) JMY and WAVE2 were necessary for the expression and localization of Arp2/3 complex in mouse oocytes. RNAi of both caused the degradation of actin cap intensity, indicating the roles of NPFs in the formation of actin cap. Moreover, JMY and WAVE2 RNAi decreased the expression of ARP2, a key component of Arp2/3 complex. However, knock down of Arp2/3 complex by Arpc2 and Arpc3 siRNA microinjection did not affect the expression and localization of JMY and WAVE2. Our results indicate that the NPFs, JMY and WAVE2, are upstream regulators of Arp2/3 complex in mammalian oocyte asymmetric division. PMID:23272233

  19. Co-Expression and Co-Localization of Cartilage Glycoproteins CHI3L1 and Lubricin in Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Morphological, Immunohistochemical and Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Di Rosa, Michelino; Malaguarnera, Lucia; Puzzo, Lidia; Leonardi, Rosy; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common human arthritis characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage. Several studies reported that levels of human cartilage glycoprotein chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1) are known as a potential marker for the activation of chondrocytes and the progression of Osteoarthritis (OA), whereas lubricin appears to be chondroprotective. The aim of this study was to investigate the co-expression and co-localization of CHI3L1 and lubricin in normal and osteoarthritic rat articular cartilage to correlate their modified expression to a specific grade of OA. Samples of normal and osteoarthritic rat articular cartilage were analyzed by the Kellgren–Lawrence OA severity scores, the Kraus’ modified Mankin score and the Histopathology Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) system for histomorphometric evaluations, and through CHI3L1 and lubricin gene expression, immunohistochemistry and double immuno-staining analysis. The immunoexpression and the mRNA levels of lubricin increased in normal cartilage and decreased in OA cartilage (normal vs. OA, p < 0.01). By contrast, the immunoexpression and the mRNA levels of CHI3L1 increased in OA cartilage and decreased in normal cartilage (normal vs. OA, p < 0.01). Our findings are consistent with reports suggesting that these two glycoproteins are functionally associated with the development of OA and in particular with grade 2/3 of OA, suggesting that in the future they could be helpful to stage the severity and progression of the disease. PMID:26978347

  20. Astrocytes Specifically Remove Surface-Adsorbed Fibrinogen and Locally Express Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Tony W.; Swarup, Vimal P.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan; Tresco, Patrick A.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Surface-adsorbed fibrinogen (FBG) was recognized by adhering astrocytes and removed from the substrates in vitro by a two-phase removal process. The cells removed adsorbed FBG from binary proteins surface patterns (FBG + laminin, or FBG + albumin) while leaving the other protein behind. Astrocytes preferentially expressed chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) at the loci of fibrinogen stimuli; however no differences in overall CSPG production as a function of FBG surface coverage were identified. Removal of FBG by astrocytes was also found to be independent of transforming growth factor type β (TGF-β) receptor based signaling as cells maintained CSPG production in the presence of TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitor, SB 431542. The inhibitor decreased CSPG expression, but did not abolicsh it entirely. Because blood contact and subsequent FBG adsorption are unavoidable in neural implantations, the results indicate that implant-adsorbed FBG may contribute to reactive astrogliosis around the implant as astrocytes specifically recognize adsorbed FBG. PMID:23499985

  1. Analysis of Rheb in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum: cellular localization, spatial expression and overexpression.

    PubMed

    Swer, Pynskhem Bok; Bhadoriya, Pooja; Saran, Shweta

    2014-03-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum encodes a single Rheb protein showing sequence similarity to human homologues of Rheb. The DdRheb protein shares 52 percent identity and 100 percent similarity with the human Rheb1 protein. Fluorescence of Rheb yellow fluorescent protein fusion was detected in the D. discoideum cytoplasm. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses showed that rheb is expressed at all stages of development and in prestalk cells in the multicellular structures developed. When the expression of rheb as a fusion with lacZ was driven under its own promoter, the beta-galactosidase activity was seen in the prestalk cells. D. discoideum overexpressing Rheb shows an increase in the size of the cell. Treatment of the overexpressing Rheb cells with rapamycin confirms its involvement in the TOR signalling pathway.

  2. Depot differences in steroid receptor expression in adipose tissue: possible role of the local steroid milieu.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Cuenca, S; Monjo, M; Proenza, A M; Roca, P

    2005-01-01

    Sex hormones play an important role in adipose tissue metabolism by activating specific receptors that alter several steps of the lipolytic and lipogenic signal cascade in depot- and sex-dependent manners. However, studies focusing on steroid receptor status in adipose tissue are scarce. In the present study, we analyzed steroid content [testosterone (T), 17beta-estradiol (17beta-E2), and progesterone (P4)] and steroid receptor mRNA levels in different rat adipose tissue depots. As expected, T levels were higher in males than in females (P = 0.031), whereas the reverse trend was observed for P4 (P < 0.001). It is noteworthy that 17beta-E2 adipose tissue levels were higher in inguinal than in the rest of adipose tissues for both sexes, where no sex differences in 17beta-E2 tissue levels were noted (P = 0.010 for retroperitoneal, P = 0.005 for gonadal, P = 0.018 for mesenteric). Regarding steroid receptor levels, androgen (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and ERbeta densities were more clearly dependent on adipose depot location than on sex, with visceral depots showing overall higher mRNA densities than their subcutaneous counterparts. Besides, expression of ERalpha predominated over ERbeta expression, and progesterone receptor (PR-B form and PR-A+B form) mRNAs were identically expressed regardless of anatomic depot and sex. In vitro studies in 3T3-L1 cells showed that 17beta-E2 increased ERalpha (P = 0.001) and AR expression (P = 0.001), indicating that estrogen can alter estrogenic and androgenic signaling in adipose tissue. The results highlighted in this study demonstrate important depot-dependent differences in the sensitivity of adipose tissues to sex hormones between visceral and subcutaneous depots that could be related to metabolic situations observed in response to sex hormones.

  3. Genomic organization, expression, and chromosome localization of a third aurora-related kinase gene, Aie1.

    PubMed

    Hu, H M; Chuang, C K; Lee, M J; Tseng, T C; Tang, T K

    2000-11-01

    We previously reported two novel testis-specific serine/threonine kinases, Aie1 (mouse) and AIE2 (human), that share high amino acid identities with the kinase domains of fly aurora and yeast Ipl1. Here, we report the entire intron-exon organization of the Aie1 gene and analyze the expression patterns of Aie1 mRNA during testis development. The mouse Aie1 gene spans approximately 14 kb and contains seven exons. The sequences of the exon-intron boundaries of the Aie1 gene conform to the consensus sequences (GT/AG) of the splicing donor and acceptor sites of most eukaryotic genes. Comparative genomic sequencing revealed that the gene structure is highly conserved between mouse Aie1 and human AIE2. However, much less homology was found in the sequence outside the kinase-coding domains. The Aie1 locus was mapped to mouse chromosome 7A2-A3 by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Northern blot analysis indicates that Aie1 mRNA likely is expressed at a low level on day 14 and reaches its plateau on day 21 in the developing postnatal testis. RNA in situ hybridization indicated that the expression of the Aie1 transcript was restricted to meiotically active germ cells, with the highest levels detected in spermatocytes at the late pachytene stage. These findings suggest that Aie1 plays a role in spermatogenesis.

  4. Efficient Spatio-Temporal Local Binary Patterns for Spontaneous Facial Micro-Expression Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yandan; See, John; Phan, Raphael C.-W.; Oh, Yee-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Micro-expression recognition is still in the preliminary stage, owing much to the numerous difficulties faced in the development of datasets. Since micro-expression is an important affective clue for clinical diagnosis and deceit analysis, much effort has gone into the creation of these datasets for research purposes. There are currently two publicly available spontaneous micro-expression datasets—SMIC and CASME II, both with baseline results released using the widely used dynamic texture descriptor LBP-TOP for feature extraction. Although LBP-TOP is popular and widely used, it is still not compact enough. In this paper, we draw further inspiration from the concept of LBP-TOP that considers three orthogonal planes by proposing two efficient approaches for feature extraction. The compact robust form described by the proposed LBP-Six Intersection Points (SIP) and a super-compact LBP-Three Mean Orthogonal Planes (MOP) not only preserves the essential patterns, but also reduces the redundancy that affects the discriminality of the encoded features. Through a comprehensive set of experiments, we demonstrate the strengths of our approaches in terms of recognition accuracy and efficiency. PMID:25993498

  5. Cellular localization and expression of template-activating factor I in different cell types.

    PubMed

    Nagata, K; Saito, S; Okuwaki, M; Kawase, H; Furuya, A; Kusano, A; Hanai, N; Okuda, A; Kikuchi, A

    1998-05-01

    Template-activating factors I (TAF-I) alpha and beta have been identified as chromatin remodeling factors from human HeLa cells. TAF-I beta corresponds to the protein encoded by the set gene, which was found in an acute undifferentiated leukemia as a fusion version with the can gene via chromosomal translocation. To determine the localization of TAF-I, we raised both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against TAF-I. The proteins that react to the antibodies are present not only in human cells but also in mouse, frog, insect, and yeast cells. The mouse TAF-I homologue is ubiquitous in a variety of tissue cells, including liver, kidney, spleen, lung, heart, and brain. It is of interest that the amounts of TAF-I alpha and beta vary among hemopoietic cells and some specific cell types do not contain TAF-I alpha. The level of the TAF-I proteins does not change significantly during the cell cycle progression in either HeLa cells synchronized with an excess concentration of thymidine or NIH 3T3 cells released from the serum-depleted state. TAF-I is predominantly located in nuclei, while TAF-I that is devoid of its acidic region, the region which is essential for the TAF-I activity, shows both nuclear and cytoplasmic localization. The localization of TAF-I in conjunction with the regulation of its activity is discussed.

  6. Expression and localization of GLUT1 and GLUT12 in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Jenalle D; Williams, Elizabeth D; Slavin, John L; Best, James D; Rogers, Suzanne

    2003-04-15

    Increased glucose consumption is a characteristic of malignant cells and in prostate carcinoma is associated with the proliferation of both androgen-dependent and independent cells. Transport of polar glucose across the nonpolar membrane relies on glucose transporter proteins, known as GLUTs. Increased expression of GLUT1 is a characteristic of many malignant cells. The authors characterized and cloned the cDNA for a novel glucose transporter, GLUT12, which was identified initially in malignant breast epithelial cells. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no reports on the expression of glucose transporters in the human prostate or human prostate carcinoma cells. The authors evaluated GLUT1 and GLUT12 expression in human prostate carcinoma cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed on total RNA extracted from cultured prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP, C4, C4-2, and C4-2B using primers to amplify GLUT1, GLUT12, or the housekeeping gene, 36B4. Total protein extracted from prostate carcinoma cell lines was assessed for GLUT12 protein by Western blot analysis. Cultured cell monolayers were incubated with antibodies to GLUT1 or GLUT12 and a peripheral Golgi protein, Golgi 58K, for detection by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy. Sections of benign prostatic hyperplasia and human prostate carcinoma were stained for immunohistochemical detection of GLUT1 and GLUT12. GLUT1 and GLUT12 mRNA and protein were detected in all cell lines evaluated. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated both GLUT1 and GLUT12 on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm in all cultured prostate carcinoma cell lines, with GLUT1 but not GLUT12 appearing to colocalize with the Golgi. Immunohistochemical staining of benign prostatic hyperplasia indicated expression of GLUT1 but not GLUT12. Malignant tissue stained for GLUT12 but was negative for GLUT1. GLUT1 and GLUT12 are expressed in human prostate carcinoma cells. One possible rationale for the GLUT1 Golgi

  7. Subcellular Localization of Large Yellow Croaker ( Larimichthys crocea) TLR21 and Expression Profiling of Its Gene in Immune Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qingxue; Fan, Zejun; Yao, Cuiluan

    2018-04-01

    Toll-like receptor 21 (TLR21) is a non-mammalian type TLR, and plays an important role in innate immune response in fish. In this paper, the full-length cDNA sequence of TLR21 gene was identified and characterized from large yellow croaker, Larimichthys crocea and was termed as LcTLR21. It consists of 3365 bp, including a 5'-terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 97 bp, a 3'-terminal UTR of 331 bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 2937 bp encoding a polypeptide of 978 amino acid residues. The deduced LcTLR21 contains a signal peptide domain at N-terminal, 12 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) at the extracellular region, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain at the C-terminal. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that the LcTLR21-GFP was constitutively expressed in cytoplasm. Tissue expression analysis indicated that LcTLR21 gene broadly expressed in most of the examined tissues, with the most predominant abundance in spleen, followed by head-kidney and liver, while the weakest expression was detected in brain. The expression level of LcTLR21 after LPS, poly I:C and Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenges was investigated in spleen, head-kidney and liver. LcTLR21 gene transcripts increased significantly in all examined tissues after the challenges, and the highest expression level was detected in liver at 24 h after poly I:C stimulation ( P < 0.05), suggesting that LcTLR21 might play a crucial role in fish resistance to viral and bacterial infections.

  8. Expression and localization of sterile alpha motif domain containing 5 is associated with cell type and malignancy of biliary tree

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kenichi; Inagaki, Fuyuki F.; Saijou, Eiko; Miura, Yasushi; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a type of relatively rare neoplasm in adenocarcinoma. The characteristics of CCs as well as biliary epithelial cells are heterogeneous at the different portion of the biliary tree. There are two candidate stem/progenitor cells of the biliary tree, i.e., biliary tree stem/progenitor cell (BTSC) at the peribiliary gland (PBG) of large bile ducts and liver stem/progenitor cell (LPC) at the canals of Hering of peripheral small bile duct. Although previous reports suggest that intrahepatic CC (ICC) can arise from such stem/progenitor cells, the characteristic difference between BTSC and LPC in pathological process needs further investigation, and the etiology of CC remains poorly understood. Here we show that Sterile alpha motif domain containing 5 (SAMD5) is exclusively expressed in PBGs of large bile ducts in normal mice. Using a mouse model of cholestatic liver disease, we demonstrated that SAMD5 expression was upregulated in the large bile duct at the hepatic hilum, the extrahepatic bile duct and PBGs, but not in proliferating intrahepatic ductules, suggesting that SAMD5 is expressed in BTSC but not LPC. Intriguingly, human ICCs and extrahepatic CCs exhibited striking nuclear localization of SAMD5 while the normal hilar large bile duct displayed slight-to-moderate expression in cytoplasm. In vitro experiments using siRNA for SAMD5 revealed that SAMD5 expression was associated with the cell cycle regulation of CC cell lines. Conclusion: SAMD5 is a novel marker for PBG but not LPC in mice. In humans, the expression and location of SAMD5 could become a promising diagnostic marker for the cell type as well as malignancy of bile ducts and CCs. PMID:28388653

  9. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  10. Correlation range in a supercooled liquid via Green-Kubo expression for viscosity, local atomic stresses, and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, Valentin A.; Egami, Takeshi; Morris, James R.

    2009-03-01

    We present a new approach to the issue of correlation range in supercooled liquids based on Green-Kubo expression for viscosity. The integrand of this expression is the average stress-stress autocorrelation function. This correlation function could be rewritten in terms of correlations among local atomic stresses at different times and distances. The features of the autocorrelation function decay with time depend on temperature and correlation range. Through this approach we can study the development of spatial correlation with time, thus directly addressing the question of dynamic heterogeneity. We performed MD simulations on a single component system of particles interacting through short range pair potential. Our results indicate that even above the crossover temperature correlations extend well beyond the nearest neighbors. Surprisingly we found that the system size effects exist even on relatively large systems. We also address the role of diffusion in decay of stress-stress correlation function.

  11. [Inhibition of monocytes adhesion to the intima of arterial wall by local expression of antisense monocyte chemotactic protein-1].

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Qiao, H; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Liu, P; Xu, M; Ren, G; Zhao, S; She, M

    2000-04-01

    To study the mechanism of monocyte recruitment in atherogenesis and to clarify the effect of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in this process. Femoral arteries isolated from the rabbits which had been fed with a high cholesterol diet and locally perfused with MM-LDL within the artery beforehand, were used as the models. Antisense MCP-1cDNA was transferred into the arterial wall by injecting recombinant LNCX-anti-MCP-1/liposomal complex in the femoral sheath and the periarterial tissue. Expression of antisense MCP-1 mediated by recombinant LNCX plasmid/lipsomal complex gene transfer enabled to inhibit MCP-1 gene expression and adhesion of monocyte to the intima. MCP-1 plays an important role on the recruitment of monocytes in the arterial wall, which provides a potential clue in developing a gene therapy project for the prevention and treatment of atherogenesis.

  12. Generalized non-Local Resistance Expression and its Application in F/N/F Spintronic Structure with Graphene Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Huazhou; Fu, Shiwei

    We report our work on the spin transport properties in the F/N/F(ferromagnets/normal metal/ferromagnets) spintronic structure from a new theoretical perspective. A significant problem in the field is to explain the inferior measured order of magnitude for spin lifetime. Based on the known non-local resistance formula and the mechanism analysis of spin-flipping within the interfaces between F and N, we analytically derive a broadly applicable new non-local resistance expression and a generalized Hanle curve formula. After employing them in the F/N/F structure under different limits, especially in the case of graphene channel, we find that the fitting from experimental data would yield a longer spin lifetime, which approaches its theoretical predicted value in graphene. The authors acknowledge the financial support by China University of Petroleum-Beijing and the Key Laboratory of Optical Detection Technology for Oil and Gas in this institution.

  13. Search for Local Variations of Atmospheric H2O and CO on Mars with PFS/Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lellouch, E.; Encrenaz, T.; Fouchet, T.; Billebaud, F.; Formisano, V.; Atreya, S.; Ignatiev, N.; Moroz, V.; Maturilli, A.; Grassi, D.; Pfs Team

    Spectra recorded by the PFS instrument onboard Mars Express include clear spectral signatures due to CO at 4.7 and 2.3 micron, and H2O at 1.38, 2.6 and 30-50 micron. These features can be used to determine the horizontal distribution of these species on global and local scales and to monitor it with time. Here we investigate the local variations of H2O and CO, focussing on the regions of high-altitude volcanoes. Preliminary results suggest a significant decrease of the CO mixing ratio in these regions, as was found from ISM/Phobos observations (Rosenqvist et al. Icarus 98, 254, 1992).

  14. Temporal expression and mitochondrial localization of a Foxp2 isoform lacking the forkhead domain in developing Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Yuko; Fujiwara, Yuji; Matsuzaki, Ayumi; Fujita, Eriko; Kasahara, Tadashi; Yuasa, Shigeki; Momoi, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    FOXP2, a forkhead box-containing transcription factor, forms homo- or hetero-dimers with FOXP family members and localizes to the nucleus, while FOXP2(R553H), which contains a mutation related to speech/language disorders, features reduced DNA binding activity and both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization. In addition to being a loss-of-function mutation, it is possible that FOXP2(R553H) also may act as a gain-of-function mutation to inhibit the functions of FOXP2 isoforms including FOXP2Ex10+ lacking forkhead domain. Foxp2(R552H) knock-in mouse pups exhibit impaired ultrasonic vocalization and poor dendritic development in Purkinje cells. However, expressions of Foxp2 isoforms in the developing Purkinje are unclear. The appearance of 'apical cytoplasmic swelling' (mitochondria-rich regions that are the source of budding processes) correlates with dendritic development of Purkinje cells. In the present study, we focused on Foxp2 isoforms localizing to the apical cytoplasmic swelling and identified two isoforms lacking forkhead domain: Foxp2Ex12+ and Foxp2Ex15. They partly localized to the membrane fraction that includes mitochondria. Foxp2Ex12+ mainly localized to the apical cytoplasmic swelling in early developing Purkinje cells at the stellate stage (P2-P4). Mitochondrial localization of Foxp2Ex12+ in Purkinje cells was confirmed by immune-electron microscopic analysis. Foxp2Ex12+ may play a role in dendritic development in Purkinje cells. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. Local expression of vaginal Th1 and Th2 cytokines in murine vaginal candidiasis under different immunity conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanjuan; Li, Shaohua; Wu, Yan; Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Jiawen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal Th1 and Th2 cytokines in rats with experimental vaginal candidiasis under different immune conditions, ICR murine vaginal candidiasis model was established and immno-suppressed murine models of vaginal cadidiasis were established in estrogen-treated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls. The mRNA level of Th1 (IL-2)/Th2 (IL-4, IL-10, TGF-beta1) cytokines in murine vaginal tissues was determined by RT-PCR. The cykotine in local tissues was increased to different extent under normal immune condition. IL-2 mRNA was increased during early stage of infection, while IL-10 was increased transiently during late stage of infection. TGF-beta1 production was found to be increased persistently. At same time, the expression of IL-2 mRNA was suppressed in immno-suppressed group, and the level of IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-beta1 were higher than the normal immunity group to different degree during infection. The high level of IL-2 mRNA during early stage of infection was associated with clearance of mucosal Candidia albicans (C. albicans), and its expression suppressed leading to decreased clearance of mucosal C. albican in immuno-suppression. The over-expression of IL-4 and IL-10 could significantly enhance the susceptibility to C. albicans infection in mice.

  16. An XPA gene splicing mutation resulting in trace protein expression in an elderly patient with xeroderma pigmentosum group A without neurological abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Endo, Y; Kusaka-Kikushima, A; Nakamaura, S; Nakazawa, Y; Ogi, T; Uryu, M; Tsuji, G; Furue, M; Moriwaki, S

    2017-07-01

    A certain relationship between XPA gene mutations and the severity of symptoms has been observed in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A). Patients with mutations within the DNA-binding domain usually exhibit severe symptoms, whereas splicing mutations in the same domain sometimes cause very mild symptoms. This inconsistency can be explained by a small amount of functional XPA protein produced from normally spliced transcripts. We herein report the case of an adult Japanese patient with XP-A with unusually mild symptoms. We identified a homozygous c.529G>A mutation in exon 4 of the XPA gene, which resulted in aberrant splicing with a 29-bp deletion in exon 4 causing a frameshift. Intact mRNA was observable, but a Western blot analysis failed to detect any normal XPA protein. We therefore evaluated the DNA repair capacity in normal cells in which the XPA expression was artificially diminished. The repair capacity was still present in cells with trace levels of the XPA protein. The repair capacity of the cells derived from our patient with mild symptoms was poor by comparison, but still significant compared with that of the cells derived from a patient with XP-A with severe symptoms. These results provide strong evidence that a trace level of XPA protein can still exert a relatively strong repair capacity, resulting in only a mild phenotype. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Dipeptidyl Peptidase 10 (DPP10789): A Voltage Gated Potassium Channel Associated Protein Is Abnormally Expressed in Alzheimer's and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Wei-Ping; Abbott, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    The neuropathological features associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) include the presence of extracellular amyloid-β peptide-containing plaques and intracellular tau positive neurofibrillary tangles and the loss of synapses and neurons in defined regions of the brain. Dipeptidyl peptidase 10 (DPP10) is a protein that facilitates Kv4 channel surface expression and neuronal excitability. This study aims to explore DPP10789 protein distribution in human brains and its contribution to the neurofibrillary pathology of AD and other tauopathies. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed predominant neuronal staining of DPP10789 in control brains, and the CA1 region of the hippocampus contained strong reactivity in the distal dendrites of the pyramidal cells. In AD brains, robust DPP10789 reactivity was detected in neurofibrillary tangles and plaque-associated dystrophic neurites, most of which colocalized with the doubly phosphorylated Ser-202/Thr-205 tau epitope. DPP10789 positive neurofibrillary tangles and plaque-associated dystrophic neurites also appeared in other neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration, diffuse Lewy body disease, and progressive supranuclear palsy. Occasional DPP10789 positive neurofibrillary tangles and neurites were seen in some aged control brains. Western blot analysis showed both full length and truncated DPP10789 fragments with the later increasing significantly in AD brains compared to control brains. Our results suggest that DPP10789 is involved in the pathology of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25025038

  18. Subcutaneous administration of polymerized type I collagen downregulates interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 and transforming growth factor-β1 expression, and increases Foxp3-expressing cells in localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, J; Ortíz-Ávalos, M; Lima, G; Jurado-Santa Cruz, F; Llorente, L

    2012-08-01

    Localized scleroderma (LS) is a disfiguring inflammatory autoimmune disease of the skin and underlying tissue. As in systemic sclerosis, a key feature is the presence of T cells in inflammatory lesions. To evaluate the effect of polymerized type I collagen vs. methylprednisolone (MP) in LS, and to determine the influence of this polymerized collagen (PC) on CD4+ peripheral T cells expressing interleukin (IL)-4, IL-17A, interferon-γ and Forkhead box protein (Foxp)3, and on cells expressing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, IL-17A, IL-22 and Foxp3 in the skin. In total, 16 patients with LS were treated for 3 months with monthly subcutaneous intralesional injections of 0.1 mL MP (giving a total dose of 20 mg/mL each month) and 15 patients were treated, with weekly subcutaneous intralesional injections of PC, ranging from 0.2 mL (equivalent to 1.66 mg collagen) for a lesion of 50 mm in size, up to a maximum of 1.0 mL (8.3 mg collagen) for a lesion > 100 mm in size, and followed up for a further 6 months. Skin biopsies were obtained from lesions at baseline (before treatment) and 9 months later (6 months after treatment end). Tissue sections were evaluated by histology and immunohistochemistry (IL-17A, IL-22, TGF-β1 and Foxp3). CD4+ T-cell subsets were determined in peripheral blood by flow cytometry. Abnormal tissue architecture was seen in the biopsies taken from patients treated with MP, whereas the PC treatment restored normal skin architecture. PC downregulated pro-inflammatory/profibrotic cytokine expression in peripheral cells, and upregulated the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in skin. PC was safe and well tolerated. PC is not only an antifibrotic/fibrolytic agent but also an immunomodulator biodrug that restores the balance between T helper (Th)1, Th2, Th17 and Tregs, downregulates production of pro-inflammatory or profibrogenic cytokines (IL-17A, IL-22 and TGF-β1), and renews skin architecture, without adverse effects. © The Author(s). CED

  19. Quantitative expression and localization of cysteine and aspartic proteases in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lohoefer, Fabian; Reeps, Christian; Lipp, Christina; Rudelius, Martina; Haertl, Felix; Matevossian, Edouard; Zernecke, Alma; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Pelisek, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine and aspartic proteases possess high elastolytic activity and might contribute to the degradation of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall. The aim of this study was to analyze, in detail, the proteases (cathepsins B, D, K, L and S, and inhibitor cystatin C) found in human AAA and healthy aortic tissue samples. The vessel walls from AAA patients (n=36) and nonaneurysmal aortae (n=10) were retrieved using conventional surgical repair and autopsy methods. Serum samples from the same AAA patients and 10 healthy volunteers were also collected. Quantitative expression analyses were performed at the mRNA level using real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT–PCR). Furthermore, analyses at the protein level included western blot and immunoprecipitation analyses. Cellular sources of cysteine/aspartic proteases and cystatin C were identified by immunohistochemistry (IHC). All cysteine/aspartic proteases and cystatin C were detected in the AAA and control samples. Using quantitative RT–PCR, a significant increase in expression was observed for cathepsins B (P=0.021) and L (P=0.018), compared with the controls. Cathepsin B and cystatin C were also detected in the serum of AAA patients. Using IHC, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages were positive for all of the tested cathepsins, as well as cystatin C; in addition, the lymphocytes were mainly positive for cathepsin B, followed by cathepsins D and S. All cysteine/aspartic proteases analyzed in our study were detected in the AAA and healthy aorta. The highest expression was found in macrophages and SMCs. Consequently, cysteine/aspartic proteases might play a substantial role in AAA. PMID:24833013

  20. Expression and localization of VEGFR-2 in hair follicles during induced hair growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian-Jie; Jing, Jing; Lu, Zhong-Fa; Zheng, Min

    2018-06-16

    Recently, VEGFR-2 has been detected not only in vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells but also in some non-vascular endothelial cells, particularly human hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and sweat glands. In addition, VEGFR-2 has been confirmed to play direct roles in hair follicle keratinocyte regulation beyond simply angiogenesis. To elucidate whether VEGFR-2 activation plays a role in hair follicle cycling regulation, immunofluorescence of VEGFR-2 expression was performed during hair cycling of the dorsum of the mouse induced by hair plucking. We observed that staining for VEGFR-2 in hair follicles during anagen II and IV was much stronger than during anagen VI, catagen and telogen. During anagen II, intense staining for VEGFR-2 was observed on the keratinocyte strands of the hair follicle. Subsequently, we detected intense staining for VEGFR-2 in the ORS, IRS and hair bulb during anagen IV. Moderate staining for VEGFR-2 was detected in the ORS and hair bulb, but staining was most intense in IRS during anagen VI. During catagen, staining for VEGFR-2 in the IRS remained intense, while staining in the ORS and hair bulb was significantly weakened and was negative in the dermal papilla. During telogen, we detected VEGFR-2 in germ cells, cap, and club hair adjoining the epidermis. In conclusion, VEGFR-2 was expressed on the hair follicles of the dorsum of the mouse and varied in expression on the mouse hair follicles during hair cycling, suggesting that VEGFR-2 may exert roles in hair cycle regulation in hair follicles on the dorsum of mice.

  1. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  2. Abnormally high digestive enzyme activity and gene expression explain the contemporary evolution of a Diabrotica biotype able to feed on soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Curzi, Matías J; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2012-01-01

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera) (WCR) depends on the continuous availability of corn. Broad adoption of annual crop rotation between corn (Zea mays) and nonhost soybean (Glycine max) exploited WCR biology to provide excellent WCR control, but this practice dramatically reduced landscape heterogeneity in East-central Illinois and imposed intense selection pressure. This selection resulted in behavioral changes and “rotation-resistant” (RR) WCR adults. Although soybeans are well defended against Coleopteran insects by cysteine protease inhibitors, RR-WCR feed on soybean foliage and remain long enough to deposit eggs that will hatch the following spring and larvae will feed on roots of planted corn. Other than documenting changes in insect mobility and egg laying behavior, 15 years of research have failed to identify any diagnostic differences between wild-type (WT)- and RR-WCR or a mechanism that allows for prolonged RR-WCR feeding and survival in soybean fields. We documented differences in behavior, physiology, digestive protease activity (threefold to fourfold increases), and protease gene expression in the gut of RR-WCR adults. Our data suggest that higher constitutive activity levels of cathepsin L are part of the mechanism that enables populations of WCR to circumvent soybean defenses, and thus, crop rotation. These new insights into the mechanism of WCR tolerance of soybean herbivory transcend the issue of RR-WCR diagnostics and management to link changes in insect gut proteolytic activity and behavior with landscape heterogeneity. The RR-WCR illustrates how agro-ecological factors can affect the evolution of insects in human-altered ecosystems. PMID:22957201

  3. Increased conjunctival expression of protease activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) in seasonal allergic conjunctivitis: a role for abnormal conjunctival epithelial permeability in disease pathogenesis?

    PubMed

    Yeoh, S; Church, M; Lackie, P; McGill, J; Mota, M; Hossain, P

    2011-09-01

    Aeroallergen exposure to the conjunctival epithelium in seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC) may induce a cellular stress response that disrupts the barrier properties of the conjunctival epithelium, resulting in allergic disease. Whether such changes occur in SAC is unknown. Epithelial permeability is known to be increased when protease activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is activated. We evaluated the expression of PAR-2 in patients with SAC-in-season (SACS) and compared it with control non-atopic subjects or those with out-of-season allergic conjunctivitis (OSAC). Six SACS, eight normal and four OSAC specimens were examined immunohistochemically for PAR-2 and quantified in a masked fashion for the percentage of epithelia stained for each marker using Image-J software. Conjunctival epithelial heights were measured in all groups to confirm the presence of allergic eye disease. Mean percentage staining of PAR-2 was significantly greater in SACS that in normal specimens (73.4 ± 15.4% vs 32.8 ± 30.0%, p=0.038) or in OSAC (73.4 ± 15.4% vs 1.4 ± 2.2%, p=0.01). Mean conjunctival epithelial height was significantly raised in SACS (63.8 ± 9.0 μm) versus controls (44.7 ± 11.2 μm) (p=0.003, unpaired t test). Conjunctival epithelial PAR-2 is significantly upregulated in SAC. This supports the view that disruption of the barrier properties of the conjunctival epithelium is an important event in SAC pathogenesis.

  4. Heterologous expression and localization of gentisate transporter Ncg12922 from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Ying; Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049; Yan Dazhong

    2006-07-28

    Ralstonia sp. strain U2 metabolizes naphthalene via gentisate (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate) to central metabolites, but it was found unable to utilize gentisate as growth substrate. A putative gentisate transporter encoded by ncg12922 from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was functionally expressed in Ralstonia sp. strain U2, converting strain U2 to a gentisate utilizer. After ncg12922 was inserted into plasmid pGFPe with green fluorescence protein gene gfp, the expressed fusion protein Ncg12922-GFP could be visualized in the periphery of Escherichia coli cells under confocal microscope, consistent with a cytoplasmic membrane location. In contrast, GFP was ubiquitous in the cytoplasm of E. coli cells carryingmore » pGFPe only. Gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase activity was present in the cell extract from strain U2 induced with gentisate but at a much lower level (one-fifth) than that obtained with salicylate. However, it exhibited a similar level in strain U2 containing Ncg12922 induced either by salicylate or gentisate.« less

  5. Leukocyte Cell Surface Proteinases: Regulation of Expression, Functions, and Mechanisms of Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Caroline A.

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: 1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinase by cells; 2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or 3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: 1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; 2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; 3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; 4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and 5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes. PMID:18329945

  6. Expression and localization of a novel phosducin-like protein from amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saren, Gaowa; Zhao, Yonggang

    2009-05-01

    A full length amphioxus cDNA, encoding a novel phosducin-like protein ( Amphi-PhLP), was identified for the first time from the gut cDNA library of Branchiostoma belcheri. It is comprised of 1 550 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 241 amino acids, with a predicted molecular mass of approximately 28 kDa. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed a tissue-specific expression pattern of Amphi-PhLP with the high levels in the ovary, and at a lower level in the hind gut and testis, hepatic caecum, gill, endostyle, and epipharyngeal groove, while it was absent in the muscle, neural tube and notochord. In the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells transfected with the expression plasmid pEGFP-N1/ Amphi-PhLP, the fusion protein was targeted in the cytoplasm of CHO cells, suggesting that Amphi-PhLP is a cytosolic protein. This work may provide a framework for further understanding of the physiological function of Amphi-PhLP in B. belcheri.

  7. Expression and subcellular localization of the ryanodine receptor in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Leite, M F; Dranoff, J A; Gao, L; Nathanson, M H

    1999-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is the principal Ca2+-release channel in excitable cells, whereas the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor (InsP3R) is primarily responsible for Ca2+ release in non-excitable cells, including epithelia. RyR also is expressed in a number of non-excitable cell types, but is thought to serve as an auxiliary or alternative Ca2+-release pathway in those cells. Here we use reverse transcription PCR to show that a polarized epithelium, the pancreatic acinar cell, expresses the type 2, but not the type 1 or 3, isoform of RyR. We furthermore use immunochemistry to demonstrate that the type 2 RyR is distributed throughout the basolateral and, to a lesser extent, the apical region of the acinar cell, but is excluded from the trigger zone, where cytosolic Ca2+ signals originate in this cell type. Since propagation of Ca2+ waves in acinar cells is sensitive to ryanodine, caffeine and Ca2+, these findings suggest that Ca2+ waves in this cell type result from the co-ordinated release of Ca2+, first from InsP3Rs in the trigger zone, then from RyRs elsewhere in the cell. RyR may play a fundamental role in Ca2+ signalling in polarized epithelia, including for Ca2+ signals initiated by InsP3. PMID:9882629

  8. Temporal patterns of inflammatory gene expression in local tissues after banding or burdizzo castration in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Wanyong; Earley, Bernadette; Sweeney, Torres; Gath, Vivian; Crowe, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Background Castration of male cattle has been shown to elicit inflammatory reactions and acute inflammation is initiated and sustained by the participation of cytokines. Methods Sixty continental × beef bulls (Mean age 12 ± (s.e.) 0.2 months; Mean weight 341 ± (s.e.) 3.0 kg) were blocked by weight and randomly assigned to one of three treatments (n = 20 animals per treatment): 1) untreated control (Con); 2) banding castration at 0 min (Band); 3) Burdizzo castration at 0 min (Burd). Samples of the testis, epididymis and scrotal skin were collected surgically from 5 animals from each group at 12 h, 24 h, 7 d, and 14 d post-treatment, and analysed using real-time PCR. A repeated measurement analysis (Proc GLM) was performed using SAS. If there was no treatment and time interaction, main effects of treatment by time were tested by ANOVA. Results Electrophoresis data showed that by 7 d post-castration RNA isolated from all the testicle samples of the Burd castrated animals, the epididymis and middle scrotum samples from Band castrates were degraded. Transitory effects were observed in the gene expression of IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α at 12 h and 24 h post treatment. Burd castrates had greater (P < 0.05) testicular IFN-γ mRNA levels compared with Band and Con animals, but lower (P < 0.05) testicular TNF-α mRNA levels compared with Con animals. Band castrates had greater (P < 0.05) testicular IL-6 mRNA levels than Burd castrates at 12 h post-castration. Burd castrates had greater (P < 0.05) testicular IL-8 mRNA levels than Band and Con animals at 24 h post-castration. In the epididymis, Burd castrates had greater (P < 0.05) IL-6 mRNA (both at 12 h and 24 h post treatment) and IL-8 mRNA (12 h post treatment) levels compared with Band and Con animals; Burd castrates had greater (P = 0.049) IL-10 mRNA levels than Band castrates at 12 h post-castration. Conclusion Banding castration caused more inflammatory associated gene expression changes to the epididymis and

  9. Temporal patterns of inflammatory gene expression in local tissues after banding or burdizzo castration in cattle.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wanyong; Earley, Bernadette; Sweeney, Torres; Gath, Vivian; Crowe, Mark A

    2009-09-23

    Castration of male cattle has been shown to elicit inflammatory reactions and acute inflammation is initiated and sustained by the participation of cytokines. Sixty continental x beef bulls (Mean age 12 +/- (s.e.) 0.2 months; Mean weight 341 +/- (s.e.) 3.0 kg) were blocked by weight and randomly assigned to one of three treatments (n = 20 animals per treatment): 1) untreated control (Con); 2) banding castration at 0 min (Band); 3) Burdizzo castration at 0 min (Burd). Samples of the testis, epididymis and scrotal skin were collected surgically from 5 animals from each group at 12 h, 24 h, 7 d, and 14 d post-treatment, and analysed using real-time PCR. A repeated measurement analysis (Proc GLM) was performed using SAS. If there was no treatment and time interaction, main effects of treatment by time were tested by ANOVA. Electrophoresis data showed that by 7 d post-castration RNA isolated from all the testicle samples of the Burd castrated animals, the epididymis and middle scrotum samples from Band castrates were degraded. Transitory effects were observed in the gene expression of IFN-gamma, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha at 12 h and 24 h post treatment. Burd castrates had greater (P < 0.05) testicular IFN-gamma mRNA levels compared with Band and Con animals, but lower (P < 0.05) testicular TNF-alpha mRNA levels compared with Con animals. Band castrates had greater (P < 0.05) testicular IL-6 mRNA levels than Burd castrates at 12 h post-castration. Burd castrates had greater (P < 0.05) testicular IL-8 mRNA levels than Band and Con animals at 24 h post-castration. In the epididymis, Burd castrates had greater (P < 0.05) IL-6 mRNA (both at 12 h and 24 h post treatment) and IL-8 mRNA (12 h post treatment) levels compared with Band and Con animals; Burd castrates had greater (P = 0.049) IL-10 mRNA levels than Band castrates at 12 h post-castration. Banding castration caused more inflammatory associated gene expression changes to the epididymis and scrotum than burdizzo

  10. Temporal expression and immunogold localization of Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus structural proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Monospecific antisera were produced against four structural proteins (VP12, VP17, VP31, and granulin) of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus using polypeptides derived by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or acid extraction. The antisera were shown to be specific on immunoblots of SDS-PAGE separated granulosis virus and were further used to detect structural proteins in infected fat body lysates. Immunoblots of fat body lysates from early stages of infection indicated that VP12, VP17, VP31, and granulin were expressed by 2.5 days post-infection. Immunogold labeling of the virus using the monospecific antisera and electron microscopy confirmed earlier reports that granulin is located in the protein matrix, V17 is an envelope protein, and VP31 is a capsid protein.

  11. Expression and Genetic Variation in Neuroendocrine Signaling Pathways in Lethal and Nonlethal Prostate Cancer among Men Diagnosed with Localized Disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Donghao; Carlsson, Jessica; Penney, Kathryn L; Davidsson, Sabina; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Mucci, Lorelei A; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Andrén, Ove; Fang, Fang; Fall, Katja

    2017-12-01

    Background: Recent data suggest that neuroendocrine signaling pathways may play a role in the progression of prostate cancer, particularly for early-stage disease. We aimed to explore whether expression of selected genes in the adrenergic, serotoninergic, glucocorticoid, and dopaminergic pathways differs in prostate tumor tissue from men with lethal disease compared with men with nonlethal disease. Methods: On the basis of the Swedish Watchful Waiting Cohort, we included 511 men diagnosed with incidental prostate cancer through transurethral resection of the prostate during 1977-1998 with follow-up up to 30 years. For those with tumor tissue ( N = 262), we measured mRNA expression of 223 selected genes included in neuroendocrine pathways. Using DNA from normal prostate tissue ( N = 396), we genotyped 36 SNPs from 14 receptor genes. Lethal prostate cancer was the primary outcome in analyses with pathway gene expression and genetic variants. Results: Differential expression of genes in the serotoninergic pathway was associated with risk of lethal prostate cancer ( P = 0.007); similar but weaker associations were noted for the adrenergic ( P = 0.014) and glucocorticoid ( P = 0.020) pathways. Variants of the HTR2A (rs2296972; P = 0.002) and NR3CI (rs33388; P = 0.035) genes (within the serotoninergic and glucocorticoid pathways) were associated with lethal cancer in overdominant models. These genetic variants were correlated with expression of several genes in corresponding pathways ( P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings lend support to hypothesis that the neuroendocrine pathways, particularly serotoninergic pathway, are associated with lethal outcome in the natural course of localized prostate cancer. Impact: This study provides evidence of the role of neuroendocrine pathways in prostate cancer progression that may have clinical utility. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(12); 1781-7. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Expression of the CXCR6 on polymorphonuclear neutrophils in pancreatic carcinoma and in acute, localized bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaida, M M; Günther, F; Wagner, C; Friess, H; Giese, N A; Schmidt, J; Hänsch, G M; Wente, M N

    2008-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR6 has been described on lymphoid cells and is thought to participate in the homing of activated T-cells to non-lymphoid tissue. We now provide evidence that the chemokine receptor CXCR6 is also expressed by activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vivo: Examination of biopsies derived from patients with pancreatic carcinoma by confocal laser scan microscopy revealed a massive infiltration of PMN that expressed CXCR6, while PMN of the peripheral blood of these patients did not. To answer the question whether CXCR6 expression is a property of infiltrated and activated PMN, leucocytes were collected from patients with localized soft tissue infections in the course of the wound debridement. By cytofluorometry, the majority of these cells were identified as PMN. Up to 50% of these PMN were also positive for CXCR6. Again, PMN from the peripheral blood of these patients were nearly negative for CXCR6, as were PMN of healthy donors. In a series of in vitro experiments, up-regulation of CXCR6 on PMN of healthy donors by a variety of cytokines was tested. So far, a minor, although reproducible, effect of tumour necrosis factor (TNFα) was seen: brief exposure with low-dose TNFα induced expression of CXCR6 on the surface of PMN. Furthermore, we could show an increased migration of PMN induced by the axis CXCL16 and CXCR6. In summary, our data provide evidence that CXCR6 is not constitutively expressed on PMN, but is up-regulated under inflammatory conditions and mediates migration of CXCR6-positive PMN. PMID:18778363

  13. Expression of the CXCR6 on polymorphonuclear neutrophils in pancreatic carcinoma and in acute, localized bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gaida, M M; Günther, F; Wagner, C; Friess, H; Giese, N A; Schmidt, J; Hänsch, G M; Wente, M N

    2008-11-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR6 has been described on lymphoid cells and is thought to participate in the homing of activated T-cells to non-lymphoid tissue. We now provide evidence that the chemokine receptor CXCR6 is also expressed by activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vivo: Examination of biopsies derived from patients with pancreatic carcinoma by confocal laser scan microscopy revealed a massive infiltration of PMN that expressed CXCR6, while PMN of the peripheral blood of these patients did not. To answer the question whether CXCR6 expression is a property of infiltrated and activated PMN, leucocytes were collected from patients with localized soft tissue infections in the course of the wound debridement. By cytofluorometry, the majority of these cells were identified as PMN. Up to 50% of these PMN were also positive for CXCR6. Again, PMN from the peripheral blood of these patients were nearly negative for CXCR6, as were PMN of healthy donors. In a series of in vitro experiments, up-regulation of CXCR6 on PMN of healthy donors by a variety of cytokines was tested. So far, a minor, although reproducible, effect of tumour necrosis factor (TNFalpha) was seen: brief exposure with low-dose TNFalpha induced expression of CXCR6 on the surface of PMN. Furthermore, we could show an increased migration of PMN induced by the axis CXCL16 and CXCR6. In summary, our data provide evidence that CXCR6 is not constitutively expressed on PMN, but is up-regulated under inflammatory conditions and mediates migration of CXCR6-positive PMN.

  14. A vitellogenic-like carboxypeptidase expressed by human macrophages is localized in endoplasmic reticulum and membrane ruffles

    PubMed Central

    Harris, James; Schwinn, Nicole; Mahoney, James A; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Shaw, Michael; Howard, Chris J; da Silva, Rosangela P; Gordon, Siamon

    2006-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase, vitellogenic-like (CPVL) is a serine carboxypeptidase of unknown function that was first characterized in human macrophages. Initial studies suggested that CPVL is largely restricted to the monocytic lineage, although it may also be expressed by cells outside the immune system. Here, we use a new monoclonal antibody to characterize the properties and localization of CPVL in human macrophages to elucidate a possible function for the protease. CPVL is up-regulated during the maturation of monocytes (MO) to macrophages, although the protein can be seen in both. In primary macrophages, CPVL is glycosylated with high mannose residues and colocalizes with markers for endoplasmic reticulum, while in MO it is more disperse and less clearly associated with endoplasmic reticulum. CPVL is highly expressed in lamellipodia and membrane ruffles, which also concentrate markers of the secretory pathway (MIP-1α and tumour necrosis factor-α) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. CPVL can be seen on early latex bead and Candida albicans phagosomes, but it is not retained in the maturing phagosome, unlike MHC class I/II. CPVL has a mixed cytosolic and membrane-associated localization but is not detectable on the outer plasma membrane. We propose that CPVL may be involved in antigen processing, the secretory pathway and/or in actin remodelling and lamellipodium formation. PMID:16436111

  15. Xuhuai goat H-FABP gene clone, subcellular localization of expression products and the preparation of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yan-hui; Li, Bi-chun; Wei, Guang-hui; Zhu, Cai-ye; Li, Wei; Zhang, Ya-ni; Du, Li-xin; Cao, Wen-guang

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to clone the heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) gene of Xuhuai goat, to explore it bioinformatically, and analyze the subcellular localization using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The results showed that the coding sequence (CDS) length of Xuhuai goat H-FABP gene was 402 bp, encoding 133 amino acids (GenBank accession number AY466498.1). The H-FABP cDNA coding sequence was compared with the corresponding region of human, chicken, brown rat, cow, wild boar, donkey, and zebrafish. The similarity were 89%, 76%, 85%, 84%, 93%, 91%, 70%, respectively. For the corresponding amino acid sequences, the similarity were 90%, 79%, 88%, 97%, 95%, 94%, 72%, respectively. This study did not find the signal peptide region in the H-FABP protein; it revealed that H-FABP protein might be a nonsecreted protein. H-FABP expression was detected in vitro by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the EGFP-H-FABP fusion protein was localized to the cytoplasm. The gene could also be transiently and permanently expressed in mice.

  16. Src family kinase expression and subcellular localization in macrophages: implications for their role in CSF-1-induced macrophage migration.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Amy R; Mouchemore, Kellie A; Steer, James H; Sunderland, Andrew J; Sampaio, Natalia G; Greenland, Eloise L; Joyce, David A; Pixley, Fiona J

    2016-07-01

    A major role of colony-stimulating factor-1 is to stimulate the differentiation of mononuclear phagocytic lineage cells into adherent, motile, mature macrophages. The colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor transduces colony-stimulating factor-1 signaling, and we have shown previously that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p110δ is a critical mediator of colony-stimulating factor-1-stimulated motility through the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor pY721 motif. Src family kinases are also implicated in the regulation of macrophage motility and in colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor signaling, although functional redundancy of the multiple SFKs expressed in macrophages makes it challenging to delineate their specific functions. We report a comprehensive analysis of individual Src family kinase expression in macrophage cell lines and primary macrophages and demonstrate colony-stimulating factor-1-induced changes in Src family kinase subcellular localization, which provides clues to their distinct and redundant functions in macrophages. Moreover, expression of individual Src family kinases is both species specific and dependent on colony-stimulating factor-1-induced macrophage differentiation. Hck associated with the activated colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor, whereas Lyn associated with the receptor in a constitutive manner. Consistent with this, inhibitor studies revealed that Src family kinases were important for both colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor activation and colony-stimulating factor-1-induced macrophage spreading, motility, and invasion. Distinct colony-stimulating factor-1-induced changes in the subcellular localization of individual SFKs suggest specific roles for these Src family kinases in the macrophage response to colony-stimulating factor-1. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  17. Gene expression and localization of two types of AQP5 in Xenopus tropicalis under hydration and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yuki; Sano, Takahiro; Tsuchiya, Nobuhito; Okada, Reiko; Mochida, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2014-07-01

    Two types of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) genes (aqp-xt5a and aqp-xt5b) were identified in the genome of Xenopus tropicalis by synteny comparison and molecular phylogenetic analysis. When the frogs were in water, AQP-xt5a mRNA was expressed in the skin and urinary bladder. The expression of AQP-xt5a mRNA was significantly increased in dehydrated frogs. AQP-xt5b mRNA was also detected in the skin and increased in response to dehydration. Additionally, AQP-xt5b mRNA began to be slightly expressed in the lung and stomach after dehydration. For the pelvic skin of hydrated frogs, immunofluorescence staining localized AQP-xt5a and AQP-xt5b to the cytoplasm of secretory cells of the granular glands and the apical plasma membrane of secretory cells of the small granular glands, respectively. After dehydration, the locations of both AQPs in their respective glands did not change, but AQP-xt5a was visualized in the cytoplasm of secretory cells of the small granular glands. For the urinary bladder, AQP-xt5a was observed in the apical plasma membrane and cytoplasm of a number of granular cells under normal hydration. After dehydration, AQP-xt5a was found in the apical membrane and cytoplasm of most granular cells. Injection of vasotocin into hydrated frogs did not induce these changes in the localization of AQP-xt5a in the small granular glands and urinary bladder, however. The results suggest that AQP-xt5a might be involved in water reabsorption from the urinary bladder during dehydration, whereas AQP-xt5b might play a role in water secretion from the small granular gland. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Expression and cellular localization of the transcription factor NeuroD1 in the developing and adult rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Castro, Analía E; Benitez, Sergio G; Farias Altamirano, Luz E; Savastano, Luis E; Patterson, Sean I; Muñoz, Estela M

    2015-05-01

    Circadian rhythms govern many aspects of mammalian physiology. The daily pattern of melatonin synthesis and secretion is one of the classic examples of circadian oscillations. It is mediated by a class of neuroendocrine cells known as pinealocytes which are not yet fully defined. An established method to evaluate functional and cytological characters is through the expression of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators. NeuroD1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in the specification and maintenance of both endocrine and neuronal phenotypes. We have previously described developmental and adult regulation of NeuroD1 mRNA in the rodent pineal gland. However, the transcript levels were not influenced by the elimination of sympathetic input, suggesting that any rhythmicity of NeuroD1 might be found downstream of transcription. Here, we describe NeuroD1 protein expression and cellular localization in the rat pineal gland during development and the daily cycle. In embryonic and perinatal stages, protein expression follows the mRNA pattern and is predominantly nuclear. Thereafter, NeuroD1 is mostly found in pinealocyte nuclei in the early part of the night and in cytoplasm during the day, a rhythm maintained into adulthood. Additionally, nocturnal nuclear NeuroD1 levels are reduced after sympathetic disruption, an effect mimicked by the in vivo administration of α- and β-adrenoceptor blockers. NeuroD1 phosphorylation at two sites, Ser(274) and Ser(336) , associates with nuclear localization in pinealocytes. These data suggest that NeuroD1 influences pineal phenotype both during development and adulthood, in an autonomic and phosphorylation-dependent manner. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Local Context Finder (LCF) reveals multidimensional relationships among mRNA expression profiles of Arabidopsis responding to pathogen infection

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Fumiaki; Glazebrook, Jane

    2003-01-01

    A major task in computational analysis of mRNA expression profiles is definition of relationships among profiles on the basis of similarities among them. This is generally achieved by pattern recognition in the distribution of data points representing each profile in a high-dimensional space. Some drawbacks of commonly used pattern recognition algorithms stem from their use of a globally linear space and/or limited degrees of freedom. A pattern recognition method called Local Context Finder (LCF) is described here. LCF uses nonlinear dimensionality reduction for pattern recognition. Then it builds a network of profiles based on the nonlinear dimensionality reduction results. LCF was used to analyze mRNA expression profiles of the plant host Arabidopsis interacting with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. In one case, LCF revealed two dimensions essential to explain the effects of the NahG transgene and the ndr1 mutation on resistant and susceptible responses. In another case, plant mutants deficient in responses to pathogen infection were classified on the basis of LCF analysis of their profiles. The classification by LCF was consistent with the results of biological characterization of the mutants. Thus, LCF is a powerful method for extracting information from expression profile data. PMID:12960373

  20. Prolonged, brain-wide expression of nuclear-localized GCaMP3 for functional circuit mapping

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christina K.; Miri, Andrew; Leung, Louis C.; Berndt, Andre; Mourrain, Philippe; Tank, David W.; Burdine, Rebecca D.

    2014-01-01

    Larval zebrafish offer the potential for large-scale optical imaging of neural activity throughout the central nervous system; however, several barriers challenge their utility. First, ~panneuronal probe expression has to date only been demonstrated at early larval stages up to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf), precluding imaging at later time points when circuits are more mature. Second, nuclear exclusion of genetically-encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) limits the resolution of functional fluorescence signals collected during imaging. Here, we report the creation of transgenic zebrafish strains exhibiting robust, nuclearly targeted expression of GCaMP3 across the brain up to at least 14 dpf utilizing a previously described optimized Gal4-UAS system. We confirmed both nuclear targeting and functionality of the modified probe in vitro and measured its kinetics in response to action potentials (APs). We then demonstrated in vivo functionality of nuclear-localized GCaMP3 in transgenic zebrafish strains by identifying eye position-sensitive fluorescence fluctuations in caudal hindbrain neurons during spontaneous eye movements. Our methodological approach will facilitate studies of larval zebrafish circuitry by both improving resolution of functional Ca2+ signals and by allowing brain-wide expression of improved GECIs, or potentially any probe, further into development. PMID:25505384

  1. The potato-specific apyrase is apoplastically localized and has influence on gene expression, growth, and development.

    PubMed

    Riewe, David; Grosman, Lukasz; Fernie, Alisdair R; Wucke, Cornelia; Geigenberger, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Apyrases hydrolyze nucleoside triphosphates and diphosphates and are found in all eukaryotes and a few prokaryotes. Although their enzymatic properties have been well characterized, relatively little is known regarding their subcellular localization and physiological function in plants. In this study, we used reverse genetic and biochemical approaches to investigate the role of potato (Solanum tuberosum)-specific apyrase. Silencing of the apyrase gene family with RNA interference constructs under the control of the constitutive 35S promoter led to a strong decrease in apyrase activity to below 10% of the wild-type level. This decreased activity led to phenotypic changes in the transgenic lines, including a general retardation in growth, an increase in tuber number per plant, and differences in tuber morphology. Silencing of apyrase under the control of a tuber-specific promoter led to similar changes in tuber morphology; however, there were no direct effects of apyrase inhibition on tuber metabolism. DNA microarrays revealed that decreased expression of apyrase leads to increased levels of transcripts coding for cell wall proteins involved in growth and genes involved in energy transfer and starch synthesis. To place these results in context, we determined the subcellular localization of the potato-specific apyrase. Using a combination of approaches, we were able to demonstrate that this enzyme is localized to the apoplast. We describe the evidence that underlies both this fact and that potato-specific apyrase has a crucial role in regulating growth and development.

  2. Global gene expression analysis provides insight into local adaptation to geothermal streams in tadpoles of the Andean toad Rhinella spinulosa.

    PubMed

    Pastenes, Luis; Valdivieso, Camilo; Di Genova, Alex; Travisany, Dante; Hart, Andrew; Montecino, Martín; Orellana, Ariel; Gonzalez, Mauricio; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Allende, Miguel L; Maass, Alejandro; Méndez, Marco A

    2017-05-16

    The anuran Rhinella spinulosa is distributed along the Andes Range at altitudes that undergo wide daily and seasonal variation in temperature. One of the populations inhabits geothermal streams, a stable environment that influences life history traits such as the timing of metamorphosis. To investigate whether this population has undergone local adaptation to this unique habitat, we carried out transcriptome analyses in animals from two localities in two developmental stages (prometamorphic and metamorphic) and exposed them to two temperatures (20 and 25 °C). RNA-Seq, de novo assembly and annotation defined a transcriptome revealing 194,469 high quality SNPs, with 1,507 genes under positive selection. Comparisons among the experimental conditions yielded 1,593 differentially expressed genes. A bioinformatics search for candidates revealed a total of 70 genes that are highly likely to be implicated in the adaptive response of the population living in a stable environment, compared to those living in an environment with variable temperatures. Most importantly, the population inhabiting the geothermal environment showed decreased transcriptional plasticity and reduced genetic variation compared to its counterpart from the non-stable environment. This analysis will help to advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that account for the local adaptation to geothermal streams in anurans.

  3. Cadherin-8 expression, synaptic localization, and molecular control of neuronal form in prefrontal corticostriatal circuits.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Lauren G; Riemslagh, Fréderike W; Sullivan, Josefa M; Mesias, Roxana; Williams, Frances M; Huntley, George W; Benson, Deanna L

    2015-01-01

    Neocortical interactions with the dorsal striatum support many motor and executive functions, and such underlying functional networks are particularly vulnerable to a variety of developmental, neurological, and psychiatric brain disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. Relatively little is known about the development of functional corticostriatal interactions, and in particular, virtually nothing is known of the molecular mechanisms that control generation of prefrontal cortex-striatal circuits. Here, we used regional and cellular in situ hybridization techniques coupled with neuronal tract tracing to show that Cadherin-8 (Cdh8), a homophilic adhesion protein encoded by a gene associated with autism spectrum disorders and learning disability susceptibility, is enriched within striatal projection neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex and in striatal medium spiny neurons forming the direct or indirect pathways. Developmental analysis of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot data show that Cdh8 expression peaks in the prefrontal cortex and striatum at P10, when cortical projections start to form synapses in the striatum. High-resolution immunoelectron microscopy shows that Cdh8 is concentrated at excitatory synapses in the dorsal striatum, and Cdh8 knockdown in cortical neurons impairs dendritic arborization and dendrite self-avoidance. Taken together, our findings indicate that Cdh8 delineates developing corticostriatal circuits where it is a strong candidate for regulating the generation of normal cortical projections, neuronal morphology, and corticostriatal synapses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Anatomical localization, gene expression profiling and functional characterization of adult human neck brown fat.

    PubMed

    Cypess, Aaron M; White, Andrew P; Vernochet, Cecile; Schulz, Tim J; Xue, Ruidan; Sass, Christina A; Huang, Tian Liang; Roberts-Toler, Carla; Weiner, Lauren S; Sze, Cathy; Chacko, Aron T; Deschamps, Laura N; Herder, Lindsay M; Truchan, Nathan; Glasgow, Allison L; Holman, Ashley R; Gavrila, Alina; Hasselgren, Per-Olof; Mori, Marcelo A; Molla, Michael; Tseng, Yu-Hua

    2013-05-01

    The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure is the underlying cause of the current obesity and diabetes pandemics. Central to these pathologies is the fat depot: white adipose tissue (WAT) stores excess calories, and brown adipose tissue (BAT) consumes fuel for thermogenesis using tissue-specific uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). BAT was once thought to have a functional role in rodents and human infants only, but it has been recently shown that in response to mild cold exposure, adult human BAT consumes more glucose per gram than any other tissue. In addition to this nonshivering thermogenesis, human BAT may also combat weight gain by becoming more active in the setting of increased whole-body energy intake. This phenomenon of BAT-mediated diet-induced thermogenesis has been observed in rodents and suggests that activation of human BAT could be used as a safe treatment for obesity and metabolic dysregulation. In this study, we isolated anatomically defined neck fat from adult human volunteers and compared its gene expression, differentiation capacity and basal oxygen consumption to different mouse adipose depots. Although the properties of human neck fat vary substantially between individuals, some human samples share many similarities with classical, also called constitutive, rodent BAT.

  5. Chronic allograft nephropathy: expression and localization of PAI-1 and PPAR-gamma.

    PubMed

    Revelo, Monica P; Federspiel, Charles; Helderman, Harold; Fogo, Agnes B

    2005-12-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is a major cause of loss of renal allografts. Mechanisms postulated to be involved include sequelae of rejection, warm ischaemia time, drug toxicity, ongoing hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is implicated not only in thrombosis, but also in fibrosis, by inhibiting matrix degradation, and is expressed in renal parenchymal cells as well as in macrophages. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) is a member of the steroid receptor superfamily, and plays a major beneficial role in lipid regulation, insulin sensitivity and macrophage function, factors that may play a role in CAN. We therefore studied the expression of these molecules in CAN. All renal biopsy/nephrectomy files from Vanderbilt and Nashville VAMC from a 6 year period were reviewed to identify all renal transplant biopsies or nephrectomies more than 6 months after transplant with CAN. CAN was defined as fibrosis in the graft, vascular, interstitial or glomerular. All cases were scored for severity of fibrosis in vasculature (0-3 scale), glomeruli (% affected with either segmental and/or global sclerosis) and interstitial fibrosis (% of sample affected). PAI-1 and PPAR-gamma immunostaining was assessed on a 0-3 scale in glomeruli, vessels and tubules. Eighty-two patients with a total of 106 samples met entry criteria. The population consisted of 59 Caucasians and 23 African-Americans; 49 males, 33 females with average age 37.9+/-1.7 years. Average time after transplant at time of biopsy was 60.5+/-4.9 months (range 7-229). Glomerulosclerosis extent in CAN was on average 26.5+/-2.4% compared with 3.6+/-1.2% in normal control kidneys from native kidney cancer nephrectomies and 0% in transplanted kidney biopsies from patients obtained > or =6 months after transplantation without CAN. Native control kidneys showed mild interstitial fibrosis (8.0+/-1.2%), whereas transplant controls showed very minimal fibrosis (2

  6. Differential expression and localization of four connexins in the ovary of the ayu (Plecoglossus Altivelis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yoshizaki, G.; Takeuchi, T.; Soyano, K.; Itoh, F.; Patino, R.

    2007-01-01

    The post-vitellogenic oocytes of teleost fish are generally unresponsive to maturation-inducing hormone (MIH) until a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge stimulates sensitivity via the acquisition of oocyte-maturational competence (OMC). Heterologous gap junctions (GJs) between granulosa cells and the oocyte have been previously implicated in the regulation of oocyte maturation in various vertebrate species. Although heterologous GJ are present in ovarian follicles of ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis), their role in maturation remains unclear. In the present study, we cloned and characterized complementary DNAs for GJ protein connexin (Cx), and examined the expression pattern of Cx messenger RNAs in the ayu ovary. Four Cx cDNAs with predicted molecular masses of 32.1 (Cx32.1), 34.9 (Cx34.9), 44.1 (Cx44.1), and 44.2 (Cx44.2) kDa, respectively, were cloned. Northern blot analysis revealed that the levels of Cx44.1 and Cx44.2 transcripts were similar during the vitellogenic and ovulatory stages. Cx32.1 transcripts were more abundant during the vitellogenic stage, but their levels declined thereafter. Cx34.9 transcript levels increased during the vitellogenic stage and remained high during the acquisition of OMC. In situ hybridization revealed that Cx44.1 and Cx44.2 signals were restricted to the oocyte, whereas the Cx32.1 and Cx34.9 signals were detected in both cellular fractions. Furthermore, a dye-transfer assay revealed the presence of functional GJs between the oocytes and follicle cells. These results suggest that Cx34.9 contributes to the formation of heterologous GJs between oocytes and granulosa cells. Moreover, GJs formed by Cx34.9 may function during the LH-dependent acquisition of OMC and the MIH-dependent resumption of meiosis in ayu. ?? 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Cytokinins influence root gravitropism via differential regulation of auxin transporter expression and localization in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pernisova, Marketa; Prat, Tomas; Grones, Peter; Harustiakova, Danka; Matonohova, Martina; Spichal, Lukas; Nodzynski, Tomasz; Friml, Jiri; Hejatko, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Redirection of intercellular auxin fluxes via relocalization of the PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3) and PIN7 auxin efflux carriers has been suggested to be necessary for the root gravitropic response. Cytokinins have also been proposed to play a role in controlling root gravitropism, but conclusive evidence is lacking. We present a detailed study of the dynamics of root bending early after gravistimulation, which revealed a delayed gravitropic response in transgenic lines with depleted endogenous cytokinins (Pro35S:AtCKX) and cytokinin signaling mutants. Pro35S:AtCKX lines, as well as a cytokinin receptor mutant ahk3, showed aberrations in the auxin response distribution in columella cells consistent with defects in the auxin transport machinery. Using in vivo real-time imaging of PIN3-GFP and PIN7-GFP in AtCKX3 overexpression and ahk3 backgrounds, we observed wild-type-like relocalization of PIN proteins in the columella early after gravistimulation, with gravity-induced relocalization of PIN7 faster than that of PIN3. Nonetheless, the cellular distribution of PIN3 and PIN7 and expression of PIN7 and the auxin influx carrier AUX1 was affected in AtCKX overexpression lines. Based on the retained cytokinin sensitivity in pin3 pin4 pin7 mutant, we propose the AUX1-mediated auxin transport rather than columella-located PIN proteins as a target of endogenous cytokinins in the control of root gravitropism. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Quantitative expression of protein heterogeneity: Response of amino acid side chains to their local environment.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Debashree; Mehler, Ernest L

    2008-08-01

    A general method has been developed to characterize the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the microenvironment (MENV), in which a given amino acid side chain is immersed, by calculating a quantitative property descriptor (QPD) based on the relative (to water) hydrophobicity of the MENV. Values of the QPD were calculated for a test set of 733 proteins to analyze the modulating effects on amino acid residue properties by the MENV in which they are imbedded. The QPD values and solvent accessibility were used to derive a partitioning of residues based on the MENV hydrophobicities. From this partitioning, a new hydrophobicity scale was developed, entirely in the context of protein structure, where amino acid residues are immersed in one or more "MENVpockets." Thus, the partitioning is based on the residues "sampling" a large number of "solvents" (MENVs) that represent a very large range of hydrophobicity values. It was found that the hydrophobicity of around 80% of amino acid side chains and their MENV are complementary to each other, but for about 20%, the MENV and their imbedded residue can be considered as mismatched. Many of these mismatches could be rationalized in terms of the structural stability of the protein and/or the involvement of the imbedded residue in function. The analysis also indicated a remarkable conservation of local environments around highly conserved active site residues that have similar functions across protein families, but where members have relatively low sequence homology. Thus, quantitative evaluation of this QPD is suggested, here, as a tool for structure-function prediction, analysis, and parameter development for the calculation of properties in proteins. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Genome-wide co-localization of Polycomb orthologs and their effects on gene expression in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycomb group proteins form multicomponent complexes that are important for establishing lineage-specific patterns of gene expression. Mammalian cells encode multiple permutations of the prototypic Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) with little evidence for functional specialization. An aim of this study is to determine whether the multiple orthologs that are co-expressed in human fibroblasts act on different target genes and whether their genomic location changes during cellular senescence. Results Deep sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitated with antibodies against CBX6, CBX7, CBX8, RING1 and RING2 reveals that the orthologs co-localize at multiple sites. PCR-based validation at representative loci suggests that a further six PRC1 proteins have similar binding patterns. Importantly, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies against different orthologs implies that multiple variants of PRC1 associate with the same DNA. At many loci, the binding profiles have a distinctive architecture that is preserved in two different types of fibroblast. Conversely, there are several hundred loci at which PRC1 binding is cell type-specific and, contrary to expectations, the presence of PRC1 does not necessarily equate with transcriptional silencing. Interestingly, the PRC1 binding profiles are preserved in senescent cells despite changes in gene expression. Conclusions The multiple permutations of PRC1 in human fibroblasts congregate at common rather than specific sites in the genome and with overlapping but distinctive binding profiles in different fibroblasts. The data imply that the effects of PRC1 complexes on gene expression are more subtle than simply repressing the loci at which they bind. PMID:24485159

  10. Differential gene expression responses distinguish contact and respiratory sensitizers and nonsensitizing irritants in the local lymph node assay.

    PubMed

    Adenuga, David; Woolhiser, Michael R; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Boverhof, Darrell R

    2012-04-01

    Genomic approaches have the potential to enhance the specificity and predictive accuracy of existing toxicology endpoints, including those for chemical sensitization. The present study was conducted to determine whether gene expression responses can distinguish contact sensitizers (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene [DNCB] and hexyl cinnamic aldehyde [HCA]), respiratory sensitizers (ortho-phthalaldehyde and trimellitic anhydride [TMA]), and nonsensitizing irritants (methyl salicylate [MS] and nonanoic acid [NA]) in the local lymph node assay (LLNA). Female Balb/c mice received doses of each chemical as per the standard LLNA dosing regimen on days 1, 2, and 3. Auricular lymph nodes were analyzed for tritiated thymidine ((3)HTdR) incorporation on day 6 and for gene expression responses on days 6 and 10. All chemicals induced dose-dependent increases in stimulation index, which correlated strongly with the number of differentially expressed genes. A majority of genes modulated by the irritants were similarly altered by the sensitizers, consistent with the irritating effects of the sensitizers. However, a select number of responses involved with immune-specific functions, such as dendritic cell activation, were unique to the sensitizers and may offer the ability to distinguish sensitizers from irritants. Genes for the mast cell proteases 1 and 8, Lgals7, Tim2, Aicda, Il4, and Akr1c18 were more strongly regulated by respiratory sensitizers compared with contact sensitizers and may represent potential biomarkers for discriminating between contact and respiratory sensitizers. Collectively, these data suggest that gene expression responses may serve as useful biomarkers to distinguish between respiratory and contact sensitizers and nonsensitizing irritants in the LLNA.

  11. Identification of multiple dmrt1s in catfish: localization, dimorphic expression pattern, changes during testicular cycle and after methyltestosterone treatment.

    PubMed

    Raghuveer, K; Senthilkumaran, B

    2009-05-01

    The double sex and mab-3 related (DM) transcription factor 1 (dmrt1) plays an important role in testicular differentiation. Here, we report cloning of multiple dmrt1s, a full-length and two alternative spliced forms from adult catfish (Clarias gariepinus) testis, which encode predicted proteins of 287 (dmrt1a), 253 (dmrt1b) and 233 (dmrt1c) amino acid residues respectively. Interestingly, dmrt1c lacks the majority of the DM domain. Multiple dmrt1s (dmrt1a and dmrt1c) were obtained from Clarias batrachus as well. Tissue distribution (transcript and protein) of catfish dmrt1 revealed exclusive expression in testis. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed the presence of multiple dmrt1s with high levels of dmrt1a in adult testis but not in ovary. Real-time RT-PCR analysis during testicular cycle showed higher levels of dmrt1 transcripts in preparatory and pre-spawning when compared with spawning and post-spawning phases. Immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence localization revealed the presence of catfish Dmrt1 protein in spermatogonia and spermatocytes, which indicates plausible role in spermatogenesis. Histological analysis indicated initiation of gonadal sex differentiation in catfish around 40-50 days after hatching. The potential role for dmrt1 in testicular differentiation is evident from its stage-dependent elevated expression in developing testis. Furthermore, dimorphic expressions of dmrt1s were evident at different stages of gonadal development or recrudescence in catfish. Treatment of methyl testosterone (MT) during early stages of gonadal sex differentiation resulted in adult males. Interestingly, we also obtained MT-treated fishes having ova-testis gonads. Analysis of dmrt1, sox9a, foxl2 and cyp19a1 expression patterns in MT-treated gonads revealed tissue-specific pattern. These results together suggest that multiple dmrt1s are testis-specific markers in catfish.

  12. Reduced miR-512 and the Elevated Expression of Its Targets cFLIP and MCL1 Localize to Neurons With Hyperphosphorylated Tau Protein in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Mezache, Louisa; Mikhail, Madison; Garofalo, Michela; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-10-01

    The cause for the neurofibrillary tangles and plaques in Alzheimer disease likely relates to an abnormal accumulation of their key components, which include β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau protein. We segregated Alzheimer brain sections from people with end-stage disease into those with abundant hyperphosphorylated tau protein and those without and compared each to normal brains for global microRNA patterns. A significant reduced expression of several microRNAs, including miR-512, was evident in the Alzheimer brain sections with abundant hyperphosphorylated tau. Immunohistochemistry documented that 2 known targets of microRNA-512, cFLIP and MCL1, were significantly over expressed and each colocalized to neurons with the abnormal tau protein. Analysis for apoptosis including activated caspase-3, increased caspase-4 and caspase-8, apoptosis initiating factor, APAF-1 activity, and the TUNEL assay was negative in the areas where neurons showed hyperphosphorylated tau. MCM2 expression, a marker of neuroprogenitor cells, was significantly reduced in the Alzheimer sections that contained the hyperphosphorylated tau. These results suggest that a basic defect in Alzheimer disease may be the reduced microRNA-driven increased expression of proteins that may alter the apoptotic/antiapoptotic balance of neurons. This, in turn, could lead to the accumulation of key Alzheimer proteins such as hyperphosphorylated tau that ultimately prevent normal neuronal function and lead to disease symptomatology.

  13. Cloning, expression analysis, and chromosomal localization of HIP1R, an isolog of huntingtin interacting protein (HIP1).

    PubMed

    Seki, N; Muramatsu, M; Sugano, S; Suzuki, Y; Nakagawara, A; Ohhira, M; Hayashi, A; Hori, T; Saito, T

    1998-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder which is associated with CAG expansion in the coding region of the gene for huntingtin protein. Recently, a huntingtin interacting protein, HIP1, was isolated by the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we report the isolation of a cDNA clone for HIP1R (huntingtin interacting protein-1 related), which encodes a predicted protein product sharing a striking homology with HIP1. RT-PCR analysis showed that the messenger RNA was ubiquitously expressed in various human tissues. Based on PCR-assisted analysis of a radiation hybrid panel and fluorescence in situ hybridization, HIP1R was localized to the q24 region of chromosome 12.

  14. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  15. 1α,25 dihydroxi-vitamin D{sub 3} modulates CDK4 and CDK6 expression and localization

    SciTech Connect

    Irazoqui, Ana P.; Heim, Nadia B.; Boland, Ricardo L.

    We recently reported that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and p38 MAPK participate in pro-differentiation events triggered by 1α,25(OH){sub 2}-vitamin D{sub 3} [1,25D] in skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, our studies demonstrated that 1,25D promotes G0/G1 arrest of cells inducing cyclin D3 and cyclin dependent kinases inhibitors (CKIs) p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} expression in a VDR and p38 MAPK dependent manner. In this work we present data indicating that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 also play a role in the mechanism by which 1,25D stimulates myogenesis. To investigate VDR involvement in hormone regulation of CDKs 4 and 6, wemore » significantly reduced its expression by the use of a shRNA against mouse VDR, generating the skeletal muscle cell line C2C12-VDR. Investigation of changes in cellular cycle regulating proteins by immunoblotting showed that the VDR is involved in the 1,25D –induced CDKs 4 and 6 protein levels at 6 h of hormone treatment. CDK4 levels remains high during S phase peak and G0/G1 arrest while CDK6 expression decreases at 12 h and increases again al 24 h. The up-regulation of CDKs 4 and 6 by 1,25D (6 h) was abolished in C2C12 cells pre-treated with the ERK1/2 inhibitor, UO126. Moreover, CDKs 4 and 6 expression induced by the hormone nor was detected when α and β isoforms of p38 MAPK were inhibited by compound SB203580. Confocal images show that there is not co-localization between VDR and CDKs at 6 h of hormone treatment, however CDK4 and VDR co-localizates in nucleus after 12 h of 1,25D exposure. Of relevance, at this time 1,25D promotes CDK6 localization in a peri-nuclear ring. Our data demonstrate that the VDR, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK are involved in the control of CDKs 4 and 6 by 1,25D in skeletal muscle cells sustaining the operation of a VDR and MAPKs –dependent mechanism in hormone modulation of myogenesis. - Highlights: • 1,25D modulates CDKs 4 and 6 expression in skeletal muscle cells. • CDK4 co

  16. Transgene expression and local tissue distribution of naked and polymer-condensed plasmid DNA after intradermal administration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, R. Noelle; Zhong, Xiao; Panus, David; Han, Wenqing; Ji, Weihang; Wang, Chun

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccination using cationic polymers as carriers has the potential to be a very powerful method of immunotherapy, but typical immune responses generated have been less than robust. To better understand the details of DNA vaccine delivery in vivo, we prepared polymer/DNA complexes using three structurally distinct cationic polymers and fluorescently labeled plasmid DNA and injected them intradermally into mice. We analyzed transgene expression (luciferase) and the local tissue distribution of the labeled plasmid at the injection site at various time points (from hours to days). Comparable numbers of luciferase expressing cells were observed in the skin of mice receiving naked plasmid or polyplexes one day after transfection. At day 4, however, the polyplexes appeared to result in more transfected skin cells than naked plasmid. Live animal imaging revealed that naked plasmid dispersed quickly in the skin of mice after injection and had a wider distribution than any of the three types of polyplexes. However, naked plasmid level dropped to below detection limit after 24 h, whereas polyplexes persisted for up to 2 weeks. The PEGylated polyplexes had a significantly wider distribution in the tissue than the nonPEGylated polyplexes. PEGylated polyplexes also distributed more broadly among dermal fibroblasts and allowed greater interaction with antigen-presenting cells (APCs) (dendritic cells and macrophages) starting at around 24 h post-injection. By day 4, co-localization of polyplexes with APCs was observed at the injection site regardless of polymer structure, whereas small amounts of polyplexes were found in the draining lymph nodes. These in vivo findings demonstrate the superior stability of PEGylated polyplexes in physiological milieu and provide important insight on how cationic polymers could be optimized for DNA vaccine delivery. PMID:22300619

  17. Regional expression and ultrastructural localization of EphA7 in the hippocampus and cerebellum of adult rat.

    PubMed

    Amegandjin, Clara A; Jammow, Wafaa; Laforest, Sylvie; Riad, Mustapha; Baharnoori, Moogeh; Badeaux, Frédérique; DesGroseillers, Luc; Murai, Keith K; Pasquale, Elena B; Drolet, Guy; Doucet, Guy

    2016-08-15

    EphA7 is expressed in the adult central nervous system (CNS), where its roles are yet poorly defined. We mapped its distribution using in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) combined with light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM) in adult rat and mouse brain. The strongest ISH signal was in the hippocampal pyramidal and granule cell layers. Moderate levels were detected in habenula, striatum, amygdala, the cingulate, piriform and entorhinal cortex, and in cerebellum, notably the Purkinje cell layer. The IHC signal distribution was consistent with ISH results, with transport of the protein to processes, as exemplified in the hippocampal neuropil layers and weakly stained pyramidal cell layers. In contrast, in the cerebellum, the Purkinje cell bodies were the most strongly immunolabeled elements. EM localized the cell surface-expression of EphA7 essentially in postsynaptic densities (PSDs) of dendritic spines and shafts, and on some astrocytic leaflets, in both hippocampus and cerebellum. Perikaryal and dendritic labeling was mostly intracellular, associated with the synthetic and trafficking machineries. Immunopositive vesicles were also observed in axons and axon terminals. Quantitative analysis in EM showed significant differences in the frequency of labeled elements between regions. Notably, labeled dendrites were ∼3-5 times less frequent in cerebellum than in hippocampus, but they were individually endowed with ∼10-40 times higher frequencies of PSDs, on their shafts and spines. The cell surface localization of EphA7, being preferentially in PSDs, and in perisynaptic astrocytic leaflets, provides morphologic evidence that EphA7 plays key roles in adult CNS synaptic maintenance, plasticity, or function. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2462-2478, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Molecular cloning, expression analysis and subcellular localization of a Transparent Testa 12 ortholog in brown cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-Shan; Wu, Nan; Shen, Zhi-Lin; Lv, Kai; Qian, Sen-He; Guo, Ning; Sun, Xu; Cai, Yong-Ping; Lin, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Transparent Testa 12 (TT12) is a kind of transmembrane transporter of proanthocyanidins (PAs), which belongs to a membrane-localized multidrug and toxin efflux (MATE) family, but the molecular basis of PAs transport is still poorly understood. Here, we cloned a full-length TT12 cDNA from the fiber of brown cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), named GhTT12 (GenBank accession No. KF240564), which comprised 1733 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1503 bp and encoded a putative protein containing 500 amino acid residues with a typical MATE conserved domain. The GhTT12 gene had 96.8% similarity to AA genome in Gossypium arboretum. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis denoted that the relative expression of GhTT12 in brown cotton was 1-5 folds higher than that in white cotton. The mRNA level was the highest at 5 days post anthesis (DPA) and reduced gradually during the fiber development. Expressing GhTT12-fused green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Nicotiana tabacum showed that GhTT12-GFP was localized in the vacuole membrane. The content of PAs increased firstly and decreased afterwards, and reached the maximum at 15 DPA in brown cotton. But for white cotton, the content of PAs remained at a low level during the fiber development. We speculate that GhTT12 may participate in the transportation of PAs from the cytoplasmic matrix to the vacuole. Taken together, our data revealed that GhTT12 was functional as a PAs transmembrane transporter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficient Male Rats Exhibit Abnormal Behavioral Activation in the Forced Swim Test Following Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment: Association with Altered 5-HT1A and Alpha2A Adrenergic Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n=34) or without (DEF, n=30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n=14) and DEF (n=12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (−26%, p=0.0001) and DEF+FLX (−32%, p=0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF+FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON+FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF+FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF+FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON+FLX rats. DEF+FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats. PMID:24360505

  20. Preparing and Analyzing Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) Library for the Mammary Tissue of Local Turkish Kivircik Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Omeroglu Ulu, Zehra; Ulu, Salih; Un, Cemal; Ozdem Oztabak, Kemal; Altunatmaz, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Kivircik sheep is an important local Turkish sheep according to its meat quality and milk productivity. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression profiles of both prenatal and postnatal stages for the Kivircik sheep. Therefore, two different cDNA libraries, which were taken from the same Kivircik sheep mammary gland tissue at prenatal and postnatal stages, were constructed. Total 3072 colonies which were randomly selected from the two libraries were sequenced for developing a sheep ESTs collection. We used Phred/Phrap computer programs for analysis of the raw EST and readable EST sequences were assembled with the CAP3 software. Putative functions of all unique sequences and statistical analysis were determined by Geneious software. Total 422 ESTs have over 80% similarity to known sequences of other organisms in NCBI classified by Panther database for the Gene Ontology (GO) category. By comparing gene expression profiles, we observed some putative genes that may be relative to reproductive performance or play important roles in milk synthesis and secretion. A total of 2414 ESTs have been deposited to the NCBI GenBank database (GW996847–GW999260). EST data in this study have provided a new source of information to functional genome studies of sheep. PMID:28239610

  1. Sub-cellular mRNA localization modulates the regulation of gene expression by small RNAs in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Korkmazhan, Elgin; Stavans, Joel; Levine, Erel

    2017-10-01

    Small non-coding RNAs can exert significant regulatory activity on gene expression in bacteria. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding bacterial gene expression by sRNAs. However, recent findings that demonstrate that families of mRNAs show non-trivial sub-cellular distributions raise the question of how localization may affect the regulatory activity of sRNAs. Here we address this question within a simple mathematical model. We show that the non-uniform spatial distributions of mRNA can alter the threshold-linear response that characterizes sRNAs that act stoichiometrically, and modulate the hierarchy among targets co-regulated by the same sRNA. We also identify conditions where the sub-cellular organization of cofactors in the sRNA pathway can induce spatial heterogeneity on sRNA targets. Our results suggest that under certain conditions, interpretation and modeling of natural and synthetic gene regulatory circuits need to take into account the spatial organization of the transcripts of participating genes.

  2. Changes in histopathology and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 expression in skin graft with different time on Indonesian local cats.

    PubMed

    Erwin; Etriwati; Gunanti; Handharyani, Ekowati; Noviana, Deni

    2017-06-01

    A good skin graft histopathology is followed by formation of hair follicle, sweat gland, sebaceous gland, blood vessel, lightly dense connective tissue, epidermis, and dermis layer. This research aimed to observe histopathology feature and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 expression on cat skin post skin grafting within a different period of time. Nine male Indonesian local cats aged 1-2 years old weighing 3-4 kg were separated into three groups. First surgery created defect wound of 2 cm × 2 cm in size to whole groups. The wounds were left alone for several days, differing in interval between each group, respectively: Group I (for 2 days), Group II (for 4 days), and Group III (for 6 days). The second surgery was done to each group which harvested skin of thoracic area and applied it on recipient wound bed. On day 24 th post skin graft was an examination of histopathology and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 immunohistochemistry. Group I donor skin's epidermis layer had not formed completely whereas epidermis of donor skin of Groups II and III had completely formed. In all group hair follicle, sweat gland, sebaceous gland, and neovascularization were found. The density of connective tissue in Group I was very solid than other groups. Cytokeratin AE1/AE3 expression was found on donor skin's epithelial cell in epidermis and dermis layer with very brown intensity for Group II, brown intensity for Group II, and lightly brown for Group I. Histopathological structure and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 expression post skin graft are better in Groups II and III compared to Group I.

  3. Localization and regulation of glucagon receptors in the chick eye and preproglucagon and glucagon receptor expression in the mouse eye.

    PubMed

    Feldkaemper, Marita P; Burkhardt, Eva; Schaeffel, Frank

    2004-09-01

    Myopia is a condition in which the eye is too long for the focal length of cornea and lens. Analysis of the messengers that are released by the retina to control axial eye growth in the animal model of the chicken revealed that glucagon-immunoreactive amacrine cells are involved in the retinal image processing that controls the growth of the sclera. It was found that the amount of retinal glucagon mRNA increased during treatment with positive lenses and pharmacological studies supported the idea that glucagon may act as a stop signal for eye growth. Glucagon exerts its regulatory effects by binding to a single type of glucagon receptor. In this study, we have sequenced the chicken glucagon receptor and compared its DNA and amino acid sequence with the human and mouse homologues. After sequencing about 80% of the receptor, we found a homology between 79.4 and 75.6% on cDNA level. At the protein level, about 73% of the amino acids were identical. Moreover, the cellular localization and regulation of the glucagon receptor in the chick retina was studied. In situ hybridization studies showed that many cells in the ganglion cell layer and inner nuclear layer, and some cells in the outer nuclear layer, express the receptor mRNA. Injection of the glucagon agonist Lys17,18,Glu21-glucagon induced a down-regulation of glucagon receptor mRNA content. Since the mouse would be an attractive mammalian model to study the biochemical and genetic basis of myopia, and because recent studies have demonstrated that form deprivation myopia can be induced, the expression of preproglucagon and glucagon receptor genes were also studied in the mouse retina and were found to be expressed.

  4. Expression and localization of components of the histone deacetylases multiprotein repressory complexes in the mouse preimplantation embryo.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Boris; Makedonski, Kirill; Shemer, Ruth; Razin, Aharon

    2003-12-01

    DNA methylation had been implicated in the assembly of multiprotein repressory complexes that affect chromatin architecture thereby rendering genes inactive. Proteins containing methyl binding domains (MBDs) are major components of these complexes. MBD3 is a component of the HDAC associated chromatin remodeling complex Mi2/NuRD. The addition of MBD2 to the Mi2/NuRD complex creates MeCP1, a complex that is known to inactivate methylated promoters. The undermethylated state of the mouse preimplantation embryo prompted us to investigate the known repressory complexes at this developmental stage. We found individual components of Mi2/NuRD: MBD3, Mi2, HDAC1 and HDAC2 to be expressed from a very early stage of embryo development and to localize in close proximity with each other and with constitutive heterochromatin by the blastula stage. Expression of MBD2, a component of MeCP1, starts in the blastula stage. Then it is also found to be in proximity with heterochromatin (based on DAPI staining) and with MBD3, Mi2 and HDAC1. In contrast, expression of MeCP2, an MBD containing component of a third repressory complex (MeCP2/Sin3A), is not seen in the preimplantation embryo. Our results suggest that both Mi2/NuRD and MeCP1 complexes are already present at the very early stages of embryo development, while a MeCP2 complex is added to the arsenal of repressory complexes post-implantation at a stage when DNA methylation takes place.

  5. Postovulatory aging affects dynamics of mRNA, expression and localization of maternal effect proteins, spindle integrity and pericentromeric proteins in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Trapphoff, T.; Heiligentag, M.; Dankert, D.; Demond, H.; Deutsch, D.; Fröhlich, T.; Arnold, G.J.; Grümmer, R.; Horsthemke, B.; Eichenlaub-Ritter, U.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract STUDY QUESTION Is the postovulatory aging-dependent differential decrease of mRNAs and polyadenylation of mRNAs coded by maternal effect genes associated with altered abundance and distribution of maternal effect and RNA-binding proteins (MSY2)? SUMMARY ANSWER Postovulatory aging results in differential reduction in abundance of maternal effect proteins, loss of RNA-binding proteins from specific cytoplasmic domains and critical alterations of pericentromeric proteins without globally affecting protein abundance. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Oocyte postovulatory aging is associated with differential alteration in polyadenylation and reduction in abundance of mRNAs coded by selected maternal effect genes. RNA-binding and -processing proteins are involved in storage, polyadenylation and degradation of mRNAs thus regulating stage-specific recruitment of maternal mRNAs, while chromosomal proteins that are stage-specifically expressed at pericentromeres, contribute to control of chromosome segregation and regulation of gene expression in the zygote. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Germinal vesicle (GV) and metaphase II (MII) oocytes from sexually mature C57B1/6J female mice were investigated. Denuded in vivo or in vitro matured MII oocytes were postovulatory aged and analyzed by semiquantitative confocal microscopy for abundance and localization of polyadenylated RNAs, proteins of maternal effect genes (transcription activator BRG1 also known as ATP-dependent helicase SWI/SNF related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4 (SMARCA4) and NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 5 (NLRP5) also known as MATER), RNA-binding proteins (MSY2 also known as germ cell-specific Y-box-binding protein, YBX2), and post-transcriptionally modified histones (trimethylated histone H3K9 and acetylated histone H4K12), as well as pericentromeric ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked, also termed ATP-dependent helicase

  6. Postovulatory aging affects dynamics of mRNA, expression and localization of maternal effect proteins, spindle integrity and pericentromeric proteins in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Trapphoff, T; Heiligentag, M; Dankert, D; Demond, H; Deutsch, D; Fröhlich, T; Arnold, G J; Grümmer, R; Horsthemke, B; Eichenlaub-Ritter, U

    2016-01-01

    Is the postovulatory aging-dependent differential decrease of mRNAs and polyadenylation of mRNAs coded by maternal effect genes associated with altered abundance and distribution of maternal effect and RNA-binding proteins (MSY2)? Postovulatory aging results in differential reduction in abundance of maternal effect proteins, loss of RNA-binding proteins from specific cytoplasmic domains and critical alterations of pericentromeric proteins without globally affecting protein abundance. Oocyte postovulatory aging is associated with differential alteration in polyadenylation and reduction in abundance of mRNAs coded by selected maternal effect genes. RNA-binding and -processing proteins are involved in storage, polyadenylation and degradation of mRNAs thus regulating stage-specific recruitment of maternal mRNAs, while chromosomal proteins that are stage-specifically expressed at pericentromeres, contribute to control of chromosome segregation and regulation of gene expression in the zygote. Germinal vesicle (GV) and metaphase II (MII) oocytes from sexually mature C57B1/6J female mice were investigated. Denuded in vivo or in vitro matured MII oocytes were postovulatory aged and analyzed by semiquantitative confocal microscopy for abundance and localization of polyadenylated RNAs, proteins of maternal effect genes (transcription activator BRG1 also known as ATP-dependent helicase SWI/SNF related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4 (SMARCA4) and NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 5 (NLRP5) also known as MATER), RNA-binding proteins (MSY2 also known as germ cell-specific Y-box-binding protein, YBX2), and post-transcriptionally modified histones (trimethylated histone H3K9 and acetylated histone H4K12), as well as pericentromeric ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked, also termed ATP-dependent helicase ATRX or X-linked nuclear protein (XNP)). For proteome analysis five replicates of 30 mouse

  7. Phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization, and expression patterns of RPD3/HDA1 family histone deacetylases in plants

    PubMed Central

    Alinsug, Malona V; Yu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Keqiang

    2009-01-01

    Background Although histone deacetylases from model organisms have been previously identified, there is no clear basis for the classification of histone deacetylases under the RPD3/HDA1 superfamily, particularly on plants. Thus, this study aims to reconstruct a phylogenetic tree to determine evolutionary relationships between RPD3/HDA1 histone deacetylases from six different plants representing dicots with Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, and Pinus taeda, monocots with Oryza sativa and Zea mays, and the lower plants with Physcomitrella patens. Results Sixty two histone deacetylases of RPD3/HDA1 family from the six plant species were phylogenetically analyzed to determine corresponding orthologues. Three clusters were formed separating Class I, Class II, and Class IV. We have confirmed lower and higher plant orthologues for AtHDA8 and AtHDA14, classifying both genes as Class II histone deacetylases in addition to AtHDA5, AtHDA15, and AtHDA18. Since Class II histone deacetylases in other eukaryotes have been known to undergo nucleocytoplasmic transport, it remains unknown whether such functional regulation also happens in plants. Thus, bioinformatics studies using different programs and databases were conducted to predict their corresponding localization sites, nuclear export signal, nuclear localization signal, as well as expression patterns. We also found new conserved domains in most of the RPD3/HDA1 histone deacetylases which were similarly conserved in its corresponding orthologues. Assessing gene expression patterns using Genevestigator, it appears that RPD3/HDA1 histone deacetylases are expressed all throughout the plant parts and developmental stages of the plant. Conclusion The RPD3/HDA1 histone deacetylase family in plants is divided into three distinct groups namely, Class I, Class II, and Class IV suggesting functional diversification. Class II comprises not only AtHDA5, AtHDA15, and AtHDA18 but also includes AtHDA8 and AtHDA14. New conserved

  8. Express

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Express ; CASRN 101200 - 48 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  9. Immunoglobulin T from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.): molecular characterization, tissue localization and expression after nodavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Francesco; Stocchi, Valentina; Nunez-Ortiz, Noelia; Randelli, Elisa; Gerdol, Marco; Pallavicini, Alberto; Facchiano, Angelo; Bernini, Chiara; Guerra, Laura; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Picchietti, Simona

    2017-03-15

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) are fundamental components of the adaptive immune system of vertebrates, with the IgT/IgZ isotype specific of Teleosts. In this paper we describe the identification of an IgT heavy chain from the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.), its molecular characterization and tissue mRNA localization by in situ hybridization. Sea bass IgT consists of 552 aa (Accession Number KM410929) and it contains a putative 19 amino acids long signal peptide and one potential N-glycosylation site. The C-region consists of four C H domains; each contains the cysteine and tryptophan residues required for their correct folding. Based on the recent sequencing of sea bass genome, we have identified five different genomic contigs bearing exons unequivocally pertaining to IgT (C H 2, C H 3 and C H 4), but none corresponded to a complete IgH locus as IgT sequences were found in the highly fragmented assembled genomic regions which could not be assigned to any major scaffold. The 3D structure of sea bass IgT has been modelled using the crystal structure of a mouse Ig gamma as a template, thus showing that the amino acid sequence is suitable for the expected topology referred to an immunoglobulin-like architecture. The basal expression of sea bass IgT and IgM in different organs has been analysed: gut and gills, important mucosal organs, showed high IgT transcripts levels and this was the first indication of the possible involvement of sea bass IgT in mucosal immune responses. Moreover, sea bass IgT expression increased in gills and spleen after infection with nodavirus, highlighting the importance of IgT in sea bass immune responses. In situ hybridization confirmed the presence of IgT transcripts in the gut and it revealed a differential expression along the intestinal tract, with a major expression in the posterior intestine, suggesting the hindgut as a site for the recruitment of IgT + cells in this species. IgT transcripts were also found in gill filaments and

  10. Decidualized Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Mediate Hemostasis, Angiogenesis, and Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.; Krikun, Graciela; Hickey, Martha; Huang, S. Joseph; Schatz, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Factor VII binds trans-membrane tissue factor to initiate hemostasis by forming thrombin. Tissue factor expression is enhanced in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells during the luteal phase. Long-term progestin only contraceptives elicit: 1) abnormal uterine bleeding from fragile vessels at focal bleeding sites, 2) paradoxically high tissue factor expression at bleeding sites; 3) reduced endometrial blood flow promoting local hypoxia and enhancing reactive oxygen species levels; and 4) aberrant angiogenesis reflecting increased stromal cell-expressed vascular endothelial growth factor, decreased Angiopoietin-1 and increased endothelial cell-expressed Angiopoietin-2. Aberrantly high local vascular permeability enhances circulating factor VII to decidualized stromal cell-expressed tissue factor to generate excess thrombin. Hypoxia-thrombin interactions augment expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-8 by stromal cells. Thrombin, vascular endothelial growth factor and interlerukin-8 synergis-tically augment angiogenesis in a milieu of reactive oxygen species-induced endothelial cell activation. The resulting enhanced vessel fragility promotes abnormal uterine bleeding. PMID:19208784

  11. SPINK1 Overexpression in Localized Prostate Cancer: a Rare Event Inversely Associated with ERG Expression and Exclusive of Homozygous PTEN Deletion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Evans, Andrew; Donnelly, Bryan; Bismar, Tarek A

    2017-04-01

    SPINK1 is proposed as potential prognostic marker in prostate cancer (PCA). However, its relation to PTEN and ERG in localized PCA remains unclear. The study population consisted of two independent cohorts of men treated by radical prostatectomy for localized PCA (discovery n = 218 and validation n = 129). Patterns of association between SPINK1 and each of ERG and PTEN were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Associations between SPINK1 expression and various pathologic parameters and clinical outcome were also investigated. SPINK1 was expressed in 15.3 % and 10.9 % of cases in the discovery and validation cohort, respectively. SPINK expression was observed in 5.56 % of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and 1.1 % of adjacent morphologically benign prostatic glands. SPINK1 and ERG expression were almost exclusive, with only 1.0 % of the cases co-expressing both in the same core sample. SPINK1 interfocal and within-core heterogeneity was noted in 29.2 % and 64.6 % of cases, respectively. SPINK1 expression was not significantly associated with PTEN deletion in the two cohorts (p = 0.871 for discovery cohort and p = 0.293 for validation cohort). While SPINK1 expression did occur with hemizygous PTEN deletion, there was a complete absence of SPINK1 expression in PCA showing homozygous PTEN deletion, which was confirmed in the validation cohort (p = 0.02). Despite SPINK1's association with higher Gleason score (>7) (p = 0.02), it was not associated with other pathological parameters or biochemical recurrence post-radical prostatectomy. We documented absolute exclusivity between SPINK1 overexpression and homozygous PTEN deletion in localized PCA. SPINK1 and ERG expressions are exclusive events in PCA. SPINK1 is not of added prognostic value in localized PCA.

  12. Lenticular abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Agarwal, Tushar; Kumar, Gaurav; Kushmesh, Rakhi; Tejwani, Lalit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    To study the lenticular problems in children presenting at an apex institute. Retrospective analysis of records (< 14 years) of new lens clinic cases was done. Of 1,047 children, 687 were males. Mean age at presentation was 6.35 ± 4.13 years. Developmental cataract was seen in 45.6% and posttraumatic cataract in 29.7% of patients. Other abnormalities were cataract with retinal detachment, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, subluxated lens, micro/spherophakia, cataract secondary to uveitis, intraocular lens complications, cataract with choroidal coloboma, and visual axis opacification. Developmental and posttraumatic cataracts were the most common abnormalities. Delayed presentation is of concern. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Expression, subcellular localization, and cis-regulatory structure of duplicated phytoene synthase genes in melon (Cucumis melo L.).

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoqiong; Coku, Ardian; Inoue, Kentaro; Tian, Li

    2011-10-01

    Carotenoids perform many critical functions in plants, animals, and humans. It is therefore important to understand carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation in plants. Phytoene synthase (PSY) catalyzes the first committed and rate-limiting step in carotenoid biosynthesis. While PSY is present as a single copy gene in Arabidopsis, duplicated PSY genes have been identified in many economically important monocot and dicot crops. CmPSY1 was previously identified from melon (Cucumis melo L.), but was not functionally characterized. We isolated a second PSY gene, CmPSY2, from melon in this work. CmPSY2 possesses a unique intron/exon structure that has not been observed in other plant PSYs. Both CmPSY1 and CmPSY2 are functional in vitro, but exhibit distinct expression patterns in different melon tissues and during fruit development, suggesting differential regulation of the duplicated melon PSY genes. In vitro chloroplast import assays verified the plastidic localization of CmPSY1 and CmPSY2 despite the lack of an obvious plastid target peptide in CmPSY2. Promoter motif analysis of the duplicated melon and tomato PSY genes and the Arabidopsis PSY revealed distinctive cis-regulatory structures of melon PSYs and identified gibberellin-responsive motifs in all PSYs except for SlPSY1, which has not been reported previously. Overall, these data provide new insights into the evolutionary history of plant PSY genes and the regulation of PSY expression by developmental and environmental signals that may involve different regulatory networks.

  14. Expression, functionality, and localization of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases in replicative and non-replicative forms of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, S; Valenzuela, L; Ponce, I; Sierra, S; Bahamondes, P; Ramirez, S; Rojas, V; Kemmerling, U; Galanti, N; Cabrera, G

    2014-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. The parasite has to overcome oxidative damage by ROS/RNS all along its life cycle to survive and to establish a chronic infection. We propose that T. cruzi is able to survive, among other mechanisms of detoxification, by repair of its damaged DNA through activation of the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER is highly conserved in eukaryotes with apurinic/apirimidinic endonucleases (APEs) playing a fundamental role. Previous results showed that T. cruzi exposed to hydrogen peroxide and peroxinitrite significantly decreases its viability when co-incubated with methoxyamine, an AP endonuclease inhibitor. In this work the localization, expression and functionality of two T. cruzi APEs (TcAP1, Homo sapiens APE1 orthologous and TcAP2, orthologous to Homo sapiens APE2 and to Schizosaccaromyces pombe Apn2p) were determined. These enzymes are present and active in the two replicative parasite forms (epimastigotes and amastigotes) as well as in the non-replicative, infective trypomastigotes. TcAP1 and TcAP2 are located in the nucleus of epimastigotes and their expression is constitutive. Epimastigote AP endonucleases as well as recombinant TcAP1 and TcAP2 are inhibited by methoxyamine. Overexpression of TcAP1 increases epimastigotes viability when they are exposed to acute ROS/RNS attack. This protective effect is more evident when parasites are submitted to persistent ROS/RNS exposition, mimicking nature conditions. Our results confirm that the BER pathway is involved in T. cruzi resistance to DNA oxidative damage and points to the participation of DNA AP endonucleases in parasite survival. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Nitrosative/Oxidative Stress Conditions Regulate Thioredoxin-Interacting Protein (TXNIP) Expression and Thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1) Nuclear Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Fernando Toshio; Batista, Wagner Luiz; Sartori, Adriano; Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Masutani, Hiroshi; Arai, Roberto Jun; Yodoi, Junji; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo Pequeno

    2013-01-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX-1) is a multifunctional protein that controls the redox status of other proteins. TRX-1 can be found in the extracellular milieu, cytoplasm and nucleus, and it has distinct functions in each environment. Previously, we studied the intracellular localization of TRX-1 and its relationship with the activation of the p21Ras - ERK1/2 MAP Kinases signaling pathway. In situations where this pathway was activated by stress conditions evoked by a nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), TRX-1 accumulated in the nuclear compartment due to nitrosylation of p21Ras and activation of downstream ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Presently, we demonstrate that ERK1/2 MAP Kinases activation and spatial distribution within cells trigger TRX-1 nuclear translocation through down-regulation of the physiological inhibitor of TRX-1, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein (TXNIP). Once activated by the oxidants, SNAP and H2O2, the ERK1/2 MAP kinases migrate to the nucleus. This is correlated with down-regulation of TXNIP. In the presence of the MEK inhibitors (PD98059 or UO126), or in cells transfected with the Protein Enriched in Astrocytes (PEA-15), a cytoplasmic anchor of ERK1/2 MAP kinases, TRX-1 nuclear migration and TXNIP down-regulation are no longer observed in cells exposed to oxidants. On the other hand, over-expression of TXNIP abolishes nuclear migration of TRX-1 under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions, whereas gene silencing of TXNIP facilitates nuclear migration even in the absence of stress conditions. Studies based on the TXNIP promoter support this regulation. In conclusion, changes in TRX-1 compartmentalization under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions are dependent on the expression levels of TXNIP, which are regulated by cellular compartmentalization and activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases. PMID:24376827

  16. Nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions regulate thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) expression and thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1) nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fernando Toshio; Batista, Wagner Luiz; Sartori, Adriano; Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Masutani, Hiroshi; Arai, Roberto Jun; Yodoi, Junji; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo Pequeno

    2013-01-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX-1) is a multifunctional protein that controls the redox status of other proteins. TRX-1 can be found in the extracellular milieu, cytoplasm and nucleus, and it has distinct functions in each environment. Previously, we studied the intracellular localization of TRX-1 and its relationship with the activation of the p21Ras-ERK1/2 MAP Kinases signaling pathway. In situations where this pathway was activated by stress conditions evoked by a nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), TRX-1 accumulated in the nuclear compartment due to nitrosylation of p21Ras and activation of downstream ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Presently, we demonstrate that ERK1/2 MAP Kinases activation and spatial distribution within cells trigger TRX-1 nuclear translocation through down-regulation of the physiological inhibitor of TRX-1, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein (TXNIP). Once activated by the oxidants, SNAP and H₂O₂, the ERK1/2 MAP kinases migrate to the nucleus. This is correlated with down-regulation of TXNIP. In the presence of the MEK inhibitors (PD98059 or UO126), or in cells transfected with the Protein Enriched in Astrocytes (PEA-15), a cytoplasmic anchor of ERK1/2 MAP kinases, TRX-1 nuclear migration and TXNIP down-regulation are no longer observed in cells exposed to oxidants. On the other hand, over-expression of TXNIP abolishes nuclear migration of TRX-1 under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions, whereas gene silencing of TXNIP facilitates nuclear migration even in the absence of stress conditions. Studies based on the TXNIP promoter support this regulation. In conclusion, changes in TRX-1 compartmentalization under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions are dependent on the expression levels of TXNIP, which are regulated by cellular compartmentalization and activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases.

  17. Expression and localization of p-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein 4, and breast cancer resistance protein in the female lower genital tract of human and pigtailed macaque.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Hu, Minlu; Pearlman, Andrew; Patton, Dorothy; Rohan, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    Antiretroviral drug absorption and disposition in cervicovaginal tissue is important for the effectiveness of vaginally or orally administered drug products in preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) of HIV-1 sexual transmission to women. Therefore, it is imperative to understand critical determinants of cervicovaginal tissue pharmacokinetics. This study aimed to examine the mRNA expression and protein localization of three efflux transporters, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), in the lower genital tract of premenopausal women and pigtailed macaques. Along the human lower genital tract, the three transporters were moderately to highly expressed compared to colorectal tissue and liver, as revealed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In a given genital tract segment, the transporter with the highest expression level was either BCRP or P-gp, while MRP4 was always expressed at the lowest level among the three transporters tested. The immunohistochemical staining showed that P-gp and MRP4 were localized in multiple cell types including epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells. BCRP was predominantly localized in the vascular endothelial cells. Differences in transporter mRNA level and localization were observed among endocervix, ectocervix, and vagina. Compared to human tissues, the macaque cervicovaginal tissues displayed comparable expression and localization patterns of the three transporters, although subtle differences were observed between the two species. The role of these cervicovaginal transporters in drug absorption and disposition warrants further studies. The resemblance between human and pigtailed macaque in transporter expression and localization suggests the utility of the macaque model in the studies of human cervicovaginal transporters.

  18. Abnormal Web Usage Control by Proxy Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hsiang-Fu; Tseng, Li-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Approaches to designing a proxy server with Web usage control and to making the proxy server effective on local area networks are proposed to prevent abnormal Web access and to prioritize Web usage. A system is implemented to demonstrate the approaches. The implementation reveals that the proposed approaches are effective, such that the abnormal…

  19. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    PubMed

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  20. Omega-3 fatty acid deficient male rats exhibit abnormal behavioral activation in the forced swim test following chronic fluoxetine treatment: association with altered 5-HT1A and alpha2A adrenergic receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K

    2014-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n = 34) or without (DEF, n = 30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n = 14) and DEF (n = 12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-26%, p = 0.0001) and DEF + FLX (-32%, p = 0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF + FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON + FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF + FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF + FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON + FLX rats. DEF + FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Alterative Expression and Localization of Profilin 1/VASPpS157 and Cofilin 1/VASPpS239 Regulates Metastatic Growth and is Modified by DHA Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mehboob; Heyob, Kathryn; Jacob, Naduparambil K.; Rogers, Lynette K.

    2016-01-01

    Profilin 1, cofilin 1, and vasodialator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) are actin binding proteins (ABP) which regulate actin remodelling and facilitate cancer cell metastases. MiR~17–92 is highly expressed in metastatic tumors and profilin1 and cofilin1 are predicted targets. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) inhibits cancer cell proliferation and adhesion. These studies tested the hypothesis that the metastatic phenotype is driven by changes in ABPs including alternative phosphorylation and/or changes in subcellular localization. Additionally, we tested the efficacy of DHA supplementation to attenuate or inhibit these changes. Human lung cancer tissue sections were analyzed for F-actin content and expression and cellular localization of profilin1, cofilin1 and VASP (S157 or S239 phosphorylation). The metastatic phenotype was investigated in A549 and MLE12 cells lines using 8 Br-cAMP as a metastasis inducer and DHA as a therapeutic agent. Migration was assessed by wound assay and expression measured by western blot and confocal analysis. MiR~17–92 expression was measured by qRT-PCR. Results indicated increased expression and altered cellular distribution of profilin1/VASPpS157 but no changes in cofilin1/VASPpS239 in the human malignant tissues compared to normal tissues. In A549 and MLE12 cells, the expression patterns of profilin1/VASPpS157 or cofilin1/VASPpS239 suggested an interaction in regulation of actin dynamics. Furthermore, DHA inhibited cancer cell migration and viability, ABP expression and cellular localization, and modulated expression of miR~17–92 in A549 cells with minimal effects in MLE12 cells. Further investigations are warranted to understand ABP interactions, changes in cellular localization, regulation by miR~17–92, and DHA as a novel therapeutic. PMID:27496138

  2. Alterative Expression and Localization of Profilin 1/VASPpS157 and Cofilin 1/VASPpS239 Regulates Metastatic Growth and Is Modified by DHA Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mehboob; Heyob, Kathryn; Jacob, Naduparambil K; Rogers, Lynette K

    2016-09-01

    Profilin 1, cofilin 1, and vasodialator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) are actin-binding proteins (ABP) that regulate actin remodeling and facilitate cancer cell metastases. miR-17-92 is highly expressed in metastatic tumors and profilin1 and cofilin1 are predicted targets. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) inhibits cancer cell proliferation and adhesion. These studies tested the hypothesis that the metastatic phenotype is driven by changes in ABPs including alternative phosphorylation and/or changes in subcellular localization. In addition, we tested the efficacy of DHA supplementation to attenuate or inhibit these changes. Human lung cancer tissue sections were analyzed for F-actin content and expression and cellular localization of profilin1, cofilin1, and VASP (S157 or S239 phosphorylation). The metastatic phenotype was investigated in A549 and MLE12 cells lines using 8 Br-cAMP as a metastasis inducer and DHA as a therapeutic agent. Migration was assessed by wound assay and expression measured by Western blot and confocal analysis. miR-17-92 expression was measured by qRT-PCR. Results indicated increased expression and altered cellular distribution of profilin1/VASP(pS157), but no changes in cofilin1/VASP(pS239) in the human malignant tissues compared with normal tissues. In A549 and MLE12 cells, the expression patterns of profilin1/VASP(pS157) or cofilin1/VASP(pS239) suggested an interaction in regulation of actin dynamics. Furthermore, DHA inhibited cancer cell migration and viability, ABP expression and cellular localization, and modulated expression of miR-17-92 in A549 cells with minimal effects in MLE12 cells. Further investigations are warranted to understand ABP interactions, changes in cellular localization, regulation by miR-17-92, and DHA as a novel therapeutic. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2220-31. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Placental transporter localization and expression in the Human: the importance of species, sex, and gestational age differences†

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Natasha; Filis, Panagiotis; Soffientini, Ugo; Bellingham, Michelle; O’Shaughnessy, Peter J; Fowler, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The placenta is a critical organ during pregnancy, essential for the provision of an optimal intrauterine environment, with fetal survival, growth, and development relying on correct placental function. It must allow nutritional compounds and relevant hormones to pass into the fetal bloodstream and metabolic waste products to be cleared. It also acts as a semipermeable barrier to potentially harmful chemicals, both endogenous and exogenous. Transporter proteins allow for bidirectional transport and are found in the syncytiotrophoblast of the placenta and endothelium of fetal capillaries. The major transporter families in the human placenta are ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC), and insufficiency of these transporters may lead to deleterious effects on the fetus. Transporter expression levels are gestation-dependent and this is of considerable clinical interest as levels of drug resistance may be altered from one trimester to the next. This highlights the importance of these transporters in mediating correct and timely transplacental passage of essential compounds but also for efflux of potentially toxic drugs and xenobiotics. We review the current literature on placental molecular transporters with respect to their localization and ontogeny, the influence of fetal sex, and the relevance of animal models. We conclude that a paucity of information exists, and further studies are required to unlock the enigma of this dynamic organ. PMID:28339967

  4. Structural analysis, plastid localization, and expression of the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase from tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shorrosh, B S; Roesler, K R; Shintani, D; van de Loo, F J; Ohlrogge, J B

    1995-06-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) catalyzes the synthesis of malonyl-coenzyme A, which is utilized in the plastid for de novo fatty acid synthesis and outside the plastid for a variety of reactions, including the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids and flavonoids. Recent evidence for both multifunctional and multisubunit ACCase isozymes in dicot plants has been obtained. We describe here the isolation of a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv bright yellow 2 [NT1]) cDNA clone (E3) that encodes a 58.4-kD protein that shares 80% sequence similarity and 65% identity with the Anabaena biotin carboxylase subunit of ACCase. Similar to other biotin carboxylase subunits of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the E3-encoded protein contains a putative ATP-binding motif but lacks a biotin-binding site (methionine-lysine-methionine or methionine-lysine-leucine). The deduced protein sequence contains a putative transit peptide whose function was confirmed by its ability to direct in vitro chloroplast uptake. The subcellular localization of this biotin carboxylase has also been confirmed to be plastidial by western blot analysis of pea (Pisum sativum), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), and castor (Ricinus communis L.) plastid preparations. Northern blot analysis indicates that the plastid biotin carboxylase transcripts are expressed at severalfold higher levels in castor seeds than in leaves.

  5. Structural analysis, plastid localization, and expression of the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase from tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Shorrosh, B S; Roesler, K R; Shintani, D; van de Loo, F J; Ohlrogge, J B

    1995-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) catalyzes the synthesis of malonyl-coenzyme A, which is utilized in the plastid for de novo fatty acid synthesis and outside the plastid for a variety of reactions, including the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids and flavonoids. Recent evidence for both multifunctional and multisubunit ACCase isozymes in dicot plants has been obtained. We describe here the isolation of a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv bright yellow 2 [NT1]) cDNA clone (E3) that encodes a 58.4-kD protein that shares 80% sequence similarity and 65% identity with the Anabaena biotin carboxylase subunit of ACCase. Similar to other biotin carboxylase subunits of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the E3-encoded protein contains a putative ATP-binding motif but lacks a biotin-binding site (methionine-lysine-methionine or methionine-lysine-leucine). The deduced protein sequence contains a putative transit peptide whose function was confirmed by its ability to direct in vitro chloroplast uptake. The subcellular localization of this biotin carboxylase has also been confirmed to be plastidial by western blot analysis of pea (Pisum sativum), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), and castor (Ricinus communis L.) plastid preparations. Northern blot analysis indicates that the plastid biotin carboxylase transcripts are expressed at severalfold higher levels in castor seeds than in leaves. PMID:7610168

  6. Analysis of Sir2E in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum: cellular localization, spatial expression and overexpression.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Takahiro; Yasukawa, Hiro

    2008-10-01

    It has been reported that Dictyostelium discoideum encodes four silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) proteins (Sir2A-D) showing sequence similarity to human homologues of Sir2 (SIRT1-3). Further screening in a database revealed that D. discoideum encodes an additional Sir2 homologue (Sir2E). The amino acid sequence of Sir2E is not similar to those of SIRTs but is similar to those of proteins encoded by Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum. Fluorescence of Sir2E-green fluorescent protein fusion protein was detected in the D. discoideum nucleus, indicating that Sir2E is a nuclear localizing protein. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses showed that D. discoideum expressed sir2E in amoebae in the growth phase and in prestalk cells in the developmental phase. D. discoideum overexpressing sir2E grew faster than the wild type. These results indicate that Sir2E plays important roles both in the growth phase and developmental phase of D. discoideum.

  7. Local over-expression of VEGF-DΔNΔC in the uterine arteries of pregnant sheep results in long-term changes in uterine artery contractility and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vedanta; Abi-Nader, Khalil N; Shangaris, Panicos; Shaw, S W Steven; Filippi, Elisa; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Boyd, Michael; Peebles, Donald M; Martin, John; Zachary, Ian; David, Anna L

    2014-01-01

    The normal development of the uteroplacental circulation in pregnancy depends on angiogenic and vasodilatory factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Reduced uterine artery blood flow (UABF) is a common cause of fetal growth restriction; abnormalities in angiogenic factors are implicated. Previously we showed that adenovirus (Ad)-mediated VEGF-A165 expression in the pregnant sheep uterine artery (UtA) increased nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, altered vascular reactivity and increased UABF. VEGF-D is a VEGF family member that promotes angiogenesis and vasodilatation but, in contrast to VEGF-A, does not increase vascular permeability. Here we examined the effect of Ad.VEGF-DΔNΔC vector encoding a fully processed form of VEGF-D, on the uteroplacental circulation. UtA transit-time flow probes and carotid artery catheters were implanted in mid-gestation pregnant sheep (n = 5) to measure baseline UABF and maternal haemodynamics respectively. 7-14 days later, after injection of Ad.VEGF-DΔNΔC vector (5×10(11) particles) into one UtA and an Ad vector encoding β-galactosidase (Ad.LacZ) contralaterally, UABF was measured daily until scheduled post-mortem examination at term. UtAs were assessed for vascular reactivity, NOS expression and endothelial cell proliferation; NOS expression was studied in ex vivo transduced UtA endothelial cells (UAECs). At 4 weeks post-injection, Ad.VEGF-DΔNΔC treated UtAs showed significantly lesser vasoconstriction (Emax144.0 v/s 184.2, p = 0.002). There was a tendency to higher UABF in Ad.VEGF-DΔNΔC compared to Ad.LacZ transduced UtAs (50.58% v/s 26.94%, p = 0.152). There was no significant effect on maternal haemodynamics. An increased number of proliferating endothelial cells and adventitial blood vessels were observed in immunohistochemistry. Ad.VEGF-DΔNΔC expression in cultured UAECs upregulated eNOS and iNOS expression. Local over-expression of VEGF-DΔNΔC in the UtAs of pregnant mid

  8. Cloning of HSP90, expression and localization of HSP70/90 in different tissues including lactating/non-lactating yak (Bos grunniens) breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Penggang; Yu, Sijiu; Cui, Yan; He, Junfeng; Yu, Chuan; Wen, Zexing; Pan, Yangyang; Yang, Kun; Song, Liangli; Yang, Xue

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and localization of HSP70/90 in different tissues and explore the regulation effects of HSP70/90 at lactation period of female yaks. HSP90 mRNA was cloned from the heart samples of female yaks, Quantitative real-time (qRT-PCR), Western blotting (WB), immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence assays were utilized to analyze the expressions of HSP70/90 mRNA and protein in different tissues. Sequence analysis showed that HSP90 is a conserved molecular chaperone of female yaks. The qRT-PCR, WB results showed that the expressions of HSP70/90 mRNA and protein were significantly different in different tissues, and 3-fold higher expression during the lactation period than the non-lactation period of breast tissue (P < 0.01). Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence assays results showed that HSP70/90 were located in the cardiac muscle cells, cerebellar medulla, theca cells lining at the reproductive system, and the mammary epithelia of the breasts. In addition, the expression level of HSP70 was higher than those of HSP90 in all examined tissues. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that the expression and localization of HSP70/90 could provide significant evidence to further research in tissue specific expression, and lactation function of female yaks.

  9. Abnormal findings in peers during skills learning.

    PubMed

    Wearn, Andy; Nakatsuji, Miriam; Bhoopatkar, Harsh

    2017-02-01

    Peer physical examination (PPE), where students examine each other, is common in contemporary clinical skills learning. A range of benefits and risks have been explored in the literature. One persistent concern has been the identification and management of abnormal physical findings. Two previous studies have attempted to quantify the risk, one through the discussion of two exemplar cases and the other with a retrospective student survey. Here, we report the first prospective study of the number and type of abnormalities encountered as part of early clinical skills learning in a medical programme. We have a formal written consent process for PPE, which includes the management of abnormal findings through the completion of an event form. Our data come from cohorts undertaking years 2 and 3 of the programme between 2003 and 2014. One persistent concern (of PPE) has been the identification and management of abnormal physical findings RESULTS: Nineteen event forms were completed over this period. The incidence rates per year ranged from 0.23 to 1.05 per cent. Abnormal findings included raised blood pressure, heart murmur, abnormal bedside test values, and eye and skin conditions. The low event rate, along with a feasible process for dealing with this issue, goes some way to reassuring those with concerns. We acknowledge that some abnormalities may have been missed, and that some data may have been lost as a result of incorrect process; however, even the highest annual rate is low in absolute terms. We recommend a formal process for managing abnormalities. Ideally this would be part of an overall PPE written policy, communicated to students, enacted by tutors and approved by the local ethics committee. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Global-Local Precedence in the Perception of Facial Age and Emotional Expression by Children with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Thomas F.

    2005-01-01

    Global information processing and perception of facial age and emotional expression was studied in children with autism, language disorders, mental retardation, and a clinical control group. Children were given a global-local task and asked to recognize age and emotion in human and canine faces. Children with autism made fewer global responses and…

  11. Abnormality, rationality, and sanity.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Ralph; Volz, Kirsten G

    2013-11-01

    A growing body of studies suggests that neurological and mental abnormalities foster conformity to norms of rationality that are widely endorsed in economics and psychology, whereas normality stands in the way of rationality thus defined. Here, we outline the main findings of these studies, discuss their implications for experimental design, and consider how 'sane' some benchmarks of rationality really are. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential local tissue permissiveness influences the final fate of GPR17-expressing oligodendrocyte precursors in two distinct models of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Coppolino, Giusy T; Marangon, Davide; Negri, Camilla; Menichetti, Gianluca; Fumagalli, Marta; Gelosa, Paolo; Dimou, Leda; Furlan, Roberto; Lecca, Davide; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2018-05-01

    Promoting remyelination is recognized as a novel strategy to foster repair in neurodegenerative demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. In this respect, the receptor GPR17, recently emerged as a new target for remyelination, is expressed by early oligodendrocyte precursors (OPCs) and after a certain differentiation stage it has to be downregulated to allow progression to mature myelinating oligodendrocytes. Here, we took advantage of the first inducible GPR17 reporter mouse line (GPR17-iCreER T2 xCAG-eGFP mice) allowing to follow the final fate of GPR17 + cells by tamoxifen-induced GFP-labeling to unveil the destiny of these cells in two demyelination models: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), characterized by marked immune cell activation and inflammation, and cuprizone induced demyelination, where myelin dysfunction is achieved by a toxic insult. In both models, demyelination induced a strong increase of fluorescent GFP + cells at damaged areas. However, only in the cuprizone model reacting GFP + cells terminally differentiated to mature oligodendrocytes, thus contributing to remyelination. In EAE, GFP + cells were blocked at immature stages and never became myelinating oligodendrocytes. We suggest these strikingly distinct fates be due to different permissiveness of the local CNS environment. Based on previously reported GPR17 activation by emergency signals (e.g., Stromal Derived Factor-1), we propose that a marked inflammatory milieu, such as that reproduced in EAE, induces GPR17 overactivation resulting in impaired downregulation, untimely and prolonged permanence in OPCs, leading, in turn, to differentiation blockade. Combined treatments with remyelinating agents and anti-inflammatory drugs may represent new potential adequate strategies to halt neurodegeneration and foster recovery. © 2018 The Authors GLIA Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor (GPER) Is Expressed in Two Different Subcellular Localizations Reflecting Distinct Tumor Properties in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samartzis, Eleftherios P.; Noske, Aurelia; Meisel, Alexander; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Fink, Daniel; Imesch, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a novel estrogen receptor that mediates proliferative effects induced by estrogen but also by tamoxifen. The aim of our study was to analyze the frequency of GPER in a large collective of primary invasive breast carcinomas, with special emphasis on the subcellular expression and to evaluate the association with clinicopathological parameters and patient overall survival. Methods The tissue microarrays from formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded samples of primary invasive breast carcinomas (n = 981) were analyzed for GPER expression using immunohistochemistry. Expression data were compared to the clinicopathological parameters and overall survival. GPER localization was also analyzed in two immortalized breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF7 by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results A predominantly cytoplasmic GPER expression was found in 189 carcinomas (19.3%), whereas a predominantly nuclear expression was observed in 529 cases (53.9%). A simultaneous comparable positive expression of both patterns was found in 32 of 981 cases (3.2%), and negative staining was detected in 295 cases (30%). Confocal microscopy confirmed the occurrence of cytoplasmic and nuclear GPER expression in T47D and MCF7. Cytoplasmic GPER expression was significantly associated with non-ductal histologic subtypes, low tumor stage, better histologic differentiation, as well as Luminal A and B subtypes. In contrast, nuclear GPER expression was significantly associated with poorly differentiated carcinomas and the triple-negative subtype. In univariate analysis, cytoplasmic GPER expression was associated with better overall survival (p = 0.012). Conclusion Our data suggest that predominantly cytoplasmic and/or nuclear GPER expression are two distinct immunohistochemical patterns in breast carcinomas and may reflect different biological features, reason why these patterns should be clearly distinguished in histological

  14. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is expressed in two different subcellular localizations reflecting distinct tumor properties in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Samartzis, Eleftherios P; Noske, Aurelia; Meisel, Alexander; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Fink, Daniel; Imesch, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a novel estrogen receptor that mediates proliferative effects induced by estrogen but also by tamoxifen. The aim of our study was to analyze the frequency of GPER in a large collective of primary invasive breast carcinomas, with special emphasis on the subcellular expression and to evaluate the association with clinicopathological parameters and patient overall survival. The tissue microarrays from formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded samples of primary invasive breast carcinomas (n = 981) were analyzed for GPER expression using immunohistochemistry. Expression data were compared to the clinicopathological parameters and overall survival. GPER localization was also analyzed in two immortalized breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF7 by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. A predominantly cytoplasmic GPER expression was found in 189 carcinomas (19.3%), whereas a predominantly nuclear expression was observed in 529 cases (53.9%). A simultaneous comparable positive expression of both patterns was found in 32 of 981 cases (3.2%), and negative staining was detected in 295 cases (30%). Confocal microscopy confirmed the occurrence of cytoplasmic and nuclear GPER expression in T47D and MCF7. Cytoplasmic GPER expression was significantly associated with non-ductal histologic subtypes, low tumor stage, better histologic differentiation, as well as Luminal A and B subtypes. In contrast, nuclear GPER expression was significantly associated with poorly differentiated carcinomas and the triple-negative subtype. In univariate analysis, cytoplasmic GPER expression was associated with better overall survival (p = 0.012). Our data suggest that predominantly cytoplasmic and/or nuclear GPER expression are two distinct immunohistochemical patterns in breast carcinomas and may reflect different biological features, reason why these patterns should be clearly distinguished in histological evaluations. Prospective studies will be

  15. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  16. Expression and sub-cellular localization of an epigenetic regulator, co-activator arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1), is associated with specific breast cancer subtypes and ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Co-Activator Arginine Methyltransferase 1(CARM1) is an Estrogen Receptor (ER) cofactor that remodels chromatin for gene regulation via methylation of Histone3. We investigated CARM1 levels and localization across breast cancer tumors in a cohort of patients of either European or African ancestry. Methods We analyzed CARM1 levels using tissue microarrays with over 800 histological samples from 549 female cancer patients from the US and Nigeria, Africa. We assessed associations between CARM1 expression localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm for 11 distinct variables, including; ER status, Progesterone Receptor status, molecular subtypes, ethnicity, HER2+ status, other clinical variables and survival. Results We found that levels of cytoplasmic CARM1 are distinct among tumor sub-types and increased levels are associated with ER-negative (ER-) status. Higher nuclear CARM1 levels are associated with HER2 receptor status. EGFR expression also correlates with localization of CARM1 into the cytoplasm. This suggests there are distinct functions of CARM1 among molecular tumor types. Our data reveals a basal-like subtype association with CARM1, possibly due to expression of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). Lastly, increased cytoplasmic CARM1, relative to nuclear levels, appear to be associated with self-identified African ethnicity and this result is being further investigated using quantified genetic ancestry measures. Conclusions Although it is known to be an ER cofactor in breast cancer, CARM1 expression levels are independent of ER. CARM1 has distinct functions among molecular subtypes, as is indicative of its sub-cellular localization and it may function in subtype etiology. These sub-cellular localization patterns, indicate a novel role beyond its ER cofactor function in breast cancer. Differential localization among ethnic groups may be due to ancestry-specific polymorphisms which alter the gene product. PMID:23663560

  17. Idiopathic hirsutism: local and peripheral expression of aromatase (CYP19A) and 5α-reductase genes (SRD5A1 and SRD5A2).

    PubMed

    Caglayan, A Okay; Dundar, Munis; Tanriverdi, Fatih; Baysal, Nuran A; Unluhizarci, Kursad; Ozkul, Yusuf; Borlu, Murat; Batukan, Cem; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate idiopathic hirsutism etiology via molecular studies testing peripheral and local aromatase and 5α-reductase expression. Assessment of the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for type 1 and 2,5α-reductase isoenzyme gene (SDR5A1, SDR5A2) and aromatase (CYP19A) in dermal papillae cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. University hospital. 28 untreated idiopathic hirsute patients and 20 healthy women (controls). Human skin biopsies and peripheral venous blood. SDR5A1, SDR5A2, CYP19A gene expression in skin biopsies and peripheral blood. A statistically significant reduction of SRD5A1, SRD5A2, and CYP19A gene expression was found in the dermal papillae cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cell between the study and control group. Further study, including protein expression and enzyme activity assays, are warranted to characterize the paradoxically low gene expression levels of local 5α-reductase and aromatase in women with idiopathic hirsutism. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [INDIVIDUAL EVALUATION OF LORETA ABNORMALITIES IN IDIOPATHIC GENERALIZED EPILEPSY].

    PubMed

    Clemens, Béla; Puskás, Szilvia; Besenyei, Mónika; Kondákor, István; Hollódy, Katalin; Fogarasi, Andrós; Bense, Katalin; Emri, Miklós; Opposits Gábor; Kovács, Noémi Zsuzsanna; Fekete, István

    2016-03-30

    Contemporary neuroimaging methods disclosed structural and functional cerebral abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). However, individual electrical (EEG) abnormalities have not been evaluated yet in IGE patients. IGE patients were investigated in the drug-free condition and after 3-6 month of antiepileptic treatment. To estimate the reproducibility of qEEG variables a retrospective recruited cohort of IGE patients was investigated. 19-channel resting state EEG activity was recorded. For each patient a total of 2 minutes EEG activity was analyzed by LORETA (Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography). Raw LORETA values were Z-transformed and projected to a MRI template. Z-values outside within the [+3Z] to [-3Z] range were labelled as statistically abnormal. 1. In drug-free condition, 41-50% of IGE patients showed abnormal LORETA values. 2. Abnormal LORETA findings showed great inter-individual variability. 3. Most abnormal LORETA-findings were symmetrical. 4. Most maximum Z-values were localized to frontal or temporal cortex. 5. Succesfull treatment was mostly coupled with disappearence of LORETA-abnormality, persistent seizures were accompanied by persistent LORETA abnormality. 1. LORETA abnormalities detected in the untreated condition reflect seizure-generating property of the cortex in IGE patients. 2. Maximum LORETA-Z abnormalities were topographically congruent with structural abnormalities reported by other research groups. 3. LORETA might help to investigate drug effects at the whole-brain level.

  19. Expression of Bcl-2, p53, and MDM2 in Localized Prostate Cancer With Respect to the Outcome of Radical Radiotherapy Dose Escalation

    SciTech Connect

    Vergis, Roy; Corbishley, Catherine M.; Thomas, Karen

    Purpose: Established prognostic factors in localized prostate cancer explain only a moderate proportion of variation in outcome. We analyzed tumor expression of apoptotic markers with respect to outcome in men with localized prostate cancer in two randomized controlled trials of radiotherapy dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2001, 308 patients with localized prostate cancer received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy at our institution in one of two dose-escalation trials. The biopsy specimens in 201 cases were used to make a biopsy tissue microarray. We evaluated tumor expression of Bcl-2, p53, and MDM2 by immunohistochemistry with respect tomore » outcome. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years, and 5-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) was 70.4% (95% CI, 63.5-76.3%). On univariate analysis, expression of Bcl-2 (p < 0.001) and p53 (p = 0.017), but not MDM2 (p = 0.224), was significantly associated with FFBF. Expression of Bcl-2 remained significantly associated with FFBF (p = 0.001) on multivariate analysis, independently of T stage, Gleason score, initial prostate-specific antigen level, and radiotherapy dose. Seven-year biochemical control was 61% vs. 41% (p = 0.0122) for 74 Gy vs. 64 Gy, respectively, among patients with Bcl-2-positive tumors and 87% vs. 81% (p = 0.423) for 74 Gy vs. 64 Gy, respectively, among patients with Bcl-2-negative tumors. There was no statistically significant interaction between dose and Bcl-2 expression. Conclusions: Bcl-2 expression was a significant, independent determinant of biochemical control after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer. These data generate the hypothesis that Bcl-2 expression could be used to inform the choice of radiotherapy dose in individual patients.« less

  20. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  1. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna; Rosa-E-Silva, Ana Carolina Japur de Sá; Yela, Daniela Angerame; Soares Júnior, José Maria

    2017-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a frequent condition in Gynecology. It may impact physical, emotional sexual and professional aspects of the lives of women, impairing their quality of life. In cases of acute and severe bleeding, women may need urgent treatment with volumetric replacement and prescription of hemostatic substances. In some specific cases with more intense and prolonged bleeding, surgical treatment may be necessary. The objective of this chapter is to describe the main evidence on the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, both acute and chronic. Didactically, the treatment options were based on the current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification system (PALM-COEIN). The etiologies of PALM-COEIN are: uterine Polyp (P), Adenomyosis (A), Leiomyoma (L), precursor and Malignant lesions of the uterine body (M), Coagulopathies (C), Ovulatory dysfunction (O), Endometrial dysfunction (E), Iatrogenic (I), and Not yet classified (N). The articles were selected according to the recommendation grades of the PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases, and those in which the main objective was the reduction of uterine menstrual bleeding were included. Only studies written in English were included. All editorial or complete papers that were not consistent with abnormal uterine bleeding, or studies in animal models, were excluded. The main objective of the treatment is the reduction of menstrual flow and morbidity and the improvement of quality of life. It is important to emphasize that the treatment in the acute phase aims to hemodynamically stabilize the patient and stop excessive bleeding, while the treatment in the chronic phase is based on correcting menstrual dysfunction according to its etiology and clinical manifestations. The treatment may be surgical or pharmacological, and the latter is based mainly on hormonal therapy, anti-inflammatory drugs and antifibrinolytics. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro

  2. Local Inflammation Alters MMP-2 and MMP-9 Gelatinase Expression Associated with the Severity of Nifedipine-Induced Gingival Overgrowth: a Rat Model Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu-Li; Wu, Cheng-Hai; Yang, Jun; Tang, Min; Chen, Long-Jie; Zhao, Shou-Liang

    2015-08-01

    Nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth (NIGO) is characterized by cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) component accumulation in gingival connective tissues, with varying degrees of inflammation and fibrosis. Impaired collagen and ECM homeostasis may be among the underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the fibrotic changes that occur in drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO). Because matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play vital roles in regulating collagen and ECM metabolism, many studies have been performed to reveal the relationship between MMPs and DIGO. It is thought that the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, both type IV collagenases, are involved in the development of tissue inflammation and organ fibrosis. However, the few studies regarding gelatinase expression in DIGO are controversial. Recent studies have demonstrated the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine A (CsA) on gelatinase expression and/or activity; however, similar changes have yet to be detected in Nif-treated gingival tissues. In this study, we verified that Nif treatment could lead to gingival overgrowth in rats and that gingival inflammation played a pro-proliferative role in NIGO development. Additionally, we examined the temporal expression of gelatinases on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 30, and 40 during NIGO development. The aim was to investigate whether MMP-2 and MMP-9 played significant roles in regulating NIGO development and progression. MMP-2 gene expression was not altered by Nif treatment alone but was significantly inhibited by Nif treatment for 30 days in the presence of local inflammation. However, no significant alterations in MMP-2 protein expression were detected in the Nif-treated gingival tissue, regardless of the presence or absence of local inflammation. Moreover, Nif treatment could lead to transient and significant increases in MMP-9 gene and protein expression levels in the presence of local inflammation. In particular, active MMP-9 expression increased significantly

  3. Data based abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwar, Yashasvi

    Data based abnormality detection is a growing research field focussed on extracting information from feature rich data. They are considered to be non-intrusive and non-destructive in nature which gives them a clear advantage over conventional methods. In this study, we explore different streams of data based anomalies detection. We propose extension and revisions to existing valve stiction detection algorithm supported with industrial case study. We also explored the area of image analysis and proposed a complete solution for Malaria diagnosis. The proposed method is tested over images provided by pathology laboratory at Alberta Health Service. We also address the robustness and practicality of the solution proposed.

  4. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. Local Expression of Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase in Syngeneic Fibroblasts Significantly Prolongs Survival of an Engineered Three-Dimensional Islet Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Reza B.; Forouzandeh, Farshad; Rezakhanlou, Alireza Moeen; Hartwell, Ryan; Medina, Abelardo; Warnock, Garth L.; Larijani, Bagher; Ghahary, Aziz

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The requirement of systemic immunosuppression after islet transplantation is of significant concern and a major drawback to clinical islet transplantation. Here, we introduce a novel composite three-dimensional islet graft equipped with a local immunosuppressive system that prevents islet allograft rejection without systemic antirejection agents. In this composite graft, expression of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), a tryptophan-degrading enzyme, in syngeneic fibroblasts provides a low-tryptophan microenvironment within which T-cells cannot proliferate and infiltrate islets. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Composite three-dimensional islet grafts were engineered by embedding allogeneic mouse islets and adenoviral-transduced IDO–expressing syngeneic fibroblasts within collagen gel matrix. These grafts were then transplanted into renal subcapsular space of streptozotocin diabetic immunocompetent mice. The viability, function, and criteria for graft take were then determined in the graft recipient mice. RESULTS IDO-expressing grafts survived significantly longer than controls (41.2 ± 1.64 vs. 12.9 ± 0.73 days; P < 0.001) without administration of systemic immunesuppressive agents. Local expression of IDO suppressed effector T-cells at the graft site, induced a Th2 immune response shift, generated an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, delayed alloantibody production, and increased number of regulatory T-cells in draining lymph nodes, which resulted in antigen-specific impairment of T-cell priming. CONCLUSIONS Local IDO expression prevents cellular and humoral alloimmune responses against islets and significantly prolongs islet allograft survival without systemic antirejection treatments. This promising finding proves the potent local immunosuppressive activity of IDO in islet allografts and sets the stage for development of a long-lasting nonrejectable islet allograft using stable IDO induction in bystander fibroblasts. PMID:20522587

  6. c-Met Expression Is a Marker of Poor Prognosis in Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Baschnagel, Andrew M.; Williams, Lindsay; Hanna, Alaa

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic significance of c-Met expression in relation to p16 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Archival tissue from 107 HNSCC patients treated with chemoradiation was retrieved, and a tissue microarray was assembled. Immunohistochemical staining of c-Met, p16, and EGFR was performed. c-Met expression was correlated with p16, EGFR, clinical characteristics, and clinical endpoints including locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Fifty-one percent of patients were positive for p16,more » and 53% were positive for EGFR. Both p16-negative (P≤.001) and EGFR-positive (P=.019) status predicted for worse DFS. Ninety-three percent of patients stained positive for c-Met. Patients were divided into low (0, 1, or 2+ intensity) or high (3+ intensity) c-Met expression. On univariate analysis, high c-Met expression predicted for worse LRC (hazard ratio [HR] 2.27; 95% CI, 1.08-4.77; P=.031), DM (HR 4.41; 95% CI, 1.56-12.45; P=.005), DFS (HR 3.00; 95% CI, 1.68-5.38; P<.001), and OS (HR 4.35; 95% CI, 2.13-8.88; P<.001). On multivariate analysis, after adjustment for site, T stage, smoking history, and EGFR status, only high c-Met expression (P=.011) and negative p16 status (P=.003) predicted for worse DFS. High c-Met expression was predictive of worse DFS in both EGFR-positive (P=.032) and -negative (P=.008) patients. In the p16-negative patients, those with high c-Met expression had worse DFS (P=.036) than did those with low c-Met expression. c-Met expression was not associated with any outcome in the p16-positive patients. Conclusions: c-Met is expressed in the majority of locally advanced HNSCC cases, and high c-Met expression predicts for worse clinical outcomes. High c-Met expression predicted for worse DFS in

  7. Astrocytes express specific variants of CaM KII delta and gamma, but not alpha and beta, that determine their cellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Vallano, M L; Beaman-Hall, C M; Mathur, A; Chen, Q

    2000-04-01

    Multiple isoforms of type II Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaM KII) are composed of two major neuron-specific subunits, designated alpha and beta, and two less well-characterized subunits that are also expressed in non-neuronal tissues, designated delta and gamma. Regulated expression of these 4 gene products, and several variants produced by alternative splicing, shows temporal and regional specificity and influences intracellular targeting. We used immunoblotting and RT-PCR to analyze subunit and variant expression and distribution in cultured cerebellar astrocytes and neurons, and whole cerebellar cortex from rodent brain. The data indicate that: (i) astrocytes express a single splice variant of delta, namely delta(2); (ii) like neurons, astrocytes express two forms of CaM KII gamma; gamma(B) and gamma(A); (iii) these CaM KII variants are enriched in the supernate fraction in astrocytes, and the particulate fraction in neurons; (iv) unlike neurons, astrocytes do not express detectable levels of alpha or beta subunits or their respective splice variants. The results indicate that neurons and astrocytes express distinct CaM KII subunits and variants that localize to distinct subcellular compartments and, by inference, exert distinct cellular functions. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Preclinical Potency and Biodistribution Studies of an AAV 5 Vector Expressing Human Interferon-β (ART-I02) for Local Treatment of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aalbers, Caroline J.; Bevaart, Lisette; Loiler, Scott; de Cortie, Karin; Wright, J. Fraser; Mingozzi, Federico; Tak, Paul P.; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Proof of concept for local gene therapy for the treatment of arthritis with immunomodulatory cytokine interferon beta (IFN-β) has shown promising results in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For the treatment of RA patients, we engineered a recombinant adeno-associated serotype 5 vector (rAAV5) encoding human (h)IFN-β under control of a nuclear factor κB promoter (ART-I02). Methods The potency of ART-I02 in vitro as well as biodistribution in vivo in arthritic animals was evaluated to characterize the vector prior to clinical application. ART-I02 expression and bioactivity after transduction was evaluated in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from different species. Biodistribution of the vector after local injection was assessed in a rat adjuvant arthritis model through qPCR analysis of vector DNA. In vivo imaging was used to investigate transgene expression and kinetics in a mouse collagen induced arthritis model. Results Transduction of RA FLS in vitro with ART-I02 resulted in high expression levels of bioactive hIFN-β. Transduction of FLS from rhesus monkeys, rodents and rabbits with ART-I02 showed high transgene expression, and hIFN-β proved bioactive in FLS from rhesus monkeys. Transgene expression and bioactivity in RA FLS were unaltered in the presence of methotrexate. In vivo, vector biodistribution analysis in rats after intra-articular injection of ART-I02 demonstrated that the majority of vector DNA remained in the joint (>93%). In vivo imaging in mice confirmed local expression of rAAV5 in the knee joint region and demonstrated rapid detectable and sustained expression up until 7 weeks. Conclusions These data show that hIFN-β produced by RA FLS transduced with ART-I02 is bioactive and that intra-articular delivery of rAAV5 drives expression of a therapeutic transgene in the joint, with only limited biodistribution of vector DNA to other tissues, supporting progress towards a phase 1 clinical trial for the local treatment of

  9. Preclinical Potency and Biodistribution Studies of an AAV 5 Vector Expressing Human Interferon-β (ART-I02) for Local Treatment of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aalbers, Caroline J; Bevaart, Lisette; Loiler, Scott; de Cortie, Karin; Wright, J Fraser; Mingozzi, Federico; Tak, Paul P; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J

    2015-01-01

    Proof of concept for local gene therapy for the treatment of arthritis with immunomodulatory cytokine interferon beta (IFN-β) has shown promising results in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For the treatment of RA patients, we engineered a recombinant adeno-associated serotype 5 vector (rAAV5) encoding human (h)IFN-β under control of a nuclear factor κB promoter (ART-I02). The potency of ART-I02 in vitro as well as biodistribution in vivo in arthritic animals was evaluated to characterize the vector prior to clinical application. ART-I02 expression and bioactivity after transduction was evaluated in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from different species. Biodistribution of the vector after local injection was assessed in a rat adjuvant arthritis model through qPCR analysis of vector DNA. In vivo imaging was used to investigate transgene expression and kinetics in a mouse collagen induced arthritis model. Transduction of RA FLS in vitro with ART-I02 resulted in high expression levels of bioactive hIFN-β. Transduction of FLS from rhesus monkeys, rodents and rabbits with ART-I02 showed high transgene expression, and hIFN-β proved bioactive in FLS from rhesus monkeys. Transgene expression and bioactivity in RA FLS were unaltered in the presence of methotrexate. In vivo, vector biodistribution analysis in rats after intra-articular injection of ART-I02 demonstrated that the majority of vector DNA remained in the joint (>93%). In vivo imaging in mice confirmed local expression of rAAV5 in the knee joint region and demonstrated rapid detectable and sustained expression up until 7 weeks. These data show that hIFN-β produced by RA FLS transduced with ART-I02 is bioactive and that intra-articular delivery of rAAV5 drives expression of a therapeutic transgene in the joint, with only limited biodistribution of vector DNA to other tissues, supporting progress towards a phase 1 clinical trial for the local treatment of arthritis in patients with RA.

  10. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  11. Effect of short-term hyperinsulinemia on the localization and expression of endothelin receptors A and B in lamellar tissue of the forelimbs of horses

    PubMed Central

    Gauff, Felicia C.; Patan-Zugaj, Bianca; Licka, Theresia F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of short-term hyperinsulinemia on the localization and expression of endothelin receptor (ETR)-A and ETR-B in lamellar tissue of the forelimbs of horses. Samples Distal portion of 15 cadaveric forelimbs from healthy adult horses (1 limb/horse) obtained immediately after slaughter at an abattoir. Procedures Each forelimb was assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (perfused with autologous blood for 10 hours [control perfusion; n = 5], perfused with an insulin [142 ± 81 μU/mL] perfusate for 10 hours [insulinemic perfusion; 5], or not perfused [unperfused control; 5]). Immunohistochemical evaluation of lamellar tissue was performed to assess localization of ETR-A and ETR-B. Expression of ETR-A and ETR-B was measured semiquantitatively on a scale of 0 to 3 (0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, and 3 = high-intensity staining) and quantitatively by means of gray value analysis with imaging software. Results In all specimens, ETR-A and ETR-B were localized in endothelium, smooth muscle cells, axons, and keratinocytes. Quantitative expression of ETR-A in the midportion of the primary epidermal lamellae for the insulinemic perfusion group (149 ± 16) was lower than that for the control perfusion group (158 ± 15). Expression of ETR-B in the primary epidermal lamellae tips for the insulinemic perfusion group (140 ± 29) was higher than that for the control perfusion group (114 ± 8). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Hyperinsulinemia caused significant changes in endothelin receptor expression, which suggested that ETR antagonists might be beneficial for treatment of laminitis in horses. PMID:24669922

  12. Expression and localization of members of the thrombospondin family during final follicle maturation and corpus luteum formation and function in the bovine ovary

    PubMed Central

    BERISHA, Bajram; SCHAMS, Dieter; RODLER, Daniela; SINOWATZ, Fred; PFAFFL, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the expression patterns and localization of the thrombospondin family members (THBS1, THBS2) and their receptors (CD36 and CD47) in bovine ovaries. First, the antral follicles were classified into 5 groups based on the follicle size and estradiol-17beta (E2) concentration in the follicular fluid (< 0.5, 0.5–5, 5–40, 40–180 and >180 E2 ng/ml). Second, the corpus luteum (CL) was assigned to the following stages: days 1–2, 3–4, 5–7, 8–12, 13–16 and >18 of the estrous cycle and of pregnancy (month 1–2, 3–4, 6–7 and > 8). Third, the corpora lutea were collected by transvaginal ovariectomy before and 0.5, 2, 4, 12, 24, 48 and 64 h after inducing luteolysis by injecting a prostaglandin F2alpha analog. The mRNA expression of examined factors was measured by RT-qPCR, steroid hormone concentration by EIA, and localization by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA expression of THBS1, THBS2, CD36, and CD47 in the granulosa cells and theca interna was high in the small follicles and reduced in the preovulatory follicles. The mRNA expression of THBS1, THBS2, and CD47 in the CL during the estrous cycle was high, but decreased significantly during pregnancy. After induced luteolysis, thrombospondins increased significantly to reach the maximum level at 12 h for THBS1, 24 h for THBS2, and 48 h for CD36. The temporal expression and localization pattern of the thrombospondins and their specific receptors in the antral follicles and corpora lutea during the different physiological phases of the estrous cycle and induced luteolysis appear to be compatible with their inhibitory role in the control of ovarian angiogenesis. PMID:27396384

  13. Abnormal hippocampal shape in offenders with psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Marina; Ganzola, Rossana; Rossi, Roberta; Sabattoli, Francesca; Laakso, Mikko P; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Vaurio, Olli; Könönen, Mervi; Aronen, Hannu J; Thompson, Paul M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Tiihonen, Jari

    2010-03-01

    Posterior hippocampal volumes correlate negatively with the severity of psychopathy, but local morphological features are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate hippocampal morphology in habitually violent offenders having psychopathy. Manual tracings of hippocampi from magnetic resonance images of 26 offenders (age: 32.5 +/- 8.4), with different degrees of psychopathy (12 high, 14 medium psychopathy based on the Psychopathy Checklist Revised), and 25 healthy controls (age: 34.6 +/- 10.8) were used for statistical modelling of local changes with a surface-based radial distance mapping method. Both offenders and controls had similar hippocampal volume and asymmetry ratios. Local analysis showed that the high psychopathy group had a significant depression along the longitudinal hippocampal axis, on both the dorsal and ventral aspects, when compared with the healthy controls and the medium psychopathy group. The opposite comparison revealed abnormal enlargement of the lateral borders in both the right and left hippocampi of both high and medium psychopathy groups versus controls, throughout CA1, CA2-3 and the subicular regions. These enlargement and reduction effects survived statistical correction for multiple comparisons in the main contrast (26 offenders vs. 25 controls) and in most subgroup comparisons. A statistical check excluded a possible confounding effect from amphetamine and polysubstance abuse. These results indicate that habitually violent offenders exhibit a specific abnormal hippocampal morphology, in the absence of total gray matter volume changes, that may relate to different autonomic modulation and abnormal fear-conditioning. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Local tidal regime dictates plasticity of expression of locomotor activity rhythms of American horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Rebecca L.; Watson, Winsor H.; Chabot, Christopher C.

    2017-01-01

    While horseshoe crabs Limulus polyphemus from regions with two daily tides express endogenous circatidal (~ 12.4 h) activity rhythms, much less is known about locomotor rhythm expression in horseshoe crabs from other tidal regimes. This study investigated whether horseshoe crabs (1) always express activity rhythms consistent with their natural tides, and (2) can alter activity rhythm expression in response to novel tide cycles. Activity rhythms of animals from environments with two daily tides (Gulf of Maine, 43°6′ N/70°52′ W, and Massachusetts, 41°32′ N/70°40′W), one dominant daily tide (Apalachee Bay, Florida, 29°58′ N/84°20′ W), and microtides (Indian River Lagoon, Florida, 28°5′ N/80°35′ W) were recorded in 2011–2013 during three artificial tide conditions: no tides, a 12.4 h tidal cycle, and a 24.8 h tidal cycle. Interestingly, L. polyphemus from the microtidal site (n = 7) appeared “plastic” in their responses; they were able to express both bimodal and unimodal rhythms in response to different tide cycles. In contrast, the other two populations exhibited more fixed responses: regardless of the tides they were exposed to, animals from areas with one dominant daily tide (n = 18) consistently expressed unimodal rhythms, while those from areas with two daily tides (n = 28) generally expressed bimodal rhythms. Rhythms expressed by L. polyphemus thus appear to be a function of endogenous clocks, the tidal cues to which animals are exposed, and tidal cues that animals experience throughout ontogeny. PMID:29051673

  15. Local C-Reactive Protein Expression in Obliterative Lesions and the Bronchial Wall in Posttransplant Obliterative Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Päiväniemi, Outi E.; Maasilta, Paula K.; Vainikka, Tiina L. S.; Alho, Hanni S.; Karhunen, Pekka J.; Salminen, Ulla-Stina

    2009-01-01

    The local immunoreactivity of C-reactive protein (CRP) was studied in a heterotopic porcine model of posttranplant obliterative bronchiolitis (OB). Bronchial allografts and control autografts were examined serially 2–28 days after subcutaneous transplantation. The autografts stayed patent. In the allografts, proliferation of inflammatory cells (P < .0001) and fibroblasts (P = .02) resulted in occlusion of the bronchial lumens (P < .01). Influx of CD4+ (P < .001) and CD8+ (P < .0001) cells demonstrated allograft immune response. CRP positivity simultaneously increased in the bronchial walls (P < .01), in macrophages, myofibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Local CRP was predictive of features characteristic of OB (R = 0.456–0.879, P < .05−P < .0001). Early obliterative lesions also showed CRP positivity, but not mature, collagen-rich obliterative plugs (P < .05). During OB development, CRP is localized in inflammatory cells, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells probably as a part of the local inflammatory response. PMID:19503785

  16. Enhanced heterologous expression of biologically active human granulocyte colony stimulating factor in transgenic tobacco BY-2 cells by localization to endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nisha R; Chidambareswaren, M; Manjula, S

    2014-09-01

    Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells, one of the best characterized cell lines is an attractive expression system for heterologous protein expression. However, the expression of foreign proteins is currently hampered by their low yield, which is partially the result of proteolytic degradation. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine. Recombinant hG-CSF is successfully being used for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in cancer patients. Here, we describe a simple strategy for producing biologically active hG-CSF in tobacco BY-2 cells, localized in the apoplast of BY-2 cells, as well as targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER targeting significantly enhanced recombinant production which scaled to 17.89 mg/l from 4.19 mg/l when expressed in the apoplasts. Southern blotting confirmed the stable integration of hG-CSF in the BY-2 nuclear genome, and the expression of hG-CSF was analysed by Western blotting. Total soluble protein containing hG-CSF isolated from positive calli showed proliferative potential when tested on HL-60 cell lines by MTT assay. We also report the potential of a Fluorescence-activated cell sorting approach for an efficient sorting of the hG-CSF-expressing cell lines, which will enable the generation of homogenous high-producing cell lines.

  17. Localization and developmental expression of two chicken host defense peptides: cathelicidin-2 and avian β-defensin 9.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; van Dijk, Albert; Dwars, R Marius; Haagsman, Henk P

    2016-08-01

    In the first weeks of life young chickens are highly susceptible to infectious diseases due to immaturity of the immune system. Little is known about the expression of host defense peptides (HDPs) during this period. In this study we examined the expression pattern of two chicken HDPs, the cathelicidin CATH-2 and the β-defensin AvBD9 by immunohistochemistry in a set of organs from embryonic day 12 until four weeks posthatch. AvBD9 was predominantly found in enteroendocrine cells throughout the intestine, the first report of in vivo HDP expression in this cell type, and showed stable expression levels during development. CATH-2 was exclusively found in heterophils which decreased after hatch in most of the examined organs including spleen, bursa and small intestine. In the lung CATH-2 expression was biphasic and peaked at the first day posthatch. In short, CATH-2 and AvBD9 appear to be expressed in cell types strategically located to respond to infectious stimuli, suggesting these peptides play a role in embryonic and early posthatch defense. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Localization, Localization, Localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T.; Malin, M.; Golombek, M.; Duxbury, T.; Johnson, A.; Guinn, J.; McElrath, T.; Kirk, R.; Archinal, B.; Soderblom, L.

    2004-01-01

    Localization of the two Mars Exploration Rovers involved three independent approaches to place the landers with respect to the surface of Mars and to refine the location of those points on the surface with the Mars control net: 1) Track the spacecraft through entry, descent, and landing, then refine the final roll stop position by radio tracking and comparison to images taken during descent; 2) Locate features on the horizon imaged by the two rovers and compare them to the MOC and THEMIS VIS images, and the DIMES images on the two MER landers; and 3) 'Check' and refine locations by acquisition of MOC 1.5 meter and 50 cm/pixel images.

  19. Gene expression profiles in paraffin-embedded core biopsy tissue predict response to chemotherapy in women with locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gianni, Luca; Zambetti, Milvia; Clark, Kim; Baker, Joffre; Cronin, Maureen; Wu, Jenny; Mariani, Gabriella; Rodriguez, Jaime; Carcangiu, Marialuisa; Watson, Drew; Valagussa, Pinuccia; Rouzier, Roman; Symmans, W Fraser; Ross, Jeffrey S; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Pusztai, Lajos; Shak, Steven

    2005-10-10

    We sought to identify gene expression markers that predict the likelihood of chemotherapy response. We also tested whether chemotherapy response is correlated with the 21-gene Recurrence Score assay that quantifies recurrence risk. Patients with locally advanced breast cancer received neoadjuvant paclitaxel and doxorubicin. RNA was extracted from the pretreatment formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded core biopsies. The expression of 384 genes was quantified using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and correlated with pathologic complete response (pCR). The performance of genes predicting for pCR was tested in patients from an independent neoadjuvant study where gene expression was obtained using DNA microarrays. Of 89 assessable patients (mean age, 49.9 years; mean tumor size, 6.4 cm), 11 (12%) had a pCR. Eighty-six genes correlated with pCR (unadjusted P < .05); pCR was more likely with higher expression of proliferation-related genes and immune-related genes, and with lower expression of estrogen receptor (ER) -related genes. In 82 independent patients treated with neoadjuvant paclitaxel and doxorubicin, DNA microarray data were available for 79 of the 86 genes. In univariate analysis, 24 genes correlated with pCR with P < .05 (false discovery, four genes) and 32 genes showed correlation with P < .1 (false discovery, eight genes). The Recurrence Score was positively associated with the likelihood of pCR (P = .005), suggesting that the patients who are at greatest recurrence risk are more likely to have chemotherapy benefit. Quantitative expression of ER-related genes, proliferation genes, and immune-related genes are strong predictors of pCR in women with locally advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant anthracyclines and paclitaxel.

  20. The local expression and trafficking of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in the axons of sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Noreen M; Scott, Shane S; Aschrafi, Armaz; Gale, Jenna; Vohra, Sanah N; MacGibeny, Margaret A; Kar, Amar N; Gioio, Anthony E; Kaplan, Barry B

    2016-06-01

    Synthesis and regulation of catecholamine neurotransmitters in the central nervous system are implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify factors that regulate the presynaptic synthesis of catecholamines, we tested the hypothesis that the rate-limiting enzyme of the catecholamine biosynthetic pathway, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), is locally synthesized in axons and presynaptic nerve terminals of noradrenergic neurons. To isolate pure axonal mRNA and protein, rat superior cervical ganglion sympathetic neurons were cultured in compartmentalized Campenot chambers. qRT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization analyses showed that TH mRNA is present in distal axons. Colocalization experiments with nerve terminal marker proteins suggested that both TH mRNA and protein localize in regions of the axon that resemble nerve terminals (i.e., synaptic boutons). Analysis of polysome-bound RNA showed that TH mRNA is present in polysomes isolated from distal axons. Metabolic labeling of axonally synthesized proteins labeled with the methionine analog, L-azidohomoalanine, showed that TH is locally synthesized in axons. Moreover, the local transfection and translation of exogenous TH mRNA into distal axons facilitated axonal dopamine synthesis. Finally, using chimeric td-Tomato-tagged constructs, we identified a sequence element within the TH 3'UTR that is required for the axonal localization of the reporter mRNA. Taken together, our results provide the first direct evidence that TH mRNA is trafficked to the axon and that the mRNA is locally translated. These findings raise the interesting possibility that the biosynthesis of the catecholamine neurotransmitters is locally regulated in the axon and/or presynaptic nerve terminal. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Spatial localization of EGF family ligands and receptors in the zebrafish ovarian follicle and their expression profiles during folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tse, Anna Chung-Kwan; Ge, Wei

    2010-07-01

    The roles of epidermal growth factor (EGF) family in the ovary have received increasing attention recently. Despite this, the production sites of EGF family members in the ovarian follicle still remain controversial. Using zebrafish as the model, the present study investigated spatial distribution of several EGF family ligands and receptors in the follicle as well as their temporal expression profiles during folliculogenesis. RT-PCR analysis on the somatic follicle layer and oocyte revealed that all EGF family ligands examined (egf, tgfa, btc and hbegf) were mostly or exclusively expressed in the oocyte. In contrast, their common receptor (egfr) was expressed exclusively in the follicle layer. By comparison, members of activin family showed an opposite pattern of distribution. Activin subunits (inhbaa and inhbb) were both expressed exclusively in the follicle layer whereas activin receptors and follistatin were abundantly present in the oocyte. During folliculogenesis, egf, tgfa and hbegf increased their expression together with egfr in the fast secondary growth phase. The developmental profiles of EGF family during embryogenesis appeared to argue for an important role for EGF family in folliculogenesis rather than embryogenesis as maternal molecules. The present study provided clear evidence for the existence of two paracrine pathways in the follicle, the oocyte-derived EGF family ligands and follicle cell-derived activins, which may mediate oocyte-to-follicle cell and follicle cell-to-oocyte communications, respectively. The functional relationship between these two signaling systems in the follicle is suggested by the observation that all four EGFR ligands examined significantly stimulated activin subunit expression in cultured follicle cells. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ying; Cameron, Iain T; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2017-09-01

    It is not uncommon for a woman to suffer from abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) or heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) at some point during her lifetime. Once pathology is excluded, in practice, management needs to be individualised, taking into account the improvement of the woman's symptoms and quality of life. Peer-reviewed journals, governmental and professional society publications. There is now agreement on a structured, universal approach to the diagnosis of AUB, with the aide memoirs PALM (polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyoma, malignancy) and COEIN (coagulopathies, ovulatory dysfunction, endometrial, iatrogenic, not otherwise classified). Once malignancy and significant pelvic pathology have been ruled out, medical treatment is an effective first-line therapeutic option, with surgery, including endometrial ablation and hysterectomy, offered when medical management has failed to resolve symptoms and fertility is no longer desired. There remains controversy around the management of the types and subtypes of adenomyosis and leiomyoma, and understanding their impact on clinical reproductive outcomes. Standardised assessment tools for measuring outcomes of AUB are being developed. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools should be developed to help stratify treatment for women with AUB, particularly relating to 'unclassified' and 'endometrial' causes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    PubMed

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  4. A rice chloroplast transit peptide sequence does not alter the cytoplasmic localization of sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase expressed in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Lee, Kyungjin; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-09-01

    Ectopic overexpression of melatonin biosynthetic genes of animal origin has been used to generate melatonin-rich transgenic plants to examine the functional roles of melatonin in plants. However, the subcellular localization of these proteins expressed in the transgenic plants remains unknown. We studied the localization of sheep (Ovis aries) serotonin N-acetyltransferase (OaSNAT) and a translational fusion of a rice SNAT transit peptide to OaSNAT (TS:OaSNAT) in plants. Laser confocal microscopy analysis revealed that both OaSNAT and TS:OaSNAT proteins were localized to the cytoplasm even with the addition of the transit sequence to OaSNAT. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing the TS:OaSNAT fusion transgene exhibited high SNAT enzyme activity relative to untransformed wild-type plants, but lower activity than transgenic rice plants expressing the wild-type OaSNAT gene. Melatonin levels in both types of transgenic rice plant corresponded well with SNAT enzyme activity levels. The TS:OaSNAT transgenic lines exhibited increased seminal root growth relative to wild-type plants, but less than in the OaSNAT transgenic lines, confirming that melatonin promotes root growth. Seed-specific OaSNAT expression under the control of a rice prolamin promoter did not confer high levels of melatonin production in transgenic rice seeds compared with seeds from transgenic plants expressing OaSNAT under the control of the constitutive maize ubiquitin promoter. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Ovarian Expression, Localization, and Function of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) During the Periovulatory Period of the Human Menstrual Cycle1

    PubMed Central

    Rosewell, Katherine L.; Li, Feixue; Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Akin, James W.; Brännström, Mats; Curry, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ovulation involves reorganization of the extracellular matrix of the follicle. This study examines the expression, localization, and potential function of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) during ovulation in women. The dominant follicle of the menstrual cycle was collected at specified times throughout the ovulatory process: pre-, early, late, and postovulatory. For quantitative studies, the follicle was bisected; granulosa and theca cells were separated and collected. For immunohistochemistry (IHC), the intact follicle was embedded and TIMP3 was localized. Additionally, granulosa cells were collected from women undergoing in vitro fertilization and treated with increasing concentrations of recombinant TIMP3, and cell viability was assessed. Real-time PCR for TIMP3 mRNA revealed an increase in TIMP3 mRNA expression in granulosa cells from the early to the late ovulatory stage. Thecal TIMP3 mRNA expression was constitutive across the periovulatory period. TIMP3 protein was localized by IHC to the granulosa and theca cell layers in pre-, early, and late ovulatory follicles as well as to the vascular bed. The staining was most intense in the granulosa and theca cells in the late ovulatory group. Treatment of human granulosa-lutein cells with exogenous recombinant TIMP3 for 24 h decreased cell viability by 60%. Using human follicles collected throughout the periovulatory period of the menstrual cycle, we have demonstrated that TIMP3 mRNA expression increases and that TIMP3 protein is in the appropriate cellular layers to regulate proteolytic remodeling as the follicle progresses toward ovulation. In addition, we have shown that elevated levels of TIMP3 lead to decreased cell viability. PMID:24048576

  6. Ovarian expression, localization, and function of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) during the periovulatory period of the human menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Rosewell, Katherine L; Li, Feixue; Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Akin, James W; Brännström, Mats; Curry, Thomas E

    2013-11-01

    Ovulation involves reorganization of the extracellular matrix of the follicle. This study examines the expression, localization, and potential function of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) during ovulation in women. The dominant follicle of the menstrual cycle was collected at specified times throughout the ovulatory process: pre-, early, late, and postovulatory. For quantitative studies, the follicle was bisected; granulosa and theca cells were separated and collected. For immunohistochemistry (IHC), the intact follicle was embedded and TIMP3 was localized. Additionally, granulosa cells were collected from women undergoing in vitro fertilization and treated with increasing concentrations of recombinant TIMP3, and cell viability was assessed. Real-time PCR for TIMP3 mRNA revealed an increase in TIMP3 mRNA expression in granulosa cells from the early to the late ovulatory stage. Thecal TIMP3 mRNA expression was constitutive across the periovulatory period. TIMP3 protein was localized by IHC to the granulosa and theca cell layers in pre-, early, and late ovulatory follicles as well as to the vascular bed. The staining was most intense in the granulosa and theca cells in the late ovulatory group. Treatment of human granulosa-lutein cells with exogenous recombinant TIMP3 for 24 h decreased cell viability by 60%. Using human follicles collected throughout the periovulatory period of the menstrual cycle, we have demonstrated that TIMP3 mRNA expression increases and that TIMP3 protein is in the appropriate cellular layers to regulate proteolytic remodeling as the follicle progresses toward ovulation. In addition, we have shown that elevated levels of TIMP3 lead to decreased cell viability.

  7. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S.; De Jesus, Danilo R.; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Schutter, Dennis J.L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. Results We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. Limitations The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders. PMID:23937798

  8. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders.

    PubMed

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S; De Jesus, Danilo R; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2014-01-01

    Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders.

  9. Local differentiation and plasticity in size and sex expression in jack-in-the-pulpit, Arisaema triphyllum (Araceae).

    PubMed

    Vitt, Pati; Holsinger, Kent E; Jones, Cynthia S

    2003-12-01

    The size advantage hypothesis suggests that natural selection will favor size-dependent sex expression when one sex gains more than the other by being large. But members of a minority sex will also have a higher reproductive value, on average. Thus, an individual's reproductive success depends on the reproductive decisions made by neighboring individuals. As a result, the optimal relationship between size and sex may differ among populations. In Arisaema triphyllum, the probability for an individual to be female increases with size, regardless of the character measured. A reciprocal transplant experiment showed the relationship between size and sexual expression is environmentally plastic. Plants originating from our two study sites became female at a larger average size when grown at one site than when grown at the other. In addition to environmental influence on sex expression, the experiment demonstrated genetic differences in the relationship between size and sex. Plants collected from one site became female at a larger size than those from the other, regardless of where they were grown. Thus, while the environment in which an individual was grown had a substantial influence on its sex expression, populations only a few kilometers apart have genetically different relationships between size and sex.

  10. TRPV6 and Calbindin-D9k-expression and localization in the bovine uterus and placenta during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transient receptor potential channel type 6 (TRPV6) and Calbindin-D9k (CaBP-9k) are involved in the active calcium (Ca2+) transport mechanism in many tissues including placenta and uterus, suggesting a role in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Moreover, TRPV6 and CaBP-9k seem to support the materno-fetal Ca2+ transport that is crucial for fetal Ca2+ homeostasis, bone growth and development. However, it is unknown if these proteins are also involved in the aetiology of pathologies associated with parturition in cows, such as retained fetal membranes (RFM). The aim of the current study was to create an expression profile of uterine and placentomal TRPV6 and CaBP-9k mRNAs and proteins during pregnancy and postpartum in cows with and without fetal membrane release. Methods Uteri and placentomes of 27 cows in different stages of pregnancy and placentomes of cows with and without RFM were collected. Protein and mRNA expression of TRPV6 and CaBP-9k was investigated by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results In the uterine endometrium, highest TRPV6 and CaBP-9k expression was found in the last trimester of pregnancy, with a particular increase of protein in the glandular epithelium. In the placentomes, a gradual increase in TRPV6 mRNA was detectable towards parturition, while protein expression did not change significantly. Placentomal CaBP-9k expression did not change significantly throughout pregnancy but immunohistochemistry revealed an increase in staining intensity in the maternal crypt epithelium. Immunohistochemical, stronger placental CaBP-9k signals were seen in animals with RFM compared to animals with an undisturbed fetal membrane release, while protein levels, measured by Western blot analyses did not change significantly. Conclusions The results of the present study demonstrate a dynamic expression of TRPV6 and CaBP-9k during pregnancy in the bovine uterine endometrium and placentomes, suggesting a functional role

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression correlated with tumor response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Diclehan; Uner, Aytug; Akyurek, Nalan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze whether the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors are associated with tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients who had undergone preoperative chemoradiotherapy were evaluated retrospectively. Treatment consisted of pelvic radiotherapy and two cycles of 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks later. MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry of the preradiation biopsy and surgical specimens. The intensity and extent of staining were evaluated separately, and a final score was calculated by multiplying the two scores. The primarymore » endpoint was the correlation of expression with tumor response, with the secondary endpoint the effect of chemoradiotherapy on the expression. Results: Preoperative treatment resulted in downstaging in 20 patients (45%) and no clinical response in 24 (55%). The pathologic tumor response was complete in 11 patients (25%), partial in 23 (52%), and none in 10 (23%). Positive MMP-9 staining was observed in 20 tumors (45%) and was associated with the clinical nodal stage (p = 0.035) and the pathologic and clinical response (p < 0.0001). The staining status of the other markers was associated with neither stage nor response. The overall pathologic response rate was 25% in MMP-9-positive patients vs. 52% in MMP-9-negative patients (p = 0.001). None of the 11 patients with pathologic complete remission was MMP-9 positive. Conclusions: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression correlated with a poor tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal carcinoma patients.« less

  12. The Three Clades of the Telomere-Associated TLO Gene Family of Candida albicans Have Different Splicing, Localization, and Expression Features

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew Z.; Baller, Joshua A.; Dulmage, Keely; Wigen, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans grows within a wide range of host niches, and this adaptability enhances its success as a commensal and as a pathogen. The telomere-associated TLO gene family underwent a recent expansion from one or two copies in other CUG clade members to 14 expressed copies in C. albicans. This correlates with increased virulence and clinical prevalence relative to those of other Candida clade species. The 14 expressed TLO gene family members have a conserved Med2 domain at the N terminus, suggesting a role in general transcription. The C-terminal half is more divergent, distinguishing three clades: clade α and clade β have no introns and encode proteins that localize primarily to the nucleus; clade γ sometimes undergoes splicing, and the gene products localize within the mitochondria as well as the nuclei. Additionally, TLOα genes are generally expressed at much higher levels than are TLOγ genes. We propose that expansion of the TLO gene family and the predicted role of Tlo proteins in transcription regulation provide C. albicans with the ability to adapt rapidly to the broad range of different environmental niches within the human host. PMID:22923044

  13. Prevention of autoimmune diabetes and islet allograft rejection by beta cell expression of XIAP: Insight into possible mechanisms of local immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Obach, Mercè; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Montane, Joel; Wind, Katarina; Soukhatcheva, Galina; Dai, Derek; Priatel, John J; Orban, Paul C; Verchere, C Bruce

    2018-06-05

    Overexpression of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) prevents islet allograft rejection. We constructed an adeno-associated virus expressing XIAP driven by the rat insulin promoter (dsAAV8-RIP-XIAP) for long-term beta-cell gene expression in vivo. Pancreatic delivery of dsAAV8-RIP-XIAP prevented autoimmune diabetes in 70% of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, associated with decreased insulitis. Islets from Balb/c mice transduced with dsAAV8-RIP-XIAP were protected following transplantation into streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic Bl/6 recipients, associated with decreased graft infiltration. Interestingly, dsAAV8-RIP-XIAP transduction induced expression of lactate dehydrogenase (LDHA) and monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), two genes normally suppressed in beta cells and involved in production and release of lactate, a metabolite known to suppress local immune responses. Transduction of Balb/c islets with AAV8-RIP-LDHA-MCT1 tended to prolong allograft survival following transplant into STZ-diabetic Bl/6 recipients. These findings suggest that XIAP has therapeutic potential in autoimmune diabetes and raise the possibility that local lactate production may play a role in XIAP-mediated immunomodulation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Local and systemic gene expression responses of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) to infection with the salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis)

    PubMed Central

    Skugor, Stanko; Glover, Kevin Alan; Nilsen, Frank; Krasnov, Aleksei

    2008-01-01

    Background The salmon louse (SL) is an ectoparasitic caligid crustacean infecting salmonid fishes in the marine environment. SL represents one of the major challenges for farming of salmonids, and veterinary intervention is necessary to combat infection. This study addressed gene expression responses of Atlantic salmon infected with SL, which may account for its high susceptibility. Results The effects of SL infection on gene expression in Atlantic salmon were studied throughout the infection period from copepodids at 3 days post infection (dpi) to adult lice (33 dpi). Gene expression was analyzed at three developmental stages in damaged and intact skin, spleen, head kidney and liver, using real-time qPCR and a salmonid cDNA microarray (SFA2). Rapid detection of parasites was indicated by the up-regulation of immunoglobulins in the spleen and head kidney and IL-1 receptor type 1, CD4, beta-2-microglobulin, IL-12β, CD8α and arginase 1 in the intact skin of infected fish. Most immune responses decreased at 22 dpi, however, a second activation was observed at 33 dpi. The observed pattern of gene expression in damaged skin suggested the development of inflammation with signs of Th2-like responses. Involvement of T cells in responses to SL was witnessed with up-regulation of CD4, CD8α and programmed death ligand 1. Signs of hyporesponsive immune cells were seen. Cellular stress was prevalent in damaged skin as seen by highly significant up-regulation of heat shock proteins, other chaperones and mitochondrial proteins. Induction of the major components of extracellular matrix, TGF-β and IL-10 was observed only at the adult stage of SL. Taken together with up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), this classifies the wounds afflicted by SL as chronic. Overall, the gene expression changes suggest a combination of chronic stress, impaired healing and immunomodulation. Steady increase of MMP expression in all tissues except liver was a remarkable feature of SL

  15. The homeostatic regulation of REM sleep: A role for localized expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brainstem.

    PubMed

    Datta, Subimal; Knapp, Clifford M; Koul-Tiwari, Richa; Barnes, Abigail

    2015-10-01

    Homeostatic regulation of REM sleep plays a key role in neural plasticity and deficits in this process are implicated in the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms that underlie this homeostatic regulation process. This study examined the hypothesis that, during selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD), increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in REM sleep regulating areas is critical for the development of homeostatic drive for REM sleep, as measured by an increase in the number of REM sleep transitions. Rats were assigned to RSD, non-sleep deprived (BSL), or total sleep deprivation (TSD) groups. Physiological recordings were obtained from cortical, hippocampal, and pontine EEG electrodes over a 6h period, in which sleep deprivation occurred during the first 3h. In the RSD, but not the other conditions, homeostatic drive for REM sleep increased progressively. BDNF protein expression was significantly greater in the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) and subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) in the RSD as compared to the TSD and BSL groups, areas that regulate REM sleep, but not in the medial preoptic area, which regulates non-REM sleep. There was a significant positive correlation between RSD-induced increases in number of REM sleep episodes and increased BDNF expression in the PPT and SubCD. These increases positively correlated with levels of homeostatic drive for REM sleep. These results, for the first time, suggest that selective RSD-induced increased expression of BDNF in the PPT and SubCD are determinant factors in the development of the homeostatic drive for REM sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Homeostatic Regulation of REM Sleep: A role for Localized Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Subimal; Knapp, Clifford M.; Koul-Tiwari, Richa; Barnes, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic regulation of REM sleep plays a key role in neural plasticity and deficits in this process are implicated in the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms that underlie this homeostatic regulation process. This study examined the hypothesis that, during selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD), increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in REM sleep regulating areas is critical for the development of homeostatic drive for REM sleep, as measured by an increase in the number of REM sleep transitions. Rats were assigned to RSD, non-sleep deprived (BSL), or total sleep deprivation (TSD) groups. Physiological recordings were obtained from cortical, hippocampal, and pontine EEG electrodes over a 6-hour period, in which sleep deprivation occurred during the first 3 hours. In the RSD, but not the other conditions, homeostatic drive for REM sleep increased progressively. BDNF protein expression was significantly greater in the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) and subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) in the RSD as compared to the TSD and BSL groups, areas that regulate REM sleep, but not in the medial preoptic area, which regulates non-REM sleep. There was a significant positive correlation between RSD-induced increases in number of REM sleep episodes and increased BDNF expression in the PPT and SubCD. These increases positively correlated with levels of homeostatic drive for REM sleep. These results, for the first time, suggest that selective RSD-induced increased expression of BDNF in the PPT and SubCD are determinant factors in the development of the homeostatic drive for REM sleep. PMID:26146031

  17. Lipopolysaccharide mitagates methamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine depletion via modulating local TNF-alpha and dopamine transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Ting; Tsai, Yen-Ping N; Cherng, Chianfang G; Ke, Jing-Jer; Ho, Ming-Che; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Yu, Lung

    2009-04-01

    Systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment may affect methamphetamine (MA)-induced nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) depletion. This study was undertaken to determine the critical time window for the protective effects of LPS treatment and the underlying mechanisms. An LPS injection (1 mg/kg) 72 h before or 2 h after MA treatment [three consecutive, subcutaneous injections of MA (10 mg/kg each) at 2-h intervals] diminished the MA-induced DA depletion in mouse striatum. Such an LPS-associated effect was independent of MA-produced hyperthermia. TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 expressions were all elevated in striatal tissues following a systemic injection with LPS, indicating that peripheral LPS treatment affected striatal pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Striatal TNF-alpha expression was dramatically increased at 72 and 96 h after the MA treatment, while such TNF-alpha elevation was abolished by the LPS pretreatment protocol. Moreover, MA-produced activation of nuclear NFkappaB, a transcription factor following TNF-alpha activation, in striatum was abolished by the LPS (1 mg/kg) pretreatment. Furthermore, thalidomide, a TNF-alpha antagonist, treatment abolished the LPS pretreatment-associated protective effects. Pretreatment with mouse recombinant TNF-alpha in striatum diminished the MA-produced DA depletion. Finally, single LPS treatment caused a rapid down-regulation of dopamine transporter (DAT) in striatum. Taken together, we conclude that peripheral LPS treatment protects nigrostriatal DA neurons against MA-induced toxicity, in part, by reversing elevated TNF-alpha expression and subsequent signaling cascade and causing a rapid DAT down-regulation in striatum.

  18. Molecular cloning, developmental expression, and cellular localization of the 70-kDa RPA-1 subunit of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, J; Logarinho, E; Avides, M C; Sunkel, C E

    1999-12-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a highly conserved multifunctional heterotrimeric complex, involved in DNA replication, repair, recombination, and possibly transcription. Here, we report the cloning of the gene that codes for the largest subunit of the Drosophila melanogaster RPA homolog, dmRPA70. In situ hybridization showed that dmRPA70 RNA is present in developing embryos during the first 16 cycles. After this point, dm-RPA70 expression is downregulated in cells that enter a G1 phase and exit the mitotic cycle, becoming restricted to brief bursts of accumulation from late G1 to S phase. This pattern of regulated expression is also observed in the developing eye imaginal disc. In addition, we have shown that the presence of cyclin E is necessary and sufficient to drive the expression of dmRPA70 in embryonic cells arrested in G1 but is not required in tissues undergoing endoreduplication. Immunolocalization showed that in early developing embryos, the dmRPA70 protein associates with chromatin from the end of mitosis until the beginning of the next prophase in a dynamic speckled pattern that is strongly suggestive of its association with replication foci.

  19. Detection of dominant flow and abnormal events in surveillance video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sooyeong; Byun, Hyeran

    2011-02-01

    We propose an algorithm for abnormal event detection in surveillance video. The proposed algorithm is based on a semi-unsupervised learning method, a kind of feature-based approach so that it does not detect the moving object individually. The proposed algorithm identifies dominant flow without individual object tracking using a latent Dirichlet allocation model in crowded environments. It can also automatically detect and localize an abnormally moving object in real-life video. The performance tests are taken with several real-life databases, and their results show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently detect abnormally moving objects in real time. The proposed algorithm can be applied to any situation in which abnormal directions or abnormal speeds are detected regardless of direction.

  20. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  1. Na+/K+ ATPase regulates the expression and localization of acetylcholine receptors in a pump activity-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Motomichi; Iwasaki, Kouichi

    2008-01-01

    Na+/K+ ATPase is a plasma membrane-localized sodium pump that maintains the ion gradients between the extracellular and intracellular environments, which in turn controls the cellular resting membrane potential. Recent evidence suggests that the pump is also localized at synapses and regulates synaptic efficacy. However, its precise function at the synapse is unknown. Here we show that two mutations in the α subunit of the eat-6 Na+/K+ ATPase in Caenorhabditis elegans dramatically increase the sensitivity to acetylcholine (Ach) agonists and alter the localization of nicotinic Ach receptors at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). These defects can be rescued by mutated EAT-6 proteins which lack its pump activity, suggesting the presence of a novel function for Ach signaling. The Na+/K+ ATPase accumulates at postsynaptic sites and appears to surround Ach receptors to maintain rigid clusters at the NMJ. Our findings suggest a critical pump activity-independent, allele –specific role for Na+/K+ ATPase on postsynaptic organization and synaptic efficacy. PMID:18599311

  2. High expression of Y-box-binding protein 1 is associated with local recurrence and predicts poor outcome in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xuebing; Yan, Leil