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Sample records for abnormal expression patterns

  1. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  2. Microarray analysis of microRNA expression patterns in the semen of infertile men with semen abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Te; Cheng, Weiwei; Gao, Yongtao; Wang, Hui; Liu, Zhixue

    2012-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in tissue development and the pathology of many diseases, however, the effects and roles of miRNAs in the development of semen abnormalities in infertile males have not yet been investigated. In this study, we analyzed and compared the miRNA expression profiles of abnormal semen from 86 infertile males with normal semen from 86 healthy males using an miRNA microarray. In total, 52 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the abnormal semen of infertile males and the normal semen of healthy males. The differential expression of selected miRNAs was validated by real time qRT-PCR and northern blotting: miR-574-5p, miR-297, miR-122, miR-1275, miR-373, miR-185 and miR-193b were upregulated (fold change>1.5, p<0.001) and miR-100, miR-512-3p, miR-16, miR-19b, miR-23b and miR-26a were downregulated (fold change<0.667, p<0.001) in the semen of infertile males with semen abnormalities. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into specific miRNAs that are associated with semen abnormalities in infertile males.

  3. Aberrant gene expression patterns in placentomes are associated with phenotypically normal and abnormal cattle cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Everts, Robin E; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Razzak, Anthony; Hue, Isabelle; Green, Cheryl A; Oliveira, Rosane; Vignon, Xavier; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Tian, X Cindy; Yang, Xiangzhong; Renard, Jean-Paul; Lewin, Harris A

    2008-03-14

    Transcription profiling of placentomes derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, n = 20), in vitro fertilization (IVF, n = 9), and artificial insemination (AI, n = 9) at or near term development was performed to better understand why SCNT and IVF often result in placental defects, hydrops, and large offspring syndrome (LOS). Multivariate analysis of variance was used to distinguish the effects of SCNT, IVF, and AI on gene expression, taking into account the effects of parturition (term or preterm), sex of fetus, breed of dam, breed of fetus, and pathological finding in the offspring (hydrops, normal, or other abnormalities). Differential expression of 20 physiologically important genes was confirmed with quantitative PCR. The largest effect on placentome gene expression was attributable to whether placentas were collected at term or preterm (i.e., whether the collection was because of disease or to obtain stage-matched controls) followed by placentome source (AI, IVF, or SCNT). Gene expression in SCNT placentomes was dramatically different from AI (n = 336 genes; 276 >2-fold) and from IVF (n = 733 genes; 162 >2-fold) placentomes. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEG) showed that IVF has significant effects on genes associated with cellular metabolism. In contrast, DEG associated with SCNT are involved in multiple pathways, including cell cycle, cell death, and gene expression. Many DEG were shared between the gene lists for IVF and SCNT comparisons, suggesting that common pathways are affected by the embryo culture methods used for IVF and SCNT. However, the many unique gene functions and pathways affected by SCNT suggest that cloned fetuses may be starved and accumulating toxic wastes due to placental insufficiency caused by reprogramming errors. Many of these genes are candidates for hydrops and LOS.

  4. Expression of ERα and PR in Various Morphological Patterns of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding-Endometrial causes in Reproductive Age Group

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pallavi; Chaurasia, Amrita; Dhingra, Vishal; Misra, Vatsala

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) is most common gynaecological problem but its management is not well defined. So FIGO/PALMCOEIN classification was developed to provide clear management options as treatment is different in PALM and AUB-E group. FIGO/PALM-COEIN classification and immunohistochemistry with ERα and PR expression in AUB-E group will be helpful in management of these patients, thus preventing surgical interventions. Aim To study histomorphological classification according to FIGO/PALM-COEIN classification in patients presenting with AUB into PALM and AUB-E group. To study the receptor expression of ERα and PR in AUB-E group. Materials and Methods This cross sectional study was performed in patients presenting with AUB in reproductive age group (15-45 years). Six hundred endometrial specimens were stained with H&E for histolomorphological examination and classified as per FIGO/PALM-COEIN classification of AUB in non-gravid women in reproductive age group. Fifty endometrial biopsies were of pregnancy and pregnancy related complications and were excluded from study. A total of 550 samples were evaluated in present study. IHC for quantification of ERα and PR expression was carried out in AUB-E (100) cases and control group endometrium (20) cases due to technical constraints. Statistical Analysis Unpaired student t-test was performed. p-value ≤ 0.05 was taken as critical level of significance. Results Endometrial (58.19%) (AUB-E) causes were most common cause of AUB. Most common morphology was AUB-E (Proliferative endometrium), AUB-L (Leiomyoma) and AUB-E (Secretory endometrium) respectively. Statistically significant expression of ERα and PR was found in AUB-E endometrium as compared to control group endometrium. In Non secretory/Proliferative endometrium AUB-E group. Proliferative endometrium and hyperplasia without atypia had significant expression of ERα and PR in glands and stroma when compared with proliferative phase control group

  5. Repeated stress-induced expression pattern alterations of the hippocampal chloride transporters KCC2 and NKCC1 associated with behavioral abnormalities in female mice.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Takao; Masuhara, Masaaki; Iwai, Haruki; Sonomura, Takahiro; Sato, Tomoaki

    2015-09-11

    The balance of cation-chloride co-transporters, particularly KCC2 and NKCC1, is critical for GABAergic inhibitory signaling. However, KCC2/NKCC1 balance is disrupted in many neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, correlations between chronic stress, KCC2 and NKCC1 in the hippocampus remain poorly understood. Despite the fact that emotional disorders in humans are far more prevalent in women, there have been relatively few studies about female subjects. Here we investigated behaviors and expression patterns of KCC2 and NKCC1 in the hippocampi of female mice under chronic stress. Repeated stress (RS) was induced in experimental mice by repeated forced water administration. Then, expression patterns of GABAergic signaling molecules were identified by immunohistochemical analysis and performance was assessed using several behavioral tests. The results of semi-quantitative analysis showed that RS decreased KCC2 expression and increased NKCC1 expression in membranes of granular and pyramidal cells in the hippocampus. The novel object recognition (NOR) test and sociability test revealed that RS induced cognitive and sociability deficits, whereas RS increased the time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze test and induced attention deficits in other tests. In summary, RS induced alterations in membrane KCC2/NKCC1 balance in the hippocampus of female mice, which may contribute to GABAergic disinhibition associated with cognitional, sociability and attention deficits. PMID:26239662

  6. NUP98/JARID1A is a novel recurrent abnormality in pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia with a distinct HOX gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, J D E; Hollink, I H I M; Arentsen-Peters, S T C J M; van Galen, J F; Berna Beverloo, H; Baruchel, A; Trka, J; Reinhardt, D; Sonneveld, E; Zimmermann, M; Alonzo, T A; Pieters, R; Meshinchi, S; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Zwaan, C Michel

    2013-12-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities and early response to treatment are the main prognostic factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, NUP98/NSD1 (t(5; 11)(q35; p15)), a cytogenetically cryptic fusion, was described as recurrent event in AML, characterized by dismal prognosis and HOXA/B gene overexpression. Using split-signal fluorescence in situ hybridization, other NUP98-rearranged pediatric AML cases were identified, including several acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) cases with a cytogenetically cryptic fusion of NUP98 to JARID1A (t(11;15)(p15;q35)). In this study we screened 105 pediatric AMKL cases to analyze the frequency of NUP98/JARID1A and other recurrent genetic abnormalities. NUP98/JARID1A was identified in 11/105 patients (10.5%). Other abnormalities consisted of RBM15/MKL1 (n=16), CBFA2T3/GLIS2 (n=13) and MLL-rearrangements (n=13). Comparing NUP98/JARID1A-positive patients with other pediatric AMKL patients, no significant differences in sex, age and white blood cell count were found. NUP98/JARID1A was not an independent prognostic factor for 5-year overall (probability of overall survival (pOS)) or event-free survival (probability of event-free survival (pEFS)), although the 5-year pOS for the entire AMKL cohort was poor (42 ± 6%). Cases with RBM15/MLK1 fared significantly better in terms of pOS and pEFS, although this was not independent from other risk factors in multivariate analysis. NUP98/JARID1A cases were characterized by HOXA/B gene overexpression, which is a potential druggable pathway. In conclusion, NUP98/JARID1A is a novel recurrent genetic abnormality in pediatric AMKL.

  7. Dietary Patterns and Glucose Tolerance Abnormalities in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuna; Ma, Guansheng; Zhai, Fengying; Li, Yanping; Hu, Yisong; Feskens, Edith J.M.; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association of the dietary pattern with the presence of newly diagnosed glucose tolerance abnormalities among Chinese adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 20,210 adults aged 45–69 years from the 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey were included. Information on dietary intake was collected using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Factor analysis and cluster analysis were used to identify the food factors and dietary pattern clusters. RESULTS Four dietary pattern clusters were identified (“Green Water,” “Yellow Earth,” “Western Adopter,” and “New Affluence”). The prevalence of glucose tolerance abnormalities ranged from 3.9% in the Green Water to 8.0% in the New Affluence. After adjustment for area, age, sex, current smoking, and physical activity, subjects in the Yellow Earth cluster (prevalence ratio 1.22 [95% CI 1.04–1.43]) and New Affluence cluster (2.05 [1.76–2.37]) had significantly higher prevalence rates compared with those for the Green Water cluster. After further adjustment for BMI and waist-to-height ratio, the elevated risk in the New Affluence remained statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS Dietary patterns and food factors are associated with the presence of glucose tolerance abnormalities in China, even independent of obesity. A New Affluence diet is an important modifiable risk factor, which needs attention from the prevention point of view. PMID:19675202

  8. Mitochondrial abnormalities in dermatomyositis: characteristic pattern of neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Alhatou, Mohammed I; Sladky, John T; Bagasra, Omar; Glass, Jonathan D

    2004-08-01

    The objective of the work described in this paper was to evaluate mitochondrial abnormalities in perifascicular atrophic fibers in muscle biopsies from patients with dermatomyositis (DM). We localized cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) histochemically in muscle biopsies of 12 patients with DM, and 12 control patients with neurogenic atrophy. These two histochemical techniques were also combined on single tissue sections in order to accentuate any COX-negative fibers. Eleven out of 12 patients (91.6%) with DM showed histochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in perifascicular distribution. Similar abnormalities in histochemical staining were not seen in comparably sized myofibers that were atrophic due to denervation. It is concluded that abnormal SDH and COX histochemical activities in atrophic perifascicular fibers are characteristic of dermatomyositis. These abnormal staining characteristics could not be accounted for solely by myofiber atrophy, or by generalized abnormalities in histochemical staining.

  9. Expression of CD1d protein in human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Abdelwahed Hussein, Mahmoud-Rezk

    2011-05-01

    CD1d is a member of CD1 family of transmembrane glycoproteins, which represent antigen-presenting molecules. Immunofluorescent staining methods were utilized to examine expression pattern of CD1d in human testicular specimens. In testis showing normal spermatogenesis, a strong CD1d cytoplasmic expression was seen the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. A moderate expression was observed in the spermatocytes. In testes showing maturation arrest, CD1d expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and weak in spermatogonia and spermatocytes compared to testis with normal spermatogenesis. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, CD1d expression was strong in the Sertoli and Leydig cells. This preliminary study displayed testicular infertility-related changes in CD1d expression. The ultrastructural changes associated with with normal and abnormal spermatogenesis are open for further investigations.

  10. Abnormal expression of the imprinted gene Phlda2 in cloned bovine placenta.

    PubMed

    Guillomot, M; Taghouti, G; Constant, F; Degrelle, S; Hue, I; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Jammes, H

    2010-06-01

    Cloning in mammals suffers from high rates of pregnancy losses associated with abnormal placentation, mainly placentomegaly, leading to fetal death. Placental growth is dependent on the regulated expression of many genes of which imprinted genes play a fundamental role. Among them, the Phlda2 gene is expressed from the maternal allele and acts to limit placental growth in mouse and human. Here we used Northern blots, quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization to analyze the expression patterns of bovine PHLDA2 and to compare its expression levels in normal and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) placentas over a range of gestational stages. PHLDA2 is not expressed in extra-embryonic tissues before d32 of gestation but the level of expression increases throughout pregnancy until term in the placental villi collected from pregnancy obtained by artificial insemination (AI). At all stages of pregnancy, PHLDA2 mRNA are specifically localized in the trophoblast mononucleated cells contrasting with lack of expression in the binucleated cells and uterine tissues. In SCNT placentas, a similar pattern of expression was observed during early pregnancy. In contrast the level of expression is significantly reduced around d200 of gestation in the placental villi from pathological clones. The reduced expression of PHLDA2 was obvious particularly in the placental villi anchored within the uterine crypts with expression confined to the trophoblast of the chorionic plate. Altogether, these results highlight a similarity in expression patterns for PHLDA2 bovine and human where expression is localized to the trophoblast throughout pregnancy and parallels the continuous growth of the placenta. Moreover, the lack of expression in the fetal villi from oversized bovine cloned placenta is consistent with the function of PHLDA2 in restraining placental growth and underlines an aberrant expression of this gene after somatic cloning.

  11. Heat shock protein 27 expression in the human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Assaf, Hanan A; Hussein, Mahmoud Rezk A

    2008-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in protein folding, assembly and transport, and which play critical roles in the regulation of cell growth, survival and differentiation. We set out to test the hypothesis that HSP27 protein is expressed in the human testes and its expression varies with the state of spermatogenesis. HSP27 expression was examined in 30 human testicular biopsy specimens (normal spermatogenesis, maturation arrest and Sertoli cell only syndrome, 10 cases each) using immunofluorescent methods. The biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing investigations for infertility. The seminiferous epithelium of the human testes showing normal spermatogenesis had a cell type-specific expression of HSP27. HSP27 expression was strong in the cytoplasm of the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. Alternatively, the expression was moderate in the spermatocytes, weak in the spermatids and absent in the spermatozoa. In testes showing maturation arrest, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells, weak in the spermatogonia, and spermatocytes. It was absent in the spermatids and Leydig cells. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and absent in the Leydig cells. We report for the first time the expression patterns of HSP27 in the human testes and show differential expression during normal spermatogenesis, indicating a possible role in this process. The altered expression of this protein in testes showing abnormal spermatogenesis may be related to the pathogenesis of male infertility.

  12. Noise Effects on the Complex Patterns of Abnormal Heartbeats

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Glass, Leon; Goldberger, Ary L.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-08-06

    Patients at high risk for sudden death often exhibit complex heart rhythms in which abnormal heartbeats are interspersed with normal heartbeats. We analyze such a complex rhythm in a single patient over a 12-h period and show that the rhythm can be described by a theoretical model consisting of two interacting oscillators with stochastic elements. By varying the magnitude of the noise, we show that for an intermediate level of noise, the model gives best agreement with key statistical features of the dynamics.

  13. Noise effects on the complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, V.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Ivanov, P. C.; Glass, L.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    Patients at high risk for sudden death often exhibit complex heart rhythms in which abnormal heartbeats are interspersed with normal heartbeats. We analyze such a complex rhythm in a single patient over a 12-h period and show that the rhythm can be described by a theoretical model consisting of two interacting oscillators with stochastic elements. By varying the magnitude of the noise, we show that for an intermediate level of noise, the model gives best agreement with key statistical features of the dynamics.

  14. Patterns of Structural MRI Abnormalities in Deficit and Nondeficit Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Galderisi, Silvana; Quarantelli, Mario; Volpe, Umberto; Mucci, Armida; Cassano, Giovanni Battista; Invernizzi, Giordano; Rossi, Alessandro; Vita, Antonio; Pini, Stefano; Cassano, Paolo; Daneluzzo, Enrico; De Peri, Luca; Stratta, Paolo; Brunetti, Arturo; Maj, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Negative symptoms of schizophrenia have generally been found in association with ventricular enlargement and prefrontal abnormalities. These relationships, however, have not been observed consistently, most probably because negative symptoms are heterogeneous and result from different pathophysiological mechanisms. The concept of deficit schizophrenia (DS) was introduced by Carpenter et al to identify a clinically homogeneous subgroup of patients characterized by the presence of primary and enduring negative symptoms. Findings of brain structural abnormalities reported by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies focusing on DS have been mixed. The present study included 34 patients with DS, 32 with nondeficit schizophrenia (NDS), and 31 healthy comparison subjects, providing the largest set of MRI findings in DS published so far. The Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome was used to categorize patients as DS or NDS patients. The 2 patient groups were matched on age and gender and did not differ on clinical variables, except for higher scores on the negative dimension and more impaired interpersonal relationships in DS than in NDS subjects. Lateral ventricles were larger in NDS than in control subjects but were not enlarged in patients with DS. The cingulate gyri volume was smaller in NDS but not in DS patients as compared with healthy subjects. Both groups had smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and temporal lobes than healthy subjects, but DS patients had significantly less right temporal lobe volume as compared with NDS patients. These findings do not support the hypothesis that DS is the extreme end of a severity continuum within schizophrenia. PMID:17728266

  15. Brain gene expression differences are associated with abnormal tail biting behavior in pigs.

    PubMed

    Brunberg, E; Jensen, P; Isaksson, A; Keeling, L J

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge about gene expression in animals involved in abnormal behaviors can contribute to the understanding of underlying biological mechanisms. This study aimed to explore the motivational background to tail biting, an abnormal injurious behavior and severe welfare problem in pig production. Affymetrix microarrays were used to investigate gene expression differences in the hypothalamus and prefrontal cortex of pigs performing tail biting, pigs receiving bites to the tail and neutral pigs who were not involved in the behavior. In the hypothalamus, 32 transcripts were differentially expressed (P < 0.05) when tail biters were compared with neutral pigs, 130 when comparing receiver pigs with neutrals, and two when tail biters were compared with receivers. In the prefrontal cortex, seven transcripts were differently expressed in tail biters when compared with neutrals, seven in receivers vs. neutrals and none in the tail biters vs. receivers. In total, 19 genes showed a different expression pattern in neutral pigs when compared with both performers and receivers. This implies that the functions of these may provide knowledge about why the neutral pigs are not involved in tail biting behavior as performers or receivers. Among these 19 transcripts were genes associated with production traits in pigs (PDK4), sociality in humans and mice (GTF2I) and novelty seeking in humans (EGF). These are in line with hypotheses linking tail biting with reduced back fat thickness and explorative behavior. PMID:23146156

  16. Synergistic combination of clinical and imaging features predicts abnormal imaging patterns of pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Jaster-Miller, Kirsten; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Yao, Jianhua; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We designed and tested a novel hybrid statistical model that accepts radiologic image features and clinical variables, and integrates this information in order to automatically predict abnormalities in chest computed-tomography (CT) scans and identify potentially important infectious disease biomarkers. In 200 patients, 160 with various pulmonary infections and 40 healthy controls, we extracted 34 clinical variables from laboratory tests and 25 textural features from CT images. From the CT scans, pleural effusion (PE), linear opacity (or thickening) (LT), tree-in-bud (TIB), pulmonary nodules, ground glass opacity (GGO), and consolidation abnormality patterns were analyzed and predicted through clinical, textural (imaging), or combined attributes. The presence and severity of each abnormality pattern was validated by visual analysis of the CT scans. The proposed biomarker identification system included two important steps: (i) a coarse identification of an abnormal imaging pattern by adaptively selected features (AmRMR), and (ii) a fine selection of the most important features from the previous step, and assigning them as biomarkers, depending on the prediction accuracy. Selected biomarkers were used to classify normal and abnormal patterns by using a boosted decision tree (BDT) classifier. For all abnormal imaging patterns, an average prediction accuracy of 76.15% was obtained. Experimental results demonstrated that our proposed biomarker identification approach is promising and may advance the data processing in clinical pulmonary infection research and diagnostic techniques. PMID:23930819

  17. Pattern recognition of abnormal left ventricle wall motion in cardiac MR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingli; Radau, Perry; Connelly, Kim; Dick, Alexander; Wright, Graham

    2009-01-01

    There are four main problems that limit application of pattern recognition techniques for recognition of abnormal cardiac left ventricle (LV) wall motion: (1) Normalization of the LV's size, shape, intensity level and position; (2) defining a spatial correspondence between phases and subjects; (3) extracting features; (4) and discriminating abnormal from normal wall motion. Solving these four problems is required for application of pattern recognition techniques to classify the normal and abnormal LV wall motion. In this work, we introduce a normalization scheme to solve the first and second problems. With this scheme, LVs are normalized to the same position, size, and intensity level. Using the normalized images, we proposed an intra-segment classification criterion based on a correlation measure to solve the third and fourth problems. Application of the method to recognition of abnormal cardiac MR LV wall motion showed promising results.

  18. Abnormal cell surface antigen expression in individuals with variant CD45 splicing and histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boxall, Sally; McCormick, James; Beverley, Peter; Strobel, Stephan; De Filippi, Paola; Dawes, Ritu; Klersy, Catherine; Clementi, Rita; De Juli, Emanuella; Ferster, Aline; Wallace, Diana; Aricò, Maurizio; Danesino, Cezare; Tchilian, Elma

    2004-03-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) are members of a group of rare heterogenous disorders, the histiocytoses, characterized by uncontrolled accumulation of pleomorphic infiltrates of leukocytes. The etiology of these diseases is mainly unknown. CD45 is a hemopoietic cell specific tyrosine phosphatase essential for antigen receptor mediated signaling in lymphocytes and different patterns of CD45 splicing are associated with distinct functions. Recently a polymorphism (C77G) in exon 4 of CD45 causing abnormal CD45 splicing and a point mutation affecting CD45 dimerization were implicated in multiple sclerosis in humans and lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in mice respectively. Here we show that two patients with HLH exhibited abnormal CD45 splicing caused by the C77G variant allele, while a further 21 HLH patients have normal CD45. We have also examined 62 LCH patients and found three to have the C77G mutation. Peripheral blood thymus-derived (T) CD8(+) cells from normal individuals carrying the C77G mutation show a significant decrease in the proportion of cells expressing L-selectin and increased frequency of cells with LFA-1(hi) expression. It remains to be established whether C77G is a contributing factor in these histiocytic disorders. PMID:14630980

  19. Abnormal Patterns of Tongue-Palate Contact in the Speech of Individuals with Cleft Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbon, Fiona E.

    2004-01-01

    Individuals with cleft palate, even those with adequate velopharyngeal function, are at high risk for disordered lingual articulation. This article attempts to summarize current knowledge of abnormal tongue-palate contact patterns derived from electropalatographic (EPG) data in speakers with cleft palate. These data, which have been reported in 23…

  20. Movement-related cortical potentials in paraplegic patients: abnormal patterns and considerations for BCI-rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren; Jiang, Ning; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Hasan, Muhammad; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Allan, David; Fraser, Matthew; Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Conway, Bernie; Dremstrup, Kim; Farina, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive EEG-based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) can be promising for the motor neuro-rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. However, this shall require detailed knowledge of the abnormalities in the EEG signatures of paraplegic patients. The association of abnormalities in different subgroups of patients and their relation to the sensorimotor integration are relevant for the design, implementation and use of BCI systems in patient populations. This study explores the patterns of abnormalities of movement related cortical potentials (MRCP) during motor imagery tasks of feet and right hand in patients with paraplegia (including the subgroups with/without central neuropathic pain (CNP) and complete/incomplete injury patients) and the level of distinctiveness of abnormalities in these groups using pattern classification. The most notable observed abnormalities were the amplified execution negativity and its slower rebound in the patient group. The potential underlying mechanisms behind these changes and other minor dissimilarities in patients' subgroups, as well as the relevance to BCI applications, are discussed. The findings are of interest from a neurological perspective as well as for BCI-assisted neuro-rehabilitation and therapy.

  1. Abnormal Image Detection in Endoscopy Videos Using a Filter Bank and Local Binary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Nawarathna, Ruwan; Oh, JungHwan; Muthukudage, Jayantha; Tavanapong, Wallapak; Wong, Johnny; de Groen, Piet C.; Tang, Shou Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Finding mucosal abnormalities (e.g., erythema, blood, ulcer, erosion, and polyp) is one of the most essential tasks during endoscopy video review. Since these abnormalities typically appear in a small number of frames (around 5% of the total frame number), automated detection of frames with an abnormality can save physician’s time significantly. In this paper, we propose a new multi-texture analysis method that effectively discerns images showing mucosal abnormalities from the ones without any abnormality since most abnormalities in endoscopy images have textures that are clearly distinguishable from normal textures using an advanced image texture analysis method. The method uses a “texton histogram” of an image block as features. The histogram captures the distribution of different “textons” representing various textures in an endoscopy image. The textons are representative response vectors of an application of a combination of Leung and Malik (LM) filter bank (i.e., a set of image filters) and a set of Local Binary Patterns on the image. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed method achieves 92% recall and 91.8% specificity on wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) images and 91% recall and 90.8% specificity on colonoscopy images. PMID:25132723

  2. Frequency and patterns of abnormal Pap smears in Sudanese women with infertility: What are the perspectives?

    PubMed Central

    Almobarak, Ahmed O; Elhoweris, Mohammed H; Nour, Hilmi M; Ahmed, Mohammed Abd Allah M; Omer, Al-Fadhil Alobeed; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pelvic inflammatory disease is one of the major causes of infertility in females. Also, women with infertility are at high-risk of developing cervical intraepithelial lesions or even carcinoma. Aim: To assess the prevalence and patterns of epithelial cell abnormalities in cervical smears in Sudanese infertile and fertile women. Materials and Methods: The present study included 200 cases (women with infertility) of age group 20-60 years who had routine pap smear. A total of 700 fertile women constituted the control group. Results: Among the 200 infertile women, 93.5% reported as negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (NILM), and 6.5% were epithelial cell abnormalities (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and above). In the control group 96.6% of the smears reported as NILM and 3.4% as epithelial cell abnormalities. The percentage of abnormal pap smears in the infertile women was significantly higher when compared with the control group. Conclusions: Epithelial cell abnormalities are significantly higher in women with infertility as compared with fertile women. Importantly, inflammatory smears were reported two times more than in the controls. We recommend pap smear as a routine practice for all women assessed for infertility problems. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the incidence of human papilloma virus infections in infertile women with abnormal cervical cytology. PMID:23833398

  3. Abnormal expression of A20 and its regulated genes in peripheral blood from patients with lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell-mediated immunity is often suppressed in patients with hematological malignancies. Recently, we found that low T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 signaling was related to abnormal expression of the negative regulator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) A20 in acute myeloid leukemia. To investigate the characteristics of T cell immunodeficiency in lymphomas, we analyzed the expression features of A20 and its upstream regulating factor mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) and genes downstream of NF-κB in patients with different lymphoma subtypes, including T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (T-NHL), B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) and NK/T cell lymphoma (NK/T-CL). Methods Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression level of the MALT1, MALT-V1 (variant 1), A20 and NF-κB genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 24 cases with T-NHL, 19 cases with B-NHL and 16 cases with NK/T-CL, and 31 healthy individuals (HI) served as control. Results Significantly lower A20 and NF-κB expression was found in patients with all three lymphoma subtypes compared with the healthy controls. Moreover, the MALT1 expression level was downregulated in all three lymphoma subtypes. A significant positive correlation between the expression level of MALT1 and A20, MALT1-V1 and A20, MALT1-V1 and NF-κB, and A20 and NF-κB was found. Conclusions An abnormal MALT1-A20-NF-κB expression pattern was found in patients with lymphoma, which may result a lack of A20 and dysfunctional MALT1 and may be related to lower T cell activation, which is a common feature in Chinese patients with lymphoma. This finding may at least partially explain the molecular mechanism of T cell immunodeficiency in lymphomas. PMID:24790527

  4. A mouse model of conduction system patterning abnormalities in heterotaxy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Czosek, Richard J; Haaning, Allison; Ware, Stephanie M

    2010-10-01

    Duplication or absence of parts of the specialized cardiac conduction system in patients with heterotaxy syndrome causes significant clinical disease, but the mechanistic basis by which embryonic disruption of left-right patterning alters conduction system patterning in these patients is not well understood. We sought to determine whether a mouse model of X-linked human heterotaxy recapitulates conduction system abnormalities identified in patients with heterotaxy. Cardiac structure and conduction system patterning were evaluated in Zic3 null embryos from e9.5 to e16.5 using genetic and molecular methods. Severe structural abnormalities involving atrial, ventricular, and conotruncal development were associated with a spectrum of disorganized and ambiguous arrangements throughout the conduction system, including the appearance of duplicated structures. The severity and location of conduction system abnormalities correlated with the severity and location of associated structural heart disease and were identifiable at the earliest stages examined. The Zic3 mouse model provides a novel tool to dissect the mechanistic underpinnings of conduction system patterning and dysfunction and its relationship to cardiovascular malformations, making it a promising model to improve understanding and risk assessment in the clinical arena.

  5. Developmental abnormalities and reduced fruit softening in tomato plants expressing an antisense Rab11 GTPase gene.

    PubMed

    Lu, C; Zainal, Z; Tucker, G A; Lycett, G W

    2001-08-01

    A cDNA clone from tomato fruit encodes a protein with strong homology with the rab11/YPT3 class of small GTPases that is thought to be involved in the control of protein trafficking within cells. The gene, LeRab11a, showed a pattern consistent with a single copy in DNA gel blots. The corresponding mRNA was developmentally regulated during fruit ripening, and its expression was inhibited in several ripening mutants. Its reduced expression in the Never-ripe mutant indicates that it may be induced by ethylene in fruit. The ripening-induced expression in tissues that are undergoing cell wall loosening immediately suggests a possible role in trafficking of cell wall-modifying enzymes. The message also was produced in leaves and flowers but not in roots. Antisense transformation was used to generate a "mutant phenotype." Antisense fruit changed color as expected but failed to soften normally. This was accompanied by reduced levels of two cell wall hydrolases, pectinesterase and polygalacturonase. There were other phenotypic effects in the plants, including determinate growth, reduced apical dominance, branched inflorescences, abnormal floral structure, and ectopic shoots on the leaves. In some plants, ethylene production was reduced. These data suggest an alternative or additional role in exocytosis or endocytosis of homeotic proteins, hormone carriers, or receptors.

  6. Unsupervised Pattern Classifier for Abnormality-Scaling of Vibration Features for Helicopter Gearbox Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jammu, Vinay B.; Danai, Kourosh; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    A new unsupervised pattern classifier is introduced for on-line detection of abnormality in features of vibration that are used for fault diagnosis of helicopter gearboxes. This classifier compares vibration features with their respective normal values and assigns them a value in (0, 1) to reflect their degree of abnormality. Therefore, the salient feature of this classifier is that it does not require feature values associated with faulty cases to identify abnormality. In order to cope with noise and changes in the operating conditions, an adaptation algorithm is incorporated that continually updates the normal values of the features. The proposed classifier is tested using experimental vibration features obtained from an OH-58A main rotor gearbox. The overall performance of this classifier is then evaluated by integrating the abnormality-scaled features for detection of faults. The fault detection results indicate that the performance of this classifier is comparable to the leading unsupervised neural networks: Kohonen's Feature Mapping and Adaptive Resonance Theory (AR72). This is significant considering that the independence of this classifier from fault-related features makes it uniquely suited to abnormality-scaling of vibration features for fault diagnosis.

  7. Abnormal urothelial HLA-DR expression in interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Bottazzo, G F

    1992-03-01

    Interstitial cystitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the urinary bladder that predominantly afflicts middle-age women. The end stage of the disease is ulceration of the urothelium, the so-called Hunner's ulcer. The aetiology of interstitial cystitis remains obscure. We have studied bladder biopsies from 22 cases of interstitial cystitis and control groups consisting of six cases of bacterial cystitis and eight healthy women. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed on the biopsies using murine MoAbs to human HLA class I molecules, and class II molecules, HLA-DP, HLA-DQ and HLA-DR. In interstitial cystitis, bacterial cystitis and normal controls most cells expressed HLA class I products. In six cases of interstitial cystitis and one case of bacterial cystitis there was evidence of HLA class I hyperexpression. In normal bladder and bacterial cystitis HLA class II expression was restricted to submucosal dendritic cells, Langerhans cells macrophages, vascular endothelial cells and activated lymphocytes. All but two cases of interstitial cystitis showed surface expression of HLA-DR (but not HLA-DP or DQ). In all cases of interstitial cystitis there was an increase in the numbers of macrophages, activated lymphocytes and vascular endothelial cells expressing HLA class II molecules within the submucosa. These findings provide further evidence for the importance of inappropriate HLA molecule expression in a disease suspected of having an autoimmune pathogenesis and where cellular autoimmune mechanisms play a decisive role in the destruction of the target cells--the bladder urothelium.

  8. Abnormal aquaporin-3 protein expression in hyperproliferative skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kristen E; Bollag, Roni J; Fussell, Nicole; By, Charya; Sheehan, Daniel J; Bollag, Wendy B

    2011-10-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) and psoriasis represent common hyperproliferative skin disorders, with approximately one million new NMSC diagnoses each year in the United States alone and a psoriasis prevalence of about 2% worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the glycerol channel, aquaporin-3 (AQP3) and the enzyme phospholipase D2 (PLD2) interact functionally in epidermal keratinocytes of the skin to inhibit their proliferation. However, others have suggested that AQP3 is pro-proliferative in keratinocytes and is upregulated in the NMSC, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To evaluate the AQP3/PLD2 signaling module in skin diseases, we determined their levels in SCC, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and psoriasis as compared to normal epidermis. Skin biopsies with the appropriate diagnoses (10 normal, 5 SCC, 13 BCC and 10 plaque psoriasis samples) were obtained from the pathology archives and examined by immunohistochemistry using antibodies recognizing AQP3 and PLD2. In normal epidermis AQP3, an integral membrane protein, was localized mainly to the plasma membrane and PLD2 to the cell periphery, particularly in suprabasal layers. In BCC, AQP3 and PLD2 levels were reduced as compared to the normal-appearing overlying epidermis. In SCC, AQP3 staining was "patchy," with areas of reduced AQP3 immunoreactivity exhibiting positivity for Ki67, a marker of proliferation. PLD2 staining was unchanged in SCC. In psoriasis, AQP3 staining was usually observed in the cytoplasm rather than in the membrane. Also, in the majority of psoriatic samples, PLD2 showed weak immunoreactivity or aberrant localization. These results suggest that abnormalities in the AQP3/PLD2 signaling module correlate with hyperproliferation in psoriasis and the NMSCs. PMID:21400035

  9. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  10. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  11. Teachers' knowledge of normal and abnormal elimination patterns in elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Boyt, Margaret A

    2005-12-01

    Dysfunctional elimination may be learned, to some degree. Because children spend nearly half of their waking hours at school, there is the potential for school to have a significant impact on their elimination patterns. Surveys were mailed to 1,000 randomly selected Iowa public elementary school teachers; 467 of the surveys were returned. Findings indicate that most elementary school teachers are unaware of the potential health problems of elimination dysfunction. One third of respondents indicated that they ask children to wait to go to the bathroom. Suboptimal conditions exist in most of the school bathrooms, with only 35% of the boys' restrooms and 48% of the girls' restrooms reported as "always clean." Those teachers with more experience were more likely to report information about abnormal elimination to the school nurse. Very few teachers (18% of respondents) reported having received information about abnormal elimination and even fewer (8% of respondents) were aware of specialists trained to treat children with these problems. School nurses can have a significant impact on the development of healthy bladder habits in children. Teachers need information about normal and abnormal elimination patterns in children. PMID:16285844

  12. Abnormal Brain Connectivity Patterns in Adults with ADHD: A Coherence Study

    PubMed Central

    Sato, João Ricardo; Hoexter, Marcelo Queiroz; Castellanos, Xavier Francisco; Rohde, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the resting state have shown decreased functional connectivity between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and regions of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in adult patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) relative to subjects with typical development (TD). Most studies used Pearson correlation coefficients among the BOLD signals from different brain regions to quantify functional connectivity. Since the Pearson correlation analysis only provides a limited description of functional connectivity, we investigated functional connectivity between the dACC and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in three groups (adult patients with ADHD, n = 21; TD age-matched subjects, n = 21; young TD subjects, n = 21) using a more comprehensive analytical approach – unsupervised machine learning using a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) that quantifies an abnormality index for each individual. The median abnormality index for patients with ADHD was greater than for TD age-matched subjects (p = 0.014); the ADHD and young TD indices did not differ significantly (p = 0.480); the median abnormality index of young TD was greater than that of TD age-matched subjects (p = 0.016). Low frequencies below 0.05 Hz and around 0.20 Hz were the most relevant for discriminating between ADHD patients and TD age-matched controls and between the older and younger TD subjects. In addition, we validated our approach using the fMRI data of children publicly released by the ADHD-200 Competition, obtaining similar results. Our findings suggest that the abnormal coherence patterns observed in patients with ADHD in this study resemble the patterns observed in young typically developing subjects, which reinforces the hypothesis that ADHD is associated with brain maturation deficits. PMID:23049834

  13. Prelinguistic Pitch Patterns Expressing "Communication" and "Apprehension"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papaeliou, Christina F.; Trevarthen, Colwyn

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether pitch patterns of prelinguistic vocalizations could discriminate between social vocalizations, uttered apparently with the intention to communicate, and "private" speech, related to solitary activities as an expression of "thinking". Four healthy ten month old English-speaking infants (2 boys and 2 girls) were…

  14. Abnormal joint torque patterns exhibited by chronic stroke subjects while walking with a prescribed physiological gait pattern

    PubMed Central

    Neckel, Nathan D; Blonien, Natalie; Nichols, Diane; Hidler, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    leg, both being typical abnormal torque synergy patterns common to stroke gait. Conclusion Despite the Lokomat guiding stroke subjects through physiologically symmetric kinematic gait patterns, abnormal asymmetric joint torque patterns are still generated. These differences from the control group are characteristic of the hip hike and circumduction strategy employed by stroke subjects. PMID:18761735

  15. Fus Expression Patterns in Developing Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the RNA/DNA-binding protein FUS, Fused in sarcoma, was shown to play a role in growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis in vertebrates. Because little is known about Fus, we investigated its expression pattern in murine tooth development. In situ hybridization of mouse mandibles at specific developmental stages was performed with a DIG-labeled RNA probe. During early tooth development, Fus was detected in the dental epithelium and dental mesenchyme at 11 days postcoitum (dpc) and 12 dpc. From 14 dpc, Fus was strongly expressed in the dental papilla and the cervical loop of the dental epithelium. At postnatal day 4 (PN4), Fus expression was observed in the odontoblasts, ameloblasts, the proliferation zone of the pulp, and the cervical loop. At PN14, the expression pattern of Fus was found to be maintained in the odontoblasts and the proliferation zone of the pulp. Furthermore, Fus expression was especially strong in the Hertwig’s epithelial root sheath (HERS). Therefore, this study suggests that Fus may play a role in the HERS during root development. PMID:25949136

  16. Neural code alterations and abnormal time patterns in Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Daniela Sabrina; Cerquetti, Daniel; Merello, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The neural code used by the basal ganglia is a current question in neuroscience, relevant for the understanding of the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease. While a rate code is known to participate in the communication between the basal ganglia and the motor thalamus/cortex, different lines of evidence have also favored the presence of complex time patterns in the discharge of the basal ganglia. To gain insight into the way the basal ganglia code information, we studied the activity of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), an output node of the circuit. Approach. We implemented the 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinsonism in Sprague-Dawley rats, and recorded the spontaneous discharge of single GPi neurons, in head-restrained conditions at full alertness. Analyzing the temporal structure function, we looked for characteristic scales in the neuronal discharge of the GPi. Main results. At a low-scale, we observed the presence of dynamic processes, which allow the transmission of time patterns. Conversely, at a middle-scale, stochastic processes force the use of a rate code. Regarding the time patterns transmitted, we measured the word length and found that it is increased in Parkinson’s disease. Furthermore, it showed a positive correlation with the frequency of discharge, indicating that an exacerbation of this abnormal time pattern length can be expected, as the dopamine depletion progresses. Significance. We conclude that a rate code and a time pattern code can co-exist in the basal ganglia at different temporal scales. However, their normal balance is progressively altered and replaced by pathological time patterns in Parkinson’s disease.

  17. Abnormal methylation pattern in constitutive and facultative heterochromatin of ICF patients

    SciTech Connect

    Miniou, P.; Blanquet, V.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.

    1994-09-01

    ICF syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by variable immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial abnormalities. Stretchings and frequent associations of centromeric or juxtacentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 1 and 16 principally, and to a lesser degree, chromosome 9 mimic chromosome features of normal PHA-stimulated lymphocytes treated with 5-azacytidine, an inducer of demethylation. In fact, in these patients we have detected by DNA digestion with methyl-sensitive enzymes a hypomethylation of classical satellites 2 and 3, located in heterochromatin. To assess the role of other satellite DNA in the heterochromatin modifications and chromosome rearrangements, in situ fluorescent method using 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) monoclonal antibody on chromosomes and nuclei were performed in parallel with Southern blot analysis of other satellite sequences located in heterochromatin. 5-MeC reveals that constitutive and facultative heterochromatin (X inactive chromosome) are hypomethylated. Alpha satellite sequences corresponding to centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 9, 16, 18 and X are mostly methylated in patients G and R, and are undermethylated in patient S. Both molecular and cytogenetic analysis are in agreement. By in situ hybridization, breakpoints of rearranged chromosomes were located in stretched and hypomethylated classical satellites. In euchromatin, 5-MeC antibodies reveal an R-like banding pattern indicating an unequal distribution of DNA methylation, disclosing another aspect of chromosome organization. The underlying hypomethylation, associated with an abnormal chromatin structure, may predispose to chromosome instability.

  18. Abnormal changes of multidimensional surface features using multivariate pattern classification in amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuyu; Yuan, Xiankun; Pu, Fang; Li, Deyu; Fan, Yubo; Wu, Liyong; Chao, Wang; Chen, Nan; He, Yong; Han, Ying

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is associated with changes in cortical morphological features, such as cortical thickness, sulcal depth, surface area, gray matter volume, metric distortion, and mean curvature. These features have been proven to have specific neuropathological and genetic underpinnings. However, most studies primarily focused on mass-univariate methods, and cortical features were generally explored in isolation. Here, we used a multivariate method to characterize the complex and subtle structural changing pattern of cortical anatomy in 24 aMCI human participants and 26 normal human controls. Six cortical features were extracted for each participant, and the spatial patterns of brain abnormities in aMCI were identified by high classification weights using a support vector machine method. The classification accuracy in discriminating the two groups was 76% in the left hemisphere and 80% in the right hemisphere when all six cortical features were used. Regions showing high weights were subtle, spatially complex, and predominately located in the left medial temporal lobe and the supramarginal and right inferior parietal lobes. In addition, we also found that the six morphological features had different contributions in discriminating the two groups even for the same region. Our results indicated that the neuroanatomical patterns that discriminated individuals with aMCI from controls were truly multidimensional and had different effects on the morphological features. Furthermore, the regions identified by our method could potentially be useful for clinical diagnosis. PMID:25100588

  19. Abnormal metabolic pattern associated with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Meles, Sanne K; Tang, Chris C; Teune, Laura K; Dierckx, Rudi A; Dhawan, Vijay; Mattis, Paul J; Leenders, Klaus L; Eidelberg, David

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been associated with a specific metabolic covariance pattern. Although the expression of this PD cognition-related pattern (PDCP) correlates with neuropsychological performance, it is not known whether the PDCP topography is reproducible across PD populations. We therefore sought to identify a PDCP topography in a new sample comprised of 19 Dutch PD subjects. Network analysis of metabolic scans from these individuals revealed a significant PDCP that resembled the original network topography. Expression values for the new PDCP correlated (P=0.001) with executive dysfunction on the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB). Subject scores for the new PDCP correlated (P<0.001) with corresponding values for the original pattern, which also correlated (P<0.005) with FAB scores in this patient group. For further validation, subject scores for the new PDCP were computed in an independent group of 86 American PD patients. In this cohort, subject scores for the new and original PDCP topographies were closely correlated (P<0.001); significant correlations between pattern expression and cognitive performance (P<0.05) were observed for both PDCP topographies. These findings suggest that the PDCP is a replicable imaging marker of PD cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26058693

  20. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  1. Sensory neuron-specific sodium channel SNS is abnormally expressed in the brains of mice with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and humans with multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Joel A.; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman; Baker, David; Newcombe, Jia; Cuzner, M. Louise; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2000-10-01

    Clinical abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS) have classically been considered to be caused by demyelination and/or axonal degeneration; the possibility of molecular changes in neurons, such as the deployment of abnormal repertoires of ion channels that would alter neuronal electrogenic properties, has not been considered. Sensory Neuron-Specific sodium channel SNS displays a depolarized voltage dependence, slower activation and inactivation kinetics, and more rapid recovery from inactivation than classical "fast" sodium channels. SNS is selectively expressed in spinal sensory and trigeminal ganglion neurons within the peripheral nervous system and is not expressed within the normal brain. Here we show that sodium channel SNS mRNA and protein, which are not present within the cerebellum of control mice, are expressed within cerebellar Purkinje cells in a mouse model of MS, chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. We also demonstrate SNS mRNA and protein expression within Purkinje cells from tissue obtained postmortem from patients with MS, but not in control subjects with no neurological disease. These results demonstrate a change in sodium channel expression in neurons within the brain in an animal model of MS and in humans with MS and suggest that abnormal patterns of neuronal ion channel expression may contribute to clinical abnormalities such as ataxia in these disorders.

  2. Exhaled Aerosol Pattern Discloses Lung Structural Abnormality: A Sensitivity Study Using Computational Modeling and Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua A.; Kim, JongWon; Mckee, Edward; Lin, En-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Background Exhaled aerosol patterns, also called aerosol fingerprints, provide clues to the health of the lung and can be used to detect disease-modified airway structures. The key is how to decode the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and retrieve the lung structural information for a non-invasive identification of respiratory diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, a CFD-fractal analysis method was developed to quantify exhaled aerosol fingerprints and applied it to one benign and three malign conditions: a tracheal carina tumor, a bronchial tumor, and asthma. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 30 L/min were simulated, with exhaled distributions recorded at the mouth. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to simulate respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Aerosol morphometric measures such as concentration disparity, spatial distributions, and fractal analysis were applied to distinguish various exhaled aerosol patterns. Findings Utilizing physiology-based modeling, we demonstrated substantial differences in exhaled aerosol distributions among normal and pathological airways, which were suggestive of the disease location and extent. With fractal analysis, we also demonstrated that exhaled aerosol patterns exhibited fractal behavior in both the entire image and selected regions of interest. Each exhaled aerosol fingerprint exhibited distinct pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, lacunarity, and multifractal spectrum. Furthermore, a correlation of the diseased location and exhaled aerosol spatial distribution was established for asthma. Conclusion Aerosol-fingerprint-based breath tests disclose clues about the site and severity of lung diseases and appear to be sensitive enough to be a practical tool for diagnosis and prognosis of respiratory diseases with structural abnormalities. PMID:25105680

  3. A gait paradigm reveals different patterns of abnormal cerebellar motor learning in primary focal dystonias.

    PubMed

    Hoffland, B S; Veugen, L C; Janssen, M M H P; Pasman, J W; Weerdesteyn, V; van de Warrenburg, B P

    2014-12-01

    Accumulating evidence points to a role of the cerebellum in the pathophysiology of primary dystonia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the abnormalities of cerebellar motor learning in primary dystonia are solely detectable in more pure forms of cerebellum-dependent associative motor learning paradigms, or whether these are also present in other motor learning paradigms that rely heavily on the cerebellum but in addition require a more widespread sensorimotor network. Twenty-six patients with various forms of focal dystonia and 10 age-matched healthy controls participated in a motor learning paradigm on a split-belt treadmill. By using reflective markers, three-dimensional kinematics were recorded using a 6-camera motion analysis system. Adaptation walking parameters were analyzed offline, comparing the different dystonia groups and healthy controls. Patients with blepharospasm and writer's cramp were significantly impaired on various adaptation walking parameters. Whereas results of cervical dystonia patients did not differ from healthy controls in terms of adaptation walking parameters, differences in parameters of normal gait were found. We have here demonstrated abnormal sensorimotor adaptation with the split-belt paradigm in patients with blepharospasm and writer's cramp. This reinforces the current concept of cerebellar dysfunction in primary dystonia, and that this extends beyond more pure forms of cerebellum-dependent associative motor learning paradigms. However, the finding of normal adaptation in cervical dystonia patients indicates that the pattern of cerebellar dysfunction may be slightly different for the various forms of primary focal dystonia, suggesting that actual cerebellar pathology may not be a primary driving force in dystonia.

  4. Alterations to the remote control of Shh gene expression cause congenital abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert E.; Lettice, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-species conserved non-coding elements occur in the vertebrate genome and are clustered in the vicinity of developmentally regulated genes. Many are known to act as cis-regulators of transcription and may reside at long distances from the genes they regulate. However, the relationship of conserved sequence to encoded regulatory information and indeed, the mechanism by which these contribute to long-range transcriptional regulation is not well understood. The ZRS, a highly conserved cis-regulator, is a paradigm for such long-range gene regulation. The ZRS acts over approximately 1 Mb to control spatio-temporal expression of Shh in the limb bud and mutations within it result in a number of limb abnormalities, including polydactyly, tibial hypoplasia and syndactyly. We describe the activity of this developmental regulator and discuss a number of mechanisms by which regulatory mutations in this enhancer function to cause congenital abnormalities. PMID:23650631

  5. Pericellular Innervation of Neurons Expressing Abnormally Hyperphosphorylated Tau in the Hippocampal Formation of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered. PMID:20631843

  6. Expression of pattern recognition receptors in cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Yun; Park, Moon Suh; Byun, Jae Yong; Kim, Young Il; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2014-02-01

    Although many immunologic mechanisms have been investigated in studies of the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma, the role of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) has not been fully determined. Therefore, we assessed innate immune responses in patients with cholesteatoma. We prospectively evaluated 21 patients with acquired cholesteatoma between August 2010 and July 2012. Cholesteatoma specimens were obtained during surgery, and skin from the external meatus of each patient was used as a control. RNA was extracted from these tissue samples, followed by real-time PCR to quantitatively assess the relative expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I, NO synthase (NOS) and cytokines. The levels of TLR-2, -3, -4, -6, -7, and -10, NOD-2, and IL-1 and -8 mRNAs were significantly higher in the cholesteatoma than in the skin specimens (p < .05). The expression levels of TLR-2 and -3, RIG-I, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNAs were significantly higher in cholesteatomas from women than from men. The levels of TLR-8, NOD-2, IL-12, and TNF-α mRNAs were significantly higher in recurrent than in initial cholesteatoma specimens (p < .05). Hearing level did not correlate with the levels of expression of mRNAs encoding TLRs, NLRs, NOS, RIG-I and related cytokines (p > .05). In conclusion, alterations in innate immunity triggered by PRRs are important in the pathophysiology of cholesteatoma. Gender differences and frequency of surgery may affect the expression of PRRs in cholesteatomas.

  7. Abnormal WT1 expression in the CD34-negative compartment in myelodysplastic bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, Jeroen P; Knops, Gertrudis H J N; Van De Locht, Louis T F; Menke, Aswin L; Jansen, Joop H; Mensink, Ewald J B M; Raymakers, Reinier A P; De Witte, Theo

    2002-09-01

    In normal bone marrow, WT1 expression is restricted to CD34+ cells. We assessed WT1 mRNA expression levels with quantitative, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in normal, myelodysplastic (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukaemia (sAML) bone marrow subfractions, based on differentiation status. The highest WT1 expression was observed in the primitive CD34+ rhodamine-123 (rho) dull cells, both in healthy donors and MDS or sAML patients. In contrast to normal CD34-negative bone marrow cells, WT1 was present in CD34-negative bone marrow cells in 12 out of 13 MDS patients and two sAML samples. Further analysis of this aberrant WT1 expression was performed in the CD34-negative subfractions of three MDS patients. In one of these, WT1 expression was found exclusively in the erythroid cells. This patient was completely transfusion dependent and showed morphological dyserythropoiesis. In another MDS patient, WT1 expression was found in a non-erythroid compartment. We conclude that abnormal WT1 expression may contribute to the disturbed differentiation of haematopoietic cells in MDS patients.

  8. Conditional expression of human bone Gla protein in osteoblasts causes skeletal abnormality in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Tanaka, Daisuke; Maruyama, Yojiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-07-20

    Bone Gla protein (BGP), also known as osteocalcin, is one of the most abundant γ-carboxylated noncollagenous protein in bone matrix and plays important roles in mineralization and calcium ion homeostasis. BGP is synthesized specifically in osteoblasts; however, its precise function in bone metabolism has not been fully elucidated. To investigate the in vivo function of human BGP (hBGP), we generated CAG-GFP(floxed)-hBGP transgenic mice carrying a transgene cassette composed of the promoter and a floxed GFP linked to hBGP cDNA. The mice were crossed with ColI-Cre mice, which express the Cre recombinase driven by the mouse collagen type 1a1 gene promoter, to obtain hBGP(ColI) conditional transgenic mice that expressed human BGP in osteoblasts. The hBGP(ColI) mice did not survive more than 2days after birth. The analysis of the 18.5-day post coitum fetuses of the hBGP(ColI) mice revealed that they displayed abnormal skeletal growth such as deformity of the rib and short femur and cranium lengths. Moreover, increased BGP levels were detected in the serum of the neonates. These findings indicate that hBGP expression in osteoblasts resulted in the abnormal skeletal growth in the mice. Our study provides a valuable model for understanding the fundamental role of BGP in vivo.

  9. Mice with Dab1 or Vldlr insufficiency exhibit abnormal neonatal vocalization patterns

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, E. R.; Burkett, Z. D.; Day, N. F.; Schwartz, B. A.; Phelps, P. E.; White, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic changes in components of the Reelin-signaling pathway (RELN, DAB1) are associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk. Social communication deficits are a key component of the ASD diagnostic criteria, but the underlying neurogenetic mechanisms remain unknown. Reln insufficient mice exhibit ASD-like behavioral phenotypes including altered neonatal vocalization patterns. Reelin affects multiple pathways including through the receptors, Very low-density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr), Apolipoprotein receptor 2 (Apoer2), and intracellular signaling molecule Disabled-1 (Dab1). As Vldlr was previously implicated in avian vocalization, here we investigate vocalizations of neonatal mice with a reduction or absence of these components of the Reelin-signaling pathway. Mice with low or no Dab1 expression exhibited reduced calling rates, altered call-type usage, and differential vocal development trajectories. Mice lacking Vldlr expression also had altered call repertoires, and this effect was exacerbated by deficiency in Apoer2. Together with previous findings, these observations 1) solidify a role for Reelin in vocal communication of multiple species, 2) point to the canonical Reelin-signaling pathway as critical for development of normal neonatal calling patterns in mice, and 3) suggest that mutants in this pathway could be used as murine models for Reelin-associated vocal deficits in humans. PMID:27184477

  10. Abnormal expression of vesicular transport proteins in pulmonary arterial hypertension in monocrotaline-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongliang; Luo, Qin; Liu, Zhihong; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Zhihui

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular vesicular transport is shown to be dysfunctional in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the expression of intracellular vesicular transport proteins in PAH remains unclear. To elucidate the possible role of these proteins in the development of PAH, the changes in the expressions of N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), α-soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP), synaptosome-associated membrane protein 23 (SNAP23), type 2 bone morphogenetic receptor (BMPR2), caveolin-1 (cav-1), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were examined in lung tissues of monocrotaline (MCT)-treated rats by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, caspase-3, also examined by western blot analysis, was used as an indicator of apoptosis. Our data showed that during the development of PAH, the expressions of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23 were significantly increased before pulmonary arterial pressure started to increase and then significantly decreased after PAH was established. The expressions of BMPR2 and eNOS were similar to those of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23; however, the expression of cav-1 was down-regulated after MCT treatment. Caspase-3 expression was increased after exposure to MCT. In conclusion, the expressions of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNPA23 changed greatly during the onset of PAH, which was accompanied by abnormal expressions of BMPR2, cav-1, and eNOS, as well as an increase in apoptosis. Thus, changes in NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23 expressions appear to be mechanistically associated with the development of PAH in MCT-treated rats. PMID:25630652

  11. Over-expression of thymosin beta 4 promotes abnormal tooth development and stimulation of hair growth.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hee-Jae; Philp, Deborah; Lee, Soo-Hyun; Moon, Hye-Sung; Kleinman, Hynda K; Nakamura, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 has multi-functional roles in cell physiology. It accelerates wound healing, hair growth and angiogenesis, and increases laminin-5 expression in corneal epithelium. Furthermore, thymosin beta 4 stimulates tumor growth and metastasis by induction of cell migration and vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis. Using a construct on the skin-specific keratin-5 promoter, we have developed thymosin beta 4 over-expressing transgenic mice to further study its functional roles. Thymosin beta 4 in adult skin and in embryonic stages of the transgenic mouse was analyzed by both Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The over-expression of thymosin beta 4 was observed especially around hair follicles and in the teeth in the transgenic mice. We examined the phenotype of the thymosin beta 4 over-expressing mice. Hair growth was accelerated. In addition, the transgenic mice had abnormally-shaped white teeth and dull incisors. We found that the expression of laminin-5 was up-regulated in the skin of the transgenic mice. We conclude that thymosin beta 4 has an important physiological role in hair growth and in tooth development.

  12. Gene expression pattern in canine mammary osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pawłowski, K M; Majewska, A; Szyszko, K; Dolka, I; Motyl, T; Król, M

    2011-01-01

    Canine mammary sarcomas are usually very aggressive and easily metastasize. Unfortunately the biology of this type of tumor is not well known because they are a very rare type of tumors. The aim of this study was to find differences in gene expression patterns in canine mammary osteosarcomas (malignant) versus osteomas (benign) using DNA microarrays. Our microarray experiment showed that 11 genes were up-regulated in osteosarcoma in comparison to osteoma whereas 36 genes were down-regulated. Among the up-regulated genes were: PDK1, EXT1, and EIF4H which are involved in AKT/PI3K and GLI/Hedgehog pathways. These genes play an important role in cell biology (cancer cell proliferation) and may be essential in osteosarcoma formation and development. Analyzing the down-regulated genes, the most interesting seemed to be HSPB8 and SEPP1. HSPB8 is a small heat shock protein that plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and breast carcinogenesis. Also SEPP1 may play a role in carcinogenesis, as its down-regulation may induce oxidative stress possibly resulting in carcinogenesis. The preliminary results of the present study indicate that the up-regulation of three genes EXT1, EIF4H, and PDK1 may play an essential role in osteosarcoma formation, development and proliferation. In our opinion the cross-talk between GLI/Hedgehog and PI3K/AKT pathways may be a key factor to increase tumor proliferation and malignancy. PMID:21528706

  13. Reduction of NOTCH1 expression pertains to maturation abnormalities of keratinocytes in squamous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kei; Fujii, Takuma; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Miki, Yoshio; Omura, Ken; Morita, Kei-ichi; Kayamori, Kou; Katsube, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2012-05-01

    Notch is a transmembrane receptor functioning in the determination of cell fate. Abnormal Notch signaling promotes tumor development, showing either oncogenic or tumor suppressive activity. The uncertainty about the exact role of Notch signaling, partially, stems from inconsistencies in descriptions of Notch expression in human cancers. Here, we clarified basal-cell dominant expression of NOTCH1 in squamous epithelium. NOTCH1 was downregulated in squamous neoplasms of oral mucosa, esophagus and uterine cervix, compared with the normal basal cells, although the expression tended to be retained in cervical lesions. NOTCH1 downregulation was observed even in precancers, and there was little difference between cancers and high-grade precancerous lesions, suggesting its minor contribution to cancer-specific events such as invasion. In culture experiments, reduction of NOTCH1 expression resulted in downregulation of keratin 13 and keratin 15, and upregulation of keratin 17, and NOTCH1 knockdown cells formed a dysplastic stratified epithelium mimicking a precancerous lesion. The NOTCH1 downregulation and the concomitant alterations of those keratin expressions were confirmed in the squamous neoplasms both by immunohistochemical and cDNA microarray analyses. Our data indicate that reduction of NOTCH1 expression directs the basal cells to cease terminal differentiation and to form an immature epithelium, thereby playing a major role in the histopathogenesis of epithelial dysplasia. Furthermore, downregulation of NOTCH1 expression seems to be an inherent mechanism for switching the epithelium from a normal and mature state to an activated and immature state, suggesting its essential role in maintaining the epithelial integrity.

  14. Classification of abnormal fundus autofluorescence patterns in the junctional zone of geographic atrophy in patients with age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bindewald, A; Schmitz-Valckenberg, S; Jorzik, J J; Dolar-Szczasny, J; Sieber, H; Keilhauer, C; Weinberger, A W A; Dithmar, S; Pauleikhoff, D; Mansmann, U; Wolf, S; Holz, F G

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To describe and classify patterns of abnormal fundus autofluorescence (FAF) in the junctional zone of geographic atrophy (GA) in patients with age related macular degeneration. Methods: Digital FAF images were recorded in 164 eyes of 107 patients using a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO; excitation 488 nm, detection above 500 nm) as part of a prospective multicentre natural history study (FAM Study). FAF images were obtained in accordance with a standardised protocol for digital image acquisition and generation of mean images after automated alignment. Results: Image quality was sufficient for classification of FAF patterns in 149 eyes (90.9%) with lens opacities being the most common reason for insufficient image quality. Abnormal FAF outside GA in 149 eyes was classified into four patterns: focal (12.1%), banded (12.8%), patchy (2.0%), and diffuse (57.0%), whereby 12.1% had normal background FAF in the junctional zone. In 4% there was no predominant pattern. The diffuse pattern was subdivided into four groups including reticular (4.7%), branching (27.5%), fine granular (18.1%), and fine granular with peripheral punctate spots (6.7%). Conclusions: Different phenotypic patterns of abnormal FAF in the junctional zone of GA can be identified with cSLO FAF imaging. These distinct patterns may reflect heterogeneity at a cellular and molecular level in contrast with a non-specific ageing process. A refined phenotypic classification may be helpful to identify prognostic determinants for the spread of atrophy and visual loss, for identification of genetic risk factors as well as for the design of future interventional trials. PMID:15965170

  15. Relating movement recurrence and expressive timing patterns in music performances.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Euler C F; Yehia, Hani C; Loureiro, Mauricio A

    2015-09-01

    In this study the movement patterns of ten expert musicians are quantitatively related to expressive timing patterns and the music structure during performances. The hypothesis is that ancillary gestures recurrently employed are closely related to expressive intentions, and that the expressive content imposed in key musical passages is thus reflected in the patterns of gestural recurrence. A movement and an audio analysis of 30 clarinet performances of a Brahms' excerpt are compared. Results show direct correlations between the recurrence pattern of clarinetists' ancillary movements and expressive bar duration manipulations employed by them, associated with melodic phrasing and harmonic transitions. PMID:26428815

  16. Relating movement recurrence and expressive timing patterns in music performances.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Euler C F; Yehia, Hani C; Loureiro, Mauricio A

    2015-09-01

    In this study the movement patterns of ten expert musicians are quantitatively related to expressive timing patterns and the music structure during performances. The hypothesis is that ancillary gestures recurrently employed are closely related to expressive intentions, and that the expressive content imposed in key musical passages is thus reflected in the patterns of gestural recurrence. A movement and an audio analysis of 30 clarinet performances of a Brahms' excerpt are compared. Results show direct correlations between the recurrence pattern of clarinetists' ancillary movements and expressive bar duration manipulations employed by them, associated with melodic phrasing and harmonic transitions.

  17. Cardiac troponin I is abnormally expressed in non-small cell lung cancer tissues and human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Liu, Jia-Bao; Bian, Zhi-Ping; Xu, Jin-Dan; Wu, Heng-Fang; Gu, Chun-Rong; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Ji-Nan; Chen, Xiang-Jian; Yang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is the only sarcomeric protein identified to date that is expressed exclusively in cardiac muscle. Its expression in cancer tissues has not been reported. Herein, we examined cTnI expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues, human adenocarcinoma cells SPCA-1 (lung) and BGC 823 (gastric) by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Immunopositivity for cTnI was demonstrated in 69.4% (34/49) NSCLC tissues evaluated, and was strong intensity in 35.3% (6/17) lung squamous cell carcinoma cases. The non-cancer-bearing lung tissues except tuberculosis (9/9, 100%) showed negative staining for cTnI. Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human cTnI were applied in immunofluorescence. The result showed that the staining pattern within SPCA-1 and BGC 823 was dependent on the epitope of the cTnI mAbs. The membrane and nucleus of cancer cells were stained by mAbs against N-terminal peptides of cTnI, and cytoplasm was stained by mAbs against the middle and C-terminal peptides of cTnI. A ~25 kD band was identified by anti-cTnI mAb in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 extracts by western blot, as well as in cardiomyocyte extracts. The cTnI mRNA expressions in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells were about ten thousand times less than that in cardiomyocytes. Our study shows for the first time that cTnI protein and mRNA were abnormally expressed in NSCLC tissues, SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells. These findings challenge the conventional view of cTnI as a cardiac-specific protein, enabling the potential use of cTnI as a diagnostic marker or targeted therapy for cancer.

  18. Abnormal gene expression in cerebellum of Npc1-/- mice during postnatal development

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guanghong; Wen, Zhining; Irizarry, Kristopher; Huang, Ying; Mitsouras, Katherine; Darmani, Mariam; Leon, Terry; Shi, Leming; Bi, Xiaoning

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with abnormal lipid storage as the major cellular pathologic hallmark. Genetic analyses have identified mutations in NPC1 gene in the great majority of cases, while mutations in NPC2 account for the remainders. Yet, little is known regarding the cellular mechanisms responsible for NPC pathogenesis, especially for neurodegeneration, which is the usual cause of death. To identify critical steps that could account for the pathological manifestations of the disease in one of the most affected brain structures, we performed global gene expression analysis in the cerebellum from three-week old Npc1+/+ and Npc1-/- mice with two different microarray platforms (Agilent and Illumina). Differentially-expressed genes identified by both microarray platforms were then subjected to KEGG pathway analysis. Expression of genes in six pathways was significantly altered in Npc1-/- mice; functionally, these signaling pathways belong to the following three categories: 1) steroid and terpenoid biosynthesis, 2) immune response, and 3) cell adhesion/motility. In addition, the expression of several proteins involved in lipid transport was significantly altered in Npc1-/- mice. Our results provide novel molecular insight regarding the mechanisms of pathogenesis in NPC disease and reveal potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:20153740

  19. A spatiotemporal mining framework for abnormal association patterns in marine environments with a time series of remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Cunjin; Song, Wanjiao; Qin, Lijuan; Dong, Qing; Wen, Xiaoyang

    2015-06-01

    A spatiotemporal mining framework is a novel tool for the analysis of marine association patterns using multiple remote sensing images. From data pretreatment, to algorithm design, to association rule mining and pattern visualization, this paper outlines a spatiotemporal mining framework for abnormal association patterns in marine environments, including pixel-based and object-based mining models. Within this framework, some key issues are also addressed. In the data pretreatment phase, we propose an algorithm for extracting abnormal objects or pixels over marine surfaces, and construct a mining transaction table with object-based and pixel-based strategies. In the mining algorithm phase, a recursion method to construct a direct association pattern tree is addressed with an asymmetric mutual information table, and a recursive mining algorithm to find frequent items. In the knowledge visualization phase, a "Dimension-Attributes" visualization framework is used to display spatiotemporal association patterns. Finally, spatiotemporal association patterns for marine environmental parameters in the Pacific Ocean are identified, and the results prove the effectiveness and the efficiency of the proposed mining framework.

  20. Endometrial inflammation and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins induced by Mycoplasma bovis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengyao; Wang, Guoqing; Lv, Tingting; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Xie, Guanghong; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng; Cao, Rongfeng

    2014-03-15

    Mycoplasma bovis infection can cause endometrial inflammation leading to infertility and involuntary culling in dairy cows. Because extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins affect the adherence of mycoplasma to eukaryotic cell surface, they may play a role in the pathogenesis of the bacteria. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the endometrial inflammatory response and ECM protein expression induced by M bovis. Endometrial concentrations of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and mRNA and protein expression of collagen IV (CL-IV), fibronectin (FN), and laminin (LN) were evaluated 10, 20, and 30 days after M bovis intrauterine infusion in breed cows 18 days postpartum. The presence of the bacteria in the uterus was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Endometrial TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations in the treatment group were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 20 and 30 days after infusion. Endometrial CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression increased (P < 0.01) 20 days after infusion in all groups. However, the increase was more pronounced in the treatment group and reactive expressions were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 10, 20, and 30 days after infusion. In conclusion, M bovis triggered endometrial inflammatory response and increased CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression. The abnormal expression of ECM these proteins may promote the pathogenic effects of M bovis that lead to endometrial tissue damage and infertility.

  1. Global analysis of patterns of gene expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomancak, Pavel; Berman, Benjamin P; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Kwan, Elaine; Hartenstein, Volker; Celniker, Susan E; Rubin, Gerald M

    2007-01-01

    Background Cell and tissue specific gene expression is a defining feature of embryonic development in multi-cellular organisms. However, the range of gene expression patterns, the extent of the correlation of expression with function, and the classes of genes whose spatial expression are tightly regulated have been unclear due to the lack of an unbiased, genome-wide survey of gene expression patterns. Results We determined and documented embryonic expression patterns for 6,003 (44%) of the 13,659 protein-coding genes identified in the Drosophila melanogaster genome with over 70,000 images and controlled vocabulary annotations. Individual expression patterns are extraordinarily diverse, but by supplementing qualitative in situ hybridization data with quantitative microarray time-course data using a hybrid clustering strategy, we identify groups of genes with similar expression. Of 4,496 genes with detectable expression in the embryo, 2,549 (57%) fall into 10 clusters representing broad expression patterns. The remaining 1,947 (43%) genes fall into 29 clusters representing restricted expression, 20% patterned as early as blastoderm, with the majority restricted to differentiated cell types, such as epithelia, nervous system, or muscle. We investigate the relationship between expression clusters and known molecular and cellular-physiological functions. Conclusion Nearly 60% of the genes with detectable expression exhibit broad patterns reflecting quantitative rather than qualitative differences between tissues. The other 40% show tissue-restricted expression; the expression patterns of over 1,500 of these genes are documented here for the first time. Within each of these categories, we identified clusters of genes associated with particular cellular and developmental functions. PMID:17645804

  2. Frequency and patterns of abnormality detected by iodine-123 amine emission CT after cerebral infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Brott, T.G.; Gelfand, M.J.; Williams, C.C.; Spilker, J.A.; Hertzberg, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 31 patients with cerebral infarction and 13 who had had transient ischemic attacks, using iodine-123-labeled N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxyl-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propanediamin e (I-123-HIPDM) as the radiopharmaceutical. SPECT scans were compared with computed tomographic (CT) scans. SPECT was as sensitive as CT in detecting cerebral infarction (94% vs. 84%). The abnormalities were larger on the SPECT scans than on the CT scans in 19 cases, equal in seven, and smaller in five (SPECT abnormalities greater than or equal to CT abnormalities in 86% of cases). Fifteen of 30 patients with hemispheric infarction had decreased perfusion (decreased uptake of I-123-HIPDM) to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the cerebral hemisphere involved by the infarction (crossed cerebellar diaschisis). Nine of these 15 patients had major motor deficits, while only one of the 15 without crossed cerebellar diaschisis had a major motor deficit.

  3. Differential Expression Patterns and Developmental Roles of Duplicated Scinderin-Like Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Sujuan; Nakaya, Naoki; Piatigorsky, Joram

    2011-01-01

    Scinderin, the closest homologue of the actin-severing protein, gelsolin, has two similar paralogs (Scinla and Scinlb) in zebrafish. Scinla is abundant in the adult cornea; Scinlb comprises considerably less corneal protein. Here we show that scinla is expressed in the nose, lens, brain, cornea and annular ligament of the iridocorneal angle; by contrast, scinlb is expressed in the hatching gland, floor plate, notochord, otic vesicle, brain, pharynx, cartilage, swim bladder and cornea. Activity of scinla and scinlb promoter fragments driving the EGFP reporter gene in transgenic zebrafish resembled scinla or scinlb expression. Previously, we showed that reduction of scinla by injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides ventralized embryos; here specific reduction of scinlb expression led to subtle brain abnormalities associated with increased cell death, decreased shhb expression in the floor plate, and slightly reduced eye distance. Thus, scinla and scinlb have different expression patterns and developmental roles during zebrafish development. PMID:19681161

  4. Abnormal expression of 8-nitroguanine in the brain of mice exposed to arsenic subchronically.

    PubMed

    Piao, Fengyuan; Li, Sheng; Li, Qiujuan; Ye, Jianxin; Liu, Shuang

    2011-01-01

    To provide molecular toxicological evidences for exploring the mechanism of arsenic-induced neurotoxicity the accumulation of arsenic (As), the formation of 8-nitroguanine (8-NO(2)-G) were examined in brain tissue of mice exposed to arsenic. And the gene expressions of inducible NOS (iNOS), superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and peroxiredoxin 2 (Prdx2) were also analyzed by GeneChip. In the result, the concentration of As in the brain tissue of mice was 4.00, 13.70, 21.48 and 29.88 ng/g in the controls and experimental groups exposed to 1, 2 and 4 mg/l As(2)O(3), respectively and increased in dose-response manner. Nervous cells in the brain of mice exposed to As showed disappearances of axons, vacuolar degeneration in cytoplasm and karyolysis, whereas no such pathological changes were observed in the control group. Weak immunoreactivity against 8-NO(2)-G was observed in the brain tissue of mice given 1 or 2 ppm arsenic trioxide. More intensive immunoreactivity was found in cells at 4 ppm and it was mainly distributed in cytoplasm. The expressions of SOD1 and Prdx2 were down-regulated in the brain of mice exposed to As, but iNOS expression was not disturbed by As exposure. No the 8-NO(2)-G immunoreactivity or abnormal expressions of these genes in brain tissue were observed in controls. These results indicate that As induces high expression of 8-NO(2)-G in brain tissues of mice and that RNA in the cells may be modified by overproduced reactive nitrogen species.

  5. Expression of an Arabidopsis plasma membrane aquaporin in Dictyostelium results in hypoosmotic sensitivity and developmental abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, F; Loomis, W F; Chrispeels, M J

    1997-06-10

    The rd28 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes a water channel protein, or aquaporin, of the plasma membrane. A construct in which transcription of the rd28 cDNA is controlled by the Dictyostelium actin15 promoter was transformed into Dictyostelium discoideum cells. Transformants contained RD28 protein in their plasma membranes. When shifted to a low-osmotic-strength buffer, cells expressing rd28 swelled rapidly and burst, indicating that the plant aquaporin allowed rapid water entry in the amoebae. The rate of osmotic lysis was a function of the osmotic pressure of the buffer. We also selected transformants in which the expression of the rd28 cDNA is driven by the promoter of the prespore cotB gene. These transformants accumulated rd28 mRNA uniquely in prespore cells. In low-osmotic-strength buffer, the cotB::rd28 cells aggregated and formed normally proportioned slugs but failed to form normal fruiting bodies. The number of spores was reduced 20-fold, and the stalks of the fruiting bodies were abnormally short. The consequences of expressing RD28 in prespore cells could be partially overcome by increasing the osmolarity of the medium. Under these conditions, the cotB::rd28 cells formed fruiting bodies of more normal appearance, and the number of viable spores increased slightly. Because prespore cells have to shrink and dehydrate to form spores, it was not unexpected that expression of an aquaporin would disrupt this process, but it was surprising to find that stalk differentiation was also affected by expression of rd28 in prespore cells. It appears that osmotic stress on prespore cells alters their ability to signal terminal differentiation in prestalk cells. The results provide independent confirmation that plant aquaporins can function in the cells of other organisms, and that D. discoideum can be used to study the properties of these water channels.

  6. Spreading Photoparoxysmal EEG Response is Associated with an Abnormal Cortical Excitability Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groppa, Sergey; Jerosch, Bettina; Muhle, Hiltrud; Kurth, Christoph; Shepherd, Alex J.; Siebner, Hartwig; Stephani, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Photosensitivity or photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is a highly heritable electroencephalographic trait characterized by an abnormal cortical response to intermittent photic stimulation (IPS). In PPR-positive individuals, IPS induces spikes, spike-waves or intermittent slow waves. The PPR may be restricted to posterior visual areas (i.e. local PPR…

  7. Inactivation of ca10a and ca10b Genes Leads to Abnormal Embryonic Development and Alters Movement Pattern in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Aspatwar, Ashok; Barker, Harlan R.; Saralahti, Anni K.; Bäuerlein, Carina A.; Ortutay, Csaba; Pan, Peiwen; Kuuslahti, Marianne; Parikka, Mataleena; Rämet, Mika; Parkkila, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase related proteins (CARPs) X and XI are highly conserved across species and are predominantly expressed in neural tissues. The biological role of these proteins is still an enigma. Ray-finned fish have lost the CA11 gene, but instead possess two co-orthologs of CA10. We analyzed the expression pattern of zebrafish ca10a and ca10b genes during embryonic development and in different adult tissues, and studied 61 CARP X/XI-like sequences to evaluate their phylogenetic relationship. Sequence analysis of zebrafish ca10a and ca10b reveals strongly predicted signal peptides, N-glycosylation sites, and a potential disulfide, all of which are conserved, suggesting that all of CARP X and XI are secretory proteins and potentially dimeric. RT-qPCR showed that zebrafish ca10a and ca10b genes are expressed in the brain and several other tissues throughout the development of zebrafish. Antisense morpholino mediated knockdown of ca10a and ca10b showed developmental delay with a high rate of mortality in larvae. Zebrafish morphants showed curved body, pericardial edema, and abnormalities in the head and eye, and there was increased apoptotic cell death in the brain region. Swim pattern showed abnormal movement in morphant zebrafish larvae compared to the wild type larvae. The developmental phenotypes of the ca10a and ca10b morphants were confirmed by inactivating these genes with the CRISPR/Cas9 system. In conclusion, we introduce a novel zebrafish model to investigate the mechanisms of CARP Xa and CARP Xb functions. Our data indicate that CARP Xa and CARP Xb have important roles in zebrafish development and suppression of ca10a and ca10b expression in zebrafish larvae leads to a movement disorder. PMID:26218428

  8. Abnormal energy regulation in early life: childhood gene expression may predict subsequent chronic mountain sickness

    PubMed Central

    Huicho, Luis; Xing, Guoqiang; Qualls, Clifford; Rivera-Ch, María; Gamboa, Jorge L; Verma, Ajay; Appenzeller, Otto

    2008-01-01

    Background Life at altitude depends on adaptation to ambient hypoxia. In the Andes, susceptibility to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a clinical condition that occurs to native highlanders or to sea level natives with prolonged residence at high altitude, remains poorly understood. We hypothesized that hypoxia-associated gene expression in children of men with CMS might identify markers that predict the development of CMS in adults. We assessed distinct patterns of gene expression of hypoxia-responsive genes in children of highland Andean men, with and without CMS. Methods We compared molecular signatures in children of highland (HA) men with CMS (n = 10), without CMS (n = 10) and in sea level (SL) children (n = 20). Haemoglobin, haematocrit, and oxygen saturation were measured. Gene expression in white cells was assessed at HA and then, in the same subjects, within one hour of arrival at sea level. Results HA children showed higher expression levels of genes regulated by HIF (hypoxia inducible factor) and lower levels of those involved in glycolysis and in the tricarboxilic acid (TCA) cycle. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1(PDK1) and HIF prolyl hydroxylase 3 (HPH3) mRNA expressions were lowest in children of CMS fathers at altitude. At sea level the pattern of gene expression in the 3 children's groups was indistinguishable. Conclusion The molecular signatures of children of CMS patients show impaired adaptation to hypoxia. At altitude children of CMS fathers had defective coupling between glycolysis and mitochondria TCA cycle, which may be a key mechanism/biomarker for adult CMS. Early biologic markers of disease susceptibility in Andeans might impact health services and social planning. PMID:18954447

  9. Identification of abnormal motor cortex activation patterns in children with cerebral palsy by functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Behbehani, Khosrow; Romero, Mario I.; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Reid, Dahlia; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the utility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a tool for physicians to study cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Motor cortex activation patterns were studied in five healthy children and five children with CP (8.4+/-2.3 years old in both groups) performing a finger-tapping protocol. Spatial (distance from center and area difference) and temporal (duration and time-to-peak) image metrics are proposed as potential biomarkers for differentiating abnormal cortical activation in children with CP from healthy pediatric controls. In addition, a similarity image-analysis concept is presented that unveils areas that have similar activation patterns as that of the maximum activation area, but are not discernible by visual inspection of standard activation images. Metrics derived from the images presenting areas of similarity are shown to be sensitive identifiers of abnormal activation patterns in children with CP. Importantly, the proposed similarity concept and related metrics may be applicable to other studies for the identification of cortical activation patterns by fNIRS.

  10. Adult-onset multiple acyl CoA dehydrogenation deficiency associated with an abnormal isoenzyme pattern of serum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Fuminobu; Baba, Kousuke; Toyooka, Keiko; Liang, Wen-Chen; Nishino, Ichizo; Yamadera, Misaki; Sumi, Hisae; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Nishikawa, Yoshiro

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of a 37 year-old male with multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD). The patient had suffered from exercise intolerance in his hip and thigh muscles for one year. Then, restriction of carbohydrates for a diet made his symptoms rapidly deteriorate. Blood test revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel missense mutations in the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase gene (ETFDH), and an abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern: LDH-1 (60.0%) and LDH-2 (26.0%) predominated with abnormally elevated LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (2.3), compared with muscle-derived LDH-5 (4.0%). Oral riboflavin treatment significantly improved his exercise intolerance and the LDH profile: LDH-1 (34.4%), LDH-2 (34.9%), LDH-5 (6.9%) and LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (1.0). The abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern may be one feature of adult-onset MADD selectively affecting type I muscle fibers with relatively high LDH-1 content. PMID:21907580

  11. Prenatal exposure to phencyclidine produces abnormal behaviour and NMDA receptor expression in postpubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingling; Mamiya, Takayoshi; Lu, Ping; Toriumi, Kazuya; Mouri, Akihiro; Hiramatsu, Masayuki; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Zou, Li-Bo; Nagai, Taku; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2010-08-01

    Several studies have shown the disruptive effects of non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists on neurobehavioural development. Based on the neurodevelopment hypothesis of schizophrenia, there is growing interest in animal models treated with NMDA antagonists at developing stages to investigate the pathogenesis of psychological disturbances in humans. Previous studies have reported that perinatal treatment with phencyclidine (PCP) impairs the development of neuronal systems and induces schizophrenia-like behaviour. However, the adverse effects of prenatal exposure to PCP on behaviour and the function of NMDA receptors are not well understood. This study investigated the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to PCP in mice. The prenatal PCP-treated mice showed hypersensitivity to a low dose of PCP in locomotor activity and impairment of recognition memory in the novel object recognition test at age 7 wk. Meanwhile, the prenatal exposure reduced the phosphorylation of NR1, although it increased the expression of NR1 itself. Furthermore, these behavioural changes were attenuated by atypical antipsychotic treatment. Taken together, prenatal exposure to PCP produced long-lasting behavioural deficits, accompanied by the abnormal expression and dysfunction of NMDA receptors in postpubertal mice. It is worth investigating the influences of disrupted NMDA receptors during the prenatal period on behaviour in later life.

  12. Meta-analysis of the prognostic value of abnormally expressed lncRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhen; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Yin, Chang-Qing; Guan, Qing; Chen, Hao; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Many long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to be abnormally expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and may have the potential to serve as prognostic markers. In this study, a meta-analysis was conducted to systematically evaluate the prognostic value of various lncRNAs in HCC. Eligible literatures were systematically collected from PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library (up to December 30, 2015). The main outcomes including overall survival, relapse-free survival, and disease-free survival were analyzed. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using random- or fixed-effects models. A total of 2,991 patients with HCC in People's Republic of China from 27 studies were included in the analysis. The level of lncRNAs showed a significant association with clinical outcomes. Abnormally elevated lncRNA transcription level predicted poor overall survival (HR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.20-2.34, P=0.002; I (2)=75.5%, P=0.000) and relapse-free survival (HR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.65-2.61, P<0.001; I (2)=24.0%, P=0.215), while no association was observed with disease-free survival of HCC patients (HR: 1.39, 95% CI: 0.51-3.78, P=0.524; I (2)=81.3%, P=0.005). Subgroup analysis further showed that lncRNA transcription level was significantly associated with tumor size (relative risk [RR]: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.01-1.39, P=0.035), microvascular invasion (RR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.10-1.89, P=0.009), and portal vein tumor thrombus (RR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.03-2.20, P=0.036). Publication bias and sensitivity analysis further confirmed the stability of our results. Our present meta-analysis indicates that abnormal lncRNA transcription level may serve as a promising indicator for prognostic evaluation of patients with HCC in People's Republic of China. PMID:27574455

  13. Meta-analysis of the prognostic value of abnormally expressed lncRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhen; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Yin, Chang-Qing; Guan, Qing; Chen, Hao; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Many long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to be abnormally expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and may have the potential to serve as prognostic markers. In this study, a meta-analysis was conducted to systematically evaluate the prognostic value of various lncRNAs in HCC. Eligible literatures were systematically collected from PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library (up to December 30, 2015). The main outcomes including overall survival, relapse-free survival, and disease-free survival were analyzed. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using random- or fixed-effects models. A total of 2,991 patients with HCC in People’s Republic of China from 27 studies were included in the analysis. The level of lncRNAs showed a significant association with clinical outcomes. Abnormally elevated lncRNA transcription level predicted poor overall survival (HR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.20–2.34, P=0.002; I2=75.5%, P=0.000) and relapse-free survival (HR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.65–2.61, P<0.001; I2=24.0%, P=0.215), while no association was observed with disease-free survival of HCC patients (HR: 1.39, 95% CI: 0.51–3.78, P=0.524; I2=81.3%, P=0.005). Subgroup analysis further showed that lncRNA transcription level was significantly associated with tumor size (relative risk [RR]: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.01–1.39, P=0.035), microvascular invasion (RR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.10–1.89, P=0.009), and portal vein tumor thrombus (RR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.03–2.20, P=0.036). Publication bias and sensitivity analysis further confirmed the stability of our results. Our present meta-analysis indicates that abnormal lncRNA transcription level may serve as a promising indicator for prognostic evaluation of patients with HCC in People’s Republic of China. PMID:27574455

  14. Leptospira interrogans induces uterine inflammatory responses and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Guo, Mengyao; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), a worldwide zoonosis, infect humans and animals. In dogs, four syndromes caused by leptospirosis have been identified: icteric, hemorrhagic, uremic (Stuttgart disease) and reproductive (abortion and premature or weak pups), and also it caused inflammation. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of matrix molecules that is crucial to the reproduction. Both inflammatory response and ECM are closed relative to reproductive. The aim of this study was to clarify how L. interrogans affected the uterus of dogs, by focusing on the inflammatory responses, and ECM expression in dogs uterine tissue infected by L. interrogans. In the present study, 27 dogs were divided into 3 groups, intrauterine infusion with L. interrogans, to make uterine infection, sterile EMJH, and normal saline as a control, respectively. The uteruses were removed by surgical operation in 10, 20, and 30 days, respectively. The methods of histopathological analysis, ELISA, Western blot and qPCR were used. The results showed that L. interrogans induced significantly inflammatory responses, which were characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltration and high expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in uterine tissue of these dogs. Furthermore, L. interrogans strongly down-regulated the expression of ECM (collagens (CL) IV, fibronectins (FN) and laminins (LN)) in mRNA and protein levels. These data indicated that strongly inflammatory responses, and abnormal regulation of ECM might contribute to the proliferation of dogs infected by L. interrogans. PMID:25153777

  15. Leptospira interrogans induces uterine inflammatory responses and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Guo, Mengyao; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), a worldwide zoonosis, infect humans and animals. In dogs, four syndromes caused by leptospirosis have been identified: icteric, hemorrhagic, uremic (Stuttgart disease) and reproductive (abortion and premature or weak pups), and also it caused inflammation. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of matrix molecules that is crucial to the reproduction. Both inflammatory response and ECM are closed relative to reproductive. The aim of this study was to clarify how L. interrogans affected the uterus of dogs, by focusing on the inflammatory responses, and ECM expression in dogs uterine tissue infected by L. interrogans. In the present study, 27 dogs were divided into 3 groups, intrauterine infusion with L. interrogans, to make uterine infection, sterile EMJH, and normal saline as a control, respectively. The uteruses were removed by surgical operation in 10, 20, and 30 days, respectively. The methods of histopathological analysis, ELISA, Western blot and qPCR were used. The results showed that L. interrogans induced significantly inflammatory responses, which were characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltration and high expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in uterine tissue of these dogs. Furthermore, L. interrogans strongly down-regulated the expression of ECM (collagens (CL) IV, fibronectins (FN) and laminins (LN)) in mRNA and protein levels. These data indicated that strongly inflammatory responses, and abnormal regulation of ECM might contribute to the proliferation of dogs infected by L. interrogans.

  16. Variation in Gene Expression Patterns in Human Gastric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Leung, Suet Y.; Yuen, Siu T.; Chu, Kent-Man; Ji, Jiafu; Li, Rui; Chan, Annie S.Y.; Law, Simon; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Wong, John; So, Samuel; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the world's second most common cause of cancer death. We analyzed gene expression patterns in 90 primary gastric cancers, 14 metastatic gastric cancers, and 22 nonneoplastic gastric tissues, using cDNA microarrays representing ∼30,300 genes. Gastric cancers were distinguished from nonneoplastic gastric tissues by characteristic differences in their gene expression patterns. We found a diversity of gene expression patterns in gastric cancer, reflecting variation in intrinsic properties of tumor and normal cells and variation in the cellular composition of these complex tissues. We identified several genes whose expression levels were significantly correlated with patient survival. The variations in gene expression patterns among cancers in different patients suggest differences in pathogenetic pathways and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:12925757

  17. Expression patterns of placental microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Mouillet, Jean-Francois; Chu, Tianjiao; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2016-01-01

    Among different types of small RNA molecules, distinct types of microRNAs (miRNAs) are expressed in many cell types, where they modulate RNA stability and translation, thus controlling virtually every aspect of tissue development, proliferation, differentiation, and function. Aberrant miRNA expression has been linked to discrete pathological processes. As the placenta plays a pivotal role in governing fetal development, it is not surprising that the placenta expresses numerous types of miRNAs. Whereas many of these miRNAs are ubiquitously expressed, certain miRNA species are largely unique to the placenta. Research in the field of placental miRNAs is in its early phase, with most studies centering on cataloging placental miRNA species or examining differences in placental miRNA expression between placentas from normal pregnancies and those from pregnancies complicated by pathologies that are associated with placental dysfunction. Recent research endeavors ventured to assess the function of miRNAs in cultured placental trophoblasts, using in vitro conditions that model relevant pathophysiological processes. The impact of miRNA-mediated repression on the trophoblast transcriptome, particularly in response to genetic and environmental perturbations, remains largely unknown. Further in depth studies are required to unravel the functional significance of miRNAs in molding placental robustness, which must constantly adapt to altered maternal physiological status in order to sustain optimal support to the developing embryo. In this review we summarize the current information about placental miRNAs expression, and the lingering challenges in this field. PMID:21425434

  18. Abnormal Sensory Protein Expression and Urothelial Dysfunction in Ketamine-Related Cystitis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze patterns of sensory protein expression and urothelial dysfunction in ketamine-related cystitis (KC) in humans. Methods Biopsies of bladder mucosa were performed in 29 KC patients during cystoscopy. Then specimens were analyzed for tryptase, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), E-cadherin, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) with immunofluorescence staining and quantification. In addition, 10 healthy control bladder specimens were analyzed and compared with the KC specimens. Another 16 whole bladder specimens obtained from partial cystectomy were also analyzed for the muscarinic receptors M2 and M3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), β-3 adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs), and the P2X3 receptor by western blotting. In addition, 3 normal control bladder specimens were analyzed and compared with the KC specimens. Results The KC bladder mucosa revealed significantly less expression of ZO-1 and E-cadherin, and greater expression of TUNEL and tryptase activity than the control samples. The expression of M3 and β3-AR in the KC specimens was significantly greater than in the controls. The expression of iNOS, eNOS, M2, and P2X3 was not significantly different between the KC and control specimens. Conclusions The bladder tissue of KC patients revealed significant urothelial dysfunction, which was associated with mast-cell mediated inflammation, increased urothelial cell apoptosis, and increased expression of the M3 and β3-AR. PMID:27706016

  19. Identification of Abnormal System Noise Temperature Patterns in Deep Space Network Antennas Using Neural Network Trained Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Thomas; Pham, Timothy; Liao, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a fuzzy logic function trained by an artificial neural network to classify the system noise temperature (SNT) of antennas in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). The SNT data were classified into normal, marginal, and abnormal classes. The irregular SNT pattern was further correlated with link margin and weather data. A reasonably good correlation is detected among high SNT, low link margin and the effect of bad weather; however we also saw some unexpected non-correlations which merit further study in the future.

  20. Patterns of activity expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Dubofsky, E A; Simpson, S D; Chabot, Christopher C; Watson, Winsor H

    2013-09-01

    Adult American horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, possess endogenous circadian and circatidal clocks controlling visual sensitivity and locomotion, respectively. The goal of this study was to determine the types of activity rhythms expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs (n = 24) when exposed to a 14:10 light/dark cycle (LD) for 10 days, followed by 10 days of constant darkness (DD). Horseshoe crab activity was recorded with a digital time-lapse video system that used an infrared-sensitive camera so animals could be monitored at night. In LD, 15 animals expressed daily patterns of activity, 6 displayed a circatidal pattern, and the remaining 3 were arrhythmic. Of the 15 animals with daily patterns of locomotion, 7 had a significant preference (P < 0.05) for diurnal activity and 3 for nocturnal activity; the remainder did not express a significant preference for day or night activity. In DD, 13 horseshoe crabs expressed circatidal rhythms and 8 maintained a pattern of about 24 h. Although these results suggest the presence of a circadian clock influencing circatidal patterns of locomotion, these apparent circadian rhythms may actually represent the expression of just one of the two bouts of activity driven by the putative circalunidian clocks that control their tidal rhythms. Overall, these results indicate that, like adults, juvenile horseshoe crabs express both daily and tidal patterns of activity and that at least one, and maybe both, of these patterns is driven by endogenous clocks. PMID:24088795

  1. Patterns of activity expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Dubofsky, E A; Simpson, S D; Chabot, Christopher C; Watson, Winsor H

    2013-09-01

    Adult American horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, possess endogenous circadian and circatidal clocks controlling visual sensitivity and locomotion, respectively. The goal of this study was to determine the types of activity rhythms expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs (n = 24) when exposed to a 14:10 light/dark cycle (LD) for 10 days, followed by 10 days of constant darkness (DD). Horseshoe crab activity was recorded with a digital time-lapse video system that used an infrared-sensitive camera so animals could be monitored at night. In LD, 15 animals expressed daily patterns of activity, 6 displayed a circatidal pattern, and the remaining 3 were arrhythmic. Of the 15 animals with daily patterns of locomotion, 7 had a significant preference (P < 0.05) for diurnal activity and 3 for nocturnal activity; the remainder did not express a significant preference for day or night activity. In DD, 13 horseshoe crabs expressed circatidal rhythms and 8 maintained a pattern of about 24 h. Although these results suggest the presence of a circadian clock influencing circatidal patterns of locomotion, these apparent circadian rhythms may actually represent the expression of just one of the two bouts of activity driven by the putative circalunidian clocks that control their tidal rhythms. Overall, these results indicate that, like adults, juvenile horseshoe crabs express both daily and tidal patterns of activity and that at least one, and maybe both, of these patterns is driven by endogenous clocks.

  2. Abnormal expression of TIP30 and arrested nucleocytoplasmic transport within oligodendrocyte precursor cells in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Jin; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Nawa, Mikiro; Aiso, Sadakazu; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2008-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) persist near the demyelinated axons arising in MS but inefficiently differentiate into oligodendrocytes and remyelinate these axons. The pathogenesis of differentiation failure remains elusive. We initially hypothesized that injured axons fail to present Contactin, a positive ligand for the oligodendroglial Notch1 receptor to induce myelination, and thus tracked axoglial Contactin/Notch1 signaling in situ, using immunohistochemistry in brain tissue from MS patients containing chronic demyelinated lesions. Instead, we found that Contactin was saturated on demyelinated axons, Notch1-positive OPCs accumulated in Contactin-positive lesions, and the receptor was engaged, as demonstrated by cleavage to Notch1-intracellular domain (NICD). However, nuclear translocalization of NICD, required for myelinogenesis, was virtually absent in these cells. NICD and related proteins carrying nuclear localization signals were associated with the nuclear transporter Importin but were trapped in the cytoplasm. Abnormal expression of TIP30, a direct inhibitor of Importin, was observed in these OPCs. Overexpression of TIP30 in a rat OPC cell line resulted in cytoplasmic entrapment of NICD and arrest of differentiation upon stimulation with Contactin-Fc. Our results suggest that extracellular inhibitory factors as well as an intrinsic nucleocytoplasmic transport blockade within OPCs may be involved in the pathogenesis of remyelination failure in MS. PMID:19104151

  3. The correction of biochemical abnormalities in fibroblasts of a Zellweger patient by gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Shimozawa, N.; Suzuki, Y.; Oril, T.

    1994-09-01

    Zellweger syndrome is a prototype of peroxisome-deficient disorders and a fatal autosomal recessive disease with no effective therapy. We identified nine genetic complementation groups of these disorders among several laboratories, and mutations in peroxisome assembly factor-1 (PAF-1) and the 70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein (PMP70) genes have been described in Zellweger patients from our group F and Roscher`s group 1, respectively. We now succeed the permanent recovery of generalized peroxisomal abnormalities in fibroblasts of a Zellweger patient from the group F by the stable transfection of human cDNA encoding PAF-1. In the transfectants, a number of peroxisomal dysfunctions such as lignocelic acid oxidation, dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase activity and biogenesis of peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation enzymes were restored, as well as morphological absence of peroxisomes. These findings are useful for basic studies on gene therapy of peroxisomal disorders in the cultured cellular system. Further study on expression of human PMP70 cDNA in fibroblasts from Roscher`s group 1 will be also necessary to confirm whether the PMP70 is responsible for Zellweger syndrome.

  4. Novel SLC5A2 mutation contributes to familial renal glucosuria: Abnormal expression in renal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Hou, Ping; Liu, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Familial renal glucosuria (FRG) is characterized by persistent glucosuria in the presence of normal serum glucose concentrations, while other impairments of tubular function are absent. Mutations in the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SLC5A2) gene have been found to be responsible for FRG. However, direct evidence for the presence of SLC5A2 mutant in renal tissues is very rare. In previous studies, a non-sense mutation (c.1320 G>A:p.W440X) that would cause premature termination of the protein was found. However, the effects in the renal tissues were not reported. In the current study, a patient with FRG and a urinary glucose excretion rate of 8.3 g/day is described, for whom a novel missense mutation (c.1319G>A:p.W440X) was revealed by sequencing. Furthermore, in the immunofluorescence examination of a renal biopsy specimen, SLC5A2 was detected in the apical side of the proximal convoluted tubule, discontinuously decreased in comparison with that in normal and disease controls. The results imply that both wild-type SLC5A2 and mutant SLC5A2 with abnormal distribution were expressed in the renal tissues, and that the reduction of SLC5A2 expression and function were due to the c.1319G>A:p.W440X mutation. The current study provides valuable clues regarding the SLC5A2 molecule from genotype to phenotype in families affected by FRG. PMID:27446256

  5. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Schizophrenia Based on an International Mega-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Cota Navin; Calhoun, Vince D; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Chen, Jiayu; Patel, Veena; Liu, Jingyu; Segall, Judith; Franke, Barbara; Zwiers, Marcel P; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan; Fisher, Simon E; Fernandez, Guillen; van Erp, Theo G M; Potkin, Steven; Ford, Judith; Mathalon, Daniel; McEwen, Sarah; Lee, Hyo Jong; Mueller, Bryon A; Greve, Douglas N; Andreassen, Ole; Agartz, Ingrid; Gollub, Randy L; Sponheim, Scott R; Ehrlich, Stefan; Wang, Lei; Pearlson, Godfrey; Glahn, David C; Sprooten, Emma; Mayer, Andrew R; Stephen, Julia; Jung, Rex E; Canive, Jose; Bustillo, Juan; Turner, Jessica A

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of gray matter concentration (GMC) deficits in patients with schizophrenia (Sz) have identified robust changes throughout the cortex. We assessed the relationships between diagnosis, overall symptom severity, and patterns of gray matter in the largest aggregated structural imaging dataset to date. We performed both source-based morphometry (SBM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses on GMC images from 784 Sz and 936 controls (Ct) across 23 scanning sites in Europe and the United States. After correcting for age, gender, site, and diagnosis by site interactions, SBM analyses showed 9 patterns of diagnostic differences. They comprised separate cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. Seven patterns showed greater GMC in Ct than Sz, while 2 (brainstem and cerebellum) showed greater GMC for Sz. The greatest GMC deficit was in a single pattern comprising regions in the superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal cortex, which replicated over analyses of data subsets. VBM analyses identified overall cortical GMC loss and one small cluster of increased GMC in Sz, which overlapped with the SBM brainstem component. We found no significant association between the component loadings and symptom severity in either analysis. This mega-analysis confirms that the commonly found GMC loss in Sz in the anterior temporal lobe, insula, and medial frontal lobe form a single, consistent spatial pattern even in such a diverse dataset. The separation of GMC loss into robust, repeatable spatial patterns across multiple datasets paves the way for the application of these methods to identify subtle genetic and clinical cohort effects.

  6. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Schizophrenia Based on an International Mega-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Cota Navin; Calhoun, Vince D.; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Chen, Jiayu; Patel, Veena; Liu, Jingyu; Segall, Judith; Franke, Barbara; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan; Fisher, Simon E.; Fernandez, Guillen; van Erp, Theo G. M.; Potkin, Steven; Ford, Judith; Mathalon, Daniel; McEwen, Sarah; Lee, Hyo Jong; Mueller, Bryon A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Andreassen, Ole; Agartz, Ingrid; Gollub, Randy L.; Sponheim, Scott R.; Ehrlich, Stefan; Wang, Lei; Pearlson, Godfrey; Glahn, David C.; Sprooten, Emma; Mayer, Andrew R.; Stephen, Julia; Jung, Rex E.; Canive, Jose; Bustillo, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of gray matter concentration (GMC) deficits in patients with schizophrenia (Sz) have identified robust changes throughout the cortex. We assessed the relationships between diagnosis, overall symptom severity, and patterns of gray matter in the largest aggregated structural imaging dataset to date. We performed both source-based morphometry (SBM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses on GMC images from 784 Sz and 936 controls (Ct) across 23 scanning sites in Europe and the United States. After correcting for age, gender, site, and diagnosis by site interactions, SBM analyses showed 9 patterns of diagnostic differences. They comprised separate cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. Seven patterns showed greater GMC in Ct than Sz, while 2 (brainstem and cerebellum) showed greater GMC for Sz. The greatest GMC deficit was in a single pattern comprising regions in the superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal cortex, which replicated over analyses of data subsets. VBM analyses identified overall cortical GMC loss and one small cluster of increased GMC in Sz, which overlapped with the SBM brainstem component. We found no significant association between the component loadings and symptom severity in either analysis. This mega-analysis confirms that the commonly found GMC loss in Sz in the anterior temporal lobe, insula, and medial frontal lobe form a single, consistent spatial pattern even in such a diverse dataset. The separation of GMC loss into robust, repeatable spatial patterns across multiple datasets paves the way for the application of these methods to identify subtle genetic and clinical cohort effects. PMID:25548384

  7. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Schizophrenia Based on an International Mega-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Cota Navin; Calhoun, Vince D; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Chen, Jiayu; Patel, Veena; Liu, Jingyu; Segall, Judith; Franke, Barbara; Zwiers, Marcel P; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan; Fisher, Simon E; Fernandez, Guillen; van Erp, Theo G M; Potkin, Steven; Ford, Judith; Mathalon, Daniel; McEwen, Sarah; Lee, Hyo Jong; Mueller, Bryon A; Greve, Douglas N; Andreassen, Ole; Agartz, Ingrid; Gollub, Randy L; Sponheim, Scott R; Ehrlich, Stefan; Wang, Lei; Pearlson, Godfrey; Glahn, David C; Sprooten, Emma; Mayer, Andrew R; Stephen, Julia; Jung, Rex E; Canive, Jose; Bustillo, Juan; Turner, Jessica A

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of gray matter concentration (GMC) deficits in patients with schizophrenia (Sz) have identified robust changes throughout the cortex. We assessed the relationships between diagnosis, overall symptom severity, and patterns of gray matter in the largest aggregated structural imaging dataset to date. We performed both source-based morphometry (SBM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses on GMC images from 784 Sz and 936 controls (Ct) across 23 scanning sites in Europe and the United States. After correcting for age, gender, site, and diagnosis by site interactions, SBM analyses showed 9 patterns of diagnostic differences. They comprised separate cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. Seven patterns showed greater GMC in Ct than Sz, while 2 (brainstem and cerebellum) showed greater GMC for Sz. The greatest GMC deficit was in a single pattern comprising regions in the superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal cortex, which replicated over analyses of data subsets. VBM analyses identified overall cortical GMC loss and one small cluster of increased GMC in Sz, which overlapped with the SBM brainstem component. We found no significant association between the component loadings and symptom severity in either analysis. This mega-analysis confirms that the commonly found GMC loss in Sz in the anterior temporal lobe, insula, and medial frontal lobe form a single, consistent spatial pattern even in such a diverse dataset. The separation of GMC loss into robust, repeatable spatial patterns across multiple datasets paves the way for the application of these methods to identify subtle genetic and clinical cohort effects. PMID:25548384

  8. Abnormal fMRI Activation Pattern during Story Listening in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds Losin, Elizabeth A.; Rivera, Susan M.; O'Hare, Elizabeth D.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.; Pinter, Joseph D.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is characterized by disproportionately severe impairments of speech and language, yet little is known about the neural underpinnings of these deficits. We compared fMRI activation patterns during passive story listening in 9 young adults with Down syndrome and 9 approximately age-matched, typically developing controls. The typically…

  9. Teachers' Knowledge of Normal and Abnormal Elimination Patterns in Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyt, Margaret A.

    2005-01-01

    Dysfunctional elimination may be learned, to some degree. Because children spend nearly half of their waking hours at school, there is the potential for school to have a significant impact on their elimination patterns. Surveys were mailed to 1,000 randomly selected Iowa public elementary school teachers; 467 of the surveys were returned. Findings…

  10. Genomic imprinting as a probable explanation for variable intrafamilial phenotypic expression of an unusual chromosome 3 abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Fryburg, J.S.; Shashi, V.; Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    We present a 4 generation family in which an abnormal chromosome 3 with dup(3)(q25) segregated from great-grandmother to grandmother to son without phenotypic effect. The son`s 2 daughters have dysmorphic features, mild developmental delays and congenital heart disease. Both girls have the abnormal chr. 3 but are the only family members with the abnormality to have phenotypic effects. An unaffected son of the father has normal chromosomes. FISH with whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 14, 18, and 22 excluded these as the origin of the extra material. Chromosome 3-specific paint revealed a uniform pattern, suggesting that the extra material is from chromosome 3. Comparative genomic hybridization and DNA studies are pending. Possible explanations for the discordance in phenotypes between the 4th generation offspring and the first 3 generations include: an undetected rearrangement in the previous generations that is unbalanced in the two affected individuals; the chromosome abnormality may be a benign variant and unrelated to the phenotype; or, most likely, genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is suggested by the observation that a phenotypic effect was only seen after the chromosome was inherited from the father. The mothers in the first two generations appear to have passed the abnormal chr. 3 on without effect. This is an opportunity to delineate a region of the human genome affected by paternal imprinting.

  11. Developmental abnormalities and differential expression of genes induced in oil and dispersant exposed Menidia beryllina embryos.

    PubMed

    Adeyemo, Olanike K; Kroll, Kevin J; Denslow, Nancy D

    2015-11-01

    Exposure of fish embryos to relatively low concentrations of oil has been implicated in sub-lethal toxicity. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of the exposure of Menidia beryllina embryos at 30-48h post-fertilization to the water accommodated fractions of oil (WAF, 200ppm, v/v), dispersants (20ppm, v/v, Corexit 9500 or 9527), and mixtures of oil and each of the dispersants to produce chemically enhanced water accommodated fractions (CEWAFs) over a 72-hour period. The polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylene and xylene (BTEX) constituents of the 5X concentrated exposure solutions (control, WAF, dispersants and CEWAFs) were determined and those of the 1× exposures were derived using a dilution factor. PAH, BTEX and low molecular weight PAH constituents greater than 1ppb were observed in WAF and the dispersants, but at much higher levels in CEWAFs. The WAF and CEWAFs post-weathering were diluted at 1:5 (200ml WAF/CEWAF: 800ml 25ppt saltwater) for embryo exposures. Mortality, heartbeat, embryo normalcy, abnormality types and severities were recorded. The qPCR assay was used to quantify abundances of transcripts of target genes for sexual differentiation and sex determination (StAR, dmrt-1, amh, cyp19b, vtg and chg-L,), growth regulation (ghr) and stress response (cyp1a and Hsp90); and gapdh served as the housekeeping gene. Temperature was 21±1.5°C throughout the experimental period, while mortality was low and not significantly different (p=0.68) among treatments. Heartbeat was significantly different (0.0034) with the lowest heartbeats recorded in Corexit 9500 (67.5beats/min) and 9527 (67.1beats/min) exposed embryos compared with controls (82.7beats/min). Significantly more treated embryos were in a state of deterioration, with significantly more embryos presenting arrested tissue differentiation compared with controls (p=0.021). Exposure to WAF, dispersants and CEWAF induced aberrant expression of all the genes, with

  12. Developmental abnormalities and differential expression of genes induced in oil and dispersant exposed Menidia beryllina embryos.

    PubMed

    Adeyemo, Olanike K; Kroll, Kevin J; Denslow, Nancy D

    2015-11-01

    Exposure of fish embryos to relatively low concentrations of oil has been implicated in sub-lethal toxicity. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of the exposure of Menidia beryllina embryos at 30-48h post-fertilization to the water accommodated fractions of oil (WAF, 200ppm, v/v), dispersants (20ppm, v/v, Corexit 9500 or 9527), and mixtures of oil and each of the dispersants to produce chemically enhanced water accommodated fractions (CEWAFs) over a 72-hour period. The polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylene and xylene (BTEX) constituents of the 5X concentrated exposure solutions (control, WAF, dispersants and CEWAFs) were determined and those of the 1× exposures were derived using a dilution factor. PAH, BTEX and low molecular weight PAH constituents greater than 1ppb were observed in WAF and the dispersants, but at much higher levels in CEWAFs. The WAF and CEWAFs post-weathering were diluted at 1:5 (200ml WAF/CEWAF: 800ml 25ppt saltwater) for embryo exposures. Mortality, heartbeat, embryo normalcy, abnormality types and severities were recorded. The qPCR assay was used to quantify abundances of transcripts of target genes for sexual differentiation and sex determination (StAR, dmrt-1, amh, cyp19b, vtg and chg-L,), growth regulation (ghr) and stress response (cyp1a and Hsp90); and gapdh served as the housekeeping gene. Temperature was 21±1.5°C throughout the experimental period, while mortality was low and not significantly different (p=0.68) among treatments. Heartbeat was significantly different (0.0034) with the lowest heartbeats recorded in Corexit 9500 (67.5beats/min) and 9527 (67.1beats/min) exposed embryos compared with controls (82.7beats/min). Significantly more treated embryos were in a state of deterioration, with significantly more embryos presenting arrested tissue differentiation compared with controls (p=0.021). Exposure to WAF, dispersants and CEWAF induced aberrant expression of all the genes, with

  13. Post hoc pattern matching: assigning significance to statistically defined expression patterns in single channel microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Hulshizer, Randall; Blalock, Eric M

    2007-01-01

    Background Researchers using RNA expression microarrays in experimental designs with more than two treatment groups often identify statistically significant genes with ANOVA approaches. However, the ANOVA test does not discriminate which of the multiple treatment groups differ from one another. Thus, post hoc tests, such as linear contrasts, template correlations, and pairwise comparisons are used. Linear contrasts and template correlations work extremely well, especially when the researcher has a priori information pointing to a particular pattern/template among the different treatment groups. Further, all pairwise comparisons can be used to identify particular, treatment group-dependent patterns of gene expression. However, these approaches are biased by the researcher's assumptions, and some treatment-based patterns may fail to be detected using these approaches. Finally, different patterns may have different probabilities of occurring by chance, importantly influencing researchers' conclusions about a pattern and its constituent genes. Results We developed a four step, post hoc pattern matching (PPM) algorithm to automate single channel gene expression pattern identification/significance. First, 1-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), coupled with post hoc 'all pairwise' comparisons are calculated for all genes. Second, for each ANOVA-significant gene, all pairwise contrast results are encoded to create unique pattern ID numbers. The # genes found in each pattern in the data is identified as that pattern's 'actual' frequency. Third, using Monte Carlo simulations, those patterns' frequencies are estimated in random data ('random' gene pattern frequency). Fourth, a Z-score for overrepresentation of the pattern is calculated ('actual' against 'random' gene pattern frequencies). We wrote a Visual Basic program (StatiGen) that automates PPM procedure, constructs an Excel workbook with standardized graphs of overrepresented patterns, and lists of the genes comprising

  14. Expression patterns of FGF receptors in the developing mammalian cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Toshinori; Ray, Catherine A.; Younkins, Christa; Bermingham-McDonogh, Olivia

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of factors in the development of the mammalian cochlea. There are four fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR1-4) and all four are expressed in the cochlea during development. While there are examples in the literature of expression patterns of some of the receptors at specific stages of cochlear development there has been no systematic study. We have assembled a full analysis of the patterns of receptor expression during cochlear development for all four Fgfrs using in situ hybridization. We have analyzed the expression patterns from E13.5 through post-natal ages. We find that Fgfr1, 2 and 3 are expressed in the epithelium of the cochlear duct and Fgfr4 is limited in its expression to the mesenchyme surrounding the duct. We compare the receptor expression pattern to markers of the sensory domain (p27kip1) and the early hair cells (math1). PMID:20131355

  15. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint.

    PubMed

    Zapala, Matthew A; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J; Reilly, John F; Young, Warren G; Bloom, Floyd E; Lockhart, David J; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-07-19

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional "imprint" consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior-posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org).

  16. Neurulation abnormalities secondary to altered gene expression in neural tube defect susceptible Splotch embryos.

    PubMed

    Bennett, G D; An, J; Craig, J C; Gefrides, L A; Calvin, J A; Finnell, R H

    1998-01-01

    The murine mutant Splotch (Sp) is a well-established model for studying neural tube closure defects. In the current investigation, the progression through neural tube closure (NTC) as well as the expression patterns of 12 developmentally regulated genes were examined in the neural tissue of wildtype (+/+), Splotch heterozygous (Sp/+), and Splotch homozygous (Sp/Sp) embryos during neurulation. The overall growth of the embryos, as measured by the number of somite pairs, did not differ significantly between the three genotypes at any of the collection time-points. There was, however, a significant delay in the progression through NTC for both the Sp/+ and Sp/Sp embryos. A univariate analysis on the expression of the 12 candidate genes (bcl-2, FBP-2, Hmx-2, Msx-3, N-cam, N-cad, noggin, p53, Pax-3, Shh, Wee-1, wnt-1) revealed that although 11 were statistically altered, across time or by genotype, there were no significant interactions between gestation age and genotype for any of these genes during NTC. However, a multivariate statistical analysis on the simultaneous expression of these genes revealed interactions at both gestation day (GD) 8:12 (day:hour) and 9:00 among Pax-3, N-cam, N-cad, bcl-2, p53, and Wee-1 that could potentially explain the aberrant NTC. The data from these studies suggest that a disruption in the genes that govern the cell cycle or extracellular matrices of the developing neural tube might play a critical role in the occurrence of the NTDs observed in Splotch embryos.

  17. Minichromosome maintenance 2 and 5 expressions are increased in the epithelium of hereditary gingival fibromatosis associated with dental abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; de Oliveira Santos, Carolina; Bonan, Paulo Rogério; de Figueiredo Moura, Paula; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante; León, Jorge Esquiche; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Gingiva fibromatosis is a relatively rare condition characterized by diffuse enlargement of the gingiva, which is caused by expansion and accumulation of the connective tissue. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate proliferative and apoptotic biomarker expression in normal gingiva and two forms of gingival fibromatosis. METHODS: Archived tissue specimens of hereditary gingival fibromatosis, gingival fibromatosis and dental abnormality syndrome and normal gingiva were subject to morphological analysis and immunohistochemical staining. The results were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: Proteins associated with proliferation were found in the nuclei of epithelial cells from the basal and suprabasal layers, whereas apoptotic proteins were detected in the cytoplasm of the upper layers of the epithelium. Increased expressions of minichromosome maintenance proteins 2 and 5 were observed in the gingival fibromatosis and dental abnormality syndrome samples. In contrast, geminin expression was higher in normal gingiva samples. No difference in the expression of apoptotic proteins was observed among the groups. CONCLUSION: Our findings support a role for augmented proliferation of epithelial cells within the overgrown tissues associated with gingival fibromatosis or dental abnormality syndrome. However, our data suggest that different biological mechanisms may account for the pathogenesis of different types of gingival fibromatosis. PMID:21789376

  18. Abnormal luteinizing hormone response patterns to synthetic gonadotrophin releasing hormone in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Katz, M; Carr, P J

    1976-08-01

    Basal gonadotrophin and sex steroid levels and responses to an intravenous injection of 100 mug gonadotrophin releasing hormone (Gn-RH) have been studied in 15 patients with polycystic ovaries. Mean basal LH concentration was raised and an excessive, exaggerated and prolonged response was observed after Gn-RH treatment, but patients could further be subdivided into two functional groups on the basis of their basal LH values and LH response patterns. Evidence was also produced which suggested a breakdown in the negative feedback mechanism in these patients.

  19. Spreading photoparoxysmal EEG response is associated with an abnormal cortical excitability pattern.

    PubMed

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groppa, Sergey; Jerosch, Bettina; Muhle, Hiltrud; Kurth, Christoph; Shepherd, Alex J; Siebner, Hartwig; Stephani, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Photosensitivity or photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is a highly heritable electroencephalographic trait characterized by an abnormal cortical response to intermittent photic stimulation (IPS). In PPR-positive individuals, IPS induces spikes, spike-waves or intermittent slow waves. The PPR may be restricted to posterior visual areas (i.e. local PPR with occipital spikes only) or spread to anterior non-visual cortical regions (i.e. PPR with propagation). The mechanisms underlying the PPR and causing its spread remain to be clarified. In unmedicated PPR-positive individuals and PPR-negative control participants without any history of previous seizures, we used focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the excitability of the visual or primary motor cortex (M1). In the first experiment [18 healthy control subjects (i.e. without PPR in electroencephalography: 6 females, mean age 26.5 +/- 7.34 years) and 17 healthy participants with PPR (7 females, mean age 25.18 +/- 12.2 years) were studied], occipital TMS was used to elicit phosphenes or to suppress the visual perception of letter trigrams. PPR-positive individuals with propagation had lower phosphene thresholds and steeper stimulus-response curves than individuals without PPR or with occipital spikes only. Occipital TMS also induced a stronger suppression of visual perception in PPR-positive subjects with propagation relative to subjects without PPR or with occipital spikes. In the second experiment, we applied TMS over the right M1 without concurrent IPS and measured the motor threshold, the stimulus response curve, and the duration of the cortical silent period (CSP) in PPR positive individuals with propagation and in PPR-negative control participants [15 right-handed healthy subjects without PPR (3 males, mean age 17.7 +/- 3.6 years) and 14 right-handed healthy individuals showing a PPR with propagation (3 males, mean age 17.4 +/- 3.9 years)]. PPR-positive individuals showed no changes in these

  20. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns are altered during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Popp, Michael P.; Gurley, William B.; Guy, Charles; Norwood, Kelly L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments results in differential gene expression. A 5-day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on gene expression patterns initially by using the Adh/GUS transgene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response (Paul, A.L., Daugherty, C.J., Bihn, E.A., Chapman, D.K., Norwood, K.L., Ferl, R.J., 2001. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis, Plant Physiol. 126, 613-621). As a follow-on to the reporter gene analysis, we report here the evaluation of genome-wide patterns of native gene expression within Arabidopsis shoots utilizing the Agilent DNA array of 21,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - Taqman®). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays probed with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to RNA isolated from ground control plants revealed 182 genes that were differentially expressed in response to the spaceflight mission by more than 4-fold, and of those only 50 genes were expressed at levels chosen to support a conservative change call. None of the genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were induced to this level. However, genes related to heat shock were dramatically induced - but in a pattern and under growth conditions that are not easily explained by elevated temperatures. These gene expression data are discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment and with regard to potential future spaceflight experiment

  1. Differential expression pattern of UBX family genes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Seiji; Sasagawa, Yohei; Ogura, Teru . E-mail: ogura@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi . E-mail: yamanaka@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-29

    UBX (ubiquitin regulatory X)-containing proteins belong to an evolutionary conserved protein family and determine the specificity of p97/VCP/Cdc48p function by binding as its adaptors. Caenorhabditis elegans was found to possess six UBX-containing proteins, named UBXN-1 to -6. However, no general or specific function of them has been revealed. During the course of understanding not only their function but also specified function of p97, we investigated spatial and temporal expression patterns of six ubxn genes in this study. Transcript analyses showed that the expression pattern of each ubxn gene was different throughout worm's development and may show potential developmental dynamics in their function, especially ubxn-5 was expressed specifically in the spermatogenic germline, suggesting a crucial role in spermatogenesis. In addition, as ubxn-4 expression was induced by ER stress, it would function as an ERAD factor in C. elegans. In vivo expression analysis by using GFP translational fusion constructs revealed that six ubxn genes show distinct expression patterns. These results altogether demonstrate that the expression of all six ubxn genes of C. elegans is differently regulated.

  2. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  3. The pattern of gene expression in human CD34+ stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guolin; Chen, Jianjun; Lee, Sanggyu; Clark, Terry; Rowley, Janet D.; Wang, San Ming

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the pattern of gene expression in human primary CD34+ stem/progenitor cells. We identified 42,399 unique serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) tags among 106,021 SAGE tags collected from 2.5 × 106 CD34+ cells purified from bone marrow. Of these unique SAGE tags, 21,546 matched known expressed sequences, including 3,687 known genes, and 20,854 were novel without a match. The SAGE tags that matched known sequences tended to be at higher levels, whereas the novel SAGE tags tended to be at lower levels. By using the generation of longer sequences from SAGE tags for gene identification (GLGI) method, we identified the correct gene for 385 of 440 high-copy SAGE tags that matched multiple genes and we generated 198 novel 3′ expressed sequence tags from 138 high-copy novel SAGE tags. We observed that many different SAGE tags were derived from the same genes, reflecting the high heterogeneity of the 3′ untranslated region in the expressed genes. We compared the quantitative relationship for genes known to be important in hematopoiesis. The qualitative identification and quantitative measure for each known gene, expressed sequence tag, and novel SAGE tag provide a base for studying normal gene expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and for studying abnormal gene expression in hematopoietic diseases. PMID:11717454

  4. Abnormal Expression of Synaptic Proteins and Neurotrophin-3 in the Down Syndrome Mouse Model Ts65Dn

    PubMed Central

    Pollonini, Gabriella; Gao, Virginia; Rabe, Ausma; Palminiello, Sonia; Albertini, Giorgio; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2008-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) results from triplication of the whole or distal part of human chromosome 21. DS subjects suffer from deficits in learning and memory and cognitive functions in general, and, starting from early development, their brains show dendritic and spine structural alterations and cell loss. These defects concern many cortical brain regions as well as the hippocampus, which is known to play a critical role in memory and cognition. Most of these abnormalities are reproduced in the mouse model Ts65Dn, which is partially trisomic for the mouse chromosome 16 that is homologous to a portion of human chromosome 21. Thus, Ts65Dn is widely utilized as an animal model of DS. To better understand the molecular defects underlying the cognitive and particularly the memory impairments of DS, we investigated whether the expression of several molecules known to play critical roles in long-term synaptic plasticity and long-term memory in a variety of species is dysregulated in either the neonatal brain or adult hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice. We found abnormal expression of the synaptic proteins synaptophysin, MAP2 and CDK5 and of the neurotrophin NT-3. Both the neonatal brain and adult hippocampus revealed significant abnormalities. These results suggest that a dysregulation in the expression of neurotrophins as well as proteins involved in synaptic development and plasticity may play a potential role in the neural pathology of DS in humans. PMID:18703118

  5. Disruption of an Evolutionarily Novel Synaptic Expression Pattern in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xi; Hu, Haiyang; Guijarro, Patricia; Mitchell, Amanda; Ely, John J.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Hof, Patrick R.; Qiu, Zilong; Pääbo, Svante; Akbarian, Schahram; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive defects in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) include socialization and communication: key behavioral capacities that separate humans from other species. Here, we analyze gene expression in the prefrontal cortex of 63 autism patients and control individuals, as well as 62 chimpanzees and macaques, from natal to adult age. We show that among all aberrant expression changes seen in ASD brains, a single aberrant expression pattern overrepresented in genes involved synaptic-related pathways is enriched in nucleotide variants linked to autism. Furthermore, only this pattern contains an excess of developmental expression features unique to humans, thus resulting in the disruption of human-specific developmental programs in autism. Several members of the early growth response (EGR) transcription factor family can be implicated in regulation of this aberrant developmental change. Our study draws a connection between the genetic risk architecture of autism and molecular features of cortical development unique to humans. PMID:27685936

  6. Interocular suppression patterns in binocularly abnormal observers using luminance- and contrast-modulated noise stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chima, Akash S; Formankiewicz, Monika A; Waugh, Sarah J

    2016-08-01

    In binocular viewing, images presented to the amblyopic eye are suppressed in the cortex to prevent confusion or diplopia. The present study measures depth and extent of interocular suppression across the central circular 24° visual field in observers with strabismus and microstrabismus. Visual stimuli were concentric rings of alternating polarity, each divided into sectors. Rings were defined by luminance (L), luminance-modulated noise (LM), or contrast-modulated noise (CM). They were viewed binocularly except for the tested ring, which was viewed dichoptically, so that the modulation of one sector presented to the weaker or amblyopic eye was adjusted to perceptually match the surrounding ring presented to the preferred eye. A two alternative forced-choice paradigm combined with a staircase procedure allowed for measurement of the point of subjective equality, or perceptual match. Depth of suppression was calculated as the difference between physical modulations presented to the two eyes at this point. Strabismic participants showed suppression deeper centrally than peripherally, and in one hemifield of the visual field more than the other. Suppression was deeper for L than LM, and CM than LM stimuli. Microstrabismic suppression was weaker than that of strabismics, central for L and LM stimuli, with suppression of CM stimuli being broader, deeper and more in one hemifield. Suppression depth was positively correlated with interocular visual acuity difference and stereoacuity reduction. Clinically, LM stimuli could be used for assessment of deeper amblyopes to assess suppression patterns, while more sensitive detection of mild suppression would be possible using CM stimuli.

  7. Characterization of GPR101 transcript structure and expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Trivellin, Giampaolo; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Daly, Adrian F; Larco, Darwin O; Palmeira, Leonor; Faucz, Fabio R; Thiry, Albert; Leal, Letícia F; Rostomyan, Liliya; Quezado, Martha; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Janjic, Marija M; Villa, Chiara; Wu, T John; Stojilkovic, Stanko S; Beckers, Albert; Feldman, Benjamin; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-08-01

    We recently showed that Xq26.3 microduplications cause X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG). X-LAG patients mainly present with growth hormone and prolactin-secreting adenomas and share a minimal duplicated region containing at least four genes. GPR101 was the only gene highly expressed in their pituitary lesions, but little is known about its expression patterns. In this work, GPR101 transcripts were characterized in human tissues by 5'-Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) and RNAseq, while the putative promoter was bioinformatically predicted. We investigated GPR101 mRNA and protein expression by RT-quantitative PCR (qPCR), whole-mount in situ hybridization, and immunostaining, in human, rhesus monkey, rat and zebrafish. We identified four GPR101 isoforms characterized by different 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) and a common 6.1kb long 3'UTR. GPR101 expression was very low or absent in almost all adult human tissues examined, except for specific brain regions. Strong GPR101 staining was observed in human fetal pituitary and during adolescence, whereas very weak/absent expression was detected during childhood and adult life. In contrast to humans, adult monkey and rat pituitaries expressed GPR101, but in different cell types. Gpr101 is expressed in the brain and pituitary during rat and zebrafish development; in rat pituitary, Gpr101 is expressed only after birth and shows sexual dimorphism. This study shows that different GPR101 transcripts exist and that the brain is the major site of GPR101 expression across different species, although divergent species- and temporal-specific expression patterns are evident. These findings suggest an important role for GPR101 in brain and pituitary development and likely reflect the very different growth, development and maturation patterns among species. PMID:27282544

  8. Imprinting mutations suggested by abnormal DNA methylation patterns in familial angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, A. ); Dittrich, B.; Buiting, K.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Horsthemke, B. ); Greger, V.; Lalande, M. ); Anvret, M. )

    1994-05-01

    The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. The authors have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the gene for the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N, which maps 130 kb telomeric to D15S63. Furthermore, they have identified a pair of nondeletion Angelman syndrome sibs and two isolated Angelman syndrome patients who carry a paternal methylation imprint on the maternal chromosome. These Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients may have a defect in the imprinting process in 15q11-13. The authors propose a model in which a cis-acting mutation prevents the resetting of the imprinting signal in the germ line and thus disturbs the expression of imprinted genes in this region. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. MEPD: medaka expression pattern database, genes and more

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Barba, Juan I.; Rahman, Raza-Ur; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Mateo, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    The Medaka Expression Pattern Database (MEPD; http://mepd.cos.uni-heidelberg.de/) is designed as a repository of medaka expression data for the scientific community. In this update we present two main improvements. First, we have changed the previous clone-centric view for in situ data to a gene-centric view. This is possible because now we have linked all the data present in MEPD to the medaka gene annotation in ENSEMBL. In addition, we have also connected the medaka genes in MEPD to their corresponding orthologous gene in zebrafish, again using the ENSEMBL database. Based on this, we provide a link to the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN) to allow researches to compare expression data between these two fish model organisms. As a second major improvement, we have modified the design of the database to enable it to host regulatory elements, promoters or enhancers, expression patterns in addition to gene expression. The combination of gene expression, by traditional in situ, and regulatory element expression, typically by fluorescence reporter gene, within the same platform assures consistency in terms of annotation. In our opinion, this will allow researchers to uncover new insights between the expression domain of genes and their regulatory landscape. PMID:26450962

  10. MEPD: medaka expression pattern database, genes and more.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Barba, Juan I; Rahman, Raza-Ur; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Mateo, Juan L

    2016-01-01

    The Medaka Expression Pattern Database (MEPD; http://mepd.cos.uni-heidelberg.de/) is designed as a repository of medaka expression data for the scientific community. In this update we present two main improvements. First, we have changed the previous clone-centric view for in situ data to a gene-centric view. This is possible because now we have linked all the data present in MEPD to the medaka gene annotation in ENSEMBL. In addition, we have also connected the medaka genes in MEPD to their corresponding orthologous gene in zebrafish, again using the ENSEMBL database. Based on this, we provide a link to the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN) to allow researches to compare expression data between these two fish model organisms. As a second major improvement, we have modified the design of the database to enable it to host regulatory elements, promoters or enhancers, expression patterns in addition to gene expression. The combination of gene expression, by traditional in situ, and regulatory element expression, typically by fluorescence reporter gene, within the same platform assures consistency in terms of annotation. In our opinion, this will allow researchers to uncover new insights between the expression domain of genes and their regulatory landscape. PMID:26450962

  11. A regulatory network controls nephrocan expression and midgut patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Juan; Wei, Wei; Saund, Ranajeet S.; Xiang, Ping; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Yi, Yuyin; Alder, Olivia; Lu, Daphne Y. D.; Savory, Joanne G. A.; Krentz, Nicole A. J.; Montpetit, Rachel; Cullum, Rebecca; Hofs, Nicole; Lohnes, David; Humphries, R. Keith; Yamanaka, Yojiro; Duester, Gregg; Saijoh, Yukio; Hoodless, Pamela A.

    2014-01-01

    Although many regulatory networks involved in defining definitive endoderm have been identified, the mechanisms through which these networks interact to pattern the endoderm are less well understood. To explore the mechanisms involved in midgut patterning, we dissected the transcriptional regulatory elements of nephrocan (Nepn), the earliest known midgut specific gene in mice. We observed that Nepn expression is dramatically reduced in Sox17−/− and Raldh2−/− embryos compared with wild-type embryos. We further show that Nepn is directly regulated by Sox17 and the retinoic acid (RA) receptor via two enhancer elements located upstream of the gene. Moreover, Nepn expression is modulated by Activin signaling, with high levels inhibiting and low levels enhancing RA-dependent expression. In Foxh1−/− embryos in which Nodal signaling is reduced, the Nepn expression domain is expanded into the anterior gut region, confirming that Nodal signaling can modulate its expression in vivo. Together, Sox17 is required for Nepn expression in the definitive endoderm, while RA signaling restricts expression to the midgut region. A balance of Nodal/Activin signaling regulates the anterior boundary of the midgut expression domain. PMID:25209250

  12. Interocular suppression patterns in binocularly abnormal observers using luminance- and contrast-modulated noise stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chima, Akash S; Formankiewicz, Monika A; Waugh, Sarah J

    2016-08-01

    In binocular viewing, images presented to the amblyopic eye are suppressed in the cortex to prevent confusion or diplopia. The present study measures depth and extent of interocular suppression across the central circular 24° visual field in observers with strabismus and microstrabismus. Visual stimuli were concentric rings of alternating polarity, each divided into sectors. Rings were defined by luminance (L), luminance-modulated noise (LM), or contrast-modulated noise (CM). They were viewed binocularly except for the tested ring, which was viewed dichoptically, so that the modulation of one sector presented to the weaker or amblyopic eye was adjusted to perceptually match the surrounding ring presented to the preferred eye. A two alternative forced-choice paradigm combined with a staircase procedure allowed for measurement of the point of subjective equality, or perceptual match. Depth of suppression was calculated as the difference between physical modulations presented to the two eyes at this point. Strabismic participants showed suppression deeper centrally than peripherally, and in one hemifield of the visual field more than the other. Suppression was deeper for L than LM, and CM than LM stimuli. Microstrabismic suppression was weaker than that of strabismics, central for L and LM stimuli, with suppression of CM stimuli being broader, deeper and more in one hemifield. Suppression depth was positively correlated with interocular visual acuity difference and stereoacuity reduction. Clinically, LM stimuli could be used for assessment of deeper amblyopes to assess suppression patterns, while more sensitive detection of mild suppression would be possible using CM stimuli. PMID:27580040

  13. Abnormal lipid rafts related ganglioside expression and signaling in T lymphocytes in immune thrombocytopenia patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Donglei; Liu, Wenjie; Li, Huiyuan; Fu, Rongfeng; Liu, Xiaofan; Xue, Feng; Yang, Renchi

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant T lymphocytes signaling is considered to play a crucial role in the abnormal immune state of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Lipid raft has been verified to engage in the T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated T lymphocytes signal transduction. Whether lipid raft-associated T cells signal transduction has impact on the pathogenesis of ITP is still unconfirmed. In this study, we aimed to reveal the abnormality in structure and function of lipid rafts (LRs) in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes of patients with ITP. Our results showed that there was an increased lipid raft aggregation in ITP patients, while this kind of increase would not be influenced by platelet counts or therapeutic regimes. Stimulation by anti-CD3/CD28 monoclonal antibodies promoted enhanced lipid raft clustering in T lymphocytes of ITP patients compared with negative controls. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) could block the abnormal lipid raft aggregation and disrupt the TCR-mediated T cells proliferation and cytokines secretion, including both proinflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The spontaneous activation of T lymphocytes from ITP patients might be due to the elevated co-localization of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) CD45 and lipid rafts in patients' CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. These findings suggest that the autoactivation of T lymphocytes from ITP patients may lead to the abnormality in lipid raft structure and raft-anchored proteins, and the changes conversely promote the TCR-mediated T cells activation of ITP patients.

  14. Abnormal Patterns of Lipoprotein Lipase Release into the Plasma in GPIHBP1-deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Michael M.; Yin, Liya; Beigneux, Anne P.; Davies, Brandon S. J.; Gin, Peter; Estrada, Kristine; Melford, Kristan; Bishop, Joseph R.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Fong, Loren G.; Bensadoun, André; Young, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    GPIHBP1-deficient mice (Gpihbp1–/–) exhibit severe chylomicronemia. GPIHBP1 is located within capillaries of muscle and adipose tissue, and expression of GPIHBP1 in Chinese hamster ovary cells confers upon those cells the ability to bind lipoprotein lipase (LPL). However, there has been absolutely no evidence that GPIHBP1 actually interacts with LPL in vivo. Heparin is known to release LPL from its in vivo binding sites, allowing it to enter the plasma. After an injection of heparin, we reasoned that LPL bound to GPIHBP1 in capillaries would be released very quickly, and we hypothesized that the kinetics of LPL entry into the plasma would differ in Gpihbp1–/– and control mice. Indeed, plasma LPL levels peaked very rapidly (within 1 min) after heparin in control mice. In contrast, plasma LPL levels in Gpihbp1–/– mice were much lower 1 min after heparin and increased slowly over 15 min. In keeping with that result, plasma triglycerides fell sharply within 10 min after heparin in wild-type mice, but were negligibly altered in the first 15 min after heparin in Gpihbp1–/– mice. Also, an injection of Intralipid released LPL into the plasma of wild-type mice but was ineffective in releasing LPL in Gpihbp1–/– mice. The observed differences in LPL release cannot be ascribed to different tissue stores of LPL, as LPL mass levels in tissues were similar in Gpihbp1–/– and control mice. The differences in LPL release after intravenous heparin and Intralipid strongly suggest that GPIHBP1 represents an important binding site for LPL in vivo. PMID:18845532

  15. Small reduction of neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex area induces abnormal breathing periods in awake goats.

    PubMed

    Wenninger, J M; Pan, L G; Klum, L; Leekley, T; Bastastic, J; Hodges, M R; Feroah, T; Davis, S; Forster, H V

    2004-11-01

    In awake rats, >80% bilateral reduction of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R)-expressing neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötzC) resulted in hypoventilation and an "ataxic" breathing pattern (Gray PA, Rekling JC, Bocchiaro CM, Feldman JL, Science 286: 1566-1568, 1999). Accordingly, the present study was designed to gain further insight into the role of the pre-BötzC area NK1R-expressing neurons in the control of breathing during physiological conditions. Microtubules were chronically implanted bilaterally into the medulla of adult goats. After recovery from surgery, the neurotoxin saporin conjugated to substance P, specific for NK1R-expressing neurons, was bilaterally injected (50 pM in 10 microl) into the pre-BötzC area during the awake state (n = 8). In unoperated goats, 34 +/- 0.01% of the pre-BötzC area neurons are immunoreactive for the NK1R, but, in goats after bilateral injection of SP-SAP into the pre-BötzC area, NK1R immunoreactivity was reduced to 22.5 +/- 2.5% (29% decrease, P < 0.01). Ten to fourteen days after the injection, the frequency of abnormal breathing periods was sixfold greater than before injection (107.8 +/- 21.8/h, P < 0.001). Fifty-six percent of these periods were breaths of varying duration and volume with an altered respiratory muscle activation pattern, whereas the remaining were rapid, complete breaths with coordinated inspiratory-expiratory cycles. The rate of occurrence and characteristics of abnormal breathing periods were not altered during a CO2 inhalation-induced hyperpnea. Pathological breathing patterns were eliminated during non-rapid eye movement sleep in seven of eight goats, but they frequently occurred on arousal from non-rapid eye movement sleep. We conclude that a moderate reduction in pre-BötzC NK1R-expressing neurons results in state-dependent transient changes in respiratory rhythm and/or eupneic respiratory muscle activation patterns. PMID:15247160

  16. On Expression Patterns and Developmental Origin of Human Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Lior; Chechik, Gal

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical substructures of the human brain have characteristic cell-types, connectivity and local circuitry, which are reflected in area-specific transcriptome signatures, but the principles governing area-specific transcription and their relation to brain development are still being studied. In adult rodents, areal transcriptome patterns agree with the embryonic origin of brain regions, but the processes and genes that preserve an embryonic signature in regional expression profiles were not quantified. Furthermore, it is not clear how embryonic-origin signatures of adult-brain expression interplay with changes in expression patterns during development. Here we first quantify which genes have regional expression-patterns related to the developmental origin of brain regions, using genome-wide mRNA expression from post-mortem adult human brains. We find that almost all human genes (92%) exhibit an expression pattern that agrees with developmental brain-region ontology, but that this agreement changes at multiple phases during development. Agreement is particularly strong in neuron-specific genes, but also in genes that are not spatially correlated with neuron-specific or glia-specific markers. Surprisingly, agreement is also stronger in early-evolved genes. We further find that pairs of similar genes having high agreement to developmental region ontology tend to be more strongly correlated or anti-correlated, and that the strength of spatial correlation changes more strongly in gene pairs with stronger embryonic signatures. These results suggest that transcription regulation of most genes in the adult human brain is spatially tuned in a way that changes through life, but in agreement with development-determined brain regions. PMID:27564987

  17. Inheritance of abnormal expression of SOS-like response in xeroderma pigmentosum and hereditary cancer-prone syndromes.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, P J; Houweling, A; Cornelissen-Steijger, D M; Arwert, F; Menko, F H; Pinedo, H M; Terleth, C; van der Eb, A J

    1996-06-01

    The time course of induction of SOS-like stress responses such as enhanced reactivation (ER) and enhanced mutagenesis (EM) has been investigated in UV-C-irradiated skin fibroblasts from a xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) family, using herpes simplex virus type 1 as a probe. Similar ER studies were performed in a Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) family and in a family with a high incidence of breast, ovarian, and colon cancer. In two XP (complementation group B) patients, with a striking absence of skin tumors even at an age of >40 years, only induction of EM was observed, whereas ER was absent (XPER-). The ER- phenotype was inherited from the father, whereas cells from the mother exhibited normal expression of ER and EM. This suggests that the absence of ER is a hereditary trait that is not correlated with a repair-deficient phenotype. Abnormally high levels of ER were observed in UV-C-exposed skin fibroblasts from rive LFS patients. The inheritance of the ER response was studied in one LFS family. High levels of ER were observed only in cells derived from affected individuals carrying one mutated p53 allele, whereas cells from unaffected family members, carrying two wild-type p53 alleles, exhibited normal ER levels. This result shows that abnormally high levels of ER positively correlate with the occurrence of cancer in affected individuals from a LFS family. Interestingly, abnormally high levels of ER were observed in cells from afflicted as well as from unafflicted members of a family with a high incidence of breast, ovarian, colon, and stomach cancer. This suggests that these latter individuals have inherited a mutated, putative predisposing gene, resulting in abnormal expression of ER, but that cancer had not yet developed. The results indicate that the ER response can possibly be used as a prognostic marker to identify carriers in various hereditary cancer-prone syndromes at an early age. PMID:8653707

  18. Evolving expression patterns of the homeotic gene Scr in insects.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Karla D; Hrycaj, Steven; Mahfooz, Najmus; Popadic, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    While the mRNA expression patterns of homeotic genes have been examined in numerous arthropod species, data on their protein accumulation is extremely limited. To address this gap, we analyzed the protein expression pattern of the hox gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) in six hemimetabolous insects from four divergent orders (Thysanura, Orthoptera, Dictyoptera and Hemiptera). Our comparative analysis reveals that the original domain of SCR expression was likely confined to the head and then subsequently moved into the prothorax (T1) in winged insect lineages. The data also show a trend toward the posteriorization of the anterior boundary of SCR expression in the head, which starts in the mandibles (Thysanura) and then gradually shifts to the maxillary (Orthoptera) and labial segments (Dictyoptera and Hemiptera), respectively. In Thermobia (firebrat) and Oncopeltus (milkweed bug) we also identify instances where SCR protein is not detected in regions where mRNA is expressed. This finding suggests the presence of a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism of Scr in these species. Finally, we show that SCR expression in insect T1 legs is highly variable and exhibits divergent patterning even among related species. In addition, signal in the prothoracic legs of more basal insect lineages cannot be associated with any T1 specific features, indicating that the acquisition of SCR in this region preceded any apparent gain of function. Overall, our results show that Scr expression has diverged considerably among hemimetabolous lineages and establish a framework for subsequent analyses to determine its role in the evolution of the insect head and prothorax. PMID:20336613

  19. Evolving expression patterns of the homeotic gene Scr in insects.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Karla D; Hrycaj, Steven; Mahfooz, Najmus; Popadic, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    While the mRNA expression patterns of homeotic genes have been examined in numerous arthropod species, data on their protein accumulation is extremely limited. To address this gap, we analyzed the protein expression pattern of the hox gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) in six hemimetabolous insects from four divergent orders (Thysanura, Orthoptera, Dictyoptera and Hemiptera). Our comparative analysis reveals that the original domain of SCR expression was likely confined to the head and then subsequently moved into the prothorax (T1) in winged insect lineages. The data also show a trend toward the posteriorization of the anterior boundary of SCR expression in the head, which starts in the mandibles (Thysanura) and then gradually shifts to the maxillary (Orthoptera) and labial segments (Dictyoptera and Hemiptera), respectively. In Thermobia (firebrat) and Oncopeltus (milkweed bug) we also identify instances where SCR protein is not detected in regions where mRNA is expressed. This finding suggests the presence of a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism of Scr in these species. Finally, we show that SCR expression in insect T1 legs is highly variable and exhibits divergent patterning even among related species. In addition, signal in the prothoracic legs of more basal insect lineages cannot be associated with any T1 specific features, indicating that the acquisition of SCR in this region preceded any apparent gain of function. Overall, our results show that Scr expression has diverged considerably among hemimetabolous lineages and establish a framework for subsequent analyses to determine its role in the evolution of the insect head and prothorax.

  20. VESPUCCI: Exploring Patterns of Gene Expression in Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Moretto, Marco; Sonego, Paolo; Pilati, Stefania; Malacarne, Giulia; Costantini, Laura; Grzeskowiak, Lukasz; Bagagli, Giorgia; Grando, Maria Stella; Moser, Claudio; Engelen, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale transcriptional studies aim to decipher the dynamic cellular responses to a stimulus, like different environmental conditions. In the era of high-throughput omics biology, the most used technologies for these purposes are microarray and RNA-Seq, whose data are usually required to be deposited in public repositories upon publication. Such repositories have the enormous potential to provide a comprehensive view of how different experimental conditions lead to expression changes, by comparing gene expression across all possible measured conditions. Unfortunately, this task is greatly impaired by differences among experimental platforms that make direct comparisons difficult. In this paper, we present the Vitis Expression Studies Platform Using COLOMBOS Compendia Instances (VESPUCCI), a gene expression compendium for grapevine which was built by adapting an approach originally developed for bacteria, and show how it can be used to investigate complex gene expression patterns. We integrated nearly all publicly available microarray and RNA-Seq expression data: 1608 gene expression samples from 10 different technological platforms. Each sample has been manually annotated using a controlled vocabulary developed ad hoc to ensure both human readability and computational tractability. Expression data in the compendium can be visually explored using several tools provided by the web interface or can be programmatically accessed using the REST interface. VESPUCCI is freely accessible at http://vespucci.colombos.fmach.it. PMID:27242836

  1. VESPUCCI: Exploring Patterns of Gene Expression in Grapevine.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Marco; Sonego, Paolo; Pilati, Stefania; Malacarne, Giulia; Costantini, Laura; Grzeskowiak, Lukasz; Bagagli, Giorgia; Grando, Maria Stella; Moser, Claudio; Engelen, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale transcriptional studies aim to decipher the dynamic cellular responses to a stimulus, like different environmental conditions. In the era of high-throughput omics biology, the most used technologies for these purposes are microarray and RNA-Seq, whose data are usually required to be deposited in public repositories upon publication. Such repositories have the enormous potential to provide a comprehensive view of how different experimental conditions lead to expression changes, by comparing gene expression across all possible measured conditions. Unfortunately, this task is greatly impaired by differences among experimental platforms that make direct comparisons difficult. In this paper, we present the Vitis Expression Studies Platform Using COLOMBOS Compendia Instances (VESPUCCI), a gene expression compendium for grapevine which was built by adapting an approach originally developed for bacteria, and show how it can be used to investigate complex gene expression patterns. We integrated nearly all publicly available microarray and RNA-Seq expression data: 1608 gene expression samples from 10 different technological platforms. Each sample has been manually annotated using a controlled vocabulary developed ad hoc to ensure both human readability and computational tractability. Expression data in the compendium can be visually explored using several tools provided by the web interface or can be programmatically accessed using the REST interface. VESPUCCI is freely accessible at http://vespucci.colombos.fmach.it.

  2. MiRNA expression patterns predict survival in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to define new prognostic subgroups in patients with glioblastoma a miRNA screen (> 1000 miRNAs) from paraffin tissues followed by a bio-mathematical analysis was performed. Methods 35 glioblastoma patients treated between 7/2005 - 8/2008 at a single institution with surgery and postoperative radio(chemo)therapy were included in this retrospective analysis. For microarray analysis the febit biochip "Geniom® Biochip MPEA homo-sapiens" was used. Total RNA was isolated from FFPE tissue sections and 1100 different miRNAs were analyzed. Results It was possible to define a distinct miRNA expression pattern allowing for a separation of distinct prognostic subgroups. The defined miRNA pattern was significantly associated with early death versus long-term survival (split at 450 days) (p = 0.01). The pattern and the prognostic power were both independent of the MGMT status. Conclusions At present, this is the first dataset defining a prognostic role of miRNA expression patterns in patients with glioblastoma. Having defined such a pattern, a prospective validation of this observation is required. PMID:22074483

  3. Insulin over expression induces heart abnormalities via reactive oxygen species regulation, might be step towards cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, S; Ali, T; Gul, M; Javed, Q; Emanueli, C; Murtaza, I

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is known to regulate blood—glucose level and promote its utilization as an energy source in cardiac tissues under normal physiological conditions as well as stimulates signaling pathways that involved cell growth and proliferation. Although recently insulin generated free radicals via NAD(P)H has been documented but the molecular mechanism is still under investigation. The aim of present study is to elucidate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent possible role of insulin in cardiac abnormalities, including hypertrophy by regulation of antioxidants enzyme (SOD) activity. In the current study, 60 cardiac patients and 50 healthy individuals as well as the rat model with insulin administration were under investigation. Oxidant, anti—oxidant biochemical assays, hypertrophic marker expression via immunobloting and histopathology were performed. We observed statistically significant elevation of the reactive oxygen species level in the serum of patients as well as in the insulin administrated rat model, a mild expression of cardiac marker in experimental models along with abnormal histopathology of hearts. However, super oxide dismutase free radical scavenger activity was down regulated upon insulin treatment compared to control rats. Conclusively, the present study showed that over expression of insulin might stimulate cardiac hypertrophic signal via up regulation of free radicals and down regulation of antioxidants enzymes including SOD activity.

  4. Comparison of melanoblast expression patterns identifies distinct classes of genes

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Stacie K.; Baxter, Laura L.; Buac, Kristina; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Larson, Denise M.; Pavan, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A full understanding of transcriptional regulation requires integration of information obtained from multiple experimental datasets. These include datasets annotating gene expression within the context of an entire organism under normal and genetically perturbed conditions. Here we describe an expression dataset annotating pigment cell-expressed genes of the developing melanocyte and RPE lineages. Expression images are annotated and available at http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/manuscripts/Loftus/March2009/. Data is also summarized in a standardized manner using a universal melanoblast scoring scale that accounts for the embryonic location of cells and regional cell density. This approach allowed us to classify 14 pigment genes into 4 groupings classified by cell lineage expression, temporal-spatial context, and differential alteration in response to altered MITF and SOX10 status. Significant differences in regional populations were also observed across inbred strain backgrounds highlighting the value of this approach to identify modifier allele influences on melanoblast number and distributions. This analysis revealed novel features of in vivo expression patterns that are not measurable by in vitro-based assays, providing data that in combination with genomic analyses will allow modeling of pigment cell gene expression in development and disease. PMID:19493314

  5. Abnormal albumin gene expression is associated with weight loss in immunodeficient/DNA-repair-impaired wasted mice.

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.; Weaver, P.; Mobarhan, S.; Woloschak, G.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Loyola Univ.; Loyola Univ.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wst express a disease syndrome of immunodeficiency, neurologic dysfunction, increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, and dramatic weight loss that begins at 21 days of age and progresses until death at 28-32 days of age. Because of the reported association between abnormal liver status and weight loss, we designed experiments to examine expression of a variety of liver-specific genes in wst/wst mice relative to littermates (wst/.) and parental strain (BCF1) controls. METHOD: Animals were individually weighed from ages 21-28 days to determine relative weight comparisons between wst/wst mice and controls. Dot blot hybridizations were set up to quantitate the accumulation of transcripts specific for alpha-fetoprotein, albumin and other liver-specific gene products. RESULTS: These results showed a 67% reduction in albumin mRNA expression in livers derived from wst/wst mice relative to both controls. Expression of alpha-fetoprotein, as well as a variety of other liver-specific genes [secretory component (SC), metallothionein (MT-2), cytochrome P1-450 (Cyt P1-450), transferrin receptor (Tf Rec), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and immune-associated antigen (Ia)], was unaffected. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest a relationship between low albumin expression and wasting syndromes in mice. In addition, our data suggest that the wasted mouse may serve as a unique model for subnormal albumin expression.

  6. Proteomic profiling reveals a severely perturbed protein expression pattern in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Kathleen; Gannon, Joan; Doran, Philip; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2007-08-01

    Extended longevity is often accompanied by frailty and increased susceptibility to a variety of crippling disorders. One of the most striking features of human aging is sarcopenia, which is defined as the age-related decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength. Although various metabolic and functional defects in aging muscle fibres have been described over the last decade, it is not known whether a pathophysiological hierarchy exists within degenerative pathways leading to muscle wasting. Hence, in order to identify novel biomarkers of age-dependent skeletal muscle degeneration, we have here applied mass spectrometry-based proteomics for studying global muscle protein expression patterns. As a model system of sarcopenia, we have employed crude extracts from senescent rat gastrocnemius muscle, as compared to young adult tissue preparations. Using the highly sensitive protein dye Deep Purple for the analysis of the 2-D separated muscle proteome and peptide mass fingerprinting for the identification of individual protein spots, a differential expression pattern was observed for contractile proteins, metabolic factors, regulatory components and heat shock elements. A drastic increase was shown for alpha B-crystallin, myosin light chain MLC-1, phosphoglycerate kinase, adenylate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase, albumin, aconitase and nucleoside-diphosphate kinase in aged fibres. In contrast, the expression of pyruvate kinase, aldolase, creatine kinase, transferrin, alpha-tropomyosin and myosin light chain MLC-3 was decreased in old skeletal muscle. Comparative 2-D immunoblotting of selected candidate proteins has confirmed the effect of aging on the skeletal muscle proteome. These findings demonstrate a severely perturbed protein expression pattern in aged skeletal muscle, which reflects the underlying molecular alterations causing a drastic decline of muscle strength in the senescent organism. In the long-term, the systematic deduction of abnormal protein expression

  7. Abnormal miR-148b expression promotes aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Serino, Grazia; Sallustio, Fabio; Cox, Sharon N; Pesce, Francesco; Schena, Francesco P

    2012-05-01

    Aberrant O-glycosylation in the hinge region of IgA1 characterizes IgA nephropathy. The mechanisms underlying this abnormal glycosylation are not well understood, but reduced expression of the enzyme core 1, β1,3-galactosyltransferase 1 (C1GALT1) may contribute. In this study, high-throughput microRNA (miRNA) profiling identified 37 miRNAs differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with IgA nephropathy compared with healthy persons. Among them, we observed upregulation of miR-148b, which potentially targets C1GALT1. Patients with IgA nephropathy exhibited lower C1GALT1 expression, which negatively correlated with miR-148b expression. Transfection of PBMCs from healthy persons with a miR-148b mimic reduced endogenous C1GALT1 mRNA levels threefold. Conversely, loss of miR-148b function in PBMCs of patients with IgA nephropathy increased C1GALT1 mRNA and protein levels to those observed in healthy persons. Moreover, we found that upregulation of miR-148b directly correlated with levels of galactose-deficient IgA1. In vitro, we used an IgA1-producing cell line to confirm that miR-148b modulates IgA1 O-glycosylation and the levels of secreted galactose-deficient IgA1. Taken together, these data suggest a role for miRNAs in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. Abnormal expression of miR-148b may explain the aberrant glycosylation of IgA1, providing a potential pharmacologic target for IgA nephropathy.

  8. G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor (GPER) Expression in Normal and Abnormal Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Lessey, Bruce A.; Taylor, Robert N.; Wang, Wei; Bagchi, Milan K.; Yuan, Lingwen; Scotchie, Jessica; Fritz, Marc A.; Young, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid estrogen effects are mediated by membrane receptors, and evidence suggests a role for both a membrane-associated form of estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1; ERα) and G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPER; GPR30). Considering estrogen’s importance in endometrial physiology and endometriosis pathophysiology, we hypothesized that GPER could be involved in both cyclic changes in endometrial estrogen action and that aberrant expression might be seen in the eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis. Using real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analysis of normal endometrium, endometrial samples demonstrated cycle-regulated expression of GPER, with maximal expression in the proliferative phase. Eutopic and ectopic endometrium from women with endometriosis overexpressed GPER as compared to eutopic endometrium of normal participants. Ishikawa cells, an adenocarcinoma cell line, expressed GPER, with increased expression upon treatment with estrogen or an ESR1 agonist, but not with a GPER-specific agonist. Decreased expression was seen in Ishikawa cells stably transfected with progesterone receptor A. Together, these data suggest that normal endometrial GPER expression is cyclic and regulated by nuclear estrogen and progesterone receptors, while expression is dysregulated in endometriosis. PMID:22378861

  9. Expression patterns of chemokine receptors on circulating T cells from myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Sand, Kristoffer Evebø; Rye, Kristin Paulsen; Mannsåker, Bård; Bruserud, Oystein; Kittang, Astrid Olsnes

    2013-02-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are involved in the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. Recently, chemokine expression signatures have been reported to convey a prognostic value in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients. In the present study, we investigated the chemokine receptor repertoire on fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes from 31 (22 low-risk and 9 high-risk) patients affected by MDS. Chemokine receptor expression was studied in defined T-cell subsets using eight-color flow cytometry. MDS patients exhibited quantitative differences in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations. In addition, T cells obtained from MDS patients expressed a chemokine receptor pattern suggesting a dominance of mature and activated T cells. This is illustrated by increased levels of CCR3, CCR5, CX3CR1 and/or by a decreased abundance of CCR7 in defined T-cell subsets. The T-cell subset distribution appears to differ between the peripheral blood and the bone marrow of MDS patients, suggesting a preferential recruitment of specific T-cell subsets to the latter compartment. Alteration in chemokine receptor expression can develop over time even in patients that are considered clinically stable. Elevated expression levels of CXCR4 by CD8(+) cells were associated with prolonged patient survival and reduced numbers of bone marrow blasts. We conclude that immunological abnormalities in MDS also involve chemokine receptors on different subsets of T cells, and that these changes may have a prognostic value.

  10. Abnormal expression levels of sMICA and NKG2D are correlated with poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiong; Xu, Hong; Zhu, Xing-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Soluble major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A molecules (sMICA) and natural-killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) not only correlate with tumorigenesis and progression, but also with tumor invasion and metastasis. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the correlation and prognostic significance of the differential expression of sMICA and NKG2D in pancreatic carcinoma and paracarcinoma tissues from 70 patients with pancreatic carcinomas. The results showed that sMICA expression was significantly (P<0.05) higher in tumor tissues (67.1%) than that in adjacent nontumor tissues (31.4%), whereas NKG2D expression was significantly (P<0.001) lower in tumor tissues (32.9%) than that in adjacent nontumor tissues (60.0%). Spearman’s rank correlation test showed a negative correlation between the expression of sMICA and that of NKG2D (r=−0.676, P<0.001). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that a high sMICA expression was significantly correlated with decreased disease-free survival (DFS) (P<0.001) and overall survival (OS) (P<0.001), while a high NKG2D expression was significantly associated with increased DFS (P=0.001) and OS (P=0.001) of the patients. Multivariate analysis showed that a high sMICA expression was an independent predictive factor for poor DFS (P<0.001) and OS (P=0.012); but low NKG2D expression was not an independent prognostic factor for poor DFS (P=0.238) and OS (P=0.574). In conclusion, our findings suggest that the expression levels of sMICA and NKG2D are abnormal and negatively correlated with one another in pancreatic carcinoma tissues; they may be considered as valuable biomarkers for the prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:26730197

  11. Acoustic patterns of infant vocalizations expressing emotions and communicative functions.

    PubMed

    Papaeliou, C; Minadakis, G; Cavouras, D

    2002-04-01

    The present study aimed at identifying the acoustic pattern of vocalizations, produced by 7- to 11-month-old infants, that were interpreted by their mothers as expressing emotions or communicative functions. Participants were 6 healthy, first-born English infants, 3 boys and 3 girls, and their mothers. The acoustic analysis of the vocalizations was performed using a pattern recognition (PR) software system. A PR system not only calculates signal features, it also automatically detects patterns in the arrangement of such features. The following results were obtained: (a) the PR system distinguished vocalizations interpreted as emotions from vocalizations interpreted as communicative functions with an overall accuracy of 87.34%; (b) the classification accuracy of the PR system for vocalizations that convey emotions was 85.4% and for vocalizations that convey communicative functions was 89.5%; and (c) compared to vocalizations that express emotions, vocalizations that express communicative functions were shorter, displayed lower fundamental frequency values, and had greater overall intensity. These findings suggest that in the second half of the first year, infants possess a vocal repertoire that contributes to regulating cooperative interaction with their mothers, which is considered one of the major prerequisites for language acquisition.

  12. Configurable pattern-based evolutionary biclustering of gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biclustering algorithms for microarray data aim at discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. Due to the problem complexity and the characteristics of microarray datasets, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Also, the comparison among different techniques is still a challenge. The obtained results vary in relevant features such as the number of genes or conditions, which makes it difficult to carry out a fair comparison. Moreover, existing approaches do not allow the user to specify any preferences on these properties. Results Here, we present the first biclustering algorithm in which it is possible to particularize several biclusters features in terms of different objectives. This can be done by tuning the specified features in the algorithm or also by incorporating new objectives into the search. Furthermore, our approach bases the bicluster evaluation in the use of expression patterns, being able to recognize both shifting and scaling patterns either simultaneously or not. Evolutionary computation has been chosen as the search strategy, naming thus our proposal Evo-Bexpa (Evolutionary Biclustering based in Expression Patterns). Conclusions We have conducted experiments on both synthetic and real datasets demonstrating Evo-Bexpa abilities to obtain meaningful biclusters. Synthetic experiments have been designed in order to compare Evo-Bexpa performance with other approaches when looking for perfect patterns. Experiments with four different real datasets also confirm the proper performing of our algorithm, whose results have been biologically validated through Gene Ontology. PMID:23433178

  13. Duplicate gene enrichment and expression pattern diversification in multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Padawer, Timothy; Leighty, Ralph E.; Wang, Degeng

    2012-01-01

    The enrichment of duplicate genes, and therefore paralogs (proteins coded by duplicate genes), in multicellular versus unicellular organisms enhances genomic functional innovation. This study quantitatively examined relationships among paralog enrichment, expression pattern diversification and multicellularity, aiming to better understand genomic basis of multicellularity. Paralog abundance in specific cells was compared with those in unicellular proteomes and the whole proteomes of multicellular organisms. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, for which the gene sets expressed in specific cells are available, were used as uni and multicellular models, respectively. Paralog count (K) distributions [P(k)] follow a power-law relationship [P(k) ∝ k−α] in the whole proteomes of both species and in specific C. elegans cells. The value of the constant α can be used as a gauge of paralog abundance; the higher the value, the lower the paralog abundance. The α-value is indeed lower in the whole proteome of C. elegans (1.74) than in S. cerevisiae (2.34), quantifying the enrichment of paralogs in multicellular species. We also found that the power-law relationship applies to the proteomes of specific C. elegans cells. Strikingly, values of α in specific cells are higher and comparable to that in S. cerevisiae. Thus, paralog abundance in specific cells is lower and comparable to that in unicellular species. Furthermore, how much the expression level of a gene fluctuates across different C. elegans cells correlates positively with its paralog count, which is further confirmed by human gene-expression patterns across different tissues. Taken together, these results quantitatively and mechanistically establish enrichment of paralogs with diversifying expression patterns as genomic and evolutionary basis of multicellularity. PMID:22645319

  14. Expression Patterns of Cancer-Testis Antigens in Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Their Cell Derivatives Indicate Lineage Tracks

    PubMed Central

    Lifantseva, Nadya; Koltsova, Anna; Krylova, Tatyana; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Poljanskaya, Galina; Gordeeva, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into various lineages but undergo genetic and epigenetic changes during long-term cultivation and, therefore, require regular monitoring. The expression patterns of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) MAGE-A2, -A3, -A4, -A6, -A8, -B2, and GAGE were examined in undifferentiated human embryonic stem (hES) cells, their differentiated derivatives, teratocarcinoma (hEC) cells, and cancer cell lines of neuroectodermal and mesodermal origin. Undifferentiated hES cells and embryoid body cells expressed MAGE-A3, -A6, -A4, -A8, and GAGEs while later differentiated derivatives expressed only MAGE-A8 or MAGE-A4. Likewise, mouse pluripotent stem cells also express CTAs of Magea but not Mageb family. Despite similarity of the hES and hEC cell expression patterns, MAGE-A2 and MAGE-B2 were detected only in hEC cells but not in hES cells. Moreover, our analysis has shown that CTAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer cell lines and display low tissue specificity. The identification of CTA expression patterns in pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives may be useful for isolation of abnormally CTA-expressing cells to improve the safety of stem-cell based therapy. PMID:21785609

  15. Variable patterns of expression of luciferase in transgenic tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    Barnes, W M

    1990-12-01

    A carboxyl-terminally modified firefly luciferase, encoded as a gene fusion to the neomycin phosphotransferase gene (which confers kanamycin resistance), was found to be enzymatically active for both enzymes when expressed in bacteria and in transgenic plants. A military-type starlight vision system was used to conveniently analyze the pattern of gene expression in transgenic tobacco plant leaves. Transgenic tobacco plants which expressed luciferase uniformly in all areas of the leaf, and assays for luciferin, demonstrated that luciferin rapidly penetrates all regions of a tobacco leaf in at least two dimensions. Depending on the test gene structure or, presumably, on the transferred DNA (T-DNA) insertional context, other transgenic plants were obtained that expressed luciferase with a wide range of nonuniform patterns from nominally the same cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. For instance, the veins can be dark, while only the interveinal regions of the leaf lamina glow, or only the small capillary veins glow, or only the major veins glow. Local and/or systemic induction in response to wounding was also demonstrated. PMID:2251262

  16. Simultaneous Detection of Both GDNF and GFRα1 Expression Patterns in the Mouse Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Ortega-de San Luis, Clara; Pascual, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is proposed as a therapeutic tool in Parkinson's disease, addiction-related disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions affecting motor neurons (MNs). Despite the high amount of work about GDNF therapeutic application, the neuronal circuits requiring GDNF trophic support in the brain and spinal cord (SC) are poorly characterized. Here, we defined GDNF and GDNF family receptor-α 1 (GFRα1) expression pattern in the brain and SC of newborn and adult mice. We performed systematic and simultaneous detection of EGFP and LacZ expressing alleles in reporter mice and asked whether modifications of this signaling pathway lead to a significant central nervous system (CNS) alteration. GFRα1 was predominantly expressed by neurons but also by an unexpected population of non-neuronal cells. GFRα1 expression pattern was wider in neonatal than in adult CNS and GDNF expression was restricted in comparison with GFRα1 at both developmental time points. The use of confocal microscopy to imaging X-gal deposits and EGFP allowed us to identify regions containing cells that expressed both proteins and to discriminate between auto and non-autotrophic signaling. We also suggested long-range GDNF-GFRα1 circuits taking advantage of the ability of the EGFP genetically encoded reporter to label long distance projecting axons. The complete elimination of either the ligand or the receptor during development did not produce major abnormalities, suggesting a preponderant role for GDNF signaling during adulthood. In the SC, our results pointed to local modulatory interneurons as the main target of GDNF produced by Clarke's column (CC) cells. Our work increases the understanding on how GDNF signals in the CNS and establish a crucial framework for posterior studies addressing either the biological role of GDNF or the optimization of trophic factor-based therapies. PMID:27445711

  17. Simultaneous Detection of Both GDNF and GFRα1 Expression Patterns in the Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-de San Luis, Clara; Pascual, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is proposed as a therapeutic tool in Parkinson’s disease, addiction-related disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions affecting motor neurons (MNs). Despite the high amount of work about GDNF therapeutic application, the neuronal circuits requiring GDNF trophic support in the brain and spinal cord (SC) are poorly characterized. Here, we defined GDNF and GDNF family receptor-α 1 (GFRα1) expression pattern in the brain and SC of newborn and adult mice. We performed systematic and simultaneous detection of EGFP and LacZ expressing alleles in reporter mice and asked whether modifications of this signaling pathway lead to a significant central nervous system (CNS) alteration. GFRα1 was predominantly expressed by neurons but also by an unexpected population of non-neuronal cells. GFRα1 expression pattern was wider in neonatal than in adult CNS and GDNF expression was restricted in comparison with GFRα1 at both developmental time points. The use of confocal microscopy to imaging X-gal deposits and EGFP allowed us to identify regions containing cells that expressed both proteins and to discriminate between auto and non-autotrophic signaling. We also suggested long-range GDNF-GFRα1 circuits taking advantage of the ability of the EGFP genetically encoded reporter to label long distance projecting axons. The complete elimination of either the ligand or the receptor during development did not produce major abnormalities, suggesting a preponderant role for GDNF signaling during adulthood. In the SC, our results pointed to local modulatory interneurons as the main target of GDNF produced by Clarke’s column (CC) cells. Our work increases the understanding on how GDNF signals in the CNS and establish a crucial framework for posterior studies addressing either the biological role of GDNF or the optimization of trophic factor-based therapies. PMID:27445711

  18. Expression Pattern of Axin2 During Chicken Development

    PubMed Central

    Eckei, Gesa; Böing, Marion; Brand-Saberi, Beate; Morosan-Puopolo, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt-signalling is well understood and has been extensively described in many developmental processes. The regulation of this signalling pathway is of outstanding relevance for proper development of the vertebrate and invertebrate embryo. Axin2 provides a negative-feedback-loop in the canonical Wnt-pathway, being a target gene and a negative regulator. Here we provide a detailed analysis of the expression pattern in the development of the chicken embryo. By performing in-situ hybridization on chicken embryos from stage HH 04+ to HH 32 we detected a temporally and spatially restricted dynamic expression of Axin2. In particular, data about the expression of Axin2 mRNA in early embryogenesis, somites, neural tube, limbs, kidney and eyes was obtained. PMID:27680024

  19. Gene expression patterns in glucose-stimulated podocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seung Hyeok; Yang, Sanghwa; Jung, Dong Sub; Li, Jin Ji; Kim, Jin Ju; Kwak, Seung Jae; Kim, Dong Ki; Moon, Sung Jin; Lee, Jung Eun; Han, Dae-Suk; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2008-06-06

    To explore the mechanisms of podocyte injury under diabetic conditions, we performed an expression profile in glucose-stimulated podocytes. Differential gene expression profiles between conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes cultured in medium containing 5.6 and 30 mM glucose were measured with oligonucleotide microarrays. Of the genes identified, heme oxygenase-1, vascular endothelial growth factor-A, and thrombospondin-1 showed a consistently increased pattern, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 and peroxisomal proliferator activator receptor-{gamma} were down-regulated. These results were validated using real-time PCR and western blotting in podocytes, and with immunohistochemistry on renal tissues from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Not only is this the first report of gene expression profiling of podocyte injury under diabetic conditions, but the identified genes are promising targets for future diabetes research.

  20. Abnormal expression of calcyphosine is associated with poor prognosis and cell biology function in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Weiwei; Wang, Quhui; Wang, Feiran; Jiang, Yasu; Xu, Meirong; Xu, Junfei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the calcyphosine (CAPS) expression in human colorectal cancer (CRC) and to explore its clinical and prognostic significances. CAPS expression was measured by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, and immunohistochemistry. The relationships between the CAPS expression levels and the clinicopathological factors were investigated. The Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test were used to investigate the overall survival of the patients. Moreover, the effects of CAPS on biological roles of CRC cells were also evaluated by MTT assay, colony formation assay, and transwell assay. CAPS was significantly overexpressed in cancerous tissue and CRC cell lines compared with adjacent nontumor tissue and a normal human intestinal epithelial cell line. Overexpression of CAPS was significantly associated with histological grade (P=0.004), invasive depth (P<0.001), lymph node metastasis (P=0.003), tumor node metastasis stage (P=0.017), and distant metastasis (P=0.042). Furthermore, silencing of CAPS expression in CRC cells inhibited their proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that high CAPS expression might demonstrate poor prognosis in CRC patients. Cox regression analysis revealed that CAPS expression was an independent prognostic factor of CRC. Our data suggested that the upregulation of CAPS might play a role in the carcinogenesis and progression of CRC. CAPS could be used as a potential diagnostic factor and be an independent good prognostic indicator for CRC patients. PMID:26889086

  1. Expression of Genes Involved in Drosophila Wing Morphogenesis and Vein Patterning Are Altered by Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.; Hosamani, Ravikumar; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Imaginal wing discs of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) defined during embryogenesis ultimately result in mature wings of stereotyped (specific) venation patterning. Major regulators of wing disc development are the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF), Notch, Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wg), and Dpp signaling pathways. Highly stereotyped vascular patterning is also characteristic of tissues in other organisms flown in space such as the mouse retina and leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic and other adaptations of vascular patterning to space environmental factors have not yet been systematically quantified, despite widespread recognition of their critical importance for terrestrial and microgravity applications. Here we report changes in gene expression with space flight related to Drosophila wing morphogenesis and vein patterning. In addition, genetically modified phenotypes of increasingly abnormal ectopic wing venation in the Drosophila wing1 were analyzed by NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software2. Our goal is to further develop insightful vascular mappings associated with bioinformatic dimensions of genetic or other molecular phenotypes for correlation with genetic and other molecular profiling relevant to NASA's GeneLab and other Space Biology exploration initiatives.

  2. Expression pattern of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Yavropoulou, Maria P; Maladaki, Anna; Topouridou, Konstantina; Kotoula, Vasiliki; Poulios, Chris; Daskalaki, Emily; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Karkavelas, George; Yovos, John G

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of Wnt and Notch signaling in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas, but data are scarce regarding the role of Hedgehog signaling. In this study we investigated the differential expression of gene targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens from adult patients who underwent transphenoidal resection and normal human pituitary tissues that were obtained from autopsies were used. Clinical information and data from pre-operative MRI scan (extracellular tumor extension, tumor size, displacement of the optic chiasm) were retrieved from the Hospital's database. We used a customized RT(2) Profiler PCR Array, to investigate the expression of genes related to Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways (PTCH1, PTCH2, GLI1, GLI3, NOTCH3, JAG1, HES1, and HIP). A total of 52 pituitary adenomas (32 non-functioning adenomas, 15 somatotropinomas and 5 prolactinomas) were used in the final analysis. In non-functioning pituitary adenomas there was a significant decrease (approximately 75%) in expression of all Hedgehog related genes that were tested, while Notch3 and Jagged-1 expression was found significantly increased, compared with normal pituitary tissue controls. In contrast, somatotropinomas demonstrated a significant increase in expression of all Hedgehog related genes and a decrease in the expression of Notch3 and Jagged-1. There was no significant difference in the expression of Hedgehog and Notch related genes between prolactinomas and healthy pituitary tissues. Hedgehog signalling appears to be activated in somatotropinomas but not in non-functioning pituitary adenomas in contrast to the expression pattern of Notch signalling pathway. PMID:26620835

  3. Patterns of white matter diffusivity abnormalities in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: a tract-based spatial statistics study.

    PubMed

    Milesi, Jacopo; Rocca, Maria A; Bianchi-Marzoli, Stefania; Petrolini, Melissa; Pagani, Elisabetta; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2012-09-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease characterized by retinal ganglion cell degeneration and optic nerve atrophy, leading to a loss of central vision. The aim of this study was to explore the topographical pattern of damage to the brain white matter (WM) tracts from patients with chronic LHON using diffusion tensor (DT) MRI and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Brain dual-echo and DT MRI scans were acquired from 13 patients with chronic LHON and 25 matched controls using a 3.0 T scanner. TBSS analysis was performed using the FMRIB's Diffusion Toolbox. A complete neuro-ophthalmologic examination, including standardized automated Humphrey perimetry as well as average and temporal peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (PRNFL) measurements, was obtained in all patients. Mean average and temporal PRNFL thicknesses were decreased significantly in LHON patients. Compared to controls, TBSS analysis revealed significant diffusivity abnormalities in these patients, which were characterized by a decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and an increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity, affecting exclusively the optic tracts and optic radiations (OR). In patients, a significant correlation was found between optic tract average FA and mean visual acuity (r = 0.57, p = 0.04). In LHON patients, DT MRI reveals a microstructural alteration of the WM along the entire visual pathways, with a sparing of the other main WM tracts of the brain. Damage to the OR may be secondary either to trans-synaptic degeneration, which in turn is due to neuroaxonal loss in the retina and optic nerve, or to local mitochondrial dysfunction.

  4. Dietary intake, food pattern, and abnormal blood glucose status of middle-aged adults: a cross-sectional community-based study in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Hlaing, Hlaing Hlaing; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan

    2016-01-01

    Background Lifestyle changes, particularly dietary intake, had resulted in increasing trends of type-2 diabetes mellitus worldwide. However, dietary intake is diverse across country contexts. This study aimed to compare the dietary intake, food patterns, and blood glucose among middle-aged adults living in urban and suburban areas in Mandalay city, Myanmar, and explore their relationships. Methods A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted during June–November 2014. Adults aged 35–64 were randomly selected and requested to record all food they ate in a 4-day diary. Fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose values were measured over two consecutive days. Dietary intakes were calculated in terms of energy, macronutrients, glycemic index, and glycemic load, and food patterns were identified by factor analysis. The relationships between food pattern, dietary intake, and blood glucose were assessed. Results Of 440 participants, dietary intake between urban and suburban residents was significantly different. Six food patterns were identified. There was no difference in fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose between urban and suburban residents, but a strong correlation between fasting blood glucose and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose was found (correlation coefficient=0.8). Identification of abnormal blood glucose status using original fasting and converted 2-hour postprandial values showed substantial agreement (prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted Kappa=0.8). Relationships between food patterns and blood glucose or abnormal blood glucose status were not found. Conclusion Food patterns were associated with dietary intake, not with abnormal blood glucose status. Two-hour postprandial blood glucose was highly correlated with fasting blood glucose and may be used for identifying abnormal blood glucose status. PMID:27150795

  5. Abnormal bone mineral density and bone turnover marker expression profiles in patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lixin; Hou, Shengcai; Hu, Bin; Zhao, Liqiang; Miao, Jinbai; Wang, Yang; Li, Tong; Zhang, Zhenkui; You, Bin; Pang, Baosen; Liang, Yufang; Zhao, Yi; Hao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background To examine the bone mineral density (BMD) and the role of bone biomarkers, including bone formation marker procollagen type I aminoterminal propeptide (PINP) and N-terminal midmolecule fragment osteocalcin (N-MID), bone resorption marker b-C-telopeptides of type I collagen (b-CTX) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b) in the pathogenesis of PSP. Methods Eighty-three consecutive primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) patients (PSP group) and 87 healthy individuals (control group) were enrolled in this study. General data, including gender, age, height, weight, and body mass index (BMI), were recorded. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA), and ELISA were used to evaluate bone mineral density and expression levels of bone metabolism markers, including PINP, b-CTX, TRACP5b, N-MID, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH VD). Results Mean height was significantly greater in the PSP group compared with the control group, whereas weight and BMI were lower. Patients in the PSP group had significantly lower average bone mineral density, which mainly manifested as osteopenia (11/12, 91.7%); however, only one patient (8.3%) developed osteoporosis. Serum overexpression of PINP, b-CTX, TRACP5b, and N-MID were found in PSP patients. Expression of 25-OH VD was low in PSP patients. Bone resorption markers showed positive linear relationships with bone formation markers in all participants; whereas only TRACP5b expression negatively correlated with 25-OH VD. Expression levels of all bone turnover markers negatively correlated with BMI. Regression analysis identified risk factors of PSP as age, height, weight, and TRACP5b and 25-OH VD expression levels; whereas gender and PINP, b-CTX, and N-MID expression levels were not significantly associated with the onset of PSP. Conclusions It had lower bone mineral density in PSP patients. Bone formation marker PINP, N-MID and bone resorption marker b-CTX, TRACP5b were upregulated in

  6. Analysis of the pattern of expression of the Fanconi anemia group C (Facc) gene during murine development

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnoshtein, F.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a variety of congenital and skeletal malformations, progressive pancytopanenia and predisposition to malignancies. FA cells display chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Both the human and the corresponding murine cDNAs have been cloned in our lab. Here we describe the expression of Facc during mouse development, using mRNA in situ hybridization. Our aim is to obtain clues on the possible function of the Facc gene product during development that may help elucidate basic defect(s) in FA. In addition, knowledge of the exact pattern of Facc expression will assist in interpreting the phenotypes of mutant mice, currently being developed. In embryos the gene is diffusely expressed over the entire embryo, with higher hybridization levels in the mesenchyme and in both upper and lower extremities. Specific expression of Facc is seen in the perichondrium and marrow of long bones of hind limbs/hip; long bones of front limbs/shoulder region; developing digits of front and hind paws; and ribs. The signal is also detected in the following regions: cranial/frontal; facial/periorbital and maxillary/mandibular, hair follicles, diaphragm and lung. In addition, generalized Facc expression is seen during these embryonic stages. The pattern of Facc expression is consistent with the known skeletal abnormalities in FA patients, which include radial ray deformities, metacarpal hypoplasia, and abnormalities of lower limbs, ribs, head and face. The signal in the lung is consistent with the lung lobe absence and abnormal pulmonary drainage that have been detected in some FA patients. The sloped forehead and microcephaly in FA patients may have some association with the signal seen in the frontal region of the mouse cranium. Taken together, our results suggest that Facc is directly involved in the development of various embryonic tissues, particularly bone.

  7. Function and expression pattern of nonsyndromic deafness genes

    PubMed Central

    Hilgert, Nele; Smith, Richard J.H.; Van Camp, Guy

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder, present in 1 of every 500 newborns. To date, 46 genes have been identified that cause nonsyndromic hearing loss, making it an extremely heterogeneous trait. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the inner ear function and expression pattern of these genes. In general, they are involved in hair bundle morphogenesis, form constituents of the extracellular matrix, play a role in cochlear ion homeostasis or serve as transcription factors. During the past few years, our knowledge of genes involved in hair bundle morphogenesis has increased substantially. We give an up-to-date overview of both the nonsyndromic and Usher syndrome genes involved in this process, highlighting proteins that interact to form macromolecular complexes. For every gene, we also summarize its expression pattern and impact on hearing at the functional level. Gene-specific cochlear expression is summarized in a unique table by structure/cell type and is illustrated on a cochlear cross-section, which is available online via the Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage. This review should provide auditory scientists the most relevant information for all identified nonsyndromic deafness genes. PMID:19601806

  8. Abnormal Amygdala and Prefrontal Cortex Activation to Facial Expressions in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Amy S.; Reiss, Allan L.; Howe, Meghan E.; Kelley, Ryan G.; Singh, Manpreet K.; Adleman, Nancy E.; Karchemskiy, Asya; Chang, Kiki D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in pediatric bipolar disorder (BD) have reported greater amygdala and less dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation to facial expressions compared to healthy controls. The current study investigates whether these differences are associated with the early or late…

  9. Expansion of cytokine-producing CD4-CD8- T cells associated with abnormal Fas expression and hypereosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of sustained overproduction of eosinophils in the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected individuals are largely unknown. We hypothesized that T cells may release soluble products that regulate eosinophilia in these patients, as has been previously shown in bronchial asthma. We identified one patient with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and one HIV-1-infected individual with associated hypereosinophilia who demonstrated high numbers of CD4-CD8- T cells in peripheral blood. CD4-CD8- T cells from both patients, although highly activated, did not express functional Fas receptors. In one case, the lack of functional Fas receptors was associated with failure of Fas mRNA and protein expression, and in another, expression of a soluble form of the Fas molecule that may have antagonized normal signaling of Fas ligand. In contrast to the recently described lymphoproliferative/autoimmune syndrome, which is characterized by accumulation of CD4-CD8- T cells and mutations within the Fas gene, this study suggests somatic variations in Fas expression and function quite late in life. Both genetic and somatic abnormalities in regulation of the Fas gene are therefore associated with failures to undergo T cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the expanded population of CD4- CD8- T cells from both patients elaborated cytokines with antiapoptotic properties for eosinophils, indicating a major role of these T cells in the development of eosinophilia. Thus, this study demonstrates a sequential dysregulation of apoptosis in different cell types. PMID:8642249

  10. Inducible Expression of Runx2 Results in Multiorgan Abnormalities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Nan; Xiao, Zhousheng; Yin, Tong; Stubbs, Jason; Li, Linheng; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Runx2 is a transcription factor controlling skeletal development, and is also expressed in extraskeletal tissues where its function is not well understood. Existing Runx2 mutant and transgenic mouse models do not allow the necessary control of Runx2 expression to understand its functions in different tissues. We generated conditional, doxycyline-inducible, triple transgenic mice (CMV-Cre;ROSA26-neoflox/+-rtTA;Tet-O-Runx2) to investigate the effects of wide spread overexpression of Runx2. Osteoblasts isolated from CMV-Cre;ROSA26-neoflox/+-rtTA; Tet-O-Runx2 mice demonstrated a dose-dependent effect of doxycycline to stimulate Runx2 transgene expression. Doxycycline administration to CMV-Cre;ROSA26-neoflox/+-rtTA;Tet-O-Runx2 mice induced Runx2 transgene expression in all tissues tested, with the highest levels observed in kidney, ovary, and bone. Runx2 overexpression resulted in deceased body size and reduced viability. With regard to bone, Runx2 overexpressing mice paradoxically displayed profound osteopenia and diminished osteogenesis. Induced expression of Runx2 in extraskeletal tissues resulted in ectopic calcification and induction of the osteogenic program in a limited number of tissues, including lung and muscle. In addition, the triple transgenic mice showed evidence of a myeloproliferative disorder and an apparent inhibition of lymphocyte development. Thus, overexpression of Runx2 both within and outside of the skeleton can have diverse biological effects. Use of tissue specific Cre mice will allow this model to be used to conditionally and inducibly overexpress Runx2 in different tissues and provide a means to study the post-natal tissue- and cell context-dependent functions of Runx2. PMID:21268087

  11. Conserved Regional Patterns of GABA-Related Transcript Expression in the Neocortex of Subjects With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takanori; Bazmi, H. Holly; Mirnics, Karoly; Wu, Qiang; Sampson, Allan R.; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Individuals with schizophrenia exhibit disturbances in a number of cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor functions that depend on the circuitry of different cortical areas. The cognitive deficits associated with dysfunction of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex result, at least in part, from abnormalities in GABA neurotransmission, as reflected in a specific pattern of altered expression of GABA-related genes. Consequently, the authors sought to determine whether this pattern of altered gene expression is restricted to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or could also contribute to the dysfunction of other cortical areas in subjects with schizophrenia. Method Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the levels of eight GABA-related transcripts in four cortical areas (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and primary motor and primary visual cortices) of subjects (N=12) with schizophrenia and matched normal comparison subjects. Results Expression levels of seven transcripts were lower in subjects with schizophrenia, with the magnitude of reduction for each transcript comparable across the four areas. The largest reductions were detected for mRNA encoding somatostatin and parvalbumin, followed by moderate decreases in mRNA expression for the 67-kilodalton isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase, the GABA membrane transporter GAT-1, and the α1 and δ subunits of GABAA receptors. In contrast, the expression of calretinin mRNA did not differ between the subject groups in any of the four areas. Conclusions Because the areas examined represent the major functional domains (e.g., association, limbic, motor, and sensory) of the cerebral cortex, our findings suggest that a conserved set of molecular alterations affecting GABA neurotransmission contribute to the pathophysiology of different clinical features of schizophrenia. PMID:18281411

  12. Neuregulin 1 Expression and Electrophysiological Abnormalities in the Neuregulin 1 Transmembrane Domain Heterozygous Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Elisabeth; Shaw, Alex; Liu, Shijie; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pinault, Didier; Karl, Tim; O’Brien, Terence J.; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia; Jones, Nigel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Neuregulin 1 transmembrane domain heterozygous mutant (Nrg1 TM HET) mouse is used to investigate the role of Nrg1 in brain function and schizophrenia-like behavioural phenotypes. However, the molecular alterations in brain Nrg1 expression that underpin the behavioural observations have been assumed, but not directly determined. Here we comprehensively characterise mRNA Nrg1 transcripts throughout development of the Nrg1 TM HET mouse. In addition, we investigate the regulation of high-frequency (gamma) electrophysiological oscillations in this mutant mouse to associate molecular changes in Nrg1 with a schizophrenia-relevant neurophysiological profile. Methods Using exonic probes spanning the cysteine-rich, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like, transmembrane and intracellular domain encoding regions of Nrg1, mRNA levels were measured using qPCR in hippocampus and frontal cortex from male and female Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like (WT) mice throughout development. We also performed electrophysiological recordings in adult mice and analysed gamma oscillatory at baseline, in responses to auditory stimuli and to ketamine. Results In both hippocampus and cortex, Nrg1 TM HET mice show significantly reduced expression of the exon encoding the transmembrane domain of Nrg1 compared with WT, but unaltered mRNA expression encoding the extracellular bioactive EGF-like and the cysteine-rich (type III) domains, and development-specific and region-specific reductions in the mRNA encoding the intracellular domain. Hippocampal Nrg1 protein expression was not altered, but NMDA receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation was lower in Nrg1 TM HET mice. We identified elevated ongoing and reduced sensory-evoked gamma power in Nrg1 TM HET mice. Interpretation We found no evidence to support the claim that the Nrg1 TM HET mouse represents a simple haploinsufficient model. Further research is required to explore the possibility that mutation results in a gain of Nrg1 function. PMID

  13. Abnormal expression of the calmodulin gene in muscle from the dystrophic chicken

    SciTech Connect

    Hudecki, M.S.; Kibler, P.K.; Pollina, C.M.; Thacore, H.R.; Davis, P.J.; Davis, F.B.

    1986-05-29

    Compared to that of genetically-related normal chickens, pectoralis muscle from the dystrophic chicken contained increased calmodulin measured by radioimmunoassay. Determined by the dot blot procedure, expression of the calmodulin gene was enhanced in muscle from affected animals. The bioactivity of the gene product was normal. Together with previous studies reporting of increased sarcoplasmic calmodulin suggest the latter is a cellular response to defective Ca/sup 2 +/ transport at the level of cell efflux or intracellular organelle (sarcoplasmic reticulum) uptake.

  14. Expression pattern of Sox2 during mouse tooth development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Yuan, Guohua; Liu, Huan; Lin, Heng; Wan, Chunyan; Chen, Zhi

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor Sox2 plays important roles in maintaining the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells and adult progenitors. However, whether Sox2 is involved in odontogenesis has not been reported. In this study, we examined the expression pattern of Sox2 during mouse incisor and molar development using real-time PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Sox2 mRNA was expressed in the dental epithelium and mesenchyme while Sox2 protein was mainly detected in the epithelium from embryonic day (E) 11.5 to postnatal (PN) day 20. In the case of incisor, Sox2 mRNA and protein were expressed in most of dental epithelial cells from E11.5 to E14.5, and they were both highly expressed in the labial cervical loop area from E16.5 to PN20. During molar development, we observed an asymmetrical distribution of Sox2 protein in the epithelium from E13.5 to E16.5, with stronger signals in the lingual side. From E18.5 to PN2, Sox2 was expressed within the cervical loop area, and the stellate intermediate layer. From PN6 to PN14, Sox2 expression was confined mainly to the apical end of hertwig's epithelium root sheath (HERS) cells. Sox2 was also detected within the perivascular region of the dental pulp at PN14 and PN20. Our results suggested that: (1) Sox2 was involved in mouse odontogenesis, and (2) it might participate in maintaining the pluripotency of the epithelial stem cells of labial cervical loop in mouse incisor development and the epithelium progenitors during molar development, (3) Sox2 might be regulated at post-transcription level during mouse odontogenesis.

  15. Abnormal expression of ENaC and SGK1 mRNA induced by dietary sodium in Dahl salt-sensitively hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Wataru; Niisato, Naomi; Sawabe, Yukinori; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Tokuda, Shinsaku; Nishio, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2007-10-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) plays a crucial role in controlling sodium reabsorption in the kidney keeping the normal blood pressure. We previously reported that the expression of ENaC mRNA in the kidney of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats was abnormally regulated by aldosterone, however it is unknown if dietary sodium affects the expression of ENaC and serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1), which plays an important role in ENaC activation, in DS rats. In the present study, we investigated whether dietary sodium abnormally affects the expression of ENaC and SGK1 mRNA in DS rats. DS and Dahl salt-resistant (DR) rats (8 weeks old) were divided into three different groups, respectively: (1) low sodium diet (0.005% NaCl), (2) normal sodium diet (0.3% NaCl), and (3) high sodium diet (8% NaCl). The high sodium diet for 4 weeks in DS rats elevated the systolic blood pressure, but did not in any other groups. The expression of alpha-ENaC mRNA in DS rats was abnormally increased by high sodium diet in contrast to DR rats, while it was normally increased by low sodium diet in DS rats similar to DR rats. The expression of beta- and gamma-ENaC mRNA in DS rats was also abnormally increased by high sodium diet unlike DR rats. The expression of SGK1 mRNA was elevated by high sodium diet in DS rats, but it was decreased in DR rats. These observations indicate that the expression of ENaC and SGK1 mRNA is abnormally regulated by dietary sodium in salt-sensitively hypertensive rats, and that this abnormal expression would be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension.

  16. Abnormal thymic stromal lymphopoietin expression in the duodenal mucosa of patients with coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Biancheri, Paolo; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Rescigno, Maria; Giuffrida, Paolo; Fornasa, Giulia; Tsilingiri, Katerina; Pender, Sylvia L F; Papadia, Cinzia; Wood, Eleanor; Pasini, Alessandra; Ubezio, Cristina; Vanoli, Alessandro; Forbes, Alastair; MacDonald, Thomas T; Corazza, Gino R

    2016-01-01

    Objective The short isoform of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a cytokine constitutively expressed by epithelial cells, is crucial in preserving immune tolerance in the gut. TSLP deficiency has been implicated in sustaining intestinal damage in Crohn's disease. We explored mucosal TSLP expression and function in refractory and uncomplicated coeliac disease (CD), a T-cell-mediated enteropathy induced by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Design TSLP isoforms—long and short—and receptors—TSLPR and interleukin (IL)-7Rα—were assessed by immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and qRT-PCR in the duodenum of untreated, treated, potential and refractory patients with CD. The ability of the serine protease furin or CD biopsy supernatants to cleave TSLP was evaluated by immunoblotting. The production of interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-8 by untreated CD biopsies cultured ex vivo with TSLP isoforms was also assessed. Results Mucosal TSLP, but not TSLPR and IL-7Rα, was reduced in untreated CD and refractory CD in comparison to treated CD, potential CD and controls. Transcripts of both TSLP isoforms were decreased in active CD mucosa. Furin, which was overexpressed in active CD biopsies, was able to cleave TSLP in vitro. Accordingly, refractory and untreated CD supernatants showed higher TSLP-degrading capacity in comparison to treated CD and control supernatants. In our ex vivo model, both TSLP isoforms significantly downregulated IFN-γ and IL-8 production by untreated CD biopsies. Conclusions Reduced mucosal TSLP expression may contribute to intestinal damage in refractory and untreated CD. Further studies are needed to verify whether restoring TSLP might be therapeutically useful especially in refractory patients with CD. PMID:26342013

  17. Junctional abnormalities in human airway epithelial cells expressing F508del CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Brandon; Moriarty, Hannah K.; Kim, Agnes H.; McCarty, Nael A.; Koval, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) has a profound impact on airway physiology. Accumulating evidence suggests that intercellular junctions are impaired in CF. We examined changes to CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function, tight junctions, and gap junctions in NuLi-1 (CFTRwt/wt) and CuFi-5 (CFTRΔF508/ΔF508) cells. Cells were studied at air-liquid interface (ALI) and compared with primary human bronchial epithelial cells. On the basis of fluorescent lectin binding, the phenotype of the NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells at week 8 resembled that of serous, glycoprotein-rich airway cells. After week 7, CuFi-5 cells possessed 130% of the epithelial Na+ channel activity and 17% of the CFTR activity of NuLi-1 cells. In both cell types, expression levels of CFTR were comparable to those in primary airway epithelia. Transepithelial resistance of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells stabilized during maturation in ALI culture, with significantly lower transepithelial resistance for CuFi-5 than NuLi-1 cells. We also found that F508del CFTR negatively affects gap junction function in the airway. NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells express the connexins Cx43 and Cx26. While both connexins were properly trafficked by NuLi-1 cells, Cx43 was mistrafficked by CuFi-5 cells. Cx43 trafficking was rescued in CuFi-5 cells treated with 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), as assessed by intracellular dye transfer. 4-PBA-treated CuFi-5 cells also exhibited an increase in forskolin-induced CFTR-mediated currents. The Cx43 trafficking defect was confirmed using IB3-1 cells and found to be corrected by 4-PBA treatment. These data support the use of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells to examine the effects of F508del CFTR expression on tight junction and gap junction function in the context of serous human airway cells. PMID:26115671

  18. Reconstruction of gene co-expression network from microarray data using local expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological networks connect genes, gene products to one another. A network of co-regulated genes may form gene clusters that can encode proteins and take part in common biological processes. A gene co-expression network describes inter-relationships among genes. Existing techniques generally depend on proximity measures based on global similarity to draw the relationship between genes. It has been observed that expression profiles are sharing local similarity rather than global similarity. We propose an expression pattern based method called GeCON to extract Gene CO-expression Network from microarray data. Pair-wise supports are computed for each pair of genes based on changing tendencies and regulation patterns of the gene expression. Gene pairs showing negative or positive co-regulation under a given number of conditions are used to construct such gene co-expression network. We construct co-expression network with signed edges to reflect up- and down-regulation between pairs of genes. Most existing techniques do not emphasize computational efficiency. We exploit a fast correlogram matrix based technique for capturing the support of each gene pair to construct the network. Results We apply GeCON to both real and synthetic gene expression data. We compare our results using the DREAM (Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods) Challenge data with three well known algorithms, viz., ARACNE, CLR and MRNET. Our method outperforms other algorithms based on in silico regulatory network reconstruction. Experimental results show that GeCON can extract functionally enriched network modules from real expression data. Conclusions In view of the results over several in-silico and real expression datasets, the proposed GeCON shows satisfactory performance in predicting co-expression network in a computationally inexpensive way. We further establish that a simple expression pattern matching is helpful in finding biologically relevant gene network. In

  19. Strain background influences neurotoxicity and behavioral abnormalities in mice expressing the tetracycline transactivator.

    PubMed

    Han, Harry J; Allen, Carolyn C; Buchovecky, Christie M; Yetman, Michael J; Born, Heather A; Marin, Miguel A; Rodgers, Shaefali P; Song, Bryan J; Lu, Hui-Chen; Justice, Monica J; Probst, Frank J; Jankowsky, Joanna L

    2012-08-01

    The tet-off system has been widely used to create transgenic models of neurological disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and prion disease. The utility of this system lies in the assumption that the tetracycline transactivator (TTA) acts as an inert control element and does not contribute to phenotypes under study. Here we report that neuronal expression of TTA can affect hippocampal cytoarchitecture and behavior in a strain-dependent manner. While studying neurodegeneration in two tet-off Alzheimer's disease models, we unexpectedly discovered neuronal loss within the dentate gyrus of single transgenic TTA controls. Granule neurons appeared most sensitive to TTA exposure during postnatal development, and doxycycline treatment during this period was neuroprotective. TTA-induced degeneration could be rescued by moving the transgene onto a congenic C57BL/6J background and recurred on reintroduction of either CBA or C3H/He backgrounds. Quantitative trait analysis of B6C3 F2 TTA mice identified a region on Chromosome 14 that contains a major modifier of the neurodegenerative phenotype. Although B6 mice were resistant to degeneration, they were not ideal for cognitive testing. F1 offspring of TTA C57BL/6J and 129X1/SvJ, FVB/NJ, or DBA/1J showed improved spatial learning, but TTA expression caused subtle differences in contextual fear conditioning on two of these backgrounds, indicating that strain and genotype can interact independently under different behavioral settings. All model systems have limitations that should be recognized and mitigated where possible; our findings stress the importance of mapping the effects caused by TTA alone when working with tet-off models.

  20. Characterization of a variant of t(14;18) negative nodal diffuse follicular lymphoma with CD23 expression, 1p36/TNFRSF14 abnormalities, and STAT6 mutations.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Imran N; Friedman, Julia; Barry-Holson, Keegan Q; Ma, Charles; Thodima, Venkata; Kang, Irene; Padmanabhan, Raghavendra; Dias, Lizalynn M; Kelly, Kevin R; Brynes, Russell K; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Houldsworth, Jane

    2016-06-01

    A predominantly diffuse growth pattern and CD23 co-expression are uncommon findings in nodal follicular lymphoma and can create diagnostic challenges. A single case series in 2009 (Katzenberger et al) proposed a unique morphologic variant of nodal follicular lymphoma, characterized by a predominantly diffuse architecture, lack of the t(14;18) IGH/BCL2 translocation, presence of 1p36 deletion, frequent inguinal lymph node involvement, CD23 co-expression, and low clinical stage. Other studies on CD23+ follicular lymphoma, while associating inguinal location, have not specifically described this architecture. In addition, no follow-up studies have correlated the histopathologic and cytogenetic/molecular features of these cases, and they remain a diagnostic problem. We identified 11 cases of diffuse, CD23+ follicular lymphoma with histopathologic features similar to those described by Katzenberger et al. Along with pertinent clinical information, we detail their histopathology, IGH/BCL2 translocation status, lymphoma-associated chromosomal gains/losses, and assessment of mutations in 220 lymphoma-associated genes by massively parallel sequencing. All cases showed a diffuse growth pattern around well- to ill-defined residual germinal centers, uniform CD23 expression, mixed centrocytic/centroblastic cytology, and expression of at least one germinal center marker. Ten of 11 involved inguinal lymph nodes, 5 solely. By fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, the vast majority lacked IGH/BCL2 translocation (9/11). Deletion of 1p36 was observed in five cases and included TNFRSF14. Of the six cases lacking 1p36 deletion, TNFRSF14 mutations were identified in three, highlighting the strong association of 1p36/TNFRSF14 abnormalities with this follicular lymphoma variant. In addition, 9 of the 11 cases tested (82%) had STAT6 mutations and nuclear P-STAT6 expression was detectable in the mutated cases by immunohistochemistry. The proportion of STAT6 mutations is higher than

  1. Correlation of plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and inducible nitric oxide gene expression among women with cervical abnormalities and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sowjanya, A Pavani; Rao, Meera; Vedantham, Haripriya; Kalpana, Basany; Poli, Usha Rani; Marks, Morgan A; Sujatha, M

    2016-01-30

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a soluble factor involved in chronic inflammation, may modulate cervical cancer risk among HPV infected women. The aim of the study was to measure and correlate plasma nitrite/nitrate levels with tissue specific expression of iNOS mRNA among women with different grades of cervical lesions and cervical cancer. Tissue biopsy and plasma specimens were collected from 120 women with cervical neoplasia or cancer (ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and invasive cancer) and 35 women without cervical abnormalities. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA from biopsy and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels of the same study subjects were measured. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed on the promoter region and Ser608Leu (rs2297518) in exon 16 of the iNOS gene. Differences in iNOS gene expression and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels were compared across disease stage using linear and logistic regression analysis. Compared to normal controls, women diagnosed with HSIL or invasive cancer had a significantly higher concentration of plasma nitrite/nitrate and a higher median fold-change in iNOS mRNA gene expression. Genotyping of the promoter region showed three different variations: A pentanucleotide repeat (CCTTT) n, -1026T > G (rs2779249) and a novel variant -1153T > A. These variants were associated with increased levels of plasma nitrite/nitrate across all disease stages. The higher expression of iNOS mRNA and plasma nitrite/nitrate among women with pre-cancerous lesions suggests a role for nitric oxide in the natural history of cervical cancer. PMID:26435258

  2. Correlation of plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and inducible nitric oxide gene expression among women with cervical abnormalities and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sowjanya, A Pavani; Rao, Meera; Vedantham, Haripriya; Kalpana, Basany; Poli, Usha Rani; Marks, Morgan A; Sujatha, M

    2016-01-30

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a soluble factor involved in chronic inflammation, may modulate cervical cancer risk among HPV infected women. The aim of the study was to measure and correlate plasma nitrite/nitrate levels with tissue specific expression of iNOS mRNA among women with different grades of cervical lesions and cervical cancer. Tissue biopsy and plasma specimens were collected from 120 women with cervical neoplasia or cancer (ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and invasive cancer) and 35 women without cervical abnormalities. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA from biopsy and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels of the same study subjects were measured. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed on the promoter region and Ser608Leu (rs2297518) in exon 16 of the iNOS gene. Differences in iNOS gene expression and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels were compared across disease stage using linear and logistic regression analysis. Compared to normal controls, women diagnosed with HSIL or invasive cancer had a significantly higher concentration of plasma nitrite/nitrate and a higher median fold-change in iNOS mRNA gene expression. Genotyping of the promoter region showed three different variations: A pentanucleotide repeat (CCTTT) n, -1026T > G (rs2779249) and a novel variant -1153T > A. These variants were associated with increased levels of plasma nitrite/nitrate across all disease stages. The higher expression of iNOS mRNA and plasma nitrite/nitrate among women with pre-cancerous lesions suggests a role for nitric oxide in the natural history of cervical cancer.

  3. Over-expression of a grape stilbene synthase gene in tomato induces parthenocarpy and causes abnormal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, Ilaria; Bonsegna, Stefania; De Domenico, Stefania; Laddomada, Barbara; Blando, Federica; Santino, Angelo; Giovinazzo, Giovanna

    2011-10-01

    A novel strategy to induce parthenocarpy in tomato fruits by the induction of resveratrol biosynthesis in flower tissues was exploited. Two transgenic tomato lines were considered: a higher resveratrol-producing (35SS) line, constitutively expressing a grape stilbene synthase cDNA, and a lower resveratrol-producing (LoxS) line, expressing stilbene synthase under a fruit-specific promoter. The expression of the stilbene synthase gene affected flavonoid metabolism in a different manner in the transgenic lines, and in one of these, the 35SS line, resulted in complete male sterility. Resveratrol was synthesised either in 35SS or LoxS tomato flowers, at an even higher extent (about 8-10 times) in the former line. We further investigated whether stilbene synthase expression may have resulted in impaired naringenin accumulation during flower development. In the 35SS flowers, naringenin was significantly impaired by about 50%, probably due to metabolic competition. Conversely, the amount of glycosylated flavonols increased in transgenic flowers, thereby excluding the diminished production of flavonols as a reason for parthenocarpy in tomato. We further investigated whether resveratrol synthesis may have resulted changes to pollen structure. Microscopic observations revealed the presence of few and abnormal flake-like pollen grains in 35SS flowers with no germination capability. Finally, the analysis of coumaric and ferulic acids, the precursors of lignin and sporopollenin biosynthesis, revealed significant depletion of these compounds, therefore suggesting an impairment in structural compounds as a reason for pollen ablation. These overall outcomes, to the best of our knowledge, reveal for the first time the major role displayed by resveratrol synthesis on parthenocarpy in tomato fruits. PMID:21843947

  4. Prostate cancer cell response to paclitaxel is affected by abnormally expressed securin PTTG1.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Carolina; Flores, M Luz; Medina, Rafael; Pérez-Valderrama, Begoña; Romero, Francisco; Tortolero, María; Japón, Miguel A; Sáez, Carmen

    2014-10-01

    PTTG1 protein, the human securin, has a central role in sister chromatid separation during mitosis, and its altered expression has been reported in many tumor types. Paclitaxel is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, whose mechanism of action is related to its ability to arrest cells in mitosis and the subsequent induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. By using two prostate cancer cell lines with different responses to paclitaxel treatment, we have identified two situations in which PTTG1 influences cell fate differentially. In slippage-prone PC3 cells, both PTTG1 downregulation and overexpression induce an increase in mitotic cells that is associated with diminished apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. In LNCaP cells, however, PTTG1 downregulation prevents mitotic entry and, subsequently, inhibits mitosis-associated, paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, PTTG1 overexpression induces an increase in mitotic cells and apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. We have also identified a role for Mcl-1 protein in preventing apoptosis during mitosis in PC3 cells, as simultaneous PTTG1 and Mcl-1 silencing enhances mitosis-associated apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. The finding that a more efficient mitotic arrest alone in PC3 cells is not enough to increase apoptosis was also confirmed with the observation that a selected paclitaxel-resistant PC3 cell line showed an apoptosis-resistant phenotype associated with increased mitosis upon paclitaxel treatment. These findings could contribute to identify putative responsive and nonresponsive cells and help us to approach incomplete responses to paclitaxel in the clinical setting. PMID:25122070

  5. Expression Patterns of Extracellular Matrix Proteins during Posterior Commissure Development

    PubMed Central

    Stanic, Karen; Saldivia, Natalia; Förstera, Benjamín; Torrejón, Marcela; Montecinos, Hernán; Caprile, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules are pivotal for central nervous system (CNS) development, facilitating cell migration, axonal growth, myelination, dendritic spine formation, and synaptic plasticity, among other processes. During axon guidance, the ECM not only acts as a permissive or non-permissive substrate for navigating axons, but also modulates the effects of classical guidance cues, such as netrin or Eph/ephrin family members. Despite being highly important, little is known about the expression of ECM molecules during CNS development. Therefore, this study assessed the molecular expression patterns of tenascin, HNK-1, laminin, fibronectin, perlecan, decorin, and osteopontin along chick embryo prosomere 1 during posterior commissure development. The posterior commissure is the first transversal axonal tract of the embryonic vertebrate brain. Located in the dorso-caudal portion of prosomere 1, posterior commissure axons primarily arise from the neurons of basal pretectal nuclei that run dorsally to the roof plate midline, where some turn toward the ipsilateral side. Expressional analysis of ECM molecules in this area these revealed to be highly arranged, and molecule interactions with axon fascicles suggested involvement in processes other than structural support. In particular, tenascin and the HNK-1 epitope extended in ventro-dorsal columns and enclosed axons during navigation to the roof plate. Laminin and osteopontin were expressed in the midline, very close to axons that at this point must decide between extending to the contralateral side or turning to the ipsilateral side. Finally, fibronectin, decorin, and perlecan appeared unrelated to axonal pathfinding in this region and were instead restricted to the external limiting membrane. In summary, the present report provides evidence for an intricate expression of different extracellular molecules that may cooperate in guiding posterior commissure axons. PMID:27733818

  6. Facial patterning and infant emotional expression: happiness, surprise, and fear.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, S W; Campos, J J; Emde, R N

    1979-12-01

    Although recent studies have convincingly demonstrated that emotional expressions can be judged reliably from actor-posed facial displays, there exists little evidence that facial expressions in lifelike settings are similar to actor-posed displays, are reliable across situations designed to elicit the same emotion, or provide sufficient information to mediate consistent emotion judgments by raters. The present study therefore investigated these issues as they related to the emotions of happiness, surprise, and fear. 27 infants between 10 and 12 months of age (when emotion masking is not likely to confound results) were tested in 2 situations designed to elicit hapiness (peek-a-boo game and a collapsing toy), 2 to elicit surprise (a toy-switch and a vanishing-object task), and 2 to elicit fear (the visual cliff and the approach of a stranger. Dependent variables included changes in 28 facial response components taken from previous work using actor poses, as well as judgments of the presence of 6 discrete emotions. In addition, instrumental behaviors were used to verify with other than facial expression responses whether the predicted emotion was elicited. In contrast to previous conclusions on the subject, we found that judges were able to make all facial expression judgments reliably, even in the absence of contextual information. Support was also obtained for at least some degree of specificity of facial component response patterns, especially for happiness and surprise. Emotion judgments by raters were found to be a function of the presence of discrete facial components predicted to be linked to those emotions. Finally, almost all situations elicited blends, rather than discrete emotions. PMID:535426

  7. Various distinctive cytogenetic abnormalities in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia aged 60 years and older express adverse prognostic value: results from a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    van der Holt, Bronno; Breems, Dimitri A; Berna Beverloo, H; van den Berg, Eva; Burnett, Alan K; Sonneveld, Pieter; Löwenberg, Bob

    2007-01-01

    Diagnostic cytogenetic abnormalities are considered important prognostic factors in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). However, the prognostic assessments have mainly been derived from patients with AML aged <60 years. Two recent studies of AML patients of 60 years and older proposed prognostic classifications with distinct discrepancies. To further study the prognostic value of cytogenetic abnormalities in this patient population, we have evaluated cytogenetic abnormalities in a series of 293 untreated patients with AML aged 60 years and older, included in a randomised phase 3 trial, also in relation to patient characteristics and clinical outcome. The most frequently observed cytogenetic abnormality was trisomy 8 (+8), in 31 (11%) patients. Abnormalities, such as -5, 5q-, abn(17p) and abn(17q), were almost exclusively present in complex karyotypes. A relatively favourable outcome was only observed in five patients with core-binding factor abnormalities t(8;21) and inv(16)/del(16)/t(16;16). However, most of the other evaluated cytogenetic abnormalities, such as 5q-, -7, +8, abn(17p), abn(17q), and complex aberrations expressed a more adverse prognosis when compared with patients with AML aged 60 years and older with a normal karyotype. Large studies to confirm the prognosis of individual cytogenetic aberrations are warranted.

  8. Abnormal gene expression profile reveals the common key signatures associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H J; Sun, Z Q; Qian, W Q; Sheng, L

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the common gene signatures of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), and to expand the respective protein-protein interaction networks associated with CCRCC regulation. For the latter, we utilized multiple gene expression data sets from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), with which we could analyze the aberrant gene expression patterns at the transcriptome level that distinguish cancer from normal samples. We obtained the GSE781 and GSE6344 clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression datasets from GEO, which contained a total of 37 cancer and 37 normal samples. Subsequent R language analysis allowed identification of the differentially expressed genes. The genes that exhibited significant up or downregulation in cancers were entered into the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery to perform analysis of gene functional annotations, resulting in the generation of two protein-protein interaction networks that included the most significantly up or downregulated genes in CCRCC. These allowed us to identify the key factor genes, which could potentially be utilized to separate cancer versus normal samples. The differentially regulated genes are also highly likely to be functionally important regulatory factors in renal cell carcinoma: cell functions showing enrichment of these genes include amine biosynthetic and vitamin metabolic processes, ion binding, extracellular transport function, and regulation of biosynthesis. Together, the results from our study offer further reason to pursue diagnosis and therapy of CCRCC at the molecular level. PMID:25867368

  9. Abnormal expression of PTEN and PIK3CA in pemetrexed-resistant human pancreatic cancer cell line Patu8988.

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Gu, H T; Lin, S B; Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Qian, C J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of PTEN and PIK3CA in the pemetrexed-resistant human pancreatic cancer cell line Patu8988, and to evaluate their effects on the biological behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. PTEN and PIK3CA gene and protein expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot, respectively, in a pemetrexed-resistant pancreatic cancer cell line and in the parent strain of the pancreatic cancer cells. The discrepancies between the two types of cell lines were detected by a transwell test. RT-PCR and western blot analyses revealed that PTEN and PIK3CA were overexpressed in the pemetrexed-resistant pancreatic cancer cell line. PTEN and PIK3CA were shown to be upregulated by 89 and 76% (western blot), respectively, in the pemetrexed-resistant cell line, compared to the normal pancreatic cancer cell line. The migratory and invasive abilities of the pemetrexed-resistant pancreatic cancer cell were significantly reduced compared to those of the parent strain (P < 0.05; transwell assay). Both PTEN and PIK3CA expression was abnormally enhanced in the pemetrexed-resistant cell line Patu8988; the co-existence of high levels of PTEN and PIK3CA in the pemetrexed-resistant pancreatic cancer line cells induced a significant decrease in their migratory and invasive capacities. This suggested that the mechanism of pemetrexed resistant may be affected by PTEN and PIK3CA, and that these may alter the biological behavior of cancer cells. PMID:27525871

  10. Abnormal Fatty Acid Pattern in the Superior Temporal Gyrus Distinguishes Bipolar Disorder from Major Depression and Schizophrenia and Resembles Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert K.; Rider, Therese; Jandacek, Ronald; Tso, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the fatty acid composition of the postmortem superior temporal gyrus (STG), a cortical region implicated in emotional processing, from normal controls (n=15) and patients with bipolar disorder (BD, n=15), major depressive disorder (MDD, n=15), and schizophrenia (SZ, n=15). For comparative purposes, STG fatty acid composition was determined in a separate cohort of multiple sclerosis patients (MS, n=15) and normal controls (n=15). Compared with controls, patients with BD, but not MDD or SZ, exhibited abnormal elevations in the saturated fatty acids (SFA) palmitic acid (16:0), stearic acid (18:0), the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) linoleic acid (18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), and reductions in the monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) oleic acid (18:1n-9). The total MUFA/SFA and 18:1/18:0 ratios were lower in the STG of BD patients and were inversely correlated with total PUFA composition. MS patients exhibited a pattern of fatty acid abnormalities similar to that observed in BD patients including elevated PUFA and a lower 18:1/18:0 ratio. Collectively, these data demonstrate that BD patients exhibit a pattern of fatty acid abnormalities in the STG that is not observed in MDD and SZ patients and closely resembles MS patients. PMID:24439517

  11. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process.

  12. Expression patterns reveal niche diversification in a marine microbial assemblage

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Scott M; Sharma, Shalabh; Booth, Melissa; Moran, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Resolving the ecological niches of coexisting marine microbial taxa is challenging due to the high species richness of microbial communities and the apparent functional redundancy in bacterial genomes and metagenomes. Here, we generated over 11 million Illumina reads of protein-encoding transcripts collected from well-mixed southeastern US coastal waters to characterize gene expression patterns distinguishing the ecological roles of hundreds of microbial taxa sharing the same environment. The taxa with highest in situ growth rates (based on relative abundance of ribosomal protein transcripts) were typically not the greatest contributors to community transcription, suggesting strong top-down ecological control, and their diverse transcriptomes indicated roles as metabolic generalists. The taxa with low in situ growth rates typically had low diversity transcriptomes dominated by specialized metabolisms. By identifying protein-encoding genes with atypically high expression for their level of conservation, unique functional roles of community members emerged related to substrate use (such as complex carbohydrates, fatty acids, methanesulfonate, taurine, tartrate, ectoine), alternative energy-conservation strategies (proteorhodopsin, AAnP, V-type pyrophosphatases, sulfur oxidation, hydrogen oxidation) and mechanisms for negotiating a heterogeneous environment (flagellar motility, gliding motility, adhesion strategies). On average, the heterotrophic bacterioplankton dedicated 7% of their transcriptomes to obtaining energy by non-heterotrophic means. This deep sequencing of a coastal bacterioplankton transcriptome provides the most highly resolved view of bacterioplankton niche dimensions yet available, uncovering a spectrum of unrecognized ecological strategies. PMID:22931830

  13. Spatial and temporal gene expression patterns occur during corm development.

    PubMed

    de Castro, L A; Carneiro, M; Neshich, D de C; de Paiva, G R

    1992-12-01

    We investigated gene expression patterns that occur during taro corm development. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identified several different prevalent proteins that accumulate during corm development. Microsequencing studies indicated that some of these proteins are related to taste-modifying proteins, such as curculin and miraculin, and proteins found in other storage organs, such as sporamin and the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. A curculin-encoding cDNA clone, designated as TC1, was identified that corresponds to a highly prevalent 1-kb corm mRNA. The TC1 mRNA accumulates during corm development, is more prevalent in corm apical than basal regions, and is either absent, or present at low concentrations, in other vegetative organs such as the leaf and root. In situ hybridization experiments showed that the TC1 mRNA is highly concentrated in corm storage parenchyma cells and is absent, or present in reduced concentrations, in other corm cells and tissues. Our results show that corm development is associated with the differentiation of specialized cells and tissues, and that these differentiation events are coupled with the temporal and spatial expression of corm-specific genes. PMID:1467653

  14. Expression patterns reveal niche diversification in a marine microbial assemblage.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Scott M; Sharma, Shalabh; Booth, Melissa; Moran, Mary Ann

    2013-02-01

    Resolving the ecological niches of coexisting marine microbial taxa is challenging due to the high species richness of microbial communities and the apparent functional redundancy in bacterial genomes and metagenomes. Here, we generated over 11 million Illumina reads of protein-encoding transcripts collected from well-mixed southeastern US coastal waters to characterize gene expression patterns distinguishing the ecological roles of hundreds of microbial taxa sharing the same environment. The taxa with highest in situ growth rates (based on relative abundance of ribosomal protein transcripts) were typically not the greatest contributors to community transcription, suggesting strong top-down ecological control, and their diverse transcriptomes indicated roles as metabolic generalists. The taxa with low in situ growth rates typically had low diversity transcriptomes dominated by specialized metabolisms. By identifying protein-encoding genes with atypically high expression for their level of conservation, unique functional roles of community members emerged related to substrate use (such as complex carbohydrates, fatty acids, methanesulfonate, taurine, tartrate, ectoine), alternative energy-conservation strategies (proteorhodopsin, AAnP, V-type pyrophosphatases, sulfur oxidation, hydrogen oxidation) and mechanisms for negotiating a heterogeneous environment (flagellar motility, gliding motility, adhesion strategies). On average, the heterotrophic bacterioplankton dedicated 7% of their transcriptomes to obtaining energy by non-heterotrophic means. This deep sequencing of a coastal bacterioplankton transcriptome provides the most highly resolved view of bacterioplankton niche dimensions yet available, uncovering a spectrum of unrecognized ecological strategies.

  15. Expression analysis of five zebrafish RXFP3 homologues reveals evolutionary conservation of gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Donizetti, Aldo; Fiengo, Marcella; Iazzetti, Giovanni; del Gaudio, Rosanna; Di Giaimo, Rossella; Pariante, Paolo; Minucci, Sergio; Aniello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptides exert different functions in reproduction and neuroendocrine processes via interaction with two evolutionarily unrelated groups of receptors: RXFP1 and RXFP2 on one hand, RXFP3 and RXFP4 on the other hand. Evolution of receptor genes after splitting of tetrapods and teleost lineage led to a different retention rate between mammals and fish, with the latter having more gene copies compared to the former. In order to improve our knowledge on the evolution of the relaxin ligands/receptors system and have insights on their function in early stages of life, in the present paper we analyzed the expression pattern of five zebrafish RXFP3 homologue genes during embryonic development. In our analysis, we show that only two of the five genes are expressed during embryogenesis and that their transcripts are present in all the developmental stages. Spatial localization analysis of these transcripts revealed that the gene expression is restricted in specific territories starting from early pharyngula stage. Both genes are expressed in the brain but in different cell clusters and in extra-neural territories, one gene in the interrenal gland and the other in the pancreas. These two genes share expression territories with the homologue mammalian counterpart, highlighting a general conservation of gene expression regulatory processes and their putative function during evolution that are established early in vertebrate embryogenesis.

  16. Tualang Honey Protects against BPA-Induced Morphological Abnormalities and Disruption of ERα, ERβ, and C3 mRNA and Protein Expressions in the Uterus of Rats.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Zaid, Siti Sarah; Kassim, Normadiah M; Othman, Shatrah

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that can disrupt the normal functions of the reproductive system. The objective of the study is to investigate the potential protective effects of Tualang honey against BPA-induced uterine toxicity in pubertal rats. The rats were administered with BPA by oral gavage over a period of six weeks. Uterine toxicity in BPA-exposed rats was determined by the degree of the morphological abnormalities, increased lipid peroxidation, and dysregulated expression and distribution of ERα, ERβ, and C3 as compared to the control rats. Concurrent treatment of rats with BPA and Tualang honey significantly improved the uterine morphological abnormalities, reduced lipid peroxidation, and normalized ERα, ERβ, and C3 expressions and distribution. There were no abnormal changes observed in rats treated with Tualang honey alone, comparable with the control rats. In conclusion, Tualang honey has potential roles in protecting the uterus from BPA-induced toxicity, possibly accounted for by its phytochemical properties.

  17. Patterns of thyroid hormone receptor expression in zebrafish and generation of a novel model of resistance to thyroid hormone action.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Federica; Carra, Silvia; Agostini, Maura; Cotelli, Franco; Peeters, Robin; Chatterjee, Krishna; Persani, Luca

    2016-03-15

    Resistance to thyroid hormone can be due to heterozygous, dominant negative (DN) THRA (RTHα) or THRB (RTHβ) mutations, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we delineate the spatiotemporal expression of TH receptors (TRs) in zebrafish and generated morphants expressing equivalent amounts of wild-type and DN TRαs (thraa_MOs) and TRβs (thrb_MOs) in vivo. Both morphants show severe developmental abnormalities. The phenotype of thraa_MOs includes brain and cardiac defects, but normal thyroid volume and tshba expression. A combined modification of dio2 and dio3 expression can explain the high T3/T4 ratio seen in thraa_MOs, as in RTHα. Thrb_MOs show abnormal eyes and otoliths, with a typical RTHβ pattern of thyroid axis. The coexpression of wild-type, but not mutant, human TRs can rescue the phenotype in both morphants. High T3 doses can partially revert the dominant negative action of mutant TRs in morphant fish. Therefore, our morphants recapitulate the RTHα and RTHβ key manifestations representing new models in which the functional consequences of human TR mutations can be rapidly and faithfully evaluated. PMID:26802880

  18. Comparative analysis of temporal gene expression patterns in the developing ovary of the embryonic chicken

    PubMed Central

    YU, Minli; XU, Yali; YU, Defu; YU, Debing; DU, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Many genes participate in the process of ovarian germ cell development, while the combined action mechanisms of these molecular regulators still need clarification. The present study was focused on determination of differentially expressed genes and gene functions at four critical time points in chicken ovarian development. Comparative transcriptional profiling of ovaries from embryonic day 5.5 (E5.5), E12.5, E15.5 and E18.5 was performed using an Affymetrix GeneChip chicken genome microarray. Differential expression patterns for genes specifically depleted and enriched in each stage were identified. The results showed that most of the up- and downregulated genes were involved in the metabolism of retinoic acid (RA) and synthesis of hormones. Among them, a higher number of up- and downregulated genes in the E15.5 ovary were identified as being involved in steroid biosynthesis and retinol metabolism, respectively. To validate gene changes, expressions of twelve candidate genes related to germ cell development were examined by real-time PCR and found to be consistent with the of GeneChip data. Moreover, the immunostaining results suggested that ovarian development during different stages was regulated by different genes. Furthermore, a Raldh2 knockdown chicken model was produced to investigate the fundamental role of Raldh2 in meiosis initiation. It was found that meiosis occurred abnormally in Raldh2 knockdown ovaries, but the inhibitory effect on meiosis was reversed by the addition of exogenous RA. This study offers insights into the profile of gene expression and mechanisms regulating ovarian development, especially the notable role of Raldh2 in meiosis initiation in the chicken. PMID:25736178

  19. Expression pattern of aquaporins in patients with primary nephrotic syndrome with edema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Bu, Jimei; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Jihong; Bao, Xiaorong

    2015-10-01

    The association between the expression of aquaporins (AQPs) in kidney tissues and the occurrence of edema in nephrotic syndrome (NS) remains unclear. The current study aimed to investigate this association. A total of 54 patients with primary glomerular disease, diagnosed by renal biopsy, were divided into three groups: Control, NS without edema and NS with edema. The expression of AQP1, AQP2, AQP3 and AQP4 in kidney tissues from these patients was assessed using immunohistochemistry, and urinary AQP concentrations were quantified by ELISA. Comparison of the three groups was conducted using one way analysis of variance, independent samples t‑test or the Chi‑square test. AQP1 was strongly expressed in the proximal tubules. The proportion of the AQP1‑positive area in kidney tissues from patients with NS with edema was significantly reduced, in comparison with the other two groups. By contrast, the proportion of the AQP2‑positive area in the NS with edema group was significantly higher than that of the other two groups; significant differences were also observed between the control and NS without edema groups for this parameter. Urinary AQP2 concentrations in patients with NS (with and without edema) were significantly higher than that of the control group, and exhibited a significant positive correlation with kidney tissue AQP2 concentrations. The present study demonstrated the abnormal expression pattern of AQP1‑AQP4 in the kidney tissues of patients with NS, providing a basis for an improved understanding of the role of AQP in the pathogenesis of NS.

  20. Transcriptional activation by TAL1 and FUS-CHOP proteins expressed in acute malignancies as a result of chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-García, I; Rabbitts, T H

    1994-01-01

    Proteins that appear to participate in transcriptional control of gene expression are increasingly implicated in leukemias and malignant solid tumors. We report here that the N-terminal domains of the proteins TAL1 (ectopically activated in T-cell acute leukemias after chromosomal abnormalities caused by V-D-J recombinase error) (V, variable; D, diversity; J, joining) and FUS-CHOP (a liposarcoma tumor-specific fusion protein that is produced as a result of a chromosomal translocation) can function as transcription activators of specific responsive reporter genes. The result with TAL1 provides evidence that transcriptional activation can be mediated by a gene activated by translocation in T-cell acute leukemias. In the case of the liposarcoma, transactivation by the FUS-CHOP protein occurs because the FUS transcriptional activation domain is added to the DNA-binding CHOP protein normally lacking such activity. Therefore, the association of transcriptional activation and DNA-binding elements is a common consequence in proteins activated or newly created as fusion proteins after chromosomal translocations in acute leukemias and in malignant solid tumors. Images PMID:8058726

  1. Loss of prion protein leads to age-dependent behavioral abnormalities and changes in cytoskeletal protein expression.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Matthias; Greis, Catharina; Ottis, Philipp; Silva, Christopher J; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Wrede, Arne; Koppe, Katharina; Onisko, Bruce; Requena, Jesús R; Govindarajan, Nambirajan; Korth, Carsten; Fischer, Andre; Zerr, Inga

    2014-12-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a highly conserved protein whose exact physiological role remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated age-dependent behavioral abnormalities in PrPC-knockout (Prnp0/0) mice and wild-type (WT) controls. Prnp0/0 mice showed age-dependent behavioral deficits in memory performance, associative learning, basal anxiety, and nest building behavior. Using a hypothesis-free quantitative proteomic investigation, we found that loss of PrPC affected the levels of neurofilament proteins in an age-dependent manner. In order to understand the biochemical basis of these observations, we analyzed the phosphorylation status of neurofilament heavy chain (NF-H). We found a reduction in NF-H phosphorylation in both Prnp0/0 mice and in PrPC-deficient cells. The expression of Fyn and phospho-Fyn, a potential regulator for NF phosphorylation, was associated with PrPC ablation. The number of β-tubulin III-positive neurons in the hippocampus was diminished in Prnp0/0 mice relative to WT mice. These data indicate that PrPC plays an important role in cytoskeletal organization, brain function, and age-related neuroprotection. Our work represents the first direct biochemical link between these proteins and the observed behavioral phenotypes.

  2. Abnormal Expression of Urea Transporter Protein in a Rat Model of Hepatorenal Syndrome Induced by Succinylated Gelatin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiping; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhao, C Yingying; Cao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a serious complication of advanced chronic liver disease. Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) occurs with dysfunction of multiple organs when abdominal pressure increases. Here, we report on a novel model of ACS with ascites and a model of HRS in rats to observe the urea transporter protein (UT) expression in the 2 models. Material/Methods A liver cirrhosis model was induced by CCl4. After changes of liver histopathology were observed, rats were injected intraperitoneally with succinylated gelatin to establish a model of ACS and HRS. Then, changes in BUN, Cr, and renal histopathology were detected. Moreover, the UT in ACS and HRS were also quantified. Results The surfaces of liver in the cirrhotic group became coarse, with visible small nodules and became yellow and greasy. The normal structure of the hepatic lobules were destroyed, and hyperplasia of fibrotic tissue and pseudo-lobe was observed. The levels of BUN and Cr were significantly increased in rats suffering from ACS and HRS, respectively, compared to their control groups. In addition, the mRNA levels of UT-A2 and UT-A3 decreased in rats with HRS compared to cirrhotic rats. However, there was no significant difference between the mRNA levels of UT-A2, UT-A3, and UT-B in rats with ACS vs. normal rats. Conclusions It is feasible to model ACS in rats by injecting succinylated gelatin into the abdominal cavity. Increasing the intra-abdominal pressure by succinylated gelatin is also a novel approach for modeling HRS in cirrhotic rats. Compared with control rats, there is an abnormal mRNA expression of UT in ACS rats and HRS rats. PMID:26414230

  3. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    }E4, these kinases regulate one of the E1{sup ∧}E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4. - Highlights: • E4 gene products have a modular structure, and are expressed from the E1{sup ∧}E4 spliced mRNA. • E4 proteins are modified during epithelial differentiation by phosphorylation and proteolysis. • The E4 proteins contribute to genome amplification-efficiency and virus synthesis. • E4 proteins are abundantly expressed and may facilitate efficient virus release and transmission. • High-risk E4 proteins are deposited as amyloid fibres and can be used as infection biomarkers.

  4. MicroRNA-122 Influences the Development of Sperm Abnormalities from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Regulating TNP2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongyi; Liu, Jianjun; Zhao, Yanhui; Jiang, Lizhen; Huang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Sperm abnormalities are one of the main factors responsible for male infertility; however, their pathogenesis remains unclear. The role of microRNAs in the development of sperm abnormalities in infertile men has not yet been investigated. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate the influence of miR-122 expression on the differentiation of these cells into spermatozoa-like cells in vitro. After induction, mutant miR-122-transfected cells formed spermatozoa-like cells. Flow cytometry of DNA content revealed a significant increase in the haploid cell population in spermatozoa-like cells derived from mutant miR-122-transfected cells as compared to those derived from miR-122-transfected cells. During induction, TNP2 and protamine mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in mutant miR-122-transfected cells than in miR-122-transfected cells. High-throughput isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification were used to identify and quantify the different protein expression levels in miR-122- and mutant miR-122-transfected cells. Among all the proteins analyzed, the expression of lipoproteins, for example, APOB and APOA1, showed the most significant difference between the two groups. This study illustrates that miR-122 expression is associated with abnormal sperm development. MiR-122 may influence spermatozoa-like cells by suppressing TNP2 expression and inhibiting the expression of proteins associated with sperm development. PMID:23327642

  5. DNA methylation patterns in tissues from mid-gestation bovine foetuses produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer show subtle abnormalities in nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cloning of cattle by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is associated with a high incidence of pregnancy failure characterized by abnormal placental and foetal development. These abnormalities are thought to be due, in part, to incomplete re-setting of the epigenetic state of DNA in the donor somatic cell nucleus to a state that is capable of driving embryonic and foetal development to completion. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation patterns were not appropriately established during nuclear reprogramming following SCNT. A panel of imprinted, non-imprinted genes and satellite repeat sequences was examined in tissues collected from viable and failing mid-gestation SCNT foetuses and compared with similar tissues from gestation-matched normal foetuses generated by artificial insemination (AI). Results Most of the genomic regions examined in tissues from viable and failing SCNT foetuses had DNA methylation patterns similar to those in comparable tissues from AI controls. However, statistically significant differences were found between SCNT and AI at specific CpG sites in some regions of the genome, particularly those associated with SNRPN and KCNQ1OT1, which tended to be hypomethylated in SCNT tissues. There was a high degree of variation between individuals in methylation levels at almost every CpG site in these two regions, even in AI controls. In other genomic regions, methylation levels at specific CpG sites were tightly controlled with little variation between individuals. Only one site (HAND1) showed a tissue-specific pattern of DNA methylation. Overall, DNA methylation patterns in tissues of failing foetuses were similar to apparently viable SCNT foetuses, although there were individuals showing extreme deviant patterns. Conclusion These results show that SCNT foetuses that had developed to mid-gestation had largely undergone nuclear reprogramming and that the epigenetic signature at this stage was not a good predictor of whether the

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis with deficiency pattern in traditional chinese medicine shows correlation with cold and hot patterns in gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minzhi; Chen, Gao; Lu, Cheng; Xiao, Cheng; Li, Li; Niu, Xuyan; He, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Aiping

    2013-01-01

    In our precious study, the correlation between cold and hot patterns in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and gene expression profiles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been explored. Based on TCM theory, deficiency pattern is another key pattern diagnosis among RA patients, which leads to a specific treatment principle in clinical management. Therefore, a further analysis was performed aiming at exploring the characteristic gene expression profile of deficiency pattern and its correlation with cold and hot patterns in RA patients by bioinformatics analysis approach based on gene expression profiles data detected with microarray technology. The TCM deficiency pattern-related genes network comprises 7 significantly, highly connected regions which are mainly involved in protein transcription processes, protein ubiquitination, toll-like receptor activated NF- κ B regulated gene transcription and apoptosis, RNA clipping, NF- κ B signal, nucleotide metabolism-related apoptosis, and immune response processes. Toll-like receptor activated NF- κ B regulated gene transcription and apoptosis pathways are potential specific pathways related to TCM deficiency patterns in RA patients; TCM deficiency pattern is probably related to immune response. Network analysis can be used as a powerful tool for detecting the characteristic mechanism related to specific TCM pattern and the correlations between different patterns. PMID:24174973

  7. Anatomic patterning in the expression of vestibulosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.; McAllen, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the possibility that expression of vestibulosympathetic reflexes (VSR) is related to a nerve's anatomic location rather than its target organ, we compared VSR recorded from the same type of postganglionic fiber [muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC)] located at three different rostrocaudal levels: hindlimb, forelimb, and face. Experiments were performed on chloralose-anesthetized cats, and vestibular afferents were stimulated electrically. Single MVC unit activity was extracted by spike shape analysis of few-fiber recordings, and unit discrimination was confirmed by autocorrelation. Poststimulus time histogram analysis revealed that about half of the neurons were initially inhibited by vestibular stimulation (type 1 response), whereas the other MVC fibers were initially strongly excited (type 2 response). MVC units with types 1 and 2 responses were present in the same nerve fascicle. Barosensitivity was equivalent in the two groups, but fibers showing type 1 responses fired significantly faster than those giving type 2 responses (0.29 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.20 +/- 0.02 Hz). Nerve fibers with type 1 responses were most common in the hindlimb (21 of 29 units) and least common in the face (2 of 11 units), the difference in relative proportion being significant (P < 0.05, chi(2) test). These results support the hypothesis that VSR are anatomically patterned.

  8. Protein expression patterns of the yeast mating response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haiyu; Zhang, Rongfei; Shao, Bin; Wang, Xuan; Ouyang, Qi; Hao, Nan; Luo, Chunxiong

    2016-06-13

    Microfluidics, in combination with time-lapse microscopy, is a transformative technology that significantly enhances our ability to monitor and probe biological processes in living cells. However, high-throughput microfluidic devices mostly require sophisticated preparatory and setup work and are thus hard to adopt by non-experts. In this work, we designed an easy-to-use microfluidic chip, which enables tracking of 48 GFP-tagged yeast strains, with each strain under two different stimulus conditions, in a single experiment. We used this technology to investigate the dynamic pattern of protein expression during the yeast mating differentiation response. High doses of pheromone induce cell cycle arrest and the shmoo morphology, whereas low doses of pheromone lead to elongation and chemotrophic growth. By systematically analyzing the protein dynamics of 156 pheromone-regulated genes, we identified groups of genes that are preferentially induced in response to low-dose pheromone (elongation during growth) or high-dose pheromone (shmoo formation and cell cycle arrest). The protein dynamics of these genes may provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the differentiation switch induced by different doses of pheromone. PMID:27177258

  9. Changes in NMDA receptor subunits and interacting PSD proteins in dorsolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex indicate abnormal regional expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, L V; Beneyto, M; Haroutunian, V; Meador-Woodruff, J H

    2006-08-01

    Abnormal expression of the N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor and its interacting molecules of the postsynaptic density (PSD) are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Frontal regions of neocortex including dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are essential for cognitive and behavioral functions that are affected in schizophrenia. In this study, we have measured protein expression of two alternatively spliced isoforms of the NR1 subunit (NR1C2 and NR1C2') as well as expression of the NR2A-D subunits of the NMDA receptor in DLPFC and ACC in post-mortem samples from elderly schizophrenic patients and a comparison group. We found significantly increased expression of NR1C2' but not of NR1C2 in ACC, suggesting altered NMDA receptor cell membrane expression in this cortical area. We did not find significant changes in the expression of either of the NR1 isoforms in DLPFC. We did not detect changes of any of the NR2 subunits studied in either cortical area. In addition, we studied expression of the NMDA-interacting PSD molecules NF-L, SAP102, PSD-95 and PSD-93 in ACC and DLPFC at both transcriptional and translational levels. We found significant changes in the expression of NF-L in DLPFC, and PSD-95 and PSD-93 in ACC; increased transcript expression was associated with decreased protein expression, suggesting abnormal translation and/or accelerated protein degradation of these molecules in schizophrenia. Our findings suggest abnormal regional processing of the NMDA receptor and its associated PSD molecules, possibly involving transcription, translation, trafficking and protein stability in cortical areas in schizophrenia.

  10. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexia; Östlund, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphological abnormalities, which are reversed by inhibitors of protein farnesylation. In addition, treatment with protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors improves whole animal phenotypes in mouse models of HGPS. However, improvement in nuclear morphology in tissues after treatment of animals has not been demonstrated. We therefore treated transgenic mice that express progerin in epidermis with the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-276 or a combination of pravastatin and zoledronate to determine if they reversed nuclear morphological abnormalities in tissue. Immunofluorescence microscopy and “blinded” electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of FTI-276 or pravastatin plus zoledronate significantly improved nuclear morphological abnormalities in keratinocytes of transgenic mice. These results show that pharmacological blockade of protein prenylation reverses nuclear morphological abnormalities that occur in HGPS in vivo. They further suggest that skin biopsy may be useful to determine if protein farnesylation inhibitors are exerting effects in subjects with HGPS in clinical trials. PMID:21326826

  11. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Ostlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphological abnormalities, which are reversed by inhibitors of protein farnesylation. In addition, treatment with protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors improves whole animal phenotypes in mouse models of HGPS. However, improvement in nuclear morphology in tissues after treatment of animals has not been demonstrated. We therefore treated transgenic mice that express progerin in epidermis with the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-276 or a combination of pravastatin and zoledronate to determine if they reversed nuclear morphological abnormalities in tissue. Immunofluorescence microscopy and "blinded" electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of FTI-276 or pravastatin plus zoledronate significantly improved nuclear morphological abnormalities in keratinocytes of transgenic mice. These results show that pharmacological blockade of protein prenylation reverses nuclear morphological abnormalities that occur in HGPS in vivo. They further suggest that skin biopsy may be useful to determine if protein farnesylation inhibitors are exerting effects in subjects with HGPS in clinical trials.

  12. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  13. Abnormal structural luteolysis in ovaries of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM): expression of Fas ligand/Fas-mediated apoptosis signaling molecules in luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Minako; Manabe, Noboru; Komatsu, Kohji; Shimabe, Munetake; Miyamoto, Hajime

    2003-12-01

    Senescence accelerated mouse-prone (SAMP) mice with a shortened life span show accelerated changes in many of the signs of aging and a shorter reproductive life span than SAM-resistant (SAMR) controls. We previously showed that functional regression (progesterone dissimilation) occurs in abnormally accumulated luteal bodies (aaLBs) of SAMP mice, but structural regression of luteal cells in aaLB is inhibited. A deficiency of luteal cell apoptosis causes the abnormal accumulation of LBs in SAMP ovaries. In the present study, to show the abnormality of Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas-mediated apoptosis signal transducing factors in the aaLBs of the SAMP ovaries, we assessed the changes in the expression of FasL, Fas, caspase-8 and caspase-3 mRNAs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and in the expression and localization of FasL, Fas and activated caspase-3 proteins by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively, during the estrus cycle/luteolysis. These mRNAs and proteins were expressed in normal LBs of both SAMP and SAMR ovaries, but not at all or only in trace amounts in aaLBs of SAMP, indicating that structural regression is inhibited by blockage of the expression of these transducing factors in luteal cells of aaLBs in SAMP mice. PMID:14967896

  14. Dynamic expression patterns of the new protocadherin families CNRs and Pcdh-gamma during mouse odontogenesis: comparison with reelin expression.

    PubMed

    Heymann, R; Kallenbach, S; Alonso, S; Carroll, P; Mitsiadis, T A

    2001-08-01

    Protocadherins are transmembrane glycoproteins belonging to the cadherin superfamily of molecules, which are involved in many biological processes such as cell adhesion, cytoskeletal organization and morphogenesis. Protocadherins generally exhibit only moderate adhesive activity and are highly expressed in the nervous system. Here, we report on the expression pattern of two novel families of protocadherins (CNRs and Pcdh-gamma) during rodent teeth development. Furthermore, we compare their expression with that of reelin, which is the potential ligand of CNRs. Throughout odontogenesis, CNRs, Pcdh-gamma and reelin show dynamic spatiotemporal expression patterns, which relate to both morphogenesis and cell differentiation events.

  15. Abnormal metabotropic glutamate receptor expression and signaling in the cerebral cortex in diffuse Lewy body disease is associated with irregular alpha-synuclein/phospholipase C (PLCbeta1) interactions.

    PubMed

    Dalfó, E; Albasanz, J L; Martin, M; Ferrer, I

    2004-10-01

    Diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD) is a degenerative disease of the nervous system, involving the brain stem, diencephalic nuclei and cerebral cortex, associated with abnormal a-synuclein aggregation and widespread formation of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. DLBD presents as pure forms (DLBDp) or in association with Alzheimer disease (AD) in the common forms (DLBDc). Several neurotransmitter abnormalities have been reported including those of the nigrostriatal and mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, and central noradrenergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic pathways. The present work examines metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) expression and signaling in the frontal cortex of DLBDp and DLBDc cases in comparison with age-matched controls. Abnormal L-[3H]glutamate specific binding to group I and II mGluRs, and abnormal mGluR1 levels have been found in DLBD. This is associated with reduced expression levels of phospholipase C beta1 (PLCbeta1), the effector of group I mGluRs following protein G activation upon glutamate binding. Additional modification in the solubility of PLCbeta1 and reduced PLCbeta1 activity in pure and common DLBD further demonstrates for the first time abnormal mGluR signaling in the cerebral cortex in DLBD. In order to look for a possible link between abnormal mGluR signaling and a-synuclein accumulation in DLBD, immunoprecipitation studies have shown alpha-synuclein/PLCbeta1 binding in controls and decreased alpha-synuclein/PLCbeta1 binding in DLBD. This is accompanied by a shift in the distribution of a-synuclein, but not of PLCbeta1, in DLBD when compared with controls. Together, these results support the concept that abnormal a-synuclein in DLBD produces functional effects on cortical glutamatergic synapses, which are associated with reduced alpha-synuclein/PLCbeta1 interactions, and, therefore, that mGluRs are putative pharmacological targets in DLBD. Finally, these results emphasize the emergence of a functional neuropathology that has

  16. Histopathological pattern of gonads in cases of sex abnormalities in dogs: An attempt of morphological evaluation involving potential for neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Dzimira, Stanislaw; Nizanski, Wojciech; Ochota, Malgorzata; Madej, Janusz A

    2015-10-01

    Disturbances in sex differentiation (DSD - disorder of sexual development) may result from disturbances in sex chromosomes or a disturbed development of gonads, or from genotypic disturbances. The objective of this article is to describe the histological structure of gonads in dogs showing sexual disturbances and a case of a cancer resembling gonadoblastoma in one of the animals. Among the 10 examined dogs with disturbances of sex development only a single case of a gonadoblastoma was observed. In animals with sex disturbances, similarly to humans, there exists a potential tendency for neoplastic lesions in dysgenetic gonads. As a rule, its frequency in population is confined due to the early procedure of castration of non-breeding dogs. In the present study dogs demonstrated phenotypical traits of bitches with developmental anomalies such as hyperplastic clitoris with vestigial os penis (baculum), or abnormalities in the location and structure of the vulva. The material for the study included canine gonads of various breeds, sampled from phenotypical bitches, aged 7 months to 4 years - patients of the Department of Reproduction and Clinic of Farm Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Environmental and Life Sciences in Wroclaw (Poland) in years 2006-2013. The organs were surgically removed from the abdomen and sent for histopathological examination for the purpose of determining their histological structure. The 10 examined cases of altered gonads included 6 bilateral cases of testes (60%), 2 cases of bilateral ovotestis (20%), one case of co-manifestation of testis and ovotestis (10%), and a single case of a testis and a neoplastically altered gonad (gonadoblastoma) (10%).

  17. Human COL2A1-directed SV40 T antigen expression in transgenic and chimeric mice results in abnormal skeletal development

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The ability of SV40 T antigen to cause abnormalities in cartilage development in transgenic mice and chimeras has been tested. The cis- regulatory elements of the COL2A1 gene were used to target expression of SV40 T antigen to differentiating chondrocytes in transgenic mice and chimeras derived from embryonal stem (ES) cells bearing the same transgene. The major phenotypic consequences of transgenic (pAL21) expression are malformed skeleton, disproportionate dwarfism, and perinatal/neonatal death. Expression of T antigen was tissue specific and in the main characteristic of the mouse alpha 1(II) collagen gene. Chondrocyte densities and levels of alpha 1(II) collagen mRNAs were reduced in the transgenic mice. Islands of cells which express cartilage characteristic genes such as type IIB procollagen, long form alpha 1(IX) collagen, alpha 2(XI) collagen, and aggrecan were found in the articular and growth cartilages of pAL21 chimeric fetuses and neonates. But these cells, which were expressing T antigen, were not properly organized into columns of proliferating chondrocytes. Levels of alpha 1(II) collagen mRNA were reduced in these chondrocytes. In addition, these cells did not express type X collagen, a marker for hypertrophic chondrocytes. The skeletal abnormality in pAL21 mice may therefore be due to a retardation of chondrocyte maturation or an impaired ability of chondrocytes to complete terminal differentiation and an associated paucity of some cartilage matrix components. PMID:7822417

  18. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  19. Coupled Positive and Negative Feedbacks Produce Diverse Gene Expression Patterns in Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Mitarai, Namiko; Jensen, Mogens Høgh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of multicellular organism as well as of microbial communities. To investigate the formation of gene expression patterns in colonies, we build a mathematical model of two-dimensional colony growth, where cells carry a coupled positive-and-negative-feedback circuit. We demonstrate that the model can produce sectored, target (concentric), uniform, and scattered expression patterns of regulators, depending on gene expression dynamics and nutrient diffusion. We reconstructed the same regulatory structure in Escherichia coli cells and found gene expression patterns on the surface of colonies similar to the ones produced by the computer simulations. By comparing computer simulations and experimental results, we observed that very simple rules of gene expression can yield a spectrum of well-defined patterns in a growing colony. Our results suggest that variations of the protein content among cells lead to a high level of heterogeneity in colonies. Importance Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of microbial communities. In this work, we show that a simple genetic circuit composed of a positive-feedback loop and a negative-feedback loop can produce diverse expression patterns in colonies. We obtained similar sets of gene expression patterns in the simulations and in the experiments. Because the combination of positive feedback and negative feedback is common in intracellular molecular networks, our results suggest that the protein content of cells is highly diversified in colonies. PMID:25852158

  20. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D H; Young, M A; Lamprecht, T L; Helton, N M; Fulton, R; O'Laughlin, M; Fronick, C; Magrini, V; Demeter, R T; Miller, C A; Klco, J M; Wilson, R K; Ley, T J

    2015-06-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34(+) cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements.

  1. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, David H.; Young, Margaret A.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Helton, Nichole M.; Fulton, Robert; O’Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan T.; Miller, Christopher A.; Klco, Jeffery M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34+ cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements. PMID:25600023

  2. Expression of the human PAC1 receptor leads to dose-dependent hydrocephalus-related abnormalities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Bing; Song, Bing; Davidson, Wendy; MacKenzie, Alastair; Smith, Norman; McCaig, Colin D.; Harmar, Anthony J.; Shen, Sanbing

    2006-01-01

    Hydrocephalus is a common and potentially devastating birth defect affecting the CNS, and its relationship with G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) is unknown. We have expressed 2, 4, or 6 copies of a GPCR — the human PAC1 receptor with a 130-kb transgene in the mouse nervous system in a pattern closely resembling that of the endogenous gene. Consistent with PAC1 actions, PKA and PKC activity were elevated in the brains of Tg mice. Remarkably, Tg mice developed dose-dependent hydrocephalus-like characteristics, including enlarged third and lateral ventricles and reduced cerebral cortex, corpus callosum, and subcommissural organ (SCO). Neuronal proliferation and apoptosis were implicated in hydrocephalus, and we observed significantly reduced neuronal proliferation and massively increased neuronal apoptosis in the developing cortex and SCO of Tg embryos, while neurite outgrowth and neuronal migration in vitro remain uncompromised. Ventricular ependymal cilia are crucial for directing cerebrospinal fluid flow, and ependyma of Tg mice exhibited disrupted cilia with increased phospho-CREB immunoreactivity. These data demonstrate that altered neuronal proliferation/apoptosis and disrupted ependymal cilia are the main factors contributing to hydrocephalus in PAC1-overexpressing mice. This is the first report to our knowledge demonstrating that misregulation of GPCRs can be involved in hydrocephalus-related neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:16823490

  3. Abnormal N-glycosylation pattern for brain nucleotide pyrophosphatase-5 (NPP-5) in Mecp2-mutant murine models of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cortelazzo, Alessio; De Felice, Claudio; Guerranti, Roberto; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Scalabrì, Francesco; Madonna, Michele; Filosa, Stefania; Della Giovampaola, Cinzia; Capone, Antonietta; Durand, Thierry; Mirasole, Cristiana; Zolla, Lello; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Guy, Jacky; D'Esposito, Maurizio; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Neurological disorders can be associated with protein glycosylation abnormalities. Rett syndrome is a devastating genetic brain disorder, mainly caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Although its pathogenesis appears to be closely associated with a redox imbalance, no information on glycosylation is available. Glycoprotein detection strategies (i.e., lectin-blotting) were applied to identify target glycosylation changes in the whole brain of Mecp2 mutant murine models of the disease. Remarkable glycosylation pattern changes for a peculiar 50kDa protein, i.e., the N-linked brain nucleotide pyrophosphatase-5 were evidenced, with decreased N-glycosylation in the presymptomatic and symptomatic mutant mice. Glycosylation changes were rescued by selected brain Mecp2 reactivation. Our findings indicate that there is a causal link between the amount of Mecp2 and the N-glycosylation of NPP-5.

  4. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  5. Preliminary study of the effect of abnormal savda munziq on TGF-β1 and Smad7 expression in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hujun; Gao, Weicheng; Kong, Menglong; Li, Nan; Ma, Shaolin

    2015-01-01

    Background: To study the effect of abnormal savda munziq (ASMq) on TGF-β1 and Smad7 expression in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFs) and to preliminarily assess the function of abnormal savda munziq in hypertrophic scar formation at the molecular biology level. Methods: HSFs were cultured in vitro. RT-PCR and Western-blot were used to investigate the influence of 48-h treatment with ASMq at different concentrations (0 mg/mL, 0.1 mg/mL, 0.4 mg/mL, and 0.7 mg/mL) on TGF-β1 and Smad7 mRNA and protein expression levels. Results: After 48-h treatment with ASMq, the expression of TGF-β1 mRNA and protein gradually decreased in HSFs as the concentration increased. In contrary, Smad7 mRNA and protein expression were positively correlated with ASMq concentration. Conclusions: ASMq reduces TGF-β1, increases Smad7 mRNA and protein expression through regulating TGFβ-1/Smad signaling pathway, inhibiting HSFs proliferation and reducing extracellular collagen deposition. PMID:25785025

  6. Downstream targets of methyl CpG binding protein 2 and their abnormal expression in the frontal cortex of the human Rett syndrome brain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Rett Syndrome (RTT) brain displays regional histopathology and volumetric reduction, with frontal cortex showing such abnormalities, whereas the occipital cortex is relatively less affected. Results Using microarrays and quantitative PCR, the mRNA expression profiles of these two neuroanatomical regions were compared in postmortem brain tissue from RTT patients and normal controls. A subset of genes was differentially expressed in the frontal cortex of RTT brains, some of which are known to be associated with neurological disorders (clusterin and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1) or are involved in synaptic vesicle cycling (dynamin 1). RNAi-mediated knockdown of MeCP2 in vitro, followed by further expression analysis demonstrated that the same direction of abnormal expression was recapitulated with MeCP2 knockdown, which for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 was associated with a functional respiratory chain defect. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that MeCP2 associated with the promoter regions of some of these genes suggesting that loss of MeCP2 function may be responsible for their overexpression. Conclusions This study has shed more light on the subset of aberrantly expressed genes that result from MECP2 mutations. The mitochondrion has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of RTT, however it has not been at the forefront of RTT research interest since the discovery of MECP2 mutations. The functional consequence of the underexpression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 indicates that this is an area that should be revisited. PMID:20420693

  7. Loss of prion protein leads to age-dependent behavioral abnormalities and changes in cytoskeletal protein expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a multifunctional protein, whose exact physiological role remains elusive. Since previous studies indicated a neuroprotective function of PrPC, we investigated whether Prnp knockout mice(Prnp0/0)display age-dependent behavioral abnormalities. Matched sets of Prnp0/0 ...

  8. Abnormal differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in zebrafish trpm7 mutant larvae impairs development of the motor pattern.

    PubMed

    Decker, Amanda R; McNeill, Matthew S; Lambert, Aaron M; Overton, Jeffrey D; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lorca, Ramón A; Johnson, Nicolas A; Brockerhoff, Susan E; Mohapatra, Durga P; MacArthur, Heather; Panula, Pertti; Masino, Mark A; Runnels, Loren W; Cornell, Robert A

    2014-02-15

    Transient receptor potential, melastatin-like 7 (Trpm7) is a combined ion channel and kinase implicated in the differentiation or function of many cell types. Early lethality in mice and frogs depleted of the corresponding gene impedes investigation of the functions of this protein particularly during later stages of development. By contrast, zebrafish trpm7 mutant larvae undergo early morphogenesis normally and thus do not have this limitation. The mutant larvae are characterized by multiple defects including melanocyte cell death, transient paralysis, and an ion imbalance that leads to the development of kidney stones. Here we report a requirement for Trpm7 in differentiation or function of dopaminergic neurons in vivo. First, trpm7 mutant larvae are hypomotile and fail to make a dopamine-dependent developmental transition in swim-bout length. Both of these deficits are partially rescued by the application of levodopa or dopamine. Second, histological analysis reveals that in trpm7 mutants a significant fraction of dopaminergic neurons lack expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. Third, trpm7 mutants are unusually sensitive to the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, an oxidative stressor, and their motility is partially rescued by application of the iron chelator deferoxamine, an anti-oxidant. Finally, in SH-SY5Y cells, which model aspects of human dopaminergic neurons, forced expression of a channel-dead variant of TRPM7 causes cell death. In summary, a forward genetic screen in zebrafish has revealed that both melanocytes and dopaminergic neurons depend on the ion channel Trpm7. The mechanistic underpinning of this dependence requires further investigation.

  9. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Network Security via Biometric Recognition of Patterns of Gene Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry C.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular biology provides the ability to implement forms of information and network security completely outside the bounds of legacy security protocols and algorithms. This paper addresses an approach which instantiates the power of gene expression for security. Molecular biology provides a rich source of gene expression and regulation mechanisms, which can be adopted to use in the information and electronic communication domains. Conventional security protocols are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to more intensive, highly capable attacks on the underlying mathematics of cryptography. Security protocols are being undermined by social engineering and substandard implementations by IT organizations. Molecular biology can provide countermeasures to these weak points with the current security approaches. Future advances in instruments for analyzing assays will also enable this protocol to advance from one of cryptographic algorithms to an integrated system of cryptographic algorithms and real-time expression and assay of gene expression products.

  11. Patterns of miRNA expression in Arctic charr development.

    PubMed

    Kapralova, Kalina H; Franzdóttir, Sigrídur Rut; Jónsson, Hákon; Snorrason, Sigurður S; Jónsson, Zophonías O

    2014-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as a major class of developmental regulators. Sequences of many miRNAs are highly conserved, yet they often exhibit temporal and spatial heterogeneity in expression among species and have been proposed as an important reservoir for adaptive evolution and divergence. With this in mind we studied miRNA expression during embryonic development of offspring from two contrasting morphs of the highly polymorphic salmonid Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), a small benthic morph from Lake Thingvallavatn (SB) and an aquaculture stock (AC). These morphs differ extensively in morphology and adult body size. We established offspring groups of the two morphs and sampled at several time points during development. Four time points (3 embryonic and one just before first feeding) were selected for high-throughput small-RNA sequencing. We identified a total of 326 conserved and 427 novel miRNA candidates in Arctic charr, of which 51 conserved and 6 novel miRNA candidates were differentially expressed among developmental stages. Furthermore, 53 known and 19 novel miRNAs showed significantly different levels of expression in the two contrasting morphs. Hierarchical clustering of the 53 conserved miRNAs revealed that the expression differences are confined to the embryonic stages, where miRNAs such as sal-miR-130, 30, 451, 133, 26 and 199a were highly expressed in AC, whereas sal-miR-146, 183, 206 and 196a were highly expressed in SB embryos. The majority of these miRNAs have previously been found to be involved in key developmental processes in other species such as development of brain and sensory epithelia, skeletogenesis and myogenesis. Four of the novel miRNA candidates were only detected in either AC or SB. miRNA candidates identified in this study will be combined with available mRNA expression data to identify potential targets and involvement in developmental regulation. PMID:25170615

  12. Patterns of MiRNA Expression in Arctic Charr Development

    PubMed Central

    Kapralova, Kalina H.; Franzdóttir, Sigrídur Rut; Jónsson, Hákon; Snorrason, Sigurður S.; Jónsson, Zophonías O.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as a major class of developmental regulators. Sequences of many miRNAs are highly conserved, yet they often exhibit temporal and spatial heterogeneity in expression among species and have been proposed as an important reservoir for adaptive evolution and divergence. With this in mind we studied miRNA expression during embryonic development of offspring from two contrasting morphs of the highly polymorphic salmonid Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), a small benthic morph from Lake Thingvallavatn (SB) and an aquaculture stock (AC). These morphs differ extensively in morphology and adult body size. We established offspring groups of the two morphs and sampled at several time points during development. Four time points (3 embryonic and one just before first feeding) were selected for high-throughput small-RNA sequencing. We identified a total of 326 conserved and 427 novel miRNA candidates in Arctic charr, of which 51 conserved and 6 novel miRNA candidates were differentially expressed among developmental stages. Furthermore, 53 known and 19 novel miRNAs showed significantly different levels of expression in the two contrasting morphs. Hierarchical clustering of the 53 conserved miRNAs revealed that the expression differences are confined to the embryonic stages, where miRNAs such as sal-miR-130, 30, 451, 133, 26 and 199a were highly expressed in AC, whereas sal-miR-146, 183, 206 and 196a were highly expressed in SB embryos. The majority of these miRNAs have previously been found to be involved in key developmental processes in other species such as development of brain and sensory epithelia, skeletogenesis and myogenesis. Four of the novel miRNA candidates were only detected in either AC or SB. miRNA candidates identified in this study will be combined with available mRNA expression data to identify potential targets and involvement in developmental regulation. PMID:25170615

  13. Patterned electrical activity modulates sodium channel expression in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Klein, Joshua P; Tendi, Elisabetta A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Fields, R Douglas; Waxman, Stephen G

    2003-10-15

    Peripheral nerve injury induces changes in the level of gene expression for sodium channels Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 within dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which may contribute to the development of hyperexcitability, ectopic neuronal discharge, and neuropathic pain. The mechanism of this change in sodium channel expression is unclear. Decreased availability of neurotrophic factors following axotomy contributes to these changes in gene transcription, but the question of whether changes in intrinsic neuronal activity levels alone can trigger changes in the expression of these sodium channels has not been addressed. We examined the effect of electrical stimulation on the expression of Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 by using cultured embryonic mouse sensory neurons under conditions in which nerve growth factor (NGF) was not limiting. Expression of Nav1.3 was not significantly changed following stimulation. In contrast, we observed activity-dependent down-regulation of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA and protein levels after stimulation, as demonstrated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. These results show that a change in neuronal activity can alter the expression of sodium channel genes in a subtype-specific manner, via a mechanism independent of NGF withdrawal. PMID:14515348

  14. Human speech- and reading-related genes display partially overlapping expression patterns in the marmoset brain.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masaki; Okanoya, Kazuo; Koike, Taku; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Shigeru; Iriki, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    Language is a characteristic feature of human communication. Several familial language impairments have been identified, and candidate genes for language impairments already isolated. Studies comparing expression patterns of these genes in human brain are necessary to further understanding of these genes. However, it is difficult to examine gene expression in human brain. In this study, we used a non-human primate (common marmoset; Callithrix jacchus) as a biological model of the human brain to investigate expression patterns of human speech- and reading-related genes. Expression patterns of speech disorder- (FoxP2, FoxP1, CNTNAP2, and CMIP) and dyslexia- (ROBO1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319) related genes were analyzed. We found the genes displayed overlapping expression patterns in the ocular, auditory, and motor systems. Our results enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying language impairments.

  15. Systemic and cell type-specific gene expression patterns in scleroderma skin

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Michael L.; Finlay, Deborah R.; Murray, John Isaac; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Pergamenschikov, Alexander; McCalmont, Timothy H.; Brown, Patrick O.; Botstein, David; Connolly, M. Kari

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays representing >12,000 human genes to characterize gene expression patterns in skin biopsies from individuals with a diagnosis of systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma. We found consistent differences in the patterns of gene expression between skin biopsies from individuals with scleroderma and those from normal, unaffected individuals. The biopsies from affected individuals showed nearly indistinguishable patterns of gene expression in clinically affected and clinically unaffected tissue, even though these were clearly distinguishable from the patterns found in similar tissue from unaffected individuals. Genes characteristically expressed in endothelial cells, B lymphocytes, and fibroblasts showed differential expression between scleroderma and normal biopsies. Analysis of lymphocyte populations in scleroderma skin biopsies by immunohistochemistry suggest the B lymphocyte signature observed on our arrays is from CD20+ B cells. These results provide evidence that scleroderma has systemic manifestations that affect multiple cell types and suggests genes that could be used as potential markers for the disease. PMID:14530402

  16. Tualang Honey Protects against BPA-Induced Morphological Abnormalities and Disruption of ERα, ERβ, and C3 mRNA and Protein Expressions in the Uterus of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Zaid, Siti Sarah; Kassim, Normadiah M.; Othman, Shatrah

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that can disrupt the normal functions of the reproductive system. The objective of the study is to investigate the potential protective effects of Tualang honey against BPA-induced uterine toxicity in pubertal rats. The rats were administered with BPA by oral gavage over a period of six weeks. Uterine toxicity in BPA-exposed rats was determined by the degree of the morphological abnormalities, increased lipid peroxidation, and dysregulated expression and distribution of ERα, ERβ, and C3 as compared to the control rats. Concurrent treatment of rats with BPA and Tualang honey significantly improved the uterine morphological abnormalities, reduced lipid peroxidation, and normalized ERα, ERβ, and C3 expressions and distribution. There were no abnormal changes observed in rats treated with Tualang honey alone, comparable with the control rats. In conclusion, Tualang honey has potential roles in protecting the uterus from BPA-induced toxicity, possibly accounted for by its phytochemical properties. PMID:26788107

  17. 3D expression patterns of cell cycle genes in the developing chick wing and comparison with expression patterns of genes implicated in digit specification.

    PubMed

    Welten, Monique; Pavlovska, Gordana; Chen, Yu; Teruoka, Yuko; Fisher, Malcolm; Bangs, Fiona; Towers, Matthew; Tickle, Cheryll

    2011-05-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling controls integrated specification of digit pattern and growth in the chick wing but downstream gene networks remain to be unravelled. We analysed 3D expression patterns of genes encoding cell cycle regulators using Optical Projection Tomography. Hierarchical clustering of spatial matrices of gene expression revealed a dorsal layer of the wing bud, in which almost all genes were expressed, and that genes encoding positive cell cycle regulators had similar expression patterns while those of N-myc and CyclinD2 were distinct but closely related. We compared these patterns computationally with those of genes implicated in digit specification and Ptch1, 50 genes in total. Nineteen genes have similar posterior expression to Ptch1, including Hoxd13, Sall1, Hoxd11, and Bmp2, all likely Gli targets in mouse limb, and cell cycle genes, N-myc, CyclinD2. We suggest that these genes contribute to a network integrating digit specification and growth in response to Shh.

  18. [Phylogenetic analysis and expression patterns of tropomyosin in amphioxus].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Yi; Lin, Yu-Shuang; Zhang, Hong-Wei

    2012-08-01

    In amphioxus, we found a mesoderm related gene, tropomyosin, which encodes a protein comprising 284 amino acid residues, sharing high identities with other known Tropomyosin proteins both in vertebrates and invertebrates. Phylogenetically, amphioxus Tropomyosin fell outside the invertebrate clade and was at the base of the vertebrate protein family clade, indicating that it may represent an independent branch. From the early neurula to the larva stage, whole-mount in situ hybridization and histological sections found transcripts of amphioxus tropomyosin gene. Weak tropomyosin expression was first detected in the wall of the archenteron at about 10 hours-post-fertilization neurula stage, while intense expression was revealed in the differentiating presumptive notochord and the muscle. Transcripts of tropomyosin were then expressed in the formed notochord and somites. Gene expression seemed to continue in these developing organs throughout the neurular stages and remained till 72-hours, during the early larval stages. In situ study still showed tropomyosin was also expressed in the neural tube, hepatic diverticulum, notochord and the spaces between myotomes in adult amphioxus. Our results indicated that tropomyosin may play an important role in both embryonic development and adult life.

  19. Microspatial gene expression patterns in the Amazon River Plume.

    PubMed

    Satinsky, Brandon M; Crump, Byron C; Smith, Christa B; Sharma, Shalabh; Zielinski, Brian L; Doherty, Mary; Meng, Jun; Sun, Shulei; Medeiros, Patricia M; Paul, John H; Coles, Victoria J; Yager, Patricia L; Moran, Mary Ann

    2014-07-29

    We investigated expression of genes mediating elemental cycling at the microspatial scale in the ocean's largest river plume using, to our knowledge, the first fully quantitative inventory of genes and transcripts. The bacterial and archaeal communities associated with a phytoplankton bloom in Amazon River Plume waters at the outer continental shelf in June 2010 harbored ∼ 1.0 × 10(13) genes and 4.7 × 10(11) transcripts per liter that mapped to several thousand microbial genomes. Genomes from free-living cells were more abundant than those from particle-associated cells, and they generated more transcripts per liter for carbon fixation, heterotrophy, nitrogen and phosphorus uptake, and iron acquisition, although they had lower expression ratios (transcripts ⋅ gene(-1)) overall. Genomes from particle-associated cells contributed more transcripts for sulfur cycling, aromatic compound degradation, and the synthesis of biologically essential vitamins, with an overall twofold up-regulation of expression compared with free-living cells. Quantitatively, gene regulation differences were more important than genome abundance differences in explaining why microenvironment transcriptomes differed. Taxa contributing genomes to both free-living and particle-associated communities had up to 65% of their expressed genes regulated differently between the two, quantifying the extent of transcriptional plasticity in marine microbes in situ. In response to patchiness in carbon, nutrients, and light at the micrometer scale, Amazon Plume microbes regulated the expression of genes relevant to biogeochemical processes at the ecosystem scale.

  20. The legacy of diploid progenitors in allopolyploid gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Buggs, Richard J. A.; Wendel, Jonathan F.; Doyle, Jeffrey J.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Coate, Jeremy E.

    2014-01-01

    Allopolyploidization (hybridization and whole-genome duplication) is a common phenomenon in plant evolution with immediate saltational effects on genome structure and gene expression. New technologies have allowed rapid progress over the past decade in our understanding of the consequences of allopolyploidy. A major question, raised by early pioneer of this field Leslie Gottlieb, concerned the extent to which gene expression differences among duplicate genes present in an allopolyploid are a legacy of expression differences that were already present in the progenitor diploid species. Addressing this question necessitates phylogenetically well-understood natural study systems, appropriate technology, availability of genomic resources and a suitable analytical framework, including a sufficiently detailed and generally accepted terminology. Here, we review these requirements and illustrate their application to a natural study system that Gottlieb worked on and recommended for this purpose: recent allopolyploids of Tragopogon (Asteraceae). We reanalyse recent data from this system within the conceptual framework of parental legacies on duplicate gene expression in allopolyploids. On a broader level, we highlight the intellectual connection between Gottlieb's phrasing of this issue and the more contemporary framework of cis- versus trans-regulation of duplicate gene expression in allopolyploid plants. PMID:24958927

  1. Prognostic Value of Abnormal p53 Expression in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated With Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy: A Study Based on RTOG 9202

    SciTech Connect

    Che Mingxin DeSilvio, Michelle; Pollack, Alan; Grignon, David J.; Venkatesan, Varagur Mohan; Hanks, Gerald E.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to verify the significance of p53 as a prognostic factor in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9202, which compared short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) with radiation therapy (RT) to long-term androgen deprivation + RT in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (Pca). Methods and Materials: Tumor tissue was sufficient for p53 analysis in 777 cases. p53 status was determined by immunohistochemistry. Abnormal p53 expression was defined as 20% or more tumor cells with positive nuclei. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationships of p53 status to patient outcomes. Results: Abnormal p53 was detected in 168 of 777 (21.6%) cases, and was significantly associated with cause-specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 - 3.14; p = 0.014) and distant metastasis (adjusted HR = 1.72; 95% CI 1.13-2.62; p = 0.013). When patients were divided into subgroups according to assigned treatment, only the subgroup of patients who underwent STAD + RT showed significant correlation between p53 status and cause-specific mortality (adjusted HR = 2.43; 95% CI = 1.32-4.49; p = 0.0044). When patients were divided into subgroups according to p53 status, only the subgroup of patients with abnormal p53 showed significant association between assigned treatment and cause-specific mortality (adjusted HR = 3.81; 95% CI 1.40-10.37; p = 0.0087). Conclusions: Abnormal p53 is a significant prognostic factor for patients with prostate cancer who undergo short-term androgen deprivation and radiotherapy. Long-term androgen deprivation may significantly improve the cause-specific survival for those with abnormal p53.

  2. Network Security via Biometric Recognition of Patterns of Gene Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry C.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular biology provides the ability to implement forms of information and network security completely outside the bounds of legacy security protocols and algorithms. This paper addresses an approach which instantiates the power of gene expression for security. Molecular biology provides a rich source of gene expression and regulation mechanisms, which can be adopted to use in the information and electronic communication domains. Conventional security protocols are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to more intensive, highly capable attacks on the underlying mathematics of cryptography. Security protocols are being undermined by social engineering and substandard implementations by IT (Information Technology) organizations. Molecular biology can provide countermeasures to these weak points with the current security approaches. Future advances in instruments for analyzing assays will also enable this protocol to advance from one of cryptographic algorithms to an integrated system of cryptographic algorithms and real-time assays of gene expression products.

  3. Conditional Expression of Parkinson's Disease-Related R1441C LRRK2 in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons of Mice Causes Nuclear Abnormalities without Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tsika, Elpida; Kannan, Meghna; Foo, Caroline Shi-Yan; Dikeman, Dustin; Glauser, Liliane; Gellhaar, Sandra; Galter, Dagmar; Knott, Graham W.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). The clinical and neurochemical features of LRRK2-linked PD are similar to idiopathic disease although neuropathology is somewhat heterogeneous. Dominant mutations in LRRK2 precipitate neurodegeneration through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism which can be modeled in transgenic mice overexpressing human LRRK2 variants. A number of LRRK2 transgenic mouse models have been developed that display abnormalities in dopaminergic neurotransmission and alterations in tau metabolism yet without consistently inducing dopaminergic neurodegeneration. To directly explore the impact of mutant LRRK2 on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway, we developed conditional transgenic mice that selectively express human R1441C LRRK2 in dopaminergic neurons from the endogenous murine ROSA26 promoter. The expression of R1441C LRRK2 does not induce the degeneration of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons or striatal dopamine deficits in mice up to 2 years of age, and fails to precipitate abnormal protein inclusions containing alpha-synuclein, tau, ubiquitin or autophagy markers (LC3 and p62). Furthermore, mice expressing R1441C LRRK2 exhibit normal motor activity and olfactory function with increasing age. Intriguingly, the expression of R1441C LRRK2 induces age-dependent abnormalities of the nuclear envelope in nigral dopaminergic neurons including reduced nuclear circularity and increased invaginations of the nuclear envelope. In addition, R1441C LRRK2 mice display increased neurite complexity of cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Collectively, these novel R1441C LRRK2 conditional transgenic mice reveal altered dopaminergic neuronal morphology with advancing age, and provide a useful tool for exploring the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the R1441C LRRK2 mutation in PD. PMID:25174890

  4. Binary Gene Expression Patterning of the Molt Cycle: The Case of Chitin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Abehsera, Shai; Glazer, Lilah; Tynyakov, Jenny; Plaschkes, Inbar; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Khalaila, Isam; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Sagi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    In crustaceans, like all arthropods, growth is accompanied by a molting cycle. This cycle comprises major physiological events in which mineralized chitinous structures are built and degraded. These events are in turn governed by genes whose patterns of expression are presumably linked to the molting cycle. To study these genes we performed next generation sequencing and constructed a molt-related transcriptomic library from two exoskeletal-forming tissues of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, namely the gastrolith and the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium. To simplify the study of such a complex process as molting, a novel approach, binary patterning of gene expression, was employed. This approach revealed that key genes involved in the synthesis and breakdown of chitin exhibit a molt-related pattern in the gastrolith-forming epithelium. On the other hand, the same genes in the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium showed a molt-independent pattern of expression. Genes related to the metabolism of glucosamine-6-phosphate, a chitin precursor synthesized from simple sugars, showed a molt-related pattern of expression in both tissues. The binary patterning approach unfolds typical patterns of gene expression during the molt cycle of a crustacean. The use of such a simplifying integrative tool for assessing gene patterning seems appropriate for the study of complex biological processes. PMID:25919476

  5. Aberrant gene expression patterns in extraembryonic tissue from cloned porcine embryos.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Ryung; Im, Gi-Sun; Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seongsoo; Park, Jae-Hong; Kim, Hyun; Do, Yoon Jung; Park, Soo Bon; Yang, Bo-Suck; Song, Young Min; Cho, Jae-Hyeon; Ko, Yeoung-Gyu

    2013-06-01

    The abnormal development of embryos reconstructed by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is considered to be associated with consequent changes in gene expression following errors in epigenetic reprogramming. In this study, we carried out SCNT using donor fibroblast cells derived from 3-way hybrids (Landrace×Duroc×Yorkshire). A total of 655 SCNT embryos were transferred, and 6.97±2.3 cloned fetuses were successfully recovered from three surrogates at gestational day 30. An analysis of the 6.97±2.3 cloned embryos revealed that most had severe extraembryonic defects. The extraembryonic tissue from the SCNT embryos was abnormally small compared with that of the control. To investigate the differentially expressed genes between the SCNT and control extraembryonic tissues, we compared the gene expression profiles of the extraembryonic tissues from gestational day 30 cloned pig embryos with those from the control using an annealing control primer-based GeneFishing polymerase chain reaction. As a result, we found that a total of 50 genes were differentially expressed by utilizing 120 ACPs, 38 genes of which were known. Among them, 26 genes were up-regulated, whereas 12 genes were down-regulated. Real-time RT-PCR showed that apoptosis-related genes were expressed significantly higher in SCNT extraembryonic tissue than in the control, whereas metabolism-related genes were expressed at significantly lower levels in the SCNT extraembryonic tissue. These observations strongly indicate that early gestational death of SCNT embryo is caused, at least in part, by the disruption of developing extraembryonic tissues as a result of aberrant gene expression, which results in abnormal apoptosis and metabolism.

  6. Temporal patterns of gene expression during calyx of held development.

    PubMed

    Kolson, Douglas R; Wan, Jun; Wu, Jonathan; Dehoff, Marlin; Brandebura, Ashley N; Qian, Jiang; Mathers, Peter H; Spirou, George A

    2016-02-01

    Relating changes in gene expression to discrete developmental events remains an elusive challenge in neuroscience, in part because most neural territories are comprised of multiple cell types that mature over extended periods of time. The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) is an attractive vertebrate model system that contains a nearly homogeneous population of neurons, which are innervated by large glutamatergic nerve terminals called calyces of Held (CH). Key steps in maturation of CHs and MNTB neurons, including CH growth and competition, occur very quickly for most cells between postnatal days (P)2 and P6. Therefore, we characterized genome-wide changes in this system, with dense temporal sampling during the first postnatal week. We identified 541 genes whose expression changed significantly between P0-6 and clustered them into eight groups based on temporal expression profiles. Candidate genes from each of the eight profile groups were validated in separate samples by qPCR. Our tissue sample permitted comparison of known glial and neuronal transcripts and revealed that monotonically increasing or decreasing expression profiles tended to be associated with glia and neurons, respectively. Gene ontology revealed enrichment of genes involved in axon pathfinding, cell differentiation, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix. The latter category included elements of perineuronal nets, a prominent feature of MNTB neurons that is morphologically distinct by P6, when CH growth and competition are resolved onto nearly all MNTB neurons. These results provide a genetic framework for investigation of general mechanisms responsible for nerve terminal growth and maturation.

  7. Macrophage polarization alters the expression and sulfation pattern of glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Denys, Agnès; Delos, Maxime; Sikora, Anne-Sophie; Carpentier, Mathieu; Julien, Sylvain; Pestel, Joël; Allain, Fabrice

    2015-05-01

    Macrophages are major cells of inflammatory process and take part in a large number of physiological and pathological processes. According to tissue environment, they can polarize into pro-inflammatory (M1) or alternative (M2) cells. Although many evidences have hinted to a potential role of cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the functions of macrophages, the effect of M1 or M2 polarization on the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides has not been investigated so far. GAGs are composed of repeat sulfated disaccharide units. Heparan (HS) and chondroitin/dermatan sulfates (CS/DS) are the major GAGs expressed at the cell membrane. They are involved in numerous biological processes, which rely on their ability to selectively interact with a large panel of proteins. More than 20 genes encoding sulfotransferases have been implicated in HS and CS/DS biosynthesis, and the functional repertoire of HS and CS/DS has been related to the expression of these isoenzymes. In this study, we analyzed the expression of sulfotransferases as a response to macrophage polarization. We found that M1 and M2 activation drastically modified the profiles of expression of numerous HS and CS/DS sulfotransferases. This was accompanied by the expression of GAGs with distinct structural features. We then demonstrated that GAGs of M2 macrophages were efficient to present fibroblast growth factor-2 in an assay of tumor cell proliferation, thus indicating that changes in GAG structure may contribute to the functions of polarized macrophages. Altogether, our findings suggest a regulatory mechanism in which fine modifications in GAG biosynthesis may participate to the plasticity of macrophage functions.

  8. EMAGE: a spatial database of gene expression patterns during mouse embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Jeffrey H.; Yang, Yiya; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Richardson, Lorna; Stevenson, Peter; Burton, Nicholas; Baldock, Richard A.; Davidson, Duncan R.

    2006-01-01

    EMAGE () is a freely available, curated database of gene expression patterns generated by in situ techniques in the developing mouse embryo. It is unique in that it contains standardized spatial representations of the sites of gene expression for each gene, denoted against a set of virtual reference embryo models. As such, the data can be interrogated in a novel and abstract manner by using space to define a query. Accompanying the spatial representations of gene expression patterns are text descriptions of the sites of expression, which also allows searching of the data by more conventional text-based methods. PMID:16381949

  9. Distinct patterns of expression but similar biochemical properties of protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Thapar, N; Kim, A K; Clarke, S

    2001-02-01

    Protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase is a widely distributed repair enzyme that initiates the conversion of abnormal L-isoaspartyl residues to their normal L-aspartyl forms. Here we show that this activity is expressed in developing corn (Zea mays) and carrot (Daucus carota var. Danvers Half Long) plants in patterns distinct from those previously seen in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Augusta) and thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), whereas the pattern of expression observed in rice (Oryza sativa) is similar to that of winter wheat. Although high levels of activity are found in the seeds of all of these plants, relatively high levels of activity in vegetative tissues are only found in corn and carrot. The activity in leaves was found to decrease with aging, an unexpected finding given the postulated role of this enzyme in repairing age-damaged proteins. In contrast with the situation in wheat and Arabidopsis, we found that osmotic or salt stress could increase the methyltransferase activity in newly germinated seeds (but not in seeds or seedlings), whereas abscisic acid had no effect. We found that the corn, rice, and carrot enzymes have comparable affinity for methyl-accepting substrates and similar optimal temperatures for activity of 45 degrees C to 55 degrees C as the wheat and Arabidopsis enzymes. These experiments suggest that this enzyme may have specific roles in different plant tissues despite a common catalytic function.

  10. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  11. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  12. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  13. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  14. Spatio-Temporal Expression Pattern of Frizzled Receptors after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Ernest; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Wnt proteins are a large family of molecules that are critically involved in multiple central nervous system (CNS) developmental processes. Experimental evidences suggest a role for this family of proteins in many CNS disorders, including spinal cord injury (SCI), which is a major neuropathology owing to its high prevalence and chronic sensorimotor functional sequelae. Interestingly, most Wnt proteins and their inhibitors are expressed in the uninjured spinal cord, and their temporal expression patterns are dramatically altered after injury. However, little is known regarding the expression of their better-known receptors, the Frizzled family, after SCI. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of Frizzled receptors in the damaged spinal cord. Findings Based on the evidence that Wnts are expressed in the spinal cord and are transcriptionally regulated by SCI in adulthood, we analysed the spatio-temporal mRNA and protein expression patterns of Frizzled receptors after contusive SCI using quantitative RT-PCR and single and double immunohistochemistry, respectively. Our results show that almost all of the 10 known Frizzled receptors were expressed in specific spatial patterns in the uninjured spinal cords. Moreover, the Frizzled mRNAs and proteins were expressed after SCI, although their expression patterns were altered during the temporal progression of SCI. Finally, analysis of cellular Frizzled 5 expression pattern by double immunohistochemistry showed that, in the uninjured spinal cord, this receptor was expressed in neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, microglia and NG2+ glial precursors. After injury, Frizzled 5 was not only still expressed in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and NG2+ glial precursors but also in axons at all evaluated time points. Moreover, Frizzled 5 was expressed in reactive microglia/macrophages from 3 to 14 days post-injury. Conclusions Our data suggest the involvement of Frizzled receptors in physiological

  15. Spatiotemporal patterns of Musashi1 expression during inner ear development.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Yaoi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Hisa, Yasuo; Fushiki, Shinji

    2004-04-29

    Musashi1 (Msi 1) is an RNA binding protein associated with asymmetric cell divisions in neural progenitor cells. To investigate the involvement of Msi1 in the inner ear development, we studied the expression of Msi1 in mouse inner ears with RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Msi1 was expressed in all otocyst cells at embryonic day (E) 10 and 12. Msi1 immunoreactivity became lost in hair cells after E14 in vestibule and after E16 in cochlea, whereas it persisted in supporting cells until adulthood. The subcellular localization of Msi1 changed from "cytoplasmic predominance" to "nuclear predominance" during the first 2 weeks after birth. The present data suggested that Msi may play a role in inner ear development. PMID:15076722

  16. Abnormal Expression of Golgi Protein 73 in Clinical Values and Their Role in HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma Diagnosis and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Sai, Wenli; Wang, Li; Zheng, Wenjie; Yang, Junling; Pan, Liuhong; Cai, Yin; Qiu, Liwei; Zhang, Haijian; Wu, Wei; Yao, Dengfu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The up-regulation of hepatic Golgi protein 73 (GP73) is associated with the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the exact mechanism and clinical values of its diagnosis and prognosis still need to be clarified. Objectives: To investigate the clinical values of abnormal liver or circulating GP73 expression and their effect on HCC diagnosis and prognosis. Materials and Methods: The expression of GP73 was investigated in 88 cancerous and self-control non-cancerous tissues using tissue microarrays with immunohisto- chemistry and was confirmed by Western blotting. Circulating GP73 levels were detected in the sera of 281 patients with liver diseases using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The levels of circulating GP73 expression in the HCC group were higher than those in any group of benign liver diseases or controls. No significant difference was found between GP73 expression and patients’ sex or age, tumor size, or AFP level except for those with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or distal metastasis (P < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, and specificity for HCC diagnosis were 0.881, 78.34%, and 77.59% for GP73 levels over 70 μg/L or 0.754, 71.97%, and 84.48% for alpha-fetoprotein levels over 50 μg/L, respectively. The total incidence of GP73 plus alpha-fetoprotein was up to 87.26% for HCC. A positive GP73 result with brown particles was mainly located in the cytosol, with a few in the nucleus and none in the cell membrane, with abnormal expression in HCC tissues (480.7 ± 148.7) that was significantly higher (t = 10.730, P < 0.001) than those in their non-cancerous tissues (208.0 ± 66.1). The high GP73 expression in HCC was related to lymph node metastasis (χ2 = 6.940, P = 0.008), gross classification (χ2 = 6.311, P = 0.012), HBV (χ2 = 4.803, P = 0.028), tumor node metastasis staging (χ2 = 4.887, P = 0.027), and five-year survival (χ2 = 5.206, P = 0.023). Conclusions

  17. Conservation and evolutionary modifications of neuroblast expression patterns in insects.

    PubMed

    Biffar, Lucia; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2014-04-01

    One of the major questions in evolutionary developmental neurobiology is how neuronal networks have been adapted to different morphologies and behaviour during evolution. Analyses of neurogenesis in representatives of all arthropod species have revealed evolutionary modifications of various developmental mechanisms. Among others, variations can be seen in mechanisms that are associated with changes in neural progenitor identity, which in turn determines the neuronal subtype of their progeny. Comparative analyses of the molecular processes that underlie the generation of neuronal identity might therefore uncover the steps of evolutionary changes that eventually resulted in modifications in neuronal networks. Here we address this question in the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum by analyzing and comparing the development and expression profile of neural stem cells (neuroblasts) to the published neuroblast map of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. We show that substantial changes in the identity of neuroblasts have occurred during insect evolution. In almost all neuroblasts the relative positions in the ventral hemi-neuromeres are conserved; however, in over half of the neuroblasts the time of formation as well as the gene expression profile has changed. The neuroblast map presented here can be used for future comparative studies on individual neuroblast lineages in D. melanogaster and T. castaneum and additional markers and information on lineages can be added. Our data suggest that evolutionary changes in the expression profile of individual neuroblasts might have contributed to the evolution of neural diversity and subsequently to changes in neuronal networks in arthropod.

  18. PROTEIN L-ISOASPARTYL METHYLTRANSFERASE2 is differentially expressed in chickpea and enhances seed vigor and longevity by reducing abnormal isoaspartyl accumulation predominantly in seed nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pooja; Kaur, Harmeet; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Rao, Venkateswara; Saxena, Saurabh C; Majee, Manoj

    2013-03-01

    PROTEIN l-ISOASPARTYL METHYLTRANSFERASE (PIMT) is a widely distributed protein-repairing enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of abnormal l-isoaspartyl residues in spontaneously damaged proteins to normal aspartyl residues. This enzyme is encoded by two divergent genes (PIMT1 and PIMT2) in plants, unlike many other organisms. While the biological role of PIMT1 has been elucidated, the role and significance of the PIMT2 gene in plants is not well defined. Here, we isolated the PIMT2 gene (CaPIMT2) from chickpea (Cicer arietinum), which exhibits a significant increase in isoaspartyl residues in seed proteins coupled with reduced germination vigor under artificial aging conditions. The CaPIMT2 gene is found to be highly divergent and encodes two possible isoforms (CaPIMT2 and CaPIMT2') differing by two amino acids in the region I catalytic domain through alternative splicing. Unlike CaPIMT1, both isoforms possess a unique 56-amino acid amino terminus and exhibit similar yet distinct enzymatic properties. Expression analysis revealed that CaPIMT2 is differentially regulated by stresses and abscisic acid. Confocal visualization of stably expressed green fluorescent protein-fused PIMT proteins and cell fractionation-immunoblot analysis revealed that apart from the plasma membrane, both CaPIMT2 isoforms localize predominantly in the nucleus, while CaPIMT1 localizes in the cytosol. Remarkably, CaPIMT2 enhances seed vigor and longevity by repairing abnormal isoaspartyl residues predominantly in nuclear proteins upon seed-specific expression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), while CaPIMT1 enhances seed vigor and longevity by repairing such abnormal proteins mainly in the cytosolic fraction. Together, our data suggest that CaPIMT2 has most likely evolved through gene duplication, followed by subfunctionalization to specialize in repairing the nuclear proteome.

  19. Decreased HCN2 expression in STN contributes to abnormal high-voltage spindles in the cortex and globus pallidus of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Zhang, Jia-Rui; Chen, Lei; Ge, Shun-Nan; Wang, Ju-Lei; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Jia, Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ling; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2015-08-27

    Abnormal oscillation in the cortical-basal ganglia loop is involved in the pathophysiology of parkinsonism. High-voltage spindles (HVSs), one of the main type abnormal oscillations in Parkinson's disease, are regulated by dopamine D2-like receptors but not D1-like receptors. However, little is known about how dopamine D2-like receptors regulate HVSs and the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated2 (HCN2) in HVSs regulation. We simultaneously recorded the local field potential (LFP) in globus pallidus (GP) and electrocorticogram (ECoG) in primary motor cortex (M1) in freely moving 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned or control rats. The expression of HCN2 and dopamine D2 receptor in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was examined by immunochemical staining and Western blotting. We also tested the role of HCN2 in HVSs regulation by using pharmacological and shRNA methodology. We found that dopamine D2-like receptor agonists suppressed the increased HVSs in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. HCN2 was co-expressed with dopamine D2 receptor in the STN, and dopamine depletion decreased the expression of HCN2 as well as dopamine D2 receptor which contribute to the regulation of HVSs. HCN2 was down regulated by HCN2 shRNA, which thereby led to an increase in the HVSs in naïve rats while HCN2 agonist reduced the HVSs in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These results suggest that HCN2 in the STN is involved in abnormal oscillation regulation between M1 cortex and GP.

  20. Inducible Expression of a Truncated Form of Tau in Oligodendrocytes Elicits Gait Abnormalities and a Decrease in Myelin: Implications for Selective CNS Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    LoPresti, Patrizia

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton protein Tau present in oligodendrocytes (OLGs) promotes cellular process outgrowth and myelination; whereas abnormally hyperphosphorylated Tau has been shown to be present in the most debilitating form of multiple sclerosis and in selective dementias. This research examined the functional consequences of expressing a truncated form of Tau in OLGs during the second postnatal life. In particular, this truncated form of Tau (∆Tau) retains the Fyn-binding domain but lacks the microtubule-binding domain. Similar to hyperphosphorylated Tau, ∆Tau cannot bind the cytoskeleton and is missorted. The Cre/loxP recombination system was used to generate transgenic (TG) founder lines, which contain a Floxed LacZ-STOP cassette to prevent expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-∆Tau. The founder lines were then crossed with a Tamoxifen (TM)-inducible proteolipid protein (PLP)-dependent Cre driver line. Myelin PLP is the major myelin protein in the central nervous system (CNS). TM was given at postnatal day (p) 12 for 3 days, and CNS tissues were collected at p22. Only TG mice with both EGFP-∆Tau and Cre manifested an overt phenotype of loss of balance and stumbles starting around p18. CNS tissues obtained from TM-treated EGFP-∆Tau/Cre double transgenic mice had recombined PCR products, GFP, and diminished brain myelin. GFP was expressed in OLGs, but not in neurons or astrocytes. On the contrary, TM-treated TG mice with only one of the two transgenes, i.e., Cre or Tau, did not have recombinant PCR products, GFP, diminished myelin, or abnormal phenotype. Thus, this inducible model shows for the first time that a non-microtubule-associated Tau protein in OLGs elicits both myelin decrease and gait abnormalities, similar to the occurrence in selective demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Saha, Tusar T; Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation-regulated mainly by HR3-occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  2. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Saha, Tusar T; Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation-regulated mainly by HR3-occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  3. Distinct Expression Pattern of a Deafness Gene, KIAA1199, in a Primate Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Makoto; Fujioka, Masato; Okano, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Deafness is one of the most common types of congenital impairments, and at least half of the cases are caused by hereditary mutations. Mutations of the gene KIAA1199 are associated with progressive hearing loss. Its expression is abundant in human cochlea, but interestingly the spatial expression patterns are different between mouse and rat cochleae; the pattern in humans has not been fully investigated. We performed immunohistochemical analysis of a nonhuman primate, common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), cochlea with a KIAA1199-specific antibody. In the common marmoset cochlea, KIAA1199 protein expression was more widespread than in rodents, with all epithelial cells, including hair cells, expressing KIAA1199. Our results suggest that the primate pattern of KIAA1199 expression is wider in comparison with rodents and may play an essential role in the maintenance of cochlear epithelial cells. PMID:27403418

  4. Distinct Expression Pattern of a Deafness Gene, KIAA1199, in a Primate Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Hosoya, Makoto; Okano, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Deafness is one of the most common types of congenital impairments, and at least half of the cases are caused by hereditary mutations. Mutations of the gene KIAA1199 are associated with progressive hearing loss. Its expression is abundant in human cochlea, but interestingly the spatial expression patterns are different between mouse and rat cochleae; the pattern in humans has not been fully investigated. We performed immunohistochemical analysis of a nonhuman primate, common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), cochlea with a KIAA1199-specific antibody. In the common marmoset cochlea, KIAA1199 protein expression was more widespread than in rodents, with all epithelial cells, including hair cells, expressing KIAA1199. Our results suggest that the primate pattern of KIAA1199 expression is wider in comparison with rodents and may play an essential role in the maintenance of cochlear epithelial cells. PMID:27403418

  5. Integrative analysis of lung development-cancer expression associations reveals the roles of signatures with inverse expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlong; Li, Chunquan; Xu, Yanjun; Feng, Li; Shang, Desi; Yang, Xinmiao; Han, Junwei; Sun, Zeguo; Li, Yixue; Li, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have focused on exploring the associations between organ development and malignant tumors; however, the clinical relevance of the development signatures was inadequately addressed in lung cancer. In this study, we explored the associations between lung development and lung cancer progression by analyzing a total of two development and seven cancer datasets. We identified representative expression patterns (continuously up- and down-regulated) from development and cancer profiles, and inverse pattern associations were observed at both the gene and functional levels. Furthermore, we dissected the biological processes dominating the associations, and found that proliferation and immunity were respectively involved in the two inverse development-cancer expression patterns. Through sub-pathway analysis of the signatures with inverse expression patterns, we finally identified a 13-gene risk signature from the cell cycle sub-pathway, and evaluated its predictive performance for lung cancer patient clinical outcome using independent cohorts. Our findings indicated that the integrative analysis of development and cancer expression patterns provided a framework for identifying effective molecular signatures for clinical utility.

  6. Altered mRNA Splicing, Chondrocyte Gene Expression and Abnormal Skeletal Development due to SF3B4 Mutations in Rodriguez Acrofacial Dysostosis

    PubMed Central

    Nevarez, Lisette; Pogue, Robert; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The acrofacial dysostoses (AFD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome is a severe, usually perinatal lethal AFD, characterized by severe retrognathia, oligodactyly and lower limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome has been proposed to be a severe form of Nager syndrome, a non-lethal AFD that results from mutations in SF3B4, a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U2 snRNP). Furthermore, a case with a phenotype intermediate between Rodriguez and Nager syndromes has been shown to have an SF3B4 mutation. We identified heterozygosity for SF3B4 mutations in Rodriguez syndrome, confirming that the phenotype is a dominant disorder that is allelic with Nager syndrome. The mutations led to reduced SF3B4 synthesis and defects in mRNA splicing, primarily exon skipping. The mutations also led to reduced expression in growth plate chondrocytes of target genes, including the DLX5, DLX6, SOX9, and SOX6 transcription factor genes, which are known to be important for skeletal development. These data provide mechanistic insight toward understanding how SF3B4 mutations lead to the skeletal abnormalities observed in the acrofacial dysostoses. PMID:27622494

  7. Patterns of gene expression in the sheep heart during the perinatal period revealed by transcriptomic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rabaglino, M. Belen; Antolic, Andrew; Wood, Charles E.; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Septa from sheep hearts at 130 days gestation, term, and 14-day-old lambs were used to model the changes in gene expression patterns during the perinatal period using Agilent 15k ovine microarrays. We used Bioconductor for R to model five major patterns of coexpressed genes. Gene ontology and transcription factor analyses using Webgestalt modeled the biological significances and transcription factors of the gene expression patterns. Modeling indicated a decreased expression of genes associated with anatomical development and differentiation during this period, whereas those associated with increased protein synthesis and growth associated with maturation of the endoplasmic reticulum rose to term but did not further increase from the near term expression. Expression of genes associated with cell responsiveness, for example, immune responses, decreased at term but expression returned by postnatal day 14. Changes in genes related to metabolism showed differential substrate-associated patterns: those related to carbohydrate metabolism rose to term and remained stable thereafter, whereas those associated with fatty acid oxidation facility rose throughout the period. The timing of many of these maturational processes was earlier in relation to birth than in the rodent. The importance of the transcription factors, estrogen-related receptors, and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog was also highlighted in the pattern of gene expression during development of the perinatal sheep heart. PMID:26126790

  8. Patterns of gene expression in the sheep heart during the perinatal period revealed by transcriptomic modeling.

    PubMed

    Richards, Elaine M; Rabaglino, M Belen; Antolic, Andrew; Wood, Charles E; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2015-09-01

    Septa from sheep hearts at 130 days gestation, term, and 14-day-old lambs were used to model the changes in gene expression patterns during the perinatal period using Agilent 15k ovine microarrays. We used Bioconductor for R to model five major patterns of coexpressed genes. Gene ontology and transcription factor analyses using Webgestalt modeled the biological significances and transcription factors of the gene expression patterns. Modeling indicated a decreased expression of genes associated with anatomical development and differentiation during this period, whereas those associated with increased protein synthesis and growth associated with maturation of the endoplasmic reticulum rose to term but did not further increase from the near term expression. Expression of genes associated with cell responsiveness, for example, immune responses, decreased at term but expression returned by postnatal day 14. Changes in genes related to metabolism showed differential substrate-associated patterns: those related to carbohydrate metabolism rose to term and remained stable thereafter, whereas those associated with fatty acid oxidation facility rose throughout the period. The timing of many of these maturational processes was earlier in relation to birth than in the rodent. The importance of the transcription factors, estrogen-related receptors, and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog was also highlighted in the pattern of gene expression during development of the perinatal sheep heart.

  9. BEST: a novel computational approach for comparing gene expression patterns from early stages of Drosophila melanogaster development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Jayaraman, Karthik; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Gurunathan, Rajalakshmi; Marti-Subirana, Ana; Newfeld, Stuart J

    2002-12-01

    Embryonic gene expression patterns are an indispensable part of modern developmental biology. Currently, investigators must visually inspect numerous images containing embryonic expression patterns to identify spatially similar patterns for inferring potential genetic interactions. The lack of a computational approach to identify pattern similarities is an impediment to advancement in developmental biology research because of the rapidly increasing amount of available embryonic gene expression data. Therefore, we have developed computational approaches to automate the comparison of gene expression patterns contained in images of early stage Drosophila melanogaster embryos (prior to the beginning of germ-band elongation); similarities and differences in gene expression patterns in these early stages have extensive developmental effects. Here we describe a basic expression search tool (BEST) to retrieve best matching expression patterns for a given query expression pattern and a computational device for gene interaction inference using gene expression pattern images and information on the associated genotypes and probes. Analysis of a prototype collection of Drosophila gene expression pattern images is presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods in identifying biologically meaningful matches and inferring gene interactions by direct image content analysis. In particular, the use of BEST searches for gene expression patterns is akin to that of BLAST searches for finding similar sequences. These computational developmental biology methodologies are likely to make the great wealth of embryonic gene expression pattern data easily accessible and to accelerate the discovery of developmental networks.

  10. Expression of abnormal von Willebrand factor by endothelial cells from a patient with type IIA von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed Central

    Levene, R B; Booyse, F M; Chediak, J; Zimmerman, T S; Livingston, D M; Lynch, D C

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize the biosynthesis of von Willebrand factor (vWf) by cultured endothelial cells (EC) derived from the umbilical vein of a patient with type IIA von Willebrand disease. The patient's EC, compared with those from normal individuals, produced vWf that had decreased amounts of large multimers and an increase in rapidly migrating satellite species, features characteristic of plasma vWf from patients with type IIA von Willebrand disease. The type IIA EC did produce a full spectrum of vWf multimers in both cell lysates and postculture medium, although the relative amounts of the largest species were decreased. The large multimers were degraded in conjunction with the appearance of rapidly migrating satellites that contained approximately equal to 170-kDa proteolytic fragments, suggesting that this patient's functional defect is due to abnormal proteolysis and not to a primary failure of vWf subunit oligomerization. Moreover, the observed degradation appears to result from an abnormal vWf molecule and not elevated protease levels. These results suggest that this patient's von Willebrand disease phenotype is caused by increased proteolytic sensitivity of his vWf protein. Images PMID:3306682

  11. Quantitative Gait Analysis Using a Motorized Treadmill System Sensitively Detects Motor Abnormalities in Mice Expressing ATPase Defective Spastin.

    PubMed

    Connell, James W; Allison, Rachel; Reid, Evan

    2016-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are genetic conditions in which there is progressive axonal degeneration in the corticospinal tract. Autosomal dominant mutations, including nonsense, frameshift and missense changes, in the gene encoding the microtubule severing ATPase spastin are the most common cause of HSP in North America and northern Europe. In this study we report quantitative gait analysis using a motorized treadmill system, carried out on mice knocked-in for a disease-associated mutation affecting a critical residue in the Walker A motif of the spastin ATPase domain. At 4 months and at one year of age homozygous mutant mice had a number of abnormal gait parameters, including in stride length and stride duration, compared to heterozygous and wild-type littermates. Gait parameters in heterozygous animals did not differ from wild-type littermates. We conclude that quantitative gait analysis using the DigiGait system sensitively detects motor abnormalities in a hereditary spastic paraplegia model, and would be a useful method for analyzing the effects of pharmacological treatments for HSP.

  12. p27KIP1 is abnormally expressed in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas and is associated with an adverse clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Al; Sánchez, E; Sánchez-Beato, M; Cruz, M A; Chacón, I; Muñoz, E; Camacho, F I; Martínez-Montero, J C; Mollejo, M; Garcia, J F; Piris, M A

    1999-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by the combined action of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and CDK-inhibitors (CDKi), which are negative cell cycle regulators. p27KIP1 is a CDKi key in cell cycle regulation, whose degradation is required for G1/S transition. In spite of the absence of p27KIP1 expression in proliferating lymphocytes, some aggressive B-cell lymphomas have been reported to show an anomalous p27KIP1 staining. We analysed p27KIP1 expression in a series of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), correlating it with the proliferative index and clinical outcome, to characterize the implications of this anomalous staining in lymphomagenesis in greater depth. For the above mentioned purposes, an immunohistochemical technique in paraffin-embedded tissues was employed, using commercially available antibodies, in a series of 133 patients with known clinical outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed in order to ascertain which clinical and molecular variables may influence outcome, in terms of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The relationships between p27KIP1 and MIB-1 (Ki-67) were also tested. An abnormally high expression of p27KIP1 was found in lymphomas of this type. The overall correlation between p27KIP1 and MIB-1 showed there to be no significant relationship between these two parameters, this differing from observations in reactive lymphoid and other tissues. Analysis of the clinical relevance of these findings showed that a high level of p27KIP1 expression in this type of tumour is an adverse prognostic marker, in both univariate and multivariate analysis. These results show that there is abnormal p27KIP1 expression in DLBCL, with adverse clinical significance, suggesting that this anomalous p27KIP1 protein may be rendered non-functional through interaction with other cell cycle regulator proteins. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10424746

  13. AMBRA1 and SQSTM1 expression pattern in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Falasca, Laura; Torino, Francesco; Marconi, Matteo; Costantini, Manuela; Pompeo, Vincenzo; Sentinelli, Steno; De Salvo, Laura; Patrizio, Mario; Padula, Cristiano; Gallucci, Michele; Piacentini, Mauro; Malorni, Walter

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most commonly diagnosed male diseases and a leading cause of cancer mortality in men. There is emerging evidence that autophagy plays an important role in malignant cell survival and offers protection from the anti-cancer drugs in prostate cancer cells. AMBRA1 and the autophagic protein sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1; p62) expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot on tissue samples from both benign and malignant prostatic lesions. The data reported in this pilot study demonstrated an increased expression of AMBRA1 and SQSTM1, which were also associated with an accumulation of LC3II in prostate cancer but not in benign lesion. In the present study we found that: (i) at variance with benign lesion, prostate cancer cells underwent SQSTM1 accumulation, i.e., clearly displayed a defective autophagic process but, also, (ii) prostate cancer accumulated AMBRA1 and (iii) this increase positively correlated with the Gleason score. These results underscore a possible implication of autophagy in prostate cancer phenotype and of AMBRA1 as possible cancer progression biomarker in this malignancy.

  14. The Association between Abnormal Long Noncoding RNA MALAT-1 Expression and Cancer Lymph Node Metastasis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Pan, Yongsheng; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Cheng; Huang, Yuan; Zhao, Ruizhe; Cheng, Gong; Liu, Jinliang; Shao, Pengfei; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated that the expression levels of MALAT-1 were higher in cancerous tissues than matched histologically normal tissues. And, to some extent, overexpression of MALAT-1 was inclined to lymph node metastasis. This meta-analysis collected all relevant articles and explored the association between MALAT-1 expression levels and lymph node metastasis. We searched PubMed, EmBase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and OVID to address the level of MALAT-1 expression in cancer cases and noncancerous controls (accessed February 2015). And 8 studies comprising 696 multiple cancer patients were included to assess this association. The odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to assess the strength of the association using Stata 12.0 version software. The results revealed there was a significant difference in the incidence of lymph node metastasis between high MALAT-1 expression group and low MALAT-1 expression group (OR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.15–3.28, P = 0.013 random-effects model). Subgroup analysis indicated that MALAT-1 high expression had an unfavorable impact on lymph node metastasis in Chinese patients (OR = 1.87, 95% CI 1.01–2.46). This study demonstrated that the incidence of lymph node metastasis in patients detected with high MALAT-1 expression was higher than that in patients with low MALAT-1 expression in China. PMID:26989678

  15. Nursing frequency alters circadian patterns of mammary gene expression in lactating mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milking frequency impacts lactation in dairy cattle and in rodent models of lactation. The role of circadian gene expression in this process is unknown. The hypothesis tested was that changing nursing frequency alters the circadian patterns of mammary gene expression. Mid-lactation CD1 mice were stu...

  16. Modulating Effect of Enicostemma littorale on the Expression Pattern of Apoptotic, Cell Proliferative, Inflammatory and Angiogenic Markers During 7, 12-Dimethylbenz (a) Anthracene Induced Hamster Buccal Pouch Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Shanmugam; Rajasekaran, Duraisamy; Prabhakar, Murugaraj Manoj; Karthikeyan, Sekar; Manimaran, Asokan

    2015-01-01

    Enicostemma littorale leaves are traditionally used for the treatment of several diseases, including inflammation and cancer. This study has taken effort to explore the antitumor initiating potential of E. littorale leaves (ElELet) by analyzing the expression pattern of apoptotic (p53, Bcl-2 and Bcl-2 associated X-protein), cell-proliferative (cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen), angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor), invasive (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9), and inflammatory (NF-κB and cyclooxygenase-2) markers during 7, 12-dimethylbenz (a) anthracene (DMBA) induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. Oral tumors were induced in the buccal pouches of hamsters using the potent site and organ specific carcinogen, DMBA. DMBA application 3 times a week for 14 weeks resulted in tumor formation in the buccal pouches. Hundred percent tumor formations with dysregulation in the expression pattern of apoptotic, cell proliferative, inflammatory, angiogenic, and invasive markers were observed in the buccal pouches of hamsters treated with DMBA alone. ElELet at a dose of 250 mg/kg body weight orally to DMBA treated hamsters significantly prevented the tumor formation as well as corrected the abnormalities in the expression pattern of above mentioned molecular markers. ElELet thus modulated the expression pattern of all the above mentioned molecular markers in favor of the suppression of cell proliferation occurring in DMBA induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. PMID:26862274

  17. Modulating Effect of Enicostemma littorale on the Expression Pattern of Apoptotic, Cell Proliferative, Inflammatory and Angiogenic Markers During 7, 12-Dimethylbenz (a) Anthracene Induced Hamster Buccal Pouch Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Shanmugam; Rajasekaran, Duraisamy; Prabhakar, Murugaraj Manoj; Karthikeyan, Sekar; Manimaran, Asokan

    2015-01-01

    Enicostemma littorale leaves are traditionally used for the treatment of several diseases, including inflammation and cancer. This study has taken effort to explore the antitumor initiating potential of E. littorale leaves (ElELet) by analyzing the expression pattern of apoptotic (p53, Bcl-2 and Bcl-2 associated X-protein), cell-proliferative (cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen), angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor), invasive (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9), and inflammatory (NF-κB and cyclooxygenase-2) markers during 7, 12-dimethylbenz (a) anthracene (DMBA) induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. Oral tumors were induced in the buccal pouches of hamsters using the potent site and organ specific carcinogen, DMBA. DMBA application 3 times a week for 14 weeks resulted in tumor formation in the buccal pouches. Hundred percent tumor formations with dysregulation in the expression pattern of apoptotic, cell proliferative, inflammatory, angiogenic, and invasive markers were observed in the buccal pouches of hamsters treated with DMBA alone. ElELet at a dose of 250 mg/kg body weight orally to DMBA treated hamsters significantly prevented the tumor formation as well as corrected the abnormalities in the expression pattern of above mentioned molecular markers. ElELet thus modulated the expression pattern of all the above mentioned molecular markers in favor of the suppression of cell proliferation occurring in DMBA induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. PMID:26862274

  18. Modeling of gene expression pattern alteration by p,p′-DDE and dieldrin in largemouth bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia-Reyero, Natalia; Barber, David; Gross, Timothy; Denslow, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    In this study, largemouth bass (LMB) were subchronically exposed to p,p′-DDE or dieldrin in their diet to evaluate the effect of exposure on expression of genes involved in reproduction and steroid homeostasis. Using real-time PCR, we detected a different gene expression pattern for each OCP, suggesting that they each affect LMB in a different way. We also detected a different expression pattern among sexes, suggesting that sexes are affected differently by OCPs perhaps reflecting the different adaptive responses of each sex to dysregulation caused by OCP exposure.

  19. The internal auditory clock: what can evoked potentials reveal about the analysis of temporal sound patterns, and abnormal states of consciousness?

    PubMed

    Jones, S J

    2002-09-01

    internal "clocks"? Abnormal mismatch potentials may provide a manifestation of a disordered auditory time-sense, sometimes being abolished in comatose patients while the C-potentials and similar responses to the onset of tones are preserved. Both C- and M-potentials were usually found to be preserved, however, in patients who had emerged from coma and were capable of discriminating sounds. Substantially intact responses were also recorded from three patients who were functionally in a "vegetative" state. The C- and M-potentials were once again dissociated in a group of patients with multiple sclerosis, only the mismatch potentials being found to be significantly delayed. This subclinical impairment of a memory-based process responsible for the detection of change in temporal sound patterns may be related to defects in other memory domains such as working memory. PMID:12448181

  20. Fluid shear stress as a regulator of gene expression in vascular cells: possible correlations with diabetic abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Eskin, S. G.; Ruef, J.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased frequency, severity and more rapid progression of cardiovascular diseases. Metabolic perturbations from hyperglycemia result in disturbed endothelium-dependent relaxation, activation of coagulation pathways, depressed fibrinolysis, and other abnormalities in vascular homeostasis. Atherosclerosis is localized mainly at areas of geometric irregularity at which blood vessels branch, curve and change diameter, and where blood is subjected to sudden changes in velocity and/or direction of flow. Shear stress resulting from blood flow is a well known modulator of vascular cell function. This paper presents what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for signal transduction and gene regulation in vascular cells exposed to shear stress. Considering the importance of the hemodynamic environment of vascular cells might be vital to increasing our understanding of diabetes.

  1. Postmortem mRNA Expression Patterns in Left Ventricular Myocardial Tissues and Their Implications for Forensic Diagnosis of Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Son, Gi Hoon; Park, Seong Hwan; Kim, Yunmi; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jin Wook; Chung, Sooyoung; Kim, Yu-Hoon; Kim, Hyun; Hwang, Juck-Joon; Seo, Joong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD), which is primarily caused by lethal heart disorders resulting in structural and arrhythmogenic abnormalities, is one of the prevalent modes of death in most developed countries. Myocardial ischemia, mainly due to coronary artery disease, is the most common type of heart disease leading to SCD. However, postmortem diagnosis of SCD is frequently complicated by obscure histological evidence. Here, we show that certain mRNA species, namely those encoding hemoglobin A1/2 and B (Hba1/2 and Hbb, respectively) as well as pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (Pdk4), exhibit distinct postmortem expression patterns in the left ventricular free wall of SCD subjects when compared with their expression patterns in the corresponding tissues from control subjects with non-cardiac causes of death. Hba1/2 and Hbb mRNA expression levels were higher in ischemic SCD cases with acute myocardial infarction or ischemic heart disease without recent infarction, and even in cardiac death subjects without apparent pathological signs of heart injuries, than control subjects. By contrast, Pdk4 mRNA was expressed at lower levels in SCD subjects. In conclusion, we found that altered myocardial Hba1/2, Hbb, and Pdk4 mRNA expression patterns can be employed as molecular signatures of fatal cardiac dysfunction to forensically implicate SCD as the primary cause of death. PMID:24642708

  2. Stochastic gene expression: Density of defects frozen into permanent Turing patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziarmaga, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    We estimate density of defects frozen into a biological Turing pattern which was turned on at a finite rate. Self-locking of gene expression in individual cells, which makes the Turing transition discontinuous, stabilizes the pattern together with its defects. Defects frozen into the pattern are a permanent record of the transition-they give an animal its own characteristic lifelong ``fingerprints'' or, as for vital organ formation, they can be fatal. Density of defects scales like the fourth root of the transition rate. This dependence is so weak that there is not enough time during morphogenesis to get rid of defects simply by slowing down the rate. A defect-free pattern can be obtained by spatially inhomogeneous activation of the genes. If the supercritical density of activator spreads slower than certain threshold velocity, then the Turing pattern is expressed without any defects.

  3. Abnormal COX2 Protein Expression May Be Correlated with Poor Prognosis in Oral Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hong-Bo; Ye, Ming; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background. The prognostic significance of COX2 for survival of patients with oral cancer remains controversial. Thus, the meta-analysis was performed in order to identify COX2 expression impact on prognosis of oral cancer. Method. Relevant literatures were searched using the following electronic databases without any language restrictions: Web of Science, the Cochrane Library Database, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and CBM. Version 12.0 STATA software (Stata Corporation, College Station, Texas, USA) was used for the current meta-analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) with their corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were also calculated to clarify the correlation between COX2 expression and prognosis of oral cancer. Results. Final analysis of 979 oral cancer patients from 12 clinical cohort studies was performed. The meta-analysis results show that COX2 expression in cancer tissues was significantly higher than those in normal and benign tissues (all P < 0.05). Combined HR of COX2 suggests that positive COX2 expression has a shorter overall survival (OS) than those of negative COX2 expression (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The meta-analysis study shows that elevated COX2 expression may be associated with the pathogenesis of oral cancer and with a worse prognosis in oral cancer patients. PMID:25028647

  4. Diversity of Reporter Expression Patterns in Transgenic Mouse Lines Targeting Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Expressing Neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuncai; Molet, Jenny; Gunn, Benjamin G; Ressler, Kerry; Baram, Tallie Z

    2015-12-01

    Transgenic mice, including lines targeting corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF or CRH), have been extensively employed to study stress neurobiology. These powerful tools are poised to revolutionize our understanding of the localization and connectivity of CRH-expressing neurons, and the crucial roles of CRH in normal and pathological conditions. Accurate interpretation of studies using cell type-specific transgenic mice vitally depends on congruence between expression of the endogenous peptide and reporter. If reporter expression does not faithfully reproduce native gene expression, then effects of manipulating unintentionally targeted cells may be misattributed. Here, we studied CRH and reporter expression patterns in 3 adult transgenic mice: Crh-IRES-Cre;Ai14 (tdTomato mouse), Crfp3.0CreGFP, and Crh-GFP BAC. We employed the CRH antiserum generated by Vale after validating its specificity using CRH-null mice. We focused the analyses on stress-salient regions, including hypothalamus, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and hippocampus. Expression patterns of endogenous CRH were consistent among wild-type and transgenic mice. In tdTomato mice, most CRH-expressing neurons coexpressed the reporter, yet the reporter identified a few non-CRH-expressing pyramidal-like cells in hippocampal CA1 and CA3. In Crfp3.0CreGFP mice, coexpression of CRH and the reporter was found in central amygdala and, less commonly, in other evaluated regions. In Crh-GFP BAC mice, the large majority of neurons expressed either CRH or reporter, with little overlap. These data highlight significant diversity in concordant expression of reporter and endogenous CRH among 3 available transgenic mice. These findings should be instrumental in interpreting important scientific findings emerging from the use of these potent neurobiological tools. PMID:26402844

  5. Gene Expression Patterns Associated With Histopathology in Toxic Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Danielle L; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Tawa, Gregory J; Baer, Christine E; Permenter, Matthew G; McDyre, Bonna C; Dennis, William E; Boyle, Molly H; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Streicker, Michael A; Snowden, Bobbi S; Lewis, John A; Wallqvist, Anders; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Toxic industrial chemicals induce liver injury, which is difficult to diagnose without invasive procedures. Identifying indicators of end organ injury can complement exposure-based assays and improve predictive power. A multiplexed approach was used to experimentally evaluate a panel of 67 genes predicted to be associated with the fibrosis pathology by computationally mining DrugMatrix, a publicly available repository of gene microarray data. Five-day oral gavage studies in male Sprague Dawley rats dosed with varying concentrations of 3 fibrogenic compounds (allyl alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, and 4,4'-methylenedianiline) and 2 nonfibrogenic compounds (bromobenzene and dexamethasone) were conducted. Fibrosis was definitively diagnosed by histopathology. The 67-plex gene panel accurately diagnosed fibrosis in both microarray and multiplexed-gene expression assays. Necrosis and inflammatory infiltration were comorbid with fibrosis. ANOVA with contrasts identified that 51 of the 67 predicted genes were significantly associated with the fibrosis phenotype, with 24 of these specific to fibrosis alone. The protein product of the gene most strongly correlated with the fibrosis phenotype PCOLCE (Procollagen C-Endopeptidase Enhancer) was dose-dependently elevated in plasma from animals administered fibrogenic chemicals (P < .05). Semiquantitative global mass spectrometry analysis of the plasma identified an additional 5 protein products of the gene panel which increased after fibrogenic toxicant administration: fibronectin, ceruloplasmin, vitronectin, insulin-like growth factor binding protein, and α2-macroglobulin. These results support the data mining approach for identifying gene and/or protein panels for assessing liver injury and may suggest bridging biomarkers for molecular mediators linked to histopathology.

  6. Abnormal Expression of Glutamate Transporter and Transporter Interacting Molecules in Prefrontal Cortex in Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Deborah; Gupta, Daya; Harotunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; McCullumsmith, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate cycling is critically important for neurotransmission, and may be altered in schizophrenia. The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) facilitate the reuptake of glutamate from the synaptic cleft and have a key role in glutamate cycling. We hypothesized that expression of the EAATs and the EAAT regulating proteins ARHGEF11, JWA, G protein suppressor pathway 1 (GPS1), and KIAA0302 are altered in the brain in schizophrenia. To test this, we measured expression of EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, and EAAT interacting proteins in postmortem tissue from the dorsolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex of patients with schizophrenia and a comparison group using in situ hybridization and Western blot analysis. We found increased EAAT1 transcripts and decreased protein expression, increased EAAT3 transcripts and protein, and elevated protein expression of both GPS1 and KIAA0302 protein. We did not find any changes in expression of EAAT2. These data indicate that proteins involved in glutamate reuptake and cycling are altered in the cortex in schizophrenia, and may provide potential targets for future treatment strategies. PMID:18678470

  7. Single-cell transcriptome analysis reveals coordinated ectopic gene expression patterns in medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Brennecke, Philip; Reyes, Alejandro; Pinto, Sheena; Rattay, Kristin; Nguyen, Michelle; Küchler, Rita; Huber, Wolfgang; Kyewski, Bruno; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of tissue-restricted self-antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is essential for self-tolerance induction and prevents autoimmunity, with each TRA being expressed in only a few mTECs. How this process is regulated in single mTECs and coordinated at the population level, such that the varied single-cell patterns add up to faithfully represent TRAs, is poorly understood. Here we used single-cell RNA-sequencing and provide evidence for numerous recurring TRA co-expression patterns, each present in only a subset of mTECs. Co-expressed genes clustered in the genome and showed enhanced chromatin accessibility. Our findings characterize TRA expression in mTECs as a coordinated process, which might involve local re-modeling of chromatin and thus ensures a comprehensive representation of the immunological self. PMID:26237553

  8. Computational gene expression profiling under salt stress reveals patterns of co-expression

    PubMed Central

    Sanchita; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond differently to environmental conditions. Among various abiotic stresses, salt stress is a condition where excess salt in soil causes inhibition of plant growth. To understand the response of plants to the stress conditions, identification of the responsible genes is required. Clustering is a data mining technique used to group the genes with similar expression. The genes of a cluster show similar expression and function. We applied clustering algorithms on gene expression data of Solanum tuberosum showing differential expression in Capsicum annuum under salt stress. The clusters, which were common in multiple algorithms were taken further for analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) further validated the findings of other cluster algorithms by visualizing their clusters in three-dimensional space. Functional annotation results revealed that most of the genes were involved in stress related responses. Our findings suggest that these algorithms may be helpful in the prediction of the function of co-expressed genes. PMID:26981411

  9. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  10. Uighur medicine abnormal savda munzip (ASMq) suppresses expression of collagen and TGF-β1 with concomitant induce Smad7 in human hypertrophic scar fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Kong, Menglong; Ma, Tao; Gao, Weicheng; Ma, Shaolin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic scar (HS) is a common dermal disease, for which numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Hence, alternative strategy are needed. Recent basic and clinic research has shown that Uighur medicine abnormal savda munzip (ASMq) has anti-hypertrophic scar properties but its molecular mechanism is unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of ASMq on TGF-β/Smads signaling in fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar. Purpose: To investigate the effect of ASMq on the TGF-β/Smads signaling pathway in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFs). Methods: Hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFs) were isolated from human of hypertrophic scar and passaged to the 3~4 generation, which were treated with the different concentrations of ASMq. Cells treated with 5-Fu served as the positive control group. After treatment for 48 hours, expressions of Smad7, TGF-β1, type I and III collagen, were examined by immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results: ASMq markedly enhanced the expression of inhibitory Smad7, with suppression of type I and III collagen and TGF-β1. We observed that treatment of ASMq induced Smad7 to enter the cytoplasm from the nucleus of hypertrophic fibroblasts. Conclusions: ASMq inhibits scarring probably by enhancing the expression of inhibitory Smad7, and inhibiting TGF-β1, collagen expression, and is a potential treatment for scarring. PMID:26309506

  11. Prevalence and pattern of abnormal myocardial perfusion in patients with isolated coronary artery ectasia: study by 99mTc-sestamibi radionuclide scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ahmed M; Rayan, Mona; Adel, Amr; Demerdash, Salah; Atef, Mohamed; Abdallah, Mohamed; Nammas, Wail

    2014-02-01

    We explored the prevalence and pattern of abnormal myocardial perfusion in patients with isolated coronary artery ectasia (CAE), as demonstrated by (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy. Prospectively, we enrolled 35 patients with angiographically documented CAE and no significant coronary obstruction, who underwent elective coronary angiography. Patients underwent Stress-rest (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy within 4 days of coronary angiography. They were divided into 2 groups: group I: with normal perfusion scan; and group II: with reversible perfusion defects. The mean age was 49.6 ± 6.9 years; 34 (97.1 %) were males. Seventy-nine (75.2 %) arteries were affected by CAE. Among 79 arteries affected by CAE, affection was diffuse in 37 (46.8 %). Thirteen (37.1 %) patients had normal perfusion scan (group I), whereas 22 (62.9 %) had reversible perfusion defects (group II). Among 22 patients with reversible perfusion defects, 20 (90.9 %) had mild and 2 (9.1 %) had moderate ischemia. Among 49 myocardial segments with reversible perfusion defects, 22 (44.9 %) were basal, 18 (36.7 %) mid-, and 9 (18.4 %) apical segments. Diffuse CAE was significantly more prevalent in group II versus group I, in all 3 major coronary arteries (p < 0.05 for all). In patients with isolated CAE who underwent elective coronary angiography, reversible perfusion defects demonstrated by (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy were rather prevalent, mostly mild, more likely to affect the basal and mid-segments of the myocardium, and more frequently associated with diffuse ectasia.

  12. The division abnormally delayed (dally) gene: a putative integral membrane proteoglycan required for cell division patterning during postembryonic development of the nervous system in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nakato, H; Futch, T A; Selleck, S B

    1995-11-01

    We have devised a genetic screen to obtain mutants affecting cell division patterning in the developing central nervous system of Drosophila. The division abnormally delayed (dally) locus was identified using a combination of "enhancer trap" and behavioral screening methods. The ordered cell cycle progression of lamina precursor cells, which generate synaptic target neurons for photoreceptors, is disrupted in dally mutants. The first of two lamina precursor cell divisions shows a delayed entry into mitosis. The second division, one that is triggered by an intercellular signal from photoreceptor axons, fails to take place. Similar to lamina precursors, cells that generate the ommatidia of the adult eye show two synchronized divisions found along the morphogenetic furrow in the eye disc and the first division cycle in dally mutants displays a delayed progression into M phase like that found in the first lamina precursor cell division. dally mutations also affect viability and produce morphological defects in several adult tissues, including the eye, antenna, wing and genitalia. Sequencing of a dally cDNA reveals a potential open reading frame of 626 amino acids with homology to a family of Glypican-related integral membrane proteoglycans. These heparan sulfate-containing proteins are attached to the external leaflet of the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkage. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans may serve as co-receptors for a variety of secreted proteins including fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and members of the Wnt, TGF-beta and Hedgehog families. The cell division defects found in dally mutants implicate the Glypican group of integral membrane proteoglycans in the control of cell division during development.

  13. Exploring myriapod segmentation: the expression patterns of even-skipped, engrailed, and wingless in a centipede.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Cynthia L; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2002-07-01

    Segment formation is critical to arthropod development, yet there is still relatively little known about this process in most arthropods. Here, we present the expression patterns of the genes even-skipped (eve), engrailed, and wingless in a centipede, Lithobius atkinsoni. Despite some differences when compared with the patterns in insects and crustaceans, the expression of these genes in the centipede suggests that their basic roles are conserved across the mandibulate arthropods. For example, unlike the seven pair-rule stripes of eve expression in the Drosophila embryonic germband, the centipede eve gene is expressed strongly in the posterior of the embryo, and in only a few stripes between newly formed segments. Nonetheless, this pattern likely reflects a conserved role for eve in the process of segment formation, within the different context of a short-germband mode of embryonic development. In the centipede, the genes wingless and engrailed are expressed in stripes along the middle and posterior of each segment, respectively, similar to their expression in Drosophila. The adjacent expression of the engrailed and wingless stripes suggests that the regulatory relationship between the two genes may be conserved in the centipede, and thus this pathway may be a fundamental mechanism of segmental development in most arthropods.

  14. Lactase gene promoter fragments mediate differential spatial and temporal expression patterns in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Maravelias, Charalambos; Sibley, Eric

    2006-04-01

    Lactase gene expression is spatiotemporally regulated during mammalian gut development. We hypothesize that distinct DNA control regions specify appropriate spatial and temporal patterning of lactase gene expression. In order to define regions of the lactase promoter involved in mediating intestine-specific and spatiotemporal restricted expression, transgenic mice harboring 100 bp, 1.3- and 2.0- kb fragments of the 5' flanking region of the rat lactase gene cloned upstream of a luciferase reporter were characterized. The 100-bp lactase promoter-reporter transgenic mouse line expressed maximal luciferase activity in the intestine with a posterior shift in spatial restriction and ectopic expression in the stomach and lung. The temporal pattern of expression mediated by the 1.3-kb promoter?reporter transgene increases with postnatal maturation in contrast with the postnatal decline mediated by the 2.0-kb promoter-reporter transgene and the endogenous lactase gene. The differential transgene expression patterns mediated by the lactase promoter fragments suggests that intestine-specific spatial and temporal control elements reside in distinct regions of the DNA sequences upstream of the lactase gene transcription start-site.

  15. Hepatic Expression Patterns of Inflammatory and Immune Response Genes Associated with Obesity and NASH in Morbidly Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bertola, Adeline; Bonnafous, Stéphanie; Anty, Rodolphe; Patouraux, Stéphanie; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Iannelli, Antonio; Gugenheim, Jean; Barr, Jonathan; Mato, José M.; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tran, Albert; Gual, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity modulates inflammation and activation of immune pathways which can lead to liver complications. We aimed at identifying expression patterns of inflammatory and immune response genes specifically associated with obesity and NASH in the liver of morbidly obese patients. Methodology/Principal Findings Expression of 222 genes was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR in the liver of morbidly obese patients with histologically normal liver (n = 6), or with severe steatosis without (n = 6) or with NASH (n = 6), and in lean controls (n = 5). Hepatic expression of 58 out of 222 inflammatory and immune response genes was upregulated in NASH patients. The most notable changes occurred in genes encoding chemokines and chemokine receptors involved in leukocyte recruitment, CD and cytokines involved in the T cell activation towards a Th1 phenotype, and immune semaphorins. This regulation seems to be specific for the liver since visceral adipose tissue expression and serum levels of MCP1, IP10, TNFα and IL6 were not modified. Importantly, 47 other genes were already upregulated in histologically normal liver (e.g. CRP, Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway). Interestingly, serum palmitate, known to activate the TLR pathway, was increased with steatosis. Conclusion/Significance The liver of obese patients without histological abnormalities already displayed a low-grade inflammation and could be more responsive to activators of the TLR pathway. NASH was then characterized by a specific gene signature. These findings help to identify new potential actors of the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:21042596

  16. Inference of the Xenopus tropicalis embryonic regulatory network and spatial gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During embryogenesis, signaling molecules produced by one cell population direct gene regulatory changes in neighboring cells and influence their developmental fates and spatial organization. One of the earliest events in the development of the vertebrate embryo is the establishment of three germ layers, consisting of the ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. Attempts to measure gene expression in vivo in different germ layers and cell types are typically complicated by the heterogeneity of cell types within biological samples (i.e., embryos), as the responses of individual cell types are intermingled into an aggregate observation of heterogeneous cell types. Here, we propose a novel method to elucidate gene regulatory circuits from these aggregate measurements in embryos of the frog Xenopus tropicalis using gene network inference algorithms and then test the ability of the inferred networks to predict spatial gene expression patterns. Results We use two inference models with different underlying assumptions that incorporate existing network information, an ODE model for steady-state data and a Markov model for time series data, and contrast the performance of the two models. We apply our method to both control and knockdown embryos at multiple time points to reconstruct the core mesoderm and endoderm regulatory circuits. Those inferred networks are then used in combination with known dorsal-ventral spatial expression patterns of a subset of genes to predict spatial expression patterns for other genes. Both models are able to predict spatial expression patterns for some of the core mesoderm and endoderm genes, but interestingly of different gene subsets, suggesting that neither model is sufficient to recapitulate all of the spatial patterns, yet they are complementary for the patterns that they do capture. Conclusion The presented methodology of gene network inference combined with spatial pattern prediction provides an additional layer of validation to

  17. Geometric Morphometrics on Gene Expression Patterns Within Phenotypes: A Case Example on Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Mateu, Roger; Niksic, Martina; Russo, Lucia; Sharpe, James

    2016-01-01

    How the genotype translates into the phenotype through development is critical to fully understand the evolution of phenotypes. We propose a novel approach to directly assess how changes in gene expression patterns are associated with changes in morphology using the limb as a case example. Our method combines molecular biology techniques, such as whole-mount in situ hybridization, with image and shape analysis, extending the use of Geometric Morphometrics to the analysis of nonanatomical shapes, such as gene expression domains. Elliptical Fourier and Procrustes-based semilandmark analyses were used to analyze the variation and covariation patterns of the limb bud shape with the expression patterns of two relevant genes for limb morphogenesis, Hoxa11 and Hoxa13. We devised a multiple thresholding method to semiautomatically segment gene domains at several expression levels in large samples of limb buds from C57Bl6 mouse embryos between 10 and 12 postfertilization days. Besides providing an accurate phenotyping tool to quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics of gene expression patterns within developing structures, our morphometric analyses revealed high, non-random, and gene-specific variation undergoing canalization during limb development. Our results demonstrate that Hoxa11 and Hoxa13, despite being paralogs with analogous functions in limb patterning, show clearly distinct dynamic patterns, both in shape and size, and are associated differently with the limb bud shape. The correspondence between our results and already well-established molecular processes underlying limb development confirms that this morphometric approach is a powerful tool to extract features of development regulating morphogenesis. Such multilevel analyses are promising in systems where not so much molecular information is available and will advance our understanding of the genotype–phenotype map. In systematics, this knowledge will increase our ability to infer how evolution modified a common

  18. Abnormal expression of inflammatory genes in placentas of women with sickle cell anemia and sickle hemoglobin C disease.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Letícia C; Costa, Maria Laura; Ferreira, Regiane; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia M; Lanaro, Carolina; Fertrin, Kleber Y; Surita, Fernanda G; Parpinelli, Mary A; Costa, Fernando F; Melo, Mônica Barbosa de

    2016-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a complex disease that is characterized by the polymerization of deoxyhemoglobin S, altered red blood cell membrane biology, endothelial activation, hemolysis, a procoagulant state, acute and chronic inflammation, and vaso-occlusion. Among the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy, oxygen is consumed by fetal growth, and pregnant women with SCD are more frequently exposed to low oxygen levels. This might lead to red blood cells sickling, and, consequently, to vaso-occlusion. The mechanisms by which SCD affects placental physiology are largely unknown, and chronic inflammation might be involved in this process. This study aimed to evaluate the gene expression profile of inflammatory response mediators in the placentas of pregnant women with sickle cell cell anemia (HbSS) and hemoglobinopathy SC (HbSC). Our results show differences in a number of these genes. For the HbSS group, when compared to the control group, the following genes showed differential expression: IL1RAP (2.76-fold), BCL6 (4.49-fold), CXCL10 (-2.12-fold), CXCR1 (-3.66-fold), and C3 (-2.0-fold). On the other hand, the HbSC group presented differential expressions of the following genes, when compared to the control group: IL1RAP (4.33-fold), CXCL1 (3.05-fold), BCL6 (4.13-fold), CXCL10 (-3.32-fold), C3 (-2.0-fold), and TLR3 (2.38-fold). Taken together, these data strongly suggest a differential expression of several inflammatory genes in both SCD (HbSS and HbSC), indicating that the placenta might become an environment with hypoxia, and increased inflammation, which could lead to improper placental development. PMID:27546026

  19. Potential roles of abnormally expressed long noncoding RNA UCA1 and Malat-1 in metastasis of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongjing; Zhang, Xiuying; Hao, Yinghua; Fang, Zhengyu; He, Yanling

    2014-08-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive skin cancer with increasing incidence worldwide. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a group of nonprotein-coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides, are pervasively transcribed in the genome and are emerging as new players in tumorigenesis. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the role of six cancer-related lncRNAs in pairs of melanoma and adjacent normal tissues (ANTs). A total of 63 primary melanoma, paired ANTs, and metastatic lesions were collected in a Chinese population. Real-time PCR analysis was carried out to compare a series of cancer-related lncRNAs among primary melanoma tissues, ANTs, and metastatic lesions. In in-vitro studies, transwell migration assay was carried out to estimate the migration abilities of melanoma cells with different expression levels of urothelial carcinoma-associated 1 (UCA1) or metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat-1) lncRNAs. We found that UCA1 and Malat-1 lncRNAs were markedly more increased in melanomas than in paired ANTs (P<0.05). Melanomas at later stages (stages 3-4) showed higher expression of UCA1 lncRNA than those at early stages (stages 1-2) (P=0.455). In melanomas with lymph node metastasis, the metastatic lesions had a relatively higher expression of Malat-1 lncRNA than in paired primary tumors (P=0.414). Knockdown of UCA1 or Malat-1 lncRNA could attenuate the migrational ability of melanoma cells in in-vitro studies. Increased expression of UCA1 and Malat-1 lncRNAs might have a correlation with melanoma metastasis.

  20. Nucleolar protein 4-like has a complex expression pattern in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Borah, Supriya; Barrodia, Praveen; Swain, Rajeeb K

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolar protein 4-like (NOL4L) gene is present on chromosome 20 (20q11.21) in humans. Parts of this gene have been shown to fuse with RUNX1 and PAX5 in acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, respectively. The normal function of NOL4L in humans and other organisms is not well understood. The expression patterns and functions of NOL4L homologs during vertebrate development have not been reported. We sought to address these questions by studying the expression pattern of zebrafish nol4l during embryogenesis. Our data show that Znol4l mRNA is expressed in multiple organs in zebrafish embryos. The sites of expression include parts of the brain, spinal cord, pronephros, hematopoietic cells and gut. PMID:26934290

  1. Genomic aberration patterns and expression profiles of squamous cell carcinomas of the vulva.

    PubMed

    Micci, Francesca; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Haugom, Lisbeth; Dahlback, Hanne-Sofie S; Pretorius, Maria E; Davidson, Ben; Abeler, Vera M; Tropé, Claes G; Danielsen, Håvard E; Heim, Sverre

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the genomic abnormalities of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the vulva and how they correlate with gene expression. We determined the genomic and expression profiles of 15 such SCC using karyotyping, DNA ploidy analysis, arrayCGH, and expression arrays. Four of the five cases with clonal chromosomal aberrations found by G-banding showed highly abnormal karyotypes with multiple rearrangements. The imbalances scored by arrayCGH mapped to different chromosomes with losses being more common than gains. Frequent losses were scored from 3p and 8p whereas gains were frequent from 3q and 8q (loss of 8p with concomitant gain of 8q mostly occurred via 8q isochromosome formation). This is the first study of vulvar tumors using arrayCGH, and some frequent imbalances could be defined precisely. Of particular note were the sometimes large, sometimes small deletions of 3p and 9p which had minute areas in 3p14 and 9p23 as minimal commonly deleted regions. FHIT (3p14) and PTPRD (9p23) are the only genes here. They were both lost in seven cases, including homozygous losses of PTPRD in four tumors. Using qPCR we could demonstrate deregulation of the FHIT gene in tumor cells. Hence, this gene is likely to play a pathogenetic role in vulvar SCC tumorigenesis. Expression array analyses also identified a number of other genes whose expression profile was altered. Notable among the downregulated genes were MAL (in 2q11), KRT4 (in 12q13), and OLFM4 (in 13q14), whereas upregulated genes included SPRR2G (in 1q21.3) and S100A7A (in 1q21.3).

  2. Cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma: poor prognosis linked to concomitant detection in random and focal lesion bone marrow samples and associated with high-risk gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiming; Nair, Bijay; Shaughnessy, John D; Cartron, Marie-Astrid; Haessler, Jeff; Anaissie, Elias; van Rhee, Frits; Crowley, John; Barlogie, Bart

    2009-06-01

    The clinical significance of cytogenetic abnormalities (CA) present in randomly sampled (RS) or focal lesion (FL) bone marrow sites was examined in 419 untreated myeloma patients. Among 290 patients with gene expression profiling (GEP) data generated from RS sites, GEP-defined high-risk was present in 52% of the RS+/FL+ group but in only 9% of the remainder (P < 0.001). The RS+/FL+ constellation (18%) was an independent predictor of poor survival, also after adjusting for GEP-derived risk and TP53 status (Hazard ratio = 2.42, P = 0.004). The prevalence of high-risk myeloma in the RS+/FL+ group may reflect a dissemination-prone condition not shared by the other three groups. PMID:19344415

  3. Exploring the myriapod body plan: expression patterns of the ten Hox genes in a centipede.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Cynthia L; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2002-03-01

    The diversity of the arthropod body plan has long been a fascinating subject of study. A flurry of recent research has analyzed Hox gene expression in various arthropod groups, with hopes of gaining insight into the mechanisms that underlie their evolution. The Hox genes have been analyzed in insects, crustaceans and chelicerates. However, the expression patterns of the Hox genes have not yet been comprehensively analyzed in a myriapod. We present the expression patterns of the ten Hox genes in a centipede, Lithobius atkinsoni, and compare our results to those from studies in other arthropods. We have three major findings. First, we find that Hox gene expression is remarkably dynamic across the arthropods. The expression patterns of the Hox genes in the centipede are in many cases intermediate between those of the chelicerates and those of the insects and crustaceans, consistent with the proposed intermediate phylogenetic position of the Myriapoda. Second, we found two 'extra' Hox genes in the centipede compared with those in Drosophila. Based on its pattern of expression, Hox3 appears to have a typical Hox-like role in the centipede, suggesting that the novel functions of the Hox3 homologs zen and bicoid were adopted somewhere in the crustacean-insect clade. In the centipede, the expression of the gene fushi tarazu suggests that it has both a Hox-like role (as in the mite), as well as a role in segmentation (as in insects). This suggests that this dramatic change in function was achieved via a multifunctional intermediate, a condition maintained in the centipede. Last, we found that Hox expression correlates with tagmatic boundaries, consistent with the theory that changes in Hox genes had a major role in evolution of the arthropod body plan.

  4. Hox and ParaHox gene expression in early body plan patterning of polyplacophoran mollusks

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Martin; Wollesen, Tim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molecular developmental studies of various bilaterians have shown that the identity of the anteroposterior body axis is controlled by Hox and ParaHox genes. Detailed Hox and ParaHox gene expression data are available for conchiferan mollusks, such as gastropods (snails and slugs) and cephalopods (squids and octopuses), whereas information on the putative conchiferan sister group, Aculifera, is still scarce (but see Fritsch et al., 2015 on Hox gene expression in the polyplacophoran Acanthochitona crinita). In contrast to gastropods and cephalopods, the Hox genes in polyplacophorans are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence similar to the condition in annelids and other bilaterians. Here, we present the expression patterns of the Hox genes Lox5, Lox4, and Lox2, together with the ParaHox gene caudal (Cdx) in the polyplacophoran A. crinita. To localize Hox and ParaHox gene transcription products, we also investigated the expression patterns of the genes FMRF and Elav, and the development of the nervous system. Similar to the other Hox genes, all three Acr‐Lox genes are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence. Transcripts of Acr‐Cdx are seemingly present in the forming hindgut at the posterior end. The expression patterns of both the central class Acr‐Lox genes and the Acr‐Cdx gene are strikingly similar to those in annelids and nemerteans. In Polyplacophora, the expression patterns of the Hox and ParaHox genes seem to be evolutionarily highly conserved, while in conchiferan mollusks these genes are co‐opted into novel functions that might have led to evolutionary novelties, at least in gastropods and cephalopods. PMID:27098677

  5. Expression pattern of the coparyl diphosphate synthase gene in developing rice anthers.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ari; Nemoto, Keisuke; Chono, Makiko; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Yamagishi, Junko; Maekawa, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Isomaro

    2004-08-01

    Rice anthers contain high concentrations of gibberellins A(4) and A(7). To understand their physiological roles, we examined the site of their biosynthesis by analyzing the expression pattern of a gene (OsCPS) encoding coparyl diphosphate synthase in developing rice flowers. Expression was apparent in the anthers 1-2 days before flowering, and CPS mRNA accumulated in the maturing pollen.

  6. Chromosomal patterns of gene expression from microarray data: methodology, validation and clinical relevance in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Roncaroli, Federico; Hennuy, Benoit; Herens, Christian; Nguyen, Minh; Martin, Didier; Evrard, Annick; Bours, Vincent; Boniver, Jacques; Deprez, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression microarrays represent a powerful technique for the simultaneous investigation of thousands of genes. The evidence that genes are not randomly distributed in the genome and that their coordinated expression depends on their position on chromosomes has highlighted the need for mathematical approaches to exploit this dependency for the analysis of expression data-sets. Results We have devised a novel mathematical technique (CHROMOWAVE) based on the Haar wavelet transform and applied it to a dataset obtained with the Affymetrix® HG-U133_Plus_2 array in 27 gliomas. CHROMOWAVE generated multi-chromosomal pattern featuring low expression in chromosomes 1p, 4, 9q, 13, 18, and 19q. This pattern was not only statistically robust but also clinically relevant as it was predictive of favourable outcome. This finding was replicated on a data-set independently acquired by another laboratory. FISH analysis indicated that monosomy 1p and 19q was a frequent feature of tumours displaying the CHROMOWAVE pattern but that allelic loss on chromosomes 4, 9q, 13 and 18 was much less common. Conclusion The ability to detect expression changes of spatially related genes and to map their position on chromosomes makes CHROMOWAVE a valuable screening method for the identification and display of regional gene expression changes of clinical relevance. In this study, FISH data showed that monosomy was frequently associated with diffuse low gene expression on chromosome 1p and 19q but not on chromosomes 4, 9q, 13 and 18. Comparative genomic hybridisation, allelic polymorphism analysis and methylation studies are in progress in order to identify the various mechanisms involved in this multi-chromosomal expression pattern. PMID:17140431

  7. Hox and ParaHox gene expression in early body plan patterning of polyplacophoran mollusks.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Martin; Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Molecular developmental studies of various bilaterians have shown that the identity of the anteroposterior body axis is controlled by Hox and ParaHox genes. Detailed Hox and ParaHox gene expression data are available for conchiferan mollusks, such as gastropods (snails and slugs) and cephalopods (squids and octopuses), whereas information on the putative conchiferan sister group, Aculifera, is still scarce (but see Fritsch et al., 2015 on Hox gene expression in the polyplacophoran Acanthochitona crinita). In contrast to gastropods and cephalopods, the Hox genes in polyplacophorans are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence similar to the condition in annelids and other bilaterians. Here, we present the expression patterns of the Hox genes Lox5, Lox4, and Lox2, together with the ParaHox gene caudal (Cdx) in the polyplacophoran A. crinita. To localize Hox and ParaHox gene transcription products, we also investigated the expression patterns of the genes FMRF and Elav, and the development of the nervous system. Similar to the other Hox genes, all three Acr-Lox genes are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence. Transcripts of Acr-Cdx are seemingly present in the forming hindgut at the posterior end. The expression patterns of both the central class Acr-Lox genes and the Acr-Cdx gene are strikingly similar to those in annelids and nemerteans. In Polyplacophora, the expression patterns of the Hox and ParaHox genes seem to be evolutionarily highly conserved, while in conchiferan mollusks these genes are co-opted into novel functions that might have led to evolutionary novelties, at least in gastropods and cephalopods. PMID:27098677

  8. Mosaic pattern of Cre recombinase expression in cochlear outer hair cells of the Brn3.1 Cre mouse.

    PubMed

    Frenz, Silke; Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Jürgens, Lukas; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Radeloff, Andreas; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hansen, Stefan; Mlynski, Robert; Hagen, Rudolf

    2015-04-15

    The Brn3.1 gene encodes for the protein Brn3.1, which is a member of the POU-IV class of transcription factors. Mutation leads to nonsyndromic human progressive hearing loss (DFNA15). To investigate the suitability of the Brn3.1 promoter for Cre recombinase-induced genetic recombination in cochlear hair cells, we established a transgenic Brn3.1 Cre mouse. This mouse line was crossbred with floxed ROSA26 and ROSA26 reporter mice. The cochleae were histologically analysed in cryosections at E16.5 and whole-mount preparations from P2 until P85. In addition, mice from all used strains and their recombinant offspring were tested electrophysiologically by auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distorsion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Cre recombinase activity could be detected in P14 and P21 animals in a mosaic pattern in 26.3 and 9.9% of the outer hair cells, respectively. All investigated mice showed normal ABR and DPOAE values, indicating that neither insertion of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) Cre cassette into the Brn3.1 gene led to abnormal auditory development nor did the reporter strains show inherited hearing disorders. This study shows that Cre expression under the control of the Brn3.1 promoter is feasible and that the insertion of the internal ribosome entry site Cre cassette into this locus exerted no effects on hearing development. Because of the inconstant pattern and the limited duration of expression, the application of the developed mouse line might be restricted. Also, the unchanged hearing capacity and structural integrity of the organ of Corti in available reporter lines indicate that they may be useful tools for hearing research. PMID:25714426

  9. Systematic expression analysis of Hox genes at adulthood reveals novel patterns in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hutlet, Bertrand; Theys, Nicolas; Coste, Cécile; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Doshishti-Agolli, Konstantin; Lizen, Benoît; Gofflot, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Hox proteins are key regulators of animal development, providing positional identity and patterning information to cells along the rostrocaudal axis of the embryo. Although their embryonic expression and function are well characterized, their presence and biological importance in adulthood remains poorly investigated. We provide here the first detailed quantitative and neuroanatomical characterization of the expression of the 39 Hox genes in the adult mouse brain. Using RT-qPCR we determined the expression of 24 Hox genes mainly in the brainstem of the adult brain, with low expression of a few genes in the cerebellum and the forebrain. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) we have demonstrated that expression of Hox genes is maintained in territories derived from the early segmental Hox expression domains in the hindbrain. Indeed, we show that expression of genes belonging to paralogy groups PG2-8 is maintained in the hindbrain derivatives at adulthood. The spatial colinearity, which characterizes the early embryonic expression of Hox genes, is still observed in sequential antero-posterior boundaries of expression. Moreover, the main mossy and climbing fibres precerebellar nuclei express PG2-8 Hox genes according to their migration origins. Second, ISH confirms the presence of Hox gene transcripts in territories where they are not detected during development, suggesting neo-expression in these territories in adulthood. Within the forebrain, we have mapped Hoxb1, Hoxb3, Hoxb4, Hoxd3 and Hoxa5 expression in restricted areas of the sensory cerebral cortices as well as in specific thalamic relay nuclei. Our data thus suggest a requirement of Hox genes beyond their role of patterning genes, providing a new dimension to their functional relevance in the central nervous system.

  10. Expression of human complement factor H prevents age-related macular degeneration-like retina damage and kidney abnormalities in aged Cfh knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jin-Dong; Kelly, Una; Landowski, Michael; Toomey, Christopher B; Groelle, Marybeth; Miller, Chelsey; Smith, Stephanie G; Klingeborn, Mikael; Singhapricha, Terry; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulatory protein in the alternative pathway of the complement system, and CFH polymorphisms increase the genetic risk of age-related macular degeneration dramatically. These same human CFH variants have also been associated with dense deposit disease. To mechanistically study the function of CFH in the pathogenesis of these diseases, we created transgenic mouse lines using human CFH bacterial artificial chromosomes expressing full-length human CFH variants and crossed these to Cfh knockout (Cfh(-/-)) mice. Human CFH protein inhibited cleavage of mouse complement component 3 and factor B in plasma and in retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera, establishing that human CFH regulates activation of the mouse alternative pathway. One of the mouse lines, which express relatively higher levels of CFH, demonstrated functional and structural protection of the retina owing to the Cfh deletion. Impaired visual function, detected as a deficit in the scotopic electroretinographic response, was improved in this transgenic mouse line compared with Cfh(-/-) mice, and transgenics had a thicker outer nuclear layer and less sub-retinal pigment epithelium deposit accumulation. In addition, expression of human CFH also completely protected the mice from developing kidney abnormalities associated with loss of CFH. These humanized CFH mice present a valuable model for study of the molecular mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease and for testing therapeutic targets.

  11. Expression of Human Complement Factor H Prevents Age-Related Macular Degeneration–Like Retina Damage and Kidney Abnormalities in Aged Cfh Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jin-Dong; Kelly, Una; Landowski, Michael; Toomey, Christopher B.; Groelle, Marybeth; Miller, Chelsey; Smith, Stephanie G.; Klingeborn, Mikael; Singhapricha, Terry; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulatory protein in the alternative pathway of the complement system, and CFH polymorphisms increase the genetic risk of age-related macular degeneration dramatically. These same human CFH variants have also been associated with dense deposit disease. To mechanistically study the function of CFH in the pathogenesis of these diseases, we created transgenic mouse lines using human CFH bacterial artificial chromosomes expressing full-length human CFH variants and crossed these to Cfh knockout (Cfh−/−) mice. Human CFH protein inhibited cleavage of mouse complement component 3 and factor B in plasma and in retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera, establishing that human CFH regulates activation of the mouse alternative pathway. One of the mouse lines, which express relatively higher levels of CFH, demonstrated functional and structural protection of the retina owing to the Cfh deletion. Impaired visual function, detected as a deficit in the scotopic electroretinographic response, was improved in this transgenic mouse line compared with Cfh−/− mice, and transgenics had a thicker outer nuclear layer and less sub–retinal pigment epithelium deposit accumulation. In addition, expression of human CFH also completely protected the mice from developing kidney abnormalities associated with loss of CFH. These humanized CFH mice present a valuable model for study of the molecular mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease and for testing therapeutic targets. PMID:25447048

  12. Ectopic expression of an apple apomixis-related gene MhFIE induces co-suppression and results in abnormal vegetative and reproductive development in tomato.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Dong, Qing-Long; Fang, Mou-Jing; Chen, Ke-Qin; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2012-12-15

    It has been well documented that FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE) plays important regulatory roles in diverse developmental processes in model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it is largely unknown how FIE genes function in economically important crops. In this study, MhFIE gene, which was previously isolated from apomictic tea crabapple (Malus hupehensis Redh. var. pingyiensis), was introduced into tomato. The hemizygous transgenic tomato lines produced curly leaves and decreased in seed germination. In addition, the co-suppression of the transgenic MhFIE and endogenous (SlFIE) genes occurred in homozygous transgenic tomatoes. As a result, FIE silencing brought about abnormal phenotypes during reproductive development in tomato, such as increased sepal and petal numbers in flower, a fused ovule and pistil and parthenocarpic fruit formation. A yeast two-hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) demonstrated that MhFIE interacted with a tomato protein, EZ2 (SlEZ2). Its ectopic expression and SlFIE co-suppression notably influenced the expression of genes associated with leaf, flower, and fruit development. Therefore, together with other PcG proteins, FIE was involved in the regulation of vegetative and reproductive development by modulating the expression of related genes in plants.

  13. Expression pattern in retinal photoreceptors of POMGnT1, a protein involved in muscle-eye-brain disease

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Mary Luz; Haro, Carmen; Campello, Laura; Cruces, Jesús; Martín-Nieto, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The POMGNT1 gene, encoding protein O-linked-mannose β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, is associated with muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) and other dystroglycanopathies. This gene’s lack of function or expression causes hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) in the muscle and the central nervous system, including the brain and the retina. The ocular symptoms of patients with MEB include retinal degeneration and detachment, glaucoma, and abnormal electroretinogram. Nevertheless, the POMGnT1 expression pattern in the healthy mammalian retina has not yet been investigated. In this work, we address the expression of the POMGNT1 gene in the healthy retina of a variety of mammals and characterize the distribution pattern of this gene in the adult mouse retina and the 661W photoreceptor cell line. Methods Using reverse transcription (RT)–PCR and immunoblotting, we studied POMGNT1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in various mammalian species, from rodents to humans. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy analyses were performed to characterize the distribution profile of its protein product in mouse retinal sections and in 661W cultured cells. The intranuclear distribution of POMT1 and POMT2, the two enzymes preceding POMGnT1 in the α-DG O-mannosyl glycosylation pathway, was also analyzed. Results POMGNT1 mRNA and its encoded protein were expressed in the neural retina of all mammals studied. POMGnT1 was located in the cytoplasmic fraction in the mouse retina and concentrated in the myoid portion of the photoreceptor inner segments, where the protein colocalized with GM130, a Golgi complex marker. The presence of POMGnT1 in the Golgi complex was also evident in 661W cells. However, and in contrast to retinal tissue, POMGnT1 additionally accumulated in the nucleus of the 661W photoreceptors. Colocalization was found within this organelle between POMGnT1 and POMT1/2, the latter associated with euchromatic regions of the nucleus. Conclusions

  14. An efficient promoter trap for detection of patterned gene expression and subsequent functional analysis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Camilla; Franch-Marro, Xavier; Hartenstein, Volker; Alexandre, Cyrille; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2006-11-21

    Transposable elements have been used in Drosophila to detect gene expression, inactivate gene function, and induce ectopic expression or overexpression. We have combined all of these features in a single construct. A promoterless GAL4 cDNA is expressed when the construct inserts within a transcriptional unit, and GAL4 activates a GFP-encoding gene present in the same transposon. In a primary screen, patterned gene expression is detected as GFP fluorescence in the live progeny of dysgenic males. Many animals expressing GFP in distinct patterns can be recovered with relatively little effort. As expected, many insertions cause loss of function. After insertion at a genomic location, specific parts of the transposon can be excised by FLP recombinase, thus allowing it to induce conditional misexpression of the tagged gene. Therefore, both gain- and loss-of-function studies can be carried out with a single insertion in a gene identified by virtue of its expression pattern. Using this promoter trap approach, we have identified a group of cells that innervate the calyx of the mushroom body and could thus define a previously unrecognized memory circuit. PMID:17093046

  15. Shh and Pax6 have unconventional expression patterns in embryonic morphogenesis in Sepia officinalis (Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Navet, Sandra; Andouche, Aude; Baratte, Sébastien; Bonnaud, Laure

    2009-10-01

    Cephalopods show a very complex nervous system, particularly derived when compared to other molluscs. In vertebrates, the setting up of the nervous system depends on genes such as Shh and Pax6. In this paper we assess Shh and Pax6 expression patterns during Sepia officinalis development by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In vertebrates, Shh has been shown to indirectly inhibit Pax6. This seems to be the case in cephalopods as the expression patterns of these genes do not overlap during S. officinalis development. Pax6 is expressed in the optic region and brain and Shh in gut structures, as already seen in vertebrates and Drosophila. Thus, both genes show expression in analogous structures in vertebrates. Surprisingly, they also exhibit unconventional expressions such as in gills for Pax6 and ganglia borders for Shh. They are also expressed in many cephalopods' derived characters among molluscs as in arm suckers for Pax6 and beak producing tissues, nuchal organ and neural cord of the arms for Shh. This new data supports the fact that molecular control patterns have evolved with the appearance of morphological novelties in cephalopods as shown in this new model, S. officinalis.

  16. Characterization, cDNA cloning and expression pattern of relaxin gene during embryogenesis of Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Fiengo, Marcella; Donizetti, Aldo; del Gaudio, Rosanna; Minucci, Sergio; Aniello, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    We report the identification, the cDNA cloning, the temporal and spatial expression pattern analysis of the rln gene in the zebrafish Danio rerio. The deduced Rln B and A domains show different evolutionary conservation. Rln B domain shows higher similarity when compared to zebrafish and human RLN3 B domain than human RLN1 and RLN2 B domain. Differently, the zebrafish Rln A domain shows relatively low amino acid sequence similarity when compared with the same sequences. The rln gene is transcribed both during embryogenesis and in adult organism, where higher transcript level has been particularly evidenced in the brain. Moreover, we provide the first description of rln spatial expression pattern during embryonic development. In particular, we show restricted transcript localization starting at the pharyngula stage in olfactory placode, branchial arch region, and in a cell cluster near to otic vesicle. In larval stage, new transcription territories have been detected in both neural and non-neural regions. In particular, in the brain, rln expression has been revealed in telencephalic region around anterior commissure, in the preoptic area, and in restricted rombencephalic cell clusters. Expression of rln gene in extra-neural territories has been detected in the pancreatic and thyroid gland regions. Danio rerio rln expression pattern analysis reveals shared features with the mammalian RLN gene, particularly in the brain, where it might have a role in the neurophysiological processes. In addition, expression in the thyroid and pancreas region suggests a function as a paracrine and endocrine hormone.

  17. EXPRESSION PATTERNS OF ESTROGEN RECEPTORS IN THE CENTRAL AUDITORY SYSTEM CHANGE IN PREPUBERTAL AND AGED MICE

    PubMed Central

    Charitidi, K.; Frisina, R. D.; Vasilyeva, O. N.; Zhu, X.; Canlon, B.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens are important in the development, maintenance and physiology of the CNS. Several studies have shown their effects on the processing of hearing in both males and females, and these effects, in part, are thought to result from regulation of the transcription of genes via their classical estrogen receptor (ER) pathway. In order to understand the spatiotemporal changes that occur with age, we have studied the expression of ERs in the central auditory pathway in prepubertal and aged CBA mice with immunohistochemistry. In prepubertal mice a clear dichotomy was noted between the expression of ERα and ERβ. ERβ-positive neurons were found in the metencephalon whereas the majority of ERα was found in mesencephalon, diencephalon or the telencephalon. In the aged animals a different pattern of ER expression was found in terms of location and overall intensity. These age-induced changes in the expression pattern were generally not uniform, suggesting that region-specific mechanisms regulate the ERs’ age-related expression. Neither the prepubertal nor the aged animals showed sex differences in any auditory structure. Our results demonstrate different age-dependent spatial and temporal changes in the pattern of expression of ERα and ERβ, suggesting that each ER type may be involved in distinct roles across the central auditory pathway in different periods of maturation. PMID:20736049

  18. Expression of the B cell repertoire in lpr mice; abnormal expansion of a few VHJ558 germ-line genes.

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Fernández, C

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the VH gene repertoire of the J558 family was done in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated resting cells and in vivo activated cells derived from C57Bl/6-lpr mice (IghCb). Using a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) based on digestion with the restriction enzyme Pstl, the expression of the subfamilies of the J558 family of VH genes could be determined. The J558 subfamily repertoire of resting B cells of the lpr mice was similar to that of the normal mice, while the J558 repertoire of the in vivo-activated cells was altered: analysis and sequencing of the IgM-expressed J558 repertoire of a sick female mouse showed that 50% of the J558 genes were represented by a single VH gene rearrangement, showing that its expansion was monoclonal. Furthermore, this same rearrangement made up to 90% of the J558 repertoire in the IgG2a+ population, showing that it had been preferentially selected, expanded and switched. However, compared with its IgM counterpart, it showed no evidence of somatic hypermutation. PMID:7851020

  19. Heat exposure in female rats elicits abnormal fear expression and cellular changes in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gruene, Tina M; Lipps, Jennifer; Rey, Colin D; Bouck, Anna; Shansky, Rebecca M

    2014-11-01

    Despite a twofold higher prevalence of fear-related disorders in women, the neurobiological factors that modulate and drive fear expression are rarely studied in female animals. Fear conditioning and extinction are useful tools for dissecting these mechanisms, and here we tested the effects of environmental manipulations - four days of exposure to 31°C temperatures in the animal housing facility - on fear learning and memory exclusively in female rats. We found that heat exposure disrupted freezing to tone during fear conditioning, and elicited enhanced freezing during extinction and extinction retrieval. We also performed immunohistochemistry for c-fos expression in the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PL) regions of the prefrontal cortex during extinction retrieval, and found that heat exposure induced a switch from IL-dominated activity to PL-dominated activity. Finally, morphological analysis of spines in hippocampal CA3 neurons revealed an increase in spine head diameter in heat-exposed animals, which may partly underlie the persistent freezing observed in these animals. Together, our data show that heat exposure can induce changes at behavioral, physiological, and structural levels, and add to a woefully lacking body of literature on fear processes in female animals.

  20. [Abnormal expression of genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, E S; Zinovieva, O L; Oparina, N Yu; Prokofjeva, M M; Spirin, P V; Favorskaya, I A; Zborovskaya, I B; Lisitsyn, N A; Prassolov, V S; Mashkova, T D

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids are signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes and possess antitumor activity. This work presents a comprehensive description of changes in the expression of 23 genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer tumors compared to adjacent normal tissues obtained using RT-PCR. Even at early stages of malignant transformation, a significant decrease in ADH1B, ADH3, RDHL, and RALDH1 mRNA levels was observed in 82, 79, 73, and 64% of tumor specimens, respectively, and a considerable increase in AKR1B10 mRNA content was observed in 80% of tumors. Dramatic changes in the levels of these mRNAs can impair the synthesis of all-trans retinoic acid, a key natural regulatory retinoid. Apart from that, it was found that mRNA levels of nuclear retinoid receptor genes RXRγ, RARα, RXRα, and gene RDH11 were significantly decreased in 80, 67, 57, and 66% of tumor specimens, respectively. Thus, neoplastic transformation of lung tissue cells is accompanied with deregulated expression of key genes of retinoid metabolism and function.

  1. Developmental Stage Annotation of Drosophila Gene Expression Pattern Images via an Entire Solution Path for LDA.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jieping; Chen, Jianhui; Janardan, Ravi; Kumar, Sudhir

    2008-03-01

    Gene expression in a developing embryo occurs in particular cells (spatial patterns) in a time-specific manner (temporal patterns), which leads to the differentiation of cell fates. Images of a Drosophila melanogaster embryo at a given developmental stage, showing a particular gene expression pattern revealed by a gene-specific probe, can be compared for spatial overlaps. The comparison is fundamentally important to formulating and testing gene interaction hypotheses. Expression pattern comparison is most biologically meaningful when images from a similar time point (developmental stage) are compared. In this paper, we present LdaPath, a novel formulation of Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) for automatic developmental stage range classification. It employs multivariate linear regression with the L(1)-norm penalty controlled by a regularization parameter for feature extraction and visualization. LdaPath computes an entire solution path for all values of regularization parameter with essentially the same computational cost as fitting one LDA model. Thus, it facilitates efficient model selection. It is based on the equivalence relationship between LDA and the least squares method for multi-class classifications. This equivalence relationship is established under a mild condition, which we show empirically to hold for many high-dimensional datasets, such as expression pattern images. Our experiments on a collection of 2705 expression pattern images show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Results also show that the LDA model resulting from LdaPath is sparse, and irrelevant features may be removed. Thus, LdaPath provides a general framework for simultaneous feature selection and feature extraction.

  2. Developmental Stage Annotation of Drosophila Gene Expression Pattern Images via an Entire Solution Path for LDA

    PubMed Central

    YE, Jieping; Chen, Jianhui; Janardan, Ravi; Kumar, Sudhir

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression in a developing embryo occurs in particular cells (spatial patterns) in a time-specific manner (temporal patterns), which leads to the differentiation of cell fates. Images of a Drosophila melanogaster embryo at a given developmental stage, showing a particular gene expression pattern revealed by a gene-specific probe, can be compared for spatial overlaps. The comparison is fundamentally important to formulating and testing gene interaction hypotheses. Expression pattern comparison is most biologically meaningful when images from a similar time point (developmental stage) are compared. In this paper, we present LdaPath, a novel formulation of Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) for automatic developmental stage range classification. It employs multivariate linear regression with the L1-norm penalty controlled by a regularization parameter for feature extraction and visualization. LdaPath computes an entire solution path for all values of regularization parameter with essentially the same computational cost as fitting one LDA model. Thus, it facilitates efficient model selection. It is based on the equivalence relationship between LDA and the least squares method for multi-class classifications. This equivalence relationship is established under a mild condition, which we show empirically to hold for many high-dimensional datasets, such as expression pattern images. Our experiments on a collection of 2705 expression pattern images show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Results also show that the LDA model resulting from LdaPath is sparse, and irrelevant features may be removed. Thus, LdaPath provides a general framework for simultaneous feature selection and feature extraction. PMID:18769656

  3. Analysis of gene expression dynamics revealed delayed and abnormal epidermal repair process in aged compared to young skin.

    PubMed

    Sextius, Peggy; Marionnet, Claire; Tacheau, Charlotte; Bon, François-Xavier; Bastien, Philippe; Mauviel, Alain; Bernard, Bruno A; Bernerd, Françoise; Dubertret, Louis

    2015-05-01

    With aging, epidermal homeostasis and barrier function are disrupted. In a previous study, we analyzed the transcriptomic response of young skin epidermis after stratum corneum removal, and obtained a global kinetic view of the molecular processes involved in barrier function recovery. In the present study, the same analysis was performed in aged skin in order to better understand the defects which occur with aging. Thirty healthy male volunteers (67 ± 4 years old) were involved. Tape-strippings were carried out on the inner face of one forearm, the other unstripped forearm serving as control. At 2, 6, 18, 30 and 72 h after stripping, TEWL measurements were taken, and epidermis samples were collected. Total RNA was extracted and analyzed using DermArray(®) cDNA microarrays. The results highlighted that barrier function recovery and overall kinetics of gene expression were delayed following stripping in aged skin. Indeed, the TEWL measurements showed that barrier recovery in the young group appeared to be dramatically significant during the overall kinetics, while there were no significant evolution in the aged group until 30 h. Moreover, gene expression analysis revealed that the number of modulated genes following tape stripping increased as a function of time and reached a peak at 6 h after tape stripping in young skin, while it was at 30 h in aged skin, showing that cellular activity linked to the repair process may be engaged earlier in young epidermis than in aged epidermis. A total of 370 genes were modulated in the young group. In the aged group, 382 genes were modulated, whose 184 were also modulated in the young group. Only eight genes that were modulated in both groups were significantly differently modulated. The characterization of these genes into 15 functional families helped to draw a scenario for the aging process affecting epidermal repair capacity. PMID:25740152

  4. Prenatal Hypoxia-Ischemia Induces Abnormalities in CA3 Microstructure, Potassium Chloride Co-Transporter 2 Expression and Inhibitory Tone.

    PubMed

    Jantzie, Lauren L; Getsy, Paulina M; Denson, Jesse L; Firl, Daniel J; Maxwell, Jessie R; Rogers, Danny A; Wilson, Christopher G; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-01-01

    Infants who suffer perinatal brain injury, including those with encephalopathy of prematurity, are prone to chronic neurological deficits, including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems, such as anxiety, inattention, and poor social interaction. These deficits, especially in combination, pose the greatest hindrance to these children becoming independent adults. Cerebral function depends on adequate development of essential inhibitory neural circuits and the appropriate amount of excitation and inhibition at specific stages of maturation. Early neuronal synaptic responses to γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) are initially excitatory. During the early postnatal period, GABAAR responses switch to inhibitory with the upregulation of potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2. With extrusion of chloride by KCC2, the Cl(-) reversal potential shifts and GABA and glycine responses become inhibitory. We hypothesized that prenatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury chronically impairs the developmental upregulation of KCC2 that is essential for cerebral circuit formation. Following late gestation hypoxia-ischemia (HI), diffusion tensor imaging in juvenile rats shows poor microstructural integrity in the hippocampal CA3 subfield, with reduced fractional anisotropy and elevated radial diffusivity. The loss of microstructure correlates with early reduced KCC2 expression on NeuN-positive pyramidal neurons, and decreased monomeric and oligomeric KCC2 protein expression in the CA3 subfield. Together with decreased inhibitory post-synaptic currents during a critical window of development, we document for the first time that prenatal transient systemic HI in rats impairs hippocampal CA3 inhibitory tone. Failure of timely development of inhibitory tone likely contributes to a lower seizure threshold and impaired cognitive function in children who suffer perinatal brain injury. PMID:26388734

  5. Prenatal Hypoxia–Ischemia Induces Abnormalities in CA3 Microstructure, Potassium Chloride Co-Transporter 2 Expression and Inhibitory Tone

    PubMed Central

    Jantzie, Lauren L.; Getsy, Paulina M.; Denson, Jesse L.; Firl, Daniel J.; Maxwell, Jessie R.; Rogers, Danny A.; Wilson, Christopher G.; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-01-01

    Infants who suffer perinatal brain injury, including those with encephalopathy of prematurity, are prone to chronic neurological deficits, including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems, such as anxiety, inattention, and poor social interaction. These deficits, especially in combination, pose the greatest hindrance to these children becoming independent adults. Cerebral function depends on adequate development of essential inhibitory neural circuits and the appropriate amount of excitation and inhibition at specific stages of maturation. Early neuronal synaptic responses to γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) are initially excitatory. During the early postnatal period, GABAAR responses switch to inhibitory with the upregulation of potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2. With extrusion of chloride by KCC2, the Cl− reversal potential shifts and GABA and glycine responses become inhibitory. We hypothesized that prenatal hypoxic–ischemic brain injury chronically impairs the developmental upregulation of KCC2 that is essential for cerebral circuit formation. Following late gestation hypoxia–ischemia (HI), diffusion tensor imaging in juvenile rats shows poor microstructural integrity in the hippocampal CA3 subfield, with reduced fractional anisotropy and elevated radial diffusivity. The loss of microstructure correlates with early reduced KCC2 expression on NeuN-positive pyramidal neurons, and decreased monomeric and oligomeric KCC2 protein expression in the CA3 subfield. Together with decreased inhibitory post-synaptic currents during a critical window of development, we document for the first time that prenatal transient systemic HI in rats impairs hippocampal CA3 inhibitory tone. Failure of timely development of inhibitory tone likely contributes to a lower seizure threshold and impaired cognitive function in children who suffer perinatal brain injury. PMID:26388734

  6. Modeling pulmonary fibrosis by abnormal expression of telomerase/apoptosis/collagen V in experimental usual interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Parra, E R; Pincelli, M S; Teodoro, W R; Velosa, A P P; Martins, V; Rangel, M P; Barbas-Filho, J V; Capelozzi, V L

    2014-07-01

    Limitations on tissue proliferation capacity determined by telomerase/apoptosis balance have been implicated in pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, collagen V shows promise as an inductor of apoptosis. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between the telomerase/apoptosis index, collagen V synthesis, and epithelial/fibroblast replication in mice exposed to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) at high oxygen concentration. Two groups of mice were analyzed: 20 mice received BHT, and 10 control mice received corn oil. Telomerase expression, apoptosis, collagen I, III, and V fibers, and hydroxyproline were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ detection of apoptosis, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and histomorphometry. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of increased alveolar epithelial cells type 1 (AEC1) in apoptosis. Immunostaining showed increased nuclear expression of telomerase in AEC type 2 (AEC2) between normal and chronic scarring areas of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Control lungs and normal areas from UIP lungs showed weak green birefringence of type I and III collagens in the alveolar wall and type V collagen in the basement membrane of alveolar capillaries. The increase in collagen V was greater than collagens I and III in scarring areas of UIP. A significant direct association was found between collagen V and AEC2 apoptosis. We concluded that telomerase, collagen V fiber density, and apoptosis evaluation in experimental UIP offers the potential to control reepithelization of alveolar septa and fibroblast proliferation. Strategies aimed at preventing high rates of collagen V synthesis, or local responses to high rates of cell apoptosis, may have a significant impact in pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24919172

  7. Regulatory Divergence between Parental Alleles Determines Gene Expression Patterns in Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Combes, Marie-Christine; Hueber, Yann; Dereeper, Alexis; Rialle, Stéphanie; Herrera, Juan-Carlos; Lashermes, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Both hybridization and allopolyploidization generate novel phenotypes by conciliating divergent genomes and regulatory networks in the same cellular context. To understand the rewiring of gene expression in hybrids, the total expression of 21,025 genes and the allele-specific expression of over 11,000 genes were quantified in interspecific hybrids and their parental species, Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides using RNA-seq technology. Between parental species, cis- and trans-regulatory divergences affected around 32% and 35% of analyzed genes, respectively, with nearly 17% of them showing both. The relative importance of trans-regulatory divergences between both species could be related to their low genetic divergence and perennial habit. In hybrids, among divergently expressed genes between parental species and hybrids, 77% was expressed like one parent (expression level dominance), including 65% like C. eugenioides. Gene expression was shown to result from the expression of both alleles affected by intertwined parental trans-regulatory factors. A strong impact of C. eugenioides trans-regulatory factors on the upregulation of C. canephora alleles was revealed. The gene expression patterns appeared determined by complex combinations of cis- and trans-regulatory divergences. In particular, the observed biased expression level dominance seemed to be derived from the asymmetric effects of trans-regulatory parental factors on regulation of alleles. More generally, this study illustrates the effects of divergent trans-regulatory parental factors on the gene expression pattern in hybrids. The characteristics of the transcriptional response to hybridization appear to be determined by the compatibility of gene regulatory networks and therefore depend on genetic divergences between the parental species and their evolutionary history. PMID:25819221

  8. Molecular characterization and different expression patterns of the FABP gene family during goat skeletal muscle development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linjie; Li, Li; Jiang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhong, Tao; Chen, Yu; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    The FABP (adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein) genes play an important role in intracellular fatty acid transport and considered to be candidate genes for fatness traits in domestic animal. In this study, we cloned the cDNA sequences of goat FABP family genes and their expression patterns were detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR. Expression analysis showed that goat FABP1 gene was predominantly expressed in liver, kidney and large intestine. While FABP4 was widely expressed in many tissues with a high expression level was observed in the fat, skeletal muscle, stomach and lung. Notably, FABP2 gene was expressed specifically in small intestine. Moreover, goat FABP3 was expressed at 60 day with the highest level, then significantly (p < 0.01) decreased at the 90 day. No significant expression differences were observed in longissimus dorsi muscles among 3 day, 30 day and 60 day. Goat FABP4 was expressed at 3 day with the lowest level, then significantly (p < 0.01) increased to a peak at the 60 day. In addition, a significant relationship between FABP3 mRNA expression levels and intramuscular fat (IMF) content was observed. These results suggest that the FABP3 and FABP4 may be important genes for meat quality and provides useful information for further studies on their roles in skeletal muscle IMF deposit.

  9. Meta-analysis of genome-wide expression patterns associated with behavioral maturation in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Heather A; Southey, Bruce R; Robinson, Gene E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2008-01-01

    Background The information from multiple microarray experiments can be integrated in an objective manner via meta-analysis. However, multiple meta-analysis approaches are available and their relative strengths have not been directly compared using experimental data in the context of different gene expression scenarios and studies with different degrees of relationship. This study investigates the complementary advantages of meta-analysis approaches to integrate information across studies, and further mine the transcriptome for genes that are associated with complex processes such as behavioral maturation in honey bees. Behavioral maturation and division of labor in honey bees are related to changes in the expression of hundreds of genes in the brain. The information from various microarray studies comparing the expression of genes at different maturation stages in honey bee brains was integrated using complementary meta-analysis approaches. Results Comparison of lists of genes with significant differential expression across studies failed to identify genes with consistent patterns of expression that were below the selected significance threshold, or identified genes with significant yet inconsistent patterns. The meta-analytical framework supported the identification of genes with consistent overall expression patterns and eliminated genes that exhibited contradictory expression patterns across studies. Sample-level meta-analysis of normalized gene-expression can detect more differentially expressed genes than the study-level meta-analysis of estimates for genes that were well described by similar model parameter estimates across studies and had small variation across studies. Furthermore, study-level meta-analysis was well suited for genes that exhibit consistent patterns across studies, genes that had substantial variation across studies, and genes that did not conform to the assumptions of the sample-level meta-analysis. Meta-analyses confirmed previously

  10. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula defensin-like genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant genomes typically contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL) genes that encode short proteins resembling defensins, which are antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns of DEFL genes because most were recently discovered and many are not well represented on sta...

  11. GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS OF CD-1 DAY-8 EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BROMOCHLORO ACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression patterns of CD-1 day-8 embryo cultures exposed to bromochloro acetic acid

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid* and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and *Reproductiv...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A 950-GENE DNA ARRAY FOR EXAMINING GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS IN MOUSE TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of a 950-gene DNA array for examining gene expression patterns in mouse testis.

    Rockett JC, Christopher Luft J, Brian Garges J, Krawetz SA, Hughes MR, Hee Kirn K, Oudes AJ, Dix DJ.

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effec...

  13. Patterns of evolution of genes disrupted in expression in Drosophila species hybrids.

    PubMed

    Noor, Mohamed A F

    2005-04-01

    Divergence between species in regulatory pathways may contribute to hybrid incompatibilities such as sterility. Consistent with this idea, genes involved in male fertility often evolve faster than most other genes both in amino acid sequence and in expression. Previously, we identified a panel of male-specific genes under-expressed in sterile male hybrids of Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana relative to pure species, and we showed that this under-expression is associated with infertility. In a preliminary effort to assess the generalities in the patterns of evolution of these genes, I examined patterns of mRNA expression in three of these genes in sterile F 1 hybrid males of D. pseudoobscura and D. persimilis . F 1 hybrid males bearing D. persimilis X chromosomes under-expressed all these genes relative to the parental species, while hybrids bearing D. pseudoobscura X chromosomes under-expressed two of these three genes. Interestingly, the third gene, CG5762 , has undergone extensive amino acid evolution within the D. pseudoobscura species group, possibly driven by positive natural selection. We conclude that some of the same genes exhibit disruptions in expression within each of the two species groups, which could suggest commonalities in the regulatory architecture of sterility in these groups. Alternative explanations are also considered.

  14. Expression patterns of five polymorphic membrane proteins during the Chlamydia abortus developmental cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wheelhouse, Nick; Sait, Michelle; Wilson, Kim; Aitchison, Kevin; McLean, Kevin; Smith, David G.E.; Longbottom, David

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) belonging to the Type V autotransporter protein family play an important role in the pathogenesis of Chlamydia abortus (C. abortus; formerly Chlamydophila abortus) infection. In a previous study we demonstrated the expression of all the pmps at the transcriptional level. The purpose of this study was to measure the number of Pmp positive inclusions throughout the C. abortus developmental cycle to investigate heterogeneity in expression patterns. McCoy cells were infected with C. abortus and analysed for Pmp expression over a 72 h period by fluorescent immunocytochemistry. Pmp18D could be detected at all analysed time points, and could only be accurately quantified from 36 hpi while Pmp10G positive inclusions could be visualised from 36 hpi. Expression of Pmps 13G, 16G and 17G could only be visualised later in the cycle and within less than half of visualised inclusions. These results indicate that while expression of specific Pmps is constitutive (Pmp18D), the pattern of expression of other Pmps is more variable. This suggests that different members of the Pmp family may play different roles within the developmental cycle of the organism, with some (Pmps10G and 18D) having roles throughout the cycle, while the heterogeneity of expression of others may aid in antigenic variation. PMID:22776512

  15. Noncanonical role of Hox14 revealed by its expression patterns in lamprey and shark.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Takio, Yoko; Tamura, Koji; Aono, Hideaki; Meyer, Axel; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2008-05-01

    Hox genes are arranged in uninterrupted clusters in vertebrate genomes, and the nested patterns of their expression define spatial identities in multiple embryonic tissues. The ancestral Hox cluster of vertebrates has long been thought to consist of, maximally, 13 Hox genes. However, recently, Hox14 genes were discovered in three chordate lineages, the coelacanth, cartilaginous fishes, and amphioxus, but their expression patterns have not yet been analyzed. We isolated Hox14 cDNAs from the Japanese lamprey and cloudy catshark. These genes were not expressed in the central nervous systems, somites, or fin buds/folds but were expressed in a restricted cell population surrounding the hindgut. The lack of Hox14 expression in most of the embryonic axial elements, where nested Hox expressions define spatial identities, suggests a decoupling of Hox14 genes' regulation from the ancestral regulatory mechanism. The relaxation of preexisting constraint for collinear expression may have permitted the secondary losses of this Hox member in the tetrapod and teleost lineages. PMID:18448683

  16. Noncanonical role of Hox14 revealed by its expression patterns in lamprey and shark

    PubMed Central

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Takio, Yoko; Tamura, Koji; Aono, Hideaki; Meyer, Axel; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2008-01-01

    Hox genes are arranged in uninterrupted clusters in vertebrate genomes, and the nested patterns of their expression define spatial identities in multiple embryonic tissues. The ancestral Hox cluster of vertebrates has long been thought to consist of, maximally, 13 Hox genes. However, recently, Hox14 genes were discovered in three chordate lineages, the coelacanth, cartilaginous fishes, and amphioxus, but their expression patterns have not yet been analyzed. We isolated Hox14 cDNAs from the Japanese lamprey and cloudy catshark. These genes were not expressed in the central nervous systems, somites, or fin buds/folds but were expressed in a restricted cell population surrounding the hindgut. The lack of Hox14 expression in most of the embryonic axial elements, where nested Hox expressions define spatial identities, suggests a decoupling of Hox14 genes' regulation from the ancestral regulatory mechanism. The relaxation of preexisting constraint for collinear expression may have permitted the secondary losses of this Hox member in the tetrapod and teleost lineages. PMID:18448683

  17. Decreased expression of ARV1 results in cholesterol retention in the endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal bile acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fumin; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Shechtman, Caryn F; Liu, Ying; Crooke, Roseann; Graham, Mark; Cohen, David E; Sturley, Stephen L; Rader, Daniel J

    2010-10-29

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane cholesterol is maintained at an optimal concentration of ∼5 mol % by the net impact of sterol synthesis, modification, and export. Arv1p was first identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a key component of this homeostasis due to its probable role in intracellular sterol transport. Mammalian ARV1, which can fully complement the yeast lesion, encodes a ubiquitously expressed, resident ER protein. Repeated dosing of specific antisense oligonucleotides to ARV1 produced a marked reduction of ARV1 transcripts in liver, adipose, and to a lesser extent, intestine. This resulted in marked hypercholesterolemia, elevated serum bile acids, and activation of the hepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulatory pathway. Knockdown of ARV1 in murine liver and HepG2 cells was associated with accumulation of cholesterol in the ER at the expense of the plasma membrane and suppression of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins and their targets. These studies indicate a critical role of mammalian Arv1p in sterol movement from the ER and in the ensuing regulation of hepatic cholesterol and bile acid metabolism.

  18. Decreased Expression of ARV1 Results in Cholesterol Retention in the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Abnormal Bile Acid Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fumin; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Shechtman, Caryn F.; Liu, Ying; Crooke, Roseann; Graham, Mark; Cohen, David E.; Sturley, Stephen L.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane cholesterol is maintained at an optimal concentration of ∼5 mol % by the net impact of sterol synthesis, modification, and export. Arv1p was first identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a key component of this homeostasis due to its probable role in intracellular sterol transport. Mammalian ARV1, which can fully complement the yeast lesion, encodes a ubiquitously expressed, resident ER protein. Repeated dosing of specific antisense oligonucleotides to ARV1 produced a marked reduction of ARV1 transcripts in liver, adipose, and to a lesser extent, intestine. This resulted in marked hypercholesterolemia, elevated serum bile acids, and activation of the hepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulatory pathway. Knockdown of ARV1 in murine liver and HepG2 cells was associated with accumulation of cholesterol in the ER at the expense of the plasma membrane and suppression of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins and their targets. These studies indicate a critical role of mammalian Arv1p in sterol movement from the ER and in the ensuing regulation of hepatic cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. PMID:20663892

  19. Expression Pattern of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Celiac Disease Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bottasso Arias, Natalia M.; García, Marina; Bondar, Constanza; Guzman, Luciana; Redondo, Agustina; Chopita, Nestor; Córsico, Betina; Chirdo, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals following exposure to dietary gluten. Severe changes at the intestinal mucosa observed in untreated CD patients are linked to changes in the level and in the pattern of expression of different genes. Fully differentiated epithelial cells express two isoforms of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs): intestinal and liver, IFABP and LFABP, respectively. These proteins bind and transport long chain fatty acids and also have other important biological roles in signaling pathways, particularly those related to PPARγ and inflammatory processes. Herein, we analyze the serum levels of IFABP and characterize the expression of both FABPs at protein and mRNA level in small intestinal mucosa in severe enteropathy and normal tissue. As a result, we observed higher levels of circulating IFABP in untreated CD patients compared with controls and patients on gluten-free diet. In duodenal mucosa a differential FABPs expression pattern was observed with a reduction in mRNA levels compared to controls explained by the epithelium loss in severe enteropathy. In conclusion, we report changes in FABPs' expression pattern in severe enteropathy. Consequently, there might be alterations in lipid metabolism and the inflammatory process in the small intestinal mucosa. PMID:26346822

  20. Antagonism Pattern Detection between MicroRNA and Target Expression in Ewing’s Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Martignetti, Loredana; Laud-Duval, Karine; Tirode, Franck; Pierron, Gaelle; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Barillot, Emmanuel; Delattre, Olivier; Zinovyev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as fundamental regulators that silence gene expression at the post-transcriptional and translational levels. The identification of their targets is a major challenge to elucidate the regulated biological processes. The overall effect of miRNA is reflected on target mRNA expression, suggesting the design of new investigative methods based on high-throughput experimental data such as miRNA and transcriptome profiles. We propose a novel statistical measure of non-linear dependence between miRNA and mRNA expression, in order to infer miRNA-target interactions. This approach, which we name antagonism pattern detection, is based on the statistical recognition of a triangular-shaped pattern in miRNA-target expression profiles. This pattern is observed in miRNA-target expression measurements since their simultaneously elevated expression is statistically under-represented in the case of miRNA silencing effect. The proposed method enables miRNA target prediction to strongly rely on cellular context and physiological conditions reflected by expression data. The procedure has been assessed on synthetic datasets and tested on a set of real positive controls. Then it has been applied to analyze expression data from Ewing’s sarcoma patients. The antagonism relationship is evaluated as a good indicator of real miRNA-target biological interaction. The predicted targets are consistently enriched for miRNA binding site motifs in their 3′UTR. Moreover, we reveal sets of predicted targets for each miRNA sharing important biological function. The procedure allows us to infer crucial miRNA regulators and their potential targets in Ewing’s sarcoma disease. It can be considered as a valid statistical approach to discover new insights in the miRNA regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22848594

  1. Expression Patterns of CREBs in Oocyte Growth and Maturation of Fish

    PubMed Central

    Wang, De-Shou; Sudhakumari, Cheni-Chery; Kobayashi, Tohru; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    In fish, oocyte meiotic maturation is regulated by 17α, 20β-dihydroxy-progesterone through cAMP. To study the role of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in meiotic maturation, we cloned and characterized the expression pattern of CREBs from two fish models, the Nile tilapia and catfish. In the Nile tilapia three different CREBs were identified where in CREB1 was found in many tissues including gonads with abundant expression in testis. CREB2, few amino acids shorter than CREB1, was expressed in several tissues with abundant expression in ovary. In addition, a 3’UTR variant form, CREB3 was exclusively found in ovary. During natural 14-day ovarian cycle of the Nile tilapia, CREB1 expression was stable throughout vitellogenesis with a sharp decrease on the day of spawning. In contrast, CREB2 remain unchanged throughout the ovarian cycle, however elevated in 11-day full-grown immature ovarian follicle and after hCG-induction. Interestingly, CREB3 expression was induced three folds on the day of spawning as well as during hCG-induced oocyte maturation. Based on the synergistic expression pattern, CREB1 is likely to control oocyte growth, whereas CREB 2 and 3 contribute to oocyte maturation in tilapia and the latter seems to be critical. In catfish, a single form of CREB showed a maximum expression during spawning phase and hCG-induced maturation both in vivo and in vitro augmented CREB expression. These results suggest that spatial and temporal expression of CREBs seems to be important for final oocyte maturation and may also regulate oocyte growth in fish. PMID:26700177

  2. Expression Patterns of CREBs in Oocyte Growth and Maturation of Fish.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian; Sreenivasulu, Gunti; Wang, De-Shou; Sudhakumari, Cheni-Chery; Kobayashi, Tohru; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    In fish, oocyte meiotic maturation is regulated by 17α, 20β-dihydroxy-progesterone through cAMP. To study the role of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in meiotic maturation, we cloned and characterized the expression pattern of CREBs from two fish models, the Nile tilapia and catfish. In the Nile tilapia three different CREBs were identified where in CREB1 was found in many tissues including gonads with abundant expression in testis. CREB2, few amino acids shorter than CREB1, was expressed in several tissues with abundant expression in ovary. In addition, a 3'UTR variant form, CREB3 was exclusively found in ovary. During natural 14-day ovarian cycle of the Nile tilapia, CREB1 expression was stable throughout vitellogenesis with a sharp decrease on the day of spawning. In contrast, CREB2 remain unchanged throughout the ovarian cycle, however elevated in 11-day full-grown immature ovarian follicle and after hCG-induction. Interestingly, CREB3 expression was induced three folds on the day of spawning as well as during hCG-induced oocyte maturation. Based on the synergistic expression pattern, CREB1 is likely to control oocyte growth, whereas CREB 2 and 3 contribute to oocyte maturation in tilapia and the latter seems to be critical. In catfish, a single form of CREB showed a maximum expression during spawning phase and hCG-induced maturation both in vivo and in vitro augmented CREB expression. These results suggest that spatial and temporal expression of CREBs seems to be important for final oocyte maturation and may also regulate oocyte growth in fish. PMID:26700177

  3. Expression pattern of INNER NO OUTER homologue in Nymphaea (water lily family, Nymphaeaceae).

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshihiro; Ito, Motomi; Kato, Masahiro

    2003-10-01

    Two homologues of INNER NO OUTER ( INO) in Nymphaea alba and N. colorata (Nymphaeaceae) were isolated and the expression pattern of the N. alba INO homologue NaINO was examined by in situ hybridization. The INO homologues obtained have a portion similar to INO in the predicted amino acid sequences between the conserved zinc finger-like and YABBY domains. In an in situ hybridization analysis, NaINO is expressed in the outer epidermis of the outer integument, inner integument, and the tip of the nucellus. The pattern observed in the outer integument is very similar to that of Arabidopsis thaliana, while the expression in the inner integument and nucellus is not observed in A. thaliana.

  4. Temporal and spatial patterning of transgene expression by near-infrared irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Leyre; Lopez, Daniel; Arruebo, Manuel; Wilson, Christopher G; Franceschi, Renny T.; Voellmy, Richard; Santamaria, Jesus; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether near-infrared (NIR) light could be employed for patterning transgene expression in plasmonic cell constructs. Hollow gold nanoparticles with a plasmon surface band absorption peaking at ~750 nm, a wavelength within the so called “tissue optical window”, were used as fillers in fibrin-based hydrogels. These composites, which efficiently transduce NIR photon energy into heat, were loaded with genetically-modified cells that harbor a heat-activated and ligand-dependent gene switch for regulating transgene expression. NIR laser irradiation in the presence of ligand triggered 3-dimensional patterns of transgene expression faithfully matching the illuminated areas of plasmonic cell constructs. This noninvasive technology was proven useful for remotely controlling in vivo the spatiotemporal bioavailability of transgenic vascular endothelial growth factor. The combination of spatial control by means of NIR irradiation along with safe and timed transgene induction presents a high application potential for engineering tissues in regenerative medicine scenarios. PMID:24957294

  5. Peripuberty stress leads to abnormal aggression, altered amygdala and orbitofrontal reactivity and increased prefrontal MAOA gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, C; Poirier, G L; Cordero, M I; Larsen, M H; Groner, A; Marquis, J; Magistretti, P J; Trono, D; Sandi, C

    2013-01-01

    Although adverse early life experiences have been found to increase lifetime risk to develop violent behaviors, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these long-term effects remain unclear. We present a novel animal model for pathological aggression induced by peripubertal exposure to stress with face, construct and predictive validity. We show that male rats submitted to fear-induction experiences during the peripubertal period exhibit high and sustained rates of increased aggression at adulthood, even against unthreatening individuals, and increased testosterone/corticosterone ratio. They also exhibit hyperactivity in the amygdala under both basal conditions (evaluated by 2-deoxy-glucose autoradiography) and after a resident–intruder (RI) test (evaluated by c-Fos immunohistochemistry), and hypoactivation of the medial orbitofrontal (MO) cortex after the social challenge. Alterations in the connectivity between the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala were linked to the aggressive phenotype. Increased and sustained expression levels of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene were found in the prefrontal cortex but not in the amygdala of peripubertally stressed animals. They were accompanied by increased activatory acetylation of histone H3, but not H4, at the promoter of the MAOA gene. Treatment with an MAOA inhibitor during adulthood reversed the peripuberty stress-induced antisocial behaviors. Beyond the characterization and validation of the model, we present novel data highlighting changes in the serotonergic system in the prefrontal cortex—and pointing at epigenetic control of the MAOA gene—in the establishment of the link between peripubertal stress and later pathological aggression. Our data emphasize the impact of biological factors triggered by peripubertal adverse experiences on the emergence of violent behaviors. PMID:23321813

  6. Raldh3 gene expression pattern in the developing chicken inner ear.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guardado, Luis Oscar; Ferran, José Luis; Mijares, José; Puelles, Luis; Rodríguez-Gallardo, Lucía; Hidalgo-Sánchez, Matías

    2009-05-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A, is a diffusible molecule that regulates the expression of several families of genes, playing a key role in specification processes during chordate development. With the aim of defining its possible role in the developing chick inner ear, we obtained in this work a detailed spatiotemporal distribution of the enzymes involved in its synthesis, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALH1-4). Our results showed that, in contrast to the mouse inner ear, Raldh3 expression was the only Raldh gene detected in the developing chick inner ear, where it appears as early as stage 18. During inner ear morphogenesis, Raldh3 expression was predominantly observed in the endolymphatic system. The Raldh3 expression pattern delimited totally or partially the Bmp4-positive presumptive territories of vestibular sensory epithelia by stage 24 and the basilar papilla at stage 34, suggesting a possible involvement of RA in their specification. In addition, several vestibular sensory areas showed some Raldh3-expressing cells close to the Raldh3-positive domain. These results suggest that the RA signaling pathway may play a role in the initial patterning of the otic epithelium and cell differentiation therein, providing local positional information. Having in mind this Raldh3 expression pattern, we discuss the regulatory interactions among the RA, bone morphogenetic protein, and fibroblast growth factor signaling pathways in the specification of otic sensory elements. Our investigation may underpin further experimental studies aimed at understanding the possible role of signaling pathways in patterning of the developing chick inner ear.

  7. Expression of B-RAF V600E in Type II Pneumocytes Causes Abnormalities in Alveolar Formation, Airspace Enlargement and Tumor Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zanucco, Emanuele; Götz, Rudolf; Potapenko, Tamara; Carraretto, Irene; Ceteci, Semra; Ceteci, Fatih; Seeger, Werner; Savai, Rajkumar; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2011-01-01

    Growth factor induced signaling cascades are key regulatory elements in tissue development, maintenance and regeneration. Perturbations of these cascades have severe consequences, leading to developmental disorders and neoplastic diseases. As a major function in signal transduction, activating mutations in RAF family kinases are the cause of human tumorigenesis, where B-RAF V600E has been identified as the prevalent mutant. In order to address the oncogenic function of B-RAF V600E, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the activated oncogene specifically in lung alveolar epithelial type II cells. Constitutive expression of B-RAF V600E caused abnormalities in alveolar epithelium formation that led to airspace enlargements. These lung lesions showed signs of tissue remodeling and were often associated with chronic inflammation and low incidence of lung tumors. The inflammatory cell infiltration did not precede the formation of the lung lesions but was rather accompanied with late tumor development. These data support a model where the continuous regenerative process initiated by oncogenic B-RAF-driven alveolar disruption provides a tumor-promoting environment associated with chronic inflammation. PMID:22194995

  8. β-Catenin Expression Pattern in Stage I and II Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Gamallo, Carlos; Palacios, José; Moreno, Gema; Calvo de Mora, Jorge; Suárez, Asunción; Armas, Alvaro

    1999-01-01

    The immunohistochemical expression pattern of β-catenin has been correlated with β-catenin gene mutations, clinicopathological features, and disease outcome in 69 stage I and II ovarian carcinomas. β-Catenin expression was localized in the nuclei, in addition to the cytoplasm and membrane, in 11 tumors (16%): nine endometrioid carcinomas with widespread nuclear expression and two serous carcinomas with focal nuclear expression. The remaining 58 carcinomas (84%) only had membranous β-catenin expression. All but one of the endometrioid carcinomas with nuclear β-catenin expression had considerable squamous metaplasia, and five of these cases had large areas of endometrioid tumor of low malignant potential. In addition, β-catenin nuclear expression was observed in atypical epithelial cells in endometriotic glands adjacent to an endometrioid carcinoma. Sequencing was performed on 25 tumors and corresponding normal tissue: all 13 endometrioid tumors as well as 12 carcinomas of other histological types (four serous, two clear cell, two mucinous, and two mixed). There were oncogenic mutations in the phosphorylation sequence for GSK-3β in exon 3 of the β-catenin gene in seven endometrioid carcinomas with β-catenin nuclear expression. Three mutations affected codon 32 (D32G, D32Y, and D32Y), one affected codon 33 (S33C), two affected codon 37 (S37C and S37F), and one affected codon 41 (T41A). No mutations were observed in the other 18 carcinomas analyzed, comprising two endometrioid and two serous carcinomas with β-catenin nuclear expression, and 14 carcinomas of different histological types with only membranous expression. In the univariate and multivariate survival analyses, β-catenin nuclear expression was selected as an indicator of good prognosis, because no patient whose tumor expressed β-catenin in the nuclei showed relapses or died, in contrast to the 19 relapses and deaths among patients with tumors that only had β-catenin membranous expression

  9. Claudin gene expression patterns do not associate with interspecific differences in paracellular nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Price, Edwin R; Rott, Katherine H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Karasov, William H

    2016-01-01

    Bats exhibit higher paracellular absorption of glucose-sized molecules than non-flying mammals, a phenomenon that may be driven by higher permeability of the intestinal tight junctions. The various claudins, occludin, and other proteins making up the tight junctions are thought to determine their permeability properties. Here we show that absorption of the paracellular probe l-arabinose is higher in a bat (Eptesicus fuscus) than in a vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) or a hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). Furthermore, histological measurements demonstrated that hedgehogs have many more enterocytes in their intestines, suggesting that bats cannot have higher absorption of arabinose simply by having more tight junctions. We therefore investigated the mRNA levels of several claudins and occludin, because these proteins may affect permeability of tight junctions to macronutrients. To assess the expression levels of claudins per tight junction, we normalized the mRNA levels of the claudins to the constitutively expressed tight junction protein ZO-1, and combined these with measurements previously made in a bat and a rodent to determine if there were among-species differences. Although expression ratios of several genes varied among species, there was not a consistent difference between bats and non-flyers in the expression ratio of any particular gene. Protein expression patterns may differ from mRNA expression patterns, and might better explain differences among species in arabinose absorption. PMID:26393434

  10. T gene isoform expression pattern is significantly different between chordomas and notochords.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Hu, Qingtao; Wang, Liang; Chen, Wei; Tian, Kaibing; Cao, Chunwei; Wu, Zhen; Jia, Guijun; Zhang, Liwei; Zeng, Changqing; Zhang, Junting

    2015-11-13

    The T gene plays a key role in chordoma pathology. To investigate the role of T gene isoforms in chordoma, 22 skull base chordomas, three chordoma cell lines and 9 infant notochords, which were used as normal controls, were collected. We first conducted droplet digital PCR to quantify the absolute expression levels of the long and short isoforms of the T gene (T-long and T-short, respectively) and revealed that T-long was dominantly expressed in all chordomas and chordoma cell lines, but not in the notochords. The T-long/T-short ratio was significantly different between the chordomas and the notochords. Next, we validated the isoform expression pattern at protein expression level using Western blot in 9 chordomas. Furthermore, the T gene single nucleotide polymorphism site rs2305089, which is the only marker reported to be associated with chordomas, was sequenced in all of the chordoma samples. Association between rs2305089 and T-long/T-short ratio was not significant, indicating it was not involved in T gene alternative splicing. In conclusion, two T gene isoforms were investigated in skull base chordomas and chordoma cell lines, and the longer isoform was dominantly expressed. The distinct expression patterns of these T gene isoforms may contribute to the pathogenesis of skull base chordomas. However, further studies on the function of these isoforms are needed. PMID:26435504

  11. Expression pattern of Piwi-like genes in adult Myzostoma cirriferum (Annelida).

    PubMed

    Weigert, Anne; Helm, Conrad; Hausen, Harald; Zakrzewski, Anne-C; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Piwi-like genes are a subgroup of Argonaute genes which participate as gene regulators by gene silencing. In most bilaterians, such as mouse, human, insects, and zebrafish, their expression is mostly limited to gonadal stem cells. But there are some striking exceptions to this pattern; flatworms and acoels also express Piwi-like genes in somatic stem cells, due to their unique replacement system. Annelid species like Capitella teleta and Platynereis dumerilii express these genes in cells of the posterior growth zone as well as in gonadal stem cells. To investigate the expression pattern of Piwi-like genes in another annelid, we established in situ hybridization for adult Myzostoma cirriferum. Piwi-like gene transcripts recovered in an mRNA-seq library of pooled adult stages of M. cirriferum were expanded using RACE PCR, cloned and sequenced. ML analysis confirmed the identity of both transcripts as part of the Piwi1-like or Piwi2-like subfamily of Argonaute proteins. The results of in situ hybridization studies show that the expression of both Piwi-like genes, Mc-Piwi1 and Mc-Piwi2, is clearly located only in gonadal stem cells, and as such we did not find any evidence for the existence of a posterior growth zone nor expression in somatic stem cells.

  12. Claudin gene expression patterns do not associate with interspecific differences in paracellular nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Price, Edwin R; Rott, Katherine H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Karasov, William H

    2016-01-01

    Bats exhibit higher paracellular absorption of glucose-sized molecules than non-flying mammals, a phenomenon that may be driven by higher permeability of the intestinal tight junctions. The various claudins, occludin, and other proteins making up the tight junctions are thought to determine their permeability properties. Here we show that absorption of the paracellular probe l-arabinose is higher in a bat (Eptesicus fuscus) than in a vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) or a hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). Furthermore, histological measurements demonstrated that hedgehogs have many more enterocytes in their intestines, suggesting that bats cannot have higher absorption of arabinose simply by having more tight junctions. We therefore investigated the mRNA levels of several claudins and occludin, because these proteins may affect permeability of tight junctions to macronutrients. To assess the expression levels of claudins per tight junction, we normalized the mRNA levels of the claudins to the constitutively expressed tight junction protein ZO-1, and combined these with measurements previously made in a bat and a rodent to determine if there were among-species differences. Although expression ratios of several genes varied among species, there was not a consistent difference between bats and non-flyers in the expression ratio of any particular gene. Protein expression patterns may differ from mRNA expression patterns, and might better explain differences among species in arabinose absorption.

  13. Expression patterns of Wnt genes in the venom claws of centipedes.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Luke; Arthur, Wallace

    2013-01-01

    The venom claws of centipedes, also known as forcipules, represent an evolutionary novelty that must have arisen in the centipede stem species, as they are not found in any other myriapods. The developmental-genetic changes that are involved in the origin of novelties are of considerable interest. It has previously been shown that centipede forcipules have a unique Hox code. However, this is a combinatorial code: no single Hox gene has a forcipule-specific expression. Here, we focus on Wnt genes. Two genes of this family show forcipule-specific expression in the "model centipede" Strigamia maritima: Wnt7 and Wnt11. For Wnt7, this forcipular expression zone seems to be a new one, which has arisen in evolution subsequently to other expression zones of the same gene. However, for Wnt11, the forcipule-specific expression probably arose by reduction of a more general pattern that originally included most or all of the limbs of an ancestral myriapod. Thus the developmental-genetic basis of the evolutionary change that turned the first pair of walking legs into venom claws is complex, involving different types of change in expression pattern. This sort of complexity is likely to be the case regarding evolutionary changes in morphology in general. Whether the origins of those features that can be considered as novelties are different in terms of their developmental-genetic basis from more routine evolutionary changes remains an open question. PMID:24074281

  14. Analysis of changes in the expression pattern of claudins using salivary acinar cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko

    2011-01-01

    Primary saliva is produced from blood plasma in the acini of salivary glands and is modified by ion adsorption and secretion as the saliva passes through the ducts. In rodents, acinar cells of salivary glands express claudin-3 but not claudin-4, whereas duct cells express both claudins-3 and -4. The distinct claudin expression patterns may reflect differences in the permeability of tight junctions between acinar and duct cells. To analyze the role of claudins in salivary glands, we established a system for the primary culture of parotid acinar cells, where the expression patterns of claudins are remarkably changed. Real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses reveal that the expression levels of claudins-4 and -6 increased, whereas claudins-3 and -10 decreased. We found that the signal to induce those changes is triggered during cell isolation and is mediated by Src and p38 MAP kinase. Here, we introduce the methods used to determine the signal pathway that induces the change in claudin expression.

  15. Spatiotemporal patterns of expression of IGSF4 in developing mouse nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoshimi; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Tando, So; Fukui, Kenji; Fushiki, Shinji

    2005-04-21

    IGSF4 is a novel immunoglobulin (Ig)-like intercellular adhesion molecule. Since IGSF4 has been characterized by several independent research groups, this molecule is called by three names, TSLC1, SgIGSF and SynCAM. In the experiments to study global changes of gene expression in fetal murine brains after prenatal exposure to low-doses of X-rays, we have found IGSF4 as one of down-regulated genes after X-irradiation. In order to elucidate the expression of spatiotemporal expression of IGSF4 in the developing brain, we have produced polyclonal antibody against IGSF4 and studied the expression of IGSF4 with immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. At embryonic day (E) 12.5, IGSF4-immunoreactivity (IR) was observed diffusely in the telencephalic wall, whereas it became rather confined to the subplate, the cortical plate and the subventricular zone as the development proceeded. Noteworthy was a distinct radial pattern found in the cortical plate of E16.5. IGSF4-IR gradually decreased after birth and disappeared in adulthood. In the cerebellum, IGSF4 was expressed in the molecular layer at postnatal day (P) 0 through P14. By Western blot analysis, IGSF4 remained at low levels throughout embryonic stage, whereas it increased after birth. These spatiotemporal patterns of the expression suggest that IGSF4 plays crucial roles in the development of both telencephalon and cerebellum. PMID:15862624

  16. Distinct patterns of ALDH1A1 expression predict metastasis and poor outcome of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sen-Lin; Zeng, Dong-Zu; Dong, Wei-Guo; Ding, Yan-Qing; Rao, Jun; Duan, Jiang-Jie; Liu, Qing; Yang, Jing; Zhan, Na; Liu, Ying; Hu, Qi-Ping; Zhang, Xia; Cui, You-Hong; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yu, Shi-Cang; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) has been proposed as a candidate biomarker for colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, the heterogeneity of its expression makes it difficult to predict the outcome of CRC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of this molecule in CRC. Methods and Results: In this study, we examined ALDH1A1 expression by immunohistochemistry including 406 cases of primary CRC with corresponding adjacent mucosa, with confirmation of real-time PCR and Western blotting. We found that the expression patterns of ALDH1A1 were heterogeneous in the CRC and corresponding adjacent tissues. We defined the ratio of ALDH1A1 level in adjacent mucosa to that in tumor tissues as RA/C and found that the capabilities of tumor invasion and metastasis in the tumors with RA/C < 1 were significantly higher than those with RA/C ≥ 1. Follow-up data showed the worse prognoses in the CRC patients with RA/C < 1. For understanding the underlying mechanism, the localization of β-catenin was detected in the CRC tissues with different patterns of ALDH1A1 expression from 221 patients and β-catenin was found preferentially expressed in cell nuclei of the tumors with RA/C < 1 and ALDH1A1high expression of HT29 cell line, indicating that nuclear translocation of β-catenin might contribute to the increased potentials of invasion and metastasis. Conclusion: Our results indicate that RA/C is a novel biomarker to reflect the distinct expression patterns of ALDH1A1 for predicting metastasis and prognosis of CRC. PMID:25031716

  17. Unique expression patterns of cell fate molecules delineate sequential stages of dentate gyrus development.

    PubMed

    Pleasure, S J; Collins, A E; Lowenstein, D H

    2000-08-15

    The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is uniquely organized with a displaced proliferative zone that continues to generate dentate granule cells throughout life. We have analyzed the expression of Notch receptors, Notch ligands, and basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes during dentate gyrus development to determine whether the need to maintain a pool of undifferentiated precursors is reflected in the patterns of expression of these genes. Many of these genes are expressed diffusely throughout the cortical neuroepithelium at embryonic days 16 and 17 in the rat, just preceding the migration of newly born granule cells and dentate precursor cells into the dentate anlage. However, at this time, Mash1, Math3, and Id3 expression are all concentrated in the area that specifically gives rise to granule cells and dentate precursor cells. Two days later, at the time of migration of the first granule cells and dentate precursor cells, cells expressing Mash1 are seen in the migratory route from the subventricular zone to the developing dentate gyrus. Newly born granule cells expressing NeuroD are also present in this migratory pathway. In the first postnatal week, precursor cells expressing Mash1 reside in the dentate hilus, and by the third postnatal week they have largely taken up their final position in the subgranular zone along the hilar side of the dentate granule cell layer. After terminal differentiation, granule cells born in the hilus or the subgranular zone begin to express NeuroD followed by NeuroD2. This study establishes that the expression patterns of bHLH mRNAs evolve during the formation of the dentate gyrus, and the precursor cells resident in the mature dentate gyrus share features with precursor cells found in development. Thus, many of the same mechanisms that are known to regulate cell fate and precursor pool size in other brain regions are likely to be operative in the dentate gyrus at all stages of development.

  18. Porcine skeletal muscle differentially expressed gene ATP5B: molecular characterization, expression patterns, and association analysis with meat quality traits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haixia; Xu, Yongjie; Liang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yanbo; Jin, Fangfang; Liu, Dengying; Ma, Yun; Yuan, Hongyu; Song, Xinqiang; Zeng, Wenxian

    2013-04-01

    The 2-DE/MS-based proteomics approach was used to investigate the differences of porcine skeletal muscle, and ATP5B was identified as one differential expression protein. In the present study, ATP5B gene was further cloned by RT-PCR, the sequence was analyzed using the bioinformatics method, and the mRNA expression was detected by qRT-PCR. Sequence analysis showed that the porcine ATP5B gene contains an ORF encoding 528-amino-acid residues with 49 and 166 nucleotides in the 5' and 3' UTRs, respectively. The mRNA of ATP5B was widely expressed in all 14 tissues tested, but especially highly expressed in parorchis and fat. The expression pattern of ATP5B was similar in Large White and Meishan breeds, showing that the expression was upregulated by 3 days after birth and downregulated during postnatal development of skeletal muscle. Comparing the two breeds, the mRNA abundance of ATP5B in Large White was more highly expressed than in Meishan at all developmental stages (P < 0.05). Moreover, a synonymous mutation, G75A in exon 8, was identified and association analysis with the traits of meat quality showed that it was significantly associated with the RLF, FMP, IFR, IMF, and IMW (P < 0.05). These results suggested that ATP5B probably plays a key role in porcine skeletal muscle development and may provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for breed-specific differences in meat quality.

  19. Multispecies Analysis of Expression Pattern Diversification in the Recently Expanded Insect Ly6 Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kohtaro; Hazbun, Alexis; Hijazi, Assia; Vreede, Barbara; Sucena, Élio

    2015-01-01

    Gene families often consist of members with diverse expression domains reflecting their functions in a wide variety of tissues. However, how the expression of individual members, and thus their tissue-specific functions, diversified during the course of gene family expansion is not well understood. In this study, we approached this question through the analysis of the duplication history and transcriptional evolution of a rapidly expanding subfamily of insect Ly6 genes. We analyzed different insect genomes and identified seven Ly6 genes that have originated from a single ancestor through sequential duplication within the higher Diptera. We then determined how the original embryonic expression pattern of the founding gene diversified by characterizing its tissue-specific expression in the beetle Tribolium castaneum, the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, and the mosquito Anopheles stephensi and those of its duplicates in three higher dipteran species, representing various stages of the duplication history (Megaselia abdita, Ceratitis capitata, and Drosophila melanogaster). Our results revealed that frequent neofunctionalization episodes contributed to the increased expression breadth of this subfamily and that these events occurred after duplication and speciation events at comparable frequencies. In addition, at each duplication node, we consistently found asymmetric expression divergence. One paralog inherited most of the tissue-specificities of the founder gene, whereas the other paralog evolved drastically reduced expression domains. Our approach attests to the power of combining a well-established duplication history with a comprehensive coverage of representative species in acquiring unequivocal information about the dynamics of gene expression evolution in gene families. PMID:25743545

  20. Constitutive patterns of gene expression regulated by RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA-binding proteins regulate a number of cellular processes, including synthesis, folding, translocation, assembly and clearance of RNAs. Recent studies have reported that an unexpectedly large number of proteins are able to interact with RNA, but the partners of many RNA-binding proteins are still uncharacterized. Results We combined prediction of ribonucleoprotein interactions, based on catRAPID calculations, with analysis of protein and RNA expression profiles from human tissues. We found strong interaction propensities for both positively and negatively correlated expression patterns. Our integration of in silico and ex vivo data unraveled two major types of protein–RNA interactions, with positively correlated patterns related to cell cycle control and negatively correlated patterns related to survival, growth and differentiation. To facilitate the investigation of protein–RNA interactions and expression networks, we developed the catRAPID express web server. Conclusions Our analysis sheds light on the role of RNA-binding proteins in regulating proliferation and differentiation processes, and we provide a data exploration tool to aid future experimental studies. PMID:24401680

  1. A Synthesis Method of Gene Networks Having Cyclic Expression Pattern Sequences by Network Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yoshihiro; Kuroe, Yasuaki

    Recently, synthesis of gene networks having desired functions has become of interest to many researchers because it is a complementary approach to understanding gene networks, and it could be the first step in controlling living cells. There exist several periodic phenomena in cells, e.g. circadian rhythm. These phenomena are considered to be generated by gene networks. We have already proposed synthesis method of gene networks based on gene expression. The method is applicable to synthesizing gene networks possessing the desired cyclic expression pattern sequences. It ensures that realized expression pattern sequences are periodic, however, it does not ensure that their corresponding solution trajectories are periodic, which might bring that their oscillations are not persistent. In this paper, in order to resolve the problem we propose a synthesis method of gene networks possessing the desired cyclic expression pattern sequences together with their corresponding solution trajectories being periodic. In the proposed method the persistent oscillations of the solution trajectories are realized by specifying passing points of them.

  2. Wing venation and Distal-less expression in Heliconius butterfly wing pattern development.

    PubMed

    Reed, Robert D; Gilbert, Lawrence E

    2004-12-01

    Here we show that major color pattern elements of Heliconius butterfly wings develop independently of wing venation. We recovered a hybrid Heliconius displaying a mutant phenotype with a severe vein deficiency. Although this butterfly lacked most of its wing veins, the large, melanic banding patterns typical of the genus were conserved across the entire wing. The only obvious correlation between vein reduction and pigment patterns was a loss of vein-associated melanin stripes near the distal margin of the wings. We examined the expression of the eyespot-associated transcription factor Distal-less in a banded and a spotted species of Heliconius and found no obvious relationship between protein expression and the band or spot patterns typical of the genus. Together, our results suggest that the melanic bands and spots in Heliconius are unlikely to be derived from an eyespot determination system. We propose that major elements of Heliconius wing pattern formation are based primarily on a complex, whole-wing proximodistal axis system.

  3. Robust patterning of gene expression based on internal coordinate system of cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2015-06-01

    Cell-to-cell communication in multicellular organisms is established through the transmission of various kinds of chemical substances such as proteins. It is well known that gene expression triggered by a chemical substance in individuals has stable spatial patterns despite the individual differences in concentration patterns of the chemical substance. This fact reveals an important property of multicellular organisms called "robustness", which allows the organisms to generate their forms while maintaining proportion. Robustness has been conventionally accounted for by the stability of solutions of dynamical equations that represent a specific interaction network of chemical substances. However, any biological system is composed of autonomous elements. In general, an autonomous element does not merely accept information on the chemical substance from the environment; instead, it accepts the information based on its own criteria for reaction. Therefore, this phenomenon needs to be considered from the viewpoint of cells. Such a viewpoint is expected to allow the consideration of the autonomy of cells in multicellular organisms. This study aims to explain theoretically the robust patterning of gene expression from the viewpoint of cells. For this purpose, we introduced a new operator for transforming a state variable of a chemical substance from an external coordinate system to an internal coordinate system of each cell, which describes the observation of the chemical substance by cells. We then applied this operator to the simplest reaction-diffusion model of the chemical substance to investigate observation effects by cells. Our mathematical analysis of this extended model indicates that the robust patterning of gene expression against individual differences in concentration pattern of the chemical substance can be explained from the viewpoint of cells if there is a regulation field that compensates for the difference between cells seen in the observation results

  4. Methylation patterns of immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells: correlation of expression and differentiation with undermethylation.

    PubMed

    Storb, U; Arp, B

    1983-11-01

    Different states of eukaryotic gene expression are often correlated with different levels of methylation of DNA sequences containing structural genes and their flanking regions. To assess the potential role of DNA methylation in the expression of immunoglobulin genes, which require complex rearrangements prior to expression, methylation patterns were examined in cell lines representing different stages of lymphocyte maturation. Methylation of the second cytosine in the sequence 5' C-C-G-G 3' was determined by using Hpa II/Msp I endonuclease digestion. Four CH genes (C mu, C delta, C gamma 2b, and C alpha), C kappa, V kappa, C lambda, and V lambda genes were analyzed. The results lead to the following conclusions: (i) transcribed immunoglobulin genes are undermethylated; (ii) the C gene allelic to an expressed C gene is always also undermethylated; and (iii) all immunoglobulin loci tend to become increasingly undermethylated as B cells mature.

  5. Patterns of pulmonary perfusion scans in normal subjects. IV. The prevalence of abnormal scans in smokers 30 to 49 years of age

    SciTech Connect

    Fedullo, P.F.; Kapitan, K.S.; Brewer, N.S.; Ashburn, W.L.; Hartman, M.T.; Moser, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    The usefulness of ventilation-perfusion scans in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is limited by the wide range of pulmonary diseases that are associated with abnormal scans, and by the largely undetermined prevalence of abnormal scans in persons without cardiopulmonary disease. In prior studies, we found perfusion defects to be rarely present in young persons and in older nonsmokers. To determine if normal older smokers have a higher prevalence of abnormal ventilation and perfusion scans, we performed six-view /sup 99m/Tc perfusion (Q) scans and /sup 133/Xe ventilation (V) scans in 40 subjects 30 to 49 yr of age who had no known cardiopulmonary disease. Each subject had undergone a history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, spirometry, and posteroanterior chest roentgenogram prior to scanning. All V and Q scans were interpreted blindly and independently by two experienced readers. No subject demonstrated a lobar or segmental defect on two views. One subject had a matched subsegmental defect, and one subject had delayed washout from a subsegmental area of the right upper lobe during V scanning, with a normal Q scan. We conclude that abnormal V and Q scans are uncommon among normal smokers 30 to 49 yr of age.

  6. Do sleep abnormalities and misaligned sleep/circadian rhythm patterns represent early clinical characteristics for developing psychosis in high risk populations?

    PubMed

    Zanini, Marcio; Castro, Juliana; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Bittencourt, Lia; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Tufik, Sergio; Brietzke, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    Sleep architecture changes, such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) percentage variations and reductions in latency and density of rapid eye movement (REM), are found in most patients with schizophrenia and are considered to be an important part of the pathophysiology of the disorder. In addition to these sleep parameters changes, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and the sleep/circadian rhythm also occur in these patients. Sleep/circadian rhythm abnormalities negatively affect neocortical plasticity and cognition and often precede the diagnosis of the illness. Thus, it has been suggested that the sleep/circadian rhythm might be involved in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Recent advances in the identification of individuals at a high risk for developing schizophrenia allow us to investigate several neurobiological processes involved in the development of psychosis. In this article, we review the current evidence of the effects of sleep parameter abnormalities, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and misalignments of sleep circadian rhythm on the early stages of schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the preliminary evidence of sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during the prodromal stages of psychosis and propose that these abnormalities can be explored as potential predictors, as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis, of developing a psychotic disorder in at risk populations.

  7. The bovine desmocollin family: a new gene and expression patterns reflecting epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have discovered a third bovine desmocollin gene, DSC3, and studied expression of all three desmocollin genes, DSC1, 2, and 3, by Northern blotting, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. DSC1 is strongly expressed in epidermis and tongue papillae, showing a "skin"-type pattern resembling that previously described for keratins 1 and 10. Expression is absent from the epidermal basal layer but appears in the immediate suprabasal layers and continues uniformly to the lower granular layer. In tongue epithelium, expression is suprabasal and strictly localized to papillae, being absent from interpapillary regions. In other epithelial low level DSC1 expression is detectable only by RT-PCR. The distribution of Dsc1 glycoproteins, detected by an isoform-specific monoclonal antibody, closely reflects mRNA distribution in epidermis and tongue. DSC2 is ubiquitously expressed in epithelia and cardiac muscle. In stratified epithelia, expression appears immediately suprabasal, continuing weakly to the lower granular layer in epidermis and to just above half epithelial thickness in interpapillary tongue, oesophageal, and rumenal epithelia. DSC3 expression is restricted to the basal and immediately suprabasal layers in stratified epithelia. In deep rete ridges DSC expression strikingly resembles the distribution of stem, transit-amplifying, and terminally differentiating cells described by others. DSC3 expression is strongly basal, DSC2 is strong in 5-10 suprabasal layers, and then weakens to be superseded by strong DSC1. These results suggest that desmocollin isoform expression has important functional consequences in epithelial proliferation, stratification, and differentiation. The data also provide a standard for nomenclature of the desmocollins. PMID:8034749

  8. Progestins Upregulate FKBP51 Expression in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells to Induce Functional Progesterone and Glucocorticoid Withdrawal: Implications for Contraceptive- Associated Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guzeloglu Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit A.; Basar, Murat; Semerci, Nihan; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Use of long-acting progestin only contraceptives (LAPCs) offers a discrete and highly effective family planning method. Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the major side effect of, and cause for, discontinuation of LAPCs. The endometria of LAPC-treated women display abnormally enlarged, fragile blood vessels, decreased endometrial blood flow and oxidative stress. To understanding to mechanisms underlying AUB, we propose to identify LAPC-modulated unique gene cluster(s) in human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). Protein and RNA isolated from cultured HESCs treated 7 days with estradiol (E2) or E2+ medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) or E2+ etonogestrel (ETO) or E2+ progesterone (P4) were analyzed by quantitative Real-time (q)-PCR and immunoblotting. HSCORES were determined for immunostained-paired endometria of pre-and 3 months post-Depot MPA (DMPA) treated women and ovariectomized guinea pigs (GPs) treated with placebo or E2 or MPA or E2+MPA for 21 days. In HESCs, whole genome analysis identified a 67 gene group regulated by all three progestins, whereas a 235 gene group was regulated by E2+ETO and E2+MPA, but not E2+P4. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation as one of upstream regulators of the 235 MPA and ETO-specific genes. Among these, microarray results demonstrated significant enhancement of FKBP51, a repressor of PR/GR transcriptional activity, by both MPA and ETO. q-PCR and immunoblot analysis confirmed the microarray results. In endometria of post-DMPA versus pre-DMPA administered women, FKBP51 expression was significantly increased in endometrial stromal and glandular cells. In GPs, E2+MPA or MPA significantly increased FKBP51 immunoreactivity in endometrial stromal and glandular cells versus placebo- and E2-administered groups. MPA or ETO administration activates GR signaling and increases endometrial FKBP51 expression, which could be one of the mechanisms causing AUB by inhibiting PR and GR-mediated transcription

  9. Sequence and expression pattern of pax-6 are highly conserved between zebrafish and mice.

    PubMed

    Püschel, A W; Gruss, P; Westerfield, M

    1992-03-01

    Despite obvious differences in the patterns of early embryonic development, vertebrates share a number of developmental mechanisms and control genes, suggesting that they use similar genetic programs at some stages of development. To examine this idea, we isolated and characterized one such gene, pax-6, a member of the pax gene family, from the zebrafish Brachydanio rerio and determined the evolutionary conservation in the structure and expression of this gene by comparison to its homolog in mice. We found two alternatively spliced forms of the zebrafish pax-6 message. Sequence and expression pattern of the zebrafish pax-6 gene are remarkably similar to its murine homolog. pax-6 expression begins during early neurulation. A stripe of cells in the neuroectoderm, including the prospective diencephalon and a part of the telencephalon, expresses pax-6 as well as the hindbrain and the ventral spinal cord extending from the level of the first rhombomere to the posterior end of the CNS. During later development more limited regions of the brain including the eye, the olfactory bulb and the pituitary gland express pax-6. Cells at the midbrain-hindbrain junction express eng genes and are separated from the neighboring pax-6 regions by several cells that express neither gene, indicating a complex subdivision of this region. pax-6 expression appears during processes when cell-to-cell signalling is thought to be important, for example during induction of the eye and regionalization of the spinal cord and brain, suggesting that it may be one component mediating the response to inductive interactions.

  10. Early expressed genes showing a dichotomous developing pattern in the lancelet embryo.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K; Saiga, H; Wang, Y; Zhang, P J; Semba, I

    2001-04-01

    Lancelets (amphioxus), although showing the most similar anatomical features to vertebrates, never develop a vertebrate-like head but rather several structures specific to this animal. The lancelet anatomical specificity seems to be traceable to early developmental stages, such as the vertebrate dorsal and anterior-posterior determinations. The BMP and Wnt proteins play important roles in establishing the early basis of the dorsal structures and the head in vertebrates. The early behavior of BMP and Wnt may be also related to the specific body structures of lancelets. The expression patterns of a dpp-related gene, Bbbmp2/4, and two wnt-related genes, Bbwnt7 and Bbwnt8, have been studied in comparison with those of brachyury and Hnf-3beta class genes. The temporal expression patterns of these genes are similar to those of vertebrates; Bbbmp2/4 and Bbwnt8 are first expressed in the invaginating primitive gut and the equatorial region, respectively, at the initial gastrula stage. However, spatial expression pattern of Bbbmp2/4 differs significantly from the vertebrate cognates. It is expressed in the mid-dorsal inner layer of gastrulae and widely in the anterior region, in which vertebrates block BMP signaling. The present study suggests that the lancelet embryo may have two distinct developmental domains from the gastrula stage, the domains of which coincide later with the lateral diverticular and the somitocoelomic regions. The embryonic origin of the anterior-specific structures in lancelets corresponds to the anterior domain where Bbbmp2/4 is continuously expressed.

  11. Conserved alternative splicing and expression patterns of arthropod N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shu-Ning; Yonekura, Shinichi; Ting, Chun-Yuan; Robertson, Hugh M; Iwai, Youichi; Uemura, Tadashi; Lee, Chi-Hon; Chiba, Akira

    2009-04-01

    Metazoan development requires complex mechanisms to generate cells with diverse function. Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA not only expands proteomic diversity but also provides a means to regulate tissue-specific molecular expression. The N-Cadherin gene in Drosophila contains three pairs of mutually-exclusive alternatively-spliced exons (MEs). However, no significant differences among the resulting protein isoforms have been successfully demonstrated in vivo. Furthermore, while the N-Cadherin gene products exhibit a complex spatiotemporal expression pattern within embryos, its underlying mechanisms and significance remain unknown. Here, we present results that suggest a critical role for alternative splicing in producing a crucial and reproducible complexity in the expression pattern of arthropod N-Cadherin. We demonstrate that the arthropod N-Cadherin gene has maintained the three sets of MEs for over 400 million years using in silico and in vivo approaches. Expression of isoforms derived from these MEs receives precise spatiotemporal control critical during development. Both Drosophila and Tribolium use ME-13a and ME-13b in "neural" and "mesodermal" splice variants, respectively. As proteins, either ME-13a- or ME-13b-containing isoform can cell-autonomously rescue the embryonic lethality caused by genetic loss of N-Cadherin. Ectopic muscle expression of either isoform beyond the time it normally ceases leads to paralysis and lethality. Together, our results offer an example of well-conserved alternative splicing increasing cellular diversity in metazoans. PMID:19343204

  12. Patterning Expression of Regenerative Growth Factors Using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christopher G.; Martín-Saavedra, Francisco M.; Padilla, Frédéric; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Zhang, Man; Baez, Alexander M.; Bonkowski, Christopher J.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Voellmy, Richard; Vilaboa, Nuria; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Temporal and spatial control of growth factor gradients is critical for tissue patterning and differentiation. Reinitiation of this developmental program is also required for regeneration of tissues during wound healing and tissue regeneration. Devising methods for reconstituting growth factor gradients remains a central challenge in regenerative medicine. In the current study we develop a novel gene therapy approach for temporal and spatial control of two important growth factors in bone regeneration, vascular endothelial growth factor, and bone morphogenetic protein 2, which involves application of high intensity focused ultrasound to cells engineered with a heat-activated- and ligand-inducible gene switch. Induction of transgene expression was tightly localized within cell-scaffold constructs to subvolumes of ∼30 mm3, and the amplitude and projected area of transgene expression was tuned by the intensity and duration of ultrasound exposure. Conditions for ultrasound-activated transgene expression resulted in minimal cytotoxicity and scaffold damage. Localized regions of growth factor expression also established gradients in signaling activity, suggesting that patterns of growth factor expression generated by this method will have utility in basic and applied studies on tissue development and regeneration. PMID:24460731

  13. Specific patterns of changes in wheat gene expression after treatment with three antifungal compounds.

    PubMed

    Pasquer, Frédérique; Isidore, Edwige; Zarn, Jürg; Keller, Beat

    2005-03-01

    The two fungicides azoxystrobin and fenpropimorph are used against powdery mildew and rust diseases in wheat (Triticum aestivumL). Azoxystrobin, a strobilurin, inhibits fungal mitochondrial respiration and fenpropimorph, a morpholin, represses biosynthesis of ergosterol, the major sterol of fungal membranes. Although the fungitoxic activity of these compounds is well understood, their effects on plant metabolism remain unclear. In contrast to the fungicides which directly affect pathogen metabolism, benzo(1,2,3) thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methylester (BTH) induces resistance against wheat pathogens by the activation of systemic acquired resistance in the host plant. In this study, we monitored gene expression in spring wheat after treatment with each of these agrochemicals in a greenhouse trial using a microarray containing 600 barley cDNA clones. Defence-related genes were strongly induced after treatment with BTH, confirming the activation of a similar set of genes as in dicot plants following salicylic acid treatment. A similar gene expression pattern was observed after treatment with fenpropimorph and some defence-related genes were induced by azoxystrobin, demonstrating that these fungicides also activate a defence reaction. However, less intense responses were triggered than with BTH. The same experiments performed under field conditions gave dramatically different results. No gene showed differential expression after treatment and defence genes were already expressed at a high level before application of the agrochemicals. These differences in the expression patterns between the two environments demonstrate the importance of plant growth conditions for testing the impact of agrochemicals on plant metabolism.

  14. Tissue microarray analysis reveals a tight correlation between protein expression pattern and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Li-yan; Hu, Nan; Song, Yong-mei; Zou, Shuang-mei; Shou, Jian-zhong; Qian, Lu-xia; Ren, Li-qun; Lin, Dong-mei; Tong, Tong; He, Zu-gen; Zhan, Qi-min; Taylor, Philip R; Lu, Ning

    2006-01-01

    Background The development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) progresses a multistage process, collectively known as precursor lesions, also called dysplasia (DYS) and carcinoma in situ (CIS), subsequent invasive lesions and final metastasis. In this study, we are interested in investigating the expression of a variety of functional classes of proteins in ESCC and its precursor lesions and characterizing the correlation of these proteins with ESCC malignant progression. Methods Fas, FADD, caspase 8, CDC25B, fascin, CK14, CK4, annexin I, laminin-5γ2 and SPARC were analyzed using immunohistochemistry on tissue microarray containing 205 ESCC and 173 adjacent precursor lesions as well as corresponding normal mucosa. To confirm the immunohistochemical results, three proteins, fascin, CK14 and laminin-5γ2, which were overexpressed in ESCC on tissue microarray, were detected in 12 ESCC cell lines by Western blot assay. Results In ESCC and its precursor lesions, FADD, CDC25B, fascin, CK14, laminin-5γ2 and SPARC were overexpressed, while Fas, caspase 8, CK4 and annexin I were underexpressed. The abnormalities of these proteins could be classified into different groups in relation to the stages of ESCC development. They were "early" corresponding to mild and moderate DYS with overexpression of fascin, FADD and CDC25B and underexpression of Fas, caspase 8, CK4 and annexin I, "intermediate" to severe DYS and CIS with overexpression of FADD and CK14, and "late" to invasive lesions (ESCC) and to advanced pTNM stage ESCC lesions with overexpression of CK14, laminin-5γ2 and SPARC. Conclusion Analyzing the protein expression patterns of Fas, FADD, caspase 8, CDC25B, fascin, CK14, CK4, annexin I, laminin-5γ2 and SPARC would be valuable to develop rational strategies for early detection of lesions at risk in advance as well as for prevention and treatment of ESCC. PMID:17187659

  15. RGD-Binding Integrins in Prostate Cancer: Expression Patterns and Therapeutic Prospects against Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Mark; Gordon, Andrew; Shnyder, Steven D.; Patterson, Laurence H.; Sheldrake, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of male cancer deaths in the developed world. The current lack of highly specific detection methods and efficient therapeutic agents for advanced disease have been identified as problems requiring further research. The integrins play a vital role in the cross-talk between the cell and extracellular matrix, enhancing the growth, migration, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. Progression and metastasis of prostate adenocarcinoma is strongly associated with changes in integrin expression, notably abnormal expression and activation of the β3 integrins in tumour cells, which promotes haematogenous spread and tumour growth in bone. As such, influencing integrin cell expression and function using targeted therapeutics represents a potential treatment for bone metastasis, the most common and debilitating complication of advanced prostate cancer. In this review, we highlight the multiple ways in which RGD-binding integrins contribute to prostate cancer progression and metastasis, and identify the rationale for development of multi-integrin antagonists targeting the RGD-binding subfamily as molecularly targeted agents for its treatment. PMID:24213501

  16. Expression of Nav1.8 sodium channels perturbs the firing patterns of cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Renganathan, M; Gelderblom, M; Black, J A; Waxman, S G

    2003-01-10

    The sensory neuron specific sodium channel Na(v)1.8/SNS exhibits depolarized voltage-dependence of inactivation, slow inactivation and rapid repriming, which differentiate it from other voltage-gated sodium channels. Na(v)1.8 is normally selectively expressed at high levels in sensory ganglion neurons, but not within the CNS. However, expression of Na(v)1.8 mRNA and protein are upregulated within cerebellar Purkinje cells in animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS), and in human MS. To examine the effect of expression of Na(v)1.8 on the activity pattern of Purkinje cells, we biolistically introduced Na(v)1.8 cDNA into these cells in vitro. We report here that Na(v)1.8 can be functionally expressed at physiological levels (similar to the levels in DRG neurons where Na(v)1.8 is normally expressed) within Purkinje cells, and that its expression alters the activity of these neurons in three ways: first, by increasing the amplitude and duration of action potentials; second, by decreasing the proportion of action potentials that are conglomerate and the number of spikes per conglomerate action potential; and third, by contributing to the production of sustained, pacemaker-like impulse trains in response to depolarization. These results provide support for the hypothesis that the expression of Na(v)1.8 channels within Purkinje cells, which occurs in MS, may perturb their function. PMID:12493611

  17. Differentiating disease subtypes by using pathway patterns constructed from gene expressions and protein networks.

    PubMed

    Hung, Fei-Hung; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression profiles differ in different diseases. Even if diseases are at the same stage, such diseases exhibit different gene expressions, not to mention the different subtypes at a single lesion site. Distinguishing different disease subtypes at a single lesion site is difficult. In early cases, subtypes were initially distinguished by doctors. Subsequently, further differences were found through pathological experiments. For example, a brain tumor can be classified according to its origin, its cell-type origin, or the tumor site. Because of the advancements in bioinformatics and the techniques for accumulating gene expressions, researchers can use gene expression data to classify disease subtypes. Because the operation of a biopathway is closely related to the disease mechanism, the application of gene expression profiles for clustering disease subtypes is insufficient. In this study, we collected gene expression data of healthy and four myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes and applied a method that integrated protein-protein interaction and gene expression data to identify different patterns of disease subtypes. We hope it is efficient for the classification of disease subtypes in adventure.

  18. Developmental pattern of aquaporin expression in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) leaves

    PubMed Central

    Besse, Matthieu; Knipfer, Thorsten; Miller, Anthony J.; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Jahn, Thomas P.; Fricke, Wieland

    2011-01-01

    Aquaporins are multifunctional membrane channels which belong to the family of major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) and are best known for their ability to facilitate the movement of water. In the present study, earlier results from microarray experiments were followed up. These experiments had suggested that, in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), aquaporin family members are expressed in distinct patterns during leaf development. Real-time PCR and in situ hybridization were used to analyse the level and tissue-distribution of expression of candidate aquaporins, focusing on plasma membrane and tonoplast intrinsic proteins (PIPs, TIPs). Water channel function of seven aquaporins, whose transcripts were the most abundant and the most variable, was tested through expression in yeast and, in part, through expression in oocytes. All PIP1 and PIP2 subfamily members changed in expression during leaf development, with expression being much higher or lower in growing compared with mature tissue. The same applied to those TIPs which were expressed at detectable levels. Specific roles during leaf development are proposed for particular aquaporins. PMID:21737414

  19. Distinct regulatory elements mediate similar expression patterns in the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongying; Fang, Li; Chen, Nansheng; Johnsen, Robert C; Stein, Lincoln; Baillie, David L

    2005-11-18

    Identification of cis-regulatory elements and their binding proteins constitutes an important part of understanding gene function and regulation. It is well accepted that co-expressed genes tend to share transcriptional elements. However, recent findings indicate that co-expression data show poor correlation with co-regulation data even in unicellular yeast. This motivates us to experimentally explore whether it is possible that co-expressed genes are subject to differential regulatory control using the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans as an example. Excretory cell is a functional equivalent of human kidney. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression in the cell is largely unknown. We isolated a 10-bp excretory cell-specific cis-element, Ex-1, from a pgp-12 promoter. The significance of the element has been demonstrated by its capacity of converting an intestine-specific promoter into an excretory cell-specific one. We also isolated a cDNA encoding an Ex-1 binding transcription factor, DCP-66, using a yeast one-hybrid screen. Role of the factor in regulation of pgp-12 expression has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Search for occurrence of Ex-1 reveals that only a small portion of excretory cell-specific promoters contain Ex-1. Two other distinct cis-elements isolated from two different promoters can also dictate the excretory cell-specific expression but are independent of regulation by DCP-66. The results indicate that distinct regulatory elements are able to mediate the similar expression patterns.

  20. Integrated Analysis of Alzheimer's Disease and Schizophrenia Dataset Revealed Different Expression Pattern in Learning and Memory.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Xing; Dai, Shao-Xing; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and schizophrenia (SZ) are both accompanied by impaired learning and memory functions. This study aims to explore the expression profiles of learning or memory genes between AD and SZ. We downloaded 10 AD and 10 SZ datasets from GEO-NCBI for integrated analysis. These datasets were processed using RMA algorithm and a global renormalization for all studies. Then Empirical Bayes algorithm was used to find the differentially expressed genes between patients and controls. The results showed that most of the differentially expressed genes were related to AD whereas the gene expression profile was little affected in the SZ. Furthermore, in the aspects of the number of differentially expressed genes, the fold change and the brain region, there was a great difference in the expression of learning or memory related genes between AD and SZ. In AD, the CALB1, GABRA5, and TAC1 were significantly downregulated in whole brain, frontal lobe, temporal lobe, and hippocampus. However, in SZ, only two genes CRHBP and CX3CR1 were downregulated in hippocampus, and other brain regions were not affected. The effect of these genes on learning or memory impairment has been widely studied. It was suggested that these genes may play a crucial role in AD or SZ pathogenesis. The different gene expression patterns between AD and SZ on learning and memory functions in different brain regions revealed in our study may help to understand the different mechanism between two diseases. PMID:26890750

  1. Expression Patterns and Function of Chromatin Protein HMGB2 during Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Noboru; Caramés, Beatriz; Hsu, Emily; Cherqui, Stephanie; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Lotz, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The superficial zone (SZ) of articular cartilage is critical in maintaining tissue function and homeostasis and represents the site of the earliest changes in osteoarthritis (OA). The expression of chromatin protein HMGB2 is restricted to the SZ, which contains cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers. Age-related loss of HMGB2 and gene deletion are associated with reduced SZ cellularity and early onset OA. This study addressed HMGB2 expression patterns in MSC and its role during differentiation. HMGB2 was detected at higher levels in human MSC as compared with human articular chondrocytes, and its expression declined during chondrogenic differentiation of MSC. Lentiviral HMGB2 transduction of MSC suppressed chondrogenesis as reflected by an inhibition of Col2a1 and Col10a1 expression. Conversely, in bone marrow MSC from Hmgb2−/− mice, Col10a1 was more strongly expressed than in wild-type MSC. This is consistent with in vivo results from mouse growth plates showing that Hmgb2 is expressed in proliferating and prehypertrophic zones but not in hypertrophic cartilage where Col10a1 is strongly expressed. Osteogenesis was also accelerated in Hmgb2−/− MSC. The expression of Runx2, which plays a major role in late stage chondrocyte differentiation, was enhanced in Hmgb2−/− MSC, and HMGB2 negatively regulated the stimulatory effect of Wnt/β-catenin signaling on the Runx2 proximal promoter. These results demonstrate that HMGB2 expression is inversely correlated with the differentiation status of MSC and that HMGB2 suppresses chondrogenic differentiation. The age-related loss of HMGB2 in articular cartilage may represent a mechanism responsible for the decline in adult cartilage stem cell populations. PMID:21890638

  2. Dogs Evaluate Threatening Facial Expressions by Their Biological Validity--Evidence from Gazing Patterns.

    PubMed

    Somppi, Sanni; Törnqvist, Heini; Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Hänninen, Laura; Krause, Christina M; Vainio, Outi

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate response to companions' emotional signals is important for all social creatures. The emotional expressions of humans and non-human animals have analogies in their form and function, suggesting shared evolutionary roots, but very little is known about how animals other than primates view and process facial expressions. In primates, threat-related facial expressions evoke exceptional viewing patterns compared with neutral or positive stimuli. Here, we explore if domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have such an attentional bias toward threatening social stimuli and whether observed emotional expressions affect dogs' gaze fixation distribution among the facial features (eyes, midface and mouth). We recorded the voluntary eye gaze of 31 domestic dogs during viewing of facial photographs of humans and dogs with three emotional expressions (threatening, pleasant and neutral). We found that dogs' gaze fixations spread systematically among facial features. The distribution of fixations was altered by the seen expression, but eyes were the most probable targets of the first fixations and gathered longer looking durations than mouth regardless of the viewed expression. The examination of the inner facial features as a whole revealed more pronounced scanning differences among expressions. This suggests that dogs do not base their perception of facial expressions on the viewing of single structures, but the interpretation of the composition formed by eyes, midface and mouth. Dogs evaluated social threat rapidly and this evaluation led to attentional bias, which was dependent on the depicted species: threatening conspecifics' faces evoked heightened attention but threatening human faces instead an avoidance response. We propose that threatening signals carrying differential biological validity are processed via distinctive neurocognitive pathways. Both of these mechanisms may have an adaptive significance for domestic dogs. The findings provide a novel perspective on

  3. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  4. Dogs Evaluate Threatening Facial Expressions by Their Biological Validity – Evidence from Gazing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Somppi, Sanni; Törnqvist, Heini; Kujala, Miiamaaria V.; Hänninen, Laura; Krause, Christina M.; Vainio, Outi

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate response to companions’ emotional signals is important for all social creatures. The emotional expressions of humans and non-human animals have analogies in their form and function, suggesting shared evolutionary roots, but very little is known about how animals other than primates view and process facial expressions. In primates, threat-related facial expressions evoke exceptional viewing patterns compared with neutral or positive stimuli. Here, we explore if domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have such an attentional bias toward threatening social stimuli and whether observed emotional expressions affect dogs’ gaze fixation distribution among the facial features (eyes, midface and mouth). We recorded the voluntary eye gaze of 31 domestic dogs during viewing of facial photographs of humans and dogs with three emotional expressions (threatening, pleasant and neutral). We found that dogs’ gaze fixations spread systematically among facial features. The distribution of fixations was altered by the seen expression, but eyes were the most probable targets of the first fixations and gathered longer looking durations than mouth regardless of the viewed expression. The examination of the inner facial features as a whole revealed more pronounced scanning differences among expressions. This suggests that dogs do not base their perception of facial expressions on the viewing of single structures, but the interpretation of the composition formed by eyes, midface and mouth. Dogs evaluated social threat rapidly and this evaluation led to attentional bias, which was dependent on the depicted species: threatening conspecifics’ faces evoked heightened attention but threatening human faces instead an avoidance response. We propose that threatening signals carrying differential biological validity are processed via distinctive neurocognitive pathways. Both of these mechanisms may have an adaptive significance for domestic dogs. The findings provide a novel

  5. Distinct RNA transcriptome patterns are potentially associated with angiogenesis in Tie2-expressing monocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinjing; Dai, Zhiyuan; Wu, Xiaoli; Wang, Kai; Wang, Xipeng

    2016-04-10

    Tie2-expressing Monocytes (TEMs) were previously identified as a novel subset of monocytes and were believed to have prominent pro-angiogenesis activities in human tumors. While the molecular mechanism of the angiogenesis promoting capacity of TEMs remains unclear. RNA transcriptome pattern, including non-coding RNAs as microRNA (miRNA) and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), plays important role in cell differentiation and functions. However, little is known about the transcriptome patterns of TEMs, including those non-coding RNAs. We explore the transcriptome of TEMs and the matched monocytes that do not express Tie2 (Tie2(-)monocytes) isolated from peripheral blood of healthy adults employing the Agilent Human miRNA(8*60K,Design ID: 046064)microarray and the Agilent lncRNA Gene Expression(4*180K, Design ID: 042818)microarray. A total of 141 mRNAs, 142 lncRNAs and 75 miRNAs were found dysregulated in TEMs compared to Tie2(-)monocytes. TEMs have the distinct RNA transcriptome patterns according to the Hierarchical clustering and then the gene expression patterns were confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Functional annotation by Gene Ontology (GO) analyses showed that the up-regulated mRNAs in TEMs were associated to blood vessel remodeling and positive regulation of epithelial cell proliferation, and the up-regulated insulin like growth factor 1(IGF1) mRNA was involved in both pathways. For functional analysis of those dysregulated non-coding RNAs, target genes of the miRNAs were predicted and cis/trans-regulation analysis of the lncRNAs were performed.

  6. Chronic maternal morphine alters calbindin D-28k expression pattern in postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Fiorito, Filomena; Della Morte, Rossella; Maharajan, Veeramani; Costagliola, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The distribution pattern of calbindin (CB)-D28k-expressing neurons results to be altered in several brain regions of chronic morphine exposed adult mice. In this study, the influence of chronic maternal exposure to morphine on the distribution pattern of CB-D28k-expressing neurons in the brain of mouse offspring was investigated. Females of CD-1 mice were daily administered with saline or morphine for 7 days before mating, during the whole gestation period, and until 21 day post-partum. Their offspring were sacrificed on postnatal day 18, and the brains were examined by histology using cresyl violet and by immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal anti-CB-D28k antibody. Histology revealed no significant differences in the distribution pattern and the number of neurons between the offspring forebrain of the control group of mice and the two groups of mice treated with different doses of morphine. However, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the number of CB-D28k-immunoreactive neurons remarkably decreased in the cingulate cortex, in the layers II-IV of the parietal cortex and in all regions of the hippocampus, while it increased in the layers V-VI of the parietal cortex and in the subicular region of the offspring brain of morphine treated mice. Overall, our findings demonstrate that maternal exposure to morphine alters the pattern of CB-D28k-expressing neuron pattern in specific regions of murine developing brain, in a layer- and dose-dependent way, thus suggesting that these alterations might represent a mechanism by which morphine modifies the functional aspects of developing brain.

  7. [Expression pattern of genes involved in tropane alkaloids biosynthesis and tropane alkaloids accumulation in Atropa belladonna].

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Wang, Ya-Xiong; Zhang, Qiao-Zhuo; Li, Jin-Di; Xia, Ke; Wu, Neng-Biao; Liao, Zhi-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Atropa belladonna is a medicinal plant and main commercial source of tropane alkaloids (TAs) including scopolamine and hyoscyamine, which are anticholine drugs widely used clinically. Based on the high throughput transcriptome sequencing results, the digital expression patterns of UniGenes representing 9 structural genes (ODC, ADC, AIH, CPA, SPDS, PMT, CYP80F1, H6H, TRII) involved in TAs biosynthesis were constructed, and simultaneously expression analysis of 4 released genes in NCBI (PMT, CYP80F1, H6H, TRII) for verification was performed using qPCR, as well as the TAs contents detection in 8 different tissues. Digital expression patterns results suggested that the 4 genes including ODC, ADC, AIH and CPA involved in the upstream pathway of TAs, and the 2 branch pathway genes including SPDS and TRII were found to be expressed in all the detected tissues with high expression level in secondary root. While the 3 TAs-pathway-specific genes including PMT, CYP80F1, H6H were only expressed in secondary roots and primary roots, mainly in secondary roots. The qPCR detection results of PMT, CYP80F1 and H6H were consistent with the digital expression patterns, but their expression levels in primary root were too low to be detected. The highest content of hyoscyamine was found in tender stems (3.364 mg x g(-1)), followed by tender leaves (1.526 mg x g(-1)), roots (1.598 mg x g(-1)), young fruits (1.271 mg x g(-1)) and fruit sepals (1.413 mg x g(-1)). The highest content of scopolamine was detected in fruit sepals (1.003 mg x g(-1)), then followed by tender stems (0.600 mg x g(-1)) and tender leaves (0.601 mg x g(-1)). Both old stems and old leaves had the lowest content of hyoscyamine and scopolamine. The gene expression profile and TAs accumulation indicated that TAs in Atropa belladonna were mainly biosynthesized in secondary root, and then transported and deposited in tender aerial parts. Screening Atropa belladonna secondary root transcriptome database will facilitate

  8. Various ARID1A expression patterns and their clinical significance in gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Bae; Ham, In-Hye; Hur, Hoon; Lee, Dakeun

    2016-03-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is frequently mutated in gastric cancers, and loss of ARID1A expression is considered a poor prognostic factor in various cancers. However, in practice, ARID1A shows various expression patterns, and our understanding of its significance is limited. We performed immunohistochemistry for ARID1A, MLH1, and pS6 using whole tissue blocks of 350 gastric cancers and classified the ARID1A expression as follows: retained (63.7%), reduced (17.7%), complete loss (14.9%), and partial loss (3.7%). Complete/partial loss was more common in poorly differentiated histology (P < .001), and reduced or complete loss of ARID1A was frequent in cases with MLH1 loss (P < .001). The ARID1A-reduced group showed only slightly inferior disease-free survival (DFS; P = .254) and overall survival (OS; P = .377) compared to those of the ARID1A-retained group, whereas the group with complete loss showed significantly worse DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.732; P = .015) and OS (HR, 1.751; P = .013). Worse DFS (HR, 2.672; P = .005) and OS (HR, 2.531; P = .002) were also noted in the group with partial loss. High expression of pS6 was observed more frequently in groups showing altered ARID1A expression patterns (P < .001). In conclusion, reduced ARID1A expression is not a major prognostic determinant, although it may lead to AKT pathway activation. Tumor cells lacking ARID1A expression may influence the prognosis even if they constitute only a small proportion of the tumor sample. Our data provide an enhanced roadmap for understanding ARID1A with implications for future research and therapeutics. PMID:26826411

  9. Expression of the Retrotransposon Helena Reveals a Complex Pattern of TE Deregulation in Drosophila Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Soriano, Valèria; Garcia Guerreiro, Maria Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs), repeated mobile sequences, are ubiquitous in the eukaryotic kingdom. Their mobilizing capacity confers on them a high mutagenic potential, which must be strongly regulated to guarantee genome stability. In the Drosophila germline, a small RNA-mediated silencing system, the piRNA (Piwi-interacting RNA) pathway, is the main responsible TE regulating mechanism, but some stressful conditions can destabilize it. For instance, during interspecific hybridization, genomic stress caused by the shock of two different genomes can lead, in both animals and plants, to higher transposition rates. A recent study in D. buzatii—D. koepferae hybrids detected mobilization of 28 TEs, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms explaining this transposition release. We have characterized one of the mobilized TEs, the retrotransposon Helena, and used quantitative expression to assess whether its high transposition rates in hybrids are preceded by increased expression. We have also localized Helena expression in the gonads to see if cellular expression patterns have changed in the hybrids. To give more insight into changes in TE regulation in hybrids, we analysed Helena-specific piRNA populations of hybrids and parental species. Helena expression is not globally altered in somatic tissues, but male and female gonads have different patterns of deregulation. In testes, Helena is repressed in F1, increasing then its expression up to parental values. This is linked with a mislocation of Helena transcripts along with an increase of their specific piRNA levels. Ovaries have additive levels of Helena expression, but the ping-pong cycle efficiency seems to be reduced in F1 hybrids. This could be at the origin of new Helena insertions in hybrids, which would be transmitted to F1 hybrid female progeny. PMID:26812285

  10. Detection of exfoliated carcinoma cells in colonic luminal washings by identification of deranged patterns of expression of the CD44 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K; Sugino, T; Bolodeoku, J; Warren, B F; Goodison, S; Woodman, A; Toge, T; Tahara, E; Tarin, D

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate whether colonic cancer cells exfoliated into the lumen of the organ can be detected by identification of their abnormal CD44 gene products. METHODS: Exfoliated cells were obtained by centrifugation of saline wash-outs of 27 surgically resected colon specimens obtained from 15 patients with carcinoma, seven with ulcerative colitis and five with Crohn's disease. After extracting cellular mRNA, amplification by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique and analysis by Southern blot hybridisation was carried out to examine the levels and patterns of transcription of exons 11(v6), and 12(v7) and intron 9 of the CD44 gene. The transcription of these CD44 components was also examined by RT-PCR of snap-frozen solid tissue specimens from 11 of the above patients with colorectal carcinoma, seven with ulcerative colitis and five with Crohn's disease. RESULTS: Abnormal expression of exons 11(v6) and 12(v7) was detected in exfoliated cells from 11 (73%) of 15 patients with carcinoma, but not in any patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The retention of intron 9 in CD44 mRNA transcripts was detected in washings from four (27%) carcinoma specimens but not in washings from non-malignant specimens. It was confirmed that in solid tissue samples from the same carcinomas there was abnormal over-expression of numerous alternatively spliced CD44 species containing transcripts of exons 11 and 12 and retention of intron 9. Low level expression of these exons was detected in tissue from inflammatory lesions from five of seven patients with ulcerative colitis and four of five with Crohn's disease. The retention of intron 9 was not seen in normal mucosa nor IBD. CONCLUSION: Abnormal expression of the variant exons and of intron 9 of the CD44 gene in tumour cells exfoliated into the colonic lumen may be helpful markers for the early, non-invasive, diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Images PMID:8655705

  11. Comparative Analysis of Cartilage Marker Gene Expression Patterns during Axolotl and Xenopus Limb Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki; Satoh, Ayano; Satoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) can completely regenerate lost limbs, whereas Xenopus laevis frogs cannot. During limb regeneration, a blastema is first formed at the amputation plane. It is thought that this regeneration blastema forms a limb by mechanisms similar to those of a developing embryonic limb bud. Furthermore, Xenopus laevis frogs can form a blastema after amputation; however, the blastema results in a terminal cone-shaped cartilaginous structure called a "spike." The causes of this patterning defect in Xenopus frog limb regeneration were explored. We hypothesized that differences in chondrogenesis may underlie the patterning defect. Thus, we focused on chondrogenesis. Chondrogenesis marker genes, type I and type II collagen, were compared in regenerative and nonregenerative environments. There were marked differences between axolotls and Xenopus in the expression pattern of these chondrogenesis-associated genes. The relative deficit in the chondrogenic capacity of Xenopus blastema cells may account for the absence of total limb regenerative capacity.

  12. Gene expression patterns in an onychophoran reveal that regionalization predates limb segmentation in pan-arthropods.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Budd, Graham E; Akam, Michael; Prpic, Nikola-Michael

    2010-01-01

    In arthropods, such as Drosophila melanogaster, the leg gap genes homothorax (hth), extradenticle (exd), dachshund (dac), and Distal-less (Dll) regionalize the legs in order to facilitate the subsequent segmentation of the legs. We have isolated homologs of all four leg gap genes from the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis and have studied their expression. We show that leg regionalization takes place in the legs of onychophorans even though they represent simple and nonsegmented appendages. This implies that leg regionalization evolved for a different function and was only later co-opted for a role in leg segmentation. We also show that the leg gap gene patterns in onychophorans (especially of hth and exd) are similar to the patterns in crustaceans and insects, suggesting that this is the plesiomorphic state in arthropods. The reversed hth and exd patterns in chelicerates and myriapods are therefore an apomorphy for this group, the Myriochelata, lending support to the Myriochelata and Tetraconata clades in arthropod phylogeny.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Cartilage Marker Gene Expression Patterns during Axolotl and Xenopus Limb Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki; Satoh, Ayano; Satoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) can completely regenerate lost limbs, whereas Xenopus laevis frogs cannot. During limb regeneration, a blastema is first formed at the amputation plane. It is thought that this regeneration blastema forms a limb by mechanisms similar to those of a developing embryonic limb bud. Furthermore, Xenopus laevis frogs can form a blastema after amputation; however, the blastema results in a terminal cone-shaped cartilaginous structure called a "spike." The causes of this patterning defect in Xenopus frog limb regeneration were explored. We hypothesized that differences in chondrogenesis may underlie the patterning defect. Thus, we focused on chondrogenesis. Chondrogenesis marker genes, type I and type II collagen, were compared in regenerative and nonregenerative environments. There were marked differences between axolotls and Xenopus in the expression pattern of these chondrogenesis-associated genes. The relative deficit in the chondrogenic capacity of Xenopus blastema cells may account for the absence of total limb regenerative capacity. PMID:26186213

  14. Comparative Analysis of Cartilage Marker Gene Expression Patterns during Axolotl and Xenopus Limb Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki; Satoh, Ayano; Satoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) can completely regenerate lost limbs, whereas Xenopus laevis frogs cannot. During limb regeneration, a blastema is first formed at the amputation plane. It is thought that this regeneration blastema forms a limb by mechanisms similar to those of a developing embryonic limb bud. Furthermore, Xenopus laevis frogs can form a blastema after amputation; however, the blastema results in a terminal cone-shaped cartilaginous structure called a “spike.” The causes of this patterning defect in Xenopus frog limb regeneration were explored. We hypothesized that differences in chondrogenesis may underlie the patterning defect. Thus, we focused on chondrogenesis. Chondrogenesis marker genes, type I and type II collagen, were compared in regenerative and nonregenerative environments. There were marked differences between axolotls and Xenopus in the expression pattern of these chondrogenesis-associated genes. The relative deficit in the chondrogenic capacity of Xenopus blastema cells may account for the absence of total limb regenerative capacity. PMID:26186213

  15. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype.

  16. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype. PMID:27183584

  17. Videos of conspecifics elicit interactive looking patterns and facial expressions in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Clayton P; Zimmerman, Prisca E; Gothard, Katalin M

    2011-08-01

    A broader understanding of the neural basis of social behavior in primates requires the use of species-specific stimuli that elicit spontaneous, but reproducible and tractable behaviors. In this context of natural behaviors, individual variation can further inform about the factors that influence social interactions. To approximate natural social interactions similar to those documented by field studies, we used unedited video footage to induce in viewer monkeys spontaneous facial expressions and looking patterns in the laboratory setting. Three adult male monkeys (Macaca mulatta), previously behaviorally and genetically (5-HTTLPR) characterized, were monitored while they watched 10 s video segments depicting unfamiliar monkeys (movie monkeys) displaying affiliative, neutral, and aggressive behaviors. The gaze and head orientation of the movie monkeys alternated between "averted" and "directed" at the viewer. The viewers were not reinforced for watching the movies, thus their looking patterns indicated their interest and social engagement with the stimuli. The behavior of the movie monkey accounted for differences in the looking patterns and facial expressions displayed by the viewers. We also found multiple significant differences in the behavior of the viewers that correlated with their interest in these stimuli. These socially relevant dynamic stimuli elicited spontaneous social behaviors, such as eye-contact induced reciprocation of facial expression, gaze aversion, and gaze following, that were previously not observed in response to static images. This approach opens a unique opportunity to understanding the mechanisms that trigger spontaneous social behaviors in humans and nonhuman primates.

  18. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, A. L.; Daugherty, C. J.; Bihn, E. A.; Chapman, D. K.; Norwood, K. L.; Ferl, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    The use of plants as integral components of life support systems remains a cornerstone of strategies for long-term human habitation of space and extraterrestrial colonization. Spaceflight experiments over the past few decades have refined the hardware required to grow plants in low-earth orbit and have illuminated fundamental issues regarding spaceflight effects on plant growth and development. Potential incipient hypoxia, resulting from the lack of convection-driven gas movement, has emerged as a possible major impact of microgravity. We developed transgenic Arabidopsis containing the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces the plant hypoxia response and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. The staining patterns resulting from a 5-d mission on the orbiter Columbia during mission STS-93 indicate that the Adh/GUS reporter gene was activated in roots during the flight. However, the patterns of expression were not identical to terrestrial control inductions. Moreover, although terrestrial hypoxia induces Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex, no apex staining was observed in the spaceflight plants. This indicates that either the normal hypoxia response signaling is impaired in spaceflight or that spaceflight inappropriately induces Adh/GUS activity for reasons other than hypoxia.

  19. Is alopecia areata an autoimmune-response against melanogenesis-related proteins, exposed by abnormal MHC class I expression in the anagen hair bulb?

    PubMed Central

    Paus, R.; Slominski, A.; Czarnetzki, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    The etiology of alopecia areata (AA), a putative autoimmune disease characterized by sudden hair loss, has remained obscure. It is not understood, how the characteristic inflammatory infiltrate that selectively attacks anagen hair follicles in AA is generated. We hypothesize that this reflects an unexplored form of autoimmunity, a cytotoxic T cell attack on rhythmically synthesized autoantigens normally sequestered by a lack or very low level of MHC class I (MHC I)-expression, and suggest the following mechanism of AA pathogenesis: Microtrauma, neurogenic inflammation, or microbial antigens cause a localized breakdown of MHC I-"negativity" in the proximal anagen hair bulb via proinflammatory cytokines. This exposes autoantigens derived from melanogenesis-related proteins (MRP-DP), which are only generated during anagen, and triggers two successive waves of autoimmune responses: CD8+ cytotoxic T cells initiate AA after recognizing MRP-DP abnormally presented by MHC I molecules on hair matrix melanocytes and/or keratinocytes; a secondary attack, carried by CD4+ T cells and antigen presenting cells, is then mounted against MHC class II--presented additional autoantigens exposed by damaged melanocytes and keratinocytes. The latter causes most of the follicular damage, and extrafollicular disease, and depends greatly on the immunogenetic background of affected individuals. This unifying hypothesis explains the clinical heterogeneity and all salient features of AA, and argues that only the unlikely coincidence of multiple predisposing events triggers AA. The suppression of MHC I--expression and synthesis of MRP in the hair bulb, and the "tolerization" of MRP-DP autoreactive CD8+ T cells may be promising strategies for treating AA. PMID:7716973

  20. DNT cell inhibits the growth of pancreatic carcinoma via abnormal expressions of NKG2D and MICA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Zhu, Xing-Xing; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effects of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) and its ligands major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related molecules A(MICA) in DNT cell killing pancreatic carcinoma. Antibodies adsorption was used to separate DNT cell from human peripheral blood. Human pancreatic tumor models were established via implanting BXPC-3 cells into nude mice. Then randomly divided mice into blank group, gemcitabine group and DNT group. Mice weights and mice tumor volumes were measured every 5 days. 50 days later mice were euthanized at cervical dislocation method. Tumor weights were measured. Relative tumor volume and tumor inhibition rate were calculated. Western blot and qPCR were used to detect the expressions of NKG2D and MICA in the transplanted tumors of the three groups. DNT cell significantly increased over time. The blank group tumor volume and weight were significantly larger than the other groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001), but there were no significantly difference between DNT group and gemcitabine group (p > 0.05). Gemcitabine and DNT cell tumor inhibition rate were 40.4% and 35.5%. Western blot and qPCR showed that MICA mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly higher than DNT group (p = 0.001, p = 0.003). NKG2D mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly lower than DNT cells group (p < 0.001, p = 0.001). In conclusion DNT cell can significantly inhibit the growth of pancreatic carcinoma in vivo, and the mechanism may be involved in abnormal expressions of MICA and NKG2D. PMID:26616050

  1. DNT cell inhibits the growth of pancreatic carcinoma via abnormal expressions of NKG2D and MICA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Zhu, Xing-Xing; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effects of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) and its ligands major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related molecules A(MICA) in DNT cell killing pancreatic carcinoma. Antibodies adsorption was used to separate DNT cell from human peripheral blood. Human pancreatic tumor models were established via implanting BXPC-3 cells into nude mice. Then randomly divided mice into blank group, gemcitabine group and DNT group. Mice weights and mice tumor volumes were measured every 5 days. 50 days later mice were euthanized at cervical dislocation method. Tumor weights were measured. Relative tumor volume and tumor inhibition rate were calculated. Western blot and qPCR were used to detect the expressions of NKG2D and MICA in the transplanted tumors of the three groups. DNT cell significantly increased over time. The blank group tumor volume and weight were significantly larger than the other groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001), but there were no significantly difference between DNT group and gemcitabine group (p > 0.05). Gemcitabine and DNT cell tumor inhibition rate were 40.4% and 35.5%. Western blot and qPCR showed that MICA mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly higher than DNT group (p = 0.001, p = 0.003). NKG2D mRNA and protein levels in blank group were significantly lower than DNT cells group (p < 0.001, p = 0.001). In conclusion DNT cell can significantly inhibit the growth of pancreatic carcinoma in vivo, and the mechanism may be involved in abnormal expressions of MICA and NKG2D.

  2. Overlap Chronic Placental Inflammation Is Associated with a Unique Gene Expression Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Kripa; Wang, Huaqing; Troncone, Michael J.; Khan, Waliul I.; Pare, Guillaume; Terry, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    Breakdown of the balance between maternal pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways is thought to allow an anti-fetal maternal immune response that underlies development of chronic placental inflammation. Chronic placental inflammation is manifested by the influx of maternal inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes, histiocytes, and plasma cells, into the placental membranes, villi, and decidua. These infiltrates are recognized pathologically as chronic chorioamnionitis, chronic villitis of unknown etiology, and chronic deciduitis. Each of these histological entities is associated with adverse fetal outcomes including intrauterine growth restriction and preterm birth. Studying the gene expression patterns in chronically inflamed placenta, particularly when overlapping histologies are present, may lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s). Therefore, this study compared tissue with and without chronic placental inflammation, manifested as overlapping chronic chorioamnionitis, chronic villitis of unknown etiology, and chronic deciduitis. RNA expression profiling was conducted on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded placental tissue using Illumina microarrays. IGJ was the most significant differentially expressed gene identified and had increased expression in the inflamed tissue. In addition, IGLL1, CXCL13, CD27, CXCL9, ICOS, and KLRC1 had increased expression in the inflamed placental samples. These differentially expressed genes are associated with T follicular helper cells, natural killer cells, and B cells. Furthermore, these genes differ from those typically associated with the individual components of chronic placental inflammation, such as chronic villitis, suggesting that the inflammatory infiltrate associated with overlapping chronic chorioamnionitis, chronic villitis of unknown etiology, and chronic deciduitis differs is unique. To further explore and validate gene expression findings, we conducted immunohistochemical assessment of protein level

  3. Expression pattern of matrix metalloproteinases in human gynecological cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in the degradation of protein components of the extracellular matrix and thus play an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis. Their expression is related to the progression of gynecological cancers (e.g. endometrial, cervical or ovarian carcinoma). In this study we investigated the expression pattern of the 23 MMPs, currently known in humans, in different gynecological cancer cell lines. Methods In total, cell lines from three endometrium carcinomas (Ishikawa, HEC-1-A, AN3 CA), three cervical carcinomas (HeLa, Caski, SiHa), three chorioncarcinomas (JEG, JAR, BeWo), two ovarian cancers (BG-1, OAW-42) and one teratocarcinoma (PA-1) were examined. The expression of MMPs was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blot and gelatin zymography. Results We demonstrated that the cell lines examined can constitutively express a wide variety of MMPs on mRNA and protein level. While MMP-2, -11, -14 and -24 were widely expressed, no expression was seen for MMP-12, -16, -20, -25, -26, -27 in any of the cell lines. A broad range of 16 MMPs could be found in the PA1 cells and thus this cell line could be used as a positive control for general MMP experiments. While the three cervical cancer cell lines expressed 10-14 different MMPs, the median expression in endometrial and choriocarcinoma cells was 7 different enzymes. The two investigated ovarian cancer cell lines showed a distinctive difference in the number of expressed MMPs (2 vs. 10). Conclusions Ishikawa, Caski, OAW-42 and BeWo cell lines could be the best choice for all future experiments on MMP regulation and their role in endometrial, cervical, ovarian or choriocarcinoma development, whereas the teratocarcinoma cell line PA1 could be used as a positive control for general MMP experiments. PMID:20942921

  4. Temporal pattern of the posterior expression of Wingless in Drosophila blastoderm

    PubMed Central

    Vorwald-Denholtz, Peggy P.; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    In most animals, the Antero-Posterior (A-P) axis requires a gradient of Wnt signaling. Wnts are expressed posteriorly in many vertebrate and invertebrate embryos, forming a gradient of canonical Wnt/β-Catenin activity that is highest in the posterior and lowest in the anterior. One notable exception to this evolutionary conservation is in the Drosophila embryo, in which the A-P axis is established by early transcription factors of maternal origin. Despite this initial axial establishment, Drosophila still expresses Wingless (Wg), the main Drosophila Wnt homologue, in a strong posterior band early in embryogenesis. Since its discovery 30 years ago this posterior band of Wg has been largely ignored. In this study, we re-examined the onset of expression of the Wg posterior band in relation to the expression of Wg in other segments, and compared the timing of its expression to that of axial regulators such as gap and pair-rule genes. It was found that the posterior band of Wg is first detected in blastoderm at mid nuclear cycle 14, before the segment-polarity stripes of Wg are formed in other segments. The onset of the posterior band of Wg expression was preceded by that of the gap gene products Hunchback (hb) and Krüppel (Kr), and the pair-rule protein Even-skipped (Eve). Although the function of the posterior band of Wg was not analyzed in this study, we note that in temperature-sensitive Wg mutants, in which Wg is not properly secreted, the posterior band of Wg expression is diminished in strength, indicating a positive feedback loop required for Wg robust expression at the cellular blastoderm stage. We propose that this early posterior expression could play a role in the refinement of A-P patterning. PMID:21821151

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of Newt Lens Regeneration Reveals Distinct Gradients in Gene Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Nobuyasu; Ivester, Clifford J.; Braun, Thomas; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.

    2013-01-01

    Regeneration of the lens in newts is quite a unique process. The lens is removed in its entirety and regeneration ensues from the pigment epithelial cells of the dorsal iris via transdifferentiation. The same type of cells from the ventral iris are not capable of regenerating a lens. It is, thus, expected that differences between dorsal and ventral iris during the process of regeneration might provide important clues pertaining to the mechanism of regeneration. In this paper, we employed next generation RNA-seq to determine gene expression patterns during lens regeneration in Notophthalmus viridescens. The expression of more than 38,000 transcripts was compared between dorsal and ventral iris. Although very few genes were found to be dorsal- or ventral-specific, certain groups of genes were up-regulated specifically in the dorsal iris. These genes are involved in cell cycle, gene regulation, cytoskeleton and immune response. In addition, the expression of six highly regulated genes, TBX5, FGF10, UNC5B, VAX2, NR2F5, and NTN1, was verified using qRT-PCR. These graded gene expression patterns provide insight into the mechanism of lens regeneration, the markers that are specific to dorsal or ventral iris, and layout a map for future studies in the field. PMID:23613853

  6. An autopodial-like pattern of Hox expression in the fins of a basal actinopterygian fish.

    PubMed

    Davis, Marcus C; Dahn, Randall D; Shubin, Neil H

    2007-05-24

    Comparative analyses of Hox gene expression and regulation in teleost fish and tetrapods support the long-entrenched notion that the distal region of tetrapod limbs, containing the wrist, ankle and digits, is an evolutionary novelty. Data from fossils support the notion that the unique features of tetrapod limbs were assembled over evolutionary time in the paired fins of fish. The challenge in linking developmental and palaeontological approaches has been that developmental data for fins and limbs compare only highly derived teleosts and tetrapods; what is lacking are data from extant taxa that retain greater portions of the fin skeletal morphology considered primitive to all bony fish. Here, we report on the expression and function of genes implicated in the origin of the autopod in a basal actinopterygian, Polyodon spathula. Polyodon exhibits a late-phase, inverted collinear expression of 5' HoxD genes, a pattern of expression long considered a developmental hallmark of the autopod and shown in tetrapods to be controlled by a 'digit enhancer' region. These data show that aspects of the development of the autopod are primitive to tetrapods and that the origin of digits entailed the redeployment of ancient patterns of gene activity. PMID:17522683

  7. Diurnal lighting patterns and habitat alter opsin expression and colour preferences in a killifish

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley M.; Stanis, Shannon; Fuller, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in lighting environments frequently leads to population variation in colour patterns, colour preferences and visual systems. Yet lighting conditions also vary diurnally, and many aspects of visual systems and behaviour vary over this time scale. Here, we use the bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei) to compare how diurnal variation and habitat variation (clear versus tannin-stained water) affect opsin expression and the preference to peck at different-coloured objects. Opsin expression was generally lowest at midnight and dawn, and highest at midday and dusk, and this diurnal variation was many times greater than variation between habitats. Pecking preference was affected by both diurnal and habitat variation but did not correlate with opsin expression. Rather, pecking preference matched lighting conditions, with higher preferences for blue at noon and for red at dawn/dusk, when these wavelengths are comparatively scarce. Similarly, blue pecking preference was higher in tannin-stained water where blue wavelengths are reduced. In conclusion, L. goodei exhibits strong diurnal cycles of opsin expression, but these are not tightly correlated with light intensity or colour. Temporally variable pecking preferences probably result from lighting environment rather than from opsin production. These results may have implications for the colour pattern diversity observed in these fish. PMID:23698009

  8. Meteorin-Like Shows Unique Expression Pattern in Bone and Its Overexpression Inhibits Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Weiyan; Liu, Yong; Wu, Zhihong; Wang, Shaohai; Qiu, Guixing; Lin, Shouqing

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to identify and characterize genes involved in osteoblasts function. Firstly, we constructed and sequenced a human osteoblast full-length cDNA library to screen for genes whose functions have not been reported and further identify these candidate genes through detecting the relationship with the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor complex using a dual luciferase reporter system. Only one gene, namely METRNL (Meteorin, glial cell differentiation regulator-like) has been screened out. We performed immunohistochemistry to analyze expression patterns in bone and established a stable transfection MG63 cell line of METRNL-EGFP fusion protein overexpression to analyze the function of METRNL in mineralized nodule formation. Immunohistochemistry showed METRNL expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteoblasts lining trabecular bone surfaces. Overexpression of METRNL inhibited mineralized nodule formation by the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line. Thus, the identified gene, METRNL, which is associated with AP-1 transcription factor complex activity, has a unique expression pattern in bone. In addition, the anomalous expression of METRNL may inhibit bone cell differentiation. PMID:27716826

  9. Loss of NAC1 expression is associated with defective bony patterning in the murine vertebral axis.

    PubMed

    Yap, Kai Lee; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Bolon, Brad; Wu, Ren-Chin; Gao, Min; Herlinger, Alice L; Wang, Fengying; Faiola, Francesco; Huso, David; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Wang, Tian-Li; Wang, Jianlong; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2013-01-01

    NAC1 encoded by NACC1 is a member of the BTB/POZ family of proteins and participates in several pathobiological processes. However, its function during tissue development has not been elucidated. In this study, we compared homozygous null mutant Nacc1(-/-) and wild type Nacc1(+/+) mice to determine the consequences of diminished NAC1 expression. The most remarkable change in Nacc1(-/-) mice was a vertebral patterning defect in which most knockout animals exhibited a morphological transformation of the sixth lumbar vertebra (L6) into a sacral identity; thus, the total number of pre-sacral vertebrae was decreased by one (to 25) in Nacc1(-/-) mice. Heterozygous Nacc1(+/-) mice had an increased tendency to adopt an intermediate phenotype in which L6 underwent partial sacralization. Nacc1(-/-) mice also exhibited non-closure of the dorsal aspects of thoracic vertebrae T10-T12. Chondrocytes from Nacc1(+/+) mice expressed abundant NAC1 while Nacc1(-/-) chondrocytes had undetectable levels. Loss of NAC1 in Nacc1(-/-) mice was associated with significantly reduced chondrocyte migratory potential as well as decreased expression of matrilin-3 and matrilin-4, two cartilage-associated extracellular matrix proteins with roles in the development and homeostasis of cartilage and bone. These data suggest that NAC1 participates in the motility and differentiation of developing chondrocytes and cartilaginous tissues, and its expression is necessary to maintain normal axial patterning of murine skeleton.

  10. Immuno-stimultory/regulatory gene expression patterns in advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin H.; Weir, Isabelle; Tsuji, Takemasa; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that a high degree of tumor-infiltrating T cells is associated with ovarian cancer prognosis. We hypothesized that tumors display an immune-related program of transcription that can act in a stimulatory or a regulatory manner. We analyzed transcriptome-wide gene expression data from 503 ovarian tumors from the Cancer Genome Atlas to identify genes that show differential prognoses when stratified by CD3 expression. Genes with immunological functions and tumor antigen genes were selected for analysis. We repeated our analysis in an independent validation study. Five genes showed stimulatory/regulatory patterns at a high level of confidence (Bonferroni p < 0.05). Three of these (MAGEA8, MPL, AMHR2) were validated and one (WT1) could not be evaluated. These patterns show specific prognostic effect only in conjunction with CD3 expression. When patients express multiple transcripts in poor prognosis directions, there is a dose response: increasingly regulatory type tumors are associated with higher stage, lower treatment response and shorter overall survival and progression free survival. The high-confidence set of transcripts (MAGEA8, MPL, AMHR2, WT1) and selected low-confidence hits (EPOR, TLR7) alone or in combination represent candidate prognosis markers for further investigation. PMID:26622942

  11. Gene expression patterns in near isogenic lines for wheat rust resistance gene lr34/yr18.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, S H; Bai, J; Fellers, J P; Pacheco, M G; Bowden, R L

    2007-09-01

    ABSTRACT The Lr34/Yr18 resistance gene provides durable, adult-plant, slow rusting resistance to leaf rust, yellow rust, and several other diseases of wheat. Flag leaves may exhibit spontaneous leaf tip necrosis and tips are more resistant than leaf bases. Despite the importance of this gene, the mechanism of resistance is unknown. Patterns of expression for 55,052 transcripts were examined by microarray analysis in mock-inoculated flag leaves of two pairs of wheat near isogenic lines for Lr34/Yr18 (Jupateco 73S/Jupateco 73R and Thatcher/Thatcher-Lr34). The Thatcher isolines were also examined for patterns of expression after inoculation with leaf rust. Mock-inoculated leaf tips of resistant plants showed up-regulation of 57 transcripts generally associated with ABA inducibility, osmotic stress, cold stress, and/or seed maturation. Several transcripts may be useful as expression markers for Lr34/Yr18. Five transcripts were also up-regulated in resistant leaf bases. The possible role of these transcripts in resistance is discussed. In mock-inoculated plants, pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins were not up-regulated in resistant flag leaves compared with that in susceptible flag leaves. In inoculated plants, the same set of PR proteins was up-regulated in both resistant and susceptible flag leaves. However, expression was often higher in resistant plants, suggesting a possible role for Lr34/Yr18 in priming of defense responses.

  12. Diurnal lighting patterns and habitat alter opsin expression and colour preferences in a killifish.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ashley M; Stanis, Shannon; Fuller, Rebecca C

    2013-07-22

    Spatial variation in lighting environments frequently leads to population variation in colour patterns, colour preferences and visual systems. Yet lighting conditions also vary diurnally, and many aspects of visual systems and behaviour vary over this time scale. Here, we use the bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei) to compare how diurnal variation and habitat variation (clear versus tannin-stained water) affect opsin expression and the preference to peck at different-coloured objects. Opsin expression was generally lowest at midnight and dawn, and highest at midday and dusk, and this diurnal variation was many times greater than variation between habitats. Pecking preference was affected by both diurnal and habitat variation but did not correlate with opsin expression. Rather, pecking preference matched lighting conditions, with higher preferences for blue at noon and for red at dawn/dusk, when these wavelengths are comparatively scarce. Similarly, blue pecking preference was higher in tannin-stained water where blue wavelengths are reduced. In conclusion, L. goodei exhibits strong diurnal cycles of opsin expression, but these are not tightly correlated with light intensity or colour. Temporally variable pecking preferences probably result from lighting environment rather than from opsin production. These results may have implications for the colour pattern diversity observed in these fish.

  13. Expression dynamics of WOX genes mark cell fate decisions during early embryonic patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Haecker, Achim; Gross-Hardt, Rita; Geiges, Bernd; Sarkar, Ananda; Breuninger, Holger; Herrmann, Marita; Laux, Thomas

    2004-02-01

    During embryonic pattern formation, the main body axes are established and cells of different developmental fates are specified from a single-cell zygote. Despite the fundamental importance of this process, in plants, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We show that expression dynamics of novel WOX (WUSCHEL related homeobox) gene family members reveal early embryonic patterning events in Arabidopsis. WOX2 and WOX8 are co-expressed in the egg cell and zygote and become confined to the apical and basal daughter cells of the zygote, respectively, by its asymmetric division. WOX2 not only marks apical descendants of the zygote, but is also functionally required for their correct development, suggesting that the asymmetric division of the plant zygote separates determinants of apical and basal cell fates. WOX9 expression is initiated in the basal daughter cell of the zygote and subsequently shifts into the descendants of the apical daughter apparently in response to signaling from the embryo proper. Expression of WOX5 shows that identity of the quiescent center is initiated very early in the hypophyseal cell, and highlights molecular and developmental similarities between the stem cell niches of root and shoot meristems. Together, our data suggest that during plant embryogenesis region-specific transcription programs are initiated very early in single precursor cells and that WOX genes play an important role in this process.

  14. Differential Expression Patterns of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 in Nasal Polyp Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Subramaniam, Somasundaram; Yu, Xue Min; Li, Ying Ying; Chen, De Hua; Li, Tian Ying; Shen, Liang; Shi, Li; Wang, De Yun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors play an important role in airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation. The current study investigates the expression profiles of EGF, EGFR and ERBB4 in patients with nasal polyps (NP), and their response to glucocorticosteroid (GC) treatment. Fifty patients with NP (40 without GC treatment and 10 with oral GC) and 20 control subjects with septal deviation were recruited into the study. Protein levels of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 were evaluated by immune-staining. In healthy nasal epithelium, EGF and EGFR localized within p63+ basal cells, while ERBB4 localized within ciliated cells. GC-naïve NP epithelium showed weak expression of EGF in 90% of samples versus 5% of controls. EGFR was significantly increased in the epithelium with basal cell hyperplasia from GC-naïve NPs (78%, 31/40) compared to controls (23%, 4/17). EGFR was also found in some degranulating goblet cells. ERBB4 expression was significantly higher in hyperplastic epithelium from GC-naïve NPs (65%, 26/40) than in controls (6%, 1/17). GC treatment restored the EGF expression and normalized the EGFR and ERBB4 expression in NPs. Differential expression patterns of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 are essential in epithelial restitution and remodeling in nasal epithelium. PMID:27285994

  15. Expression pattern analysis of odorant-binding proteins in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    De Biasio, Filomena; Riviello, Lea; Bruno, Daniele; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Congiu, Terenzio; Sun, Yu Feng; Falabella, Patrizia

    2015-04-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are soluble proteins mediating chemoreception in insects. In previous research, we investigated the molecular mechanisms adopted by aphids to detect the alarm pheromone (E)-β-farnesene and we found that the recognition of this and structurally related molecules is mediated by OBP3 and OBP7. Here, we show the differential expression patterns of 5 selected OBPs (OBP1, OBP3, OBP6, OBP7, OBP8) obtained performing quantitative RT-PCR and immunolocalization experiments in different body parts of adults and in the 5 developmental instars, including winged and unwinged morphs, of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. The results provide an overall picture that allows us to speculate on the relationship between the differential expression of OBPs and their putative function. The expression of OBP3, OBP6, and OBP7 in the antennal sensilla suggests a chemosensory function for these proteins, whereas the constant expression level of OBP8 in all instars could suggest a conserved role. Moreover, OBP1 and OBP3 are also expressed in nonsensory organs. A light and scanning electron microscopy study of sensilla on different body parts of aphid, in particular antennae, legs, mouthparts, and cornicles-cauda, completes this research providing a guide to facilitate the mapping of OBP expression profiles.

  16. Changes in Laminin Expression Pattern during Early Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pook, Martin; Teino, Indrek; Kallas, Ade; Maimets, Toivo; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Jaks, Viljar

    2015-01-01

    Laminin isoforms laminin-511 and -521 are expressed by human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and can be used as a growth matrix to culture these cells under pluripotent conditions. However, the expression of these laminins during the induction of hESC differentiation has not been studied in detail. Furthermore, the data regarding the expression pattern of laminin chains in differentiating hESC is scarce. In the current study we aimed to fill this gap and investigated the potential changes in laminin expression during early hESC differentiation induced by retinoic acid (RA). We found that laminin-511 but not -521 accumulates in the committed cells during early steps of hESC differentiation. We also performed a comprehensive analysis of the laminin chain repertoire and found that pluripotent hESC express a more diverse range of laminin chains than shown previously. In particular, we provide the evidence that in addition to α1, α5, β1, β2 and γ1 chains, hESC express α2, α3, β3, γ2 and γ3 chain proteins and mRNA. Additionally, we found that a variant of laminin α3 chain-145 kDa-accumulated in RA-treated hESC showing that these cells produce prevalently specifically modified version of α3 chain in early phase of differentiation. PMID:26378917

  17. Changes in Laminin Expression Pattern during Early Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pook, Martin; Teino, Indrek; Kallas, Ade; Maimets, Toivo; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Jaks, Viljar

    2015-01-01

    Laminin isoforms laminin-511 and -521 are expressed by human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and can be used as a growth matrix to culture these cells under pluripotent conditions. However, the expression of these laminins during the induction of hESC differentiation has not been studied in detail. Furthermore, the data regarding the expression pattern of laminin chains in differentiating hESC is scarce. In the current study we aimed to fill this gap and investigated the potential changes in laminin expression during early hESC differentiation induced by retinoic acid (RA). We found that laminin-511 but not -521 accumulates in the committed cells during early steps of hESC differentiation. We also performed a comprehensive analysis of the laminin chain repertoire and found that pluripotent hESC express a more diverse range of laminin chains than shown previously. In particular, we provide the evidence that in addition to α1, α5, β1, β2 and γ1 chains, hESC express α2, α3, β3, γ2 and γ3 chain proteins and mRNA. Additionally, we found that a variant of laminin α3 chain—145 kDa—accumulated in RA-treated hESC showing that these cells produce prevalently specifically modified version of α3 chain in early phase of differentiation. PMID:26378917

  18. Expression Pattern of Early Growth Response Gene 1 during Olive Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ho; Noh, Jae Koo; Kim, Hyun Chul; Park, Choul-Ji; Park, Jong-Won; Kim, Kyung-Kil

    2014-01-01

    The early growth response protein 1 (Egr-1) is a widely reported zinc finger protein and a well known transcription factor encoded by the Egr-1 gene, which plays key roles in many aspects of vertebrate embryogenesis and in adult vertebrates. The Egr-1 expression is important in the formation of the gill vascular system in flounders, which develops during the post-hatching phase and is essential for survival during the juvenile period. However, the complete details of Egr-1 expression during embryo development in olive flounder are not available. We assessed the expression patterns of Egr-1 during the early development of olive flounders by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Microscopic observations showed that gill filament formation corresponded with the Egr-1 expression. Thus, we showed that Egr-1 plays a vital role in angiogenesis in the gill filaments during embryogenesis. Further, Egr-1 expression was found to be strong at 5 days after hatching (DAH), in the development of the gill vascular system, and this strong expression level was maintained throughout all the development stages. Our findings have important implications with respect to the biological role of Egr-1 and evolution of the first respiratory blood vessels in the gills of olive flounder. Further studies are required to elucidate the Egr-1-mediated stress response and to decipher the functional role of Egr-1 in developmental stages. PMID:25949193

  19. Distinct development patterns of c-mos protooncogene expression in female and male mouse germ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mutter, G.L.; Wolgemuth, D.J.

    1987-08-01

    The protooncogene c-mos is expressed in murine reproductive tissues, producing transcripts of 1.7 and 1.4 kilobases in testis and ovary, respectively. In situ hybridization analysis of c-mos expression in histological sections of mouse ovaries revealed that oocytes are the predominant if not exclusive source of c-mos transcripts. /sup 35/S- or /sup 32/P-labelled RNA probes were transcribed. c-mos transcripts accumulate in growing oocytes, increasing 40- to 90-fold during oocyte and follicular development. c-mos transcripts were also detected in male germ cells and are most abundant after the cells have entered the haploid stage of spermatogenesis. This developmentally regulated pattern of c-mos expression in oocytes and spermatogenic cells suggest that the c-mos gene product may have a function in normal germ-cell differentiation or early embryogenesis.

  20. MicroRNA and gene expression patterns in the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Ping; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Stroncek, David F

    2009-01-01

    Background The unique features of human embryonic stem (hES) cells make them the best candidate resource for both cell replacement therapy and development research. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the simultaneous maintenance of their self-renewal properties and undifferentiated state remain unclear. Non-coding microRNAs (miRNA) which regulate mRNA cleavage and inhibit encoded protein translation exhibit temporal or tissue-specific expression patterns and they play an important role in development timing. Results In this study, we analyzed miRNA and gene expression profiles among samples from 3 hES cell lines (H9, I6 and BG01v), differentiated embryoid bodies (EB) derived from H9 cells at different time points, and 5 adult cell types including Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMVEC), Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC), Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells (UASMC), Normal Human Astrocytes (NHA), and Lung Fibroblasts (LFB). This analysis rendered 104 miRNAs and 776 genes differentially expressed among the three cell types. Selected differentially expressed miRNAs and genes were further validated and confirmed by quantitative real-time-PCR (qRT-PCR). Especially, members of the miR-302 cluster on chromosome 4 and miR-520 cluster on chromosome 19 were highly expressed in undifferentiated hES cells. MiRNAs in these two clusters displayed similar expression levels. The members of these two clusters share a consensus 7-mer seed sequence and their targeted genes had overlapping functions. Among the targeted genes, genes with chromatin structure modification function are enriched suggesting a role in the maintenance of chromatin structure. We also found that the expression level of members of the two clusters, miR-520b and miR-302c, were negatively correlated with their targeted genes based on gene expression analysis Conclusion We identified the expression patterns of miRNAs and gene transcripts in the undifferentiation of human embryonic

  1. Gene expression patterns in Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, exposed to a suite of model toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Sharon E.; Skillman, Ann D.; Small, Jonathan A.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-05-25

    The increased availability and use of DNA microarrays has allowed the characterization of gene expression patterns associated with different toxicants. An important question is whether toxicant induced changes in gene expression in fish are sufficiently diverse to allow for identification of specific modes of action and/or specific contaminants. In theory, each class of toxicant may generate a gene expression profile unique to its mode of toxic action. We exposed isogenic (cloned) rainbow trout Oncorhyncus mykiss, to sublethal levels of a series of model toxicants with varying modes of action, including ethynylestradiol (xeno-estrogen), trenbolone (anabolic steroid; model androgen), 2,2,4,4´tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47, thyroid active), diquat (oxidant stressor), chromium VI, and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) for a period of 1-3 weeks. Following exposure, fish were euthanized, livers harvested and RNA extracted. Fluorescently labeled cDNA were generated and hybridized against a commercially available Atlantic Salmon / Trout array (GRASP project, University of Victoria) spotted with 16,000 cDNA’s. The slides were scanned to measure abundance of a given transcript in each sample relative to controls. Data were analyzed via Genespring (Silicon Genetics) to identify a list of up and down regulated genes, as well as to determine gene clustering patterns that can be used as “expression signatures”. Our analysis indicates each toxicant generated specific gene expression profiles. Most genes exhibiting altered expression responded to only one of the toxicants. Relatively few genes are co-expressed in multiple treatments. For example, BaP and Diquat, both of which exert toxicity via oxidative stress, up-regulated 28 of the same genes, of over 100 genes altered by ether treatment. Other genes associated with steroidogenesis, p450 and estrogen responsive genes appear to be useful for selectively identifying toxicant mode of in fish, suggesting a link between gene expression

  2. FoxP2 expression in the cerebellum and inferior olive: development of the transverse stripe-shaped expression pattern in the mouse cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hirofumi; Sugihara, Izumi

    2012-02-15

    Many molecules are expressed heterogeneously in subpopulations of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) and inferior olive (IO) neurons during development or in adulthood. These expression patterns are often organized in longitudinal stripes in the cerebellar cortex, which may be related to functional compartmentalization. FoxP2, a transcription factor, is expressed in PCs and IO neurons, but the details of its expression pattern remain unclear. Here we examined FoxP2 expression patterns systematically by immunostaining serial sections of the hindbrain from embryonic day 14.5 to adulthood in mice. FoxP2 was highly expressed in virtually all PCs at and before postnatal day 6 (P6), except for those in the flocculus and small parts of the nodulus (vermal lobule X), where FoxP2 expression was moderate or absent. After P6, FoxP2 expression gradually diminished in PCs in some areas. In adults, FoxP2 was expressed, less intensely than in earlier stages, in subsets of PCs that were mostly arranged transversely along the folial apices. In contrast, FoxP2 was expressed intensely in most IO neurons during development and in adulthood. FoxP2 was also expressed in a small population of neurons in the cerebellar nuclei. FoxP2 expression in adult rats and chicks was generally comparable to that in adult mice, suggesting evolutionary conservation of the expression pattern. Thus, the FoxP2 expression pattern reflects new transverse compartmentalization in the adult cerebellar cortex, although its functional significance remains unclear.

  3. Ultra-Deep Sequencing Reveals the microRNA Expression Pattern of the Human Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea; Khayat, André S.; Silva, Artur; Alencar, Dayse O.; Lobato, Jessé; Luz, Larissa; Pinheiro, Daniel G.; Varuzza, Leonardo; Assumpção, Monica; Assumpção, Paulo; Santos, Sidney; Zanette, Dalila L.; Silva, Wilson A.; Burbano, Rommel; Darnet, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Background While microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in tissue differentiation and in maintaining basal physiology, little is known about the miRNA expression levels in stomach tissue. Alterations in the miRNA profile can lead to cell deregulation, which can induce neoplasia. Methodology/Principal Findings A small RNA library of stomach tissue was sequenced using high-throughput SOLiD sequencing technology. We obtained 261,274 quality reads with perfect matches to the human miRnome, and 42% of known miRNAs were identified. Digital Gene Expression profiling (DGE) was performed based on read abundance and showed that fifteen miRNAs were highly expressed in gastric tissue. Subsequently, the expression of these miRNAs was validated in 10 healthy individuals by RT-PCR showed a significant correlation of 83.97% (P<0.05). Six miRNAs showed a low variable pattern of expression (miR-29b, miR-29c, miR-19b, miR-31, miR-148a, miR-451) and could be considered part of the expression pattern of the healthy gastric tissue. Conclusions/Significance This study aimed to validate normal miRNA profiles of human gastric tissue to establish a reference profile for healthy individuals. Determining the regulatory processes acting in the stomach will be important in the fight against gastric cancer, which is the second-leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. PMID:20949028

  4. Patterned transgene expression in multiple channel bridges after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    De Laporte, Laura; Huang, Alyssa; Ducommun, Melissa M.; Zelivyanska, Marina L.; Aviles, Misael O.; Adler, Andrew F.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    Patterning of gene delivery on sub-millimeter length scales within tissue engineering scaffolds can provide a fundamental technology to recreate the complex architectures of tissues. Surface-mediated delivery of lipoplexes mixed with fibronectin was investigated to pattern vectors within 250 µm channels on poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) bridges. Initial studies performed in vitro on PLG surfaces indicated that a DNA density of 0.07 µg/mm2 inside each channel with a weight ratio of DNA to fibronectin of 1:20 maximized the number of transfected cells and the levels of transgene expression. Patterned vectors encoding for nerve growth factor (NGF) resulted in localized neurite extension within the channel. Translation to 3D multiple channel bridges enabled patterned transfection of different vectors throughout the channels for ratios of DNA to fibronectin of 1:4 and multiple DNA depositions, with a large increase of neural cell bodies and neurite extension for delivery of DNA encoding for NGF. In vivo, the immobilization of non-viral vectors within the channels resulted in localized transfection within the pore structure of the bridge immediately around the channels of the bridge containing DNA. This surface immobilization strategy enables patterned gene delivery in vitro and in vivo on lengths scales of hundreds of microns and may find utility in strategies aims at regenerating tissues with complex architectures. PMID:20167291

  5. Optogenetic Patterning of Whisker-Barrel Cortical System in Transgenic Rat Expressing Channelrhodopsin-2

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Yukinobu; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Shibuya, Yuma; Matsuzaka, Yoshiya; Kawashima, Ryuta; Mushiake, Hajime; Ishizuka, Toru; Yawo, Hiromu

    2014-01-01

    The rodent whisker-barrel system has been an ideal model for studying somatosensory representations in the cortex. However, it remains a challenge to experimentally stimulate whiskers with a given pattern under spatiotemporal precision. Recently the optogenetic manipulation of neuronal activity has made possible the analysis of the neuronal network with precise spatiotemporal resolution. Here we identified the selective expression of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), an algal light-driven cation channel, in the large mechanoreceptive neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) as well as their peripheral nerve endings innervating the whisker follicles of a transgenic rat. The spatiotemporal pattern of whisker irradiation thus produced a barrel-cortical response with a specific spatiotemporal pattern as evidenced by electrophysiological and functional MRI (fMRI) studies. Our methods of generating an optogenetic tactile pattern (OTP) can be expected to facilitate studies on how the spatiotemporal pattern of touch is represented in the somatosensory cortex, as Hubel and Wiesel did in the visual cortex. PMID:24695456

  6. Patterns of developmental expression of the RNA editing enzyme rADAR2.

    PubMed

    Paupard M-C; O'Connell, M A; Gerber, A P; Zukin, R S

    2000-01-01

    To date, two structurally related RNA-editing enzymes with adenosine deaminase activity have been identified in mammalian tissue: ADAR1 and ADAR2 [Bass B. I. et al. (1997) RNA 3, 947-949]. In rodents, ADAR2 undergoes alternative RNA splicing, giving rise to two splice variants that differ by the presence or absence of a 10-amino-acid insert in the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain. However, the physiological significance of the splicing and its regional and developmental regulation are as yet unknown. The present study examined spatial and temporal patterns of ADAR2 gene transcripts within specific neuronal populations of rat brain. The two rodent ADAR2 isoforms were expressed at comparable levels at all ages examined. rADAR2 messenger RNA expression was first detectable in the thalamic nuclei formation at embryonic day E19. The rADAR2b insert and rADAR2a splice probes produced images similar to that of the rADAR2 pan probe. At birth, rADAR2a messenger RNA splice variants were abundantly expressed in the thalamic nuclei. No signal for any probe was detectable in other brain regions, including neocortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum at this stage of development. During the first week of postnatal life, rADAR2 messenger RNA expression (detected with the pan probe) increased gradually in several brain regions, with low expression detected at postnatal day P7 in the olfactory bulb, inferior colliculus, and within the pyramidal and granule cell layers of the hippocampus. Hybridization patterns of the rADAR2a variant probe reached peak expression at about the second week of life, while peak expression of the rADAR2b probe was reached at about the third week of life. At the end of the first week of life (P7), expression of both splice variants was strongest in the thalamic nuclei. By P14, rADAR2 messenger RNA expression was more consolidated in the deeper structures, including the thalamic nuclei and the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. By P21, maximal levels

  7. Disentangling dynamic networks: Separated and joint expressions of functional connectivity patterns in time.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Nora; Shirer, William R; Greicius, Michael D; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2014-12-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (FC) is highly variable across the duration of a scan. Groups of coevolving connections, or reproducible patterns of dynamic FC (dFC), have been revealed in fluctuating FC by applying unsupervised learning techniques. Based on results from k-means clustering and sliding-window correlations, it has recently been hypothesized that dFC may cycle through several discrete FC states. Alternatively, it has been proposed to represent dFC as a linear combination of multiple FC patterns using principal component analysis. As it is unclear whether sparse or nonsparse combinations of FC patterns are most appropriate, and as this affects their interpretation and use as markers of cognitive processing, the goal of our study was to evaluate the impact of sparsity by performing an empirical evaluation of simulated, task-based, and resting-state dFC. To this aim, we applied matrix factorizations subject to variable constraints in the temporal domain and studied both the reproducibility of ensuing representations of dFC and the expression of FC patterns over time. During subject-driven tasks, dFC was well described by alternating FC states in accordance with the nature of the data. The estimated FC patterns showed a rich structure with combinations of known functional networks enabling accurate identification of three different tasks. During rest, dFC was better described by multiple FC patterns that overlap. The executive control networks, which are critical for working memory, appeared grouped alternately with externally or internally oriented networks. These results suggest that combinations of FC patterns can provide a meaningful way to disentangle resting-state dFC.

  8. Increased Lung Expression of Anti-Angiogenic Factors in Down Syndrome: Potential Role in Abnormal Lung Vascular Growth and the Risk for Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Galambos, Csaba; Minic, Angela D.; Bush, Douglas; Nguyen, Dominique; Dodson, Blair; Seedorf, Gregory; Abman, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Infants with Down syndrome (DS) or Trisomy 21, are at high risk for developing pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but mechanisms that increase susceptibility are poorly understood. Laboratory studies have shown that early disruption of angiogenesis during development impairs vascular and alveolar growth and causes PAH. Human chromosome 21 encodes known anti-angiogenic factors, including collagen18a1 (endostatin, ES), ß-amyloid peptide (BAP) and Down Syndrome Critical Region 1 (DSCR-1). Therefore, we hypothesized that fetal lungs from subjects with DS are characterized by early over-expression of anti-angiogenic factors and have abnormal lung vascular growth in utero. Methods Human fetal lung tissue from DS and non-DS subjects were obtained from a biorepository. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to assay 84 angiogenesis-associated genes and individual qRT-PCR was performed for ES, amyloid protein precursor (APP) and DSCR1. Western blot analysis (WBA) was used to assay lung ES, APP and DSCR-1 protein contents. Lung vessel density and wall thickness were determined by morphometric analysis. Results The angiogenesis array identified up-regulation of three anti-angiogenic genes: COL18A1 (ES), COL4A3 (tumstatin) and TIMP3 (tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidase 3) in DS lungs. Single qRT-PCR and WBA showed striking elevations of ES and APP mRNA (p = 0.022 and p = 0.001) and protein (p = 0.040 and p = 0.002; respectively). Vessel density was reduced (p = 0.041) and vessel wall thickness was increased in DS lung tissue (p = 0.033) when compared to non-DS subjects. Conclusions We conclude that lung anti-angiogenic factors, including COL18A1 (ES), COL4A3, TIMP3 and APP are over-expressed and fetal lung vessel growth is decreased in subjects with DS. We speculate that increased fetal lung anti-angiogenic factor expression due to trisomy 21 impairs lung vascular growth and signaling, which impairs alveolarization and

  9. In vivo biomarker expression patterns are preserved in 3D cultures of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Windus, Louisa C.E.; Kiss, Debra L.; Glover, Tristan; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-11-15

    Here we report that Prostate Cancer (PCa) cell-lines DU145, PC3, LNCaP and RWPE-1 grown in 3D matrices in contrast to conventional 2D monolayers, display distinct differences in cell morphology, proliferation and expression of important biomarker proteins associated with cancer progression. Consistent with in vivo growth rates, in 3D cultures, all PCa cell-lines were found to proliferate at significantly lower rates in comparison to their 2D counterparts. Moreover, when grown in a 3D matrix, metastatic PC3 cell-lines were found to mimic more precisely protein expression patterns of metastatic tumour formation as found in vivo. In comparison to the prostate epithelial cell-line RWPE-1, metastatic PC3 cell-lines exhibited a down-regulation of E-cadherin and {alpha}6 integrin expression and an up-regulation of N-cadherin, Vimentin and {beta}1 integrin expression and re-expressed non-transcriptionally active AR. In comparison to the non-invasive LNCaP cell-lines, PC3 cells were found to have an up-regulation of chemokine receptor CXCR4, consistent with a metastatic phenotype. In 2D cultures, there was little distinction in protein expression between metastatic, non-invasive and epithelial cells. These results suggest that 3D cultures are more representative of in vivo morphology and may serve as a more biologically relevant model in the drug discovery pipeline. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed and optimised 3D culturing techniques for Prostate Cancer cell-lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated biomarker expression in 2D versus 3D culture techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metastatic PC3 cells re-expressed non-transcriptionally active androgen receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metastatic PCa cell lines retain in vivo-like antigenic profiles in 3D cultures.

  10. Serum microRNA expression patterns that predict early treatment failure in prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant K.; Preus, Leah; Hu, Qiang; Yan, Li; Long, Mark D.; Morrison, Carl D.; Nesline, Mary; Johnson, Candace S.; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Kohli, Manish; Liu, Song; Trump, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns in the serum of prostate cancer (CaP) patients that predict the risk of early treatment failure following radical prostatectomy (RP). Microarray and Q-RT-PCR analyses identified 43 miRNAs as differentiating disease stages within 14 prostate cell lines and reflectedpublically available patient data. 34 of these miRNA were detectable in the serum of CaP patients. Association with time to biochemical progression was examined in a cohort of CaP patients following RP. A greater than two-fold increase in hazard of biochemical progression associated with altered expression of miR-103, miR-125b and miR-222 (p <.0008) in the serum of CaP patients. Prediction models based on penalized regression analyses showed that the levels of the miRNAs and PSA together were better at detecting false positives than models without miRNAs, for similar level of sensitivity. Analyses of publically available data revealed significant and reciprocal relationships between changes in CpG methylation and miRNA expression patterns suggesting a role for CpG methylation to regulate miRNA. Exploratory validation supported roles for miR-222 and miR-125b to predict progression risk in CaP. The current study established that expression patterns of serum-detectable miRNAs taken at the time of RP are prognostic for men who are at risk of experiencing subsequent early biochemical progression. These non-invasive approaches could be used to augment treatment decisions. PMID:24583788

  11. Delta-like 1 homolog in Capra hircus: molecular characteristics, expression pattern and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiangtao; Zhao, Wei; Zhan, Siyuan; Xiao, Ping; Zhou, Jingxuan; Wang, Linjie; Li, Li; Zhang, Hongping; Niu, Lili; Zhong, Tao

    2016-06-01

    To research the molecular characteristics, expression pattern and phylogeny of the Delta-like 1 homolog gene (Dlk1) in goats. Dlk1 transcripts were identified in the Jianyang Da'er goats by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic trees were constructed by Bayesian inference and neighbor-joining methods. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), western blotting and in situ hybridization were performed to analyze the expression pattern of Dlk1. Five alternatively transcripts were identified in different tissues and designated as Dlk1-AS1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Compared with the normal transcript Dlk1-AS1, Dlk1-AS4 and Dlk1-AS5 retained the identical open reading frame (ORF) and encoded proteins with truncated epidermal-growth-factor like repeats of 121 and 83 amino acids, respectively. Using the Bayesian inference method, the consensus phylogenetic tree indicated that caprine Dlk1 had a closer relationship with bovine Dlk1 than with Dlk1 from pigs, humans and mice. qPCR revealed high expression levels of Dlk1 in the kidney (P < 0.01). However, mRNA and protein levels presented an inconsistent correlation, possibly because of post-transcriptional regulation. RNA in situ hybridization indicated that Dlk1 mRNA was localized in the interlobular bile duct and alongside the hepatocyte nuclei, in the epithelial cells of proximal and distal convoluted tubules and in the connective region between the mesothelium and myocardium in the heart. The Dlk1 gene in goats produces alternatively spliced transcripts, with specific expression and cellular localization patterns. These findings would lay the foundation for further study. PMID:27108112

  12. [A study on the pattern of pain expression of peptic ulcer patients].

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Choi, Y H

    1991-08-01

    Pain is a subjective and multidimensional concept. Therefore the patient's expression of pain have been referred to the best believable indicator of pain condition but the support data obtained from the patient considered cultural difference is a deficient condition in determined on the precise nursing diagnosis. The purpose of this research was to understand multiple pain responses in cultural difference and sensitivity, to encourage communication between medical teams, and to provide the foundation data of on data of precise nursing assessment for the patient in pain. The research problem was to grasp pain express pattern of Korean peptic ulcer patients. The subjects were 20 peptic ulcer patients in medical unit or OPD of twp university hospitals in Seoul. Data were collected from September 7th to 22nd, 1990 by intensive interviews. Interviews were done by the researcher and all were tape-recorded. The Data analysis was done by Phenomenological method from Van Kaam. Validity assured by confirmation of the internal consistency of the statements and category by nursing colleague in educational and clinicians in medical care. From the emic data, 96 descriptive statements were organized in 18 theme cluster. The results of study were summarized as follows. 1. Pain Express Pattern cluster of Peptic Ulcer Patients were "pain as clogging", "shallow pain", "pain as pressing", "nauseateing pain", "pain as smarting", "pain as pulling", "pain as pricking", "pain as bursting", "wrenching pain", "excising pain", "uncontrollable pain for mind and body", "awakening pain", "pain as hollowing" and the other cluster. As above mentioned, Pain Express Pattern of Peptic Ulcer Patient appeared diversely in verbal and they were propered to Korean culture. Therefore they will provide for the foundation data of precise nursing assessment.

  13. Inference of gene interaction networks using conserved subsequential patterns from multiple time course gene expression datasets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Deciphering gene interaction networks (GINs) from time-course gene expression (TCGx) data is highly valuable to understand gene behaviors (e.g., activation, inhibition, time-lagged causality) at the system level. Existing methods usually use a global or local proximity measure to infer GINs from a single dataset. As the noise contained in a single data set is hardly self-resolved, the results are sometimes not reliable. Also, these proximity measurements cannot handle the co-existence of the various in vivo positive, negative and time-lagged gene interactions. Methods and results We propose to infer reliable GINs from multiple TCGx datasets using a novel conserved subsequential pattern of gene expression. A subsequential pattern is a maximal subset of genes sharing positive, negative or time-lagged correlations of one expression template on their own subsets of time points. Based on these patterns, a GIN can be built from each of the datasets. It is assumed that reliable gene interactions would be detected repeatedly. We thus use conserved gene pairs from the individual GINs of the multiple TCGx datasets to construct a reliable GIN for a species. We apply our method on six TCGx datasets related to yeast cell cycle, and validate the reliable GINs using protein interaction networks, biopathways and transcription factor-gene regulations. We also compare the reliable GINs with those GINs reconstructed by a global proximity measure Pearson correlation coefficient method from single datasets. It has been demonstrated that our reliable GINs achieve much better prediction performance especially with much higher precision. The functional enrichment analysis also suggests that gene sets in a reliable GIN are more functionally significant. Our method is especially useful to decipher GINs from multiple TCGx datasets related to less studied organisms where little knowledge is available except gene expression data. PMID:26681650

  14. Distribution pattern(s) of sperm protein at 22 kDa (SP22) on fresh, cooled and frozen/thawed equine spermatozoa and expression of SP22 in tissues from the testes and epididymides of normal stallions.

    PubMed

    Miller, L M J; Woodward, E M; Campos, J R; Squires, E L; Troedsson, M H T

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to (i) verify localization of SP22 on fresh, cooled, and frozen/thawed equine spermatozoa and to (ii) determine SP22 mRNA and protein expression in equine testicular and epididymal tissues. Immunocytochemistry and Western blots were performed on the spermatozoa samples. Northern blots and Western blots were performed on the tissue samples. The immunocytochemistry revealed the presence of SP22 in all samples tested. The fresh spermatozoa stained predominantly over the equatorial segment as did the samples cooled for 1 and 2 days. The samples cooled for 3 days, and the frozen/thawed samples had an increased proportion of no staining. The Western blots revealed SP22 was present on all semen samples tested. The Northern blot of the tissues revealed a 1.0 kb mRNA transcript present in each of the tissues, and the Western blot revealed the presence of SP22 in each of the tissues. As expected, SP22 was found to be altered on cooled and frozen/thawed spermatozoa. Our results suggest that the equatorial pattern is the normal pattern in spermatozoa, while a complete loss of SP22 from the surface of spermatozoa seems to be the staining pattern indicating the most extreme abnormality with scattered staining of the head indicating intermediate damage.

  15. Graded and discontinuous EphA-ephrinB expression patterns in the developing auditory brainstem.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Matthew M; Harris, J Aaron; Brubaker, Donald Q; Klotz, Caitlyn A; Gabriele, Mark L

    2016-05-01

    Eph-ephrin interactions guide topographic mapping and pattern formation in a variety of systems. In contrast to other sensory pathways, their precise role in the assembly of central auditory circuits remains poorly understood. The auditory midbrain, or inferior colliculus (IC) is an intriguing structure for exploring guidance of patterned projections as adjacent subdivisions exhibit distinct organizational features. The central nucleus of the IC (CNIC) and deep aspects of its neighboring lateral cortex (LCIC, Layer 3) are tonotopically-organized and receive layered inputs from primarily downstream auditory sources. While less is known about more superficial aspects of the LCIC, its inputs are multimodal, lack a clear tonotopic order, and appear discontinuous, terminating in modular, patch/matrix-like distributions. Here we utilize X-Gal staining approaches in lacZ mutant mice (ephrin-B2, -B3, and EphA4) to reveal EphA-ephrinB expression patterns in the nascent IC during the period of projection shaping that precedes hearing onset. We also report early postnatal protein expression in the cochlear nuclei, the superior olivary complex, the nuclei of the lateral lemniscus, and relevant midline structures. Continuous ephrin-B2 and EphA4 expression gradients exist along frequency axes of the CNIC and LCIC Layer 3. In contrast, more superficial LCIC localization is not graded, but confined to a series of discrete ephrin-B2 and EphA4-positive Layer 2 modules. While heavily expressed in the midline, much of the auditory brainstem is devoid of ephrin-B3, including the CNIC, LCIC Layer 2 modular fields, the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL), as well as much of the superior olivary complex and cochlear nuclei. Ephrin-B3 LCIC expression appears complementary to that of ephrin-B2 and EphA4, with protein most concentrated in presumptive extramodular zones. Described tonotopic gradients and seemingly complementary modular/extramodular patterns suggest Eph

  16. Parabolic flight induces changes in gene expression patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Manak, Michael S; Mayfield, John D; Reyes, Matthew F; Gurley, William B; Ferl, Robert J

    2011-10-01

    Our primary objective was to evaluate gene expression changes in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to parabolic flight as part of a comprehensive approach to the molecular biology of spaceflight-related adaptations. In addition, we wished to establish parabolic flight as a tractable operations platform for molecular biology studies. In a succession of experiments on NASA's KC-135 and C-9 parabolic aircraft, Arabidopsis plants were presented with replicated exposure to parabolic flight. Transcriptome profiling revealed that parabolic flight caused changes in gene expression patterns that stood the statistical tests of replication on three different flight days. The earliest response, after 20 parabolas, was characterized by a prominence of genes associated with signal transduction. After 40 parabolas, this prominence was largely replaced by genes associated with biotic and abiotic stimuli and stress. Among these responses, three metabolic processes stand out in particular: the induction of auxin metabolism and signaling, the differential expression of genes associated with calcium-mediated signaling, and the repression of genes associated with disease resistance and cell wall biochemistry. Many, but not all, of these responses are known to be involved in gravity sensing in plants. Changes in auxin-related gene expression were also recorded by reporter genes tuned to auxin signal pathways. These data demonstrate that the parabolic flight environment is appropriate for molecular biology research involving the transition to microgravity, in that with replication, proper controls, and analyses, gene expression changes can be observed in the time frames of typical parabolic flight experiments.

  17. Polyphenol oxidase in potato. A multigene family that exhibits differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, P W; Dry, I B; Robinson, S P

    1995-10-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants was high in stolons, tubers, roots, and flowers but low in leaves and stems. PPO activity per tuber continued to increase throughout tuber development but was highest on a fresh weight basis in developing tubers. PPO activity was greatest at the tuber exterior, including the skin and cortex tissue 1 to 2 mm beneath the skin. Flowers had high PPO activity throughout development, particularly in the anthers and ovary. Five distinct cDNA clones encoding PPO were isolated from developing tuber RNA. POT32 was the major form expressed in tubers and was found in all parts of the tuber and at all stages of tuber development. It was also expressed in roots but not in photosynthetic tissues. POT33 was expressed in tubers but mainly in the tissue near the skin. POT72 was detected in roots and at low levels in developing tubers. NOR333 was identical with the P2 PPO clone previously isolated from potato leaves (M.D. Hunt, N.T. Eannetta, Y. Haifeng, S.M. Newman, J.C. Steffens [1993] Plant Mol Biol 21: 59-68) and was detected in young leaves and in tissue near the tuber skin but was highly expressed in flowers. The results indicate that PPO is present as a small multigene family in potato and that each gene has a specific temporal and spatial pattern of expression. PMID:7480344

  18. Expression patterns of epiplakin1 in pancreas, pancreatic cancer and regenerating pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tetsu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Baba, Hideo; Goto, Mizuki; Fujiwara, Sakuhei; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2008-07-01

    Epiplakin1 (Eppk1) is a plakin family gene with its function remains largely unknown, although the plakin genes are known to function in interconnecting cytoskeletal filaments and anchoring them at plasma membrane-associated adhesive junction. Here we analyzed the expression patterns of Eppk1 in the developing and adult pancreas in the mice. In the embryonic pancreas, Eppk1+/Pdx1+ and Eppk1+/Sox9+ pancreatic progenitor cells were observed in early pancreatic epithelium. Since Pdx1 expression overlapped with that of Sox9 at this stage, these multipotent progenitor cells are Eppk1+/Pdx1+/Sox9+ cells. Then Eppk1 expression becomes confined to Ngn3+ or Sox9+ endocrine progenitor cells, and p48+ exocrine progenitor cells, and then restricted to the duct cells and a cells at birth. In the adult pancreas, Eppk1 is expressed in centroacinar cells (CACs) and in duct cells. Eppk1 is observed in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), previously identified as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) precursor lesions. In addition, the expansion of Eppk1-positive cells occurs in a caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, an acinar cell regeneration model. Furthermore, in the partial pancreatectomy (Px) regeneration model using mice, Eppk1 is expressed in "ducts in foci", a tubular structure transiently induced. These results suggest that Eppk1 serves as a useful marker for detecting pancreatic progenitor cells in developing and regenerating pancreas.

  19. Bioinformatic analysis of miRNA expression patterns in TFF2 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Y; Shan, H Q; Huang, W; Wu, Y M; Lu, H; Jin, Y

    2014-10-20

    Trefoil factors, which bear a unique 3-loop trefoil domain, are a family of small secretory protease-resistant peptides (7-12 kDa) discovered in the 1980s. Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2) is a unique member of trefoil factors family that plays important roles in gastrointestinal mucosal defense and repair. However, few studies have characterized the miRNA expression patterns in TFF2 knock-out mice. In this study, we investigated the regulatory role of miRNAs in TFF2 knock-out mice. Whole miRNome profiling for TFF2 knock-out mice and wild-type mice were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 14 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified using the limma package. Target genes for 2 differentially expressed miRNAs were retrieved from 2 databases. After mapping these target genes into STRING, an interaction network was constructed. Gene Ontology analysis suggested that the differentially expressed miRNAs are involved in cyclic AMP metabolism and the growth process. Additionally, dysregulated miRNAs target pathways of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. Our results suggest that miRNAs may play important regulatory roles in processes involving TFF2, particularly in the regulation of signal transduction pathways. However, further validation of our results is needed.

  20. Investigating the brain basis of facial expression perception using multi-voxel pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Wegrzyn, Martin; Riehle, Marcel; Labudda, Kirsten; Woermann, Friedrich; Baumgartner, Florian; Pollmann, Stefan; Bien, Christian G; Kissler, Johanna

    2015-08-01

    Humans can readily decode emotion expressions from faces and perceive them in a categorical manner. The model by Haxby and colleagues proposes a number of different brain regions with each taking over specific roles in face processing. One key question is how these regions directly compare to one another in successfully discriminating between various emotional facial expressions. To address this issue, we compared the predictive accuracy of all key regions from the Haxby model using multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Regions of interest were extracted using independent meta-analytical data. Participants viewed four classes of facial expressions (happy, angry, fearful and neutral) in an event-related fMRI design, while performing an orthogonal gender recognition task. Activity in all regions allowed for robust above-chance predictions. When directly comparing the regions to one another, fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus (STS) showed highest accuracies. These results underscore the role of the fusiform gyrus as a key region in perception of facial expressions, alongside STS. The study suggests the need for further specification of the relative role of the various brain areas involved in the perception of facial expression. Face processing appears to rely on more interactive and functionally overlapping neural mechanisms than previously conceptualised. PMID:26046623

  1. Patterns of homoeologous gene expression shown by RNA sequencing in hexaploid bread wheat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) has a large, complex and hexaploid genome consisting of A, B and D homoeologous chromosome sets. Therefore each wheat gene potentially exists as a trio of A, B and D homoeoloci, each of which may contribute differentially to wheat phenotypes. We describe a novel approach combining wheat cytogenetic resources (chromosome substitution ‘nullisomic-tetrasomic’ lines) with next generation deep sequencing of gene transcripts (RNA-Seq), to directly and accurately identify homoeologue-specific single nucleotide variants and quantify the relative contribution of individual homoeoloci to gene expression. Results We discover, based on a sample comprising ~5-10% of the total wheat gene content, that at least 45% of wheat genes are expressed from all three distinct homoeoloci. Most of these genes show strikingly biased expression patterns in which expression is dominated by a single homoeolocus. The remaining ~55% of wheat genes are expressed from either one or two homoeoloci only, through a combination of extensive transcriptional silencing and homoeolocus loss. Conclusions We conclude that wheat is tending towards functional diploidy, through a variety of mechanisms causing single homoeoloci to become the predominant source of gene transcripts. This discovery has profound consequences for wheat breeding and our understanding of wheat evolution. PMID:24726045

  2. Rejuvenation of Gene Expression Pattern of Aged Human Skin by Broadband Light Treatment: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Anne Lynn S; Bitter, Patrick H; Qu, Kun; Lin, Meihong; Rapicavoli, Nicole A; Chang, Howard Y

    2013-01-01

    Studies in model organisms suggest that aged cells can be functionally rejuvenated, but whether this concept applies to human skin is unclear. Here we apply 3′-end sequencing for expression quantification (“3-seq”) to discover the gene expression program associated with human photoaging and intrinsic skin aging (collectively termed “skin aging”), and the impact of broadband light (BBL) treatment. We find that skin aging was associated with a significantly altered expression level of 2,265 coding and noncoding RNAs, of which 1,293 became “rejuvenated” after BBL treatment; i.e., they became more similar to their expression level in youthful skin. Rejuvenated genes (RGs) included several known key regulators of organismal longevity and their proximal long noncoding RNAs. Skin aging is not associated with systematic changes in 3′-end mRNA processing. Hence, BBL treatment can restore gene expression pattern of photoaged and intrinsically aged human skin to resemble young skin. In addition, our data reveal, to our knowledge, a previously unreported set of targets that may lead to new insights into the human skin aging process. PMID:22931923

  3. Molecular profiling of experimental endometriosis identified gene expression patterns in common with human disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Idhaliz; Rivera, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Lynnette A.; Santiago, Olga I.; Vernon, Michael W.; Appleyard, Caroline B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To validate a rat model of endometriosis using cDNA microarrays by identifying common gene expression patterns beween experimental and natural disease. DESIGN Autotransplantation rat model. SETTING Medical school department. ANIMALS Female Sprague-Dawley rats. INTERVENTIONS Endometriosis was surgically-induced by suturing uterine horn implants next to the small intestine’s mesentery. Control rats received sutures with no implants. After 60 days, endometriotic implants and uterine horn were obtained. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Gene expression levels determined by cDNA microarrays and QRT-PCR. METHODS Cy5-labeled cDNA was synthesized from total RNA obtained from endometriotic implants. Cy3-labeled cDNA was synthesized using uterine RNA from a control rat. Gene expression levels were analyzed after hybridizing experimental and control labeled cDNA to PIQOR™ Toxicology Rat Microarrays (Miltenyi Biotec) containing 1,252 known genes. Cy5/Cy3 ratios were determined and genes with >2-fold higher or <0.5-fold lower expression levels were selected. Microarray results were validated by QRT-PCR. RESULTS We observed differential expression of genes previously shown to be upregulated in patients, including growth factors, inflammatory cytokines/receptors, tumor invasion/metastasis factors, adhesion molecules, and anti-apoptotic factors. CONCLUSIONS This study presents evidence in support of using this rat model to study the natural history of endometriosis and test novel therapeutics for this incurable disease. PMID:17478174

  4. Serotype-dependent expression patterns of stabilized lipopolysaccharide aggregates in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans strains.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Haruko; Fujise, Osamu; Miura, Mayumi; Tanaka, Ayako; Hisano, Kyoko; Haraguchi, Akira; Hamachi, Takafumi; Maeda, Katsumasa

    2012-10-01

    Above a critical concentration, amphiphilic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules in an aqueous environment form aggregate structures, probably because of interactions involving hydrophobic bonds. Ionic bonds involving divalent cations stabilize these aggregate structures, making them resistant to breakdown by detergents. The aim of this study was to examine expression patterns of stabilized LPS aggregates in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a microorganism that causes periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of various serotypes and truncated LPS mutants were prepared for this study. Following treatment with a two-phase separation system using the detergent Triton X-114, crude LPS extracts of the study strains were separated into detergent-phase LPS (DP-LPS) and aqueous-phase LPS (AP-LPS). Repeated treatment of the aqueous phase with the two-phase separation system produced only a slight decrease in AP-LPS, suggesting that AP-LPS was resistant to the detergent and thus distinguishable from DP-LPS. The presence of divalent cations increased the yield of AP-LPS. AP-LPS expression patterns were serotype-dependent; serotypes b and f showing early expression, and serotypes a and c late expression. In addition, highly truncated LPS from a waaD (rfaD) mutant were unable to generate AP-LPS, suggesting involvement of the LPS structure in the generation of AP-LPS. The two-phase separation was able to distinguish two types of LPS with different physical states at the supramolecular structure level. Hence, AP-LPS likely represents stabilized LPS aggregates, whereas DP-LPS might be derived from non-stabilized aggregates. Furthermore, time-dependent expression of stabilized LPS aggregates was found to be serotype-dependent in A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  5. Gene Expression Pattern of Cells From Inflamed and Normal Areas of Osteoarthritis Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Cécile; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, Eulàlia; Vergés, Josep; Munaut, Carine; Noël, Agnès; Henrotin, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the gene expression patterns of synovial cells from inflamed or normal/reactive areas of synovial membrane obtained from the same patient with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods At the time of total knee replacement, synovial tissues were obtained from 12 patients with knee OA. The inflammation status of the synovial membrane was characterized according to macroscopic criteria and classified as normal/reactive or inflamed. Biopsy samples were cultured separately for 7 days. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed on normal/reactive and inflamed areas. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm the identified genes that were differentially expressed. Results We identified 896 genes that were differentially expressed between normal/reactive and inflamed areas. The key pathways were related to inflammation, cartilage metabolism, Wnt signaling, and angiogenesis. In the inflammation network, the genes TREM1 and S100A9 were strongly up-regulated. The genes MMP3, MMP9, CTSH (cathepsin H), and CTSS (cathepsin S) were significantly up-regulated in the cartilage catabolism pathway, while the most up-regulated anabolism enzyme gene was HAS1. In the Wnt signaling pathway, the genes for Wnt-5a and low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 were up-regulated, while the gene FZD2 and the gene for Dkk-3 were down-regulated. Finally, STC1, which codes for a protein involved in angiogenesis, was identified as the most up-regulated gene in inflamed compared with normal/reactive areas. Conclusion This study is the first to identify different expression patterns between 2 areas of the synovial membrane from the same patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis. This analysis also provides information regarding new genes and proteins as potential targets of treatment. PMID:24757147

  6. Expression, polymorphism and methylation pattern of interleukin-6 in periodontal tissues.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Florença Abdanur; Viana, Michelle Beatriz; Dupim, Ana Carolina; Brito, João Artur Ricieri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; da Costa, José Eustáquio; Moreira, Paula Rocha

    2013-07-01

    Periodontitis is considered an inflammatory disorder of bacterial etiology that results in periodontal tissue destruction, as a result of complex interactions between periodontal pathogens, host and immune response. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms may modulate the individual response since it is able to influence the gene expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of -174 G/C polymorphism and the methylation status of the promoter region of IL-6 gene on the expression of IL-6 in gingival samples from individuals with chronic periodontitis. Gingival biopsies were collected from 21 patients with chronic periodontitis and 21 controls. Histologic sections stained by hematoxylin-eosin were used for histopathological evaluation. The IL-6 gene expression was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. The polymorphism IL-6 -174 C/G was studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and restriction endonuclease digestion (HspII). Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction was used to verify the DNA methylation pattern. The number of inflammatory cells in tissue fragments from individuals with chronic periodontitis was higher than in the control group and the inflammatory infiltrate was predominantly mononuclear. The expression of IL-6 was higher in the group with periodontitis. In polymorphism assay, no statistical difference in the distribution of genotypes and alleles in both groups were observed. The most of samples were partially methylated. No difference was observed in methylation pattern from two different regions of the IL-6 gene among groups. The high expression of IL-6 is an important factor related to chronic periodontitis, but was not associated with methylation status or the -174 (G/C) genetic polymorphism, suggesting that other mechanisms are involved in this gene transcription regulation.

  7. The SOD Gene Family in Tomato: Identification, Phylogenetic Relationships, and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kun; Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Ruan, Meiying; Wang, Rongqing; Ye, Qingjing; Zhou, Guozhi; Li, Zhimiao; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Zheng, Qingsong; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical antioxidant enzymes that protect organisms from reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by adverse conditions, and have been widely found in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an important economic crop and is cultivated worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stresses severely hinder growth and development of the plant, which affects the production and quality of the crop. To reveal the potential roles of SOD genes under various stresses, we performed a systematic analysis of the tomato SOD gene family and analyzed the expression patterns of SlSOD genes in response to abiotic stresses at the whole-genome level. The characteristics of the SlSOD gene family were determined by analyzing gene structure, conserved motifs, chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. We determined that there are at least nine SOD genes in tomato, including four Cu/ZnSODs, three FeSODs, and one MnSOD, and they are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of SOD genes from tomato and other plant species were separated into two groups with a high bootstrap value, indicating that these SOD genes were present before the monocot-dicot split. Additionally, many cis-elements that respond to different stresses were found in the promoters of nine SlSOD genes. Gene expression analysis based on RNA-seq data showed that most genes were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of SlSOD6 and SlSOD8, which were only expressed in young fruits. Microarray data analysis showed that most members of the SlSOD gene family were altered under salt- and drought-stress conditions. This genome-wide analysis of SlSOD genes helps to clarify the function of SlSOD genes under different stress conditions and provides information to aid in further understanding the evolutionary relationships of SOD genes in plants. PMID:27625661

  8. Tissue-specific PAI-1 gene expression and glycosylation pattern in insulin-resistant old rats.

    PubMed

    Serrano, R; Barrenetxe, J; Orbe, J; Rodríguez, J A; Gallardo, N; Martínez, C; Andrés, A; Páramo, J A

    2009-11-01

    Increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been associated with obesity, aging, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, conditions that contribute to increased cardiovascular risk. PAI-1 is expressed in a variety of tissues, but the cellular origin of plasma PAI-1 is unknown. To link insulin resistance, aging, and cardiovascular disease, we examined the expression and glycosylation pattern of PAI-1 in liver and white adipose tissue (WAT) from adult (3 mo) and insulin-resistant old (24 mo) Wistar rats. Glycosylated PAI-1 protein was also purified by affinity chromatography from endothelial culture supernatans to analyze its inhibitory activity. We also analyzed the contribution of adipocytes and stromal vascular cells from WAT to PAI-1 levels with aging. Aging caused a significant increase of PAI-1 mRNA (P < 0.001) in WAT that was predominantly due to the adipocytes and not to stroma-vascular cells, while there was no modification in liver from aged rats. Moreover, PAI-1 expression increased during preadipocyte differentiation (P < 0.001). Furthermore, we found a tissue-dependent PAI-1 glycosylation pattern: adipose tissue only expresses the glycosylated PAI-1 form, whereas the liver mainly expresses the nonglycosylated form. Finally, we also found evidences suggesting that the glycosylated PAI-1 form shows higher inhibitory activity than the nonglycosylated. Our data suggest that WAT may be a major source of the elevated plasma levels of PAI-1 in insulin-resistant old rats. Additionally, the high degree of PAI-1 glycosylation and activity, together with the significant increase in visceral fat in old rats, may well contribute to an increased cardiovascular risk associated with insulin-resistant states.

  9. The SOD Gene Family in Tomato: Identification, Phylogenetic Relationships, and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kun; Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Ruan, Meiying; Wang, Rongqing; Ye, Qingjing; Zhou, Guozhi; Li, Zhimiao; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Zheng, Qingsong; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical antioxidant enzymes that protect organisms from reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by adverse conditions, and have been widely found in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an important economic crop and is cultivated worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stresses severely hinder growth and development of the plant, which affects the production and quality of the crop. To reveal the potential roles of SOD genes under various stresses, we performed a systematic analysis of the tomato SOD gene family and analyzed the expression patterns of SlSOD genes in response to abiotic stresses at the whole-genome level. The characteristics of the SlSOD gene family were determined by analyzing gene structure, conserved motifs, chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. We determined that there are at least nine SOD genes in tomato, including four Cu/ZnSODs, three FeSODs, and one MnSOD, and they are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of SOD genes from tomato and other plant species were separated into two groups with a high bootstrap value, indicating that these SOD genes were present before the monocot-dicot split. Additionally, many cis-elements that respond to different stresses were found in the promoters of nine SlSOD genes. Gene expression analysis based on RNA-seq data showed that most genes were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of SlSOD6 and SlSOD8, which were only expressed in young fruits. Microarray data analysis showed that most members of the SlSOD gene family were altered under salt- and drought-stress conditions. This genome-wide analysis of SlSOD genes helps to clarify the function of SlSOD genes under different stress conditions and provides information to aid in further understanding the evolutionary relationships of SOD genes in plants.

  10. Expression patterns and subcellular localization of carbonic anhydrases are developmentally regulated during tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Reibring, Claes-Göran; El Shahawy, Maha; Hallberg, Kristina; Kannius-Janson, Marie; Nilsson, Jeanette; Parkkila, Seppo; Sly, William S; Waheed, Abdul; Linde, Anders; Gritli-Linde, Amel

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) play fundamental roles in several physiological events, and emerging evidence points at their involvement in an array of disorders, including cancer. The expression of CAs in the different cells of teeth is unknown, let alone their expression patterns during odontogenesis. As a first step towards understanding the role of CAs during odontogenesis, we used immunohistochemistry, histochemistry and in situ hybridization to reveal hitherto unknown dynamic distribution patterns of eight CAs in mice. The most salient findings include expression of CAII/Car2 not only in maturation-stage ameloblasts (MA) but also in the papillary layer, dental papilla mesenchyme, odontoblasts and the epithelial rests of Malassez. We uncovered that the latter form lace-like networks around incisors; hitherto these have been known to occur only in molars. All CAs studied were produced by MA, however CAIV, CAIX and CARPXI proteins were distinctly enriched in the ruffled membrane of the ruffled MA but exhibited a homogeneous distribution in smooth-ended MA. While CAIV, CAVI/Car6, CAIX, CARPXI and CAXIV were produced by all odontoblasts, CAIII distribution displayed a striking asymmetry, in that it was virtually confined to odontoblasts in the root of molars and root analog of incisors. Remarkably, from initiation until near completion of odontogenesis and in several other tissues, CAXIII localized mainly in intracellular punctae/vesicles that we show to overlap with LAMP-1- and LAMP-2-positive vesicles, suggesting that CAXIII localizes within lysosomes. We showed that expression of CAs in developing teeth is not confined to cells involved in biomineralization, pointing at their participation in other biological events. Finally, we uncovered novel sites of CA expression, including the developing brain and eye, the olfactory epithelium, melanoblasts, tongue, notochord, nucleus pulposus and sebaceous glands. Our study provides important information for future single or

  11. The SOD Gene Family in Tomato: Identification, Phylogenetic Relationships, and Expression Patterns.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kun; Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Ruan, Meiying; Wang, Rongqing; Ye, Qingjing; Zhou, Guozhi; Li, Zhimiao; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Zheng, Qingsong; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical antioxidant enzymes that protect organisms from reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by adverse conditions, and have been widely found in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an important economic crop and is cultivated worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stresses severely hinder growth and development of the plant, which affects the production and quality of the crop. To reveal the potential roles of SOD genes under various stresses, we performed a systematic analysis of the tomato SOD gene family and analyzed the expression patterns of SlSOD genes in response to abiotic stresses at the whole-genome level. The characteristics of the SlSOD gene family were determined by analyzing gene structure, conserved motifs, chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. We determined that there are at least nine SOD genes in tomato, including four Cu/ZnSODs, three FeSODs, and one MnSOD, and they are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of SOD genes from tomato and other plant species were separated into two groups with a high bootstrap value, indicating that these SOD genes were present before the monocot-dicot split. Additionally, many cis-elements that respond to different stresses were found in the promoters of nine SlSOD genes. Gene expression analysis based on RNA-seq data showed that most genes were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of SlSOD6 and SlSOD8, which were only expressed in young fruits. Microarray data analysis showed that most members of the SlSOD gene family were altered under salt- and drought-stress conditions. This genome-wide analysis of SlSOD genes helps to clarify the function of SlSOD genes under different stress conditions and provides information to aid in further understanding the evolutionary relationships of SOD genes in plants. PMID:27625661

  12. Disruption of dopamine neuron activity pattern regulation through selective expression of a human KCNN3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Soden, Marta E; Jones, Graham L; Sanford, Christina A; Chung, Amanda S; Güler, Ali D; Chavkin, Charles; Luján, Rafael; Zweifel, Larry S

    2013-11-20

    The calcium-activated small conductance potassium channel SK3 plays an essential role in the regulation of dopamine neuron activity patterns. Here we demonstrate that expression of a human disease-related SK3 mutation (hSK3Δ) in dopamine neurons of mice disrupts the balance between tonic and phasic dopamine neuron activity. Expression of hSK3Δ suppressed endogenous SK currents, reducing coupling between SK channels and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and increasing permissiveness for burst firing. Consistent with enhanced excitability of dopamine neurons, hSK3Δ increased evoked calcium signals in dopamine neurons in vivo and potentiated evoked dopamine release. Specific expression of hSK3Δ led to deficits in attention and sensory gating and heightened sensitivity to a psychomimetic drug. Sensory-motor alterations and psychomimetic sensitivity were recapitulated in a mouse model of transient, reversible dopamine neuron activation. These results demonstrate the cell-autonomous effects of a human ion channel mutation on dopamine neuron physiology and the impact of activity pattern disruption on behavior. PMID:24206670

  13. Remote Patterning of Transgene Expression Using Near Infrared-Responsive Plasmonic Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Martín-Saavedra, Francisco; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    The development of noninvasive technologies for remote control of gene expression has received increased attention for their therapeutic potential in clinical scenarios, including cancer, neurological disorders, immunology, tissue engineering, as well as developmental biology research. Near-infrared (NIR) light is a suitable source of energy that can be employed to pattern transgene expression in plasmonic cell constructs. Gold nanoparticles tailored to exhibit a plasmon surface band absorption peaking at NIR wavelengths within the so called tissue optical window (TOW) can be used as fillers in fibrin-based hydrogels. These biocompatible composites can be loaded with cells harboring heat-inducible gene switches. NIR laser irradiation of the resulting plasmonic cell constructs causes the local conversion of NIR photon energy into heat, achieving spatially restricted patterns of transgene expression that faithfully match the illuminated areas of the hydrogels. In combination with cells genetically engineered to harbor gene switches activated by heat and dependent on a small-molecule regulator (SMR), NIR-responsive hydrogels allow reliable and safe control of the spatiotemporal availability of therapeutic biomolecules in target tissues. PMID:26965130

  14. Expression pattern of CD34 at the maternal-foetal interface during pregnancy in pigs.

    PubMed

    Hong, L; Hou, C; Li, X; Li, C; Yu, M

    2013-10-01

    The pig exhibits a non-invasive, epitheliochorial placentation. Adhesion molecules are indispensable for successful implantation and establishment of placentation. CD34 is an adhesion molecule belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF). To take the first step to investigate the role of CD34 in placentation, we examined the expression pattern of CD34 at the maternal-foetal interface in Yorkshire gilts on days 15, 26, 50 or 95 and in Meishan gilts on days 26, 50 or 95 of pregnancy (n = 3 gilts/breed/day of pregnancy) by immunohistochemical technique. The CD34-positive signals were detected in uterine luminal epithelium and trophectoderm in Yorkshire pigs; the staining for CD34 was located in trophectoderm but barely detectable at the uterine luminal epithelium on day 15 of pregnancy. Then, the expression of CD34 increased dramatically in both the uterine luminal epithelium and trophectoderm by day 26, and weak staining intensity was observed at the maternal-foetal interface on days 50 and 95 of pregnancy. The expression pattern of CD34 in Meishan pigs is similar to that in Yorkshire pigs except that only a few positive signals were observed at the luminal epithelium on day 26 of pregnancy. These results suggest that CD34 may be involved in mediating the cell-to-cell adhesion between trophectoderm and the luminal epithelial cells during early pregnancy in pigs.

  15. Expression patterns of FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 map to bacterial entry sites in plant shoots and roots

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Martina; Wyrsch, Ines; Strutt, James; Wimalasekera, Rinukshi; Webb, Alex; Boller, Thomas; Robatzek, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens can colonize all plant organs and tissues. To prevent this, each cell must be capable of autonomously triggering defence. Therefore, it is generally assumed that primary sensors of the immune system are constitutively present. One major primary sensor against bacterial infection is the FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) pattern recognition receptor (PRR). To gain insights into its expression pattern, the FLS2 promoter activity in β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter lines was monitored. The data show that pFLS2::GUS activity is highest in cells and tissues vulnerable to bacterial entry and colonization, such as stomata, hydathodes, and lateral roots. GUS activity is also high in the vasculature and, by monitoring Ca2+ responses in the vasculature, it was found that this tissue contributes to flg22-induced Ca2+ burst. The FLS2 promoter is also regulated in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner and is responsive to hormones, damage, and biotic stresses. This results in stimulus-dependent expansion of the FLS2 expression domain. In summary, a tissue- and cell type-specific map of FLS2 expression has been created correlating with prominent entry sites and target tissues of plant bacterial pathogens. PMID:25205577

  16. Disruption of dopamine neuron activity pattern regulation through selective expression of a human KCNN3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Soden, Marta E; Jones, Graham L; Sanford, Christina A; Chung, Amanda S; Güler, Ali D; Chavkin, Charles; Luján, Rafael; Zweifel, Larry S

    2013-11-20

    The calcium-activated small conductance potassium channel SK3 plays an essential role in the regulation of dopamine neuron activity patterns. Here we demonstrate that expression of a human disease-related SK3 mutation (hSK3Δ) in dopamine neurons of mice disrupts the balance between tonic and phasic dopamine neuron activity. Expression of hSK3Δ suppressed endogenous SK currents, reducing coupling between SK channels and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and increasing permissiveness for burst firing. Consistent with enhanced excitability of dopamine neurons, hSK3Δ increased evoked calcium signals in dopamine neurons in vivo and potentiated evoked dopamine release. Specific expression of hSK3Δ led to deficits in attention and sensory gating and heightened sensitivity to a psychomimetic drug. Sensory-motor alterations and psychomimetic sensitivity were recapitulated in a mouse model of transient, reversible dopamine neuron activation. These results demonstrate the cell-autonomous effects of a human ion channel mutation on dopamine neuron physiology and the impact of activity pattern disruption on behavior.

  17. Global Gene Expression Patterns in Clostridium thermocellum as Determined by Microarray Analysis of Chemostat Cultures on Cellulose or Cellobiose▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Riederer, Allison; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Makino, Shin-ichi; Stevenson, David M.; Bukhman, Yury V.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Fox, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    A microarray study of chemostat growth on insoluble cellulose or soluble cellobiose has provided substantial new information on Clostridium thermocellum gene expression. This is the fir