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Sample records for abnormal fetal heart

  1. Fetal and neonatal mortality in patients with isolated congenital heart diseases and heart conditions associated with extracardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Marantz, Pablo; Sáenz Tejeira, M Mercedes; Peña, Gabriela; Segovia, Alejandra; Fustiñana, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    Congenital malformations are a known cause of intrauterine death; of them, congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are accountable for the highest fetal and neonatal mortality rates. They are strongly associated with other extracardiac malformations and an early fetal mortality. Two hundred and twenty fves cases of CHDs are presented. Of them, 155 were isolated CHDs (group A) and 70 were associated with extracardiac malformations, chromosomal disorders, or genetic syndromes (group B). The overall mortality in group B was higher than that observed in group A (p <0.01). Prenatal mortality was similar in both groups: A: 8.4% (13 out of 155); B: 15.7% (11 out of 70). Postnatal mortality was A: 16.8% (26 out of 155) (p <0.01), OR: 0.52 (95% CI: 0.16-1.7); B: 32.9% (23 out of 70) (p <0.01), OR: 0.41 (95% CI: 0.20-0.83). Heart diseases associated with extracardiac abnormalities had a higher mortality rate than isolated congenital heart diseases in the period up to 60 weeks of postmenstrual age (140 days post-term). No differences were observed between both groups of patients in terms of prenatal mortality.

  2. Hypoxia and fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Patterson, A J; Zhang, L

    2010-10-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not the only gene involved in adaptation to hypoxia, its role places it as a central figure in orchestrating events needed for adaptation to hypoxic stress. Although "normal" hypoxia (lower oxygen tension in the fetus as compared with the adult) is essential in heart formation, further abnormal hypoxia in utero adversely affects cardiogenesis. Prenatal hypoxia alters myocardial structure and causes a decline in cardiac performance. Not only are the effects of hypoxia apparent during the perinatal period, but prolonged hypoxia in utero also causes fetal programming of abnormality in the heart's development. The altered expression pattern of cardioprotective genes such as protein kinase c epsilon, heat shock protein 70, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, likely predispose the developing heart to increased vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury later in life. The events underlying the long-term changes in gene expression are not clear, but likely involve variation in epigenetic regulation.

  3. Abortion for fetal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Maclean, N E

    1979-07-25

    I wish to thank Dr. Pauline Bennett for her reply (NZ Med J, 13 June). She has demonstrated well that in dealing with sensitive difficult issues such as abortion for fetal abnormality, the one thing the doctor is not recommended to do is to speak the truth] I am prompted to write this letter for 2 reasons. Firstly, the excellent letter written by Dr. A. M. Rutherford (NZ Med J, 13 June) on the subject of abortion stated, "The most disturbing feature about the whole controversy is the 'blunting of our conscience'." When the doctors are not encouraged to be honest with patients then indeed our conscience has been blunted. Secondly, I watched Holocaust last night, and cannot refrain from stating that I see frightening parallels between our liberal abortion policy and the activities of the Nazis. As I watched the "mental patients" being herded into the shed for gassing by the polite, tidy, white coated medical staff, and then heard the compassionate, sensitive, letter of the hospital authorities to the relatives of the deceased, the parallel became obvious. The mental patients were weak, defenseless, burdensome, and uneconomic; the unborn are weak, defenseless, burdensome, and uneconomic. The hospital authority's letter was acceptable in many ways, acceptable except that its words bore no relation to the truth. It is said that the "first casualty of war is the truth". Whether that war involves the Jews, or the insane, or the unborn, the statement would seem correct.

  4. Ultrasound screening for fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chitty, L S

    1995-12-01

    Ultrasound screening for fetal abnormalities is increasingly becoming part of routine antenatal care in Europe and the UK. However, there has been very little formal evaluation of this practice. In this article reports of routine ultrasound screening are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages discussed. The majority of routine anomaly scanning is done in the second trimester but there may be a case for screening at other times in pregnancy and alternative anomaly screening policies are discussed. PMID:8710765

  5. [Hypoxaemia, peripheral chemoreceptors and fetal heart rate].

    PubMed

    Secourgeon, J-F

    2012-02-01

    The perinatal results of the widespread adoption of the continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring during labor remain rather disappointing. This is due in part to a lack of consistent interpretation of the fetal heart tracings. Despite efforts by referral agencies over the past decade the situation has not improved. In defense of practitioners the heterogeneity and complexity of definitions and classifications patterns especially morphological currently proposed should be noted. Whereas with the recent advances in the field of neuroscience, it is now possible to visualize the chain of pathophysiological events that lead from the hypoxemic stimulus of the glomus cell to changes in the morphology of the fetal heart rate tracing. Thus by taking some examples of real situations, we propose a method of analysis that dissects the fetal heart tracing and take into account the functional specifications of the chemoreceptor when exposed to a hypoxic environment. Furthermore we can identify tracings with a "threshold effect" and also "sensitization and desensitization effects" according to the intensity, duration and recurrence of hypoxaemic episodes. This new approach based upon specific research into the mechanism behind the fetal heart rate abnormalities may be useful to complement the morphological study of the fetal heart tracing, to provide a better idea of the fetal status and to better define the indications of fetal blood sampling procedures.

  6. Passive Fetal Heart Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Mowrey, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fetal heart monitoring system and method for detecting and processing acoustic fetal heart signals transmitted by different signal transmission modes. One signal transmission mode, the direct contact mode, occurs in a first frequency band when the fetus is in direct contact with the maternal abdominal wall. Another signal transmission mode, the fluid propagation mode, occurs in a second frequency band when the fetus is in a recessed position with no direct contact with the maternal abdominal wall. The second frequency band is relatively higher than the first frequency band. The fetal heart monitoring system and method detect and process acoustic fetal heart signals that are in the first frequency band and in the second frequency band.

  7. Fetal MR Imaging of Gastrointestinal Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Furey, Elizabeth A; Bailey, April A; Twickler, Diane M

    2016-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an increasing and valuable role in antenatal diagnosis and perinatal management of fetal gastrointestinal (GI) abnormalities. Advances in MR imaging data acquisition and use of motion-insensitive techniques have established MR imaging as an important adjunct to obstetric ultrasonography (US) for fetal diagnosis. In this regard, MR imaging provides high diagnostic accuracy for antenatal diagnosis of common and uncommon GI pathologic conditions. In the setting of fetal GI disease, T1-weighted images demonstrate the amount and distribution of meconium, which is crucial to the diagnostic capability of fetal MR imaging. Specifically, knowledge of the T1 signal intensity characteristics of fetal meconium, the normal pattern of meconium with advancing gestational age, and the expected caliber of small and large bowel in the fetus is key to diagnosis of abnormalities of the GI tract. Use of ultrafast T2-weighted sequences for evaluation of the expected location and morphology of fluid-containing structures, including the stomach and small bowel, in the fetal abdomen further aids in diagnostic confidence. Uncommonly encountered fetal GI pathologic conditions, especially cloacal dysmorphology, may demonstrate characteristic MR imaging patterns, which may add additional information to that from fetal US, allowing improved fetal and neonatal management. This article discusses common indications for fetal MR imaging of the GI tract, imaging protocols for fetal GI MR imaging, the normal appearance of the fetal GI tract with advancing gestational age, and the imaging appearances of common fetal GI abnormalities, as well as uncommon fetal GI conditions with characteristic appearances. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27163598

  8. Passive Fetal Heart Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor); Wynkoop, Mark W. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. H. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A fetal heart monitoring system preferably comprising a backing plate having a generally concave front surface and a generally convex back surface, and at least one sensor element attached to the concave front surface for acquiring acoustic fetal heart signals produced by a fetus within a body. The sensor element has a shape that conforms to the generally concave back surface of the backing plate. In one embodiment, the at least one sensor element comprises an inner sensor, and a plurality of outer sensors surrounding the inner sensor. The fetal heart monitoring system can further comprise a web belt, and a web belt guide movably attached to the web belt. The web belt guide being is to the convex back surface of the backing plate.

  9. Ablation of the CLP-1 gene leads to down-regulation of the HAND1 gene and abnormality of the left ventricle of the heart and fetal death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Facan; Wagner, Michael; Siddiqui, M A Q

    2004-06-01

    We have recently reported that cardiac lineage protein-1 (CLP-1), a nuclear protein with an acidic region that constitutes a potential protein-protein interaction domain, regulates transcription of the cardiac myosin light chain-2v (MLC-2v) gene promoter in a manner consistent with its being a transcriptional co-activator or regulator. To test the postulate that CLP-1 is a regulator of cardiac genes we ablated the CLP-1 gene in mice. Past embryonic day (E)16.5, CLP-1 null alleles did not show Mendelian inheritance suggesting that absence of CLP-1 was lethal in late fetal stages. CLP-1 (-/-) fetal hearts exhibited a reduced left ventricular chamber with thickened myocardial walls, features suggestive of cardiac hypertrophy. Electron microscopic analysis of E16.5 CLP-1 (-/-) ventricular myocardium showed a marked decline in cell density and altered nuclear and myofibril morphologies similar to that seen in animal models of hypertrophic heart. Analysis of contractile and non-contractile protein genes known to be re-expressed during cardiac hypertrophy showed them to have higher expression levels in CLP-1 (-/-) hearts thereby confirming the hypertrophic phenotype at the molecular level. Analysis of cardiac development genes showed that expression of the HAND1 transcription factor, a gene involved in patterning of the heart tube and down-regulated in hypertrophic hearts, was also significantly reduced in CLP-1 (-/-) fetal hearts. CLP-1 and HAND1 have similar expression patterns in the developing heart ventricles. These data suggest that CLP-1 and the HAND transcription factors may be part of a genetic program critical to proper heart development, perturbation of which can lead to cardiomyopathy.

  10. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  11. Randomised controlled trial of intrapartum fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    Mahomed, K.; Nyoni, R.; Mulambo, T.; Kasule, J.; Jacobus, E.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare effectiveness of different methods of monitoring intrapartum fetal heart rate. DESIGN--Prospective randomised controlled trial. SETTING--Referral maternity hospital, Harare, Zimbabwe. SUBJECTS--1255 women who were 37 weeks or more pregnant with singleton cephalic presentation and normal fetal heart rate before entry into study. INTERVENTIONS--Intermittent monitoring of fetal heart rate by electronic monitoring, Doppler ultrasound, use of Pinard stethoscope by a research midwife, or routine use of Pinard stethoscope by attending midwife. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Abnormal fetal heart rate patterns, need for operative delivery for fetal distress, neonatal mortality, Apgar scores, admission to neonatal unit, neonatal seizures, and hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. RESULTS--Abnormalities in fetal heart rate were detected in 54% (172/318) of the electronic monitoring group, 32% (100/312) of the ultrasonography group, 15% (47/310) of the Pinard stethoscope group, and 9% (28/315) of the routine monitoring group. Caesarean sections were performed for 28% (89%), 24% (76), 10% (32), and 15% (46) of the four groups respectively. Neonatal outcome was best in the ultrasonography group: hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy occurred in two, one, seven, and 10 cases in the four groups respectively; neonatal seizures occurred only in the last two groups (six and nine cases respectively); and deaths occurred in eight, two, five, and nine cases respectively. CONCLUSIONS--Abnormalities in fetal heart rate were more reliably detected by Doppler ultrasonography than with Pinard stethoscope, and its use resulted in good perinatal outcome. The use of relatively cheap ultrasound monitors should be further evaluated and promoted in obstetric units caring for high risk pregnancies in developing countries with scarce resources. PMID:8136665

  12. Familial Precocious Fetal Abnormal Cortical Sulcation.

    PubMed

    Frassoni, Carolina; Avagliano, Laura; Inverardi, Francesca; Spaccini, Luigina; Parazzini, Cecilia; Rustico, Maria Angela; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Righini, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The development of the human cerebral cortex is a complex and precisely programmed process by which alterations may lead to morphological and functional neurological abnormalities. We report familial cases of prenatally diagnosed abnormal brain, characterized by aberrant symmetrical mesial oversulcation of the parietooccipital lobes, in fetuses affected by abnormal skeletal features. Fetal brain anomalies were characterized by prenatal magnetic resonance imaging at 21 weeks of gestation and histologically evaluated at 22 weeks. Histological examination added relevant information showing some focal cortical areas of micropoligyria and heterotopic extension of the cortical plate into the marginal zone beneath the cortical surface. Genetic analysis of the fetuses excluded FGFR3 mutations known to be related to skeletal dysplasia and aberrant symmetrical oversulcation in other brain areas (temporal lobes). Hence, the present report suggests the existence of a class of rare syndromes of skeleton and brain development abnormality unrelated to FGFR3 mutations or related to other not described FGFR3 gene defects. Using magnetic resonance imaging, histopathology and molecular characterization we provide an example of a translational study of a rare and unreported brain congenital malformation. PMID:27177044

  13. Fetal Heart Rate Response to Maternal Exercise.

    PubMed

    Monga, Manju

    2016-09-01

    Current guidelines regarding recommended exercise in pregnancy appear consistent with reported research regarding fetal heart changes in response to maternal exercise. Fetal heart rate increases during pregnancy, but maternal exercise appears well tolerated if performed in uncomplicated pregnancies and not in the supine position. Maximal levels of exercise that are well tolerated by the fetus have not yet been well defined; however, recent literature suggests that sustained exercise during pregnancy may have beneficial effects on autonomic control of fetal heart rate and variability that may lead to long-term health benefits. PMID:27388963

  14. A review of contemporary modalities for identifying abnormal fetal growth.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C; Stuart, B; Fitzpatrick, C; Turner, M J; Kennelly, M M

    2013-04-01

    Detecting aberrant fetal growth has long been an important goal of modern obstetrics. Failure to diagnose abnormal fetal growth results in perinatal morbidity or mortality. However, the erroneous diagnosis of abnormal growth may lead to increased maternal anxiety and unnecessary obstetric interventions. We review the aetiology of deviant fetal growth and its implications both for the neonatal period and later in adult life. We examine maternal factors that may influence fetal growth such as obesity, glycaemic control and body composition. We discuss novel ways to improve our detection of abnormal fetal growth with a view to optimising antenatal care and clinical outcomes. These include using customised centiles or individualised growth assessment methods to improve accuracy. The role of fetal subcutaneous measurements as a surrogate marker of the nutritional status of the baby is also discussed. Finally, we investigate the role of Doppler measurements in identifying growth-restricted babies.

  15. Surrogate Motherhood and Abortion for Fetal Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ruth; van Zyl, Liezl

    2015-10-01

    A diagnosis of fetal abnormality presents parents with a difficult - even tragic - moral dilemma. Where this diagnosis is made in the context of surrogate motherhood there is an added difficulty, namely that it is not obvious who should be involved in making decisions about abortion, for the person who would normally have the right to decide - the pregnant woman - does not intend to raise the child. This raises the question: To what extent, if at all, should the intended parents be involved in decision-making? In commercial surrogacy it is thought that as part of the contractual agreement the intended parents acquire the right to make this decision. By contrast, in altruistic surrogacy the pregnant woman retains the right to make these decisions, but the intended parents are free to decide not to adopt the child. We argue that both these strategies are morally unsound, and that the problems encountered serve to highlight more fundamental defects within the commercial and altruistic models, as well as in the legal and institutional frameworks that support them. We argue in favour of the professional model, which acknowledges the rights and responsibilities of both parties and provides a legal and institutional framework that supports good decision-making. In particular, the professional model acknowledges the surrogate's right to decide whether to undergo an abortion, and the intended parents' obligation to accept legal custody of the child. While not solving all the problems that arise in surrogacy, the model provides a framework that supports good decision-making. PMID:25688455

  16. Surrogate Motherhood and Abortion for Fetal Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ruth; van Zyl, Liezl

    2015-10-01

    A diagnosis of fetal abnormality presents parents with a difficult - even tragic - moral dilemma. Where this diagnosis is made in the context of surrogate motherhood there is an added difficulty, namely that it is not obvious who should be involved in making decisions about abortion, for the person who would normally have the right to decide - the pregnant woman - does not intend to raise the child. This raises the question: To what extent, if at all, should the intended parents be involved in decision-making? In commercial surrogacy it is thought that as part of the contractual agreement the intended parents acquire the right to make this decision. By contrast, in altruistic surrogacy the pregnant woman retains the right to make these decisions, but the intended parents are free to decide not to adopt the child. We argue that both these strategies are morally unsound, and that the problems encountered serve to highlight more fundamental defects within the commercial and altruistic models, as well as in the legal and institutional frameworks that support them. We argue in favour of the professional model, which acknowledges the rights and responsibilities of both parties and provides a legal and institutional framework that supports good decision-making. In particular, the professional model acknowledges the surrogate's right to decide whether to undergo an abortion, and the intended parents' obligation to accept legal custody of the child. While not solving all the problems that arise in surrogacy, the model provides a framework that supports good decision-making.

  17. Pulmonary Hypoplasia Associated with Congenital Heart Diseases: A Fetal Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruchonnet-Metrailler, Isabelle; Bessieres, Bettina; Bonnet, Damien; Vibhushan, Shamila; Delacourt, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormalities of the fetal pulmonary vasculature may affect lung morphogenesis. Postnatal studies have suggested that pulmonary hypoplasia (PH) may be associated with congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Objective To determine the prevalence of PH associated with CHDs, and to evaluate whether CHDs with right outflow obstruction were associated with the highest risk of lung growth impairment. Methods Between January 2006 and December 2010, fetuses with CHD obtained following the termination of pregnancies due to fetal abnormalities were examined in a prospective manner for the detection of heart and lung defects. CHDs were classified into five pathophysiological groups. Lung weight (LW), body weight (BW), and LW/BW ratio were analyzed for each case. The expression of CD31 and VEGF in the lung was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Fetuses with CHDs and right outflow obstruction had significantly lower LW for a given BW, and significantly lower LW/BW ratios for a given gestational age. When defining PH as a fetal LW/BW ratio <0.015 before 28 weeks, and <0.012 after 28 weeks, PH was detected in 15 of the 119 fetuses analyzed (13%). It was significantly associated with CHD with right outflow obstruction, independently of chromosomal abnormalities and associated extracardiac abnormalities (p<0.03). Right outflow obstruction was detected in 60% of the fetuses with CHD and PH, but in only 32% of those with CHD but no PH. In fetuses with right outflow obstruction, no difference was observed between those with PH and those without PH, in terms of the ratio of pulmonary artery diameter to aortic diameter, lung CD31 expression, or lung VEGF expression. Conclusion CHDs with right outflow obstruction are a significant risk factor for prenatally acquired PH. The occurrence of fetal PH is not correlated with abnormalities of the pulmonary vasculature, suggesting the involvement of perfusion-independent mechanisms. PMID:24699523

  18. Acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1991-01-01

    The acoustically based fetal heart rate monitor permits an expectant mother to perform the fetal Non-Stress Test in her home. The potential market would include the one million U.S. pregnancies per year requiring this type of prenatal surveillance. The monitor uses polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2) piezoelectric polymer film for the acoustic sensors, which are mounted in a seven-element array on a cummerbund. Evaluation of the sensor ouput signals utilizes a digital signal processor, which performs a linear prediction routine in real time. Clinical tests reveal that the acoustically based monitor provides Non-Stress Test records which are comparable to those obtained with a commercial ultrasonic transducer.

  19. Skeletal Muscle Abnormalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, Shintaro; Takada, Shingo; Matsushima, Shouji; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Exercise capacity is lowered in patients with heart failure, which limits their daily activities and also reduces their quality of life. Furthermore, lowered exercise capacity has been well demonstrated to be closely related to the severity and prognosis of heart failure. Skeletal muscle abnormalities including abnormal energy metabolism, transition of myofibers from type I to type II, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduction in muscular strength, and muscle atrophy have been shown to play a central role in lowered exercise capacity. The skeletal muscle abnormalities can be classified into the following main types: 1) low endurance due to mitochondrial dysfunction; and 2) low muscle mass and muscle strength due to imbalance of protein synthesis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms of these skeletal muscle abnormalities have been studied mainly using animal models. The current review including our recent study will focus upon the skeletal muscle abnormalities in heart failure. PMID:26346520

  20. Metabolic gene profile in early human fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Iruretagoyena, J I; Davis, W; Bird, C; Olsen, J; Radue, R; Teo Broman, A; Kendziorski, C; Splinter BonDurant, S; Golos, T; Bird, I; Shah, D

    2014-07-01

    receptor and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor transcripts were detected, and have not been described previously in human fetal heart during this period. For the first time global gene expression of heart has been described in human samples to create a database of normal development to understand and compare with known abnormal fetal heart development.

  1. Fetal echocardiographic screening of diabetic pregnancies for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gladman, G; McCrindle, B W; Boutin, C; Smallhorn, J F

    1997-02-01

    This study sought to assess pregnant diabetic women for the presence of fetal cardiac anomalies and to determine whether better diabetic control was associated with a reduced risk to the fetus. Between 1988 and 1995, pregnant type I and II diabetic women routinely underwent fetal echocardiography. Hemoglobin A1c values were used as an indicator of maternal diabetic control and any relation between congenital heart disease in the fetus and maternal hemoglobin A1c levels was sought. Cardiac defects were identified in 7 of 328 pregnancies assessed, for an incidence of congenital heart disease of 2.1% (95% confidence interval: 0.6-3.6%). A review of the postnatal cardiac database did not reveal any undetected major malformations. The mean hemoglobin A1c level was 7.6% +/- 2.0% obtained at a mean gestational age of 12 +/- 7 weeks. Hemoglobin A1c levels of mothers carrying a fetus with congenital heart disease did not significantly differ from those with a normal fetus: 8.1% +/- 3.4% versus 7.6% +/- 1.9% (p = 0.48). Mothers with an affected fetus demonstrated a wide range of HbA1c levels (4.1 to 13.7%). Thus, the incidence of significant fetal cardiac abnormalities is low and not significantly related to maternal diabetic control. PMID:9259899

  2. Canadian firm's software helps physicians diagnose fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, D

    1996-06-01

    An Ottawa company has developed CD-ROM software that helps physicians diagnose fetal abnormalities. Suspicious prenatal ultrasound images can be compared, within seconds, with a collection of moving and still ultrasound images, along with text descriptions of 400 anomalies contained in a program called Platypus. PMID:8646663

  3. Imaging findings in fetal diaphragmatic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Leonor; Gudinchet, François; Meuli, Reto

    2015-12-01

    Imaging plays a key role in the detection of a diaphragmatic pathology in utero. US is the screening method, but MRI is increasingly performed. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is by far the most often diagnosed diaphragmatic pathology, but unilateral or bilateral eventration or paralysis can also be identified. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration can be located in the diaphragm and, exceptionally, diaphragmatic tumors or secondary infiltration of the diaphragm from tumors originating from an adjacent organ have been observed in utero. Congenital abnormalities of the diaphragm impair normal lung development. Prenatal imaging provides a detailed anatomical evaluation of the fetus and allows volumetric lung measurements. The comparison of these data with those from normal fetuses at the same gestational age provides information about the severity of pulmonary hypoplasia and improves predictions about the fetus's outcome. This information can help doctors and families to make decisions about management during pregnancy and after birth. We describe a wide spectrum of congenital pathologies of the diaphragm and analyze their embryological basis. Moreover, we describe their prenatal imaging findings with emphasis on MR studies, discuss their differential diagnosis and evaluate the limits of imaging methods in predicting postnatal outcome. PMID:26255159

  4. Signal processing methodologies for an acoustic fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, Robert A., III; Stoughton, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Research and development is presented of real time signal processing methodologies for the detection of fetal heart tones within a noise-contaminated signal from a passive acoustic sensor. A linear predictor algorithm is utilized for detection of the heart tone event and additional processing derives heart rate. The linear predictor is adaptively 'trained' in a least mean square error sense on generic fetal heart tones recorded from patients. A real time monitor system is described which outputs to a strip chart recorder for plotting the time history of the fetal heart rate. The system is validated in the context of the fetal nonstress test. Comparisons are made with ultrasonic nonstress tests on a series of patients. Comparative data provides favorable indications of the feasibility of the acoustic monitor for clinical use.

  5. Fetal heart rate changes associated with general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Fedorkow, D M; Stewart, T J; Parboosingh, J

    1989-07-01

    Decreased fetal heart rate variability was noted 90 seconds after the induction of general anesthesia with sodium thiopentone and fentanyl in a patient undergoing basket extraction of a renal calculus at 30 weeks' gestation. The fetal sleep pattern lasted for 105 minutes after the anesthetic was discontinued, 45 minutes after the mother was fully awake.

  6. Exploring the Relationship between Fetal Heart Rate and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, Barbara S.; Hains, Sylvia M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A relationship between fetal heart rate (HR) and cognition is explored within the context of infant, child and adult studies where the association is well established. Lack of direct access to the fetus and maturational changes limit research paradigms and response measures for fetal studies. Nevertheless, neural regulation of HR shows a number of…

  7. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    SciTech Connect

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-25

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced 'modified' Sensitivity (SE deg.) and 'modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV deg.) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  8. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-01

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced `modified' Sensitivity (SE°) and `modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV°) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  9. Transfer entropy analysis of maternal and fetal heart rate coupling.

    PubMed

    Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Endo, Miyuki; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H

    2015-01-01

    Although evidence of the short term relationship between maternal and fetal heart rates has been found in previous model-based studies, knowledge about the mechanism and patterns of the coupling during gestation is still limited. In this study, a model-free method based on Transfer Entropy (TE) was applied to quantify the maternal-fetal heart rate couplings in both directions. Furthermore, analysis of the lag at which TE was maximum and its changes throughout gestation, provided more information about the mechanism of coupling and its latency. Experimental results based on fetal electrocardiograms (fECGs) and maternal ECG showed the evidence of coupling for 62 out of 65 healthy mothers and fetuses in each direction, by statistically validating against the surrogate pairs. The fetuses were divided into three gestational age groups: early (16-25 weeks), mid (26-31 weeks) and late (32-41 weeks) gestation. The maximum TE from maternal to fetal heart rate significantly increased from early to mid gestation, while the coupling delay on both directions decreased significantly from mid to late gestation. These changes occur concomitant with the maturation of the fetal sensory and autonomic nervous systems with advancing gestational age. In conclusion, the application of TE with delays revealed detailed information about the changes in fetal-maternal heart rate coupling strength and latency throughout gestation, which could provide novel clinical markers of fetal development and well-being.

  10. Reliability of spectral analysis of fetal heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Warmerdam, G J J; Vullings, R; Bergmans, J W M; Oei, S G

    2014-01-01

    Spectral analysis of fetal heart rate variability could provide information on fetal wellbeing. Unfortunately, fetal heart rate recordings are often contaminated by artifacts. Correction of these artifacts affects the outcome of spectral analysis, but it is currently unclear what level of artifact correction facilitates reliable spectral analysis. In this study, a method is presented that estimates the error in spectral powers due to artifact correction, based on the properties of the Continuous Wavelet Transformation. The results show that it is possible to estimate the error in spectral powers. The information about this error makes it possible for clinicians to assess the reliability of spectral analysis of fetal heart rate recordings that are contaminated by artifacts. PMID:25570577

  11. [An Algorithm for Correcting Fetal Heart Rate Baseline].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodong; Lu, Yaosheng

    2015-10-01

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) baseline estimation is of significance for the computerized analysis of fetal heart rate and the assessment of fetal state. In our work, a fetal heart rate baseline correction algorithm was presented to make the existing baseline more accurate and fit to the tracings. Firstly, the deviation of the existing FHR baseline was found and corrected. And then a new baseline was obtained finally after treatment with some smoothing methods. To assess the performance of FHR baseline correction algorithm, a new FHR baseline estimation algorithm that combined baseline estimation algorithm and the baseline correction algorithm was compared with two existing FHR baseline estimation algorithms. The results showed that the new FHR baseline estimation algorithm did well in both accuracy and efficiency. And the results also proved the effectiveness of the FHR baseline correction algorithm.

  12. Women's experiences of coping with pregnancy termination for fetal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, Caroline; Mitchell, Kathryn; Fox, Pauline

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy termination for fetal abnormality (TFA) can have significant psychological consequences. Most previous research has been focused on measuring the psychological outcomes of TFA, and little is known about the coping strategies involved. In this article, we report on women's coping strategies used during and after the procedure. Our account is based on experiences of 27 women who completed an online survey. We analyzed the data using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Coping comprised four structures, consistent across time points: support, acceptance, avoidance, and meaning attribution. Women mostly used adaptive coping strategies but reported inadequacies in aftercare, which challenged their resources. The study's findings indicate the need to provide sensitive, nondirective care rooted in the acknowledgment of the unique nature of TFA. Enabling women to reciprocate for emotional support, promoting adaptive coping strategies, highlighting the potential value of spending time with the baby, and providing long-term support (including during subsequent pregnancies) might promote psychological adjustment to TFA.

  13. Fetal heart screening in low-risk pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Rustico, M A; Benettoni, A; D'Ottavio, G; Maieron, A; Fischer-Tamaro, I; Conoscenti, G; Meir, Y; Montesano, M; Cattaneo, A; Mandruzzato, G

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether a screening program for fetal cardiac malformations is justified in a low-risk population, and which factors influence its accuracy. The fetal heart was evaluated in 7024 pregnant women at 20-22 weeks, and evaluation was repeated at a more advanced gestational age in 9% of cases. Cardiological follow-up was continued postnatally until 2 years of age. The overall prevalence of cardiac anomaly was 0.93%. The incidences of major and minor defects were 0.44% and 0.48%, respectively. There were 23 true positives (0.33%): in 20 cases, the diagnosis was made in the second trimester, and 13 women (65%) chose termination of pregnancy. Seventeen of the 20 cases identified in the second trimester were serious malformations. There were 42 false negatives (0.60%). Of these, 12 had signs of cardiac dysfunction at birth or within the 1st month of life, and three of them died as a result of their cardiac anomaly. There were eight false positives (0.11%), all of a minor type. Six abnormal karyotypes, out of a total of 21 performed in the true-positive group (28.5%), were found. In addition, five of the 42 newborns in the false-negative group had trisomy 21. The overall sensitivity was 35.4%, and 61.3% for major defects. The accuracy in two distinct periods was estimated because the level of experience of the operators was different: sensitivity was 45.2% in period 1 (1986-88) (77.8% for major defects) and 26.5% in period 2 (1989-92) (52.9% for major defects). We conclude that a fetal heart screening program in the obstetric population is justified. It defines a high-risk group for karyotyping, allows planning of delivery in a tertiary center or the choice of terminating the pregnancy for the parents and appears to have a positive cost-benefit ratio. A crucial factor is the level of training and experience of the operators, who need specific teaching support. PMID:8590200

  14. Diffusion MRI Tractography of the Developing Human Fetal Heart

    PubMed Central

    Jackowski, Marcel P.; Kostis, William J.; Dai, Guangping; Sanders, Stephen; Sosnovik, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Human myocardium has a complex and anisotropic 3D fiber pattern. It remains unknown, however, when in fetal life this anisotropic pattern develops and whether the human heart is structurally fully mature at birth. We aimed here to use diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) tractography to characterize the evolution of fiber architecture in the developing human fetal heart. Methods Human fetal hearts (n = 5) between 10–19 weeks of gestation were studied. The heart from a 6-day old neonate and an adult human heart served as controls. The degree of myocardial anisotropy was measured by calculating the fractional anisotropy (FA) index. In addition, fiber tracts were created by numerically integrating the primary eigenvector field in the heart into coherent streamlines. Results At 10–14 weeks the fetal hearts were highly isotropic and few tracts could be resolved. Between 14–19 weeks the anisotropy seen in the adult heart began to develop. Coherent fiber tracts were well resolved by 19 weeks. The 19-week myocardium, however, remained weakly anisotropic with a low FA and no discernable sheet structure. Conclusions The human fetal heart remains highly isotropic until 14–19 weeks, at which time cardiomyocytes self-align into coherent tracts. This process lags 2–3 months behind the onset of cardiac contraction, which may be a prerequisite for cardiomyocyte maturation and alignment. No evidence of a connective tissue scaffold guiding this process could be identified by DTI. Maturation of the heart’s sheet structure occurs late in gestation and evolves further after birth. PMID:23991152

  15. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  16. Percutaneous In Utero Thoracoamniotic Shunt Creation for Fetal Thoracic Abnormalities Leading to Non-Immune Hydrops

    PubMed Central

    White, Sarah B.; Tutton, Sean M.; Rilling, William S.; Kuhlmann, Randall S.; Peterson, Erika L.; Wigton, Thomas R.; Ames, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In a fetus, rare, fetal thoracic abnormalities can cause mediastinal shift and vena cava obstruction resulting in fetal hydrops and intra-uterine fetal demise. This series describes a trans-abdominal, trans-uterine Seldinger based percutaneous approach to create a shunt for treatment of these fetal abnormalities. Material and Methods Five fetuses presented with non-immune fetal hydrops due to fetal thoracic abnormalities causing severe mass effect. Under direct ultrasound guidance, an 18 G needle was used to access the malformation. Through a peel away sheath, a customized pediatric transplant 4.5 French double J ureteral stent was advanced; the leading loop was placed in the fetal thorax and the trailing end left outside the fetal thorax within the amniotic cavity. Results Seven thoracoamniotic shunts were successfully placed in 5 fetuses, with one shunt immediately replaced due to displacement during the procedure and the second not functioning at follow-up requiring insertion of a second shunt. All fetuses had successful decompression of the thoracic malformation, allowing lung re-expansion and resolution of hydrops. Three of 5 mothers had meaningful (> 7 days) prolongation of their pregnancies. All pregnancies were maintained to > 30 weeks, with a range of 30 weeks 1 day to 37 weeks 2 days. There were no maternal complications. Conclusions Seldinger based percutaneous approach to draining fetal thoracic abnormalities is feasible and can allow for prolongation of pregnancy, antenatal lung development and ultimately result in fetal survival. PMID:24702750

  17. Real-time signal processing for fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ibrahimy, Muhammad I; Ahmed, Firoz; Mohd Ali, M A; Zahedi, Edmond

    2003-02-01

    An algorithm based on digital filtering, adaptive thresholding, statistical properties in the time domain, and differencing of local maxima and minima has been developed for the simultaneous measurement of the fetal and maternal heart rates from the maternal abdominal electrocardiogram during pregnancy and labor for ambulatory monitoring. A microcontroller-based system has been used to implement the algorithm in real-time. A Doppler ultrasound fetal monitor was used for statistical comparison on five volunteers with low risk pregnancies, between 35 and 40 weeks of gestation. Results showed an average percent root mean square difference of 5.32% and linear correlation coefficient from 0.84 to 0.93. The fetal heart rate curves remained inside a +/- 5-beats-per-minute limit relative to the reference ultrasound method for 84.1% of the time. PMID:12665042

  18. Phase plane based identification of fetal heart rate patterns

    PubMed Central

    Vairavan, Srinivasan; Sriram, Bhargavi; Wilson, James D.; Preissl, Hubert; Eswaran, Hari

    2012-01-01

    Using a phase plane analysis (PPA) of the spatial spread of trajectories of the fetal heart rate and its time-derivative we characterize the fetal heart rate patterns (fHRP) as defined by Nijhuis. For this purpose, we collect 22 fetal magnetocardiogram using a 151 SQUID system from 22 low-risk fetuses in gestational ages ranging from 30 to 37 weeks. Each study lasted for 30 minutes. After the attenuation of the maternal cardiac signals, we identify the R waves using an adaptive Hilbert transform approach and calculate the fetal heart rate. On these datasets, we apply the proposed approach and the traditionally used approaches such as standard deviation of the normal to normal intervals (SDNN) and root mean square of the successive difference (RMSSD). Heart rate patterns are scored by an expert using Nijhuis criteria and revealed A, B, and D patterns. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve is used to assess the performance of the metric to differentiate the different patterns. Results showed that only PPA was able to differentiate all pairs of fHRP with high performance. PMID:22254593

  19. Heart disease link to fetal hypoxia and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Giussani, Dino A; Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A; Richter, Hans G; Camm, Emily J; Thakor, Avnesh S; Kane, Andrew D; Hansell, Jeremy A; Brain, Kirsty L; Skeffington, Katie L; Itani, Nozomi; Wooding, F B Peter; Cross, Christine M; Allison, Beth J

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the intrauterine environment interacts with our genetic makeup to shape the risk of developing disease in later life. Fetal chronic hypoxia is a common complication of pregnancy. This chapter reviews how fetal chronic hypoxia programmes cardiac and endothelial dysfunction in the offspring in adult life and discusses the mechanisms via which this may occur. Using an integrative approach in large and small animal models at the in vivo, isolated organ, cellular and molecular levels, our programmes of work have raised the hypothesis that oxidative stress in the fetal heart and vasculature underlies the mechanism via which prenatal hypoxia programmes cardiovascular dysfunction in later life. Developmental hypoxia independent of changes in maternal nutrition promotes fetal growth restriction and induces changes in the cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrine systems of the adult offspring, which are normally associated with disease states during ageing. Treatment with antioxidants of animal pregnancies complicated with reduced oxygen delivery to the fetus prevents the alterations in fetal growth, and the cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrine dysfunction in the fetal and adult offspring. The work reviewed offers both insight into mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for clinical intervention against the early origin of cardiometabolic disease in pregnancy complicated by fetal chronic hypoxia.

  20. Magnetographic assessment of fetal hiccups and their effect on fetal heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Popescu, E A; Popescu, M; Bennett, T L; Lewine, J D; Drake, W B; Gustafson, K M

    2007-06-01

    Fetal hiccups emerge as early as nine weeks post-conception, being the predominant diaphragmatic movement before 26 weeks of gestation. They are considered as a programmed isometric inspiratory muscle exercise of the fetus in preparation for the post-natal respiratory function, or a manifestation of a reflex circuitry underlying the development of suckling and gasping patterns. The present paper provides the first evidence of non-invasive biomagnetic measurements of the diaphragm spasmodic contractions associated with fetal hiccups. The magnetic field patterns generated by fetal hiccups exhibit well-defined morphological features, consisting of an initial high frequency transient waveform followed by a more prolonged low frequency component. This pattern is consistent across recordings obtained from two fetal subjects, and it is confirmed by signals recorded in a neonatal subject. These results demonstrate that fetal biomagnetometry can provide insights into the electrophysiological mechanisms of diaphragm motor function in the fetus. Additionally, we study the correlation between hiccup events and fetal cardiac rhythm and provide evidence that hiccups may modulate the fetal heart rate during the last trimester of pregnancy.

  1. Echocardiographic Assessment of Embryonic and Fetal Mouse Heart Development: A Focus on Haemodynamics and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Hahurij, Nathan D.; Calkoen, Emmeline E.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Roest, Arno A. W.; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.; Poelmann, Robert E.; De Ruiter, Marco C.; van Munsteren, Conny J.; Steendijk, Paul; Blom, Nico A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Heart development is a complex process, and abnormal development may result in congenital heart disease (CHD). Currently, studies on animal models mainly focus on cardiac morphology and the availability of hemodynamic data, especially of the right heart half, is limited. Here we aimed to assess the morphological and hemodynamic parameters of normal developing mouse embryos/fetuses by using a high-frequency ultrasound system. Methods. A timed breeding program was initiated with a WT mouse line (Swiss/129Sv background). All recordings were performed transabdominally, in isoflurane sedated pregnant mice, in hearts of sequential developmental stages: 12.5, 14.5, and 17.5 days after conception (n = 105). Results. Along development the heart rate increased significantly from 125 ± 9.5 to 219 ± 8.3 beats per minute. Reliable flow measurements could be performed across the developing mitral and tricuspid valves and outflow tract. M-mode measurements could be obtained of all cardiac compartments. An overall increase of cardiac systolic and diastolic function with embryonic/fetal development was observed. Conclusion. High-frequency echocardiography is a promising and useful imaging modality for structural and hemodynamic analysis of embryonic/fetal mouse hearts. PMID:24707208

  2. Maternal bisphenol a exposure impacts the fetal heart transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C; Vandevoort, Catherine A; Settles, Matthew L; Robison, Barrie D; Murdoch, Gordon K

    2014-01-01

    Conditions during fetal development influence health and disease in adulthood, especially during critical windows of organogenesis. Fetal exposure to the endocrine disrupting chemical, bisphenol A (BPA) affects the development of multiple organ systems in rodents and monkeys. However, effects of BPA exposure on cardiac development have not been assessed. With evidence that maternal BPA is transplacentally delivered to the developing fetus, it becomes imperative to examine the physiological consequences of gestational exposure during primate development. Herein, we evaluate the effects of daily, oral BPA exposure of pregnant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) on the fetal heart transcriptome. Pregnant monkeys were given daily oral doses (400 µg/kg body weight) of BPA during early (50-100 ± 2 days post conception, dpc) or late (100 ± 2 dpc--term), gestation. At the end of treatment, fetal heart tissues were collected and chamber specific transcriptome expression was assessed using genome-wide microarray. Quantitative real-time PCR was conducted on select genes and ventricular tissue glycogen content was quantified. Our results show that BPA exposure alters transcription of genes that are recognized for their role in cardiac pathophysiologies. Importantly, myosin heavy chain, cardiac isoform alpha (Myh6) was down-regulated in the left ventricle, and 'A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 12', long isoform (Adam12-l) was up-regulated in both ventricles, and the right atrium of the heart in BPA exposed fetuses. BPA induced alteration of these genes supports the hypothesis that exposure to BPA during fetal development may impact cardiovascular fitness. Our results intensify concerns about the role of BPA in the genesis of human metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Pharmacologic Approaches to Electrolyte Abnormalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Grodin, Justin L

    2016-08-01

    Electrolyte abnormalities are common in heart failure and can arise from a variety of etiologies. Neurohormonal activation from ventricular dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and heart failure medications can perturb electrolyte homeostasis which impact both heart failure-related morbidity and mortality. These include disturbances in serum sodium, chloride, acid-base, and potassium homeostasis. Pharmacological treatments differ for each electrolyte abnormality and vary from older, established treatments like the vaptans or acetazolamide, to experimental or theoretical treatments like hypertonic saline or urea, or to newer, novel agents like the potassium binders: patiromer and zirconium cyclosilicate. Pharmacologic approaches range from limiting electrolyte intake or directly repleting the electrolyte, to blocking or promoting their resorption, and to neurohormonal antagonism. Because of the prevalence and clinical impact of electrolyte abnormalities, understanding both the older and newer therapeutic options is and will continue to be necessity for the management of heart failure. PMID:27278221

  4. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further.

  5. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further. PMID:21728077

  6. Heart rate variability parameters and fetal movement complement fetal behavioral states detection via magnetography to monitor neurovegetative development

    PubMed Central

    Brändle, Johanna; Preissl, Hubert; Draganova, Rossitza; Ortiz, Erick; Kagan, Karl O.; Abele, Harald; Brucker, Sara Y.; Kiefer-Schmidt, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Fetal behavioral states are defined by fetal movement and heart rate variability (HRV). At 32 weeks of gestational age (GA) the distinction of four fetal behavioral states represented by combinations of quiet or active sleep or awakeness is possible. Prior to 32 weeks, only periods of fetal activity and quiesence can be distinguished. The increasing synchronization of fetal movement and HRV reflects the development of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) control. Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) detects fetal heart activity at high temporal resolution, enabling the calculation of HRV parameters. This study combined the criteria of fetal movement with the HRV analysis to complete the criteria for fetal state detection. HRV parameters were calculated including the standard deviation of the normal-to-normal R–R interval (SDNN), the mean square of successive differences of the R–R intervals (RMSSD, SDNN/RMSSD ratio, and permutation entropy (PE) to gain information about the developing influence of the ANS within each fetal state. In this study, 55 magnetocardiograms from healthy fetuses of 24–41 weeks’ GA were recorded for up to 45 min using a fetal biomagnetometer. Fetal states were classified based on HRV and movement detection. HRV parameters were calculated for each state. Before GA 32 weeks, 58.4% quiescence and 41.6% activity cycles were observed. Later, 24% quiet sleep state (1F), 65.4% active sleep state (2F), and 10.6% active awake state (4F) were observed. SDNN increased over gestation. Changes of HRV parameters between the fetal behavioral states, especially between 1F and 4F, were statistically significant. Increasing fetal activity was confirmed by a decrease in PE complexity measures. The fHRV parameters support the differentiation between states and indicate the development of autonomous nervous control of heart rate function. PMID:25904855

  7. Prone position craniotomy in pregnancy without fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Jean; Alexander, Ashish; Philip, Shoba; Thomas, Anoop

    2016-09-01

    A pregnant patient in second trimester scheduled for posterior fossa craniotomy in prone position is a challenge for the anesthesiologist. Things to consider are physiological changes during pregnancy, non-obstetric surgery in pregnant patients, neuroanesthetic principles, effects of prone positioning, and need for fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring. We have described the anesthetic management of this case and discussed intra-operative FHR monitoring including controversies about its role, indications, and various options available as per fetal gestational age. In our case we attempted intermittent intra-operative FHR monitoring to optimize maternal positioning and fetal oxygenation even though the fetus was pre-viable. However the attempt was abandoned due to practical difficulties with prone positioning. Patient made good neurological recovery following the procedure and delivered a healthy term baby 4 months later. Decisions regarding fetal monitoring should be individualized based on viability of the fetus and feasibility of emergency cesarean delivery. Good communication between a multidisciplinary team involving neurosurgeon, anesthesiologist, obstetrician, and neonatologist is important for a successful outcome for mother and fetus. We conclude that prone position neurosurgery can safely be carried out in a pregnant patient with pre-viable fetus without FHR monitoring. PMID:27555144

  8. Puerperal endometritis and intrauterine fetal heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rehu, M; Haukkamaa, M

    1980-08-01

    The incidence of puerperal endometritis in 5058 patients who were delivered during a one year study period was recorded prospectively. Caesarean section was performed in 774 cases (15.3%) and intrauterine fetal heart rate monitoring was used in 2016 cases (39.9%). After vaginal delivery, the incidence of endometritis was 1.5% in those monitored externally and 2.4% in those monitored internally (P less than 0.05). After Caesarean section, endometritis occurred in 8.0% of those monitored externally and in 16.4% of those monitored internally for varying times (P less than 0.01). The duration of monitoring had no significant effect on these infection rates. The risk of puerperal endometritis after internal fetal monitoring seemed to be the same as after one vaginal examination. PMID:7259077

  9. Design of an FECG scalp electrode fetal heart rate monitor.

    PubMed

    Reguig, F B; Kirk, D L

    1996-03-01

    The design of a fetal heart rate (FHR) monitor using fetal electrocardiogram (FECG) scalp electrodes is described. It is shown that the design approach followed two stages: generation of FHR pulses at R-R intervals and FHR computation. The former uses a simple hardware approach for QRS detection and R-wave enhancement, while the latter requires a software implementation in order to produce FHR traces on a beat to beat basis. The QRS detection is based on bandpass filtering using switched mode capacitor technique; the R-wave enhancement and amplitude information are achieved by differentiation followed by fullwave rectification and peak detection. An adaptive threshold together with a comparator circuit are used to generate FHR pulses at R-R intervals. Beat to beat variations of FHR traces are produced by hardware and software implementation on a Z80 microprocessor board. Results obtained by the FHR monitor are evaluated and contrasted to other commercial FHR monitors. PMID:8673321

  10. Three-dimensional ultrasonographic visualization of fetal chromosome abnormalities: a preliminary experience report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Komwilaisak, Ratana; Ratanasiri, Thawalwong; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan

    2004-10-01

    The accurate diagnosis of fetal malformations in utero can provide both heath care providers and parents a number of management options. Three-dimensional ultrasonography is a new technique of diagnosis which has several potential advantages to allow for evaluation of specific anomalies by permitting high-quality views of body surface. We report 4 cases of fetal chromosomal abnormalities including 2 cases of trisomy 21, 1 case of trisomy 13 and 1 case of 48, XXY/+18. All cases were proved to have abnormal chromosomes by amniocentesis or percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling. After 3D reconstruction, we can identify specific facial abnormalities which can not be visualized by conventional two-dimensional ultrasound such as low set ear Mongolian's slant eyes, facial dysmorphism of trisomy 13 and trisomy 18. We also clearly visualized abnormalities of digits such as overlapping fingers, club hands and sandal gap. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the fetal body surface improves the antenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities characterized by a particular dysmorphism. Our report suggests that three-dimensional ultrasonography has the potential to provide novel informations on the fetal anatomy and be useful in visualization and identification of chromosomal abnormalities in utero.

  11. Linear and nonlinear measures of fetal heart rate patterns evaluated on very short fetal magnetocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Eder Rezende; Murta, Luiz Otavio; Baffa, Oswaldo; Wakai, Ronald T; Comani, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effectiveness of linear short- and long-term variability time domain parameters, an index of sympatho-vagal balance (SDNN/RMSSD) and entropy in differentiating fetal heart rate patterns (fHRPs) on the fetal heart rate (fHR) series of 5, 3 and 2 min duration reconstructed from 46 fetal magnetocardiograms. Gestational age (GA) varied from 21 to 38 weeks. FHRPs were classified based on the fHR standard deviation. In sleep states, we observed that vagal influence increased with GA, and entropy significantly increased (decreased) with GA (SDNN/RMSSD), demonstrating that a prevalence of vagal activity with autonomous nervous system maturation may be associated with increased sleep state complexity. In active wakefulness, we observed a significant negative (positive) correlation of short-term (long-term) variability parameters with SDNN/RMSSD. ANOVA statistics demonstrated that long-term irregularity and standard deviation of normal-to-normal beat intervals (SDNN) best differentiated among fHRPs. Our results confirm that short- and long-term variability parameters are useful to differentiate between quiet and active states, and that entropy improves the characterization of sleep states. All measures differentiated fHRPs more effectively on very short HR series, as a result of the fMCG high temporal resolution and of the intrinsic timescales of the events that originate the different fHRPs. PMID:22945491

  12. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion in fetuses with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Wang, Shuyu

    2014-11-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion are implicated in congenital heart defects (CHDs). This study was designed to detect these abnormalities in fetuses and determine the effect of genetic factors on CHD etiology. Between January 2010 and December 2011, 113 fetuses with CHD treated at the Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital were investigated, using chromosome karyotyping of either amniotic fluid cell or umbilical cord blood cell samples. Fetuses with a normal result were then investigated for the 22q11 microdeletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of the 113 patients, 12 (10.6%) exhibited chromosomal abnormalities, while 6 (5.3%) of the remaining 101 cases presented with a 22q11 microdeletion. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly higher in the group of fetuses presenting with extracardiac malformations in addition to CHD (P<0.001), although the detection of the 22q11 microdeletion was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.583). In addition, all fetuses with the 22q11 microdeletion occurred de novo. In conclusion, genetic factors are important in the etiology of CHD. Where fetuses present with cardiac defects, additional chromosomal analysis is required to detect extracardiac abnormalities. Fetuses with heart defects should also be considered for 22q11 microdeletion detection to evaluate fetal prognosis, particularly prior to surgery.

  13. [Lived experience of women with fetal chromosomal abnormality receiving termination at second trimester].

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chin-Mei; Su, Tsann-Juu; Chen, Yueh-Chih; Hwang, Jiann-Lonng

    2007-12-01

    Fetal chromosomal examination helps screen fetal chromosomal abnormalities prenatally. Diagnosis of such anomalies allows pregnancy termination, but causes tremendous trauma during pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of women suffering from fetal chromosomal abnormalities who are urgently required to terminate their pregnancy. The qualitative field study was conducted at a medical center in Taipei. The researcher, a primary nurse, conducted interviews with five women face to face or over the phone to collect the data. The period of care lasted for two weeks, beginning with confirmed diagnosis of fetal chromosomal abnormalities, followed by the subjects' decision on pregnancy termination, and ending up with their discharge from the hospital. The study is presented in narrative form and the data analyzed using interpretive research strategies of phenomenology. Three categories of lived experience emerged from the data: (1) recurring nightmares, (2) the torment from making the decision of pregnancy termination, and (3) frustration or sadness afterwards. The results illustrated that the lived experience of the women suffering from fetal chromosomal abnormalities and receiving termination was a continuous process. We suggest that medical staff concern themselves with the issue and provide humanistic caring for patients during the various different phases.

  14. Human fetal cardiac progenitors: The role of stem cells and progenitors in the fetal and adult heart.

    PubMed

    Bulatovic, Ivana; Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Sylvén, Christer; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The human fetal heart is formed early during embryogenesis as a result of cell migrations, differentiation, and formative blood flow. It begins to beat around gestation day 22. Progenitor cells are derived from mesoderm (endocardium and myocardium), proepicardium (epicardium and coronary vessels), and neural crest (heart valves, outflow tract septation, and parasympathetic innervation). A variety of molecular disturbances in the factors regulating the specification and differentiation of these cells can cause congenital heart disease. This review explores the contribution of different cardiac progenitors to the embryonic heart development; the pathways and transcription factors guiding their expansion, migration, and functional differentiation; and the endogenous regenerative capacity of the adult heart including the plasticity of cardiomyocytes. Unfolding these mechanisms will become the basis for understanding the dynamics of specific congenital heart disease as well as a means to develop therapy for fetal as well as postnatal cardiac defects and heart failure.

  15. Dual transmission model of the fetal heart tone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Donald A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    2001-05-01

    Detection of the fetal heart tone by auscultation is sometimes easy, other times very difficult. In the model proposed here, the level of difficulty depends upon the position of the fetus within the maternal abdomen. If the fetus lies in the classical left/right occiput anterior position (head down, back against the maternal abdominal wall), detection by a sensor or stethoscope on the maternal abdominal surface is easy. In this mode, named here the ``direct contact'' mode, the heartbeat pushes the fetus against the detecting sensor. The motion generates pressure by impact and does not involve acoustic propagation at all. If the fetus lies in a persistent occiput posterior position (spine-to-spine, fetus facing forward), detection is difficult. In this, the ``fluid propagation'' mode, sound generated by the fetal heart and propagating across the amniotic fluid produces extremely weak signals at the maternal surface, typically 30 dB lower than those of the direct contact mode. This reduction in tone level can be compensated by judicious selection of detection frequency band and by exploiting the difference between the background noise levels of the two modes. Experimental clinical results, demonstrating the tones associated with the two respective modes, will be presented.

  16. Abnormal Cerebral Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Ceschin, Rafael; Pruetz, Jay D.; Detterich, Jon A.; Del Castillo, Sylvia; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Kim, Richard; Painter, Michael J.; Gilles, Floyd H.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Williams, Roberta G.; Blüml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Abnormal cerebral microstructure has been documented in term neonates with congenital heart disease (CHD) portending risk for injury and poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate diffuse cerebral microstructural abnormalities when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between microstructural abnormalities, white matter injury (e.g., punctate white matter lesions, pWMLs) and other clinical variables, including heart lesion. Material and Methods Using Tract-Based-Spatial-Statistics (TBSS), an unbiased, voxel-wise method for analyzing diffusion tensor imaging data, we compared 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Results Compared to term neonates without CHD, preterm neonates with CHD had microstructural abnormalities in widespread regions of the central white matter. However, 42% of the preterm CHD neonates had pWMLs. When neonates with pWMLs were excluded, microstructural abnormalities remained only in the splenium. Preterms with CHD had similar microstructure to preterms without CHD. Conclusion Diffuse microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD, strongly associated with pWMLs. Independently, regional vulnerability of the splenium, a structure associated with visual spatial function, was observed in all preterm CHD neonates. PMID:23703146

  17. Termination of pregnancy for fetal abnormality: a meta-ethnography of women's experiences.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, Caroline; Mitchell, Kathryn; Fox, Pauline

    2014-11-01

    Due to technological advances in antenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities, more women face the prospect of terminating pregnancies on these grounds. Much existing research focuses on women's psychological adaptation to this event. However, there is a lack of holistic understanding of women's experiences. This article reports a systematic review of qualitative studies into women's experiences of pregnancy termination for fetal abnormality. Eight databases were searched up to April 2014 for peer-reviewed studies, written in English, that reported primary or secondary data, used identifiable and interpretative qualitative methods, and offered a valuable contribution to the synthesis. Altogether, 4,281 records were screened; 14 met the inclusion criteria. The data were synthesised using meta-ethnography. Four themes were identified: a shattered world, losing and regaining control, the role of health professionals and the power of cultures. Pregnancy termination for fetal abnormality can be considered as a traumatic event that women experience as individuals, in their contact with the health professional community, and in the context of their politico-socio-legal environment. The range of emotions and experiences that pregnancy termination for fetal abnormality generates goes beyond the abortion paradigm and encompasses a bereavement model. Coordinated care pathways are needed that enable women to make their own decisions and receive supportive care.

  18. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-11-24

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer. PMID:26554006

  19. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-11-24

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer.

  20. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A.; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q.; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer. PMID:26554006

  1. The effect of warfarin dosage on maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Soma-Pillay, P; Nene, Z; Mathivha, T M; Macdonald, A P

    2011-01-01

    There are several challenges in the management of pregnant women with mechanical heart valves. Pregnancy increases the risk of thromboembolism and there is currently no consensus on the safest anticoagulation method during pregnancy. The objective of the study was to determine the correlation between the warfarin dose and pregnancy outcome in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves. Warfarin in pregnancy was associated with a low risk of valve thrombosis or maternal death. The risk for fetal abnormalities was not related to the maternal warfarin dosage. However, the risk for stillbirth was significantly increased with increasing doses of warfarin. PMID:27579092

  2. Myocardial bridges of the coronary arteries in the human fetal heart.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Yusuf Ozgür; Cavdar, Safiye; Yalin, Aymelek; Yener, Nuran; Ozdogmus, Omer

    2010-09-01

    During the last century, many investigators reported on myocardial bridges in the adult human heart. In the present study, 39 human fetal hearts (the mean gestastional age was 30 weeks) were studied for myocardial bridging, and the results were correlated with adult data. Among the 39 (27 male and 12 female) fetal hearts studied, 26 bridges were observed on 18 fetal hearts (46.2%). Ten of the bridges had one myocardial bridge, whereas double myocardial bridges were observed in eight fetal hearts. The most frequent myocardial bridges were observed on the left anterior descending artery (LAD), which had 13 bridges (50%). Eight (30.7%) myocardial bridges were on the diagonal artery, and on the posterior descending artery there were five (19.3%). Myocardial bridges were not observed on the circumflex artery. The data presented in this study may provide potentially useful information for the preoperative evaluation of the newborn and may have a clinical implication for sudden fetal death.

  3. Embodied experiences of prenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormality and pregnancy termination.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Penelope; McClaren, Belinda J; Hodgson, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Pregnant women routinely undergo prenatal screening in Australia and this has become a common experience of motherhood. When prenatal screening or prenatal testing results in diagnosis of a serious fetal abnormality, women are presented with a decision to continue or terminate their pregnancy. Few recent studies have explored women's psychosocial experience of prenatal diagnosis and pregnancy termination for fetal abnormality, and within this small group of studies it is rare for research to consider the embodied aspect of women's experiences. This paper reports on qualitative findings from in-depth interviews with 59 women in Melbourne, Australia who received a prenatal diagnosis of a significant abnormality and decided to terminate the pregnancy. Interview transcripts were coded inductively through thematic analysis. Two themes about embodiment were generated from the interviews: transitioning embodiment, and vulnerable bodies in un/comfortable spaces. Theory of pregnant embodiment was drawn on in interpreting women's narratives. Recommendations arising from the analysis include health professionals recognising, acknowledging and accommodating the transitioning embodied state of women as they consider, prepare for, undergo and recover from pregnancy termination for fetal abnormality. Further recommendations address the connections and disconnections between this transitioning embodied state and the spaces of clinics, hospitals and home. PMID:27578350

  4. In-utero carbon monoxide poisoning and multiple fetal abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Hennequin, Y.; Blum, D.; Vamos, E.; Steppe, M.; Goedseels, J.; Cavatorta, E. . Queen Fabiola Children's Hospital)

    1993-01-23

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning during pregnancy can lead to feto-maternal fatalities and stillbirths. Teratogenic effects have been reported. The authors strongly suspected an association between mild but chronic CO poisoning of the mother and major multiple malformations in the baby. Retrospective interviews of the mother disclosed that at 10 weeks' gestation, she had complained of headache and dizziness. At the same time, her 16-month-old daughter had an episode of unconsciousness. A faulty kitchen gas water-heater was suspected but the family did not have it repaired. The mother continued to have headaches regularly. During the 7th month of pregnancy, the daughter was found comatose. In the emergency ward, carboxyhemoglobins levels were 27.5% for the child and 14% for the pregnant mother. Both were treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Investigations by the gas company revealed a highly abnormal CO production from the kitchen and bathroom gas-water heaters: 120 and 100 parts per million, respectively, after 2 minutes of use.

  5. Association of GDF1 rs4808863 with fetal congenital heart defects: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Wu, Qingqing; Wang, Li; Li, Xiaofei; Ma, Yuqing; Yao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Background Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common fetal defects and the most important cause of child mortality and morbidity. Objective To investigate the association between growth/differentiation factor 1 (GDF1) polymorphisms and fetal CHDs, by evaluating the association of GDF1 rs4808863 with fetal CHDs. Design A case–control study. Setting Beijing, China. Participants We selected 124 fetuses with a CHD and a normal karyotype and normal array-based comparative genomic hybridisation analysis and compared them with 124 normal fetuses matched for gestational age and sex. Fetuses with a CHD, from 20 to 32 weeks of gestation were included. Fetuses with any chromosomal abnormalities, and fetuses from multiple pregnancies and those carried by pregnant women with chronic diseases, were excluded from this research. DNA extraction and genotyping were carried out for all cases to investigate the genotype distributions of GDF1 rs4808863. Results A significant difference was noted for the CT phenotype of GDF1 rs4808863 between the controls and the fetuses with CHDs using homozygote and heterozygote comparisons. The minor allele (T allele) of GDF1 rs4808863 was associated with an increased risk of CHD (p<0.05). A statistically significant difference between controls and fetuses with CHDs was noted in a comparison with the mutation genotype CT+TT and wild-type genotype CC (p<0.05) using dominant modal analysis. After stratification analysis, the CT phenotype, the minor allele (T allele) and the mutation genotype CT+TT of the rs4808863 polymorphism were associated with atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD), left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) and left–right laterality defects (p<0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that the GDF1 rs4808863 polymorphism contributes to an increased risk of fetal CHDs, especially the subtypes of AVSD, LVOTO and left–right laterality defects. PMID:26656983

  6. Reduced Fetal Cerebral Oxygen Consumption is Associated With Smaller Brain Size in Fetuses With Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liqun; Macgowan, Christopher K; Sled, John G; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Manlhiot, Cedric; Porayette, Prashob; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Jaeggi, Edgar; McCrindle, Brian W; Kingdom, John; Hickey, Edward; Miller, Steven; Seed, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal hypoxia has been implicated in the abnormal brain development seen in newborns with congenital heart disease (CHD). New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology now offers the potential to investigate the relationship between fetal hemodynamics and brain dysmaturation. Methods and Results We measured fetal brain size, oxygen saturation and blood flow in the major vessels of the fetal circulation in 30 late gestation fetuses with CHD and 30 normal controls using phase contrast MRI and T2 mapping. Fetal hemodynamic parameters were calculated using a combination of MRI flow and oximetry data and fetal hemoglobin concentrations estimated from population averages. In fetuses with CHD, reductions in umbilical vein oxygen content (p<0.001), and failure of the normal streaming of oxygenated blood from the placenta to the ascending aorta were associated with a mean reduction in ascending aortic saturation of 10% (p < 0.001), while cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen extraction were no different from controls. This accounted for the mean 15% reduction in cerebral oxygen delivery (p = 0.08) and 32% reduction cerebral VO2 in CHD fetuses (p < 0.001), which were associated with a 13% reduction in fetal brain volume (p < 0.001). Fetal brain size correlated with ascending aortic oxygen saturation and cerebral VO2 (r = 0.37 p = 0.004). Conclusions This study supports a direct link between reduced cerebral oxygenation and impaired brain growth in fetuses with CHD and raises the possibility that in utero brain development could be improved with maternal oxygen therapy. PMID:25762062

  7. Evaluation of fetal echocardiography as a routine antenatal screening tool for detection of congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Krishnananda; Shetty, Ranjan; Narayan, Pratap Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background Fetal echocardiography plays a pivotal role in identifying the congenital heart defects (CHDs) in utero. Though foetal echocardiography is mostly reserved for high risk pregnant women, its role as a routine prenatal screening tool still needs to be defined. Performing foetal echocardiography based on only these indications can lead to a significant numbers of CHD cases going undetected who will be deprived of further management leading to increased early neonatal mortalities. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence of CHDs by fetal echocardiography in an unselected population of pregnant women in comparison with pregnant women with conventional high risk factors for CHD. Methods This study enrolled consecutive pregnant women who attended antenatal clinic between 2008 and 2012 in a tertiary care hospital. These pregnant women were categorized into two groups: high risk group included pregnant women with traditional risk factors for CHD as laid down by Pediatric Council of the American Society of Echocardiography and low risk group. Detailed fetal 2 D echocardiography was done. Results A total of 1,280 pregnant women were included in study. The 118 women were categorized as the high risk group while remaining 1,162 were included in the low risk group. Twenty six cases of CHDs were detected based on abnormal foetal echocardiography (20.3 per 1,000). Two of the 26 cases of CHD occurred in high risk group whereas the remaining 24 occurred in low risk pregnancy. The difference in the incidence of CHDs between the two groups was not significant statistically (P=0.76). Conclusions Our study shows no difference in incidence of CHDs between pregnancies associated with high risk factors compared to low risk pregnancies. So we advocate foetal echocardiography should be included as a part of routine antenatal screening and all pregnant women irrespective of risk factors for CHDs. PMID:26885491

  8. Beat-to-beat heart rate detection in multi-lead abdominal fetal ECG recordings.

    PubMed

    Peters, C H L; van Laar, J O E H; Vullings, R; Oei, S G; Wijn, P F F

    2012-04-01

    Reliable monitoring of fetal condition often requires more information than is provided by cardiotocography, the standard technique for fetal monitoring. Abdominal recording of the fetal electrocardiogram may offer valuable additional information, but unfortunately is troubled by poor signal-to-noise ratios during certain parts of pregnancy. To increase the usability of abdominal fetal ECG recordings, an algorithm was developed that enhances fetal QRS complexes in these recordings and thereby provides a promising method for detecting the beat-to-beat fetal heart rate in recordings with poor signal-to-noise ratios. The method was evaluated on generated recordings with controlled signal-to-noise ratios and on actual recordings that were performed in clinical practice and were annotated by two independent experts. The evaluation on the generated signals demonstrated excellent results (sensitivity of 0.98 for SNR≥1.5). Only for SNR<2, the inaccuracy of the fetal heart rate detection exceeded 2 ms, which may still suffice for cardiotocography but is unacceptable for analysis of the beat-to-beat fetal heart rate variability. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of the method in actual recordings were reduced to approximately 90% for SNR≤2.4, but were excellent for higher signal-to-noise ratios.

  9. Zika Virus Infection with Prolonged Maternal Viremia and Fetal Brain Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Driggers, Rita W; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Korhonen, Essi M; Kuivanen, Suvi; Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Smura, Teemu; Rosenberg, Avi; Hill, D Ashley; DeBiasi, Roberta L; Vezina, Gilbert; Timofeev, Julia; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Levanov, Lev; Razak, Jennifer; Iyengar, Preetha; Hennenfent, Andrew; Kennedy, Richard; Lanciotti, Robert; du Plessis, Adre; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-06-01

    The current outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has been associated with an apparent increased risk of congenital microcephaly. We describe a case of a pregnant woman and her fetus infected with ZIKV during the 11th gestational week. The fetal head circumference decreased from the 47th percentile to the 24th percentile between 16 and 20 weeks of gestation. ZIKV RNA was identified in maternal serum at 16 and 21 weeks of gestation. At 19 and 20 weeks of gestation, substantial brain abnormalities were detected on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without the presence of microcephaly or intracranial calcifications. On postmortem analysis of the fetal brain, diffuse cerebral cortical thinning, high ZIKV RNA loads, and viral particles were detected, and ZIKV was subsequently isolated.

  10. Zika Virus Infection with Prolonged Maternal Viremia and Fetal Brain Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Driggers, Rita W; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Korhonen, Essi M; Kuivanen, Suvi; Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Smura, Teemu; Rosenberg, Avi; Hill, D Ashley; DeBiasi, Roberta L; Vezina, Gilbert; Timofeev, Julia; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Levanov, Lev; Razak, Jennifer; Iyengar, Preetha; Hennenfent, Andrew; Kennedy, Richard; Lanciotti, Robert; du Plessis, Adre; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-06-01

    The current outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has been associated with an apparent increased risk of congenital microcephaly. We describe a case of a pregnant woman and her fetus infected with ZIKV during the 11th gestational week. The fetal head circumference decreased from the 47th percentile to the 24th percentile between 16 and 20 weeks of gestation. ZIKV RNA was identified in maternal serum at 16 and 21 weeks of gestation. At 19 and 20 weeks of gestation, substantial brain abnormalities were detected on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without the presence of microcephaly or intracranial calcifications. On postmortem analysis of the fetal brain, diffuse cerebral cortical thinning, high ZIKV RNA loads, and viral particles were detected, and ZIKV was subsequently isolated. PMID:27028667

  11. The relationship of fetal heart rate at 10-14 weeks and birthweight at term.

    PubMed

    Panburana, P; Ajjimakorn, S; Jaovisidha, A; Tangkajiwangkoon, P

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the fetal heart rate at 10-14 weeks and birthweight at term. At the fetal medicine unit, Ramathibodi Hospital, the screening for Down's syndrome at 10-14 weeks' gestation by ultrasound has been ongoing since January 1997. Transabdominal ultrasound examination is routinely performed for the crown-rump length, nuchal translucency thickness and fetal heart rate. The fetal heart rate is measured over four to six cardiac cycles by using the pulsed Doppler technique. One thousand and fourteen term singleton pregnancies that resulted in phenotypically normal live births were studied. The study was done was carried out at 10-14 weeks of gestation (mean 12.27 weeks) from January 1997 to November 1997. The mean patient age was 26.78 years old. The mean gestational age and birthweight were 38.83 weeks and 3,097.83 grams respectively. The incidence of low birthweight (less than 2,500 grams) was 14.2 per cent. Regression analysis demonstrated no significant relation between fetal heart rate at 10-14 weeks and birthweight at term. In conclusion, the result of this study revealed that there was no correlation of the fetal heart rate at 10-14 weeks' gestation and birthweight at term.

  12. The effect of maternal ethanol ingestion on fetal rat heart vitamin A: a model for fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    DeJonge, M H; Zachman, R D

    1995-04-01

    Ethanol consumption during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Although the exact mechanism is unknown, nutritional alterations caused by ethanol exposure may be an etiologic factor in FAS. The congenital heart defects seen in FAS are similar to those found in vitamin A teratogenesis. Because ethanol ingestion alters vitamin A metabolism, we hypothesized that the cardiac manifestations seen in FAS result from an alteration in vitamin A metabolism or function in the developing fetus. Twenty-day gestation fetal rat hearts from ethanol-exposed and control pregnancies were analyzed for 1) levels of endogenous retinol, retinyl palmitate, and retinoic acid by quantitative HPLC; 2) binding activity levels of both retinol by cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid by cellular retinoic acid binding protein using specific competitive binding assays; and 3) relative abundance of cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid receptor alpha, beta, and gamma subtype message as expressed in mRNA. Levels of retinol and retinyl palmitate were significantly higher (p < 0.01) and the level of retinoic acid was significantly lower (p < 0.02) in the ethanol-exposed fetal hearts. Binding activity levels of cellular retinol binding protein and cellular retinoic acid binding protein were not different in the two groups. The message for retinoic acid receptor alpha (3.7 kb) was increased (p < 0.01) and the message for retinoic acid receptor beta was decreased (p < 0.05) in the ethanol-exposed hearts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7596680

  13. Categorizing Fetal Heart Rate Variability with and without Visual Aids

    PubMed Central

    Ashdown, Amanda J.; Scerbo, Mark W.; Belfore, Lee A.; Davis, Stephen S.; Abuhamad, Alfred Z.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the ability of clinicians to correctly categorize images of fetal heart rate (FHR) variability with and without the use of exemplars. Study Design A sample of 33 labor and delivery clinicians inspected static FHR images and categorized them into one of four categories defined by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) based on the amount of variability within absent, minimal, moderate, or marked ranges. Participants took part in three conditions: two in which they used exemplars representing FHR variability near the center or near the boundaries of each range, and a third control condition with no exemplars. The data gathered from clinicians were compared with those from a previous study using novices. Results Clinicians correctly categorized more images when the FHR variability fell near the center rather than the boundaries of each range, F (1,32) = 71.69, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.69. They also correctly categorized more images when exemplars were available, F (2,64) = 5.44, p = 0.007, partial η2 = 0.15. Compared with the novices, the clinicians were more accurate and quicker in their category judgments, but this difference was limited to the condition without exemplars. Conclusion The results suggest that categorizing FHR variability is more difficult when the examples fall near the boundaries of each NICHD-defined range. Thus, clinicians could benefit from training with visual aids to improve judgments about FHR variability and potentially enhance safety in labor and delivery. PMID:27722031

  14. Length to width ratio of the ductus venosus in simple screening for fetal congenital heart diseases in the second trimester.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wei-Hsiu; Lee, Shy-Ming; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Tang, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Chen, Ran-Chou

    2016-09-01

    Antenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) is still low even though screening was first introduced over 25 years ago. The purpose of our study was to determine the efficacy of a second-trimester prenatal ultrasonographic method of screening for CHD.From September 2012 to September 2013, the length and width of the fetal ductus venosus were measured sonographically in 1006 singleton fetuses, and the ratio of length to width was calculated. The accuracy of each fetal measurement and Doppler ultrasonography were determined. The standard fetal echocardiographic evaluations including 2-dimensional gray-scale imaging, color, and Doppler color flow mapping were performed. The transducer was aligned to the long axis of the fetal trunk to view the ductus venosus in its full length, including the inlet (isthmus) and outlet portions of the vessel. The diameters of the vessel inner wall and mid-point of the ductus venosus were measured using calipers. All scans and fetal measurements were conducted by a registered sonographer with more than 20 years of perinatal ultrasound screening experience.Of the 1006 singleton fetuses between 19 and 28 weeks' gestation, 36 had CHD. The ductus venosus length/width ratio (DVR) for the first CHD screening was extremely sensitive at 88.90%, with a specificity of 99.10% for the cardiac abnormalities included in this study. Chromosomal anomalies accompanied CHD in 0.4% (4/1006) of all cases and 11.11% (4/36) of the CHD cases.The DVR differed significantly between fetuses with CHD and normal fetuses during the second trimester. Careful assessment of the ratio should be a part of the sonographic examination of every fetus. In the case of a small DVR, advanced echocardiography and karyotype analysis should be performed. The ratio is a helpful tool for screening CHD abnormalities prenatally in the Chinese population. PMID:27684831

  15. Quantifying the Interactions between Maternal and Fetal Heart Rates by Transfer Entropy.

    PubMed

    Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of the short term relationship between maternal and fetal heart rates has been found in previous studies. However there is still limited knowledge about underlying mechanisms and patterns of the coupling throughout gestation. In this study, Transfer Entropy (TE) was used to quantify directed interactions between maternal and fetal heart rates at various time delays and gestational ages. Experimental results using maternal and fetal electrocardiograms showed significant coupling for 63 out of 65 fetuses, by statistically validating against surrogate pairs. Analysis of TE showed a decrease in transfer of information from fetus to the mother with gestational age, alongside the maturation of the fetus. On the other hand, maternal to fetal TE was significantly greater in mid (26-31 weeks) and late (32-41 weeks) gestation compared to early (16-25 weeks) gestation (Mann Whitney Wilcoxon (MWW) p<0.05). TE further increased from mid to late, for the fetuses with RMSSD of fetal heart rate being larger than 4 msec in the late gestation. This difference was not observed for the fetuses with smaller RMSSD, which could be associated with the quiet sleep state. Delay in the information transfer from mother to fetus significantly decreased (p = 0.03) from mid to late gestation, implying a decrease in fetal response time. These changes occur concomitant with the maturation of the fetal sensory and autonomic nervous systems with advancing gestational age. The effect of maternal respiratory rate derived from maternal ECG was also investigated and no significant relationship was found between breathing rate and TE at any lag. In conclusion, the application of TE with delays revealed detailed information on the fetal-maternal heart rate coupling strength and latency throughout gestation, which could provide novel clinical markers of fetal development and well-being.

  16. [Abnormal positions of the heart. An analysis on 1039 cases].

    PubMed

    Mătăsaru, Silvia; Crupa, Maria; Felea, Doina; Cosmescu, Adriana; Barbacariu, Liliana; Petroaie, Antoneta

    2003-01-01

    The aim was to study the impact of the cardiac malpositions into the group of the 1039 congenital heart diseases registered in the Pediatric Outpatient Department of "Sf. Spiridon" hospital. All patients were investigated noninvasively using clinical examination, electrocardiogram, routine Roentgenogram, two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, abdominal echography and, only in two cases, cardiac catheterisation. 23 (2.21%) from 1039 congenital heart diseases registered were cardiac malpositions: dextroposition--3 cases (13.04%), dextrocardia--7 cases (30.43%) and situs inversus--13 cases (56.52%). Most of the children were boys (65.21%), 70% from all cases coming from urban area. Only 3 children had structural cardiac anomalies: two cases with dextrocardia (one with atrial septal defect and one with atrioventricular canal) and one with situs inversus and tetralogy of Fallot, two of them suffering surgical correction. Psychological impact was the main problem of these children, especially during the adolescence, except the two cases with structural cardiac abnormalities who needed following and surgical treatment.

  17. Abnormal intermittency of heart rate in patients with neurocardiogenic syncope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Myung-Kul; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Kim, June-Soo

    2002-03-01

    Introduction: We aim to test our hypothesis that, during daily activity, though not as prominent as during HUT test, the patients may show different degree of intermittency in heart rates compared to healthy persons. METHOD AND RESULTS: Thirty patients with neurocardiogenic syncope who showed a positive HUT test and thirty healthy controls without history of syncope were included. Their twenty-four hour ambulatory electrocardiograms were digitized and RR interval (RRI) data of six-hour interval were analyzed. To quantify the intermittency (C1) behavior, The intermittency analysis was performed using Mexican hat wavelet. For the syncope group, the values of C1 were significantly higher at 6AM-6PM and lower at 6AM-midnight, respectively. However, the values were not different at midnight-6AM. The significant night-day circadian change shown in the control group was lost in C1. CONCLUSION: When compared to healthy control, the patients with neurocardiogenic syncope shows increased intermittency of heart rates in daytime during daily activity, and abnormal circadian rhythms of the index. These new findings may be useful for investigating the pathophysiology of neurocardiogenic syncope and early identification of the patients.

  18. The Application of an Anatomical Database for Fetal Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Pei, Qiu-Yan; Li, Yun-Tao; Yang, Zhen-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fetal congenital heart anomalies are the most common congenital anomalies in live births. Fetal echocardiography (FECG) is the only prenatal diagnostic approach used to detect fetal congenital heart disease (CHD). FECG is not widely used, and the antenatal diagnosis rate of CHD varies considerably. Thus, mastering the anatomical characteristics of different kinds of CHD is critical for ultrasound physicians to improve FECG technology. The aim of this study is to investigate the applications of a fetal CHD anatomic database in FECG teaching and training program. Methods: We evaluated 60 transverse section databases including 27 types of fetal CHD built in the Prenatal Diagnosis Center in Peking University People's Hospital. Each original database contained 400–700 cross-sectional digital images with a resolution of 3744 pixels × 5616 pixels. We imported the database into Amira 5.3.1 (Australia Visage Imaging Company, Australia) three-dimensional (3D) software. The database functions use a series of 3D software visual operations. The features of the fetal CHD anatomical database were analyzed to determine its applications in FECG continuing education and training. Results: The database was rebuilt using the 3D software. The original and rebuilt databases can be displayed dynamically, continuously, and synchronically and can be rotated at arbitrary angles. The sections from the dynamic displays and rotating angles are consistent with the sections in FECG. The database successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship features of different fetal CHDs. We established a fetal CHD anatomy training database and a standardized training database for FECG. Ultrasound physicians and students can learn the anatomical features of fetal CHD and FECG through either centralized training or distance education. Conclusions: The database of fetal CHD successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship of different kinds of

  19. Analysis of Fetal Heart Rate and Uterine Activity Signals by Using Apple II Plus Microcomputer *

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Sze-ya; Jilek, Jiri; Yeh, Michael M.

    1981-01-01

    Intrapartum electronic fetal monitoring has been used widely for over a decade in obstetric practice. Its main purpose is to provide information about the labor and fetal conditions so that better obstetrical care can be provided. However, there is certain information obtained from monitoring which needs electronic or computer aids to make them useful clinically. This study describes the experience of using the Apple II plus microcomputer in obtaining and analyzing fetal heart rate and uterine activity signals from the intrapartum clinical monitor. This was done by building an analog-to-digital converting board and by using 6502 microprocessor machine language routines. Approximately 60 to 80 minutes of tracings can be processed before 30 kilobytes of memory are filled. The data is then transferred to a 5¼″ diskette for permanent storage and for future data reduction. With this approach, uterine activity units and fetal heart rate variability indices are calculated.

  20. Maternal systemic lupus erythematosus associated with fetal congenital heart block. A case report.

    PubMed

    Moore, P J

    1981-08-15

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is a rare cause of fetal bradycardia and, if misinterpreted as fetal distress, may lead to detrimental obstetric intervention. There is a definite association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), as well as other connective tissue disorders in the mother and CHB in her offspring. A case of CHB in the child of a mother with asymptomatic SLE is reported and a useful diagnostic investigation, the sonar-atropine test, is described.

  1. Investigating the beat by beat phase synchronization between maternal and fetal heart rates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Khandoker, Ahsan H; Marzbanrad, Faezeh; Funamoto, Kiyoe; Sugibayashi, Rika; Endo, Miyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2013-01-01

    The development of the fetal cardiovascular system plays a crucial role in fetal health. The evolution of the relationship between fetal and maternal cardiac systems during fetal maturation is a characterizing feature for fetal cardiac development. This paper aims to evaluate this relationship by investigating the beat-to-beat synchronization between fetal and maternal heart rates and its variation at different stages of pregnancy. Synchronization epochs and phase locking patterns are analyzed at certain synchronization ratios (SRs) for three gestational age groups (16-26 weeks, 27-33 weeks, 34-40 weeks). Results show that the normalized synchronization epoch is significantly different for three age groups with the p-value of 6.72*10(-6) and 2.89*10(-4) at SR of 1:2 and 4:5 respectively. The variance of phase locking also shows significant difference for three groups with the p-value less than 10(-7) at four SRs. Results also suggest that synchronization may be the force behind the increase in the maternal heart rate to maintain the fetal development and provide supplies for the fetus. Overall, the findings propose new clinical markers for evaluating the antenatal development.

  2. Application of higher-order cepstral techniques in problems of fetal heart signal extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabry-Rizk, Madiha; Zgallai, Walid; Hardiman, P.; O'Riordan, J.

    1996-10-01

    Recently, cepstral analysis based on second order statistics and homomorphic filtering techniques have been used in the adaptive decomposition of overlapping, or otherwise, and noise contaminated ECG complexes of mothers and fetals obtained by a transabdominal surface electrodes connected to a monitoring instrument, an interface card, and a PC. Differential time delays of fetal heart beats measured from a reference point located on the mother complex after transformation to cepstra domains are first obtained and this is followed by fetal heart rate variability computations. Homomorphic filtering in the complex cepstral domain and the subuent transformation to the time domain results in fetal complex recovery. However, three problems have been identified with second-order based cepstral techniques that needed rectification in this paper. These are (1) errors resulting from the phase unwrapping algorithms and leading to fetal complex perturbation, (2) the unavoidable conversion of noise statistics from Gaussianess to non-Gaussianess due to the highly non-linear nature of homomorphic transform does warrant stringent noise cancellation routines, (3) due to the aforementioned problems in (1) and (2), it is difficult to adaptively optimize windows to include all individual fetal complexes in the time domain based on amplitude thresholding routines in the complex cepstral domain (i.e. the task of `zooming' in on weak fetal complexes requires more processing time). The use of third-order based high resolution differential cepstrum technique results in recovery of the delay of the order of 120 milliseconds.

  3. [Detection of Heart Rate of Fetal ECG Based on STFT and BSS].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Cai, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Changes in heart rate of fetal is function regulating performance of the circulatory system and the central nervous system, it is significant to detect heart rate of fetus in perinatal fetal. This paper puts forward the fetal heart rate detection method based on short time Fourier transform and blind source separation. First of all, the mixed ECG signal was preprocessed, and then the wavelet transform technique was used to separate the fetal ECG signal with noise from mixed ECG signal, after that, the short-time Fourier transform and the blind separation were carried on it, and then calculated the correlation coefficient of it, Finally, An independent component that it has strongest correlation with the original signal was selected to make FECG peak detection and calculated the fetal instantaneous heart rate. The experimental results show that the method can improve the detection rate of the FECG peak (R), and it has high accuracy in fixing peak(R) location in the case of low signal-noise ratio. PMID:27197491

  4. The Fetal Heart in Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Van Mieghem, Tim; Lewi, Liesbeth; Gucciardo, Léonardo; DeKoninck, Philip; Van Schoubroeck, Dominique; Devlieger, Roland; Deprest, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome is a severe complication occurring in 10% of monochorionic twin pregnancies. The disease is usually explained as due to an intrauterine imbalance in intertwin blood exchange, which leads to a volume depleted-donor twin and an overfilled recipient twin. The recipient has signs of cardiac dysfunction, which can be measured using echocardiography or blood and amniotic fluid derived biomarkers. Whereas cardiac dysfunction typically progresses in pregnancies treated with amniodrainage, it usually disappears within a few weeks after fetoscopic laser coagulation of the connecting intertwin anastomoses. Nevertheless, recipients remain at a increased risk of pulmonary stenosis. In this paper, we summarize the cardiac alterations in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, describe the changes seen after fetal therapy, list the newly proposed staging systems based on fetal cardiac function, and make recommendations about the use of fetal echocardiography in the evaluation and followup of pregnancies complicated by twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome. PMID:20811613

  5. Is there evidence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization?

    PubMed Central

    Van Leeuwen, Peter; Geue, Daniel; Lange, Silke; Cysarz, Dirk; Bettermann, Henrik; Grönemeyer, Dietrich HW

    2003-01-01

    Background The prenatal condition offers a unique possibility of examining physiological interaction between individuals. Goal of this work was to look for evidence of coordination between fetal and maternal cardiac systems. Methods 177 magnetocardiograms were recorded in 62 pregnancies (16th–42nd week of gestation). Fetal and maternal RR interval time series were constructed and the phases, i.e. the timing of the R peaks of one time series in relation to each RR interval of the other were determined. The distributions of these phases were examined and synchrograms were constructed for real and surrogate pairs of fetal and maternal data sets. Synchronization epochs were determined for defined n:m coupling ratios. Results Differences between real and surrogate data could not be found with respect to number of synchronization epochs found (712 vs. 741), gestational age, subject, recording or n:m combination. There was however a preference for the occurrence of synchronization epochs in specific phases in real data not apparent in the surrogate for some n:m combinations. Conclusion The results suggest that occasional coupling between fetal and maternal cardiac systems does occur. PMID:12702214

  6. Development of a piezopolymer pressure sensor for a portable fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Pretlow, R. A.; Stoughton, J. W.; Baker, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    A piezopolymer pressure sensor has been developed for service in a portable fetal heart rate monitor, which will permit an expectant mother to perform the fetal nonstress test, a standard predelivery test, in her home. Several sensors are mounted in an array on a belt worn by the mother. The sensor design conforms to the distinctive features of the fetal heart tone, namely, the acoustic signature, frequency spectrum, signal amplitude, and localization. The components of a sensor serve to fulfill five functions: signal detection, acceleration cancellation, acoustical isolation, electrical shielding, and electrical isolation of the mother. A theoretical analysis of the sensor response yields a numerical value for the sensor sensitivity, which is compared to experiment in an in vitro sensor calibration. Finally, an in vivo test on patients within the last six weeks of term reveals that nonstress test recordings from the acoustic monitor compare well with those obtained from conventional ultrasound.

  7. Fetal Heart Rate Reactivity Differs by Women's Psychiatric Status: An Early Marker for Developmental Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Catherine; Sloan, Richard P.; Myers, Michael M.; Ellman, Lauren; Werner, Elizabeth; Jeon, Jiyeon; Tager, Felice; Fifer, William P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there are differences in fetal heart rate (FHR) reactivity associated with women's psychiatric status. Method: In 57 women in their 36th to 38th week of pregnancy (mean age 27 [+ or -] 6 years), electrocardiogram, blood pressure (BP), respiration (RSP), and FHR were measured during baseline and a psychological…

  8. Fetal Heart Rate and Variability: Stability and Prediction to Developmental Outcomes in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Costigan, Kathleen; Achy-Brou, Aristide

    2007-01-01

    Stability in cardiac indicators before birth and their utility in predicting variation in postnatal development were examined. Fetal heart rate and variability were measured longitudinally from 20 through 38 weeks gestation (n = 137) and again at age 2 (n = 79). Significant within-individual stability during the prenatal period and into childhood…

  9. Fetal autonomic brain age scores, segmented heart rate variability analysis, and traditional short term variability

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Dirk; Kowalski, Eva-Maria; Schmidt, Alexander; Tetschke, Florian; Nowack, Samuel; Rudolph, Anja; Wallwitz, Ulrike; Kynass, Isabelle; Bode, Franziska; Tegtmeyer, Janine; Kumm, Kathrin; Moraru, Liviu; Götz, Theresa; Haueisen, Jens; Witte, Otto W.; Schleußner, Ekkehard; Schneider, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances of fetal autonomic brain development can be evaluated from fetal heart rate patterns (HRP) reflecting the activity of the autonomic nervous system. Although HRP analysis from cardiotocographic (CTG) recordings is established for fetal surveillance, temporal resolution is low. Fetal magnetocardiography (MCG), however, provides stable continuous recordings at a higher temporal resolution combined with a more precise heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. A direct comparison of CTG and MCG based HRV analysis is pending. The aims of the present study are: (i) to compare the fetal maturation age predicting value of the MCG based fetal Autonomic Brain Age Score (fABAS) approach with that of CTG based Dawes-Redman methodology; and (ii) to elaborate fABAS methodology by segmentation according to fetal behavioral states and HRP. We investigated MCG recordings from 418 normal fetuses, aged between 21 and 40 weeks of gestation. In linear regression models we obtained an age predicting value of CTG compatible short term variability (STV) of R2 = 0.200 (coefficient of determination) in contrast to MCG/fABAS related multivariate models with R2 = 0.648 in 30 min recordings, R2 = 0.610 in active sleep segments of 10 min, and R2 = 0.626 in quiet sleep segments of 10 min. Additionally segmented analysis under particular exclusion of accelerations (AC) and decelerations (DC) in quiet sleep resulted in a novel multivariate model with R2 = 0.706. According to our results, fMCG based fABAS may provide a promising tool for the estimation of fetal autonomic brain age. Beside other traditional and novel HRV indices as possible indicators of developmental disturbances, the establishment of a fABAS score normogram may represent a specific reference. The present results are intended to contribute to further exploration and validation using independent data sets and multicenter research structures. PMID:25505399

  10. Fetal growth and coronary heart disease in south India.

    PubMed

    Stein, C E; Fall, C H; Kumaran, K; Osmond, C; Cox, V; Barker, D J

    1996-11-01

    People from India living overseas have high rates of coronary heart disease which are not explained by known coronary risk factors. In India, coronary heart disease is predicted to become the most common cause of death within 15 years. Small size at birth is a newly described risk factor for coronary heart disease. The authors studied 517 men and women born between 1934 and 1954 in a mission hospital in Mysore, South India, and who still lived near the hospital. Researchers related the prevalence of coronary heart disease, defined by standard criteria, to individual birth size. 25 men and 27 women had coronary heart disease. Low birth weight, short birth length, and small head circumference were associated with a raised prevalence of the disease. The associations were stronger and statistically significant among people aged 45 years and over. High rates of disease were also found in those whose mothers had a low body weight during pregnancy. The highest prevalence of coronary heart disease was in people who weighed 2.5 kg or less at birth and whose mothers weighed less than 45 kg during pregnancy. These associations were largely independent of known coronary risk factors.

  11. HSPC117 deficiency in cloned embryos causes placental abnormality and fetal death

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingying; Hai, Tang; Liu, Zichuan; Zhou, Shuya; Lv, Zhuo; Ding, Chenhui; Liu, Lei; Niu, Yuyu; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Tong, Man; Wang, Liu; Jouneau, Alice; Zhang, Xun; Ji, Weizhi; Zhou, Qi

    2010-07-02

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been successfully used in many species to produce live cloned offspring, albeit with low efficiency. The low frequency of successful development has usually been ascribed to incomplete or inappropriate reprogramming of the transferred nuclear genome. Elucidating the genetic differences between normal fertilized and cloned embryos is key to understand the low efficiency of SCNT. Here, we show that expression of HSPC117, which encodes a hypothetical protein of unknown function, was absent or very low in cloned mouse blastocysts. To investigate the role of HSPC117 in embryo development, we knocked-down this gene in normal fertilized embryos using RNA interference. We assessed the post-implantation survival of HSPC117 knock-down embryos at 3 stages: E9 (prior to placenta formation); E12 (after the placenta was fully functional) and E19 (post-natal). Our results show that, although siRNA-treated in vivo fertilized/produced (IVP) embryos could develop to the blastocyst stage and implanted without any difference from control embryos, the knock-down embryos showed substantial fetal death, accompanied by placental blood clotting, at E12. Furthermore, comparison of HSPC117 expression in placentas of nuclear transfer (NT), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and IVP embryos confirmed that HSPC117 deficiency correlates well with failures in embryo development: all NT embryos with a fetus, as well as IVP and ICSI embryos, had normal placental HSPC117 expression while those NT embryos showing reduced or no expression of HSPC117 failed to form a fetus. In conclusion, we show that HSPC117 is an important gene for post-implantation development of embryos, and that HSPC117 deficiency leads to fetal abnormalities after implantation, especially following placental formation. We suggest that defects in HSPC117 expression may be an important contributing factor to loss of cloned NT embryos in vivo.

  12. Monitoring fetal heart rate during pregnancy: contributions from advanced signal processing and wearable technology.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Maria G; Fanelli, Andrea; Magenes, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring procedures are the basis to evaluate the clinical state of patients and to assess changes in their conditions, thus providing necessary interventions in time. Both these two objectives can be achieved by integrating technological development with methodological tools, thus allowing accurate classification and extraction of useful diagnostic information. The paper is focused on monitoring procedures applied to fetal heart rate variability (FHRV) signals, collected during pregnancy, in order to assess fetal well-being. The use of linear time and frequency techniques as well as the computation of non linear indices can contribute to enhancing the diagnostic power and reliability of fetal monitoring. The paper shows how advanced signal processing approaches can contribute to developing new diagnostic and classification indices. Their usefulness is evaluated by comparing two selected populations: normal fetuses and intra uterine growth restricted (IUGR) fetuses. Results show that the computation of different indices on FHRV signals, either linear and nonlinear, gives helpful indications to describe pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular and neural system controlling the fetal heart. As a further contribution, the paper briefly describes how the introduction of wearable systems for fetal ECG recording could provide new technological solutions improving the quality and usability of prenatal monitoring.

  13. Monitoring Fetal Heart Rate during Pregnancy: Contributions from Advanced Signal Processing and Wearable Technology

    PubMed Central

    Signorini, Maria G.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring procedures are the basis to evaluate the clinical state of patients and to assess changes in their conditions, thus providing necessary interventions in time. Both these two objectives can be achieved by integrating technological development with methodological tools, thus allowing accurate classification and extraction of useful diagnostic information. The paper is focused on monitoring procedures applied to fetal heart rate variability (FHRV) signals, collected during pregnancy, in order to assess fetal well-being. The use of linear time and frequency techniques as well as the computation of non linear indices can contribute to enhancing the diagnostic power and reliability of fetal monitoring. The paper shows how advanced signal processing approaches can contribute to developing new diagnostic and classification indices. Their usefulness is evaluated by comparing two selected populations: normal fetuses and intra uterine growth restricted (IUGR) fetuses. Results show that the computation of different indices on FHRV signals, either linear and nonlinear, gives helpful indications to describe pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular and neural system controlling the fetal heart. As a further contribution, the paper briefly describes how the introduction of wearable systems for fetal ECG recording could provide new technological solutions improving the quality and usability of prenatal monitoring. PMID:24639886

  14. Reduced systolic pressure load decreases cell-cycle activity in the fetal sheep heart.

    PubMed

    O'Tierney, P F; Anderson, D F; Faber, J J; Louey, S; Thornburg, K L; Giraud, G D

    2010-08-01

    The fetal heart is highly sensitive to changes in mechanical load. We have previously demonstrated that increased cardiac load can stimulate cell cycle activity and maturation of immature cardiomyocytes, but the effects of reduced load are not known. Sixteen fetal sheep were given either continuous intravenous infusion of lactated Ringer solution (LR) or enalaprilat, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor beginning at 127 days gestational age. After 8 days, fetal arterial pressure in the enalaprilat-infused fetuses (23.8 +/- 2.8 mmHg) was lower than that of control fetuses (47.5 +/- 4.7 mmHg) (P < 0.0001). Although the body weights of the two groups of fetuses were similar, the heart weight-to-body weight ratios of the enalaprilat-infused fetuses were less than those of the LR-infused fetuses (5.6 +/- 0.5 g/kg vs. 7.0 +/- 0.6 g/kg, P < 0.0001). Dimensions of ventricular myocytes were not different between control and enalaprilat-infused fetuses. However, there was a significant decrease in cell cycle activity in both the right ventricle (P < 0.005) and the left ventricle (P < 0.002) of the enalaprilat-infused fetuses. Thus, we conclude a sustained reduction in systolic pressure load decreases hyperplastic growth in the fetal heart. PMID:20484695

  15. Canine fetal heart rate: do accelerations or decelerations predict the parturition day in bitches?

    PubMed

    Gil, E M U; Garcia, D A A; Giannico, A T; Froes, T R

    2014-10-15

    Ultrasonography is a safe and efficient technique for monitoring fetal development and viability. One of the most important and widely used parameters to verify fetal viability is the fetal heart rate (HR). In human medicine, the fetal HR normally oscillates during labor in transient accelerations and decelerations associated with uterine contractions. The present study investigated whether these variations also occur in canine fetuses and its relationship to parturition. A cohort study was conducted in 15 pregnant bitches undergoing two-dimensional high-resolution ultrasonographic examination during the 8th and 9th week of gestation. Fetal HR was assessed in M-mode for 5 minutes in each fetus in all bitches. In addition, the bitches were monitored for clinical signs of imminent parturition. Associations between the HR, antepartum time, and delivery characteristics were evaluated with a Poisson regression model. Fetal HR acceleration and deceleration occurred in canine fetuses and predicted the optimal time of parturition. These findings can help veterinarians and sonographers better understand this phenomenon in canine fetuses.

  16. Prenatal aneupioidy detection by fluorencence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 1,068 second trimester pregnancies with fetal ultrasound abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, B.E.; Wright, M.; Lytle, C. |

    1994-09-01

    One indication for rapid prenatal aneuploidy detection in uncultured amniocytes by FISH is the identification of fetal abnormalities by ultrasound. We analyzed 1,068 consecutive specimens from second trimester pregnancies with fetal ultrasound abnormalities referred for FISH plus cytogenetics. These specimens are a subset (14.7%) of the most recent 7,240 clinical referrals for these combined analyses. Hybridization with specific probes for chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X and Y were used to detect common aneuploidies. As defined by previously described criteria, specimens were reported as informative disomic, informative trisomic, or uninformative within two days of receipt. The rate of informative results from acceptable specimens was 90.1%. The vast majority of uninformative results was due to maternal cell contamination which precluded analysis. Within the informative group there were no false positives, false negatives nor reports of incorrect gender. Of the 1,068 tested specimens with ultrasound abnormalities, 135 (12.5%) were cytogenetically diagnosed as aneuploid. Prior to the cytogenetic analysis, a total of 107 aneuploidies were correctly identified by FISH. The remaining 26 aneuploidies generated an uninformative FISH result. The overall FISH detection rate for aneuploidy (including informative and uninformative results) was 79%. Other unbalanced chromosome abnormalities were present in 2.1% of specimens and 0.7% had balanced chromosome abnormalities. The inclusive total cytogenetic abnormality rate was 15.4%, of which 85% were potentially detectable by our FISH protocol. This clinical experience demonstrates that aneuploidy detection by FISH on uncultured amniocytes can provide accurate and rapid identification of aneuploidies, especially when such abnormalities are suspected following the diagnosis of fetal anomalies by ultrasound examination.

  17. Decreased baseline variability on fetal heart rate pattern in a fetus with heterotaxy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ryutaro; Takei, Kohta; Kaneshi, Yosuke; Morikawa, Mamoru; Cho, Kazutoshi; Minakami, Hisanori

    2015-12-01

    In a fetus with suspected heterotaxy syndrome, a decreased/absent baseline variability of fetal heart rate pattern developed at gestational week 36(+5) and continued for 5 days until birth at gestational week 37(+2), while repeat biophysical profile scorings with ultrasound were consistently unremarkable. This neonate weighing 2404 g with Apgar scores of 7 (1-min) and 8 (5-min) and umbilical arterial cord blood pH of 7.28 with base deficit of 3.9 mmol/L, showed a heart rate of 120 b.p.m. for 3 h after birth, but subsequently developed sinus bradycardia (84 b.p.m.) unresponsive to crying. Isoproterenol initiated 9 h after birth was effective in the increase of heart rate to 120 b.p.m. in this neonate. Brain magnetic resonance imaging at 16 days of age was unremarkable. The decreased/absent baseline variability of fetal heart rate pattern was speculated to have been caused by sinus node dysfunction, and not by reduced fetal oxygenation in this case. PMID:26421346

  18. Toward the improvement in fetal monitoring during labor with the inclusion of maternal heart rate analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Hernâni; Pinto, Paula; Silva, Manuela; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Bernardes, João

    2016-04-01

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring is used routinely in labor, but conventional methods have a limited capacity to detect fetal hypoxia/acidosis. An exploratory study was performed on the simultaneous assessment of maternal heart rate (MHR) and FHR variability, to evaluate their evolution during labor and their capacity to detect newborn acidemia. MHR and FHR were simultaneously recorded in 51 singleton term pregnancies during the last two hours of labor and compared with newborn umbilical artery blood (UAB) pH. Linear/nonlinear indices were computed separately for MHR and FHR. Interaction between MHR and FHR was quantified through the same indices on FHR-MHR and through their correlation and cross-entropy. Univariate and bivariate statistical analysis included nonparametric confidence intervals and statistical tests, receiver operating characteristic curves and linear discriminant analysis. Progression of labor was associated with a significant increase in most MHR and FHR linear indices, whereas entropy indices decreased. FHR alone and in combination with MHR as FHR-MHR evidenced the highest auROC values for prediction of fetal acidemia, with 0.76 and 0.88 for the UAB pH thresholds 7.20 and 7.15, respectively. The inclusion of MHR on bivariate analysis achieved sensitivity and specificity values of nearly 100 and 89.1%, respectively. These results suggest that simultaneous analysis of MHR and FHR may improve the identification of fetal acidemia compared with FHR alone, namely during the last hour of labor.

  19. Detection of fetal heart movement in first trimester of pregnancy using pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Robinson, H P

    1972-11-25

    A method is reported by which the presence or absence of fetal heart movement may be reliably detected by an abdominal approach from the 48th day of pregnancy onwards (menstrual age). The technique involves the use of commercially available diagnostic sonar apparatus using two display and time position modes in combination.A series of 106 examinations on 56 patients in early pregnancy is presented in which there were no false results.

  20. Maternal psychological impact of fetal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sklansky, Mark; Tang, Alvin; Levy, Denis; Grossfeld, Paul; Kashani, Iraj; Shaughnessy, Robin; Rothman, Abraham

    2002-02-01

    The maternal psychological impact of fetal echocardiography may be deleterious in the face of newly diagnosed congenital heart disease. This questionnaire-based study prospectively examined the psychological impact of both normal and abnormal fetal echocardiography. Normal fetal echocardiography decreased maternal anxiety, increased happiness, and increased the closeness women felt toward their unborn children. In contrast, when fetal echocardiography detected congenital heart disease, maternal anxiety typically increased, and mothers commonly felt less happy about being pregnant. However, among women who had recently delivered infants with congenital heart disease, those who had had fetal echocardiography during the pregnancy felt less responsible for their infants' defects and tended to have improved their relationships with the infants' fathers after the prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease. Further study of the psychological and medical impact of fetal echocardiography will be necessary to define and optimize the clinical value of this powerful diagnostic tool.

  1. How to read fetal heart rate tracings in labor: a comparison between ACOG and NICE guidelines.

    PubMed

    Buscicchio, Giorgia; Gentilucci, Lucia; Martorana, Rossana; Martino, Cristina; Tranquilli, Andrea Luigi

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess reproducibility and clinical relevance of current guidelines on fetal heart rate interpretation in labor. Two obstetricians with comparable experience analyzed one hundred fetal heart rate tracings. One doctor made a first analysis using American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) 2009 guideline's criteria; the other used National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) 2007 guideline's criteria; subsequently they repeated the evaluation crossing the guidelines used. The primary outcome of this experiment was to determine the time spent to evaluate the tracings, secondary outcomes were: the intraobserver concordance (concordance of the evaluation with the two systems for each investigator), the interobserver concordance (concordance between the interpretation given by each investigator) and. the concordance between operators' grading and actual outcome of labor. The interpretation of fetal heart rate tracings was longer using ACOG criteria. The intraobserver agreement was significant. The interobserver agreement was better using NICE guidelines. The same trend showed for the concordance between investigators' grading and actual outcomes There was more discordance in worse outcomes. Both guidelines are interesting and useful, but NICE seems easier to handle than ACOG.

  2. Spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC): new technology for evaluation of the fetal heart.

    PubMed

    DeVore, G R; Falkensammer, P; Sklansky, M S; Platt, L D

    2003-10-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) is a new approach for clinical assessment of the fetal heart. It offers an easy to use technique to acquire data from the fetal heart and to aid in visualization with both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) cine sequences. The acquisition is performed in two steps: first, images are acquired by a single, automatic volume sweep. Second, the system analyzes the image data according to their spatial and temporal domain and processes an online dynamic 3D image sequence that is displayed in a multiplanar reformatted cross-sectional display and/or a surface rendered display. The examiner can navigate within the heart, re-slice, and produce all of the standard image planes necessary for a comprehensive diagnosis. The advantages of STIC for use in evaluation of the fetal heart are as follows: the technique delivers a temporal resolution which corresponds to a B-mode frame rate of approximately 80 frames/s; it provides the examiner with an unlimited number of images for review; it allows for correlation between image planes that are perpendicular to the main image acquisition plane; it may shorten the evaluation time when complex heart defects are suspected; it enables the reconstruction of a 3D rendered image that contains depth and volume which may provide additional information that is not available from the thin multiplanar image slices (e.g. for pulmonary veins, septal thickness); it lends itself to storage and review of volume data by the examiner or by experts at a remote site; it provides the examiner with the ability to review all images in a looped cine sequence. PMID:14528474

  3. [A new ECG electrode concept for the conduction of fetal heart action potentials without penetration of the skin].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S; Langner, K; Rothe, J; Saling, E

    1982-10-01

    Internal cardiotocography is an important method for reliable supervision of the fetus during labor. The main task is the prevention of fetal hypoxia. However, there is a considerable disadvantage as the electrodes used penetrate the fetal skin, creating a possible entry point for organisms. The concept we have developed forms a new way of decreasing the risk of infection during labor by conducting the fetal heart rate potentials without penetrating the skin. The electrode is fixed to the skin of the presenting part by tissue adhesive and electrical contact between the fetal skin and the wire of the electrode is established through using electrolyte fluid.

  4. Investigation of the interaction of cardiotoxic anticancer agents using the fetal mouse heart organ culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Kimler, B.F.; Rethorst, R.D.; Cox, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    The fetal mouse heart organ culture system was utilized in an effort to document and predict the potential cardiotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, Adriamycin (ADR), and Dihydroxyanthraquinone (DHAQ); alone and in combination. These antineoplastic agents have been shown to produce clinical cardiomyopathy which is often dose-limiting. Fetal mouse hearts (gestational day 17) were removed and placed in a culture system of 6-well microtiter plates. A single heart was placed in each well on a piece of aluminium mesh, above the culture medium but bathed by capillary action. The plates were then placed in a 100% oxygen environment and incubated at 37/sup 0/C. Treatments performed on day 1 after culture were Cs-137 irradiation (10, 20, or 40 Gy); ADR (10, 30, or 100 micrograms/ml); DHAQ (5, 20, or 50 micrograms/ml); or various combinations of drugs and radiation. Hearts were checked every day for functional activity as evidenced by continuous heart best. Untreated hearts beat rhythmically for up to 9 days (average = 6.8 days); treated hearts stopped beating between 2 and 7 days after treatment. Using this endpoint of functional retention time (FRT), dose response curves were obtained for all individual agents. Combinations of ADR and DHAQ (at concentrations that resulted in FRTs of 3.5 days) produced no greater effect than either agent alone. However, the combination of radiation (FRT = 5.3 days) with ADR, DHAQ or both drugs was more effective than was drug alone. This system may help to predict the cardiotoxic effects that result from the use of these drugs and radiation.

  5. Impact of Heart Disease on Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Koutrolou-Sotiropoulou, Paraskevi; Parikh, Puja B; Miller, Charles; Lima, Fabio V; Butler, Javed; Stergiopoulos, Kathleen

    2015-08-01

    Pregnant women with underlying heart disease (HD) are at increased risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. In this study, we sought to identify the risk and risk factors for adverse maternal and fetal events in pregnant women with underlying HD. Pregnant women referred for echocardiogram with known or suspected HD were categorized into those with (1) cardiomyopathy, (2) other HD (congenital, coronary, arrhythmia, or valvular), and (3) no HD. Primary outcome was major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), defined as a composite of death, sustained arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and transient ischemic attack/stroke. Secondary outcome was fetal adverse clinical events (FACE), a composite of infant death, prematurity, underweight status, intracranial hemorrhage, and respiratory distress. Of the 173 pregnancies, 37 (21%) had cardiomyopathy, 65 (38%) had other HD, and 68 (39%) had no HD. MACE was higher in pregnancies with cardiomyopathy (p <0.001) because of higher rates of heart failure and cardiac arrest (up to 6 months postpartum, p <0.001 and 0.023, respectively). FACE rates were higher in cardiomyopathy pregnancies (p <0.001). In multivariate analysis, cardiomyopathy (odds ratio [OR] 11.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.7 to 35.4), hypertension (OR 10.69, 95% CI 3.70 to 30.90), and arrhythmia (OR 7.6, 95% CI 2.1 to 27) were independently associated with higher MACE. Cardiomyopathy (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 7.0) and hypertension (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 9.0) were also independently predictive of higher FACE. In conclusion, pregnant women with cardiomyopathy had higher rates of adverse MACE and FACE rates. Cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and arrhythmia were independently associated with adverse cardiovascular and fetal clinical events, whereas other HD was not.

  6. Epigenomic Landscape of Human Fetal Brain, Heart, and Liver.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liying; Guo, Hongshan; Hu, Boqiang; Li, Rong; Yong, Jun; Zhao, Yangyu; Zhi, Xu; Fan, Xiaoying; Guo, Fan; Wang, Xiaoye; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Wen, Lu; Qiao, Jie; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-02-26

    The epigenetic regulation of spatiotemporal gene expression is crucial for human development. Here, we present whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses of a wide variety of histone markers in the brain, heart, and liver of early human embryos shortly after their formation. We identified 40,181 active enhancers, with a large portion showing tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific patterns, pointing to their roles in controlling the ordered spatiotemporal expression of the developmental genes in early human embryos. Moreover, using sequential ChIP-seq, we showed that all three organs have hundreds to thousands of bivalent domains that are marked by both H3K4me3 and H3K27me3, probably to keep the progenitor cells in these organs ready for immediate differentiation into diverse cell types during subsequent developmental processes. Our work illustrates the potentially critical roles of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific epigenomes in regulating the spatiotemporal expression of developmental genes during early human embryonic development.

  7. DASAF: An R Package for Deep Sequencing-Based Detection of Fetal Autosomal Abnormalities from Maternal Cell-Free DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohong; Tang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Feng; Tao, Chunmei; Gao, Junhui; Ma, Mengmeng; Zhong, Tingyan; Cai, JianPing; Li, Yixue; Ding, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Background. With the development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), noninvasive prenatal diagnosis using maternal cell-free DNA is fast becoming the preferred method of fetal chromosomal abnormality detection, due to its inherent high accuracy and low risk. Typically, MPS data is parsed to calculate a risk score, which is used to predict whether a fetal chromosome is normal or not. Although there are several highly sensitive and specific MPS data-parsing algorithms, there are currently no tools that implement these methods. Results. We developed an R package, detection of autosomal abnormalities for fetus (DASAF), that implements the three most popular trisomy detection methods-the standard Z-score (STDZ) method, the GC correction Z-score (GCCZ) method, and the internal reference Z-score (IRZ) method-together with one subchromosome abnormality identification method (SCAZ). Conclusions. With the cost of DNA sequencing declining and with advances in personalized medicine, the demand for noninvasive prenatal testing will undoubtedly increase, which will in turn trigger an increase in the tools available for subsequent analysis. DASAF is a user-friendly tool, implemented in R, that supports identification of whole-chromosome as well as subchromosome abnormalities, based on maternal cell-free DNA sequencing data after genome mapping. PMID:27437397

  8. DASAF: An R Package for Deep Sequencing-Based Detection of Fetal Autosomal Abnormalities from Maternal Cell-Free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Feng; Tao, Chunmei; Gao, Junhui; Ma, Mengmeng; Zhong, Tingyan; Cai, JianPing; Li, Yixue

    2016-01-01

    Background. With the development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), noninvasive prenatal diagnosis using maternal cell-free DNA is fast becoming the preferred method of fetal chromosomal abnormality detection, due to its inherent high accuracy and low risk. Typically, MPS data is parsed to calculate a risk score, which is used to predict whether a fetal chromosome is normal or not. Although there are several highly sensitive and specific MPS data-parsing algorithms, there are currently no tools that implement these methods. Results. We developed an R package, detection of autosomal abnormalities for fetus (DASAF), that implements the three most popular trisomy detection methods—the standard Z-score (STDZ) method, the GC correction Z-score (GCCZ) method, and the internal reference Z-score (IRZ) method—together with one subchromosome abnormality identification method (SCAZ). Conclusions. With the cost of DNA sequencing declining and with advances in personalized medicine, the demand for noninvasive prenatal testing will undoubtedly increase, which will in turn trigger an increase in the tools available for subsequent analysis. DASAF is a user-friendly tool, implemented in R, that supports identification of whole-chromosome as well as subchromosome abnormalities, based on maternal cell-free DNA sequencing data after genome mapping. PMID:27437397

  9. Consuming a Western diet for two weeks suppresses fetal genes in mouse hearts

    PubMed Central

    Medford, Heidi M.; Cox, Emily J.; Miller, Lindsey E.

    2014-01-01

    Diets high in sugar and saturated fat (Western diet) contribute to obesity and pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. A common physiological response to obesity is hypertension, which induces cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Hypertrophy is regulated at the level of chromatin by repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), and pathological hypertrophy is associated with reexpression of a fetal cardiac gene program. Reactivation of fetal genes is commonly observed in hypertension-induced hypertrophy; however, this response is blunted in diabetic hearts, partially due to upregulation of the posttranslational modification O-linked-β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) to proteins by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT). OGT and O-GlcNAc are found in chromatin-modifying complexes, but it is unknown whether they play a role in Western diet-induced hypertrophic remodeling. Therefore, we investigated the interactions between O-GlcNAc, OGT, and the fetal gene-regulating transcription factor complex REST/mammalian switch-independent 3A/histone deacetylase (HDAC). Five-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a Western (n = 12) or control diet (n = 12) for 2 wk to examine the early hypertrophic response. Western diet-fed mice exhibited fasting hyperglycemia and increased body weight (P < 0.05). As expected for this short duration of feeding, cardiac hypertrophy was not yet evident. We found that REST is O-GlcNAcylated and physically interacts with OGT in mouse hearts. Western blot analysis showed that HDAC protein levels were not different between groups; however, relative to controls, Western diet hearts showed increased REST and decreased ANP and skeletal α-actin. Transcript levels of HDAC2 and cardiac α-actin were decreased in Western diet hearts. These data suggest that REST coordinates regulation of diet-induced hypertrophy at the level of chromatin. PMID:24523346

  10. Ultrasound findings in fetal congenital heart block associated with maternal anti-Ro/SSA and Anti-La/SSB antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jasmine; Clark, Toshi J; Tan, Justin H; Delaney, Shani; Jolley, Jennifer A

    2015-03-01

    We present the sonographic features of a second-trimester fetus diagnosed with a bradyarrhythmia at 19 weeks' gestation. The mother carried a diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome, including the presence of SSA and SSB antibodies. Ultrasound M-mode and fetal echocardiogram revealed the etiology of the bradycardia to be a complete fetal congenital heart block, likely due to transplacental passage of autoimmune anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies. Consequential to the congenital heart block, the fetus developed hydrops fetalis at 21 weeks' gestational age. We discuss the 2 major etiologies of congenital heart block and the implications in subsequent pregnancies.

  11. Three-dimensional scaffolds of fetal decellularized hearts exhibit enhanced potential to support cardiac cells in comparison to the adult.

    PubMed

    Silva, A C; Rodrigues, S C; Caldeira, J; Nunes, A M; Sampaio-Pinto, V; Resende, T P; Oliveira, M J; Barbosa, M A; Thorsteinsdóttir, S; Nascimento, D S; Pinto-do-Ó, P

    2016-10-01

    A main challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the limited data on microenvironmental cues that sustain survival, proliferation and functional proficiency of cardiac cells. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential of fetal (E18) and adult myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM) to support cardiac cells. Acellular three-dimensional (3D) bioscaffolds were obtained by parallel decellularization of fetal- and adult-heart explants thereby ensuring reliable comparison. Acellular scaffolds retained main constituents of the cardiac ECM including distinctive biochemical and structural meshwork features of the native equivalents. In vitro, fetal and adult ECM-matrices supported 3D culture of heart-derived Sca-1(+) progenitors and of neonatal cardiomyocytes, which migrated toward the center of the scaffold and displayed elongated morphology and excellent viability. At the culture end-point, more Sca-1(+) cells and cardiomyocytes were found adhered and inside fetal bioscaffolds, compared to the adult. Higher repopulation yields of Sca-1(+) cells on fetal ECM relied on β1-integrin independent mitogenic signals. Sca-1(+) cells on fetal bioscaffolds showed a gene expression profile that anticipates the synthesis of a permissive microenvironment for cardiomyogenesis. Our findings demonstrate the superior potential of the 3D fetal microenvironment to support and instruct cardiac cells. This knowledge should be integrated in the design of next-generation biomimetic materials for heart repair.

  12. [The abdominal fetal EKG for the analysis of pre- and subpartual heart frequency (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Breuker, K H; Khalili-Brunklaus, D; Bolte, A

    1976-10-15

    The application possibilities of abdominal fetal electrocardiography for pre- and subpartual continuous registration of the fetal heart frequency are examined. For this purpose the technical quality of 403 abdominal FEKG-registrations were checked in the individual stages of pregnancy and during birth. The average time spent looking for the best position with the greatest R-wave amplitude amounting to 2.6 min. The abdominal longitudinal position and the right hand oblique abdominal position proved to be advantageous with longitudinal presentation of the fetus. With fetal oblique to transverse presentation and in the 6th to 7th month of pregnancy the transverse abdominal position was likewise favourable. The technical quality of the supervision varied in the individual months of pregnancy. The best results were achieved in the 6th and 11th month of pregnancy. The worst technical quality was registered in the 8th month. In the 7th and 9th month two thirds of registrations were at least adequate. Sub partu the registrations during the first stage of labour were in two thirds of the cases very good and good, in a quarter satisfactory, in approx. a sixth adequate and fairly bad. In the second stage the registrations were considerably worse, 10.7% were satisfactory, 28.6% adequate and 59.8% deficient. Prepartually the technical quality was dependent on the fetal R-wave amplitude. In the second stage of labour no correlation between fetal R-wave amplitude and technical quality could be ascertained. The rupture of the amnion only influenced the quality of the registrations, if the satisfactory of labour increased. Adiposis and the position of the placenta did not affect the technical quality of the registrations. The lateral positions of the patient led to unusable registrations in 26.2%, in 46.9% the left and in 44.6% the right lateral position could be accepted without loss of quality. The comparison of the subpartual parallel registrations by means of phonocardiography

  13. Increase in the embedding dimension in the heart rate variability associated with left ventricular abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, D. S.; Irurzun, I. M.; Mitelman, J.; Mola, E. E.

    2006-10-01

    In the present study, the authors report evidence that the existence of premature ventricular contractions increases the embedding dimension of the cardiac dynamics. They also analyze patients with congestive heart failure, a severe clinical condition associated with abnormal left ventricular function. Results also show an increase in the embedding dimension of the heart rate variability. They used electrocardiograms collected by themselves with quality standards that make them comparable with other databases.

  14. Correlating multidimensional fetal heart rate variability analysis with acid-base balance at birth.

    PubMed

    Frasch, Martin G; Xu, Yawen; Stampalija, Tamara; Durosier, Lucien D; Herry, Christophe; Wang, Xiaogang; Casati, Daniela; Seely, Andrew Je; Alfirevic, Zarko; Gao, Xin; Ferrazzi, Enrico

    2014-12-01

    Fetal monitoring during labour currently fails to accurately detect acidemia. We developed a method to assess the multidimensional properties of fetal heart rate variability (fHRV) from trans-abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) during labour. We aimed to assess this novel bioinformatics approach for correlation between fHRV and neonatal pH or base excess (BE) at birth.We enrolled a prospective pilot cohort of uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at 38-42 weeks' gestation in Milan, Italy, and Liverpool, UK. Fetal monitoring was performed by standard cardiotocography. Simultaneously, with fECG (high sampling frequency) was recorded. To ensure clinician blinding, fECG information was not displayed. Data from the last 60 min preceding onset of second-stage labour were analyzed using clinically validated continuous individualized multiorgan variability analysis (CIMVA) software in 5 min overlapping windows. CIMVA allows simultaneous calculation of 101 fHRV measures across five fHRV signal analysis domains. We validated our mathematical prediction model internally with 80:20 cross-validation split, comparing results to cord pH and BE at birth.The cohort consisted of 60 women with neonatal pH values at birth ranging from 7.44 to 6.99 and BE from -0.3 to -18.7 mmol L(-1). Our model predicted pH from 30 fHRV measures (R(2) = 0.90, P < 0.001) and BE from 21 fHRV measures (R(2) = 0.77, P < 0.001).Novel bioinformatics approach (CIMVA) applied to fHRV derived from trans-abdominal fECG during labor correlated well with acid-base balance at birth. Further refinement and validation in larger cohorts are needed. These new measurements of fHRV might offer a new opportunity to predict fetal acid-base balance at birth. PMID:25407948

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and careful stratification of fetal heart rate (FHR) is extremely important in all pregnancies. The most lethal cardiac rhythm disturbances occur during apparently normal pregnancies where FHR and rhythmare regular and within normal or low-normal ranges. These hidden depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, associated with genetic ion channelopathies cannot be detected by echocardiography, and may be responsible for up to 10% of unexplained fetal demise, prompting a need for newer and better fetal diagnostic techniques. Other manifest fetal arrhythmias such as premature beats, tachycardia, and bradycardia are commonly recognized. Heart rhythm diagnosis in obstetrical practice is usually made by M-mode and pulsed Doppler fetal echocardiography, but not all fetal cardiac time intervals are captured by echocardiographic methods. This article reviews different types of fetal arrhythmias, their presentation and treatment strategies, and gives an overview of the present and future diagnostic techniques. PMID:24858320

  16. Teaching Recognition of Normal and Abnormal Heart Sounds Using Computer-Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musselman, Eugene E.; Grimes, George M.

    1976-01-01

    The computer is being used in an innovative manner to teach the recognition of normal and abnormal canine heart sounds at the University of Chicago. Experience thus far indicates that the PLATO program resources allow the maximum development of the student's proficiency in auscultation. (Editor/LBH)

  17. Fetal Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... There is actually no direct contact between the circulatory systems of the mother and fetus. The fetus does ... use its own lungs until birth, so its circulatory system is different from that of a newborn baby. ...

  18. [Advance in diagnosis and treatment of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease with traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Rong; Wang, Jiel; Liu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    To discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, therapies and prescriptions of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease. According to the advance in modern diagnosis and treatment, the authors believed that psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease is closely related with mental stresses, like anxiety, depression and insomnia. It is mostly caused by emotional injury and expressed in heart, liver, spleen and kidney. The pathogenesis is heart-liver hyperactivity, yin deficiency in heart and kidney, and insufficiency in heart and spleen. The full recognition of etiology and pathogenesis of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease and the combined treatment of disease and syndromes are of great significance to reduce mental stress and other risk factors, prevent and treat coronary heart disease and improve prognosis.

  19. The Influence of Bearing-Down Technique on the Fetal Heart Rate during the Second Stage of Labor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlis, Deborah Woolley

    This experimental study contrasted the effects of sustained bearing-down efforts with short bearing-down efforts during the first twelve contractions of the second stage of labor. A single subject design with intrasubject replication was used to compare the incidence, duration, and amplitude of fetal heart rate decelerations, as well as the beat-to-beat variability of those decelerations. Neonatal outcome was evaluated with umbilical arterial cord blood pH values and the one- and five-minute APGAR scores. Thirty -two nulliparous women alternated the use of vigorous, sustained Valsalva-style bearing-down efforts with shorter efforts called minipushes every three contractions during the second stage of labor. Sixteen women began the second stage using the Valsalva-style bearing-down technique; sixteen began the second stage using the minipush. The fetal heart rate was recorded by an internal fetal scalp electrode. Uterine contractility was measured by an internal uterine pressure catheter. A repeated-measures MANOVA showed a significant interaction between the order of implementation of the bearing-down techniques and the amplitude of the fetal heart rate decelerations. A similar comparison of the duration of the decelerations showed no significant differences between the two bearing-down techniques. Likewise, analysis of the incidence of fetal heart rate decelerations and the magnitude of the beat-to-beat variability revealed no significant differences between the two techniques.

  20. The Influence of a Crosshair Visual Aid on Observer Detection of Simulated Fetal Heart Rate Signals.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Rebecca A; Scerbo, Mark W; Anderson-Montoya, Brittany L; Belfore, Lee A; Abuhamad, Alfred Z; Davis, Stephen S

    2016-03-01

    Objective To determine whether a visual aid overlaid on fetal heart rate (FHR) tracings increases detection of critical signals relative to images with no visual aid. Study Design In an experimental study, 21 undergraduate students viewed 240 images of simulated FHR tracings twice, once with the visual aids and once without aids. Performance was examined for images containing three different types of FHR signals (early deceleration, late deceleration, and acceleration) and four different FHR signal-to-noise ratios corresponding to FHR variability types (absent, minimal, moderate, and marked) identified by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (2008). Performance was analyzed using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results The presence of the visual aid significantly improved correct detections of signals overall and decreased false alarms for the marked variability condition. Conclusion The results of the study provide evidence that the presence of a visual aid was useful in helping novices identify FHR signals in simulated maternal-fetal heart rate images. Further, the visual aid was most useful for conditions in which the signal is most difficult to detect (when FHR variability is highest).

  1. The Influence of a Crosshair Visual Aid on Observer Detection of Simulated Fetal Heart Rate Signals.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Rebecca A; Scerbo, Mark W; Anderson-Montoya, Brittany L; Belfore, Lee A; Abuhamad, Alfred Z; Davis, Stephen S

    2016-03-01

    Objective To determine whether a visual aid overlaid on fetal heart rate (FHR) tracings increases detection of critical signals relative to images with no visual aid. Study Design In an experimental study, 21 undergraduate students viewed 240 images of simulated FHR tracings twice, once with the visual aids and once without aids. Performance was examined for images containing three different types of FHR signals (early deceleration, late deceleration, and acceleration) and four different FHR signal-to-noise ratios corresponding to FHR variability types (absent, minimal, moderate, and marked) identified by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (2008). Performance was analyzed using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results The presence of the visual aid significantly improved correct detections of signals overall and decreased false alarms for the marked variability condition. Conclusion The results of the study provide evidence that the presence of a visual aid was useful in helping novices identify FHR signals in simulated maternal-fetal heart rate images. Further, the visual aid was most useful for conditions in which the signal is most difficult to detect (when FHR variability is highest). PMID:26989564

  2. Inhibition of Histone H3K9 Acetylation by Anacardic Acid Can Correct the Over-Expression of Gata4 in the Hearts of Fetal Mice Exposed to Alcohol during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chang; Zhu, Jing; Sun, Hui-Chao; Huang, Xu-Pei; Zhao, Wei-An; Zheng, Min; Liu, Ling-Juan; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular malformations can be caused by abnormalities in Gata4 expression during fetal development. In a previous study, we demonstrated that ethanol exposure could lead to histone hyperacetylation and Gata4 over-expression in fetal mouse hearts. However, the potential mechanisms of histone hyperacetylation and Gata4 over-expression induced by ethanol remain unclear. Methods and Results Pregnant mice were gavaged with ethanol or saline. Fetal mouse hearts were collected for analysis. The results of ethanol fed groups showed that global HAT activity was unusually high in the hearts of fetal mice while global HDAC activity remained unchanged. Binding of P300, CBP, PCAF, SRC1, but not GCN5, were increased on the Gata4 promoter relative to the saline treated group. Increased acetylation of H3K9 and increased mRNA expression of Gata4, α-MHC, cTnT were observed in these hearts. Treatment with the pan-histone acetylase inhibitor, anacardic acid, reduced the binding of P300, PCAF to the Gata4 promoter and reversed H3K9 hyperacetylation in the presence of ethanol. Interestingly, anacardic acid attenuated over-expression of Gata4, α-MHC and cTnT in fetal mouse hearts exposed to ethanol. Conclusions Our results suggest that P300 and PCAF may be critical regulatory factors that mediate Gata4 over-expression induced by ethanol exposure. Alternatively, P300, PCAF and Gata4 may coordinate over-expression of cardiac downstream genes in mouse hearts exposed to ethanol. Anacardic acid may thus protect against ethanol-induced Gata4, α-MHC, cTnT over-expression by inhibiting the binding of P300 and PCAF to the promoter region of these genes. PMID:25101666

  3. The Fetal Mammalian Heart Generates a Robust Compensatory Response to Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Sturzu, Anthony C.; Rajarajan, Kuppusamy; Passer, Derek; Plonowska, Karolina; Riley, Alyssa; Tan, Timothy C.; Sharma, Arun; Xu, Adele F.; Engels, Marc C.; Feistritzer, Rebecca; Li, Guang; Selig, Martin K.; Geissler, Richard; Robertson, Keston D.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Domian, Ibrahim J.; Wu, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart development is tightly regulated by signaling events acting upon a defined number of progenitor and differentiated cardiac cells. While loss-of-function of these signaling pathways leads to congenital malformation, the consequences of cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) or embryonic cardiomyocyte loss are less clear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that embryonic mouse hearts exhibit a robust mechanism for regeneration following extensive cell loss. Methods and Results By combining a conditional cell ablation approach with a novel blastocyst complementation strategy, we generated murine embryos that exhibit a full spectrum of CPC or cardiomyocyte ablation. Remarkably, ablation of up to 60% of CPCs at embryonic day 7.5 was well-tolerated and permitted embryo survival. Ablation of embryonic cardiomyocytes to a similar degree (50-60%) at embryonic day 9.0 could be fully rescued by residual myocytes with no obvious adult cardiac functional deficit. In both ablation models, an increase in cardiomyocyte proliferation rate was detected and accounted for at least some of the rapid recovery of myocardial cellularity and heart size. Conclusions Our study defines the threshold for cell loss in the embryonic mammalian heart and reveals a robust cardiomyocyte compensatory response that sustains normal fetal development. PMID:25995316

  4. Right ventricular nitric oxide signaling in an ovine model of congenital heart disease: a preserved fetal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kameny, Rebecca Johnson; He, Youping; Morris, Catherine; Sun, Christine; Johengen, Michael; Gong, Wenhui; Raff, Gary W; Datar, Sanjeev A; Oishi, Peter E; Fineman, Jeffrey R

    2015-07-01

    We recently reported superior right ventricle (RV) performance in response to acute afterload challenge in lambs with a model of congenital heart disease with chronic left-to-right cardiac shunts. Compared with control animals, shunt lambs demonstrated increased contractility because of an enhanced Anrep effect (the slow increase in contractility following myocyte stretch). This advantageous physiological response may reflect preservation of a fetal phenotype, since the RV of shunt lambs remains exposed to increased pressure postnatally. Nitric oxide (NO) production by NO synthase (NOS) is activated by myocyte stretch and is a necessary intermediary of the Anrep response. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that NO signaling is increased in the RV of fetal lambs compared with controls and shunt lambs have persistence of this fetal pattern. An 8-mm graft was placed between the pulmonary artery and aorta in fetal lambs (shunt). NOS isoform expression, activity, and association with activating cofactors were determined in fetal tissue obtained during late-gestation and in 4-wk-old juvenile shunt and control lambs. We demonstrated increased RNA and protein expression of NOS isoforms and increased total NOS activity in the RV of both shunt and fetal lambs compared with control. We also found increased NOS activation and association with cofactors in shunt and fetal RV compared with control. These data demonstrate preserved fetal NOS phenotype and NO signaling in shunt RV, which may partially explain the mechanism underlying the adaptive response to increased afterload seen in the RV of shunt lambs.

  5. Breaking bad news to a pregnant woman with a fetal abnormality on ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Andrea L; Conklin, Jona

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is a common procedure performed in pregnancy. Most obstetric patients have an ultrasound between 18 and 20 weeks' gestation. While there is debate regarding the utility of this ultrasound, it has become a routine part of prenatal care. Discovery of a fetal anomaly on ultrasound is most commonly an unexpected, emotionally devastating event for pregnant women. Counseling these women about the ultrasound findings requires empathy and sensitivity. This task falls on the physicians caring for pregnant women: maternal-fetal medicine specialists, radiologists, generalist obstetricians, and family medicine physicians. Their training regarding breaking bad news is varied. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to provide a framework to break bad news of an anomalous fetus for physicians caring for pregnant women using the SPIKES protocol. The SPIKES acronym stands for setting, perception, invitation, knowledge, empathize, summary, and strategy.

  6. Invited commentary: the incremental value of customization in defining abnormal fetal growth status.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Sun, Kun

    2013-10-15

    Reference tools based on birth weight percentiles at a given gestational week have long been used to define fetuses or infants that are small or large for their gestational ages. However, important deficiencies of the birth weight reference are being increasingly recognized. Overwhelming evidence indicates that an ultrasonography-based fetal weight reference should be used to classify fetal and newborn sizes during pregnancy and at birth, respectively. Questions have been raised as to whether further adjustments for race/ethnicity, parity, sex, and maternal height and weight are helpful to improve the accuracy of the classification. In this issue of the Journal, Carberry et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;178(8):1301-1308) show that adjustment for race/ethnicity is useful, but that additional fine tuning for other factors (i.e., full customization) in the classification may not further improve the ability to predict infant morbidity, mortality, and other fetal growth indicators. Thus, the theoretical advantage of full customization may have limited incremental value for pediatric outcomes, particularly in term births. Literature on the prediction of short-term maternal outcomes and very long-term outcomes (adult diseases) is too scarce to draw any conclusions. Given that each additional variable being incorporated in the classification scheme increases complexity and costs in practice, the clinical utility of full customization in obstetric practice requires further testing.

  7. n-Order and maximum fuzzy similarity entropy for discrimination of signals of different complexity: Application to fetal heart rate signals.

    PubMed

    Zaylaa, Amira; Oudjemia, Souad; Charara, Jamal; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents two new concepts for discrimination of signals of different complexity. The first focused initially on solving the problem of setting entropy descriptors by varying the pattern size instead of the tolerance. This led to the search for the optimal pattern size that maximized the similarity entropy. The second paradigm was based on the n-order similarity entropy that encompasses the 1-order similarity entropy. To improve the statistical stability, n-order fuzzy similarity entropy was proposed. Fractional Brownian motion was simulated to validate the different methods proposed, and fetal heart rate signals were used to discriminate normal from abnormal fetuses. In all cases, it was found that it was possible to discriminate time series of different complexity such as fractional Brownian motion and fetal heart rate signals. The best levels of performance in terms of sensitivity (90%) and specificity (90%) were obtained with the n-order fuzzy similarity entropy. However, it was shown that the optimal pattern size and the maximum similarity measurement were related to intrinsic features of the time series.

  8. Non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart: CT angiography findings.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ersin; Kafadar, Cahit; Tutar, Süleyman; Bozlar, Uğur; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) is most commonly performed for the evaluation of the coronary arteries; however, non-coronary cardiac pathologies are frequently detected on these scans. In cases where magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used, cardiac CT can serve as the first-line imaging modality to evaluate many non-coronary cardiac pathologies. In this article, we discuss congenital non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart and their cardiac CT imaging features. PMID:27609435

  9. Fetal exposure to propoxur and abnormal child neurodevelopment at 2 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Ostrea, Enrique M.; Reyes, Alexis; Villanueva-Uy, Esterlita; Pacifico, Rochelle; Benitez, Bernadette; Ramos, Essie; Bernardo, Rommel C.; Bielawski, Dawn M.; Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa; Janisse, James J.; Ager, Joel W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to determine the effects of fetal exposure to propoxur and pyrethroids, on child neurodevelopment at 2 years of age. Patients and Methods Mothers were prospectively recruited during mid-pregnancy in Bulacan, Philippines where multiple pesticides including propoxur, cyfluthrin, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, pretilachlor, bioallethrin, malathion, diazinon and transfluthrin are used. To detect prenatal exposure to these pesticides, maternal hair and blood, infant’s hair, cord blood, and meconium were analyzed for the pesticides by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Infants were examined at 2 years of age with 95.1% follow up rate and their neurodevelopment outcome was assessed by the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scale (N=754). Results Meconium analysis was the most sensitive method to detect fetal exposure to pesticides and exposure was highest for propoxur (21.3%) and the grouped pyrethroids (2.5% - bioallethrin, transfluthrin, cyfluthrin and cypermethrin). Path analysis modeling was performed to determine the effects of fetal exposure to propoxur and pyrethroids on the child’s neurodevelopment at 24 months of age while controlling for confounders. Only singletons and those with complete data for the path analysis were included (N=696). Using a path analysis model, there was a significant negative (β= −0.14, p<0.001) relationship between prenatal pesticide exposure to propoxur and motor development at 2 years of age after controlling for confounders, e.g., infant gender, socioeconomic status, maternal intelligence, home stimulation (HOME), postnatal exposure to propoxur and blood lead level at 2 years of age. Conclusion At 2 years of age, prenatal exposure to propoxur was associated with poorer motor development in children. PMID:22155319

  10. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-06-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease.

  11. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  12. Fetal cardiology: changing the definition of critical heart disease in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Słodki, M; Respondek-Liberska, M; Pruetz, J D; Donofrio, M T

    2016-08-01

    Infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) may require emergent treatment in the newborn period. These infants are likely to benefit the most from a prenatal diagnosis, which allows for optimal perinatal planning. Several cardiac centers have created guidelines for the management of these high-risk patients with CHD. This paper will review and compare several prenatal CHD classification systems with a particular focus on the most critical forms of CHD in the fetus and newborn. A contemporary definition of critical CHD is one which requires urgent intervention in the first 24 h of life to prevent death. Such cardiac interventions may be not only life saving for the infant but also decrease subsequent morbidity. Critical CHD cases may require delivery at specialized centers that can provide perinatal, obstetric, cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery care. Fetuses diagnosed in mid-gestation require detailed fetal diagnostics and serial monitoring during the prenatal period, in order to assess for ongoing changes and identify progression to a more severe cardiac status. Critical CHD may progress in utero and there is still much to be learned about how to best predict those who will require urgent neonatal interventions. Despite improved therapeutic capabilities, newborns with critical CHD continue to have significant morbidity and mortality due to compromise that begins in the delivery room. Fetal echocardiography is the best way to predict the need for specialized care at birth to improve outcome. Once the diagnosis is made of critical CHD, delivery at the proper time and in appropriate institution with specific care protocols should be initiated. More work needs to be done to better delineate the risk factors for progression of critical CHD and to determine which newborns will require specialized care. The most frequently described forms of critical CHD requiring immediate intervention include hypoplastic left heart syndrome with intact or severely restricted

  13. Fetal cardiology: changing the definition of critical heart disease in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Słodki, M; Respondek-Liberska, M; Pruetz, J D; Donofrio, M T

    2016-08-01

    Infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) may require emergent treatment in the newborn period. These infants are likely to benefit the most from a prenatal diagnosis, which allows for optimal perinatal planning. Several cardiac centers have created guidelines for the management of these high-risk patients with CHD. This paper will review and compare several prenatal CHD classification systems with a particular focus on the most critical forms of CHD in the fetus and newborn. A contemporary definition of critical CHD is one which requires urgent intervention in the first 24 h of life to prevent death. Such cardiac interventions may be not only life saving for the infant but also decrease subsequent morbidity. Critical CHD cases may require delivery at specialized centers that can provide perinatal, obstetric, cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery care. Fetuses diagnosed in mid-gestation require detailed fetal diagnostics and serial monitoring during the prenatal period, in order to assess for ongoing changes and identify progression to a more severe cardiac status. Critical CHD may progress in utero and there is still much to be learned about how to best predict those who will require urgent neonatal interventions. Despite improved therapeutic capabilities, newborns with critical CHD continue to have significant morbidity and mortality due to compromise that begins in the delivery room. Fetal echocardiography is the best way to predict the need for specialized care at birth to improve outcome. Once the diagnosis is made of critical CHD, delivery at the proper time and in appropriate institution with specific care protocols should be initiated. More work needs to be done to better delineate the risk factors for progression of critical CHD and to determine which newborns will require specialized care. The most frequently described forms of critical CHD requiring immediate intervention include hypoplastic left heart syndrome with intact or severely restricted

  14. ["Facing"--a preliminary parameter in diagnosis of fetal skeletal abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Krause, M; Feige, A

    1993-03-01

    Four cases with abnormalities of foetal faces are demonstrated--thanatophoric dwarfism, cheilognathopalotoschisis, osteogenesis imperfecta, achondrogenesis (Type I). A relationship to skeletal dysplasia was shown. We think, that the representation of foetal faces and their profile plays an important part in second trimester ultrasound screening between 18 and 22 weeks of gestational age. PMID:8467986

  15. Center for fetal monkey gene transfer for heart, lung, and blood diseases: an NHLBI resource for the gene therapy community.

    PubMed

    Tarantal, Alice F; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2012-11-01

    The goals of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Center for Fetal Monkey Gene Transfer for Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases are to conduct gene transfer studies in monkeys to evaluate safety and efficiency; and to provide NHLBI-supported investigators with expertise, resources, and services to actively pursue gene transfer approaches in monkeys in their research programs. NHLBI-supported projects span investigators throughout the United States and have addressed novel approaches to gene delivery; "proof-of-principle"; assessed whether findings in small-animal models could be demonstrated in a primate species; or were conducted to enable new grant or IND submissions. The Center for Fetal Monkey Gene Transfer for Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases successfully aids the gene therapy community in addressing regulatory barriers, and serves as an effective vehicle for advancing the field.

  16. Reactivation of Fetal Splicing Programs in Diabetic Hearts Is Mediated by Protein Kinase C Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sunil K.; Deshmukh, Vaibhav; Liu, Patrick; Nutter, Curtis A.; Espejo, Rosario; Hung, Ming-Lung; Wang, Guey-Shin; Yeo, Gene W.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is one of the complications of diabetes that eventually leads to heart failure and death. Aberrant activation of PKC signaling contributes to diabetic cardiomyopathy by mechanisms that are poorly understood. Previous reports indicate that PKC is implicated in alternative splicing regulation. Therefore, we wanted to test whether PKC activation in diabetic hearts induces alternative splicing abnormalities. Here, using RNA sequencing we identified a set of 22 alternative splicing events that undergo a developmental switch in splicing, and we confirmed that splicing reverts to an embryonic pattern in adult diabetic hearts. This network of genes has important functions in RNA metabolism and in developmental processes such as differentiation. Importantly, PKC isozymes α/β control alternative splicing of these genes via phosphorylation and up-regulation of the RNA-binding proteins CELF1 and Rbfox2. Using a mutant of CELF1, we show that phosphorylation of CELF1 by PKC is necessary for regulation of splicing events altered in diabetes. In summary, our studies indicate that activation of PKCα/β in diabetic hearts contributes to the genome-wide splicing changes through phosphorylation and up-regulation of CELF1/Rbfox2 proteins. These findings provide a basis for PKC-mediated cardiac pathogenesis under diabetic conditions. PMID:24151077

  17. Non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal chromosome abnormalities: review of clinical and ethical issues

    PubMed Central

    Gekas, Jean; Langlois, Sylvie; Ravitsky, Vardit; Audibert, François; van den Berg, David Gradus; Haidar, Hazar; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Genomics-based non-invasive prenatal screening using cell-free DNA (cfDNA screening) was proposed to reduce the number of invasive procedures in current prenatal diagnosis for fetal aneuploidies. We review here the clinical and ethical issues of cfDNA screening. To date, it is not clear how cfDNA screening is going to impact the performances of clinical prenatal diagnosis and how it could be incorporated in real life. The direct marketing to users may have facilitated the early introduction of cfDNA screening into clinical practice despite limited evidence-based independent research data supporting this rapid shift. There is a need to address the most important ethical, legal, and social issues before its implementation in a mass setting. Its introduction might worsen current tendencies to neglect the reproductive autonomy of pregnant women. PMID:26893576

  18. Intrinsic Myoarchitectural Differences Between the Left and Right Ventricles of Fetal Human Hearts: An Ultrasonic Backscatter Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mark R.; Gibson, Allyson A.; Kirschner, Carol A.; Hicks, Deborah; Ludomirsky, Achiau; Singh, Gautam K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Embryologically, cardiac chambers differ in their morphological and contractile properties from the beginning. We hypothesized that a non-invasive ultrasonic backscatter investigation might illustrate the fundamental differences in myocardial morphologic properties of the two ventricles during heart development. Objectives The goals of this investigation were: 1) to explore the feasibility of measuring the magnitude of cyclic variation of ultrasonic backscatter from the left and right ventricular free walls of fetal hearts; 2) to compare measurements of the magnitude of cyclic variation from the left and right sides of the heart; and 3) to determine if the observed results are consistent with predictions relating the overall backscatter level and the magnitude of cyclic variation. Methods Cyclic variation data from the left and right ventricular free walls were generated from analyses of the backscatter from echocardiographic images of 16 structurally normal fetal hearts at mid-gestation. Results The magnitude of cyclic variation was found to be greater for the left ventricular free wall than for the right ventricular free wall (4.5 ± 1.1 dB vs. 2.3 ± 0.9 dB, respectively; mean ± SD; p < 0.0001, paired t-test). Conclusion Measurements of the cyclic variation of backscatter can be obtained from both the left and right sides of fetal hearts demonstrating a significant difference between the measured magnitude of cyclic variation in the left and right ventricular myocardium. This observation is consistent with predictions relating the overall backscatter level and the magnitude of cyclic variation. Results of this study suggest cyclic variation measurements may offer a useful approach for characterizing intrinsic differences in myocardial properties of the two ventricles in assessing fetal heart development. PMID:19131208

  19. The roadmap of WT1 protein expression in the human fetal heart.

    PubMed

    Duim, Sjoerd N; Smits, Anke M; Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Goumans, Marie-José

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT1) is essential for cardiac development. Deletion of Wt1 in mice results in disturbed epicardial and myocardial formation and lack of cardiac vasculature, causing embryonic lethality. Little is known about the role of WT1 in the human fetal heart. Therefore, as a first step, we analyzed the expression pattern of WT1 protein during human cardiac development from week 4 till week 20. WT1 expression was apparent in epicardial, endothelial and endocardial cells in a spatiotemporal manner. The expression of WT1 follows a pattern starting at the epicardium and extending towards the lumen of the heart, with differences in timing and expression levels between the atria and ventricles. The expression of WT1 in cardiac arterial endothelial cells reduces in time, whereas WT1 expression in the endothelial cells of cardiac veins and capillaries remains present at all stages studied. This study provides for the first time a detailed description of the expression of WT1 protein during human cardiac development, which indicates an important role for WT1 also in human cardiogenesis.

  20. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  1. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  2. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  3. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  4. Antepartum fetal heart rate feature extraction and classification using empirical mode decomposition and support vector machine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiotocography (CTG) is the most widely used tool for fetal surveillance. The visual analysis of fetal heart rate (FHR) traces largely depends on the expertise and experience of the clinician involved. Several approaches have been proposed for the effective interpretation of FHR. In this paper, a new approach for FHR feature extraction based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is proposed, which was used along with support vector machine (SVM) for the classification of FHR recordings as 'normal' or 'at risk'. Methods The FHR were recorded from 15 subjects at a sampling rate of 4 Hz and a dataset consisting of 90 randomly selected records of 20 minutes duration was formed from these. All records were labelled as 'normal' or 'at risk' by two experienced obstetricians. A training set was formed by 60 records, the remaining 30 left as the testing set. The standard deviations of the EMD components are input as features to a support vector machine (SVM) to classify FHR samples. Results For the training set, a five-fold cross validation test resulted in an accuracy of 86% whereas the overall geometric mean of sensitivity and specificity was 94.8%. The Kappa value for the training set was .923. Application of the proposed method to the testing set (30 records) resulted in a geometric mean of 81.5%. The Kappa value for the testing set was .684. Conclusions Based on the overall performance of the system it can be stated that the proposed methodology is a promising new approach for the feature extraction and classification of FHR signals. PMID:21244712

  5. Effects of docosahexaenoic acid supplementation during pregnancy on fetal heart rate and variability: A randomized clinical trial☆, ☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, K.M.; Carlson, S.E.; Colombo, J.; Yeh, H.-W.; Shaddy, D.J.; Li, S.; Kerling, E.H.

    2013-01-01

    DHA (22:6n-3) supplementation during infancy has been associated with lower heart rate (HR) and improved neurobehavioral outcomes. We hypothesized that maternal DHA supplementation would improve fetal cardiac autonomic control and newborn neurobehavior. Pregnant women were randomized to 600 mg/day of DHA or placebo oil capsules at 14.4 (+/−4) weeks gestation. Fetal HRand HRV were calculated from magnetocardiograms (MCGs) at 24, 32 and 36 weeks gestational age (GA). Newborn neurobehavior was assessed using the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS). Postpartum maternal and infant red blood cell (RBC) DHA was significantly higher in the supplemented group as were metrics of fetal HRV and newborn neurobehavior in the autonomic and motor clusters. Higher HRV is associated with more responsive and flexible autonomic nervous system (ANS). Coupled with findings of improved autonomic and motor behavior, these data suggest that maternal DHA supplementation during pregnancy may impart an adaptive advantage to the fetus. PMID:23433688

  6. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Prevalence of the Metabolically Abnormal Phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Angela K.; Jacques, Paul F.; Rogers, Gail; Fox, Caroline S.; Meigs, James B.; McKeown, Nicola M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. Design and Methods The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring (1998–2001) and Third Generation (2002–2005) cohorts. Adults were classified as normal weight, overweight or obese and, within these categories, metabolic health was defined based on five criteria – hypertension, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and insulin resistance. Individuals without metabolic abnormalities were considered metabolically healthy. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between categories of SSB consumption and risk of metabolic health after stratification by BMI. Results Comparing the highest category of SSB consumers (median of 7 SSB per week) to the lowest category (non-consumers), odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for metabolically abnormal phenotypes, compared to the metabolically normal, were 1.9 (1.1–3.4) among the obese, 2.0 (1.4–2.9) among the overweight, and 1.9 (1.4–2.6) among the normal weight individuals. Conclusions In this cross-sectional analysis, it is observed that, irrespective of weight status, consumers of SSB were more likely to display metabolic abnormalities compared to non-consumers in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24550031

  7. Analysis of electrolyte abnormalities and the mechanisms leading to arrhythmias in heart failure. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Canino, B; Brucculeri, S; Firenze, A; Caimi, G

    2016-01-01

    About 50% of deaths from heart failure (HF) are sudden, presumably referable to arrhythmias. Electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities are a frequent and potentially dangerous complication in HF patients. Their incidence is almost always correlated with the severity of cardiac dysfunction; furthermore leading to arrhythmias, these imbalances are associated with a poor prognosis. The frequency of ventricular ectopic beats and sudden cardiac death correlate with both plasma and whole body levels of potassium, especially in alkalemia. The early recognition of these alterations and the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms are useful for the management of these HF patients.

  8. Analysis of electrolyte abnormalities and the mechanisms leading to arrhythmias in heart failure. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Canino, B; Brucculeri, S; Firenze, A; Caimi, G

    2016-01-01

    About 50% of deaths from heart failure (HF) are sudden, presumably referable to arrhythmias. Electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities are a frequent and potentially dangerous complication in HF patients. Their incidence is almost always correlated with the severity of cardiac dysfunction; furthermore leading to arrhythmias, these imbalances are associated with a poor prognosis. The frequency of ventricular ectopic beats and sudden cardiac death correlate with both plasma and whole body levels of potassium, especially in alkalemia. The early recognition of these alterations and the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms are useful for the management of these HF patients. PMID:27598028

  9. Fetal Heart Rate Reactivity Differs by Women’s Psychiatric Status during Psychological Stress, but Not Paced Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Fifer, William P.; Myers, Michael M.; Bagiella, Emilia; Duong, Jimmy K.; Chen, Ivy S.; Leotti, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Objective Prenatal exposure to women’s mood dysregulation is associated with variation in neurobehavioral profiles in children. Few studies have assessed these relationships during the prenatal period. Methods In 113 women in the 36th – 38th gestational week (mean age 26.3 ± 5.4 years), electrocardiogram, blood pressure, respiration, salivary cortisol, and fetal heart rate (HR) were measured during baseline, a psychological challenge (Stroop color–word matching task), and a standardized paced breathing protocol. Subjects underwent the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV prior to testing and were grouped as: depressed, co–morbid for depression and anxiety, anxiety disorder only, and control. Results There was a significant main effect of maternal diagnostic group on fetal HR only during the Stroop task: fetuses of women in the co–morbid group had a greater HR increase compared to controls (p < .05). Overall, fetuses showed robust increases in HR during paced breathing (p < .0001), but there was no significant difference by maternal diagnosis. For both tasks, changes in fetal HR were independent of women’s concurrent cardiorespiratory activity. Finally, although cortisol was higher in the co-morbid group (p <.05), independent of diagnosis, there was a trend for maternal baseline cortisol to be positively associated with average fetal HR (p = .08). Conclusions These findings indicate that variation in fetal HR reactivity — an index of emerging regulatory capacities — is likely influenced by multiple acute and chronic factors associated with women’s psychobiology. PMID:21400485

  10. Antithetical regulation of α-myosin heavy chain between fetal and adult heart failure though shuttling of HDAC5 regulating YY-1 function.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jie; Li, Yifei; Zhou, Kaiyu; Hua, Yimin; Wang, Chuan; Mu, Dezhi

    2015-04-01

    Molecular switches of myosin isoforms are known to occur in various conditions. Here, we demonstrated the result from fetal heart failure and its potential mechanisms. Fetal and adult heart failure rat models were induced by injections of isoproterenol as previously described, and Go6976 was given to heart failing fetuses. Real-time PCR and Western blot were adopted to measure the expressions of α-MHC, β-MHC and YY-1. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to analysis whether YY-1 interacts with HDAC5. Besides, histological immunofluorescence assessment was carried out to identify the location of HDAC5. α-MHC was recorded elevated in fetal heart failure which was decreased in adult heart failure. Besides, YY-1 was observed elevated both in fetal and adult failing hearts, but YY-1 could co-immunoprecipitation with HDAC5 only in adult hearts. Nuclear localization of HDAC5 was identified in adult cardiomyocytes, while cytoplasmic localization was identified in fetuses. After Go6976 supplied, HDAC5 shuttled into nucleuses interacted with YY-1. The myosin molecular switches were reversed with worsening cardiac functions and higher mortalities. Regulation of MHC in fetal heart failure was different from adult which provided a better compensation with increased α-MHC. This kind of transition was involved with shuttling of HDAC5 regulating YY-1 function.

  11. Health-related quality of life experienced by children with chromosomal abnormalities and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Joffe, Ari R; Robertson, Charlene M T; Atallah, Joseph; Alton, Gwen; Sauve, Reg S; Dinu, Irina A; Ross, David B; Rebeyka, Ivan M

    2014-03-01

    Long-term outcomes are fundamental in advising parents about the potential future of their children with congenital heart disease (CHD). No published reports have described the health-related quality of life (HRQL) experienced by children with chromosomal abnormalities who had surgery in early infancy for CHD. A study was undertaken to assess HRQL among children with chromosomal abnormalities and CHD. The authors hypothesized that these children have a worse HRQL than healthy children or a cohort of children matched for CHD diagnosis. Infants with chromosomal abnormalities undergoing cardiac surgery for CHD at 6 weeks of age or younger at the Stollery Children's Hospital between July 2000 and June 2005 were included in the study. The HRQL of these infants was assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales completed by their parents at a 4-year follow-up evaluation. The study compared the scores for 16 children with normative data. The children with chromosomal abnormalities and CHD had significantly lower mean total PedsQL (71.3 vs. 87.3; p < 0.0001), Psychosocial Summary (70.3 vs. 86.1; p < 0.0001), and Physical Summary (74.3 vs. 89.2; p = 0.0006) scores. Compared with the matched children, those with chromosomal abnormalities had a significantly lower median total PedsQL (75.0 vs. 84.6; p = 0.03), Physical Summary (79.5 vs. 96.9; p = 0.007), and School Functioning (68.5 vs. 83.0; p = 0.03) scores. A better understanding of the mechanisms and determinants of HRQL in these children has the potential to yield important implications for clinical practice including clarity for treatment decision making as well as determination of targeted supports and services to meet the needs of these children and their families differentially.

  12. A fetal human heart cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR) promotes the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kochegarov, Andrei; Moses-Arms, Ashley; Lemanski, Larry F

    2015-08-01

    A specific human fetal heart RNA has been discovered, which has the ability to induce myocardial cell formation from mouse embryonic and human-induced pluripotent stem cells in culture. In this study, commercially obtained RNA from human fetal heart was cloned, sequenced, and synthesized using standard laboratory approaches. Molecular analyses of the specific fetal cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR), revealed that it is a fragment of N-sulfoglucosaminesulfohydrolase and the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 precursor. Stem cells transfected with CIRs often form into spindle-shaped cells characteristic of cardiomyocytes,and express the cardiac-specific contractile protein marker, troponin-T, in addition to tropomyosin and α-actinin as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of these contractile proteins showed organization into sarcomeric myofibrils characteristic of striated cardiac muscle cells. Computer analyses of the RNA secondary structures of the active CIR show significant similarities to a RNA from salamander or myofibril-inducing RNA (MIR), which also promotes non-muscle cells to differentiate into cardiac muscle. Thus, these two RNAs, salamander MIR and the newly discovered human-cloned CIR reported here, appear to have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures suggesting that both play major roles in vertebrate heart development and, particularly, in the differentiation of cardiomyocytes from non-muscle cells during development.

  13. Cortisol stimulates proliferation and apoptosis in the late gestation fetal heart: differential effects of mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaodi; Reini, Seth A.; Richards, Elaine; Wood, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously found that modest chronic increases in maternal cortisol result in an enlarged fetal heart. To explore the mechanisms of this effect, we used intrapericardial infusions of a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist (canrenoate) or of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist (mifepristone) in the fetus during maternal infusion of cortisol (1 mg·kg−1·day−1). We have shown that the MR antagonist blocked the increase in fetal heart weight and in wall thickness resulting from maternal cortisol infusion. In the current study we extended those studies and found that cortisol increased Ki67 staining in both ventricles, indicating cell proliferation, but also increased active caspase-3 staining in cells of the conduction pathway in the septum and subendocardial layers of the left ventricle, suggesting increased apoptosis in Purkinje fibers. The MR antagonist blocked the increase in cell proliferation, whereas the GR antagonist blocked the increased apoptosis in Purkinje fibers. We also found evidence of activation of caspase-3 in c-kit-positive cells, suggesting apoptosis in stem cell populations in the ventricle. These studies suggest a potentially important role of corticosteroids in the terminal remodeling of the late gestation fetal heart and suggest a mechanism for the cardiac enlargement with excess corticosteroid exposure. PMID:23785077

  14. A fetal human heart cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR) promotes the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kochegarov, Andrei; Moses-Arms, Ashley; Lemanski, Larry F

    2015-08-01

    A specific human fetal heart RNA has been discovered, which has the ability to induce myocardial cell formation from mouse embryonic and human-induced pluripotent stem cells in culture. In this study, commercially obtained RNA from human fetal heart was cloned, sequenced, and synthesized using standard laboratory approaches. Molecular analyses of the specific fetal cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR), revealed that it is a fragment of N-sulfoglucosaminesulfohydrolase and the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 precursor. Stem cells transfected with CIRs often form into spindle-shaped cells characteristic of cardiomyocytes,and express the cardiac-specific contractile protein marker, troponin-T, in addition to tropomyosin and α-actinin as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of these contractile proteins showed organization into sarcomeric myofibrils characteristic of striated cardiac muscle cells. Computer analyses of the RNA secondary structures of the active CIR show significant similarities to a RNA from salamander or myofibril-inducing RNA (MIR), which also promotes non-muscle cells to differentiate into cardiac muscle. Thus, these two RNAs, salamander MIR and the newly discovered human-cloned CIR reported here, appear to have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures suggesting that both play major roles in vertebrate heart development and, particularly, in the differentiation of cardiomyocytes from non-muscle cells during development. PMID:25761723

  15. Automatic classification of squamosal abnormality in micro-CT images for the evaluation of rabbit fetal skull defects using active shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Antong; Dogdas, Belma; Mehta, Saurin; Bagchi, Ansuman; Wise, L. David; Winkelmann, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    High-throughput micro-CT imaging has been used in our laboratory to evaluate fetal skeletal morphology in developmental toxicology studies. Currently, the volume-rendered skeletal images are visually inspected and observed abnormalities are reported for compounds in development. To improve the efficiency and reduce human error of the evaluation, we implemented a framework to automate the evaluation process. The framework starts by dividing the skull into regions of interest and then measuring various geometrical characteristics. Normal/abnormal classification on the bone segments is performed based on identifying statistical outliers. In pilot experiments using rabbit fetal skulls, the majority of the skeletal abnormalities can be detected successfully in this manner. However, there are shape-based abnormalities that are relatively subtle and thereby difficult to identify using the geometrical features. To address this problem, we introduced a model-based approach and applied this strategy on the squamosal bone. We will provide details on this active shape model (ASM) strategy for the identification of squamosal abnormalities and show that this method improved the sensitivity of detecting squamosal-related abnormalities from 0.48 to 0.92.

  16. Aldosterone Inhibits the Fetal Program and Increases Hypertrophy in the Heart of Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Azibani, Feriel; Devaux, Yvan; Coutance, Guillaume; Schlossarek, Saskia; Polidano, Evelyne; Fazal, Loubina; Merval, Regine; Carrier, Lucie; Solal, Alain Cohen; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Launay, Jean-Marie; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Delcayre, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background Arterial hypertension (AH) induces cardiac hypertrophy and reactivation of “fetal” gene expression. In rodent heart, alpha-Myosin Heavy Chain (MyHC) and its micro-RNA miR-208a regulate the expression of beta-MyHC and of its intronic miR-208b. However, the role of aldosterone in these processes remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings RT-PCR and western-blot were used to investigate the genes modulated by arterial hypertension and cardiac hyperaldosteronism. We developed a model of double-transgenic mice (AS-Ren) with cardiac hyperaldosteronism (AS mice) and systemic hypertension (Ren). AS-Ren mice had increased (x2) angiotensin II in plasma and increased (x2) aldosterone in heart. Ren and AS-Ren mice had a robust and similar hypertension (+70%) versus their controls. Anatomical data and echocardiography showed a worsening of cardiac hypertrophy (+41%) in AS-Ren mice (P<0.05 vs Ren). The increase of ANP (x 2.5; P<0.01) mRNA observed in Ren mice was blunted in AS-Ren mice. This non-induction of antitrophic natriuretic peptides may be involved in the higher trophic cardiac response in AS-Ren mice, as indicated by the markedly reduced cardiac hypertrophy in ANP-infused AS-Ren mice for one month. Besides, the AH-induced increase of ßMyHC and its intronic miRNA-208b was prevented in AS-Ren. The inhibition of miR 208a (−75%, p<0.001) in AS-Ren mice compared to AS was associated with increased Sox 6 mRNA (x 1.34; p<0.05), an inhibitor of ßMyHC transcription. Eplerenone prevented all aldosterone-dependent effects. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that increased aldosterone in heart inhibits the induction of atrial natriuretic peptide expression, via the mineralocorticoid receptor. This worsens cardiac hypertrophy without changing blood pressure. Moreover, this work reveals an original aldosterone-dependent inhibition of miR-208a in hypertension, resulting in the inhibition of β-myosin heavy chain expression through the induction of

  17. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  18. Fetal Aortic Valvuloplasty for Evolving Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome: Postnatal Outcomes of the First 100 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Freud, Lindsay R.; McElhinney, Doff B.; Marshall, Audrey C.; Marx, Gerald R.; Friedman, Kevin G.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Emani, Sitaram M.; Lafranchi, Terra; Silva, Virginia; Wilkins-Haug, Louise E.; Benson, Carol B.; Lock, James E.; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FAV) can be performed for severe mid-gestation aortic stenosis (AS) in an attempt to prevent progression to hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). A subset of patients has achieved a biventricular (BV) circulation after FAV. The postnatal outcomes and survival of the BV patients, compared to those managed as HLHS, have not been reported. Methods and Results We included 100 patients who underwent FAV for severe mid-gestation AS with evolving HLHS from March 2000 to January 2013. Patients were categorized based on postnatal management as BV or HLHS. Clinical records were reviewed. Eighty-eight fetuses were live-born, and 38 had a BV circulation (31 from birth, 7 converted after initial univentricular palliation). Left-sided structures, namely aortic and mitral valve sizes and LV volume, were significantly larger in the BV group at the time of birth (p-values <0.01). After a median follow-up of 5.4 years, freedom from cardiac death among all BV patients was 96±4% at 5 years and 84±12% at 10 years, which was better than HLHS patients (log-rank p=0.04). There was no cardiac mortality in patients with a BV circulation from birth. All but 1 of the BV patients required postnatal intervention; 42% underwent aortic and/or mitral valve replacement. On most recent echocardiogram, the median LV end-diastolic volume z-score was +1.7 (range: -1.3, +8.2), and 80% had normal ejection fraction. Conclusions Short- and intermediate-term survival among patients who underwent FAV and achieved a BV circulation postnatally is encouraging. However, morbidity still exists, and on-going assessment is warranted. PMID:25052401

  19. A longitudinal study of diurnal variation in baseline fetal heart rate in one dichorionic-diamniotic twin pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Muro, M; Shono, H; Shono, M; Ito, Y; Iwasaka, T

    2001-06-01

    A longitudinal study to analyse the diurnal variations in baseline fetal heart rate (FHR) and sustained fetal tachycardia (SFT) in twin pregnancy was performed on one dichorionic twin. Twenty-four hour FHR recordings on twins were made at 32, 34 and 36 weeks of gestation simultaneously. Significant diurnal variations were found in both twins in all gestational weeks. The diurnal variations in baseline FHR of twins were highly correlated with no phase-lag. No coincidence was recognized in the appearance of SFT between twins. These results suggest the maternal influence equally affects FHR in each fetus of dichorionic twin since 32 weeks of gestation, while the appearance of SFT might be independent from maternal influence.

  20. Attenuation effect of Abnormal Savda Munziq on liver and heart toxicity caused by chemotherapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    AIKEMU, AINIWAER; AMAT, NURMUHAMAT; YUSUP, ABDIRYIM; SHAN, LIANLIAN; QI, XINWEI; UPUR, HALMURAT

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq), an Uighur medicine formula commonly used in the treatment of cancer, has been speculated to possess antioxidative and antiproliferative effects, and to regulate immune activity. The present study was designed to systematically elucidate the toxicity-reducing activity of ASMq in mice undergoing combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The mice were divided into normal (saline, 10 ml/kg) and doxorubicin + 5-FU groups (doxorubicin, 2.5 mg/kg; 5-FU, 10 mg/kg on alternate days). In addition, three groups received different doses of ASMq (2, 4 and 8 g/kg), in addition to doxorubicin (2.5 mg/kg) and 5-FU (10 mg/kg) treatment on alternate days. The histology of the heart and liver, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in heart homogenate, and various biochemical parameters of the liver were evaluated. Compared with the normal control group, ASMq dose-dependently improved a number of variables, including body weight, liver index, transaminase and total protein, and partially normalized liver and cardiac pathology. ASMq restored activities of defense antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px towards normal levels, and decreased MDA concentration in dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrated that ASMq provides significant protection against doxorubicin + 5-FU combination induced hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity. Further studies are required to determine the effects of ASMq against doxorubicin + 5-FU-induced toxicity during chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:27347066

  1. The Effect of Noncardiac and Genetic Abnormalities on Outcomes Following Neonatal Congenital Heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Gillespie, Scott; Mahle, William T; Deshpande, Shriprasad; Kogon, Brian; Maher, Kevin; Kanter, Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Significant noncardiac and genetic abnormalities (NC and GA) are common in neonates with congenital heart defects. We sought to examine current-era effect of those abnormalities on early and late outcomes following cardiac surgery. The method from 2002-2012, 1538 neonates underwent repair (n = 860, 56%) or palliation (n = 678, 44%) of congenital heart defects. Regression models examined the effect of NC and GA on operative results, resource utilization, and late outcomes. Neonates with NC and GA (n = 312, 20%) had higher incidence of prematurity (21% vs 13%; P < 0.001) and weight ≤2.5kg (24% vs 12%; P < 0.001) than neonates without NC and GA (n = 1226, 80%). Although the incidence of single ventricle was comparable (34% vs 31%; P = 0.37), neonates with NC and GA underwent more palliation (52% vs 42%; P = 0.001) and subsequently had higher percentage of STAT mortality categories (Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery (EACTS) Congenital Heart Surgery Mortality Categories) 4 and 5 procedures (78% vs 66%; P < 0.001). Adjusted logistic regression models that included disparate patient and operative variables showed that the presence of NC and GA was associated with increased unplanned reoperation (odds ratio = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1-2.7; P = 0.03) and hospital mortality (odds ratio = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.6; P = 0.002). Adjusted linear regression models showed significant association between NC and GA and increased postoperative mechanical ventilation duration, intensive care unit, and hospital stays (P < 0.001 each). Adjusted hazard analysis showed that the presence of NC and GA was associated with diminished late survival (hazard ratio = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.9-3.1; P < 0.001) and that was evident in all subgroups of patients (P < 0.001 each). Conclusion is neonates with NC and GA commonly have associated risk factors for morbidity and mortality such as prematurity and low weight. After adjusting for those factors, the presence

  2. Survey of the Definition of Fetal Viability and the Availability, Indications, and Decision Making Processes for Post-Viability Termination of Pregnancy for Fetal Abnormalities and Health Conditions in Canada.

    PubMed

    Hull, Danna; Davies, Gregory; Armour, Christine M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the definition of fetal viability and the availability, indications, and decision making processes for post-viability termination of pregnancy for fetal abnormalities and health conditions in Canada. An online survey of members of the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists, and the Canadian Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine who provide direct counselling to, or management of, prenatal patients in Canada (total sample size 815). Results of this study showed that the majority of respondents indicated that their centre will offer post-viability termination of pregnancy (98/123; 80 %). Sixty-seven percent (68/101) of respondents reported the definition of fetal viability to be 24 weeks' gestation. Most respondents reported that a collaborative decision making process was used to determine if post-viability termination of pregnancy would be offered (136/170; 80 %). For conditions presumed to be lethal/likely lethal, the majority of respondents would "sometimes" or "always" offer post-viability termination of pregnancy, whereas for conditions presumed to have a mild effect, the majority of respondents would "rarely" or "never" offer post-viability termination of pregnancy. Ninety percent (77/86) of respondents reported that perinatal hospice is offered as an alternative to termination of pregnancy. In conclusion, this study suggests that although post-viability termination is available in many provinces in Canada, variation in the definition of fetal viability and indications appear to exist. While these variations may lead to unequal access to post-viability termination of pregnancy across Canada, they might also represent the complexity of the decision making process and the importance of examining individual factors to ensure that the most appropriate decision is made in each case. PMID:26536885

  3. Survey of the Definition of Fetal Viability and the Availability, Indications, and Decision Making Processes for Post-Viability Termination of Pregnancy for Fetal Abnormalities and Health Conditions in Canada.

    PubMed

    Hull, Danna; Davies, Gregory; Armour, Christine M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the definition of fetal viability and the availability, indications, and decision making processes for post-viability termination of pregnancy for fetal abnormalities and health conditions in Canada. An online survey of members of the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists, and the Canadian Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine who provide direct counselling to, or management of, prenatal patients in Canada (total sample size 815). Results of this study showed that the majority of respondents indicated that their centre will offer post-viability termination of pregnancy (98/123; 80 %). Sixty-seven percent (68/101) of respondents reported the definition of fetal viability to be 24 weeks' gestation. Most respondents reported that a collaborative decision making process was used to determine if post-viability termination of pregnancy would be offered (136/170; 80 %). For conditions presumed to be lethal/likely lethal, the majority of respondents would "sometimes" or "always" offer post-viability termination of pregnancy, whereas for conditions presumed to have a mild effect, the majority of respondents would "rarely" or "never" offer post-viability termination of pregnancy. Ninety percent (77/86) of respondents reported that perinatal hospice is offered as an alternative to termination of pregnancy. In conclusion, this study suggests that although post-viability termination is available in many provinces in Canada, variation in the definition of fetal viability and indications appear to exist. While these variations may lead to unequal access to post-viability termination of pregnancy across Canada, they might also represent the complexity of the decision making process and the importance of examining individual factors to ensure that the most appropriate decision is made in each case.

  4. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol can cause a group of conditions called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Effects can include physical and behavioral problems such ... alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, ...

  5. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L F; Oomen, Pim J A; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Goumans, Marie-José T H; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  6. Fetal, infant, and childhood growth are predictors of coronary heart disease, diabetes, and hypertension in adult men and women.

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, C; Barker, D J

    2000-01-01

    Many human fetuses have to adapt to a limited supply of nutrients. In doing so they permanently change their structure and metabolism. These programmed changes may be the origins of a number of diseases in later life, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and noninsulin- dependent diabetes. We review epidemiologic studies in which the incidence of these diseases has been related to the recorded, early growth of individuals, while considering factors in the adult lifestyle, such as obesity and socioeconomic status. We discuss possible mechanisms. For hypertension these mechanisms include placentation, maternal blood pressure, fetal undernutrition; childhood growth, activation of the renin-angiotensin system, renal structure, programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, vascular structure, and sympathetic nervous activity. For noninsulin-dependent diabetes we discuss mechanisms concerning both insulin resistance and insulin deficiency. We include a review of evidence for the programming of serum cholesterol and clotting factor concentrations. We address the timing of critical windows for coronary heart disease, reviewing studies that allow assessment of the relative importance of fetal, infant, and childhood growth. We argue for a research strategy that combines clinical, animal, and epidemiological studies. PMID:10852853

  7. Effects of 4 hours magnesium sulfate infusion on fetal heart rate variability and reactivity in a goat model.

    PubMed

    Sameshima, H; Ikenoue, T; Kamitomo, M; Sakamoto, H

    1998-01-01

    Effects of magnesium sulfate were investigated on fetal heart rate (FHR) baseline, variability, and reactivity in goats. Six chronically catheterized fetuses of Japanese Saanen goat at 125 to 130 days' gestation (term = 147 days) were used. Magnesium sulfate was directly infused to the fetuses. Short-term variability and long-term variability were obtained according to Huey et al. The baseline, reactivity, short-term variability and long-term variability of the FHR were compared between those receiving magnesium sulfate infusions and those receiving vehicle infusions without magnesium sulfate for 4 hr. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test was applied for statistical significance. Four hours magnesium sulfate infusion significantly increased fetal plasma concentration of magnesium from 2.4-6.6 mg/dL, without significant changes in fetal respiratory gases and pH values. The baseline FHR was significantly decreased by magnesium infusion compared with that receiving vehicle infusion. The incidence of acceleration, short-term variability, and long-term variability during the fourth hour of magnesium infusion was also significantly decreased compared to a controlled infusion. The time spent by high amplitude phase of short-term variability and that of long-term variability were also significantly reduced. Significant correlation was obtained between the magnesium concentration and incidence of acceleration at fourth hour of magnesium infusion. Four hours infusion of magnesium sulfate significantly decreases baseline FHR, short-term variability, long-term variability, and reactivity in fetal goats at 0.85 gestation.

  8. Ultrastructural and cellular basis for the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics during the transition from hypertension to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanjiv J; Aistrup, Gary L; Gupta, Deepak K; O'Toole, Matthew J; Nahhas, Amanda F; Schuster, Daniel; Chirayil, Nimi; Bassi, Nikhil; Ramakrishna, Satvik; Beussink, Lauren; Misener, Sol; Kane, Bonnie; Wang, David; Randolph, Blake; Ito, Aiko; Wu, Megan; Akintilo, Lisa; Mongkolrattanothai, Thitipong; Reddy, Mahendra; Kumar, Manvinder; Arora, Rishi; Ng, Jason; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Although the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics represents a key step during the transition from hypertension to overt heart failure (HF), the underlying ultrastructural and cellular basis of abnormal myocardial mechanics remains unclear. We therefore investigated how changes in transverse (T)-tubule organization and the resulting altered intracellular Ca(2+) cycling in large cell populations underlie the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics in a model of chronic hypertension. Hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs; n = 72) were studied at different ages and stages of hypertensive heart disease and early HF and were compared with age-matched control (Wistar-Kyoto) rats (n = 34). Echocardiography, including tissue Doppler and speckle-tracking analysis, was performed just before euthanization, after which T-tubule organization and Ca(2+) transients were studied using confocal microscopy. In SHRs, abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occurred early in response to hypertension, before the development of overt systolic dysfunction and HF. Reduced longitudinal, circumferential, and radial strain as well as reduced tissue Doppler early diastolic tissue velocities occurred in concert with T-tubule disorganization and impaired Ca(2+) cycling, all of which preceded the development of cardiac fibrosis. The time to peak of intracellular Ca(2+) transients was slowed due to T-tubule disruption, providing a link between declining cell ultrastructure and abnormal myocardial mechanics. In conclusion, subclinical abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occur early in response to hypertension and coincide with the development of T-tubule disorganization and impaired intracellular Ca(2+) cycling. These changes occur before the development of significant cardiac fibrosis and precede the development of overt cardiac dysfunction and HF.

  9. Does heart rate variability reflect the systemic inflammatory response in a fetal sheep model of lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis?

    PubMed

    Durosier, Lucien D; Herry, Christophe L; Cortes, Marina; Cao, Mingju; Burns, Patrick; Desrochers, André; Fecteau, Gilles; Seely, Andrew J E; Frasch, Martin G

    2015-10-01

    Fetal inflammatory response occurs during chorioamnionitis, a frequent and often subclinical inflammation associated with increased risk for brain injury and life-lasting neurologic deficits. No means of early detection exist. We hypothesized that systemic fetal inflammation without septic shock will be reflected in alterations of fetal heart rate (FHR) variability (fHRV) distinguishing baseline versus inflammatory response states. In chronically instrumented near-term fetal sheep (n = 24), we induced an inflammatory response with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injected intravenously (n = 14). Ten additional fetuses served as controls. We measured fetal plasma inflammatory cytokine IL-6 at baseline, 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 h. 44 fHRV measures were determined continuously every 5 min using continuous individualized multi-organ variability analysis (CIMVA). CIMVA creates an fHRV measures matrix across five signal-analytical domains, thus describing complementary properties of fHRV. Using principal component analysis (PCA), a widely used technique for dimensionality reduction, we derived and quantitatively compared the CIMVA fHRV PCA signatures of inflammatory response in LPS and control groups. In the LPS group, IL-6 peaked at 3 h. In parallel, PCA-derived fHRV composite measures revealed a significant difference between LPS and control group at different time points. For the LPS group, a sharp increase compared to baseline levels was observed between 3 h and 6 h, and then abating to baseline levels, thus tracking closely the IL-6 inflammatory profile. This pattern was not observed in the control group. We also show that a preselection of fHRV measures prior to the PCA can potentially increase the difference between LPS and control groups, as early as 1 h post LPS injection. We propose a fHRV composite measure that correlates well with levels of inflammation and tracks well its temporal profile. Our results highlight the potential role of HRV to study and monitor

  10. Fetal hypoplastic left heart syndrome and maternal liver transplantation for Wilson’s disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Liver transplantation currently represents the only curative treatment for Wilson’s disease. A lifelong immunosuppressive therapy is mandatory. In spite of increased maternal and fetal risks, pregnancies after liver transplantation have been reported with favorable perinatal outcomes. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is a spectrum of congenital heart defects that results in the inability to support the systemic circulation. Although its etiology remains elusive, the prognosis of this previously fatal condition has dramatically improved over the last 2 decades mainly due to advances in prenatal diagnosis, surgical technique and perioperative care. Case presentation We present a case of a Caucasian 26-year-old woman, gravida 2, para 1 at 36+0 weeks of gestation who had received a liver transplantation due to Wilson’s disease and subsequently delivered a child with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Conclusions This coincidence of medical conditions has not been described in the literature so far and its implications for mother and child as well as the pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed on the basis of a literature review. PMID:24378118

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor Is a Therapeutic Target for Immunological Unbalance and Cardiac Abnormalities in Chronic Experimental Chagas' Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Isabela Resende; Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Silva, Andrea Alice; Moreira, Otacilio Cruz; Britto, Constança; Sarmento, Ellen Diana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chagas disease (CD) is characterized by parasite persistence and immunological unbalance favoring systemic inflammatory profile. Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, the main manifestation of CD, occurs in a TNF-enriched milieu and frequently progresses to heart failure. Aim of the Study. To challenge the hypothesis that TNF plays a key role in Trypanosoma cruzi-induced immune deregulation and cardiac abnormalities, we tested the effect of the anti-TNF antibody Infliximab in chronically T. cruzi-infected C57BL/6 mice, a model with immunological, electrical, and histopathological abnormalities resembling Chagas' heart disease. Results. Infliximab therapy did not reactivate parasite but reshaped the immune response as reduced TNF mRNA expression in the cardiac tissue and plasma TNF and IFNγ levels; diminished the frequency of IL-17A+ but increased IL-10+ CD4+ T-cells; reduced TNF+ but augmented IL-10+ Ly6C+ and F4/80+ cells. Further, anti-TNF therapy decreased cytotoxic activity but preserved IFNγ-producing VNHRFTLV-specific CD8+ T-cells in spleen and reduced the number of perforin+ cells infiltrating the myocardium. Importantly, Infliximab reduced the frequency of mice afflicted by arrhythmias and second degree atrioventricular blocks and decreased fibronectin deposition in the cardiac tissue. Conclusions. Our data support that TNF is a crucial player in the pathogenesis of Chagas' heart disease fueling immunological unbalance which contributes to cardiac abnormalities. PMID:25140115

  12. Gestational Dietary Protein Is Associated with Sex Specific Decrease in Blood Flow, Fetal Heart Growth and Post-Natal Blood Pressure of Progeny

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Overview The incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes is higher in pregnancies where the fetus is male. Sex specific differences in feto-placental perfusion indices identified by Doppler assessment have recently been associated with placental insufficiency and fetal growth restriction. This study aims to investigate sex specific differences in placental perfusion and to correlate these changes with fetal growth. It represents the largest comprehensive study under field conditions of uterine hemodynamics in a monotocous species, with a similar long gestation period to the human. Primiparous 14mo heifers in Australia (n=360) and UK (n=180) were either individually or group fed, respectively, diets with differing protein content (18, 14, 10 or 7% crude protein (CP)) from 60d prior to 98 days post conception (dpc). Fetuses and placentae were excised at 98dpc (n = 48). Fetal development an median uterine artery blood flow were assessed monthly from 36dpc until term using B-mode and Doppler ultrasonography. MUA blood flow to the male feto-placental unit increased in early pregnancy associated with increased fetal growth. Protein restriction before and shortly after conception (-60d up to 23dpc) increased MUA diameter and indices of velocity during late pregnancy, reduced fetal heart weight in the female fetus and increased heart rate at birth, but decreased systolic blood pressure at six months of age. Conclusion and Significance Sex specific differences both in feto-placental Doppler perfusion indices and response of these indices to dietary perturbations were observed. Further, maternal diet affected development of fetal cardiovascular system associated with altered fetal haemodynamics in utero, with such effects having a sex bias. The results from this study provide further insight into the gender specific circulatory differences present in the fetal period and developing cardiovascular system. PMID:25915506

  13. A stereological method for estimating the total number of ventricular myocyte nuclei in fetal and postnatal hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, A; Fagan, D G; Mayhew, T M

    1995-01-01

    An experimental protocol is presented for obtaining efficient estimates of the total numbers of myocyte nuclei in the ventricles of human hearts from archival collections. Hearts were collected postmortem from fetuses at 31-42 weeks of gestation and infants at 7 days-9 months postnatal age. Ventricles from normal and abnormal subjects were examined. Numbers of myocyte nuclei per unit volume of myocardium were estimated separately for left and right ventricles using a design-based stereological device, the physical disector (parallel pairs of sections). Absolute numbers were calculated by multiplying nuclear packing densities by myocardial volume. The latter was estimated from ventricular mass and the percentage of ventricle occupied by myocardium. The findings, albeit preliminary, suggest that (1) myocyte number may rise during the last trimester of gestation, (2) postnatal ventricular growth is probably hypertrophic and/or interstitial rather than hyperplastic and (3) whilst absolute numbers are greater in the left ventricle, the pattern of growth is similar in both ventricles. Nuclear numbers found in 2 abnormal hearts (1 from a case of sudden infant death) tended to be lower than normal. PMID:8586563

  14. Mortality from congenital abnormality in Malaysia 1991-1997: the effect of economic development on death due to congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, J J

    2001-06-01

    An analysis was done of available data from the Department of Statistics Malaysia, on the type of congenital abnormality contributing to death, to determine whether progress in health care over recent years was associated with any decline in mortality from congenital abnormality. A significant decline in death due to congenital abnormality was observed between 1991 and 1996. This was attributable to a decline in deaths due to congenital heart disease occurring because of improvements in cardiac surgical services for infants. In 1997 death due to congenital heart disease increased significantly. This could be attributed to improvements in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in the neonate.

  15. Demonstration of Normal and Abnormal Fetal Brains Using 3D Printing from In Utero MR Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, D; Griffiths, P D; Majewski, C

    2016-09-01

    3D printing is a new manufacturing technology that produces high-fidelity models of complex structures from 3D computer-aided design data. Radiology has been particularly quick to embrace the new technology because of the wide access to 3D datasets. Models have been used extensively to assist orthopedic, neurosurgical, and maxillofacial surgical planning. In this report, we describe methods used for 3D printing of the fetal brain by using data from in utero MR imaging.

  16. Demonstration of Normal and Abnormal Fetal Brains Using 3D Printing from In Utero MR Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, D; Griffiths, P D; Majewski, C

    2016-09-01

    3D printing is a new manufacturing technology that produces high-fidelity models of complex structures from 3D computer-aided design data. Radiology has been particularly quick to embrace the new technology because of the wide access to 3D datasets. Models have been used extensively to assist orthopedic, neurosurgical, and maxillofacial surgical planning. In this report, we describe methods used for 3D printing of the fetal brain by using data from in utero MR imaging. PMID:27079366

  17. Wireless fetal heart rate monitoring in inpatient full-term pregnant women: testing functionality and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Boatin, Adeline A; Wylie, Blair; Goldfarb, Ilona; Azevedo, Robin; Pittel, Elena; Ng, Courtney; Haberer, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We tested functionality and acceptability of a wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology in pregnant women in an inpatient labor unit in the United States. Women with full-term singleton pregnancies and no evidence of active labor were asked to wear the prototype technology for 30 minutes. We assessed functionality by evaluating the ability to successfully monitor the fetal heartbeat for 30 minutes, transmit this data to Cloud storage and view the data on a web portal. Three obstetricians also rated fetal cardiotocographs on ease of readability. We assessed acceptability by administering closed and open-ended questions on perceived utility and likeability to pregnant women and clinicians interacting with the prototype technology. Thirty-two women were enrolled, 28 of whom (87.5%) successfully completed 30 minutes of fetal monitoring including transmission of cardiotocographs to the web portal. Four sessions though completed, were not successfully uploaded to the Cloud storage. Six non-study clinicians interacted with the prototype technology. The primary technical problem observed was a delay in data transmission between the prototype and the web portal, which ranged from 2 to 209 minutes. Delays were ascribed to Wi-Fi connectivity problems. Recorded cardiotocographs received a mean score of 4.2/5 (± 1.0) on ease of readability with an interclass correlation of 0.81(95%CI 0.45, 0.96). Both pregnant women and clinicians found the prototype technology likable (81.3% and 66.7% respectively), useful (96.9% and 66.7% respectively), and would either use it again or recommend its use to another pregnant woman (77.4% and 66.7% respectively). In this pilot study we found that this wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology has potential for use in a United States inpatient setting but would benefit from some technology changes. We found it to be acceptable to both pregnant women and clinicians. Further research is needed to assess feasibility of using this

  18. Wireless Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring in Inpatient Full-Term Pregnant Women: Testing Functionality and Acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Boatin, Adeline A.; Wylie, Blair; Goldfarb, Ilona; Azevedo, Robin; Pittel, Elena; Ng, Courtney; Haberer, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We tested functionality and acceptability of a wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology in pregnant women in an inpatient labor unit in the United States. Women with full-term singleton pregnancies and no evidence of active labor were asked to wear the prototype technology for 30 minutes. We assessed functionality by evaluating the ability to successfully monitor the fetal heartbeat for 30 minutes, transmit this data to Cloud storage and view the data on a web portal. Three obstetricians also rated fetal cardiotocographs on ease of readability. We assessed acceptability by administering closed and open-ended questions on perceived utility and likeability to pregnant women and clinicians interacting with the prototype technology. Thirty-two women were enrolled, 28 of whom (87.5%) successfully completed 30 minutes of fetal monitoring including transmission of cardiotocographs to the web portal. Four sessions though completed, were not successfully uploaded to the Cloud storage. Six non-study clinicians interacted with the prototype technology. The primary technical problem observed was a delay in data transmission between the prototype and the web portal, which ranged from 2 to 209 minutes. Delays were ascribed to Wi-Fi connectivity problems. Recorded cardiotocographs received a mean score of 4.2/5 (± 1.0) on ease of readability with an interclass correlation of 0.81(95%CI 0.45, 0.96). Both pregnant women and clinicians found the prototype technology likable (81.3% and 66.7% respectively), useful (96.9% and 66.7% respectively), and would either use it again or recommend its use to another pregnant woman (77.4% and 66.7% respectively). In this pilot study we found that this wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology has potential for use in a United States inpatient setting but would benefit from some technology changes. We found it to be acceptable to both pregnant women and clinicians. Further research is needed to assess feasibility of using this

  19. Cardiac ultrasonography in structural abnormalities and arrhythmias. Recognition and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, M M; Silverman, N H; Villegas, M

    1993-01-01

    Fetal cardiac ultrasonography has become an important tool in the evaluation of fetuses at risk for cardiac anomalies. It can both guide prenatal treatment and assist the management and timing of delivery. We recommend that a fetal echocardiogram be done when there is a family history of congenital heart disease; maternal disease that may affect the fetus; a history of maternal drug use, either therapeutic or illegal; evidence of other fetal abnormalities; or evidence of fetal hydrops. The optimal timing of evaluation is 18 to 22 weeks' gestation. An entire range of structural cardiac defects can be visualized prenatally, including atrioventricular septal defect, ventricular septal defect, cardiomyopathy, ventricular outlet obstruction, and complex cardiac defects. The outcome for a fetus with a recognized abnormality is unfavourable, with less than 50% surviving the neonatal period. Fetal cardiac arrhythmias are also a common occurrence, 15% in the series described here. Premature atrial or ventricular contractions are most commonly seen and usually require no treatment. Supraventricular tachycardia can result in hydrops and require in utero treatment to prevent fetal demise. Complete heart block, particularly in association with structural heart disease, has a poor prognosis for fetal survival. Images PMID:8236970

  20. [Fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, P

    1997-09-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography is a new, alternative method for prenatal surveillance. The fetal magnetocardiogram (FMCG) registers the magnetic field produced by conduction currents in the fetal heart. Compared to the fetal electrocardiogram, the propagation of magnetic fields is relatively undisturbed by surrounding tissue. The FMCG thus has the advantage of a higher signal-to-noise ratio and can be acquired earlier pregnancy. Also, the high temporal resolution of the signal permits a significantly more precise determination of fetal heart rate parameters than fetal ultrasound. FMCG registration using a biomagnetometer is noninvasive and can be performed as of the second trimeter. It can be used to examine signal morphology, cardiac time intervals, heart rate variability as well as cardiac magnetic fields. To date, arrhythmic activity has been observed in the form of supraventricular and ventricular ectopies as well as atrial flutter, atrio-ventricular block, atrial tachycardia and Torsades de Pointes tachycardia. We also report here on the presence of short episodes of bradycardia in the second trimester of normal pregnancy. Measurement of the magnetic field strength at various locations above the abdomen has allowed the reconstruction of the fetal cardiac magnetic field and the determination of its relation to the position of the fetus. Signal averaging has permitted the precise examination of signal amplitude and cardiac time intervals and has shown that they increase in the course of pregnancy. Heart rate variability could be quantified in the time and frequency domain as well as using parameters of nonlinear dynamics. The results demonstrated an increase of variability and complexity over gestational age. Furthermore spectral analysis of fetal heart arte data could be associated with sympathetic and parasympathetic activity as well as, with respiration. Although the studies presenting these results have involved only limited numbers of observations, they

  1. Cardiomyocyte-specific loss of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) reproduces the abnormalities in lipids found in severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Trent, Chad M; Fang, Xiang; Son, Ni-Huiping; Jiang, HongFeng; Blaner, William S; Hu, Yunying; Yin, Yu-Xin; Farese, Robert V; Homma, Shunichi; Turnbull, Andrew V; Eriksson, Jan W; Hu, Shi-Lian; Ginsberg, Henry N; Huang, Li-Shin; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-10-24

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) catalyzes the final step in triglyceride synthesis, the conversion of diacylglycerol (DAG) to triglyceride. Dgat1(-/-) mice exhibit a number of beneficial metabolic effects including reduced obesity and improved insulin sensitivity and no known cardiac dysfunction. In contrast, failing human hearts have severely reduced DGAT1 expression associated with accumulation of DAGs and ceramides. To test whether DGAT1 loss alone affects heart function, we created cardiomyocyte-specific DGAT1 knock-out (hDgat1(-/-)) mice. hDgat1(-/-) mouse hearts had 95% increased DAG and 85% increased ceramides compared with floxed controls. 50% of these mice died by 9 months of age. The heart failure marker brain natriuretic peptide increased 5-fold in hDgat1(-/-) hearts, and fractional shortening (FS) was reduced. This was associated with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and cluster of differentiation 36. We crossed hDgat1(-/-) mice with previously described enterocyte-specific Dgat1 knock-out mice (hiDgat1(-/-)). This corrected the early mortality, improved FS, and reduced cardiac ceramide and DAG content. Treatment of hDgat1(-/-) mice with the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exenatide also improved FS and reduced heart DAG and ceramide content. Increased fatty acid uptake into hDgat1(-/-) hearts was normalized by exenatide. Reduced activation of protein kinase Cα (PKCα), which is increased by DAG and ceramides, paralleled the reductions in these lipids. Our mouse studies show that loss of DGAT1 reproduces the lipid abnormalities seen in severe human heart failure.

  2. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases

    PubMed Central

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L.

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered “center-stage” in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as “variable”. This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by “cord-compression” hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called “early” rather than “variable”. Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on

  3. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases.

    PubMed

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L

    2015-09-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered "center-stage" in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as "variable". This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by "cord-compression" hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called "early" rather than "variable". Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on time relationship to

  4. Holmes heart--a simple antenatal diagnosis of a complex cardiac anomaly? Fetal echocardiographic findings and review.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Jan; Axt-Fliedner, Roland; Gembruch, Ulrich; Hartge, David R

    2013-01-01

    Double inlet left ventricle as a rare cardiac malformation comprises a broad spectrum of anatomic variants making its correct antenatal diagnosis challenging. We report on echocardiographic findings of three fetuses found to have a less frequent morphologic subgroup of double inlet left ventricle, namely Holmes heart, characterized by a single (left) ventricle connected to both atrioventricular orifices and normally related arteries. We addressed the pre- and perinatal management as well as additional abnormalities and discussed our experiences together with what is known from current literature.

  5. 21 CFR 884.2600 - Fetal cardiac monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ascertain fetal heart activity during pregnancy and labor. The device is designed to separate fetal heart signals from maternal heart signals by analyzing electrocardiographic signals (electrical potentials generated during contraction and relaxation of heart muscle) obtained from the maternal abdomen...

  6. 21 CFR 884.2600 - Fetal cardiac monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ascertain fetal heart activity during pregnancy and labor. The device is designed to separate fetal heart signals from maternal heart signals by analyzing electrocardiographic signals (electrical potentials generated during contraction and relaxation of heart muscle) obtained from the maternal abdomen...

  7. 21 CFR 884.2600 - Fetal cardiac monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ascertain fetal heart activity during pregnancy and labor. The device is designed to separate fetal heart signals from maternal heart signals by analyzing electrocardiographic signals (electrical potentials generated during contraction and relaxation of heart muscle) obtained from the maternal abdomen...

  8. 21 CFR 884.2600 - Fetal cardiac monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ascertain fetal heart activity during pregnancy and labor. The device is designed to separate fetal heart signals from maternal heart signals by analyzing electrocardiographic signals (electrical potentials generated during contraction and relaxation of heart muscle) obtained from the maternal abdomen...

  9. Human fetal growth and organ development: 50 years of discoveries.

    PubMed

    Pardi, Giorgio; Cetin, Irene

    2006-04-01

    Knowledge about human fetal growth and organ development has greatly developed in the last 50 years. Anatomists and physiologists had already described some crucial aspects, for example, the circulation of blood during intrauterine life through the fetal heart, the liver as well as the placenta. However, only in the last century physiologic studies were performed in animal models. In the human fetus, the introduction of ultrasound and Doppler velocimetry has provided data about the growth and development of the fetus and of the circulation through the different fetal districts. Moreover, in the last 2 decades we have learned about fetal oxygenation and fetal nutrient supply caused by the availability of fetal blood samples obtained under relatively steady state conditions. These studies, together with studies using stable isotope methodologies, have clarified some aspects of the supply of the major nutrients for the fetus such as glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids. At the same time, the relevance of placental function has been recognized as a major determinant of fetal diseases leading to intrauterine growth restriction. More recently, the availability of new tools such as 3-dimensional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, have made possible the evaluation of the growth and development of fetal organs. This knowledge in the healthy fetus will improve the ability of clinicians to recognize abnormal phenotypes of the different fetal organs, thus allowing to stage fetal diseases.

  10. Change of Spectral Analysis of Fetal Heart Rate During Clinical Hypnosis: a Prospective Randomised Trial from the 20th Week of Gestation Till Term

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, J.; Hayes-Gill, B. R.; Schiermeier, S.; Hatzmann, W.; Heinrich, T. M.; Hüsken-Janßen, H.; Herrmann, E.; Louwen, F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the functional adaptive process of the fetal autonomic nervous system during hypnosis from the 20th week of gestation till term. Are there changes in the power spectrum analysis of fetal heart rate when the mother is having a clinical hypnosis or control period? Study Design: Fourty-nine FHR recordings were analysed. Included recordings were from singletons and abdominal fetal ECG-monitored pregnancies. All women were randomised to receive clinical hypnosis followed by a period with no intervention or vice versa. Statistical analyses were performed with the Wilcoxon signed ranks and Spearman rho correlation tests. Results: There was a significant difference found between fetal heart rate at baseline (144.3 ± 6.0) and hypnosis (142.1 ± 6.4). A difference was also detected between the standard deviation of the heart rate between baseline (6.7 ± 1.9) and hypnosis (6.8 ± 3.5). LFnu was smaller during baseline (80.2 ± 5.3) than during hypnosis (82.1 ± 5.7), whereas HFnu was significantly larger (19.8 ± 5.3 vs. 17.9 ± 5.7). There was no correlation between the gestation age and the change in LFnu, HFnu or ratio LF/HF due to the hypnosis intervention. Conclusion: The functional adaptive process of the fetal autonomic system during hypnosis is reflected by a sympathovagal shift towards increased sympathetic modulation. PMID:25284838

  11. Change of Spectral Analysis of Fetal Heart Rate During Clinical Hypnosis: a Prospective Randomised Trial from the 20th Week of Gestation Till Term.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, J; Hayes-Gill, B R; Schiermeier, S; Hatzmann, W; Heinrich, T M; Hüsken-Janßen, H; Herrmann, E; Louwen, F

    2012-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the functional adaptive process of the fetal autonomic nervous system during hypnosis from the 20th week of gestation till term. Are there changes in the power spectrum analysis of fetal heart rate when the mother is having a clinical hypnosis or control period? Study Design: Fourty-nine FHR recordings were analysed. Included recordings were from singletons and abdominal fetal ECG-monitored pregnancies. All women were randomised to receive clinical hypnosis followed by a period with no intervention or vice versa. Statistical analyses were performed with the Wilcoxon signed ranks and Spearman rho correlation tests. Results: There was a significant difference found between fetal heart rate at baseline (144.3 ± 6.0) and hypnosis (142.1 ± 6.4). A difference was also detected between the standard deviation of the heart rate between baseline (6.7 ± 1.9) and hypnosis (6.8 ± 3.5). LFnu was smaller during baseline (80.2 ± 5.3) than during hypnosis (82.1 ± 5.7), whereas HFnu was significantly larger (19.8 ± 5.3 vs. 17.9 ± 5.7). There was no correlation between the gestation age and the change in LFnu, HFnu or ratio LF/HF due to the hypnosis intervention. Conclusion: The functional adaptive process of the fetal autonomic system during hypnosis is reflected by a sympathovagal shift towards increased sympathetic modulation.

  12. Abnormal Development of Thalamic Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Votava-Smith, Jodie K.; Ceschin, Rafael; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Jackson, Hollie A.; Blüml, Stefan; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Preterm birth is associated with alteration in cortico-thalamic development, which underlies poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate abnormal thalamic microstructure when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between thalamic microstructural abnormalities and peri-operative clinical variables. Material and Methods We compared thalamic DTI measurements in 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Comparison was made with three other selected white matter regions using ROI manual based measurements. Correlation was made with post-conceptional age and peri-operative clinical variables. Results In preterm neonates with CHD, there were age-related differences in thalamic diffusivity (axial and radial) compared to the preterm and term non-CHD group, in contrast to no differences in anisotropy. Contrary to our hypothesis, abnormal thalamic and optic radiation microstructure was most strongly associated with an elevated first arterial blood gas pO2 and elevated pre-operative arterial blood gas pH (p<0.05). Conclusion Age-related thalamic microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD. Perinatal hyperoxemia and increased peri-operative serum pH was associated with abnormal thalamic microstructure in preterm neonates with CHD. This study emphasizes the vulnerability of thalamo-cortical development in the preterm neonate with CHD. PMID:25608695

  13. Calcium handling in human heart failure--abnormalities and target for therapy.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Hannes; Schwinger, Robert H G

    2012-07-01

    The fast cycling of calcium between internal stores and the myofilaments with rapid diffusion down steep concentration gradients provides the cellular basis for cardiac contraction and relaxation. In heart failure, the intracellular Ca(2) (+) dynamics are impaired showing reduced systolic peak Ca(2) (+), elevated diastolic Ca(2) (+) levels, and prolonged diastolic Ca(2) (+) decay. The recognition that defects in the function of Ca(2) (+) handling proteins are central to the pathogenesis of heart failure has attracted attention to these proteins as potential targets for therapy. Besides pharmacologic interventions including digitalis, ranolazine, levosimendan and others, cardiac gene therapy holds great promise and the recent clinical studies have proven the feasibility of this therapeutic approach. In this review, the rationale underlying modern therapies that modulate intracellular Ca(2) (+) handling for the treatment of human heart failure are presented and discussed.

  14. Sugar-sweetened beverages and prevalence of the metabolically abnormal phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the...

  15. Canine fetal echocardiography: correlations for the analysis of cardiac dimensions.

    PubMed

    Giannico, Amália Turner; Gil, Elaine Mayumi Ueno; Garcia, Daniela Aparecida Ayres; Sousa, Marlos Gonçalves; Froes, Tilde Rodrigues

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop regression models for correlation of canine fetal heart development with body size to characterize normal development or suggest cardiac anomalies. Twenty clinically healthy pregnant bitches, either brachycephalic and non-brachycephalic, were examined ultrasonographically. Transabdominal fetal echocardiography was conducted every 4 days from the beginning of cardiac chambers differentiation until parturition. Ten cardiac parameters were measured: length, width and diameter of the heart; heart area; left and right ventricular dimensions; left and right atrial dimensions; and aortic and pulmonary artery diameter. Femoral length, biparietal diameter and abdominal cross-sectional area were also recorded. Regression equations were developed for each parameter of fetal body size, and linear and logarithmic models were compared. The model with the highest correlation coefficient was chosen to produce equations to calculate relative dimensions based on the correlations. Only the left-ventricular chamber differed between the two racial groups. Biparietal diameter was the independent parameter that produced the highest correlation coefficient for the most fetal cardiac dimensions, although good correlations were also observed using femoral length and abdominal cross-sectional area. Heart width and heart diameter were used as surrogates of cardiac development, as these measurements showed the best statistical correlation. Quantitative evaluation of fetal cardiac structures can be used to monitor normal and abnormal cardiac development.

  16. Canine fetal echocardiography: correlations for the analysis of cardiac dimensions.

    PubMed

    Giannico, Amália Turner; Gil, Elaine Mayumi Ueno; Garcia, Daniela Aparecida Ayres; Sousa, Marlos Gonçalves; Froes, Tilde Rodrigues

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop regression models for correlation of canine fetal heart development with body size to characterize normal development or suggest cardiac anomalies. Twenty clinically healthy pregnant bitches, either brachycephalic and non-brachycephalic, were examined ultrasonographically. Transabdominal fetal echocardiography was conducted every 4 days from the beginning of cardiac chambers differentiation until parturition. Ten cardiac parameters were measured: length, width and diameter of the heart; heart area; left and right ventricular dimensions; left and right atrial dimensions; and aortic and pulmonary artery diameter. Femoral length, biparietal diameter and abdominal cross-sectional area were also recorded. Regression equations were developed for each parameter of fetal body size, and linear and logarithmic models were compared. The model with the highest correlation coefficient was chosen to produce equations to calculate relative dimensions based on the correlations. Only the left-ventricular chamber differed between the two racial groups. Biparietal diameter was the independent parameter that produced the highest correlation coefficient for the most fetal cardiac dimensions, although good correlations were also observed using femoral length and abdominal cross-sectional area. Heart width and heart diameter were used as surrogates of cardiac development, as these measurements showed the best statistical correlation. Quantitative evaluation of fetal cardiac structures can be used to monitor normal and abnormal cardiac development. PMID:26689920

  17. Complete reversibility of physiological coronary vascular abnormalities in hypertrophied hearts produced by pressure overload in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Isoyama, S; Ito, N; Kuroha, M; Takishima, T

    1989-01-01

    Using an experimental model of ascending aortic banding in the rat, we examined whether coronary circulation abnormalities in hypertrophied hearts are reversible after debanding. 4-wk banding produced significant increases in in vivo left ventricular (LV) pressure (194 +/- 13 vs. 114 +/- 9 mmHg in shamoperated controls) and LV dry wt/body wt (48 +/- 5% above controls). In isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer, coronary flow rate (CFR) was estimated under nonworking conditions. During maximal vasodilation after 1 min-ischemia, CFR at a coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) of 100 mmHg and CFR/myocardidial mass at CPPs of 100 and 150 mmHg decreased significantly (72 +/- 5%; 53 +/- 4 and 61 +/- 4% of controls). 1 or 4 wk after debanding, LV systolic pressures were similar to control values, and the degree of myocardial hypertrophy decreased to levels 23 +/- 6 (P less than 0.01) and 11 +/- 6% (P less than 0.01) above their control values, respectively. At 1 wk there was no significant increase in CFR/myocardial mass, compared to values in the banded group (67 +/- 8 vs. 53 +/- 4% of controls at 100 mmHg and 67 +/- 9 vs. 61 +/- 4% at 150 mmHg of CPP). At 4 wk, CFR and the ratio had increased toward normal. Thus, decreased coronary perfusion in hypertrophied hearts is completely reversible. Images PMID:2525568

  18. Diagnosis and management of heart failure in the fetus

    PubMed Central

    DAVEY, B.; SZWAST, A.; RYCHIK, J.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure can be defined as the inability of the heart to sufficiently support the circulation. In the fetus, heart failure can be caused by a myriad of factors that include fetal shunting abnormalities, genetic cardiomyopathies, extracardiac malformations, arrhythmias and structural congenital heart disease. With advances in ultrasound has come the ability to characterize many complex conditions, previously poorly understood. Fetal echocardiography provides the tools necessary to evaluate and understand the various physiologies that contribute to heart failure in the fetus. In this review, we will explore the different mechanisms of heart failure in this unique patient population and highlight the role of fetal echocardiography in the current management of these conditions PMID:22992530

  19. Fetal Arrhythmias Associated with Cardiac Rhabdomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F; Cuneo, Bettina; Wiggins, Delonia; Gotteiner, Nina; Wakai, Ronald T

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary heart tumors in fetuses are rare and mainly represent rhabdomyomas. The tumors have a variable expression and can be associated with arrhythmias, including both wide and narrow QRS tachycardia. Although multiple Doppler techniques exist to assess fetal heart rhythm, it can be difficult to record precise electrophysiological pathologies in fetal life. Objective Investigations defining precise electrophysiological diagnosis were performed using fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Methods In addition to routine fetal echocardiography, fMCG was used to investigate electrophysiologic rhythm patterns in a series of 10 fetuses with cardiac rhabdomyomas. Results The mean gestational age of the fetuses was 28.6 weeks (SD ± 4.7 weeks). The multiple rhabdomyomas were mainly located in the right and left ventricles as well as around the AV groove. Arrhythmias or conduction abnormalities were diagnosed in all 10 patients, although only six of them were referred due to that indication. Remarkably, 80% (8/10) had associated Wolff-Parkinson-White pre-excitation. In addition, we found prominent p waves in four fetuses. Conclusion In fetuses with rhabdomyomas, a disease where rhythm pathology is common, precise electrophysiological diagnosis can now be made by fMCG. fMCG is complimentary to echocardiography for rhythm assessment, and can detect conduction abnormalities that are not possible to diagnose prenatally with M-mode or pulsed Doppler ultrasound. Risk factor assessment using fMCG can support pregnancy management and post-natal treatment and follow-up. PMID:24333285

  20. Fetal loss in threatened abortion after demonstration of fetal cardiac activity in a low socioeconomic population.

    PubMed

    Dede, F S; Ulucay, U; Kose, M F; Dede, H; Dilbaz, S

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the incidence and risk factors of fetal loss in threatened abortion after ultrasonographic detection of fetal cardiac activity in a low socioeconomic population. A total of 202 women with singleton pregnancies who presented with vaginal bleeding in which fetal heart activity was ultrasonographically demonstrated between 5 and 14 weeks' gestation were included. Pregnancies with fetal abnormalities were excluded from the study. All cases were followed-up with respect to pregnancy outcomes. A total of 54 of 202 pregnancies (26.7%) resulted in fetal loss before 20 weeks' gestation. The mean fetal heart rate (FHR) and cervical length values were lower in spontaneous abortions than in viable pregnancies (121.2 +/- 13.3 vs 143.5 +/- 12.4 and 41 +/- 6.0 vs. 34.8 +/- 6.1, respectively; p < 0.001). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.88 for FHR and 0.77 for cervical length. A FHR value <130 b.p.m. was 81.4% sensitive, 85.1% specific and a cervical length value <40 mm was 80.8% sensitive, 54.7% specific for determination of fetal loss before 20 weeks' gestation. Fetal loss was observed in about one-quarter of pregnancies admitted with threatened abortion in a low socioeconomic population. Bradycardia and short cervix were found to be significant risk factors affecting the pregnancy outcome in women presenting with vaginal bleeding, in whom fetal cardiac activity was documented. PMID:20701515

  1. Abnormal Mitochondrial L-Arginine Transport Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure and Rexoygenation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Melissa; Joshi, Mandar; Horlock, Duncan; Lam, Nicholas T.; Gregorevic, Paul; McGee, Sean L.; Kaye, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF) and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. Methods and Results In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model) we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively) and expression of the principal L-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (p<0.001, p<0.01) compared to controls. This was accompanied by significantly lower NO production and higher 3-nitrotyrosine levels (both p<0.05). The role of mitochondrial L-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1) exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. Conclusion These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury. PMID:25111602

  2. Genetic abnormalities in FOXP1 are associated with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sheng-Wei; Mislankar, Mona; Misra, Chaitali; Huang, Nianyuan; Dajusta, Daniel G; Harrison, Steven M; McBride, Kim L; Baker, Linda A; Garg, Vidu

    2013-09-01

    The etiology for the majority of congenital heart defects (CHD) is unknown. We identified a patient with unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and hypoplastic left ventricle who harbored an ~0.3 Mb monoallelic deletion on chromosome 3p14.1. The deletion encompassed the first four exons of FOXP1, a gene critical for normal heart development that represses cardiomyocyte proliferation and expression of Nkx2.5. To determine whether FOXP1 mutations are found in patients with CHD, we sequenced FOXP1 in 82 patients with AVSD or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We discovered two patients who harbored a heterozygous c.1702C>T variant in FOXP1 that predicted a potentially deleterious substitution of a highly conserved proline (p.Pro568Ser). This variant was not found in 287 controls but is present in dbSNP at a 0.2% frequency. The orthologous murine Foxp1 p.Pro596Ser mutant protein displayed deficits in luciferase reporter assays and resulted in increased proliferation and Nkx2.5 expression in cardiomyoblasts. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of FOXP1 is associated with human CHD.

  3. Effect of Caffeine Chronically Consumed During Pregnancy on Adenosine A1 and A2A Receptors Signaling in Both Maternal and Fetal Heart from Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Inmaculada; Albasanz, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Background: Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, even during pregnancy. Its stimulatory effects are mainly due to antagonism of adenosine actions by blocking adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. Previous studies have shown that caffeine can cross the placenta and therefore modulate these receptors not only in the fetal brain but also in the heart. Methods: In the present work, the effect of caffeine chronically consumed during pregnancy on A1 and A2A receptors in Wistar rat heart, from both mothers and their fetuses, were studied using radioligand binding, Western-blotting, and adenylyl cyclase activity assays, as well as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: Caffeine did not significantly alter A1R neither at protein nor at gene expression level in both the maternal and fetal heart. On the contrary, A2AR significantly decreased in the maternal heart, although mRNA was not affected. Gi and Gs proteins were also preserved. Finally, A1R-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity did not change in the maternal heart, but A2AR mediated stimulation of this enzymatic activity significantly decreased according to the detected loss of this receptor. Conclusions: Opposite to the downregulation and desensitization of the A1R/AC pathway previously reported in the brain, these results show that this pathway is not affected in rat heart after caffeine exposure during pregnancy. In addition, A2AR is downregulated and desensitized in the maternal heart, suggesting a differential modulation of these receptor-mediated pathways by caffeine. PMID:25538864

  4. Fetal MRI: An approach to practice: A review.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Sahar N

    2014-09-01

    MRI has been increasingly used for detailed visualization of the fetus in utero as well as pregnancy structures. Yet, the familiarity of radiologists and clinicians with fetal MRI is still limited. This article provides a practical approach to fetal MR imaging. Fetal MRI is an interactive scanning of the moving fetus owed to the use of fast sequences. Single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) T2-weighted imaging is a standard sequence. T1-weighted sequences are primarily used to demonstrate fat, calcification and hemorrhage. Balanced steady-state free-precession (SSFP), are beneficial in demonstrating fetal structures as the heart and vessels. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have potential applications in fetal imaging. Knowing the developing fetal MR anatomy is essential to detect abnormalities. MR evaluation of the developing fetal brain should include recognition of the multilayered-appearance of the cerebral parenchyma, knowledge of the timing of sulci appearance, myelination and changes in ventricular size. With advanced gestation, fetal organs as lungs and kidneys show significant changes in volume and T2-signal. Through a systematic approach, the normal anatomy of the developing fetus is shown to contrast with a wide spectrum of fetal disorders. The abnormalities displayed are graded in severity from simple common lesions to more complex rare cases. Complete fetal MRI is fulfilled by careful evaluation of the placenta, umbilical cord and amniotic cavity. Accurate interpretation of fetal MRI can provide valuable information that helps prenatal counseling, facilitate management decisions, guide therapy, and support research studies. PMID:25685519

  5. Biomedical Instruments for Fetal and Neonatal Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, P.; Scopesi, F.; Serra, G.

    2006-10-01

    Specialised instruments have been developed to aid the care of the fetus and the newborn baby. Miniature sensors using optical, electrical, chemical, mechanical and magnetic principles have been produced for capturing key measurands. These include temperature, pressure, flow and dimension, as well as several specific molecules such as glucose, oxygen and carbon dioxide. During pregnancy ultrasound imaging and blood flow techniques provide valuable information concerning fetal abnormalities, fetal growth, fetal breathing and fetal heart rate. Signal processing and pattern recognition can be useful for deriving indicators of fetal distress and clinical status, based on biopotentials as well as ultrasound signals. Fetal pH measurement is a critical requirement during labour and delivery. The intensive care of ill preterm babies involves provision of an optimal thermal environment and respiratory support. Monitoring of blood gas and acid-base status is essential, and this involves both blood sampling for in vitro analysis as well as the use of invasive or non-invasive sensors. For the future it will be vital that the technologies used are subjected to controlled trials to establish benefit or otherwise.

  6. Insulin over expression induces heart abnormalities via reactive oxygen species regulation, might be step towards cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, S; Ali, T; Gul, M; Javed, Q; Emanueli, C; Murtaza, I

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is known to regulate blood—glucose level and promote its utilization as an energy source in cardiac tissues under normal physiological conditions as well as stimulates signaling pathways that involved cell growth and proliferation. Although recently insulin generated free radicals via NAD(P)H has been documented but the molecular mechanism is still under investigation. The aim of present study is to elucidate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent possible role of insulin in cardiac abnormalities, including hypertrophy by regulation of antioxidants enzyme (SOD) activity. In the current study, 60 cardiac patients and 50 healthy individuals as well as the rat model with insulin administration were under investigation. Oxidant, anti—oxidant biochemical assays, hypertrophic marker expression via immunobloting and histopathology were performed. We observed statistically significant elevation of the reactive oxygen species level in the serum of patients as well as in the insulin administrated rat model, a mild expression of cardiac marker in experimental models along with abnormal histopathology of hearts. However, super oxide dismutase free radical scavenger activity was down regulated upon insulin treatment compared to control rats. Conclusively, the present study showed that over expression of insulin might stimulate cardiac hypertrophic signal via up regulation of free radicals and down regulation of antioxidants enzymes including SOD activity.

  7. A neural network learned information measures for heart motion abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambakhsh, M. S.; Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Goela, Aashish; Islam, Ali; Peters, Terry; Li, Shuo

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we propose an information theoretic neural network for normal/abnormal left ventricular motion classification which outperforms significantly other recent methods in the literature. The proposed framework consists of a supervised 3-layer artificial neural network (ANN) which uses hyperbolic tangent sigmoid and linear transfer functions for hidden and output layers, respectively. The ANN is fed by information theoretic measures of left ventricular wall motion such as Shannon's differential entropy (SDE), Rényi entropy and Fisher information, which measure global information of subjects distribution. Using 395×20 segmented LV cavities of short-axis magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired from 48 subjects, the experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms Support Vector Machine (SVM) and thresholding based information theoretic classifiers. It yields a specificity equal to 90%, a sensitivity of 91%, and a remarkable Area Under Curve (AUC) for Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC), equal to 93.2%.

  8. Heart rate, conduction and ultrasound abnormalities in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Colotto, Marco; Amato, Silvia; Colella, Alessandra; Curione, Mario; Danese, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. Though not considered a diagnostic criterion for most EDS subtypes, cardiovascular involvement is a well-known complication in EDS. A case-control study was carried out on 28 adults with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosed according to current criteria, compared to 29 healthy subjects evaluating resting electrocardiographic (ECG), 24-h ECG and resting heart ultrasound data. Results obtained in the ECG studies showed a moderate excess in duration of the PR interval and P wave, an excess of heart conduction and rate abnormalities and an increased rate of mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency often complicating with "true" mitral valve prolapse in the ecocardiographic study. These variable ECG subclinical anomalies reported in our sample may represent the resting surrogate of such a subnormal cardiovascular response to postural changes that are known to be present in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings indicate the usefulness of a full cardiologic evaluation of adults with JHS/EDS-HT for the correct management. PMID:24752348

  9. Unhealthy lifestyles and ischaemic electrocardiographic abnormalities: the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Nabipour, I; Amiri, M; Imami, S R; Jahfari, S M; Nosrati, A; Iranpour, D; Soltanian, A R

    2008-01-01

    We assessed prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and unhealthy lifestyles in 3723 participants aged > or = 25 years in the northern Persian Gulf region; 96.0% had > or = 1 cardiovascular risk factor. Over 60% had unhealthy body weight, only 8.3% ate the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables, 70.6% were physically inactive and 19.0% were current smokers. Prevalence of electrocardiogram (ECG) with evidence of IHD was 12.7%. Present or past smoking and truncal obesity were independently associated with IHD ECGs in men, and past or present smoking and obesity in women. Hypertension and diabetes were independently associated with increased risk of IHD ECG.

  10. Usefulness of verapamil for congestive heart failure associated with abnormal left ventricular diastolic filling and normal left ventricular systolic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Setaro, J.F.; Zaret, B.L.; Schulman, D.S.; Black, H.R.; Soufer, R. )

    1990-10-15

    Normal left ventricular systolic performance with impaired left ventricular diastolic filling may be present in a substantial number of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). To evaluate the effect of oral verapamil in this subset, 20 men (mean age 68 +/- 5 years) with CHF, intact left ventricular function (ejection fraction greater than 45%) and abnormal diastolic filling (peak filling rate less than 2.5 end-diastolic volumes per second (edv/s)) were studied in a placebo-controlled, double-blind 5-week crossover trial. All patients underwent echocardiography to rule out significant valvular disease, and thallium-201 stress scintigraphy to exclude major active ischemia. Compared to baseline values, verapamil significantly improved exercise capacity by 33% (13.9 +/- 4.3 vs 10.7 +/- 3.4 minutes at baseline) and peak filling rate by 30% (2.29 +/- 0.54 vs 1.85 +/- 0.45 edv/s at baseline) (all p less than 0.05). Placebo values were 12.3 +/- 4.0 minutes and 2.16 +/- 0.48 edv/s, respectively (difference not significant for both). Improvement from baseline in an objective clinico-radiographic heart failure score (scale 0 to 13) was significantly greater with verapamil compared to placebo (median improvement in score: 3 vs 1, p less than 0.01). Mean ejection fraction and systolic blood pressure were unchanged from baseline; diastolic blood pressure and heart rate decreased to a small degree. Verapamil may have therapeutic efficacy in patients with CHF, preserved systolic function and impaired diastolic filling.

  11. Temporal Patterns in Sheep Fetal Heart Rate Variability Correlate to Systemic Cytokine Inflammatory Response: A Methodological Exploration of Monitoring Potential Using Complex Signals Bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Herry, Christophe L; Cortes, Marina; Wu, Hau-Tieng; Durosier, Lucien D; Cao, Mingju; Burns, Patrick; Desrochers, André; Fecteau, Gilles; Seely, Andrew J E; Frasch, Martin G

    2016-01-01

    Fetal inflammation is associated with increased risk for postnatal organ injuries. No means of early detection exist. We hypothesized that systemic fetal inflammation leads to distinct alterations of fetal heart rate variability (fHRV). We tested this hypothesis deploying a novel series of approaches from complex signals bioinformatics. In chronically instrumented near-term fetal sheep, we induced an inflammatory response with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injected intravenously (n = 10) observing it over 54 hours; seven additional fetuses served as controls. Fifty-one fHRV measures were determined continuously every 5 minutes using Continuous Individualized Multi-organ Variability Analysis (CIMVA). CIMVA creates an fHRV measures matrix across five signal-analytical domains, thus describing complementary properties of fHRV. We implemented, validated and tested methodology to obtain a subset of CIMVA fHRV measures that matched best the temporal profile of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6. In the LPS group, IL-6 peaked at 3 hours. For the LPS, but not control group, a sharp increase in standardized difference in variability with respect to baseline levels was observed between 3 h and 6 h abating to baseline levels, thus tracking closely the IL-6 inflammatory profile. We derived fHRV inflammatory index (FII) consisting of 15 fHRV measures reflecting the fetal inflammatory response with prediction accuracy of 90%. Hierarchical clustering validated the selection of 14 out of 15 fHRV measures comprising FII. We developed methodology to identify a distinctive subset of fHRV measures that tracks inflammation over time. The broader potential of this bioinformatics approach is discussed to detect physiological responses encoded in HRV measures. PMID:27100089

  12. Temporal Patterns in Sheep Fetal Heart Rate Variability Correlate to Systemic Cytokine Inflammatory Response: A Methodological Exploration of Monitoring Potential Using Complex Signals Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hau-Tieng; Durosier, Lucien D.; Desrochers, André; Fecteau, Gilles; Seely, Andrew J. E.; Frasch, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal inflammation is associated with increased risk for postnatal organ injuries. No means of early detection exist. We hypothesized that systemic fetal inflammation leads to distinct alterations of fetal heart rate variability (fHRV). We tested this hypothesis deploying a novel series of approaches from complex signals bioinformatics. In chronically instrumented near-term fetal sheep, we induced an inflammatory response with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injected intravenously (n = 10) observing it over 54 hours; seven additional fetuses served as controls. Fifty-one fHRV measures were determined continuously every 5 minutes using Continuous Individualized Multi-organ Variability Analysis (CIMVA). CIMVA creates an fHRV measures matrix across five signal-analytical domains, thus describing complementary properties of fHRV. We implemented, validated and tested methodology to obtain a subset of CIMVA fHRV measures that matched best the temporal profile of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6. In the LPS group, IL-6 peaked at 3 hours. For the LPS, but not control group, a sharp increase in standardized difference in variability with respect to baseline levels was observed between 3 h and 6 h abating to baseline levels, thus tracking closely the IL-6 inflammatory profile. We derived fHRV inflammatory index (FII) consisting of 15 fHRV measures reflecting the fetal inflammatory response with prediction accuracy of 90%. Hierarchical clustering validated the selection of 14 out of 15 fHRV measures comprising FII. We developed methodology to identify a distinctive subset of fHRV measures that tracks inflammation over time. The broader potential of this bioinformatics approach is discussed to detect physiological responses encoded in HRV measures. PMID:27100089

  13. Fractal Analysis and Hurst Parameter for Intrapartum Fetal Heart Rate Variability Analysis: A Versatile Alternative to Frequency Bands and LF/HF Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Doret, Muriel; Spilka, Jiří; Chudáček, Václav; Gonçalves, Paulo; Abry, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background The fetal heart rate (FHR) is commonly monitored during labor to detect early fetal acidosis. FHR variability is traditionally investigated using Fourier transform, often with adult predefined frequency band powers and the corresponding LF/HF ratio. However, fetal conditions differ from adults and modify spectrum repartition along frequencies. Aims This study questions the arbitrariness definition and relevance of the frequency band splitting procedure, and thus of the calculation of the underlying LF/HF ratio, as efficient tools for characterizing intrapartum FHR variability. Study Design The last 30 minutes before delivery of the intrapartum FHR were analyzed. Subjects Case-control study. A total of 45 singletons divided into two groups based on umbilical cord arterial pH: the Index group with pH ≤ 7.05 (n = 15) and Control group with pH > 7.05 (n = 30). Outcome Measures Frequency band-based LF/HF ratio and Hurst parameter. Results This study shows that the intrapartum FHR is characterized by fractal temporal dynamics and promotes the Hurst parameter as a potential marker of fetal acidosis. This parameter preserves the intuition of a power frequency balance, while avoiding the frequency band splitting procedure and thus the arbitrary choice of a frequency separating bands. The study also shows that extending the frequency range covered by the adult-based bands to higher and lower frequencies permits the Hurst parameter to achieve better performance for identifying fetal acidosis. Conclusions The Hurst parameter provides a robust and versatile tool for quantifying FHR variability, yields better acidosis detection performance compared to the LF/HF ratio, and avoids arbitrariness in spectral band splitting and definitions. PMID:26322889

  14. Overview of fetal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shardha; Strasburger, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Though fetal arrhythmias account for a small proportion of referrals to a fetal cardiologist, they may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The present review outlines the current literature with regard to the diagnosis and, in brief, some management strategies in fetal arrhythmias. Recent findings Advances in echocardiography have resulted in significant improvements in our ability to elucidate the mechanism of arrhythmia at the bedside. At the same time, fetal magnetocardiography is broadening our understanding of mechanisms of arrhythmia especially as it pertains to ventricular arrhythmias and congenital heart block. It provides a unique window to study electrical properties of the fetal heart, unlike what has been available to date. Recent reports of bedside use of fetal ECG make it a promising new technology. The underlying mechanisms resulting in immune-mediated complete heart block in a small subset of ‘at-risk’ fetuses is under investigation. Summary There have been great strides in noninvasive diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias. However, we still need to improve our knowledge of the electromechanical properties of the fetal heart as well as the mechanisms of arrhythmia to further improve outcomes. Multiinstitutional collaborative studies are needed to help answer some of the questions regarding patient, drug selection and management algorithms. PMID:18781114

  15. Fetal Neurobehavioral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the ontogeny of fetal autonomic, motoric, state, and interactive functioning in 31 healthy fetuses from 20 weeks through term. Found that male fetuses were more active than female fetuses, and that greater maternal stress appraisal was associated with reduced fetal heart rate variability. Found that an apparent period of…

  16. Introduction: December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young - Highlights of HeartWeek 2015: Challenges and Dilemmas of Pediatric Cardiac Care including Heart Failure in Children and Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 13th annual publication in Cardiology in the Young generated from the two meetings that composed "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Centre at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine, and entering its 16th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Paediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia entering its 19th year. This December 2015 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of the two meetings that compose HeartWeek. Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 15th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from Friday, 6 February, 2015, to Monday, 9 February, 2015. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery and its special focus was "Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries". The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's annual meeting - Cardiology 2015, the 18th Annual Update on Paediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease: "Challenges and Dilemmas" - was held at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, from Wednesday, 11 February, 2015, to Sunday, 15 February, 2015. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care

  17. Contractile abnormalities and altered drug response in engineered heart tissue from Mybpc3-targeted knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Andrea; Friedrich, Felix W; Flenner, Frederik; Geertz, Birgit; Eder, Alexandra; Schaaf, Sebastian; Hirt, Marc N; Uebeler, June; Schlossarek, Saskia; Carrier, Lucie; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Myosin-binding protein C (Mybpc3)-targeted knock-in mice (KI) recapitulate typical aspects of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We evaluated whether these functional alterations can be reproduced in engineered heart tissue (EHT) and yield novel mechanistic information on the function of cMyBP-C. EHTs were generated from cardiac cells of neonatal KI, heterozygous (HET) or wild-type controls (WT) and developed without apparent morphological differences. KI had 70% and HET 20% lower total cMyBP-C levels than WT, accompanied by elevated fetal gene expression. Under standard culture conditions and spontaneous beating, KI EHTs showed more frequent burst beating than WT and occasional tetanic contractions (14/96). Under electrical stimulation (6Hz, 37°C) KI EHTs exhibited shorter contraction and relaxation times and a twofold higher sensitivity to external [Ca(2+)]. Accordingly, the sensitivity to verapamil was 4-fold lower and the response to isoprenaline or the Ca(2+) sensitizer EMD 57033 2- to 4-fold smaller. The loss of EMD effect was verified in 6-week-old KI mice in vivo. HET EHTs were apparently normal under basal conditions, but showed similarly altered contractile responses to [Ca(2+)], verapamil, isoprenaline and EMD. In contrast, drug-induced changes in intracellular Ca(2+) transients (Fura-2) were essentially normal. In conclusion, the present findings in auxotonically contracting EHTs support the idea that cMyBP-C's normal role is to suppress force generation at low intracellular Ca(2+) and stabilize the power-stroke step of the cross bridge cycle. Pharmacological testing in EHT unmasked a disease phenotype in HET. The altered drug response may be clinically relevant.

  18. Abnormalities in intracellular calcium regulation and contractile function in myocardium from dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perreault, C. L.; Shannon, R. P.; Komamura, K.; Vatner, S. F.; Morgan, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    24 d of rapid ventricular pacing induced dilated cardiomyopathy with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in conscious, chronically instrumented dogs. We studied mechanical properties and intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) transients of trabeculae carneae isolated from 15 control dogs (n = 32) and 11 dogs with pacing-induced cardiac failure (n = 26). Muscles were stretched to maximum length at 30 degrees C and stimulated at 0.33 Hz; a subset (n = 17 control, n = 17 myopathic) was loaded with the [Ca2+]i indicator aequorin. Peak tension was depressed in the myopathic muscles, even in the presence of maximally effective (i.e., 16 mM) [Ca2+] in the perfusate. However, peak [Ca2+]i was similar (0.80 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.71 +/- 0.05 microM; [Ca2+]o = 2.5 mM), suggesting that a decrease in Cai2+ availability was not responsible for the decreased contractility. The time for decline from the peak of the Cai2+ transient was prolonged in the myopathic group, which correlated with prolongation of isometric contraction and relaxation. However, similar end-diastolic [Ca2+]i was achieved in both groups (0.29 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.02 microM), indicating that Cai2+ homeostasis can be maintained in myopathic hearts. The inotropic response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was depressed compared with the controls. However, when cAMP production was stimulated by pretreatment with forskolin, the response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was improved. Our findings provide direct evidence that abnormal [Ca2+]i handling is an important cause of contractile dysfunction in dogs with pacing-induced heart failure and suggest that deficient production of cAMP may be an important cause of these changes in excitation-contraction coupling.

  19. Mechanisms for the adverse effects of late gestational increases in maternal cortisol on the heart revealed by transcriptomic analyses of the fetal septum

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Charles E.; Rabaglino, Maria Belen; Antolic, Andrew; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown in sheep that 10 days of modest chronic increase in maternal cortisol resulting from maternal infusion of cortisol (1 mg/kg/day) caused fetal heart enlargement and Purkinje cell apoptosis. In subsequent studies we extended the cortisol infusion to term, finding a dramatic incidence of stillbirth in the pregnancies with chronically increased cortisol. To investigate effects of maternal cortisol on the heart, we performed transcriptomic analyses on the septa using ovine microarrays and Webgestalt and Cytoscape programs for pathway inference. Analyses of the transcriptomic effects of maternal cortisol infusion for 10 days (130 day cortisol vs 130 day control), or ∼25 days (140 day cortisol vs 140 day control) and of normal maturation (140 day control vs 130 day control) were performed. Gene ontology terms related to immune function and cytokine actions were significantly overrepresented as genes altered by both cortisol and maturation in the septa. After 10 days of cortisol, growth factor and muscle cell apoptosis pathways were significantly overrepresented, consistent with our previous histologic findings. In the term fetuses (∼25 days of cortisol) nutrient pathways were significantly overrepresented, consistent with altered metabolism and reduced mitochondria. Analysis of mitochondrial number by mitochondrial DNA expression confirmed a significant decrease in mitochondria. The metabolic pathways modeled as altered by cortisol treatment to term were different from those modeled during maturation of the heart to term, and thus changes in gene expression in these metabolic pathways may be indicative of the fetal heart pathophysiologies seen in pregnancies complicated by stillbirth, including gestational diabetes, Cushing's disease and chronic stress. PMID:24867915

  20. Mechanisms for the adverse effects of late gestational increases in maternal cortisol on the heart revealed by transcriptomic analyses of the fetal septum.

    PubMed

    Richards, Elaine M; Wood, Charles E; Rabaglino, Maria Belen; Antolic, Andrew; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2014-08-01

    We have previously shown in sheep that 10 days of modest chronic increase in maternal cortisol resulting from maternal infusion of cortisol (1 mg/kg/day) caused fetal heart enlargement and Purkinje cell apoptosis. In subsequent studies we extended the cortisol infusion to term, finding a dramatic incidence of stillbirth in the pregnancies with chronically increased cortisol. To investigate effects of maternal cortisol on the heart, we performed transcriptomic analyses on the septa using ovine microarrays and Webgestalt and Cytoscape programs for pathway inference. Analyses of the transcriptomic effects of maternal cortisol infusion for 10 days (130 day cortisol vs 130 day control), or ∼25 days (140 day cortisol vs 140 day control) and of normal maturation (140 day control vs 130 day control) were performed. Gene ontology terms related to immune function and cytokine actions were significantly overrepresented as genes altered by both cortisol and maturation in the septa. After 10 days of cortisol, growth factor and muscle cell apoptosis pathways were significantly overrepresented, consistent with our previous histologic findings. In the term fetuses (∼25 days of cortisol) nutrient pathways were significantly overrepresented, consistent with altered metabolism and reduced mitochondria. Analysis of mitochondrial number by mitochondrial DNA expression confirmed a significant decrease in mitochondria. The metabolic pathways modeled as altered by cortisol treatment to term were different from those modeled during maturation of the heart to term, and thus changes in gene expression in these metabolic pathways may be indicative of the fetal heart pathophysiologies seen in pregnancies complicated by stillbirth, including gestational diabetes, Cushing's disease and chronic stress.

  1. Heart murmurs

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... classified ("graded") depending on how loud the murmur sounds with a stethoscope. The grading is on a ...

  2. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  3. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is related to both reduced contractile function and incomplete relaxation: an electromechanically detailed biophysical modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, David H.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) accounts for about 50% of heart failure cases. It has features of incomplete relaxation and increased stiffness of the left ventricle. Studies from clinical electrophysiology and animal experiments have found that HFpEF is associated with impaired calcium homeostasis, ion channel remodeling and concentric left ventricle hypertrophy (LVH). However, it is still unclear how the abnormal calcium homeostasis, ion channel and structural remodeling affect the electro-mechanical dynamics of the ventricles. In this study we have developed multiscale models of the human left ventricle from single cells to the 3D organ, which take into consideration HFpEF-induced changes in calcium handling, ion channel remodeling and concentric LVH. Our simulation results suggest that at the cellular level, HFpEF reduces the systolic calcium level resulting in a reduced systolic contractile force, but elevates the diastolic calcium level resulting in an abnormal residual diastolic force. In our simulations, these abnormal electro-mechanical features of the ventricular cells became more pronounced with the increase of the heart rate. However, at the 3D organ level, the ejection fraction of the left ventricle was maintained due to the concentric LVH. The simulation results of this study mirror clinically observed features of HFpEF and provide new insights toward the understanding of the cellular bases of impaired cardiac electromechanical functions in heart failure. PMID:25852567

  4. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included.

  5. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  6. Ventricular conduction abnormalities as predictors of long‐term survival in acute de novo and decompensated chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Siirila‐Waris, Krista; Harjola, Veli‐Pekka; Marono, David; Parenica, Jiri; Kreutzinger, Philipp; Nieminen, Tuomo; Pavlusova, Marie; Tarvasmaki, Tuukka; Twerenbold, Raphael; Tolonen, Jukka; Miklik, Roman; Nieminen, Markku S.; Spinar, Jindrich; Mueller, Christian; Lassus, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims Data on the prognostic role of left and right bundle branch blocks (LBBB and RBBB), and nonspecific intraventricular conduction delay (IVCD; QRS ≥ 110 ms, no BBB) in acute heart failure (AHF) are controversial. Our aim was to investigate electrocardiographic predictors of long‐term survival in patients with de novo AHF and acutely decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF). Methods and Results We analysed the admission electrocardiogram of 982 patients from a multicenter European cohort of AHF with 3.9 years' mean follow‐up. Half (51.5%, n = 506) of the patients had de novo AHF. LBBB, and IVCD were more common in ADCHF than in de novo AHF: 17.2% vs. 8.7% (P < 0.001) and 20.6% vs. 13.2% (P = 0.001), respectively, and RBBB was almost equally common (6.9% and 8.1%; P = 0.5), respectively. Mortality during the follow‐up was higher in patients with RBBB (85.4%) and IVCD (73.7%) compared with patients with normal ventricular conduction (57.0%); P < 0.001 for both. The impact of RBBB on prognosis was prominent in de novo AHF (adjusted HR 1.93, 1.03–3.60; P = 0.04), and IVCD independently predicted death in ADCHF (adjusted HR 1.79, 1.28–2.52; P = 0.001). Both findings were pronounced in patients with reduced ejection fraction. LBBB showed no association with increased mortality in either of the subgroups. The main results were confirmed in a validation cohort of 1511 AHF patients with 5.9 years' mean follow‐up. Conclusions Conduction abnormalities predict long‐term survival differently in de novo AHF and ADCHF. RBBB predicts mortality in de novo AHF, and IVCD in ADCHF. LBBB has no additive predictive value in AHF requiring hospitalization.

  7. The impact of steroid withdrawal on the development of lipid abnormalities and obesity in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lake, K D; Reutzel, T J; Pritzker, M R; Jorgensen, C R; Emery, R W

    1993-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia and obesity are common problems after heart transplantation, which may increase the risk of chronic graft atherosclerosis. The intent of this study was to (1) determine the impact of a history of hyperlipidemia on the occurrence of lipid abnormalities after transplantation, (2) compare lipid profiles of those patients being treated with triple-drug immunosuppression versus those patients weaned from prednisone therapy, and (3) identify any factors that would predict which patients are at highest risk for the development of hyperlipidemia after transplantation. Of 89 patients who lived for more than 12 months, 35 patients had a history of hyperlipidemia before heart transplantation (cholesterol level of more than 240 mg/dl; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of more than 160 mg/dl). The most dramatic rise in cholesterol level was observed in patients with no history of hyperlipidemia who were treated with triple-drug immunosuppression, in whom a 64% increase occurred versus a 24% increase in patients receiving steroid-free immunosuppression (p < 0.001). In patients with a history of hyperlipidemia, cholesterol level increased by 20% with triple-drug immunosuppression versus 14% with steroid-free immunosuppression (p = 0.613); however, 83% of the patients in the triple-drug group and 92% in the steroid-free group had elevated cholesterol levels. Multiple regression analysis revealed that significant independent and additive (p < 0.00001) contributions with respect to percent change in cholesterol level were evident for (1) a negative history of hyperlipidemia (p = 0.005), (2) triple-drug immunosuppression (p = 0.0021), and (3) female sex (p = 0.0113). A negative history of hyperlipidemia was predictive of the percent change in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (p = 0.0049), and triple-drug immunosuppression administration predicted the percent change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.0119). Patients with a positive history

  8. Time-dependent remodeling of transmural architecture underlying abnormal ventricular geometry in chronic volume overload heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Covell, James W.

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the abnormal ventricular geometry in failing hearts may be accounted for by regionally selective remodeling of myocardial laminae or sheets, we investigated remodeling of the transmural architecture in chronic volume overload induced by an aortocaval shunt. We determined three-dimensional finite deformation at apical and basal sites in left ventricular anterior wall of six dogs with the use of biplane cineradiography of implanted markers. Myocardial strains at end diastole were measured at a failing state referred to control to describe remodeling of myofibers and sheet structures over time. After 9 ± 2 wk (means ± SE) of volume overload, the myocardial volume within the marker sets increased by >20%. At 2 wk, the basal site had myofiber elongation (0.099 ± 0.030; P < 0.05), whereas the apical site did not [P = not significant (NS)]. Sheet shear at the basal site increased progressively toward the final study (0.040 ± 0.003 at 2 wk and 0.054 ± 0.021 at final; both P < 0.05), which contributed to a significant increase in wall thickness at the final study (0.181 ± 0.047; P < 0.05), whereas the apical site did not (P = NS). We conclude that the remodeling of the transmural architecture is regionally heterogeneous in chronic volume overload. The early differences in fiber elongation seem most likely due to a regional gradient in diastolic wall stress, whereas the late differences in wall thickness are most likely related to regional differences in the laminar architecture of the wall. These results suggest that the temporal progression of ventricular remodeling may be anatomically designed at the level of regional laminar architecture. PMID:15242833

  9. Fetal electrocardiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Heriberto; Andrade, Armando; Puente, Ernestina; Lizana, Pablo R.; Mendoza, Diego

    2002-11-01

    The high intra-uterine death rate is due to failure in appropriately diagnosing some problems in the cardiobreathing system of the fetus during pregnancy. The electrocardiograph is one apparatus which might detect problems at an early stage. With electrodes located near the womb and uterus, in a way similar to the normal technique, the detection of so-called biopotential differences, caused by concentrations of ions, can be achieved. The fetal electrocardiograph is based on an ultrasound technique aimed at detecting intrauterine problems in pregnant women, because it is a noninvasive technique due to the very low level of ultrasound power used. With this system, the following tests can be done: Heart movements from the ninth week onwards; Rapid and safe diagnosis of intrauterine fetal death; Location and size of the placenta. The construction of the fetal electrocardiograph requires instrument level components directly mounted on the printed circuit board, in order to avoid stray capacitance in the cabling which prevents the detection of the E.C.G. activity. The low cost of the system makes it affordable to low budget institutions; in contrast, available commercial systems are priced in U.S. Dollars. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Fetal Heart Attenuate Myocardial Injury after Infarction: An In Vivo Serial Pinhole Gated SPECT-CT Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Garikipati, Venkata Naga Srikanth; Jadhav, Sachin; Pal, Lily; Prakash, Prem; Dikshit, Madhu; Nityanand, Soniya

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have emerged as a potential stem cell type for cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction (MI). Recently, we isolated and characterized mesenchymal stem cells derived from rat fetal heart (fC-MSC), which exhibited potential to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of intravenously injected fC-MSC in a rat model of MI using multi-pinhole gated SPECT-CT system. fC-MSC were isolated from the hearts of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat fetuses at gestation day 16 and expanded ex vivo. One week after induction of MI, 2×106 fC-MSC labeled with PKH26 dye (n = 6) or saline alone (n = 6) were injected through the tail vein of the rats. Initial in vivo tracking of 99mTc-labeled fC-MSC revealed a focal uptake of cells in the anterior mid-ventricular region of the heart. At 4 weeks of fC-MSC administration, the cells labeled with PKH26 were located in abundance in infarct/peri-infarct region and the fC-MSC treated hearts showed a significant increase in left ventricular ejection fraction and a significant decrease in the end diastolic volume, end systolic volume and left ventricular myo-mass in comparison to the saline treated group. In addition, fC-MSC treated hearts had a significantly better myocardial perfusion and attenuation in the infarct size, in comparison to the saline treated hearts. The engrafted PKH26-fC-MSC expressed cardiac troponin T, endothelial CD31 and smooth muscle sm-MHC, suggesting their differentiation into all major cells of cardiovascular lineage. The fC-MSC treated hearts demonstrated an up-regulation of cardio-protective growth factors, anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic molecules, highlighting that the observed left ventricular functional recovery may be due to secretion of paracrine factors by fC-MSC. Taken together, our results suggest that fC-MSC therapy may be a new therapeutic strategy for MI and multi

  11. Indices and detectors for fetal MCG actography.

    PubMed

    Lutter, William J; Wakai, Ronald T

    2011-06-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this study, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity. PMID:21427015

  12. Indices and Detectors for Fetal MCG Actography

    PubMed Central

    Lutter, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this work, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity. PMID:21427015

  13. Successful intrauterine treatment and good long-term outcome in an extremely severe case of fetal hemolytic disease.

    PubMed

    Dębska, Marzena; Kretowicz, Piotr; Tarasiuk, Anna; Dangel, Joanna; Dębski, Romuald

    2014-06-01

    A 34-year-old multiparous woman presented with anti-Rh-D antibodies (1: 512) and fetal hydrops at the 21(st) week of gestation. Ultrasound revealed massive fetal skin edema, ascites, hepatomegaly, placentomegaly, and anhydramnios. No fetal movements were observed. Fetal heart was enlarged, with reportedly decreased contractibility. The Doppler parameters were abnormal: the peak systolic velocity in median cerebral artery (MCA PSV) was increased (84 cm/s, 3 MoM), and absent end diastolic flow (AEDF) was reported in the umbilical artery. Ultrasound examination indicated severe fetal anemia and heart failure. Umbilical vein puncture was performed and the fetal blood count was determined (RBC 0.01 × 10(6)/µl, Ht 0.1%, PLT 67 × 10(3)/µl, WBC 2.1 × 10(3)/µl, indeterminable hemoglobin level). Packed red blood cells (0 Rh-, 30 ml) were immediately transfused to the fetus. Altogether, seven intrauterine transfusions were performed. Fetal hydrops disappeared gradually during the next few weeks. The male neonate (1860 g, 45 cm, Apgar score 3-4) was delivered after the last transfusion at 34(th) week of gestation due of intrauterine asphyxia. The infant was discharged after 21 days, in good condition, on breastfeeding. There was one 10 mm focus of periventricular leukomalacia in the brain, diagnosed based on trans-fontanel ultrasound, without any signs of damage to other organs. At the age of 5 years, the child is healthy, with no abnormalities in his neurodevelopmental parameters.

  14. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  15. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  16. Fetal cardiac interventions: an update of therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article aims to present updated therapeutic options for fetal congenital heart diseases. Methods Data source for the present study was based on comprehensive literature retrieval on fetal cardiac interventions in terms of indications, technical approaches and clinical outcomes. Results About 5% of fetal congenital heart diseases are critical and timely intrauterine intervention may alleviate heart function. Candidates for fetal cardiac interventions are limited. These candidates may include critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The advocated option are prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of atrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Conclusion Fetal cardiac interventions are feasible at midgestation with gradually improved technical success and fetal/postnatal survival due mainly to a well-trained multidisciplinary team, sophisticated equipment and better postnatal care. PMID:25372914

  17. 5D CNS+ Software for Automatically Imaging Axial, Sagittal, and Coronal Planes of Normal and Abnormal Second-Trimester Fetal Brains.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Giuseppe; Capponi, Alessandra; Persico, Nicola; Ghi, Tullio; Nazzaro, Giovanni; Boito, Simona; Pietrolucci, Maria Elena; Arduini, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to test new 5D CNS+ software (Samsung Medison Co, Ltd, Seoul, Korea), which is designed to image axial, sagittal, and coronal planes of the fetal brain from volumes obtained by 3-dimensional sonography. The study consisted of 2 different steps. First in a prospective study, 3-dimensional fetal brain volumes were acquired in 183 normal consecutive singleton pregnancies undergoing routine sonographic examinations at 18 to 24 weeks' gestation. The 5D CNS+ software was applied, and the percentage of adequate visualization of brain diagnostic planes was evaluated by 2 independent observers. In the second step, the software was also tested in 22 fetuses with cerebral anomalies. In 180 of 183 fetuses (98.4%), 5D CNS+ successfully reconstructed all of the diagnostic planes. Using the software on healthy fetuses, the observers acknowledged the presence of diagnostic images with visualization rates ranging from 97.7% to 99.4% for axial planes, 94.4% to 97.7% for sagittal planes, and 92.2% to 97.2% for coronal planes. The Cohen κ coefficient was analyzed to evaluate the agreement rates between the observers and resulted in values of 0.96 or greater for axial planes, 0.90 or greater for sagittal planes, and 0.89 or greater for coronal planes. All 22 fetuses with brain anomalies were identified among a series that also included healthy fetuses, and in 21 of the 22 cases, a correct diagnosis was made. 5D CNS+ was efficient in successfully imaging standard axial, sagittal, and coronal planes of the fetal brain. This approach may simplify the examination of the fetal central nervous system and reduce operator dependency.

  18. Fetal Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, John T.; Sladek, John R.

    1989-11-01

    This article reviews some of the significant contributions of fetal research and fetal tissue research over the past 20 years. The benefits of fetal research include the development of vaccines, advances in prenatal diagnosis, detection of malformations, assessment of safe and effective medications, and the development of in utero surgical therapies. Fetal tissue research benefits vaccine development, assessment of risk factors and toxicity levels in drug production, development of cell lines, and provides a source of fetal cells for ongoing transplantation trials. Together, fetal research and fetal tissue research offer tremendous potential for the treatment of the fetus, neonate, and adult.

  19. Human Fetal Behavior: 100 Years of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, B. S.; Low, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews literature on human fetal behavior. Includes descriptions of coupling of body movements and fetal heart rate and behavior maturation from conception to term. Discusses use of stimulus-induced behavior to examine sensory and cognitive development, and spontaneous and stimulus-induced behavior to assess fetal well-being. Notes research focus…

  20. Comparative proteomics reveals abnormal binding of ATGL and dysferlin on lipid droplets from pressure overload-induced dysfunctional rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Li, Linghai; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Weiyi; Hong, Yun; Wang, Jifeng; Zhang, Shuyan; Xu, Shimeng; Shu, Qingbo; Li, Juanfen; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Min; Qian, Zongjie; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Excessive retention of neutral lipids in cardiac lipid droplets (LDs) is a common observation in cardiomyopathy. Thus, the systematic investigation of the cardiac LD proteome will help to dissect the underlying mechanisms linking cardiac steatosis and myocardial dysfunction. Here, after isolation of LDs from normal and dysfunctional Sprague-Dawley rat hearts, we identified 752 heart-associated LD proteins using iTRAQ quantitative proteomic method, including 451 proteins previously unreported on LDs. The most noteworthy finding was the identification of the membrane resealing protein, dysferlin. An analysis of dysferlin truncation mutants indicated that its C2 domain was responsible for its LD localization. Quantitative proteomic results further determined that 27 proteins were increased and 16 proteins were decreased in LDs from post pressure overload-induced dysfunctional hearts, compared with normal hearts. Notably, adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) was dramatically decreased and dysferlin was substantially increased on dysfunctional cardiac LDs. This study for the first time reveals the dataset of the heart LD proteome in healthy tissue and the variation of it under cardiac dysfunction. These findings highlight an association between the altered LD protein localization of dysferlin and ATGL and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26795240

  1. Comparative proteomics reveals abnormal binding of ATGL and dysferlin on lipid droplets from pressure overload-induced dysfunctional rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linghai; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Weiyi; Hong, Yun; Wang, Jifeng; Zhang, Shuyan; Xu, Shimeng; Shu, Qingbo; Li, Juanfen; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Min; Qian, Zongjie; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Excessive retention of neutral lipids in cardiac lipid droplets (LDs) is a common observation in cardiomyopathy. Thus, the systematic investigation of the cardiac LD proteome will help to dissect the underlying mechanisms linking cardiac steatosis and myocardial dysfunction. Here, after isolation of LDs from normal and dysfunctional Sprague-Dawley rat hearts, we identified 752 heart-associated LD proteins using iTRAQ quantitative proteomic method, including 451 proteins previously unreported on LDs. The most noteworthy finding was the identification of the membrane resealing protein, dysferlin. An analysis of dysferlin truncation mutants indicated that its C2 domain was responsible for its LD localization. Quantitative proteomic results further determined that 27 proteins were increased and 16 proteins were decreased in LDs from post pressure overload-induced dysfunctional hearts, compared with normal hearts. Notably, adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) was dramatically decreased and dysferlin was substantially increased on dysfunctional cardiac LDs. This study for the first time reveals the dataset of the heart LD proteome in healthy tissue and the variation of it under cardiac dysfunction. These findings highlight an association between the altered LD protein localization of dysferlin and ATGL and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26795240

  2. miR-1, miR-133a/b, and miR-208a in human fetal hearts correlate to the apoptotic and proliferation markers

    PubMed Central

    Jerše, Maja; Glavač, Damjan; Zidar, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The heart is the first organ to function in the developing embryo. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in the translational regulation of gene expression, which is beside transcriptional regulation crucial for the morphologic development of muscle tissue. The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that the expression of miR-1, miR-133a/b, and miR-208a correlates with gestational age as well as with an apoptotic and proliferative index in the developing human heart. Our study included normal heart tissue samples obtained at autopsy from 46 fetuses, 12 children, and 15 adults. Proliferation and apoptosis were measured by the immunohistochemical detection of Ki67 and cleaved-CK18. Expression of miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-208a was measured using real-time PCR. We found a similar level of expression of miR-133a/b in fetal and children hearts that was different from the levels in healthy adults. We also found a correlation between a miR-208a expression to the gestational age of fetuses. We observed an inverse correlation between Ki67 expression and gestational age. Expression of Ki67 was positively correlated to the expression of miR-208a and miR-1, but inversely correlated to the expression of miR-133a/b. Expression of cleaved-CK18 was also inversely correlated to the expression of miR-133a/b. Our results showed a general decrease in the expression of miR-1 and an increase of miR-133a/b with increasing gestational age. We also found a general decrease in the expression of miR-208a, mimicking the expression of its host gene. Our results also suggest the involvement of miR-208a and miR-1 in the proliferation as well as anti-proliferative and anti-apoptotic roles of miR-133a/b. PMID:25125495

  3. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  4. Cellular mechanism of the conduction abnormalities induced by serum from anti-Ro/SSA-positive patients in rabbit hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, S; Nascimento, J H; Bonfa, E; Levy, R; Oliveira, S F; Tavares, A V; de Carvalho, A C

    1994-01-01

    In this study, IgG fractions from sera of SLE patients with anti-Ro/SSA or anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB activity were tested in Langendorff preparations of adult rabbit hearts, aiming to reproduce the cardiac manifestations observed in neonatal lupus in an experimental model. The hearts were perfused with normal Tyrode's solution for 30 min, followed by perfusion with Tyrode's containing 0.3 mg/ml of anti-Ro/SSA- (or anti-Ro/La-) positive IgG (nine sera), anti-ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-positive IgG (five sera), or IgG fractions from normal donors (five sera). In one third of the experiments done with anti-Ro/La-positive IgG, heart block was observed. With the remaining fractions, a decrease in heart rate of 17.1% was observed, but normal sinus rhythm was maintained. The IgG fractions with anti-RNP activity (five experiments) and from normal sera (six experiments) reduced heart rates by 12.9 and 3.3%, respectively, but heart block was not observed. To further characterize the cellular mechanisms involved in the conduction disturbances observed in the whole rabbit hearts, we conducted experiments with ventricular myocytes isolated from young rabbit hearts, studied by whole cell patch-clamp technique. In these experiments, the slow inward currents were analyzed during the superfusion of the cell with normal Tyrode's solution and 5 min after superfusion with Tyrode's solution containing 0.3 mg/ml of anti-Ro/SSA- (or anti-Ro/La-) positive IgG (five sera), anti-RNP-positive IgG (three sera), or IgG from normal donors (four sera). Resting and action potential amplitudes were not affected by any of the sera used. The anti-Ro/SSA IgG fraction induced a mean reduction in the peak slow inward current of 31.6%. IgG fractions with anti-RNP activity reduced slow inward current by 4.4%, whereas IgG fractions from normal donors increased this current by 3.3%. IgG-free fractions from sera of patients with anti-Ro/SSA activity did not alter the peak slow inward current. These results

  5. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Chandar Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave's disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20th week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30th week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant's specific signs and symptoms. PMID:24251220

  6. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Batra, Chandar Mohan

    2013-10-01

    Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave's disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20(th) week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30(th) week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant's specific signs and symptoms. PMID:24251220

  7. Troxerutin suppresses lipid abnormalities in the heart of high-fat-high-fructose diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Geetha, Rajagopalan; Yogalakshmi, Baskaran; Sreeja, S; Bhavani, K; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2014-02-01

    The reversal effect of troxerutin (TX) on obesity, insulin resistance, lipid accumulation, oxidative damage, and hypertension induced in the high-fat-high-fructose diet (HFFD)-fed mice model of metabolic syndrome was investigated. Adult male Mus musculus mice of body weight 25-30 g were fed either control diet or HFFD. Each group was divided into two and treated or untreated with TX (150 mg/kg bw, p.o.) from the 16th day. Assays were done in plasma and heart after 30 and 60 days of the experimental period. Significant increase in the levels of glucose and insulin, blood pressure (BP), and oxidative stress were observed after 30 days of HFFD feeding as compared to control. Animals fed HFFD for 60 days developed more severe changes in the above parameters compared to those fed for 30 days. Hearts of HFFD-fed mice registered downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, carnitine palmitoyl transferse-1b and AMP-activated protein kinase; and upregulation of cluster of differentiation 36, fatty acid-binding protein-1, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c after 60 days. TX administration restricted obesity (as seen by Lee's index); improved whole body insulin sensitivity; reduced BP, lipid accumulation, and oxidative damage; upregulated fatty acid (FA) oxidation; and downregulated FA transport and lipogenesis. Histology of heart revealed that TX diminishes inflammatory cell infiltration and fatty degeneration in HFFD-fed mice. The antioxidant property of TX and its ability to influence lipid regulatory genes could be the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects. PMID:24173620

  8. Troxerutin suppresses lipid abnormalities in the heart of high-fat-high-fructose diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Geetha, Rajagopalan; Yogalakshmi, Baskaran; Sreeja, S; Bhavani, K; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2014-02-01

    The reversal effect of troxerutin (TX) on obesity, insulin resistance, lipid accumulation, oxidative damage, and hypertension induced in the high-fat-high-fructose diet (HFFD)-fed mice model of metabolic syndrome was investigated. Adult male Mus musculus mice of body weight 25-30 g were fed either control diet or HFFD. Each group was divided into two and treated or untreated with TX (150 mg/kg bw, p.o.) from the 16th day. Assays were done in plasma and heart after 30 and 60 days of the experimental period. Significant increase in the levels of glucose and insulin, blood pressure (BP), and oxidative stress were observed after 30 days of HFFD feeding as compared to control. Animals fed HFFD for 60 days developed more severe changes in the above parameters compared to those fed for 30 days. Hearts of HFFD-fed mice registered downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, carnitine palmitoyl transferse-1b and AMP-activated protein kinase; and upregulation of cluster of differentiation 36, fatty acid-binding protein-1, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c after 60 days. TX administration restricted obesity (as seen by Lee's index); improved whole body insulin sensitivity; reduced BP, lipid accumulation, and oxidative damage; upregulated fatty acid (FA) oxidation; and downregulated FA transport and lipogenesis. Histology of heart revealed that TX diminishes inflammatory cell infiltration and fatty degeneration in HFFD-fed mice. The antioxidant property of TX and its ability to influence lipid regulatory genes could be the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects.

  9. Comparison of the Effects of Two Auditory Methods by Mother and Fetus on the Results of Non-Stress Test (Baseline Fetal Heart Rate and Number of Accelerations) in Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Khoshkholgh, Roghaie; Keshavarz, Tahereh; Moshfeghy, Zeinab; Akbarzadeh, Marzieh; Asadi, Nasrin; Zare, Najaf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of two auditory methods by mother and fetus on the results of NST in 2011-2012. Materials and methods: In this single-blind clinical trial, 213 pregnant women with gestational age of 37-41 weeks who had no pregnancy complications were randomly divided into 3 groups (auditory intervention for mother, auditory intervention for fetus, and control) each containing 71 subjects. In the intervention groups, music was played through the second 10 minutes of NST. The three groups were compared regarding baseline fetal heart rate and number of accelerations in the first and second 10 minutes of NST. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and paired T-test. Results: The results showed no significant difference among the three groups regarding baseline fetal heart rate in the first (p = 0.945) and second (p = 0.763) 10 minutes. However, a significant difference was found among the three groups concerning the number of accelerations in the second 10 minutes. Also, a significant difference was observed in the number of accelerations in the auditory intervention for mother (p = 0.013) and auditory intervention for fetus groups (p < 0.001). The difference between the number of accelerations in the first and second 10 minutes was also statistically significant (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Music intervention was effective in the number of accelerations which is the indicator of fetal health. Yet, further studies are required to be conducted on the issue. PMID:27385971

  10. Correlation between echocardiographic endocardial surface mapping of abnormal wall motion and pathologic infarct size in autopsied hearts.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, G T; Southern, J F; Choong, C Y; Thomas, J D; Fallon, J T; Guyer, D E; Weyman, A E

    1988-05-01

    We previously developed a cross-sectional echocardiographic technique for quantitatively mapping the endocardial surface of the left ventricle and on which regions of abnormal wall motion can be superimposed in their correct spatial distribution. This endocardial mapping technique (EMT) provides a measure of the left ventricular endocardial surface area (ESA in cm2), the area of abnormal wall motion (AWM in cm2), and the overall percent dysfunction (%AWM) as a measure of the functional "infarct size." To test this approach, we compared the EMT measurements with the actual endocardial surface area (in cm2) and pathologic infarct size (both percent infarct by volume and percent endocardial surface overlying infarct) measured at later autopsy in 20 adults (14 men, six women) ranging in age from 47 to 76 years (mean 64 +/- 9.6 years). The median interval from echocardiographic study to death was 19 days (range 1 to 269 days). Patients were divided into two groups based on the age of their infarcts at the time of death: (1) recent (infarct age less than 14 days; mean age 5.3 +/- 4.6 days) and (2) old (infarct age greater than 6 months; mean age 3.6 +/- 3 years). When the left ventricular endocardial surface area at autopsy was compared with the EMT-derived ESA, a close correlation was found (EMT area = 1.17 X autopsy area + 20.4; r = .94, p = .0001), with the systematic difference in the measurements accounted for by systolic arrest, loss of distending pressure, and specimen shrinkage. The echocardiographic measure of infarct size (%AWM) correlated well with the autopsy percent infarction by volume (%AWM = 1.1 X infarct volume + 5.5; r = .82, p = .0001). Similarly, a good correlation was found for the percent abnormal wall motion and the autopsy percent endocardial surface area overlying infarction (%AWM = 0.89 X infarct area - 0.9; r = .89, p = .0001). When the data were examined in relation to the age of the myocardial infarct, the echocardiographic %AWM appeared to

  11. 21 CFR 884.2640 - Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... phonocardiographic monitor is a device designed to detect, measure, and record fetal heart sounds electronically, in graphic form, and noninvasively, to ascertain fetal condition during labor. This generic type of...

  12. Fetal endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Gayatri, Kotni; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Krishna, S. V. S.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Successful outcome of pregnancy depends upon genetic, cellular, and hormonal interactions, which lead to implantation, placentation, embryonic, and fetal development, parturition and fetal adaptation to extrauterine life. The fetal endocrine system commences development early in gestation and plays a modulating role on the various physiological organ systems and prepares the fetus for life after birth. Our current article provides an overview of the current knowledge of several aspects of this vast field of fetal endocrinology and the role of endocrine system on transition to extrauterine life. We also provide an insight into fetal endocrine adaptations pertinent to various clinically important situations like placental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition. PMID:23961471

  13. Echocardiographic findings and abnormalities in HIV-infected patients: results from a large, prospective, multicenter HIV-heart study

    PubMed Central

    Reinsch, Nico; Kahlert, Philipp; Esser, Stefan; Sundermeyer, Andreas; Neuhaus, Katrin; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Potthoff, Anja; Erbel, Raimund; Buck, Thomas; Neumann, Till

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the current study was to assess cardiac structure and function as well as cardiac abnormalities in a large patient-population based multicenter study of HIV-infected subjects. Materials and methods: We enrolled 803 HIV-positive adults (83.4% men, mean age: 44.2 ± 10.3 yrs) in this prospective, cross-sectional cohort study. The study protocol included a standardized documentation of patient history, medical treatment and clinical examination. All subjects underwent a standardized transthoracic echocardiographic examination protocol including Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Echocardiographic measurements revealed a structural dilatation of the left ventricle in 10.1% of all HIV-infected subjects. Interventricular septum and posterior wall thickness were increased in 18.0% and 11.1%, respectively, with elevated muscle mass in 14.3% male and 19.4% female patients. Of all participants 13.5% exhibited a pathologic contraction characteristic of one or more myocardial segments. Prevalence of systolic and diastolic dysfunction was 34.3% and 48.0%, respectively. However, severe forms of ventricular dysfunction were rare. Conclusions: In conclusion our results demonstrate the relevance of echocardiography in this patient-population in the era of antiretroviral therapy. Above all, left ventricular wall thickness and function should be controlled regularly in HIV-infected subjects. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01119729). PMID:22254197

  14. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  15. Prevalence and distribution of congenital abnormalities in Turkey: differences between the prenatal and postnatal periods.

    PubMed

    Oztarhan, Kazim; Gedikbasi, Ali; Yildirim, Dogukan; Arslan, Oguz; Adal, Erdal; Kavuncuoglu, Sultan; Ozbek, Sibel; Ceylan, Yavuz

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of cases associated with congenital abnormalities during the following three periods: pregnancy, birth, and the neonatal period. This was a retrospective study of cases between 2002 and 2006. All abnormal pregnancies, elective terminations of pregnancies, stillbirths, and births with congenital abnormalities managed in the Neonatology Unit were classified based on the above distribution scheme. During the 5-year study period, 1906 cases with congenital abnormalities were recruited, as follows: 640 prenatally detected and terminated cases, with most abnormalities related to the central nervous system, chromosomes, and urogenital system (56.7%, 12.7%, and 8.9%, respectively); 712 neonates with congenital abnormalities (congenital heart disease [49.2%], central nervous system abnormalities [14.7%], and urogenital system abnormalities [12.9%]); and hospital stillbirths, of which 34.2% had malformations (220 prenatal cases [34.4%] had multiple abnormalities, whereas 188 liveborn cases [26.4%] had multiple abnormalities). The congenital abnormalities rate between 2002 and 2006 was 2.07%. Systematic screening for fetal anomalies is the primary means for identification of affected pregnancies.

  16. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  17. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... signal to your heart. The signal makes your heart beat at the correct pace. Pacemakers may be used: To correct abnormal heart rhythms. The heart may beat too slowly, too fast, or in an irregular ...

  18. Development of fetal brain renin–angiotensin system and hypertension programmed in fetal origins

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Caiping; Shi, Lijun; Xu, Feichao; Zhang, Lubo; Xu, Zhice

    2010-01-01

    Since the concept of fetal origins of adult diseases was introduced in 1980s, the development of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in normal and abnormal patterns has attracted attention. Recent studies have shown the importance of the fetal RAS in both prenatal and postnatal development. This review focuses on the functional development of the fetal brain RAS, and ontogeny of local brain RAS components in utero. The central RAS plays an important role in the control of fetal cardiovascular responses, body fluid balance, and neuroendocrine regulation. Recent progress has been made in demonstrating that altered fetal RAS development as a consequence of environmental insults may impact on “programming” of hypertension later in life. Given that the central RAS is of equal importance to the peripheral RAS in cardiovascular regulation, studies on the fetal brain RAS development in normal and abnormal patterns could shed light on “programming” mechanisms of adult cardiovascular diseases in fetal origins. PMID:19428956

  19. Assessment of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability and Interictal Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities in Drug-naïve Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Ozden; Cincin, Altug; Pehlivan, Aslihan; Midi, Ipek; Kepez, Alper; Agan, Kadriye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Epilepsy is a disease known to occur with autonomous phenomenons. Earlier studies indicate decreased heart rate variability (HRV) during ictal and interictal periods among epilepsy patients. In this study, we aim to investigate cardiac rhythm abnormalities and HRV during interictal period between drug-naïve patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and healthy control group. Methods: Twenty-six patients with IGE and 26 healthy individuals included in the study. In order to eliminate any structural cardiac pathology, transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all subjects and time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were evaluated after 24-hour rhythm holter monitoring. Results: Between two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of mean heart rate and maximum duration between the start of the Q waves and the end of the T waves (QT intervals). In the time domain analysis of HRV, no statically significant difference was detected for standard deviation of all R - R intervals and root-mean-square of successive differences between patient and control group (p = 0,070 and p = 0,104 respectively). In the frequency domain analysis of HRV, patients tended to display lower total power and very low frequency power than did healthy subjects, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is no major effect of the epilepsy on HRV in patients with IGE. It should be emphasized that, in this study, HRV was evaluated only in patients with IGE and that the results are not proper to be generalized for patients with partial seizures. PMID:27390676

  20. Prenatal Detection of Congenital Heart Diseases: One-Year Survey Performing a Screening Protocol in a Single Reference Center in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Luciane Alves; Rolo, Liliam Cristine; Barros, Fernanda Silveira Bello; da Silva, Karina Peres; Leslie, Ana Teresa Figueiredo Stochero; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the experience of a tertiary center in Brazil to which patients are referred whose fetuses are at increased risk for congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Methods. This was a cross-sectional observational study. The data was collected prospectively, during the year 2012, through a screening protocol of the fetal heart adapted from the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology (ISUOG) guideline. We performed a fetal echocardiogram screening for all pregnant women who were referred to the fetal cardiology outpatient obstetrics clinic of a university hospital. The exams were classified as normal or abnormal. The cases considered abnormal were undergone to a postnatal echocardiogram. We categorized the abnormal fetal heart according to severity in “complex,” “significant,” “minor,” and “others.” Results. We performed 271 fetal heart screening. The incidence of abnormal screenings was 9.96% (27 fetuses). The structural CHD when categorized due to severity showed 48.1% (n = 13) of “complex” cases, 18.5% (n = 5) “significant” cases, and 7.4% (n = 2) “minor” cases. The most common referral reason was by maternal causes (67%) followed by fetal causes (33%). The main referral indication was maternal metabolic disease (30%), but there was just one fetus with CHD in such cases (1.2%). CHDs were found in 19/29 fetuses with suspicion of some cardiac abnormality by obstetrician (65.5%). Conclusion. We observed a high rate of CHD in our population. We also found that there was higher incidence of complex cases. PMID:24523982

  1. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  2. Fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

    PubMed

    Lo, Y M

    2000-04-01

    Recently, cell-free fetal DNA has been found in maternal plasma and serum. This discovery opens up a new field of investigation and provides an easily accessible source of fetal genetic material for prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal diagnostic applications of fetal DNA in maternal plasma include the investigation of sex-linked disorders and fetal rhesus D status determination. Cell-free fetal DNA has been found to be present in much higher fractional concentrations than fetal nucleated cells in maternal blood. The concentration of fetal DNA increases throughout pregnancy, with a sharp rise towards the end of gestation. Abnormally high levels of cell-free DNA have been found in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia and preterm labor, an observation that has potential diagnostic and pathophysiologic implications. Much remains to be learned regarding the mechanisms of production and clearance of maternal plasma fetal DNA. It is hoped that the eagerly awaited answers to these and other questions may ultimately enhance our understanding of the fetomaternal relationship.

  3. Fetal biomodelling.

    PubMed

    D'Urso, P S; Thompson, R G

    1998-05-01

    A study has been performed to determine if a stereolithographic (SL) biomodel of a fetal face could be created from 3 dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US). 3D ultrasound images were acquired by Diasonics Gateway 2D Array ultrasound systems (Diasonics Ultrasound, San Jose, CA, USA) using an electromagnetic localizer (Tomtec Free Hand Scanning Device, Tomtec Imaging Systems, Middle Cove, Australia). 3D volumetric reconstruction of the fetal face was performed and the data was prepared to guide the construction of an exact solid biomodel by stereolithography (SLA 250 3D Systems, Valencia, CA, USA). A faithful solid representation of the fetal face was produced within 12 hours of the US scan. The fetal biomodel seemed to improve the display of the 3D data. The user-friendly nature of biomodelling may have clinical utility for fetal morphological assessment and as an aid when counselling parents.

  4. Evaluation of Clinical Diagnosis of Fetal Distress and Perinatal Outcome in a Low Resource Nigerian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, Perpetus Chudi; Onu, Fidelis Agwu; Onwe, Ogah Emeka; Ezeonu, Thecla Chinonyelum; Omeje, Innocent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fetal distress has been shown to contribute to the increasing caesarean section rate. There has been controversy on the usefulness of clinical diagnosis of fetal distress using only the intermittent counting of the fetal heart rate and/or passage of meconium-stained liquor. Aim To evaluate the clinical diagnosis of fetal distress and the perinatal outcome. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study in which the case records of the patients, who were diagnosed of fetal distress at Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria, from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2014, were collated. The statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 17 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago IL, USA). Results Out of the 15,640 deliveries carried out within the study period, 3,761 (24.05%) deliveries were through caesarean section. A total of 326 (8.9%) of the 3,761 caesarean sections were due to fetal distress within the study period. More so, a total of 227 (70.9%) babies were born with ≥ 7 Apgar score at the 1st minute of delivery. The perinatal mortality rate was 31.25 per 1000 deliveries. Though birth asphyxia was recorded more on babies of mothers that had fresh meconium-stained liquor and whose decision-intervention interval was more than 30 minutes when compared with those without any of the two conditions, there was no statistical significant difference between them. Conclusion The clinical diagnosis of fetal distress is accurate in 29.1% of the cases. However, it has led to an unnecessary caesarean section in the remaining 70.9% of the parturients. In order to reduce this high trend of unnecessary caesarean sections due to clinical diagnosis of fetal distress in this environment, antepartum fetal assessment with non-stress test or biophysical profile and intrapartum use of continuous electronic fetal monitoring should be used to confirm or refute the fetal distress before any surgical intervention. Fetal blood sampling

  5. Fetal Right Ventricular Diverticulum Detected by Prenatal Ultrasound Screening

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kaori; Tsuji, Shunichiro; Ono, Tetsuo; Ishiko, Akiko; Takahashi, Kentaro; Murakami, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal ultrasound screening has allowed for the detection of in utero cardiac abnormalities. Specifically, distinction is possible between ventricular diverticula and aneurysms, which is important because each condition has a different clinical outcome. We report the case of a 35-year-old, gravida 1, para 1 woman, with no significant past medical history, who underwent routine prenatal ultrasound screening at 32 weeks' gestation. A four-chamber ultrasound of the fetal heart combined with M-mode echocardiography showed abnormal dilatation of the right ventricular chamber measuring 2.2 cm × 1.0 cm but with normal contractility. Delivery was performed at full term by cesarean section, and a right ventricular diverticulum was confirmed by postnatal cardiac computed tomography. The baby developed normally with no cardiac sequelae during followup. This case demonstrates the importance of making a correct diagnosis of ventricular diverticula by prenatal ultrasound when abnormal dilatation of the fetal ventricle is identified during routine screening. Because evaluating the wall contractility by M-mode ultrasound leads to evaluating whether it has the myocardium, we conclude that M-mode echocardiography is effective for the purpose of prenatal cardiac diagnosis and can distinguish between ventricular aneurysms and functioning ventricular diverticula.

  6. Fetal Brain Behavior and Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents information on prenatal brain development, detailing the functions controlled by the medulla, pons, and midbrain, and the implications for cognitive development. Concludes that fetal cognitive motor activity, including auditory discrimination, orienting, the wake-sleep cycle, fetal heart rate accelerations, and defensive reactions,…

  7. Non-central nervous system fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Elspeth; Wright, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently offered in a limited number of centers but is predominantly used for suspected fetal central nervous system abnormalities. This article concentrates on the role of the different imaging sequences and their value to clinical practice. It also discusses the future of fetal MRI. PMID:26013057

  8. Fetal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, Jean-Martin

    1986-01-01

    Fetal surgery has come of age. For decades experimental fetal surgery proved essential in studying normal fetal physiology and development, and pathophysiology of congenital defects. Clinical fetal surgery started in the 1960s with intrauterine transfusions. In the 1970s, the advent of ultrasonography revolutionized fetal diagnosis and created a therapeutic vacuum. Fetal treatment, medical and surgical, is slowly trying to fill the gap. Most defects detected are best treated after birth, some requiring a modification in the time, mode and place of delivery for optimal obstetrical and neonatal care. Surgical intervention in utero should be considered for malformations that cause progressive damage to the fetus, leading to death or severe morbidity; that can be corrected or palliated in utero with a reasonable expectation of normal postnatal development; that cannot wait to be corrected after birth, even considering pre-term delivery; that are not accompanied by chromosomal or other major anomalies. At present, congenital hydronephrosis is the most common indication for fetal surgery, followed by obstructive hydrocephalus. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia also fulfills the criteria, but its correction poses more problems, and no clinical attempts have been reported so far. In the future many other malformations or diseases may become best treated in utero. The ethical and moral issues are complex and need to be discussed as clinical and experimental progress is made. PMID:21267309

  9. Fetal malnutrition and long-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Caroline HD

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that lower birthweight is associated with a wide range of adverse outcomes in later life, including poorer ‘human capital’ (shorter stature, lower cognitive performance); increased risk factors for later disease, (higher blood pressure and reduced glucose tolerance, and lung, kidney and immune function); clinical disease (diabetes, coronary heart disease, chronic lung and kidney disease); and increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Higher birthweight is associated with an increased risk of cancer, and (if caused by gestational diabetes) obesity and diabetes. The “developmental origins of health and disease” (DOHaD) hypothesis proposes that fetal nutrition has permanent effects on growth, structure and metabolism (‘programming’). This is supported by studies in animals showing that maternal under- and over-nutrition during pregnancy can produce similar abnormalities in the adult offspring. Common chronic diseases could potentially be prevented by achieving optimal fetal nutrition, and this could have additional benefits for survival and human capital. Recent follow-up of children born after randomised nutritional interventions in pregnancy provides weak evidence of beneficial effects on growth, vascular function, lipid concentrations, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Animal studies indicate that epigenetic phenomena may be an important mechanism underlying programming, and that nutritional interventions may need to start pre-conceptionally. PMID:23887100

  10. Fetal malnutrition and long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fall, Caroline H D

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that lower birthweight is associated with a wide range of adverse outcomes in later life, including poorer 'human capital' (shorter stature, lower cognitive performance), increased risk factors for later disease (higher blood pressure and reduced glucose tolerance, and lung, kidney and immune function), clinical disease (diabetes, coronary heart disease, chronic lung and kidney disease), and increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Higher birthweight is associated with an increased risk of cancer and (if caused by gestational diabetes) obesity and diabetes. The 'developmental origins of health and disease' hypothesis proposes that fetal nutrition has permanent effects on growth, structure and metabolism ('programming'). This is supported by studies in animals showing that maternal under- and overnutrition during pregnancy can produce similar abnormalities in the adult offspring. Common chronic diseases could potentially be prevented by achieving optimal fetal nutrition, and this could have additional benefits for survival and human capital. Recent follow-up of children born after randomized nutritional interventions in pregnancy provides weak evidence of beneficial effects on growth, vascular function, lipid concentrations, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Animal studies indicate that epigenetic phenomena may be an important mechanism underlying programming, and that nutritional interventions may need to start preconceptionally.

  11. Fetal distress during a maternal systemic allergic reaction.

    PubMed

    Klein, V R; Harris, A P; Abraham, R A; Niebyl, J R

    1984-09-01

    Systemic allergic reactions to food ingestion rarely result in life-threatening situations. When these reactions occur during pregnancy, however, the accompanying physiologic changes may result in fetal distress. A case of repetitive late decelerations in the fetal heart rate during a maternal allergic reaction is presented. Prompt and aggressive medical management brought about total resolution of maternal and fetal compromise.

  12. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... or stomach. Diagnosis Key heart tests include: Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) —This records the electrical activity of the heart as it contracts and relaxes. The ECG can detect abnormal heartbeats, some areas of damage, ...

  13. Distal 8p deletion (8) (p23.1): An easily missed chromosomal abnormality that may be associated with congenital heart defect and mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bai-Lin; Schneider, G.H.; Sabatino, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    We describe the clinical manifestations and molecular cytogenetic analyses of three patients with a similar distal deletion of chromosome 8. Each child had mild developmental delay and subtle minor anomalies. Two had cardiac anomalies but no other major congenital anomalies were present. High resolution G and R banding showed in all three patients del(8)(p23.1), but the breakpoint in case 1 was distal to 8p23.1, in case 2 was in the middle of 8p23.1, and in case 3 proximal to 8p23.1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies with a chromosome 8 paint probe confirmed that no other rearrangement had occurred. FISH with a chromosome 8-specific telomere probe indicated that two patients had terminal deletions. Chromosome analysis of the parents of case 1 and mother of case 2 were normal; the remaining parents were not available for study. Thirteen individual patients including the three in this study, and three relatives in one family with del(8)(p23.1), have been reported in the past 5 years. Major congenital anomalies, especially congenital heart defects, are most often associated with a breakpoint proximal to 8p23.1. Three patients were found within a 3-year period in this study and five cases were found within 4 years by another group, indicating that distal 8p deletion might be a relatively common chromosomal abnormality. This small deletion is easily overlooked (i.e., cases 1 and 2 were reported as normal at amniocentesis) and can be associated with few or no major congenital anomalies. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Telefetalcare: a first prototype of a wearable fetal electrocardiograph.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, A; Signorini, M G; Ferrario, M; Perego, P; Piccini, L; Andreoni, G; Magenes, G

    2011-01-01

    Fetal heart rate monitoring is fundamental to infer information about fetal health state during pregnancy. The cardiotocography (CTG) is the most common antepartum monitoring technique. Abdominal ECG recording represents the most valuable alternative to cardiotocography, as it allows passive, non invasive and long term fetal monitoring. Unluckily fetal ECG has low SNR and needs to be extracted from abdominal recordings using ad hoc algorithms. This work describes a prototype of a wearable fetal ECG electrocardiograph. The system has flat band frequency response between 1-60 Hz and guarantees good signal quality. It was tested on pregnant women between the 30(th) and 34(th) gestational week. Several electrodes configurations were tested, in order to identify the best solution. Implementation of a simple algorithm for FECG extraction permitted the reliable detection of maternal and fetal QRS complexes. The system will allow continuative and deep screening of fetal heart rate, introducing the possibility of home fetal monitoring.

  15. Fetal alcohol exposure: consequences, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pruett, Dawn; Waterman, Emily Hubbard; Caughey, Aaron B

    2013-01-01

    Maternal alcohol use during pregnancy is prevalent, with as many as 12% of pregnant women consuming alcohol. Alcohol intake may vary from an occasional drink, to weekly binge drinking, to chronic alcohol use throughout pregnancy. Whereas there are certain known consequences from fetal alcohol exposure, such as fetal alcohol syndrome, other effects are less well defined. Craniofacial dysmorphologies, abnormalities of organ systems, behavioral and intellectual deficits, and fetal death have all been attributed to maternal alcohol consumption. This review article considers the theoretical mechanisms of how alcohol affects the fetus, including the variable susceptibility to fetal alcohol exposure and the implications of ethanol dose and timing of exposure. Criteria for diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome are discussed, as well as new methods for early detection of maternal alcohol use and fetal alcohol exposure, such as the use of fatty acid ethyl esters. Finally, current and novel treatment strategies, both in utero and post utero, are reviewed.

  16. Continuous fetal tissue pH measurement in labor.

    PubMed

    Young, B K; Noumoff, J; Klein, S A; Katz, M

    1978-11-01

    Fifty-one women in labor had continuous monitoring of fetal scalp tissue pH, fetal heart rate by ECG, and uterine contractions. A miniature pH electrode secured by a double spiral fetal ECG electrode was used for measurement of fetal pH every 15 seconds. The results were correlated with fetal scalp blood pH values obtained simultaneously. Fetal scalp sampling is intermittent, requires repeated scalp incisions, is subject to errors due to air mixing and coagulation of the blood sample, and is uncomfortable for the parturient. Placement of the tissue pH electrode allows continuous data recording with the minimum discomfort to the patient and the least number of fetal scalp incisions. Clinical use of the tissue pH electrode might be a practical alternative to fetal scalp samples, if the data obtained accurately reflect fetal status.

  17. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention & Treatment of High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources ... signals in the heart's upper chambers fire abnormally, which interferes with electrical signals coming from ...

  18. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (CHD) Fix heart valves that don't work well Control abnormal heart rhythms Place medical devices Replace a damaged heart with a healthy one If other treatments—such as lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical ... surgeon will work with you to decide whether you need heart ...

  19. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Dörrie, Nora; Föcker, Manuel; Freunscht, Inga; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is one of the most prevalent and modifiable risk factors for somatic, behavioral, and neurological abnormalities. Affected individuals exhibit a wide range of such features referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). These are characterized by a more or less specific pattern of minor facial dysmorphic features, growth deficiency and central nervous system symptoms. Nevertheless, whereas the diagnosis of the full-blown fetal alcohol syndrome does not pose a major challenge, only a tentative diagnosis of FASD can be reached if only mild features are present and/or maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy cannot be verified. The respective disorders have lifelong implications. The teratogenic mechanisms induced by PAE can lead to various additional somatic findings and structural abnormalities of cerebrum and cerebellum. At the functional level, cognition, motor coordination, attention, language development, executive functions, memory, social perception and emotion processing are impaired to a variable extent. The long-term development is characterized by disruption and failure in many domains; an age-adequate independency is frequently not achieved. In addition to primary prevention, individual therapeutic interventions and tertiary prevention are warranted; provision of extensive education to affected subjects and their caregivers is crucial. Protective environments are often required to prevent negative consequences such as delinquency, indebtedness or experience of physical/sexual abuse.

  20. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Dörrie, Nora; Föcker, Manuel; Freunscht, Inga; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is one of the most prevalent and modifiable risk factors for somatic, behavioral, and neurological abnormalities. Affected individuals exhibit a wide range of such features referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). These are characterized by a more or less specific pattern of minor facial dysmorphic features, growth deficiency and central nervous system symptoms. Nevertheless, whereas the diagnosis of the full-blown fetal alcohol syndrome does not pose a major challenge, only a tentative diagnosis of FASD can be reached if only mild features are present and/or maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy cannot be verified. The respective disorders have lifelong implications. The teratogenic mechanisms induced by PAE can lead to various additional somatic findings and structural abnormalities of cerebrum and cerebellum. At the functional level, cognition, motor coordination, attention, language development, executive functions, memory, social perception and emotion processing are impaired to a variable extent. The long-term development is characterized by disruption and failure in many domains; an age-adequate independency is frequently not achieved. In addition to primary prevention, individual therapeutic interventions and tertiary prevention are warranted; provision of extensive education to affected subjects and their caregivers is crucial. Protective environments are often required to prevent negative consequences such as delinquency, indebtedness or experience of physical/sexual abuse. PMID:24965796

  1. Integrated Approach for Fetal QRS Detection

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, R. B.; Hatton, Jeff O.; Lowery, Curtis L.; Preissl, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography provides reliable signals of the fetal heart dynamics with high temporal resolution that can be used in a clinical setting. We present a robust Hilbert transform method for extraction of the fetal heart rate. Our method may be applied to signals derived from a single channel or an array of channels. In the case of multichannel data, the channels can be combined to improve signal-to-noise ratio for the extraction of fetal heart data. The method is inherently insensitive to fetal position or movement and, in addition, can be automated. We demonstrate that the determination of R-wave timing is relatively insensitive to waveform morphology. The method can also be applied if the data were preprocessed by independent component analysis (ICA). We compared the Hilbert method, ICA, ICA + Hilbert, and raw signals and found that the Hilbert method gave the best overall performance. We demonstrated that there were approximately 171 errors in 46 789 fetal heart beats. PMID:18713688

  2. Measurement of cardiac contractility using fetal isovolumetric contraction time in fetal tachyarrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yasuyuki; Athayde, Neil; Tokunaga, Shoji; Trudinger, Brian

    2011-02-01

    The isovolumetric contraction time (ICT) is known to be an index of cardiac contractility. In this study, we examined the relationship between the fetal ICT and fetal heart rate (FHR) and evaluated the usefulness of ICT in the assessment of fetal cardiac contractility in cases with fetal tachyarrhythmia. Seven cases with fetal tachyarrhythmia between 32 and 40 weeks' gestation were included in this study. The fetal ICT was measured using a continuous Doppler device and digital filters. The relationship between the fetal ICT and FHR was analyzed using the Spearman's rank correlation test in each fetus. Based on the FHR and ultrasound findings of hydrops at the measurement of ICT, the obtained data were divided into three groups: normal, tachyarrhythmia only and hydrops. The clinical usefulness of ICT was assessed using the random effect model. In 7 fetuses, a total of 60 data points were obtained. A significant correlation between fetal ICT and FHR was not noted in each fetus. The ICT of the hydrops group was significantly prolonged compared with those of the normal and tachyarrhythmia-only groups (p < 0.01). An association between the fetal ICT and FHR is not noted and the fetal ICT might have some utility to detect impaired fetal cardiac contractility even in fetuses with tachyarrhythmia.

  3. Abnormal energetics and ATP depletion in pressure-overload mouse hearts: in vivo high-energy phosphate concentration measures by noninvasive magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Chacko, V P; Weiss, Robert G

    2009-07-01

    (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers a unique means to noninvasively quantify the major cardiac high-energy phosphates, creatine phosphate (PCr) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), that are critical for normal myocardial contractile function and viability. Spatially localized (31)P MRS has been used to quantify the in vivo PCr-to-ATP ratio (PCr/ATP) of murine hearts, including those with pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by thoracic aortic constriction (TAC). To date, there has been no approach for measuring the absolute tissue concentrations of PCr and ATP in the in vivo mouse heart that promise a better understanding of high-energy metabolism. A method to quantify in vivo murine myocardial concentrations of PCr and ATP using an external reference is described, validated, and applied to normal and TAC hearts. This new method does not prolong the scan times in mice beyond those previously required to measure PCr/ATP. The new method renders an [ATP] of 5.0 +/- 0.9 (mean +/- SD) and [PCr] of 10.4 +/- 1.4 micromol/g wet wt in normal mouse hearts (n = 7) and significantly lower values in TAC hearts (n = 10) of 4.0 +/- 0.8 and 6.7 +/- 2.0 micromol/g wet wt for [ATP] (P < 0.04) and [PCr] (P < 0.001), respectively. The in vivo magnetic resonance [ATP] results are in good agreement with those obtained using an in vitro enzyme luminescent assay of perchloric acid extracts of the same hearts. In conclusion, a validated (31)P MRS method for quantifying [ATP] and [PCr] in the in vivo mouse heart using spatial localization and an external reference is described and used to demonstrate significant reductions in not only PCr/ATP but [ATP] in hypertrophied TAC hearts.

  4. Commonly Asked Questions about Children and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... only the heart. It has specialized probes and hardware that allow clear images of the fetal heart. ... Defects • Understand Your Risk • Symptoms & Diagnosis • Care & Treatment • Tools & Resources Congenital Heart Defects and Other Educational Brochures ...

  5. Fetal magnetocardiographic mapping using independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Comani, S; Mantini, D; Alleva, G; Di Luzio, S; Romani, G L

    2004-12-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is the only noninvasive technique allowing effective assessment of fetal cardiac electrical activity during the prenatal period. The reconstruction of reliable magnetic field mapping associated with fetal heart activity would allow three-dimensional source localization. The efficiency of independent component analysis (ICA) in restoring reliable fetal traces from multichannel fMCG has already been demonstrated. In this paper, we describe a method of reconstructing a complete set of fetal signals hidden in multichannel fMCG preserving their correct spatial distribution, waveform, polarity and amplitude. Fetal independent components, retrieved with an ICA algorithm (FastICA), were interpolated (fICI method) using information gathered during FastICA iterations. The restored fetal signals were used to reconstruct accurate magnetic mapping for every millisecond during the average beat. The procedure was validated on fMCG recorded from the 22nd gestational week onward with a multichannel MCG system working in a shielded room. The interpolated traces were compared with those obtained with a standard technique, and the consistency of fetal mapping was checked evaluating source localizations relative to fetal echocardiographic information. Good magnetic field distributions during the P-QRS-T waves were attained with fICI for all gestational periods; their reliability was confirmed by three-dimensional source localizations. PMID:15712724

  6. Fetal movements as a predictor of health.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jonathan; Nowlan, Niamh C; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Shaw, Caroline J; Lees, Christoph C

    2016-09-01

    The key determinant to a fetus maintaining its health is through adequate perfusion and oxygen transfer mediated by the functioning placenta. When this equilibrium is distorted, a number of physiological changes, including reduced fetal growth, occur to favor survival. Technologies have been developed to monitor these changes with a view to prolong intrauterine maturity while reducing the risks of stillbirth. Many of these strategies involve complex interpretation, for example Doppler ultrasound for fetal blood flow and computerized analysis of fetal heart rate changes. However, even with these modalities of fetal assessment to determine the optimal timing of delivery, fetal movements remain integral to clinical decision-making. In high-risk cohorts with fetal growth restriction, the manifestation of a reduction in perceived movements may warrant an expedited delivery. Despite this, there has been little evolution in the development of technologies to objectively evaluate fetal movement behavior for clinical application. This review explores the available literature on the value of fetal movement analysis as a method of assessing fetal wellbeing, and demonstrates how interdisciplinary developments in this area may aid in the improvement of clinical outcomes. PMID:27374723

  7. Fetal hydrops and anemia as signs of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sükür, Yavuz Emre; Gözüküçük, Murat; Bayramov, Vugar; Koç, Acar

    2011-11-01

    Before the 20th week of gestation, the most common cause of nonimmune hydrops fetalis is chromosomal abnormalities. Herein, we report a case of fetal hydrops, anemia, and intrauterine growth retardation that presented at 27 weeks of gestation with a negative chromosomal abnormality screening. Cordocentesis and karyotype analysis revealed fetal pancytopenia and Down syndrome. Down syndrome rarely presents with fetal hydrops and anemia. Therefore, when hydrops and anemia are diagnosed, especially in the second trimester of gestation, the possibility of Down syndrome should be kept in mind. In addition, if the pregnancy results in a live birth, the baby should be examined for transient abnormal myelopoiesis.

  8. Effect of fetal undernutrition and postnatal overfeeding on rat adipose tissue and organ growth at early stages of postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Valverde, D; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, P; Gutierrez-Arzapalo, P Y; López de Pablo, A L; Carmen González, M; López-Giménez, R; Somoza, B; Arribas, S M

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine and perinatal life are critical periods for programming of cardiometabolic diseases. However, their relative role remains controversial. We aimed to assess, at weaning, sex-dependent alterations induced by fetal or postnatal nutritional interventions on key organs for metabolic and cardiovascular control. Fetal undernutrition was induced by dam food restriction (50 % from mid-gestation to delivery) returning to ad libitum throughout lactation (Maternal Undernutrition, MUN, 12 pups/litter). Postnatal overfeeding (POF) was induced by litter size reduction from normally fed dams (4 pups/litter). Compared to control, female and male MUN offspring exhibited: 1) low birth weight and accelerated growth, reaching similar weight and tibial length by weaning, 2) increased glycemia, liver and white fat weights; 3) increased ventricular weight and tendency to reduced kidney weight (males only). Female and male POF offspring showed: 1) accelerated growth; 2) increased glycemia, liver and white fat weights; 3) unchanged heart and kidney weights. In conclusion, postnatal accelerated growth, with or without fetal undernutrition, induces early alterations relevant for metabolic disease programming, while fetal undernutrition is required for heart abnormalities. The progression of cardiac alterations and their role on hypertension development needs to be evaluated. The similarities between sexes in pre-pubertal rats suggest a role of sex-hormones in female protection against programming.

  9. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Vaughn A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100–4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success. PMID:25602072

  10. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Browne, Vaughn A; Julian, Colleen G; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-03-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100-4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success.

  11. Pregnancy in a Previously Conjoined Thoracopagus Twin with a Crisscross Heart

    PubMed Central

    Rimawi, Bassam H.; Krishna, Iris; Sahu, Anurag; Badell, Martina L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Crisscross heart (CCH) is a complex, rare, congenital, rotational, cardiac abnormality that accounts for <0.1% of congenital heart defects (CHD). CCH is characterized by the crossing of the inflow streams of the two ventricles due to an abnormal twisting of the heart. A case of maternal CCH has not been previously reported. Case. We report a case of a primigravida with a CCH, who was separated at birth from her thoracopagus conjoined twin. Pregnancy was managed by congenital cardiology, maternal-fetal medicine, anesthesiology, and obstetrics. She underwent a 39-week vaginal delivery without maternal or neonatal complication. Conclusion. A successful term pregnancy outcome was achieved in a patient with CCH using a multidisciplinary approach to address her cardiac condition. PMID:26273483

  12. First report of a de novo 18q11.2 microdeletion including GATA6 associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bui, Peter H; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Wong, Derek; Perens, Gregory; Dipple, Katrina M; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 have been previously reported in many patients. Most cases involve the more distal regions of the long arm (18q21.1->qter). However, proximal interstitial deletions involving 18q11.2 are extremely rare. Here we report on a 14-month-old female with a 4.7 Mb (19,667,062-24,401,876 hg19) de novo interstitial deletion within chromosomal band 18q11.2, which includes GATA6 and 24 other RefSeq genes. The clinical features of our patient include complex congenital heart defects, a double outlet right ventricle, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, D-malposed great arteries, an atrial septal defect, a dysplastic aortic valve and patent ductus arteriosus. In addition, she had renal anomalies-a duplicated collecting system on the left and mild right hydronephrosis. These heart and renal defects are not reported in other patients with 18q proximal interstitial deletions. Heterozygous point mutations in GATA6, encoding for a zinc finger transcription factor, have been shown to cause congenital heart defects. Given the well-established biological role of GATA6 in cardiac development, a deletion of GATA6 is very likely responsible for our patient's complex congenital heart defects. This is the smallest and most proximal 18q11.2 deletion involving GATA6 that is associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal anomalies.

  13. A Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Vest, Adriana N.; Chmait, Ramen H.; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Pruetz, Jay; Silka, Michael; Zheng, Kaihui; Peck, Ray; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized, self-contained pacemaker that could be implanted with a minimally invasive technique would dramatically improve the survival rate for fetuses that develop hydrops fetalis as a result of congenital heart block. We are currently validating a device that we developed to address this bradyarrhythmia. Preclinical studies in a fetal sheep model are underway to demonstrate that the device can be implanted via a minimally invasive approach, can mechanically withstand the harsh bodily environment, can induce effective contractions of the heart muscle with an adequate safety factor, and can successfully operate for the required device lifetime of three months using the previously-developed closed loop transcutaneous recharging system. PMID:25570982

  14. Can maternal-fetal hemodynamics influence prenatal development in dogs?

    PubMed

    Freitas, Luana Azevedo de; Mota, Gustavo Lobato; Silva, Herlon Victor Rodrigues; Carvalho, Cibele Figueira; Silva, Lúcia Daniel Machado da

    2016-09-01

    The goals of this study were to report embryonic and fetal ultrasound changes and compare blood flow of uteroplacental and umbilical arteries of normal and abnormal conceptus. Accordingly, from the day of mating or artificial insemination, all fetuses in 60 pregnancies were evaluated weekly. According to the ultrasound findings, the gestational age was determined and the conceptuses were divided into normal or abnormal (embryonic and fetal abnormalities). The two-dimensional ultrasound assessment consists of measuring and evaluating the echogenicity of conceptus and extra-fetal structures. Doppler velocimetry measured the resistivity index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) of uteroplacental and umbilical arteries. Two-dimensional and Doppler measurements were expressed as mean and standard deviation. Differences between normal and abnormal groups were subject to Mann-Whitney test (P<0.05). Of 264 fetuses, 15.90% showed embryonic abnormalities (resorption) and 5.68% presented fetal abnormalities (congenital abnormalities, fetal underdevelopment and fetal death). We observed a reduced diameter and abnormalities in the contour of gestational vesicle, lack of viability, increased placental thickness, increased fluid echogenicity and increases in RI and PI of uteroplacental arteries of conceptuses with embryonic resorption between the 2nd and 4th weeks. Fetuses with abnormalities showed changes in the flow of uteroplacental and umbilical arteries prior to visualization of two-dimensional alterations and different vascular behavior according to the classification of the change. Results show that ultrasound is efficient for the detection of embryonic and fetal abnormalities. When combined with Doppler ultrasound, it allows early detection of gestational changes, as well as hemodynamic changes, in conceptuses with abnormalities, which may influence their development. PMID:27509872

  15. Studies in Fetal Behavior: Revisited, Renewed, and Reimagined

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Voegtline, Kristin M.

    2016-01-01

    Among the earliest volumes of this Monograph series was a report by Lester Sontag and colleagues, of the esteemed Fels Institute, on the heart rate of the human fetus as an expression of the developing nervous system. Here, some 75 years later, we commemorate this work and provide historical and contemporary context on knowledge regarding fetal development, as well as results from our own research. These are based on synchronized monitoring of maternal and fetal parameters assessed between 24 and 36 weeks gestation on 740 maternal-fetal pairs compiled from eight separate longitudinal studies, which commenced in the early 1990s. Data include maternal heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and electrodermal activity and fetal heart rate, motor activity, and their integration. Hierarchical linear modeling of developmental trajectories reveals that the fetus develops in predictable ways consistent with advancing parasympathetic regulation. Findings also include: within-fetus stability (i.e., preservation of rank ordering over time) for heart rate, motor, and coupling measures; a transitional period of decelerating development near 30 weeks gestation; sex differences in fetal heart rate measures but not in most fetal motor activity measures; modest correspondence in fetal neurodevelopment among siblings as compared to unrelated fetuses; and deviations from normative fetal development in fetuses affected by intrauterine growth restriction and other conditions. Maternal parameters also change during this period of gestation and there is evidence that fetal sex and individual variation in fetal neurobehavior influence maternal physiological processes and the local intrauterine context. Results are discussed within the framework of neuromaturation, the emergence of individual differences, and the bidirectional nature of the maternal-fetal relationship. We pose a number of open questions for future research. Although the human fetus remains just out of reach, new

  16. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. 21 CFR 884.2640 - Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories. 884.2640 Section 884.2640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... phonocardiographic monitor is a device designed to detect, measure, and record fetal heart sounds electronically,...

  18. 21 CFR 884.2640 - Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories. 884.2640 Section 884.2640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... phonocardiographic monitor is a device designed to detect, measure, and record fetal heart sounds electronically,...

  19. Near-term fetal response to maternal spoken voice

    PubMed Central

    Voegtline, Kristin M.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Pater, Heather A.; DiPietro, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about prenatal learning has been largely predicated on the observation that newborns appear to recognize the maternal voice. Few studies have examined the process underlying this phenomenon; that is, whether and how the fetus responds to maternal voice in situ. Fetal heart rate and motor activity were recorded at 36 weeks gestation (n = 69) while pregnant women read aloud from a neutral passage. Compared to a baseline period, fetuses responded with a decrease in motor activity in the 10-seconds following onset of maternal speech and a trend level decelerative heart rate response, consistent with an orienting response. Subsequent analyses revealed that the fetal response was modified by both maternal and fetal factors. Fetuses of women who were previously awake and talking (n = 40) showed an orienting response to onset of maternal reading aloud, while fetuses of mothers who had previously been resting and silent (n = 29) responded with elevated heart rate and increased movement. The magnitude of the fetal response was further dependent on baseline fetal heart rate variability such that largest response was demonstrated by fetuses with low variability of mothers who were previously resting and silent. Results indicate that fetal responsivity is affected by both maternal and fetal state and have implications for understanding fetal learning of the maternal voice under naturalistic conditions. PMID:23748167

  20. 21 CFR 884.2640 - Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fetal phonocardiographic monitor and accessories. 884.2640 Section 884.2640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... phonocardiographic monitor is a device designed to detect, measure, and record fetal heart sounds electronically,...

  1. Fetal Neurobehavioral Development: A Tale of Two Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Caulfield, Laura; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Merialdi, Mario; Nguyen, Ruby H. N.; Zavaleta, Nelly; Gurewitsch, Edith D.

    2004-01-01

    Longitudinal neurobehavioral development was examined in 237 fetuses of low-risk pregnancies from 2 distinct populations-Baltimore, Maryland, and Lima, Peru-at 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, and 38 weeks gestation. Data were based on digitized Doppler-based fetal heart rate (FHR) and fetal movement (FM). In both groups, FHR declined while variability,…

  2. Recent advances in fetal near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antona, Donato; Aldrich, Clive J.; O'Brien, Patrick; Lawrence, Sally; Delpy, David T.; Wyatt, John S.

    1997-01-01

    Fetal brain injury resulting from hypoxia and ischemia during labor remains an important cause of death and long- term disability. However, little is known about fetal brain oxygenation and hemodynamics. There are currently no satisfactory clinical techniques for fetal monitoring and there remains a need for a new method to assess brain oxygenation. Fetal near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a new technique that allows noninvasive observation of changes in the cerebral concentrations of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to be made during labor. A specially designed optical probe is inserted through the dilated cervix and placed against the fetal head. It is then possible to compare changes in NIRS data with other observations of fetal conditions, such as fetal heart rate and acid-base status.

  3. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  4. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  5. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  6. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  7. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  8. STUDIES IN FETAL BEHAVIOR: REVISITED, RENEWED, AND REIMAGINED.

    PubMed

    DiPietro, Janet A; Costigan, Kathleen A; Voegtline, Kristin M

    2015-09-01

    Among the earliest volumes of this monograph series was a report by Lester Sontag and colleagues, of the esteemed Fels Institute, on the heart rate of the human fetus as an expression of the developing nervous system. Here, some 75 years later, we commemorate this work and provide historical and contemporary context on knowledge regarding fetal development, as well as results from our own research. These are based on synchronized monitoring of maternal and fetal parameters assessed between 24 and 36 weeks gestation on 740 maternal-fetal pairs compiled from eight separate longitudinal studies, which commenced in the early 1990s. Data include maternal heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and electrodrmal activity and fetal heartrate, motor activity, and their integration. Hierarchical linear modeling of developmental trajectories reveals that the fetus develops in predictable ways consistent with advancing parasympathetic regulation. Findings also include:within-fetus stability (i.e., preservation of rank ordering over time) for heart rate, motor, and coupling measures; a transitional period of decelerating development near 30 weeks gestation; sex differences in fetal heart rate measures but not in most fetal motor activity measures; modest correspondence in fetal neurodevelopment among siblings as compared to unrelated fetuses; and deviations from normative fetal development in fetuses affected by intrauterine growth restriction and other conditions. Maternal parameters also change during this period of gestation and there is evidence that fetal sex and individual variation in fetal neurobehavior influence maternal physio-logical processes and the local intrauterine context. Results are discussed within the framework of neuromaturation, the emergence of individual differences, and the bidirectional nature of the maternal-fetal relationship.We pose a number of open questions for future research. Although the human fetus remains just out of reach, new

  9. Regional Microstructural and Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Abnormalities in the Corpus Callosum of Neonates With Congenital Heart Defect Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Cornelia; Singer, Jitka; Latal, Beatrice; Knirsch, Walter; Makki, Malek

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the structural development of the corpus callosum in term neonates with congenital heart defect before and after surgery using diffusion tensor imaging and 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared parallel and radial diffusions, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy, and volume of 5 substructures of the corpus callosum: genu, rostral body, body, isthmus, and splenium. Compared to healthy controls, we found a significantly lower volume of the splenium and total corpus callosum and a higher radial diffusion and lower fractional anisotropy in the splenium of patients presurgery; a lower volume in all substructures in the postsurgery group; higher radial diffusion in the rostral body, body, and splenium; and a higher apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of postsurgery patients. Similar fractional anisotropy changes in congenital heart defect patients were reported in preterm infants. Our findings in apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of these patients (pre and postsurgery) are comparable to findings in preterm neonates with psychomotor delay. Delayed maturation of the isthmus was also reported in preterm infants.

  10. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wataganara, Tuangsit; Ebrashy, Alaa; Aliyu, Labaran Dayyabu; Moreira de Sa, Renato Augusto; Pooh, Ritsuko; Kurjak, Asim; Sen, Cihat; Adra, Abdallah; Stanojevic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly adopted in obstetrics practice in the past three decades. MRI aids prenatal ultrasound and improves diagnostic accuracy for selected maternal and fetal conditions. However, it should be considered only when high-quality ultrasound cannot provide certain information that affects the counseling, prenatal intervention, pregnancy course, and delivery plan. Major indications of fetal MRI include, but are not restricted to, morbidly adherent placenta, selected cases of fetal brain anomalies, thoracic lesions (especially in severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia), and soft tissue tumors at head and neck regions of the fetus. For fetal anatomy assessment, a 1.5-Tesla machine with a fast T2-weighted single-shot technique is recommended for image requisition of common fetal abnormalities. Individual judgment needs to be applied when considering usage of a 3-Tesla machine. Gadolinium MRI contrast is not recommended during pregnancy. MRI should be avoided in the first half of pregnancy due to small fetal structures and motion artifacts. Assessment of fetal cerebral cortex can be achieved with MRI in the third trimester. MRI is a viable research tool for noninvasive interrogation of the fetus and the placenta. PMID:27092644

  11. Current Role of Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neurologic Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Karen; Cassady, Christopher; Jones, Jeremy; Paldino, Michael; Mehollin-Ray, Amy; Guimaraes, Carolina; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used increasingly to image the fetus when important questions remain unanswered after ultrasonography, which might occur particularly with abnormal amniotic fluid volumes, difficult fetal lie or position, and maternal obesity. Ultrasonography also has limitations due to sound attenuation by bone, such as within the cranium and spine, and therefore MRI has a real advantage in delineating potentially complex neuroanatomical relationships. This article outlines current MRI protocols for evaluation of the fetal neural axis, describes indications for the use of MRI in the fetal brain and spine, and provides examples to illustrate the uses of available fetal sequences. PMID:26296481

  12. Fetal cardiac arrhythmias: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Feit, L R

    2001-05-01

    The diagnosis and management of fetal cardiac arrhythmias requires complex skills and knowledge, and has had a great impact on the care of infants with congenital heart disease and their families. Optimal benefits will be derived from a thoughtful team approach, with skillful internal communication, and especially when parental involvement is encouraged in the decision making process. PMID:11392955

  13. An interstitial deletion of 7.1Mb in chromosome band 6p22.3 associated with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including heart defects, short neck, and eye abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Anna; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Giacobini, Maibritt

    2009-01-01

    Seven cases with an interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 6 involving the 6p22 region have previously been reported. The clinical phenotype of these cases includes developmental delay, brain-, heart-, and kidney defects, eye abnormalities, short neck, craniofacial malformations, hypotonia, as well as clinodactyly or syndactyly. Here, we report a patient with a 7.1Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome band 6p22.3, detected by genome-wide screening array CGH. The patient is a 4-year-old girl with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including eye abnormalities, short neck, and a ventricular septum defect. The deleted region at 6p22.3 in our patient overlaps with six out of the seven previously reported cases with a 6p22-24 interstitial deletion. This enabled us to further narrow down the critical region for the 6p22 deletion phenotype to 2.2Mb. Twelve genes are mapped to the overlapping deleted region, among them the gene encoding the ataxin-1 protein, the ATXN1 gene. Mice with homozygous deletions in ATXN1 are phenotypically normal but show cognitive delay. Haploinsufficiency of ATXN1 may therefore contribute to the learning difficulties observed in the patients harboring a 6p22 deletion.

  14. Fetal monitoring during maternal cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, K. S.; Friesen, R. M.; Livingstone, R. A.; Peddle, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    Fetal cardiac activity was monitored with an external ultrasound transducer in two patients with clinical class III heart disease due to severe mitral stenosis complicated by pulmonary hypertension, undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy. Fetal distress was detected in one patient, who had mitral valvuloplasty, and was corrected by increasing the rate of blood flow, and the other patient had a mitral valve replacement but no fetal distress was noted. The postoperative course of both mothers and fetuses was uneventful. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:1125921

  15. A de novo 0.63 Mb 6q25.1 deletion associated with growth failure, congenital heart defect, underdeveloped cerebellar vermis, abnormal cutaneous elasticity and joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Ruggieri, Martino; Mankad, Kshitij; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Granata, Francesca; Loddo, Italia; Moschella, Emanuela; Calabro, Maria Pia; Capalbo, Anna; Bernardini, Laura; Novelli, Antonio; Polizzi, Agata; Seidler, Daniela G; Arrigo, Teresa; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-09-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are rare and are characterized by great clinical variability according to the deletion breakpoint. We report a on 6-year-old girl with a de novo 0.63 Mb deletion on chromosome 6q25.1 who demonstrated multiple congenital anomalies including a ventricular septal defect and an underdeveloped cerebellar vermis. She presented with severe pre- and post-natal growth failure, hyperextensible small joints (Beighton scores = 8/9; with normal parental scores), and an abnormally elastic, redundant skin. Abnormally high upper/lower segment ratio (i.e., 1.34 = > 3SD), mild dysmorphic facial features and developmental delay were also present. The girl's phenotype was compared with: (i) two girls, each previously reported by Bisgaard et al. and Caselli et al. with similar albeit larger (2.6-7.21 Mb) deletions; (ii) seven additional individuals (6 M; 1 F) harboring deletions within the 6q25.1 region reported in the literature; and (iii) ten further patients (5 M; 4 F; 1 unrecorded sex) recorded in the DECIPHER 6.0 database. We reported on the present girl as her findings could contribute to advance the phenotype of 6q deletions. In addition, the present deletion is the smallest so far recorded in the 6q25 region encompassing eight known genes [vs. 41 of Bisgaard et al., and 23 of Caselli et al.,], including the TAB2 (likely responsible for the girl's congenital heart defect), LATS1 gene, and the UST gene (a regulator of the homeostasis of proteoglycans, which could have played a role in the abnormal dermal and cartilage elasticity).

  16. A de novo 0.63 Mb 6q25.1 deletion associated with growth failure, congenital heart defect, underdeveloped cerebellar vermis, abnormal cutaneous elasticity and joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Ruggieri, Martino; Mankad, Kshitij; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Granata, Francesca; Loddo, Italia; Moschella, Emanuela; Calabro, Maria Pia; Capalbo, Anna; Bernardini, Laura; Novelli, Antonio; Polizzi, Agata; Seidler, Daniela G; Arrigo, Teresa; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-09-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are rare and are characterized by great clinical variability according to the deletion breakpoint. We report a on 6-year-old girl with a de novo 0.63 Mb deletion on chromosome 6q25.1 who demonstrated multiple congenital anomalies including a ventricular septal defect and an underdeveloped cerebellar vermis. She presented with severe pre- and post-natal growth failure, hyperextensible small joints (Beighton scores = 8/9; with normal parental scores), and an abnormally elastic, redundant skin. Abnormally high upper/lower segment ratio (i.e., 1.34 = > 3SD), mild dysmorphic facial features and developmental delay were also present. The girl's phenotype was compared with: (i) two girls, each previously reported by Bisgaard et al. and Caselli et al. with similar albeit larger (2.6-7.21 Mb) deletions; (ii) seven additional individuals (6 M; 1 F) harboring deletions within the 6q25.1 region reported in the literature; and (iii) ten further patients (5 M; 4 F; 1 unrecorded sex) recorded in the DECIPHER 6.0 database. We reported on the present girl as her findings could contribute to advance the phenotype of 6q deletions. In addition, the present deletion is the smallest so far recorded in the 6q25 region encompassing eight known genes [vs. 41 of Bisgaard et al., and 23 of Caselli et al.,], including the TAB2 (likely responsible for the girl's congenital heart defect), LATS1 gene, and the UST gene (a regulator of the homeostasis of proteoglycans, which could have played a role in the abnormal dermal and cartilage elasticity). PMID:25940952

  17. Fetal echocardiographic evaluation of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Sklansky, Mark; Renner, Michael; Clough, Patricia; Levine, Gregg; Campbell, Michelle; Stone, Rae; Schmitt, Todd; Chang, Ruey-Kang; Shannon-Rodriguez, Jayne

    2010-03-01

    In humans, fetal echocardiography represents the most important tool for the assessment of the cardiovascular well-being of the fetus. However, because of logistic, anatomic, and behavioral challenges, detailed fetal echocardiographic evaluation of marine mammals has not been previously described. Because the application of fetal echocardiography to cetaceans could have both clinical and academic importance, an approach to evaluating the fetal dolphin's cardiovascular status was developed with conventional, fetal echocardiographic techniques developed in humans. Eight singleton fetal bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were evaluated, each between 6 and 11 mo gestation; six fetuses underwent two fetal echocardiographic evaluations each, four at 3-mo intervals, and two at 0.5-mo intervals. Evaluations were performed without sedation, using conventional, portable ultrasound systems. Multiple transducers, probes, and maternal dolphin positions were used to optimize image quality. Fetal echocardiography included two-dimensional imaging and color flow mapping of the heart and great arteries, as well as pulsed Doppler evaluation of the umbilical artery and vein. Thorough evaluations of the fetal dolphins' cardiovascular status were performed, with the greatest resolution between 8 and 9 mo gestation. With the use of published human fetal echocardiographic findings for comparison, fetal echocardiography demonstrated normal structure and function of the heart and great arteries, including the pulmonary veins, inferior vena cava, right and left atria, foramen ovale, tricuspid and mitral valves, right and left ventricles, ventricular septum, pulmonary and aortic valves, main pulmonary artery and ascending aorta, and ductus arteriosus. Pulsed Doppler techniques demonstrated normal umbilical arterial and venous waveforms, and color flow mapping demonstrated absence of significant valvar regurgitation. Fetal echocardiography, particularly between 8 and 9 mo gestation, can

  18. Surveillance of fetal arrhythmias in the outpatient setting: current limitations and call for action.

    PubMed

    Freire, Grace

    2015-12-01

    Surveillance of fetal arrhythmias in the outpatient setting remains limited by lack of monitoring modalities. Despite technological advances made in the field of obstetrics, existing devices are not currently suitable to monitor fetal arrhythmias. In this report, the author describes the current and developing fetal heart rate monitoring technologies including the recent introduction of hand-held Doppler monitors for outpatient surveillance of fetal arrhythmias.

  19. Isolated abnormal strict morphology is not a contraindication for intrauterine insemination.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, G M; Deveneau, N E; Shridharani, A N; Strawn, E Y; Sandlow, J I

    2015-11-01

    This study sought to investigate whether isolated abnormal strict morphology (<5% normal forms) and very low strict morphology (0-1% normal forms) affects pregnancy rates in intrauterine insemination (IUI). This was a retrospective study performed at an Academic Medical Center/Reproductive Medicine Center. Four hundred and eight couples were included for 856 IUI cycles. 70 IUI cycles were performed in couples with abnormal strict morphology and otherwise normal semen parameters. Outcomes were measured as clinical pregnancy rate per IUI cycle as documented by fetal heart activity on maternal ultrasound. Clinical pregnancy rate did not significantly differ between the group with abnormal strict morphology [11/70 (15.7%)] and the normal morphology group [39/281 (13.9%)]. Additionally, there was no significant difference between the pregnancy rate in the abnormal morphology group compared to that of our overall institutional IUI pregnancy rate [145/856 (16.9%)]. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between pregnancy rate in the very low morphology group [3/14 (21.4%)] compared to those with normal morphology or the overall IUI pregnancy rate. Patients with isolated abnormal strict morphology have clinical pregnancy rates similar to those with normal morphology for IUI. Even in those with very low normal forms, consideration of IUI for assisted reproduction should not be excluded. PMID:26384603

  20. Fetal ECG: a novel predictor of atrioventricular block in anti‐Ro positive pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Helena M; Belmar, Cristian; Pasquini, Lucia; Seale, Anna; Thomas, Matthew; Dennes, William; Taylor, Myles J O; Kulinskaya, Elena; Wimalasundera, Ruwan

    2007-01-01

    Objective Approximately 2.8% of pregnancies are Ro/La antibody positive. 3–15% of fetuses develop complete heart block (CHB). First‐degree atrioventricular heart block (1° AVB) is reported in a third of Ro/La fetuses but as most have a normal postnatal ECG this may reflect inadequacies of Doppler measurement techniques. Methods Comparison was made between mechanical (mPR) and electrical (ePR) intervals obtained prospectively using Doppler and non‐invasive fetal ECG (fECG) in 52 consecutive Ro/La pregnancies in 46 women carrying 54 fetuses in an observational study at a fetal medicine unit. 121 mPR and 37 ePR intervals were recorded in 49 Ro/La fetuses. Five were referred with CHB and excluded. ePR was measured successfully in 35/37 (94%) and mPR was measured in all cases. 1° AVB was defined as PR >95% CI. Logistic regression predicted abnormal final fetal rhythm from first mPR or ePR. Results The ePR model gave 66.7% sensitivity (6 of 8 final abnormal fetal rhythm cases were predicted correctly in fetuses >20 weeks) and 96.2% specificity. mPR gave 44.4% sensitivity (4 of 9 cases) and 88.5% specificity. Z scores for ePR (zPR) were calculated from 199 normal fetuses. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.754 to 1.007). A cut‐off of 1.65 gave a sensitivity of 87.5% and specificity of 95% for those with prolonged and normal ePR intervals, respectively. Conclusion zPR is better than mPR at differentiating between normal and prolonged PR intervals, suggesting that fECG is the diagnostic tool of choice to investigate the natural history and therapy of conduction abnormalities in Ro/La pregnancies. PMID:17085531

  1. Ultrastructural correlates of left ventricular contraction abnormalities in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease: determinants of reversible segmental asynergy postrevascularization surgery.

    PubMed

    Flameng, W; Suy, R; Schwarz, F; Borgers, M; Piessens, J; Thone, F; Van Ermen, H; De Geest, H

    1981-11-01

    The relationships between structural alterations and left ventricular (LV) contraction abnormalities were studied in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Transmural biopsies of the LV anterior free wall were taken during aortocoronary bypass surgery (CABG) in 62 patients. When preoperative anterior wall motion (AWM) was reduced, significant myocardial cell degeneration was found in patients with as well as without previous anterior infarction (MI). The amount of myocardial fibrosis was increased only in patients with ECG evidence of previous anterior MI (p less than 0.001). In a second series of 139 CAD patients, cineventriculograms performed before and 8 months after CABG were examined. In patients with patent grafts to the LV anterior wall not previously infarcted, reduced AWM became normal. In patients with previous anterior MI the outcome of AWM was unpredictable (usually unimproved). Thus the histologic correlate of reduced AWM in segments not previously infarcted was progressive loss of contractile material in otherwise viable myocardial cells. Some reversibility was suggested by restoration of resting function after CABG. Unpredictable results in segments associated with pathologic Q waves appear related to the fibrous component of these previously infarcted areas. PMID:6975559

  2. Atomic Gradiometers for Fetal Magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Ibrahim; Deland, Zack; Wahl, Colin; Bulatowicz, Michael; Wakai, Ron; Walker, Thad

    2015-05-01

    We present results on development of 87 Rb atomic magnetometers configured as magnetic field gradiometers for fetal Magnetocardiography (fMCG). Operating in the Spin Exchange Relaxation Free (SERF) regime, the magnetometers have a sensitivity 1 fT /√{ Hz} . Magnetic field gradient measurements significantly reduce the interference of uniform background fields. In fMCG applications, the field from the mother's heart is one such background and cannot be passively shielded. We report schemes for implementing such gradiometers along with recent fMCG measurements. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

  3. Challenge of Fetal Mortality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Death Data File and Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set, National Vital Statistics System The magnitude of fetal ... Death Data File and Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set, NVSS. The vital statistics Fetal Death Data File ...

  4. Fetal alcohol syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol in pregnancy; Alcohol-related birth defects; Fetal alcohol effects; FAS ... varies. Almost none of these babies have normal brain development. Infants and children with fetal alcohol syndrome have many different problems, which can be ...

  5. Malformations of Cortical Development: From Postnatal to Fetal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Leibovitz, Zvi

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal fetal corticogenesis results in malformations of cortical development (MCD). Abnormal cell proliferation leads to microcephaly or megalencephaly, incomplete neuronal migration results in heterotopia and lissencephaly, neuronal overmigration manifests as cobblestone malformations, and anomalous postmigrational cortical organization is responsible for polymicrogyria and focal cortical dysplasias. MCD comprises various congenital brain disorders, caused by different genetic, infectious, or vascular etiologies and is associated with significant neurological morbidity. Although MCD are rarely diagnosed prenatally, both dedicated multiplanar neurosonography and magnetic resonance imaging enable good demonstration of fetal cortical development. The imaging signs of fetal MCD are: delayed or absent cerebral sulcation; premature abnormal sulci; thin and irregular hemispheric parenchyma; wide abnormal overdeveloped gyri; wide opening of isolated sulci; nodular bulging into the lateral ventricles; cortical clefts; intraparenchymal echogenic nodules; and cortical thickening. The postnatal and prenatal imaging features of four main malformations of cortical development-lissencephaly, cobblestone malformations, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and polymicrogyria-are described. PMID:27670206

  6. An evaluation of the use of new Doppler methods for detecting longitudinal function abnormalities in a pacing-induced heart failure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabata, Tomotsugu; Cardon, Lisa A.; Armstrong, Guy P.; Fukamach, Kiyotaka; Takagaki, Masami; Ochiai, Yoshie; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Doppler tissue echocardiography and color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity have proven useful in evaluating cross-sections of patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, but experience with serial changes is limited. Purpose and methods: We tested their use by evaluating the temporal changes of LV function in a pacing-induced congestive heart failure model. Rapid ventricular pacing was initiated and maintained in 20 dogs for 4 weeks. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and weekly during brief pacing cessation. RESULTS: With rapid pacing, LV volume significantly increased and ejection fraction (57%-28%), stroke volume (37-18 mL), and mitral annulus systolic velocity (16.1-6.6 cm/s) by Doppler tissue echocardiography significantly decreased, with ejection fraction and mitral annulus systolic velocity closely correlated (r = 0.706, P <.0001). In contrast to the mitral inflow velocities, mitral annulus early diastolic velocity decreased steadily (12.3-7.3 cm/s) resulting in a dramatic decrease in mitral annulus early/late (1.22-0.57) diastolic velocity with no tendency toward pseudonormalization. The color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity also showed significant steady decrease (57-24 cm/s) throughout the pacing period. Multiple regression analysis chose mitral annulus systolic velocity (r = 0.895, P <.0001) and propagation velocity (r = 0.782, P <.0001) for the most important factor predicting LV systolic and diastolic function, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Doppler tissue echocardiography and color M-mode Doppler flow could evaluate the serial deterioration in LV dysfunction throughout the pacing period. These were more useful in quantifying progressive LV dysfunction than conventional ehocardiographic techniques, and were probably relatively independent of preload. These techniques could be suitable for longitudinal evaluation in addition to the cross-sectional study.

  7. Fetal behavioral teratology.

    PubMed

    Visser, Gerard H A; Mulder, Eduard J H; Tessa Ververs, F F

    2010-10-01

    Ultrasound studies of fetal motor behavior provide direct – in vivo – insight in the functioning of the motor component of the fetal central nervous system. In this article, studies are reviewed showing changes in the first timetable of appearance of fetal movements, changes in quality and/or quantity of movements and disturbances in the development of fetal behavioral states in case of endogenous malfunctions, maternal diseases and exogenous behavioral teratogens.

  8. Metric optimized gating for fetal cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Jansz, Michael S; Seed, Mike; van Amerom, Joshua F P; Wong, Derek; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Macgowan, Christopher K

    2010-11-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging can be used to complement echocardiography for the evaluation of the fetal heart. Cardiac imaging typically requires gating with peripheral hardware; however, a gating signal is not readily available in utero. No successful application of existing technologies to human fetal phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging has been reported to date in the literature. The purpose of this work is to develop a technique for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal heart that does not require measurement of a gating signal. Metric optimized gating involves acquiring data without gating and retrospectively determining the proper reconstruction by optimizing an image metric. The effects of incorrect gating on phase contrast images were investigated, and the time-entropy of the series of images was found to provide a good measure of the level of corruption. The technique was validated with a pulsatile flow phantom, experiments with adult volunteers, and in vivo application in the fetal population. Images and flow curves from these measurements are presented. Additionally, numerical simulations were used to investigate the degree to which heart rate variability affects the reconstruction process. Metric optimized gating enables imaging with conventional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging sequences in the absence of a gating signal, permitting flow measurements in the great vessels in utero.

  9. Advances in fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Denise Araujo Lapa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses the main advances in fetal surgical therapy aiming to inform health care professionals about the state-of-the-art techniques and future challenges in this field. We discuss the necessary steps of technical evolution from the initial open fetal surgery approach until the development of minimally invasive techniques of fetal endoscopic surgery (fetoscopy). PMID:27074241

  10. Fetal diagnostic indications for second and third trimester outpatient pregnancy termination

    PubMed Central

    Hern, Warren M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency of diagnostic indications among women seeking to terminate pregnancies for reasons of fetal abnormality, spontaneous fetal demise, or a genetic disorder in a private outpatient clinic specializing in late outpatient abortion procedures. Method A total of 1005 women requested termination of pregnancy for reasons of genetic disorder, fetal anomaly, or fetal demise over 20 years (1992–2012). Gestational ages ranged from 12 to 39 weeks. In all cases, a documented diagnosis of fetal abnormality or fetal demise was made prior to referral. Records were reviewed to verify fetal diagnosis for all patients seeking termination of pregnancy for reasons of fetal disorder. Major complications included major unintended surgery, hemorrhage requiring transfusion, or pelvic infection. Results Preoperative diagnoses included the following: chromosomal abnormalities (n = 378), genetic syndromes and single gene disorders (n = 30), structural anomalies (n = 494), and other conditions (n = 103). These include 26 cases of spontaneous fetal demise and nine selective terminations of one abnormal twin. The major complication rate was 0.5%. Conclusions The majority of diagnoses were in the categories of genetic disorder and neurologic abnormality. © 2014 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:24424620

  11. Fetal magnetocardiogram recordings and Fourier spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, P; Anninos, P A; Lüdinghausen, M V; Kotini, A; Galazios, G; Limberis, B

    1999-07-01

    Power spectral analysis of fetal magnetocardiogram (FMCG) data was evaluated in 64 pregnancies, using the non-invasive one channel superconducting quantum interference device (DC-SQUID), in order to investigate the power spectral amplitude distribution in the frequency range between 2 and 3 Hz. In all cases with normal and uncomplicated pregnancies, the data from the fetal heart and specifically the QRS complexes, were identifiable and unaffected by any maternal cardiac activity and furthermore the power spectral amplitudes, which varied between 120 and 350 fT/Hz, were directly related to gestational age. PMID:15512338

  12. Return to the fetal gene program

    PubMed Central

    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Sen, Shiraj; Vela, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark of cardiac metabolism before birth is the predominance of carbohydrate use for energy provision. After birth, energy substrate metabolism rapidly switches to the oxidation of fatty acids. This switch accompanies the expression of “adult” isoforms of metabolic enzymes and other proteins. However, in a variety of pathophysiologic conditions, including hypoxia, ischemia, hypertrophy, atrophy, diabetes, and hypothyroidism, the postnatal heart returns to the “fetal” gene program. These adaptive mechanisms are also a feature of the failing heart muscle, where at a certain point this fetal-like reprogramming no longer suffices to support cardiac structure and function. We advance the hypothesis that in the postnatal heart, metabolic remodeling triggers the process through glycosylation of transcription factors, potentially protecting the stressed heart from irreversible functional impairment and programmed cell death. In other words, we propose a metabolic link to gene expression in the heart. PMID:20201903

  13. [Pathogenetic percularities of fetal distress in pregnant women with preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, I V

    2013-10-01

    It was performed the investigation of the fetal regulatory systems condition with the heart rate variability method application in 94 women with preeclampsia. It was established that preeclamptic patients had thrombophilia that was accompanied by increased reversible aggregation of platelets in response to low doses of ADP and collagen stimulation. The fetal deterioration in this group was characterized by decreased fetal heart rate variability fractal components with a relative predominance of the central sympathetic control circuit. The augmented sympathetic tone played the significant role in fetal rigid rhythm and decelerations appearance and has formed the fetal myocardium hypoxic injury and the suppressed sinus node response. The usage of semisynthetic diosmin 1 tablet (600 mg) 2 times daily in preeclamptic ladies has a pronounced disaggregant effect and improved fetal autonomic nervous regulation in its projections on hemodynamics. The restoration of the fetal cardiorespiratory synchronization periods has made it possible to consider that diosmine has neuroprotective effect that was directed on the fetal regulatory systems condition optimization.

  14. Fetal Biometry Studies of Malaysian Pregnant Women and Comparison with International Charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, N.; Ramli, R. M.; Jaafar, M. S.

    2010-07-01

    Fetal biometry is a measurement done on fetus anatomy to relate the fetus growth with gestational age (GA). In this study [1], fetal biometry that was studied consists of biparietal diameter (BPD), abdominal circumference (AC) and femur length (FL). Studies were carried out at Maternity Unit, Hospital Pulau Penang. From the finding, it is understood that fetal biometry distinguish the normal from abnormal fetal structures and it vary among different populations, depending upon their racial [2,3] and nutrition [4,5,6]. True findings are valuable in estimating the gestational age of the fetus, abnormalities in fetus and the consideration of maternal health specific to the Malaysian population.

  15. The Role of 4D Ultrasound in the Assessment of Fetal Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Lebit, Dr. Florentina-Daniela; Vladareanu, Professor Dr. Radu

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fetal behavior is defined as any fetal action seen by the mother or fetus diagnosed by objective methods such as cardiotocography (CTG) or ultrasound. Analysis of the dynamics of the fetal behavior with morphological studies has lead to the conclusion that fetal behavior patterns are directly reflecting development and maturation of the central nervous system. The assessment of fetal behavior by 4D ultrasound could allow distinction between normal and abnormal fetal behavior patterns which might make possible the early recognition of fetal brain impairment. Aim: Assessment of fetal movements throughout the pregnancy using 4D ultrasound. Material and Method: The study group included 144 healthy pregnant women with single pregnancies between 7-38 weeks of gestation. For the first trimester of pregnancy we assessed eight types of fetal movements and for the second and third trimesters 14 types of fetal movements and facial expressions. The analyzed parameters for each trimester of pregnancy can be used for performing antenatal neurodevelopment test, used the first time by Professor Kurjak. Results: After 15-20 minutes 4D ultrasound examination, we found a pattern of fetal behavior for each trimester of pregnancy. Conclusions: Dynamic evaluation of fetal behavior reflects directly the processes of maturation and development of the central nervous system. This can make the difference between normal and abnormal brain development and may be used for early diagnosis of neurological disorders that become manifest in perinatal and postnatal periods. PMID:22205894

  16. [Fetal responses to different methods of electrocution of pregnant sows].

    PubMed

    Peisker, Nina; Preissel, Anne-Kathrin; Ritzmann, Mathias; Schuster, Tibor; Thomes, Rainer; Henke, Julia

    2008-01-01

    The fetal stress responses in sows euthanized by electrical current during their second and last trimester of pregnancy (G1 and G2) were evaluated. Three methods of euthanasia of pregnant sows generally applicable to cases of epizootic or emergency slaughter were investigated: 1. conventional application of electrical current to the head and heart (HH); 2. application of electrical current to the head, heart and the uterus (HHU); 3. application of electrical current to the head, heart and from the upper body to the vagina (HHV). Fetuses were delivered by cesarean section at intervals of 3 to 4 minutes and remained attached to the sow by the umbilical cord. Fetal vitality, reflexes, heart rate, blood pressure, rectal body temperature, intracardial arteriovenous pCO2, pH and lactic acid were monitored for a period of 30 minutes. No method was found to kill the fetal pigs immediately. In fetuses at G1 there were no significant differences between the HH and HHU and HHV methods. Fetuses at G2 showed a significantly faster decrease in heart rate and blood pressure as well as a shorter period of time for the absence of fetal body movements and reflexes for the HHT method, compared to the other methods. Since it is not yet known to what extent the fetal pig experiences pain and suffering, the prolonged process of dying for the in utero fetus due to hypoxia which includes struggling and gasps is inconsistent with criteria for humane euthanasia and animal welfare. PMID:18822602

  17. Imaging of activated complement using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIO) - conjugated vectors: an in vivo in utero non-invasive method to predict placental insufficiency and abnormal fetal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Girardi, G; Fraser, J; Lennen, R; Vontell, R; Jansen, M; Hutchison, G

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we have developed a magnetic resonance imaging-based method for non-invasive detection of complement activation in placenta and foetal brain in vivo in utero. Using this method, we found that anti-complement C3-targeted ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles bind within the inflamed placenta and foetal brain cortical tissue, causing a shortening of the T2* relaxation time. We used two mouse models of pregnancy complications: a mouse model of obstetrics antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and a mouse model of preterm birth (PTB). We found that detection of C3 deposition in the placenta in the APS model was associated with placental insufficiency characterised by increased oxidative stress, decreased vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor levels and intrauterine growth restriction. We also found that foetal brain C3 deposition was associated with cortical axonal cytoarchitecture disruption and increased neurodegeneration in the mouse model of APS and in the PTB model. In the APS model, foetuses that showed increased C3 in their brains additionally expressed anxiety-related behaviour after birth. Importantly, USPIO did not affect pregnancy outcomes and liver function in the mother and the offspring, suggesting that this method may be useful for detecting complement activation in vivo in utero and predicting placental insufficiency and abnormal foetal neurodevelopment that leads to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25245499

  18. Killing Me Softly: The Fetal Origins Hypothesis*

    PubMed Central

    Almond, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    In the epidemiological literature, the fetal origins hypothesis associated with David J. Barker posits that chronic, degenerative conditions of adult health, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes, may be triggered by circumstance decades earlier, in utero nutrition in particular. Economists have expanded on this hypothesis, investigating a broader range of fetal shocks and circumstances and have found a wealth of later-life impacts on outcomes including test scores, educational attainment, and income, along with health. In the process, they have provided some of the most credible observational evidence in support of the hypothesis. The magnitude of the impacts is generally large. Thus, the fetal origins hypothesis has not only survived contact with economics, but has flourished. PMID:25152565

  19. Comprehensive Imaging Review of Abnormalities of the Placenta.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Sadaf F; Moshiri, Mariam; Osman, Sherif; Robinson, Tracy J; Siebert, Joseph R; Bhargava, Puneet; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-03-01

    The placenta has a fundamental role in fetal health and functions as an important bridge to normal fetal development throughout pregnancy. A complete fetal ultrasound (US) survey should include full assessment of the placenta for any possible abnormalities. Placental diseases range from abnormal morphology, size, location, extent, and degree of placentation, to abruption and the presence of rare placental neoplasms of benign or malignant nature. Some of these conditions are associated with other diseases including aneuploidies, and their discovery should alert the radiologist to perform a very thorough fetal US examination. At times, a fetal karyotype may be needed to provide additional information. Timely detection of placental abnormalities can alert the clinician regarding the need to make important management decisions to reduce fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Familiarity with the normal and abnormal imaging appearance of the placenta is therefore necessary for the radiologist. Ultrasound with Doppler is the initial imaging modality of choice for placental assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging serves as a problem-solving examination in instances where the US findings are equivocal or where additional information is needed. Computed tomography has a limited role in the evaluation of placental disease because of its relatively limited tissue characterization and in particular because of the resultant direct radiation exposure of the fetus. However, in specific instances, particularly after trauma, computed tomography can provide invaluable information for patient management. PMID:26938032

  20. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  1. Fetal Arthrogryposis Secondary to a Giant Maternal Uterine Leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Vives, José María; Hidalgo-Mora, Juan José; Soler, Inmaculada; Rubio, Juan; Quiroga, Ramiro; Perales, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenital is a rare condition defined as contractures in multiple joints at birth due to disorders starting in fetal life. Its etiology is associated with many different conditions and in many instances remains unknown. The final common pathway to all of them is decreased fetal movement (fetal akinesia) due to an abnormal intrauterine environment. Causes of decreased fetal movements may be neuropathic abnormalities, abnormalities of connective tissue or muscle, intrauterine vascular compromise, maternal diseases, and space limitations within the uterus. When the cause of arthrogryposis is space limitations in uterus, the most common etiology is oligohydramnios. The same can result from intrauterine tumours as fibroids, although to our knowledge there are only two papers reporting cases of fetal deformities related to uterine leiomyomas. We describe a well-documented exceptional case of arthrogryposis associated with the presence of a large uterine fibroid. It could illustrate the importance of a careful and appropriate assessment of uterine fibroids before and in the course of a pregnancy considering that they can cause both serious maternal and fetal complications. PMID:23198198

  2. Fetal distress and the condition of newborn infants.

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, G S; Molloy, P M; Johnson, P; Stirrat, G M; Turnbull, A C

    1983-01-01

    In a prospective audit of the obstetric management of 1210 consecutive deliveries the association was investigated between the need for operative delivery for fetal distress during labour and the condition of the newborn infant. Operative delivery was performed for only 11.5% of the newborn infants with severe acidosis at birth (umbilical artery pH less than 7.12, base deficit greater than 12 mmol (mEq)/1), 24.1% of those with an Apgar score less than 7 at one minute, and 15.8% of those with both severe acidosis and a one minute Apgar score less than 7. Most of the infants delivered operatively were in a vigorous condition at birth and did not have severe acidosis. Fetal blood sampling was done in 4.0% of labours. As none of the fetal blood values were less than 7.20 and only three of the infants sampled in utero suffered severe acidosis at birth, fetal blood sampling would have had to be performed much more often to provide a useful guide to metabolic state at birth. While the large majority of "at risk" fetuses had continuous fetal heart rate monitoring in labour, this had not been provided in 48.7% of the labours of infants with severe acidosis, 38.7% of infants with a one minute Apgar score less than 7, and 47.4% of infants with both severe acidosis and a one minute Apgar score less than 7. Continuous fetal heart rate monitoring was associated with a much higher incidence of operative delivery for fetal distress than was intermittent fetal heart rate auscultation. These results suggest an urgent need to review present methods for assessing the intrapartum condition of the fetus, making the diagnosis of fetal distress, and assessing the condition of the infant at birth. PMID:6412897

  3. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... findings suggesting, abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis,...

  4. Fetal Health and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific prenatal tests to monitor both the mother's health and fetal health during each trimester. With modern technology, health professionals can Detect birth defects Identify problems that ...

  5. Maturation of Fetal Responses to Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, B. S.; Hains, S. M. J.; Jacquet, A.-Y.; Granier-Deferre, C.; Lecanuet, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    Maturation of fetal response to music was characterized over the last trimester of pregnancy using a 5-minute piano recording of Brahms' Lullaby, played at an average of 95, 100, 105 or 110 dB (A). Within 30 seconds of the onset of the music, the youngest fetuses (28-32 weeks GA) showed a heart rate increase limited to the two highest dB levels;…

  6. Intrauterine resuscitation: active management of fetal distress.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, J A; Kinsella, S M

    2002-04-01

    Acute fetal distress in labour is a condition of progressive fetal asphyxia with hypoxia and acidosis. It is usually diagnosed by finding characteristic features in the fetal heart rate pattern, wherever possible supported by fetal scalp pH measurement. Intrauterine resuscitation consists of applying specific measures with the aim of increasing oxygen delivery to the placenta and umbilical blood flow, in order to reverse hypoxia and acidosis. These measures include initial left lateral recumbent positioning followed by right lateral or knee-elbow if necessary, rapid intravenous infusion of a litre of non-glucose crystalloid, maternal oxygen administration at the highest practical inspired percentage, inhibition of uterine contractions usually with subcutaneous or intravenous terbutaline 250 microg, and intra-amniotic infusion of warmed crystalloid solution. Specific manoeuvres for umbilical cord prolapse are also described. Intrauterine resuscitation may be used as part of the obstetric management of labour, while preparing for caesarean delivery for fetal distress, or at the time of establishment of regional analgesia during labour in the compromised fetus. The principles may also be applied during inter-hospital transfers of sick or labouring parturients.

  7. Intrauterine resuscitation: active management of fetal distress.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, J A; Kinsella, S M

    2002-04-01

    Acute fetal distress in labour is a condition of progressive fetal asphyxia with hypoxia and acidosis. It is usually diagnosed by finding characteristic features in the fetal heart rate pattern, wherever possible supported by fetal scalp pH measurement. Intrauterine resuscitation consists of applying specific measures with the aim of increasing oxygen delivery to the placenta and umbilical blood flow, in order to reverse hypoxia and acidosis. These measures include initial left lateral recumbent positioning followed by right lateral or knee-elbow if necessary, rapid intravenous infusion of a litre of non-glucose crystalloid, maternal oxygen administration at the highest practical inspired percentage, inhibition of uterine contractions usually with subcutaneous or intravenous terbutaline 250 microg, and intra-amniotic infusion of warmed crystalloid solution. Specific manoeuvres for umbilical cord prolapse are also described. Intrauterine resuscitation may be used as part of the obstetric management of labour, while preparing for caesarean delivery for fetal distress, or at the time of establishment of regional analgesia during labour in the compromised fetus. The principles may also be applied during inter-hospital transfers of sick or labouring parturients. PMID:15321562

  8. Sonographic Measurement of Fetal Ear Length in Turkish Women with a Normal Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Mucize Eriç; Uzun, Işıl; Karahasanoğlu, Ayşe; Aygün, Mehmet; Akın, Hale; Yazıcıoğlu, Fehmi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abnormal fetal ear length is a feature of chromosomal disorders. Fetal ear length measurement is a simple measurement that can be obtained during ultrasonographic examinations. Aims: To develop a nomogram for fetal ear length measurements in our population and investigate the correlation between fetal ear length, gestational age, and other standard fetal biometric measurements. Study Design: Cohort study. Methods: Ear lengths of the fetuses were measured in normal singleton pregnancies. The relationship between gestational age and fetal ear length in millimetres was analysed by simple linear regression. In addition, the correlation of fetal ear length measurements with biparietal diameter, head circumference, abdominal circumference, and femur length were evaluated.Ear length measurements were obtained from fetuses in 389 normal singleton pregnancies ranging between 16 and 28 weeks of gestation. Results: A nomogram was developed by linear regression analysis of the parameters ear length and gestational age. Fetal ear length (mm) = y = (1.348 X gestational age)−12.265), where gestational ages is in weeks. A high correlation was found between fetal ear length and gestational age, and a significant correlation was also found between fetal ear length and the biparietal diameter (r=0.962; p<0.001). Similar correlations were found between fetal ear length and head circumference, and fetal ear length and femur length. Conclusion: The results of this study provide a nomogram for fetal ear length. The study also demonstrates the relationship between ear length and other biometric measurements. PMID:25667783

  9. Medical management of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, S S; Prasad, R N

    1990-06-01

    Medical termination of abnormal pregnancy requires specific techniques since some conditions make therapy more effective, e.g., missed abortion intrauterine death and molar pregnancy, and others less so, e.g. anencephalic pregnancy. In all cases it is best to terminate the pregnancy as soon as possible to reduce anguish and risks of complications such as consumptive coagulopathy. Oxytocin is not consistently effective, but intraamniotic rivanol has oxytocic properties, and prostaglandins (PGs) are effective by several routes. Surgical methods are more popular in Japan and the US. A diagnostic flow chart is included and described. For missed abortion and fetal death vacuum aspiration or dilatation and evacuation are appropriate for early pregnancy, or PGs are used for later pregnancy, unless there are medical contraindications. Anencephalic pregnancy, usually diagnoses in 2nd or 3rd trimester, is resistant to medical therapy and must often be terminated by cesarean section. Molar pregnancy can be managed with vacuum aspiration at any length of gestation, but must be completed by curettage. Intraamniotic PGs are not advised for mole or fetal death. PG analogs can be administered intramuscularly, or vaginally in gel form. Other types of abnormal pregnancy that can be managed with PGs are spina bifida, hydrocephalus, hydrops fetalis, Dandy-Walker syndrome and Down's syndrome. Tubal pregnancy can be evacuated with intratubally administered PGs under laparoscopic control, thereby preserving tubal integrity. PMID:2225605

  10. Fetal cardiac arrhythmia detection and in utero therapy

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Janette F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    The human fetal heart develops arrhythmias and conduction disturbances in response to ischemia, inflammation, electrolyte disturbances, altered load states, structural defects, inherited genetic conditions, and many other causes. Yet sinus rhythm is present without altered rate or rhythm in some of the most serious electrophysiological diseases, which makes detection of diseases of the fetal conduction system challenging in the absence of magnetocardiographic or electrocardiographic recording techniques. Life-threatening changes in QRS or QT intervals can be completely unrecognized if heart rate is the only feature to be altered. For many fetal arrhythmias, echocardiography alone can assess important clinical parameters for diagnosis. Appropriate treatment of the fetus requires awareness of arrhythmia characteristics, mechanisms, and potential associations. Criteria to define fetal bradycardia specific to gestational age are now available and may allow detection of ion channelopathies, which are associated with fetal and neonatal bradycardia. Ectopic beats, once thought to be entirely benign, are now recognized to have important pathologic associations. Fetal tachyarrhythmias can now be defined precisely for mechanism-specific therapy and for subsequent monitoring of response. This article reviews the current and future diagnostic techniques and pharmacologic treatments for fetal arrhythmia. PMID:20418904

  11. The clinical spectrum of autoimmune congenital heart block.

    PubMed

    Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Izmirly, Peter M; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Buyon, Jill P; Khamashta, Munther A

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune congenital heart block (CHB) is an immune-mediated acquired disease that is associated with the placental transference of maternal antibodies specific for Ro and La autoantigens. The disease develops in a fetal heart without anatomical abnormalities that could otherwise explain the block, and which is usually diagnosed in utero, but also at birth or within the neonatal period. Autoantibody-mediated damage of fetal conduction tissues causes inflammation and fibrosis and leads to blockage of signal conduction at the atrioventricular (AV) node. Irreversible complete AV block is the principal cardiac manifestation of CHB, although some babies might develop other severe cardiac complications, such as endocardial fibroelastosis or valvular insufficiency, even in the absence of cardiac block. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology, classification and management of women whose pregnancies are affected by autoimmune CHB, with a particular focus on the autoantibodies associated with autoimmune CHB and how we should test for these antibodies and diagnose this disease. Without confirmed effective preventive or therapeutic strategies and further research on the aetiopathogenic mechanisms, autoimmune CHB will remain a severe life-threatening disorder. PMID:25800217

  12. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  13. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors is likely why the rates of heart disease are coming down. These factors include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, overweight and obesity. The rates of high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol haven' ...

  14. Clinical course of fetal hydrocephalus: 40 cases.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, D H; Davis, K; Manco-Johnson, M L; Manchester, D; Meier, P R; Clewell, W H

    1985-04-01

    The clinical course and outcome of hydrocephalus diagnosed in utero is not well understood. To approach this problem 40 cases were reviewed of intrauterine fetal hydrocephalus diagnosed with sonography, and follow-up information was obtained regarding them. Sonograms were evaluated for cerebral dimensions, biparietal diameter, brain mantle size, ventricular ratio, amount of amniotic fluid, and associated abnormalities. Neonatal brain sonograms and computed tomographic (CT) scans were reviewed also. Clinical charts were reviewed for maternal age and parity, referral source, family history, fetal age at diagnosis and delivery, mode of delivery, physical examination and/or autopsy findings, karyotype, amniotic alpha 1 fetoprotein level, cause of death, shunt placement after birth, and status of live infants. The observations indicate that the prognosis for fetal hydrocephalus is poor. Only six infants (15%) were alive after an average follow-up of 13 months. Three children were normal and the other three had neurologic abnormalities ranging from severe (paralysis and incontinence) to minimal (2-3 months delayed motor development). Thirty-four fetuses or neonates died. Nine families elected to terminate pregnancy. Ten opted for decompression at delivery for progressive hydrocephalus. Neural tube defects were present in 12 of 23 infants at delivery. Fourteen other infants had additional significant congenital abnormalities. Other abnormal sonographic findings included polyhydramnios (13 of 38), oligohydramnios or decreased fluid (nine of 38), neural tube defect (nine of 40), and other congenital abnormalities (nine of 40). These findings indicate that hydrocephalus diagnosed in utero by sonography is caused by a heterogeneous group of disorders. In general, the prognosis for normal development is poor. Individual prognoses, however, depend on the specific malformations and the interventions used. PMID:3883714

  15. Theoretical considerations to optimize transabdominal monitoring of fetal arterial blood oxygenation using pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zourabian, Anna; Boas, David A.

    2001-06-01

    Pulse oximetry (oxygen saturation monitoring) has markedly improved medical care in many fields, including anesthesiology, intensive care, and newborn intensive care. In obstetrics, fetal heart rate monitoring remains the standard for intrapartum assessment of fetal well being. Fetal oxygen saturation monitoring is a new technique currently under development. It is potentially superior to electronic fetal heart rate monitoring (cardiotocography) because it allows direct assessment of both fetal oxygen status and fetal tissue perfusion. Here we present the analysis for determining the most optimal wavelength selection for pulse oximetry. The wavelengths we chose as the most optimal are: the first in the range of 670-720nm and the second in the range of 825-925nm. Further we discuss the possible systematic errors during our measurements, and their contribution to the obtained saturation results.

  16. Fetal protection and maternal-fetal medicine.

    PubMed

    Nocon, J J

    1991-06-01

    Section 2.01 of the Fetal Protection Act of 1999 defines "qualified patient" as one who registers a pregnancy by six weeks of gestational age. Section 2.02 requires that a patient be "qualified" before receiving financial aid. Similarly, all private third party payers require "registration" of the pregnancy by six weeks. "Registration" consists of proof of intrauterine pregnancy by ultrasound and attachment of a telemetry device to the cervix. Such a device will monitor the patient's vital signs, contractions, fetal movement and levels of various "toxins" in the maternal blood. Toxins include but are not limited to alcohol, nicotine, controlled substances as well as excess levels of salt, carbohydrates and saturated fats. Unacceptable variations in telemetry will trip an alarm at the patient's approved prenatal care center. Such an alarm will trigger a visit from an agent from the Fetal Bureau of Investigation.

  17. Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160227.html Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause 'Danger zone' for women earlier ... WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease risk factors -- such as abnormal cholesterol levels and high blood ...

  18. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  19. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  20. Changes in fetal organ weights during gestation after selection for ovulation rate and uterine capacity in swine.

    PubMed

    Vallet, J L; Freking, B A

    2006-09-01

    We hypothesized that the ability of the fetus to alter nutrient shunting and organ growth might be associated with uterine capacity. White crossbred gilts from a randomly selected control line, a line selected for ovulation rate, and a line selected for uterine capacity (UC) were unilaterally hysterectomized-ovariectomized at 160 d of age, mated at estrus, and slaughtered at 45, 65, 85, and 105 d of gestation (9 to 18 gilts for each line x day combination). Analysis of the data revealed that heart weights and fetal weights were decreased in the ovulation rate line. No significant differences were obtained in fetal, placental, or fetal organ weights between the control and UC lines. Allometric growth of organs was assessed by examination of the slopes of the relationships between fetal weights and fetal organ weights after natural log transformation. Only the relative growth of the liver differed between selection lines and was greater (P = 0.01) in the UC compared with the control line during early pregnancy (d 45 and 65). Allometric growth of the fetal brain, liver, and heart differed with day of gestation. A brain-sparing effect was greater (P < 0.01) on d 85 and 105 compared with d 45 and 65. By contrast, a heart-sparing effect was present during early gestation and disappeared in later gestation. Fetal liver weights were hypersensitive to differences in fetal weights on d 45, possibly associated with placental effects on fetal liver weight. Fetal spleen weights were proportional to fetal weights throughout gestation. These results indicate that selection for ovulation rate decreased total fetal and fetal heart weights, and that selection for UC altered the relationship between total fetal and fetal liver weights during early gestation. Results further indicate significant changes in allometric growth of organs during gestation.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of cardiac myofibril gene expression during heart development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weian; Liu, Lingjuan; Pan, Bo; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Jing; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Tian, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac gene expression regulation is controlled not only by genetic factors but also by environmental, i.e., epigenetic factors. Several environmental toxic effects such as oxidative stress and ischemia can result in abnormal myofibril gene expression during heart development. Troponin, one of the regulatory myofibril proteins in the heart, is a well-known model in study of cardiac gene regulation during the development. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated that fetal form troponin I (ssTnI) expression in the heart is partially regulated by hormones, such as thyroid hormone. In the present study, we have explored the epigenetic role of histone modification in the regulation of ssTnI expression. Mouse hearts were collected at different time of heart development, i.e., embryonic day 15.5, postnatal day 1, day 7, day 14 and day 21. Levels of histone H3 acetylation (acH3) and histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me(3)) were detected using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in slow upstream regulatory element (SURE) domain (TnI slow upstream regulatory element), 300-bp proximal upstream domain and the first intron of ssTnI gene, which are recognized as critical regions for ssTnI regulation. We found that the levels of acH3 on the SURE region were gradually decreased, corresponding to a similar decrease of ssTnI expression in the heart, whereas the levels of H3K9me(3) in the first intron of ssTnI gene were gradually increased. Our results indicate that both histone acetylation and methylation are involved in the epigenetic regulation of ssTnI expression in the heart during the development, which are the targets for environmental factors.

  2. Fetal lung development in the diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bourbon, J R; Farrell, P M

    1985-03-01

    It seems quite likely that the normal process of fetal lung biochemical maturation is delayed by maternal diabetes and that abnormalities in the pulmonary surfactant system are involved. The appearance of PG in amniotic fluid and possibly in fetal lung is impaired or at least delayed. The same is possibly true for DSPC, the main constituent of surfactant, but recent discrepant data call for further clarification of this specific point. Careful determination of the fetal lung phospholipid profile by amniotic fluid analysis helps predict and prevent RDS in IDM, along with a careful control of the maternal diabetic condition. A study of alveolar surfactant at birth, if it could be performed in addition to amniotic fluid analysis, would help to better characterize surfactant deficiency in IDM. On the basis of both in vivo and in vitro experimental approaches, it seems clear that hyperglycemia and fetal reactional hyperinsulinism are both involved in the processes delaying fetal lung maturation. Further advances in the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to this delay will be conditional on the availability of animal models reproducing the features of the metabolic and hormonal environment of human fetuses in diabetic pregnancies. The appropriateness of in vivo models needs to be defined by two kinds of criteria: 1) presence of simultaneous hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in the fetus; 2) the presence of delayed fetal lung maturation as judged by morphology and morphometry of epithelial lung cells, by physiological assessment of surfactant, and by the phospholipid composition of the lung (and including lung tissue per se, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lamellar bodies, and/or isolated surfactant fractions). Therefore, future studies must necessarily be comprehensive in scope and include information indicating that fetal growth, blood glucose, and circulating insulin are all increased. Such models already exist in rats and rabbits. Rat models are

  3. Fetal magnetocardiography measurements with an array of microfabricated optically pumped magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Orang; Sander, Tilmann H.; Mhaskar, Rahul; LeBlanc, John; Eswaran, Hari; Steinhoff, Uwe; Okada, Yoshio; Kitching, John; Trahms, Lutz; Knappe, Svenja

    2015-06-01

    Following the rapid progress in the development of optically pumped magnetometer (OPM) technology for the measurement of magnetic fields in the femtotesla range, a successful assembly of individual sensors into an array of nearly identical sensors is within reach. Here, 25 microfabricated OPMs with footprints of 1 cm3 were assembled into a conformal array. The individual sensors were inserted into three flexible belt-shaped holders and connected to their respective light sources and electronics, which reside outside a magnetically shielded room, through long optical and electrical cables. With this setup the fetal magnetocardiogram of a pregnant woman was measured by placing two sensor belts over her abdomen and one belt over her chest. The fetal magnetocardiogram recorded over the abdomen is usually dominated by contributions from the maternal magnetocardiogram, since the maternal heart generates a much stronger signal than the fetal heart. Therefore, signal processing methods have to be applied to obtain the pure fetal magnetocardiogram: orthogonal projection and independent component analysis. The resulting spatial distributions of fetal cardiac activity are in good agreement with each other. In a further exemplary step, the fetal heart rate was extracted from the fetal magnetocardiogram. Its variability suggests fetal activity. We conclude that microfabricated optically pumped magnetometers operating at room temperature are capable of complementing or in the future even replacing superconducting sensors for fetal magnetocardiography measurements.

  4. Fetal malnutrition: a possible cause of the fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, G W

    1981-01-01

    The effects of ethanol ingestion during pregnancy on total folate levels in fetal tissues and on the concentrations of free amino acids in fetal and maternal plasma were examined in the rat. No differences were observed between the ethanol-fed and the control groups in total folates in fetal brain and liver. However, the concentration of fetal plasma histidine was reduced by 50% as a result of maternal ethanol consumption; the maternal plasma histidine level was not affected. It is suggested that fetal malnutrition in an essential amino acid, histidine, could impair fetal protein synthesis producing the fetal alcohol syndrome. PMID:7312865

  5. Maternal hypoxia alters matrix metalloproteinase expression patterns and causes cardiac remodeling in fetal and neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wenni; Xue, Qin; Li, Yong; Zhang, Lubo

    2011-11-01

    Fetal hypoxia leads to progressive cardiac remodeling in rat offspring. The present study tested the hypothesis that maternal hypoxia results in reprogramming of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression patterns and fibrillar collagen matrix in the developing heart. Pregnant rats were treated with normoxia or hypoxia (10.5% O(2)) from day 15 to 21 of gestation. Hearts were isolated from 21-day fetuses (E21) and postnatal day 7 pups (PD7). Maternal hypoxia caused a decrease in the body weight of both E21 and PD7. The heart-to-body weight ratio was increased in E21 but not in PD7. Left ventricular myocardium wall thickness and cardiomyocyte proliferation were significantly decreased in both fetal and neonatal hearts. Hypoxia had no effect on fibrillar collagen content in the fetal heart, but significantly increased the collagen content in the neonatal heart. Western blotting revealed that maternal hypoxia significantly increased collagen I, but not collagen III, levels in the neonatal heart. Maternal hypoxia decreased MMP-1 but increased MMP-13 and membrane type (MT)1-MMP in the fetal heart. In the neonatal heart, MMP-1 and MMP-13 were significantly increased. Active MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels and activities were not altered in either fetal or neonatal hearts. Hypoxia significantly increased tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-3 and TIMP-4 in both fetal and neonatal hearts. In contrast, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were not affected. The results demonstrate that in utero hypoxia reprograms the expression patterns of MMPs and TIMPs and causes cardiac tissue remodeling with the increased collagen deposition in the developing heart.

  6. Does exercise training during pregnancy influence fetal cardiovascular responses to an exercise stimulus? Insights from a randomised, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Barakat, R; Ruiz, J R; Rodríguez-Romo, G; Montejo-Rodríguez, R; Lucia, A

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the effects of maternal physical activity level on several fetal haemodynamic parameters such as pulsatility index of the fetal middle cerebral and umbilical arteries and cerebral-to-fetal ratio, as well as on fetal heart rate responses to one bout of moderate exercise (20 min cycle-ergometry at approximately 60% of age-predicted maximum heart rate) during the third pregnancy trimester were assessed. 26 Sedentary and 26 physically active gravidae aged 29 (3) and 30 (2) years, respectively, were studied. Maternal exercise did not have a deleterious effect on fetal haemodynamics (particularly, cerebral-to-fetal ratio remained within normal limits with exercise). Overall, maternal training status did not influence the fetal cardiovascular variables studied.

  7. Ethanol exposure alters early cardiac function in the looping heart: a mechanism for congenital heart defects?

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Peterson, Lindsy M; Mai, Katherine; McHale, Quinn; Jenkins, Michael W; Linask, Kersti K; Rollins, Andrew M; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol-induced congenital heart defects are frequently among the most life threatening and require surgical correction in newborns. The etiology of these defects, collectively known as fetal alcohol syndrome, has been the focus of much study, particularly involving cellular and molecular mechanisms. Few studies have addressed the influential role of altered cardiac function in early embryogenesis because of a lack of tools with the capability to assay tiny beating hearts. To overcome this gap in our understanding, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality capable of micrometer-scale resolution imaging, to rapidly and accurately map cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics in real time under physiological conditions. In this study, we exposed avian embryos to a single dose of alcohol/ethanol at gastrulation when the embryo is sensitive to the induction of birth defects. Late-stage hearts were analyzed using standard histological analysis with a focus on the atrio-ventricular valves. Early cardiac function was assayed using Doppler OCT, and structural analysis of the cardiac cushions was performed using OCT imaging. Our results indicated that ethanol-exposed embryos developed late-stage valvuloseptal defects. At early stages, they exhibited increased regurgitant flow and developed smaller atrio-ventricular cardiac cushions, compared with controls (uninjected and saline-injected embryos). The embryos also exhibited abnormal flexion/torsion of the body. Our evidence suggests that ethanol-induced alterations in early cardiac function have the potential to contribute to late-stage valve and septal defects, thus demonstrating that functional parameters may serve as early and sensitive gauges of cardiac normalcy and abnormalities.

  8. Comparison of placental growth factor and fetal flow Doppler ultrasonography to identify fetal adverse outcomes in women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are leading causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Failure to detect intrauterine growth restriction in women at high risk has been highlighted as a significant avoidable cause of serious fetal outcome. In this observational study we compare fetal flow using Doppler ultrasonography with a new test for placental growth factor (PlGF) to predict fetal adverse events. Methods Eighty-nine women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (24 with chronic hypertension, 17 with gestational hypertension, 12 with HELLP syndrome, 19 with preeclampsia and 17 with superimposed preeclampsia) were enrolled. A single maternal blood sample to measure free PlGF (Alere Triage) taken before 35 weeks of pregnancy was compared to the last Doppler ultrasound measurement of fetal flow before delivery. PlGF was classified as normal (PlGF≥100 pg/ml), low (12abnormal fetal flow was defined as either signs of centralisation of the fetal circulation or diastolic block or reverse flow in the umbilical artery or descending aorta; this was a criterion for delivery. Fetal outcomes were intrauterine growth restriction and birth before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Results In total 61/89 women had a preterm birth and 22 infants had IUGR. Of those who delivered preterm, 20/20 women with abnormal fetal flow and 36/41 (87.8%) women with normal fetal flow had low or very low PlGF. Of those infants with IUGR, 22/22 had low or very low maternal PlGF and 10/22 had abnormal fetal flow. Conclusions PlGF may provide useful information before 35th gestational week to identify fetuses requiring urgent delivery, and those at risk of later adverse outcomes not identified by fetal flow Doppler ultrasonography. PMID:23937721

  9. A Review of Fetal ECG Signal Processing; Issues and Promising Directions

    PubMed Central

    Sameni, Reza; Clifford, Gari D.

    2010-01-01

    The field of electrocardiography has been in existence for over a century, yet despite significant advances in adult clinical electrocardiography, signal processing techniques and fast digital processors, the analysis of fetal ECGs is still in its infancy. This is, partly due to a lack of availability of gold standard databases, partly due to the relatively low signal-to-noise ratio of the fetal ECG compared to the maternal ECG (caused by the various media between the fetal heart and the measuring electrodes, and the fact that the fetal heart is simply smaller), and in part, due to the less complete clinical knowledge concerning fetal cardiac function and development. In this paper we review a range of promising recording and signal processing techniques for fetal ECG analysis that have been developed over the last forty years, and discuss both their shortcomings and advantages. Before doing so, however, we review fetal cardiac development, and the etiology of the fetal ECG. A selection of relevant models for the fetal/maternal ECG mixture is also discussed. In light of current understanding of the fetal ECG, we then attempt to justify recommendations for promising future directions in signal processing, and database creation. PMID:21614148

  10. Trans-abdominal monitoring of fetal arterial blood oxygenation using pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zourabian, Anna; Siegel, Andrew M.; Chance, Britton; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Rode, Martha; Boas, David A.

    2000-10-01

    Pulse oximetry (oxygen saturation monitoring) has markedly improved medical care in many fields, including anesthesiology, intensive care, and newborn intensive care. In obstetrics, fetal heart rate monitoring remains the standard for intrapartum assessment of fetal well being. Fetal oxygen saturation monitoring is a new technique currently under development. It is potentially superior to electronic fetal heart rate monitoring (cardiotocography) because it allows direct assessment of both the fetal oxygen status and fetal tissue perfusion. Here we present the analysis for determining the most optimal wavelength selection for pulse oximetry. The wavelengths we chose as the most optimal are the first in the range of 670 - 720 nm and the second in the range of 825 - 925 nm. Further, we discuss the possible systematic errors during our measurements and their contribution to the obtained saturation results. We present feasibility studies for fetal pulse oximetry, monitored noninvasively through the maternal abdomen. Our preliminary experiments show that the fetal pulse can be discriminated from the maternal pulse and thus, in principle, the fetal arterial oxygen saturation can be obtained. We present the methodology for obtaining these data, and discuss the dependence of our measurements on the fetal position with respect to the optode assembly.

  11. Detection and Processing Techniques of FECG Signal for Fetal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Fetal electrocardiogram (FECG) signal contains potentially precise information that could assist clinicians in making more appropriate and timely decisions during labor. The ultimate reason for the interest in FECG signal analysis is in clinical diagnosis and biomedical applications. The extraction and detection of the FECG signal from composite abdominal signals with powerful and advance methodologies are becoming very important requirements in fetal monitoring. The purpose of this review paper is to illustrate the various methodologies and developed algorithms on FECG signal detection and analysis to provide efficient and effective ways of understanding the FECG signal and its nature for fetal monitoring. A comparative study has been carried out to show the performance and accuracy of various methods of FECG signal analysis for fetal monitoring. Finally, this paper further focused some of the hardware implementations using electrical signals for monitoring the fetal heart rate. This paper opens up a passage for researchers, physicians, and end users to advocate an excellent understanding of FECG signal and its analysis procedures for fetal heart rate monitoring system. PMID:19495912

  12. Correlation between Fetal Brain Activity Patterns and Behavioral States: An exploratory fetal magnetoencephalography study

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Naim; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Vairavan, Srinivasan; Siegel, Eric; Temple, Jessica; Preissl, Hubert; Lowery, Curtis L; Eswaran, Hari

    2011-01-01

    The fetal brain remains inaccessible to neurophysiological studies. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is being assessed to fill this gap. We performed 40 fetal MEG (fMEG) recordings with gestational ages (GA) ranging from 30 to 37 weeks. The data from each recording were divided into 15 second epochs which in turn were classified as continuous (CO), discontinuous (DC), or artifact. The fetal behavioral state, quiet or active sleep, was determined using previously defined criteria based on fetal movements and heart rate variability. We studied the correlation between the fetal state, the GA and the percentage of CO and DC epochs. We also analyzed the Spectral Edge Frequency (SEF) and studied its relation with state and GA. We found that the odds of a DC epoch decreased by 6% per week as the GA increased (P=0.0036). This decrease was mainly generated by changes during quiet sleep, which showed 52% DC epochs before 35 weeks GA versus 38% after 35 weeks (P=0.0006). Active sleep did not show a significant change in DC epochs with GA. When both states were compared for MEG patterns within each GA group (before and after 35 weeks), the early group was found to have more DC epochs in quiet sleep (54%) compared to active sleep (42%) (P=0.036). No significant difference in DC epochs between the two states was noted in the late GA group. Analysis of SEF showed a significant difference (P=0.0014) before and after 35 weeks GA, with higher SEF noted at late GA. However, when both quiet and active sleep states were compared within each GA group, the SEF did not show a significant difference. We conclude that fMEG shows reproducible variations in gross features and frequency content, depending on GA and behavioral state. Fetal MEG is a promising tool to investigate fetal brain physiology and maturation. PMID:21237155

  13. Extrafetal Findings on Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Merrow, Arnold C; Guimaraes, Carolina V; Victoria, Teresa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-12-01

    Although US is the mainstay of fetal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an invaluable adjunct in recent years. MRI offers superb soft tissue contrast that allows for detailed evaluation of fetal organs, particularly the brain, which enhances understanding of disease severity. MRI can yield results that are similar to or even better than those of US, particularly in cases of marked oligohydramnios, maternal obesity, or adverse fetal positioning. Incidentally detected extrafetal MRI findings are not uncommon and may affect clinical care. Physicians interpreting fetal MRI studies should be aware of findings occurring outside the fetus, including those structures important for the pregnancy. A systematic approach is necessary in the reading of such studies. This helps to ensure that important findings are not missed, appropriate clinical management is implemented, and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. In this pictorial essay, the most common extrafetal abnormalities are described and illustrated.

  14. Extrafetal Findings on Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Merrow, Arnold C; Guimaraes, Carolina V; Victoria, Teresa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-12-01

    Although US is the mainstay of fetal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an invaluable adjunct in recent years. MRI offers superb soft tissue contrast that allows for detailed evaluation of fetal organs, particularly the brain, which enhances understanding of disease severity. MRI can yield results that are similar to or even better than those of US, particularly in cases of marked oligohydramnios, maternal obesity, or adverse fetal positioning. Incidentally detected extrafetal MRI findings are not uncommon and may affect clinical care. Physicians interpreting fetal MRI studies should be aware of findings occurring outside the fetus, including those structures important for the pregnancy. A systematic approach is necessary in the reading of such studies. This helps to ensure that important findings are not missed, appropriate clinical management is implemented, and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. In this pictorial essay, the most common extrafetal abnormalities are described and illustrated. PMID:26614136

  15. Percentile ranks of sonar fetal abdominal circumference measurements.

    PubMed

    Tamura, R K; Sabbagha, R E

    1980-11-01

    We present the percentile ranks of sonar fetal abdominal circumference (AC) measurements from 18 to 41 weeks' gestation. The ACs are derived from both longitudinal and cross-sectional ultrasonic studies of 200 low-risk pregnant women. The reproducibility of sonar AC falls within 2% of the mean value; this variation permits antenatal distinction of the fetus with a small AC (less than twenty-fifth percentile) or large (greater than eightieth percentile) reading. The fetal AC measurements add another dimension to the interpretation of cephalic growth, particularly in identifying macrosomic fetuses as well as those who are either asymmetrically or symmetrically undergrown. Additionally fetal AC measurements are useful as adjuncts to the diagnosis of hydrocephalus by quantitating the difference between cephalic and body size. In the presence of fetal ascites the AC also can be used to assess the severity and progression of the abnormality.

  16. Fetal drug therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M I; Pryde, P G; Reichler, A; Bardicef, M; Johnson, M P

    1993-01-01

    Fetal drug therapy encompasses several areas, including the prevention of external genital masculinization in 21-hydroxylase deficiency syndrome (congenital adrenal hyperplasia), biochemical amelioration of methylmalonic acidemia, and biotin-responsive multiple carboxylase deficiency. The correction of cardiac arrhythmias has become relatively commonplace, and a reduction in the risks of neural tube defects is now possible with the use of preconceptual and early conceptual folic acid. Similarly, fetal function can be altered by the induction of fetal lung maturity using a number of agents; corticosteroids are the most common fetal pharmaceutic agent, and a number of other agents have also been tried. The most common route of administering pharmaceutic agents is through the mother and the placenta, although the direct administration of certain agents is becoming more common. Images PMID:8236974

  17. Fetal in vivo continuous cardiovascular function during chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Allison, B J; Brain, K L; Niu, Y; Kane, A D; Herrera, E A; Thakor, A S; Botting, K J; Cross, C M; Itani, N; Skeffington, K L; Beck, C; Giussani, D A

    2016-03-01

    Although the fetal cardiovascular defence to acute hypoxia and the physiology underlying it have been established for decades, how the fetal cardiovascular system responds to chronic hypoxia has been comparatively understudied. We designed and created isobaric hypoxic chambers able to maintain pregnant sheep for prolonged periods of gestation under controlled significant (10% O2) hypoxia, yielding fetal mean P(aO2) levels (11.5 ± 0.6 mmHg) similar to those measured in human fetuses of hypoxic pregnancy. We also created a wireless data acquisition system able to record fetal blood flow signals in addition to fetal blood pressure and heart rate from free moving ewes as the hypoxic pregnancy is developing. We determined in vivo longitudinal changes in fetal cardiovascular function including parallel measurement of fetal carotid and femoral blood flow and oxygen and glucose delivery during the last third of gestation. The ratio of oxygen (from 2.7 ± 0.2 to 3.8 ± 0.8; P < 0.05) and of glucose (from 2.3 ± 0.1 to 3.3 ± 0.6; P < 0.05) delivery to the fetal carotid, relative to the fetal femoral circulation, increased during and shortly after the period of chronic hypoxia. In contrast, oxygen and glucose delivery remained unchanged from baseline in normoxic fetuses. Fetal plasma urate concentration increased significantly during chronic hypoxia but not during normoxia (Δ: 4.8 ± 1.6 vs. 0.5 ± 1.4 μmol l(-1), P<0.05). The data support the hypotheses tested and show persisting redistribution of substrate delivery away from peripheral and towards essential circulations in the chronically hypoxic fetus, associated with increases in xanthine oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26926316

  18. Hemodynamic consequences of a restrictive ductus arteriosus and foramen ovale in fetal transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Talemal, L; Donofrio, M T

    2016-09-16

    D-transposition of the great arteries (D-TGA) is the most commonly diagnosed cyanotic congenital heart disease presenting in the neonatal period. The survival after an arterial switch operation, with freedom from adverse cardiovascular events, has been reported to be as high as 93% at 25 years. However, despite excellent surgical outcomes, there continues to be significant preoperative morbidity and potential mortality due to compromise in the delivery room from foramen ovale closure requiring urgent balloon atrial septostomy for stabilization in the first minutes of life. The prenatal diagnosis of D-TGA using fetal echocardiography has aided in the perinatal management and delivery planning of these infants, lowering preoperative morbidity and mortality and preventing delivery room compromise. Fetuses with D-TGA have more highly oxygenated blood supplying the pulmonary arteries and ductus arteriosus which likely results in ductal constriction and increased pulmonary blood flow. This may be the cause of foramen ovale restriction or closure in-utero, which then increases the risk for postnatal compromise at delivery. Theories regarding the cause of the abnormal pulmonary vasculature that may be seen in D-TGA, including aorto-pulmonary collateral formation, have been proposed but to our knowledge, observation of the ultrasound findings throughout mid and late gestation describing the progression of the abnormal fetal physiology have not been previously described. We present a case of D-TGA in which serial assessment using fetal echocardiography enabled observation of the in-utero progression of disease, predicting postnatal compromise and facilitating the planning of life-saving specialized delivery room care and intervention. PMID:27589547

  19. Fetal anemia as a signal of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Macé, Guillaume; Castaigne, Vanina; Trabbia, Aurore; Guigue, Virginie; Cynober, Evelyne; Cortey, Anne; Lalande, Valérie; Carbonne, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    An upsurge in syphilis has been observed almost everywhere over the past decade. The mother's clinical presentation is often uninformative. The diagnosis of maternal syphilis infection is most often based on serologic tests that allow early Extencilline treatment. Syphilis ultrasound findings are non-specific, and delay before treatment can be decisive for prognosis. Fetal anemia is a physiological consequence of severe infection. We confirmed that syphilis can be suggested non-invasively by MCA-PSV measurements in a context of ascitis or atypical hydrops in the absence of usual causes. It is therefore important to perform maternal TPHA/VDRL serology if fetal anemia is suspected. In association with Extencilline treatment, intra uterine transfusion can limit consequences of infection. Reduced fetal movements and non-reactive fetal heart rate may prefigure acute perinatal complications or stillbirth.

  20. Prolonged pregnancy. I. Observations concerning the causes of fetal distress.

    PubMed

    Leveno, K J; Quirk, J G; Cunningham, F G; Nelson, S D; Santos-Ramos, R; Toofanian, A; DePalma, R T

    1984-11-01

    During a 2-year prospective investigation of prolonged pregnancy in 727 women, 59 (8%) were delivered by cesarean section for fetal distress. This condition was diagnosed by means of electronic fetal heart rate monitoring in 47 of the women, and the patterns were unexpectedly characteristic of umbilical cord compression rather than uteroplacental insufficiency. Blinded sonar examinations were performed in 213 women, and the incidence of cesarean section for fetal distress as now described was significantly increased in those with oligohydramnios (two or fewer 1 cm pockets of amniotic fluid). We conclude that the pathophysiology of fetal distress in prolonged pregnancy is typically oligohydramnios that leads to compromised umbilical cord perfusion, rather than uteroplacental insufficiency.

  1. Chromosome abnormality incidence in fetuses with cerebral ventriculomegaly.

    PubMed

    Gezer, C; Ekin, A; Ozeren, M; Taner, C E; Ozer, O; Koc, A; Bilgin, M; Gezer, N S

    2014-07-01

    Ventriculomegaly (VM) is a marker of aneuploidy and warrants a detailed examination of fetal anatomy. Chromosomal abnormalities worsen the fetal and neonatal prognosis significantly and karyotyping of fetuses is critically important when accompanying anomalies are detected. Here, we report the genetic results of 140 fetuses with isolated and non-isolated VM detected during a second trimester ultrasound examination followed by invasive in utero diagnostic procedures for karyotyping. VM was diagnosed in seven (5%) fetuses with abnormal karyotype and the chromosomal abnormality incidence was higher in severe VM (6.8%) than mild (4.2%). Higher chromosomal abnormality rates were detected when VM was isolated (8.6%), rather than associated with any anomaly (3.8%). These results suggest that karyotype analysis should be offered to all patients with any degree of VM, regardless of its association with structural anomalies.

  2. Chronic ethanol exposure and folic acid supplementation: fetal growth and folate status in the maternal and fetal guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Amy J; Knuff, Amber L; Jefkins, Matthew J; Collier, Christine P; Reynolds, James N; Brien, James F

    2011-05-01

    Chronic ethanol exposure (CEE) can produce developmental abnormalities in the CNS of the embryo and developing fetus. Folic acid (FA) is an important nutrient during pregnancy and low folate status exacerbates ethanol-induced teratogenicity. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) CEE depletes folate stores in the mother and fetus; and (2) maternal FA supplementation maintains folate stores. CEE decreased fetal body, brain, hippocampus weights, and brain to body weight ratio but not hippocampus to body weight ratio. These effects of CEE were not mitigated by maternal FA administration. The FA regimen prevented the CEE-induced decrease of term fetal liver folate. However, it did not affect maternal liver folate or fetal RBC folate at term, and did not mitigate the nutritional deficit-induced decrease of term fetal hippocampus folate. This study suggests that maternal FA supplementation may have differential effects on folate status in the mother and the fetus. PMID:21315145

  3. Chronic ethanol exposure and folic acid supplementation: fetal growth and folate status in the maternal and fetal guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Amy J; Knuff, Amber L; Jefkins, Matthew J; Collier, Christine P; Reynolds, James N; Brien, James F

    2011-05-01

    Chronic ethanol exposure (CEE) can produce developmental abnormalities in the CNS of the embryo and developing fetus. Folic acid (FA) is an important nutrient during pregnancy and low folate status exacerbates ethanol-induced teratogenicity. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) CEE depletes folate stores in the mother and fetus; and (2) maternal FA supplementation maintains folate stores. CEE decreased fetal body, brain, hippocampus weights, and brain to body weight ratio but not hippocampus to body weight ratio. These effects of CEE were not mitigated by maternal FA administration. The FA regimen prevented the CEE-induced decrease of term fetal liver folate. However, it did not affect maternal liver folate or fetal RBC folate at term, and did not mitigate the nutritional deficit-induced decrease of term fetal hippocampus folate. This study suggests that maternal FA supplementation may have differential effects on folate status in the mother and the fetus.

  4. Sonographic Assessment of the Fetal Penile Development.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Funda; Yilmaz, Saynur; Akdag Cirik, Derya; Kayikcioglu, Fulya; Dilbaz, Berna; Yucel, Husniye; Gelisen, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    The intrauterine diagnosis of micropenis is an important clue in the discernment of some syndromes and hormonal deficiencies. In this study, we tried to establish reference ranges for the fetal penile length and penile width. This prospective cross-sectional study included 179 healthy singleton male fetus pregnancies that were between 17 and 37 weeks of gestation. Of these pregnancies, the fetal penile length and width were measured using trans-abdominal ultrasound. The correlation coefficients of gestational age with penile measurements were calculated. We observed that as the gestational age increased both the penile length and width increased (p < .0001, correlation coefficients R(2) = 0.854 and R(2) = 0.883; respectively). Reference values of the penile length in the Turkish Population were similar to previously evaluated populations including English, American and Israeli populations. The penile width measurement is a convenient way to diagnose micropenis, but penile width measurement alone might miss some penile abnormalities including chordee and hypospadias.

  5. Psychological and psychophysiological considerations regarding the maternal-fetal relationship

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Janet A.

    2009-01-01

    The earliest relationship does not begin with birth. Pregnant women construct mental representations of the fetus, and feelings of affiliation or “maternal-fetal attachment” generally increase over the course of gestation. While there is a fairly substantial literature on the development and moderation of psychological features of the maternal-fetal relationship, including the role of ultrasound imaging, relatively little is known about the manner in which maternal psychological functioning influences the fetus. Dispositional levels of maternal stress and anxiety are modestly associated with aspects of fetal heart rate and motor activity. Both induced maternal arousal and relaxation generate fairly immediate alterations to fetal neurobehaviors; the most consistently observed fetal response to changes in maternal psychological state involves suppression of motor activity. These effects may be mediated, in part, by an orienting response of the fetus to changes in the intrauterine environment. Conversely, there is evidence that fetal behaviors elicit maternal physiological responses. Integration of this finding into a more dynamic model of the maternal-fetal dyad, and implications for the postnatal relationship are discussed. Research on the period before birth affords tremendous opportunity for developmental scientists to advance understanding of the origins of human attachment. PMID:20228872

  6. Fetal cardiac interventions: myths and facts.

    PubMed

    Van Aerschot, Isabelle; Rosenblatt, Jonathan; Boudjemline, Younès

    2012-01-01

    An early, primary, in utero cardiac abnormality may prevent normal heart development and cause irreversible secondary structural changes. The idea of foetal cardiac intervention stems from this understanding and focuses on antenatal intervention targeting the primary abnormality to allow normal flow and haemodynamics and thus normal heart development. Crucial aspects of foetal vascular access, varying foetal lie and structural complexity make it very hard to set procedural standards. The procedures are complex and are associated with significant maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. The high risk-benefit ratio clearly explains the investigational nature of such therapies. With the development of minimally invasive techniques and continued animal experiments, foetal interventional therapy may see a low rate of morbidity and mortality, improving the prognosis of newborns with congenital heart disease previously considered incurable. PMID:22800721

  7. Molecular cytogenetic studies in structural abnormalities of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Lozzio, C.B.; Bamberger, E.; Anderson, I.

    1994-09-01

    A partial trisomy 13 was detected prenatally in an amniocentesis performed due to the following ultrasound abnormalities: open sacral neural tube defect (NTD), a flattened cerebellum, and lumbar/thoracic hemivertebrae. Elevated AFP and positive acetylcholinesterase in amniotic fluid confirmed the open NTD. Chromosome analysis showed an extra acrocentric chromosome marker. FISH analysis with the painting probe 13 showed that most of the marker was derived from this chromosome. Chromosomes on the parents revealed that the mother had a balanced reciprocal translocation t(2;13)(q23;q21). Dual labeling with painting chromosomes 2 and 13 on cells from the mother and from the amniotic fluid identified the marker as a der(13)t(2;13)(p23;q21). Thus, the fetus had a partial trisomy 13 and a small partial trisomy 2p. The maternal grandfather was found to be a carrier for this translocation. Fetal demise occurred a 29 weeks of gestation. The fetus had open lumbar NTD and showed dysmorphic features, overlapping fingers and imperforate anus. This woman had a subsequent pregnancy and chorionic villi sample showed that this fetus was normal. Another case with an abnormal chromosome 13 was a newborn with partial monosomy 13 due to the presence of a ring chromosome 13. This infant had severe intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios, dysmorphic features and multiple congenital microphthalmia, congenital heart disease, absent thumbs and toes and cervical vertebral anomalies. Chromosome studies in blood and skin fibroblast cultures showed that one chromosome 3 was replaced by a ring chromosome of various sizes. This ring was confirmed to be derived from chromosome 13 using the centromeric 21/13 probe.

  8. Familial atrial fibrillation with fetal onset

    PubMed Central

    Tikanoja, T; Kirkinen, P; Nikolajev, K; Eresmaa, L; Haring, P

    1998-01-01

    A woman presented during two pregnancies (at 25 and 23 weeks' gestation, respectively) because the fetuses had rapid, irregular tachycardia and hydrops. After maternal drug treatment and achievement of slower fetal heart rates, the hydrops gradually resolved. Both babies were born full term with continuing atrial fibrillation. In the first, an ectopic atrial rhythm was temporarily achieved during high dose flecainide treatment but, in the younger sibling, all medications and repeated cardioversions failed even temporarily to convert the atrial fibrillation with an almost isoelectric baseline in ECG to sinus rhythm. Good rate control has been achieved with digoxin in both patients. No infective, immunological, or structural cause was found in either case, and thus an inherited aetiology is probable.

 Keywords: atrial fibrillation;  arrhythmias;  fetal atrial fibrillation;  familial arrhythmias PMID:9538316

  9. Increased fetal myocardial sensitivity to insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism during ovine fetal growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Barry, James S; Rozance, Paul J; Brown, Laura D; Anthony, Russell V; Thornburg, Kent L

    2016-01-01

    Unlike other visceral organs, myocardial weight is maintained in relation to fetal body weight in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) fetal sheep despite hypoinsulinemia and global nutrient restriction. We designed experiments in fetal sheep with placental insufficiency and restricted growth to determine basal and insulin-stimulated myocardial glucose and oxygen metabolism and test the hypothesis that myocardial insulin sensitivity would be increased in the IUGR heart. IUGR was induced by maternal hyperthermia during gestation. Control (C) and IUGR fetal myocardial metabolism were measured at baseline and under acute hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp conditions at 128–132 days gestation using fluorescent microspheres to determine myocardial blood flow. Fetal body and heart weights were reduced by 33% (P = 0.008) and 30% (P = 0.027), respectively. Heart weight to body weight ratios were not different. Basal left ventricular (LV) myocardial blood flow per gram of LV tissue was maintained in IUGR fetuses compared to controls. Insulin increased LV myocardial blood flow by ∼38% (P < 0.01), but insulin-stimulated LV myocardial blood flow in IUGR fetuses was 73% greater than controls. Similar to previous reports testing acute hypoxia, LV blood flow was inversely related to arterial oxygen concentration (r2 = 0.71) in both control and IUGR animals. Basal LV myocardial glucose delivery and uptake rates were not different between IUGR and control fetuses. Insulin increased LV myocardial glucose delivery (by 40%) and uptake (by 78%) (P < 0.01), but to a greater extent in the IUGR fetuses compared to controls. During basal and hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic clamp conditions LV myocardial oxygen delivery, oxygen uptake, and oxygen extraction efficiency were not different between groups. These novel results demonstrate that the fetal heart exposed to nutrient and oxygen deprivation from placental insufficiency appears to maintain myocardial energy

  10. The history of fetal therapy.

    PubMed

    Moise, Kenneth J

    2014-08-01

    The Fetal Treatment Center founded by Michael Harrison is credited as the birthplace of fetal surgery. His trainees in pediatric surgery subsequently founded fetal centers throughout the United States. In Europe, the advent of minimally invasive fetal surgical techniques led to the establishment of treatment centers led predominantly by perinatologists. More recently, perinatologists in North America have begun to play a greater role in the field of fetal intervention.Intrauterine transfusion for the treatment of hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn was the first successful fetal intervention. Although not subjected to the rigors of clinical trials, this treatment has withstood the test of time. Interventions for other fetal disease states such as twin-twin transfusion and repair of fetal myelomeningocele were investigated in animal models followed by randomized clinical trials before widespread adoption. Tracheal occlusion for diaphragmatic hernia is still currently being investigated as the next promising step in fetal intervention.

  11. Doppler ultrasonographic assessment of maternal and fetal arteries during normal feline gestation.

    PubMed

    Blanco, P G; Rodríguez, R; Olguín, S; Rube, A; Tórtora, M; Gobello, C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe Doppler parameters of uterine, umbilical, fetal abdominal aorta, fetal renal and fetal internal carotid arteries, as well as fetal heart rate (FHR), during normal feline gestation. Fifteen, 1-4 years of age, weighing 2.5-3.9kg, domestic short-hair pregnant queens, which were born in our institutional cat colony were included in this study. Color and pulsed-wave Doppler evaluations of uterine arteries were performed every 10 days (Day 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60) from mating. Fetal Doppler and M-mode ultrasonography were performed to assess umbilical, fetal abdominal aorta, fetal renal, fetal internal carotid arteries and FHR. Both peak systolic velocity (PSV) and end diastolic velocity (EDV) of uterine artery increased up to parturition (P<0.01), while resistance index (RI) decreased from Day 10 onwards (P<0.01). From Day 40 onwards, RI of umbilical artery diminished, while PSV and EDV augmented (P<0.01). Fetal abdominal aorta (P<0.01), renal (P<0.01) and internal carotid (P<0.01) arteries diminished their RI from Days 40, 60 and 40 onwards, respectively. Both PSV and EDV of these three arteries increased progressively. Fetal heart rate was first registered on Day 20 when it began to increase up to Day 40 and then diminished to the end of gestation (P<0.01). It is concluded that blood flow of uterine, umbilical, fetal abdominal aorta, fetal renal and fetal internal carotid arteries progressively increased during normal feline pregnancy, while FHR rose to mid gestation and then decreased up to parturition.

  12. Biomonitoring of human fetal exposure to environmental chemicals in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Gerard M

    2014-01-01

    The first trimester of human fetal life, a period of extremely rapid development of physiological systems, represents the most rapid growth phase in human life. Interference in the establishment of organ systems may result in abnormal development that may be manifest immediately or programmed for later abnormal function. Exposure to environmental chemicals may be affecting development at these early stages, and yet there is limited knowledge of the quantities and identities of the chemicals to which the fetus is exposed during early pregnancy. Clearly, opportunities for assessing fetal chemical exposure directly are extremely limited. Hence, this review describes indirect means of assessing fetal exposure in early pregnancy to chemicals that are considered disrupters of development. Consideration is given to such matrices as maternal hair, fingernails, urine, saliva, sweat, breast milk, amniotic fluid and blood, and fetal matrices such as cord blood, cord tissue, meconium, placenta, and fetal liver. More than 150 articles that presented data from chemical analysis of human maternal and fetal tissues and fluids were reviewed. Priority was given to articles where chemical analysis was conducted in more than one matrix. Where correlations between maternal and fetal matrices were determined, these articles were included and are highlighted, as these may provide the basis for future investigations of early fetal exposure. The determination of fetal chemical exposure, at the time of rapid human growth and development, will greatly assist regulatory agencies in risk assessments and establishment of advisories for risk management concerning environmental chemicals.

  13. An efficient unsupervised fetal QRS complex detection from abdominal maternal ECG.

    PubMed

    Varanini, M; Tartarisco, G; Billeci, L; Macerata, A; Pioggia, G; Balocchi, R

    2014-08-01

    Non-invasive fetal heart rate is of great relevance in clinical practice to monitor fetal health state during pregnancy. To date, however, despite significant advances in the field of electrocardiography, the analysis of abdominal fetal ECG is considered a challenging problem for biomedical and signal processing communities. This is mainly due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of fetal ECG and difficulties in cancellation of maternal QRS complexes, motion and electromyographic artefacts. In this paper we present an efficient unsupervised algorithm for fetal QRS complex detection from abdominal multichannel signal recordings combining ICA and maternal ECG cancelling, which outperforms each single method. The signal is first pre-processed to remove impulsive artefacts, baseline wandering and power line interference. The following steps are then applied: maternal ECG extraction through independent component analysis (ICA); maternal QRS detection; maternal ECG cancelling through weighted singular value decomposition; enhancing of fetal ECG through ICA and fetal QRS detection. We participated in the Physionet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2013, obtaining the top official scores of the challenge (among 53 teams of participants) of event 1 and event 2 concerning fetal heart rate and fetal interbeat intervals estimation section. The developed algorithms are released as open-source on the Physionet website.

  14. Fetal pulmonary development: the role of respiratory movements.

    PubMed

    Harding, R

    1997-06-01

    The lung develops before birth as a collapsible, liquid-filled, organ. Throughout the later stages of gestation the fetal lungs are maintained at a level of expansion that is considerably greater than the level achieved as a result of passive equilibration between lung recoil and the chest wall. Fetal breathing movements (FBM) are a feature of normal fetal life and, as such, are used clinically in the assessment of fetal wellbeing. By opposing lung recoil, FBM help to maintain the high level of lung expansion that is now known to be essential for normal growth and structural maturation of the fetal lungs. During 'apnoeic' periods between successive episodes of FBM, active laryngeal constriction has the effect of opposing lung recoil by resisting the escape of lung liquid via the trachea. The prolonged absence or impairment of FBM is likely to result in a reduced mean level of lung expansion which can lead to hypoplasia of the lungs. There is clinical evidence, disputed by some, that the absence of FBM exacerbates the effects of other factors that are associated with lung hypoplasia, such as premature rupture of fetal membranes and oligohydramnios. Even in the absence of such factors, prolonged or repeated reductions or abolition of FBM may contribute to impairments of fetal lung development; FBM can be inhibited by fetal hypoxaemia, hypoglycaemia, maternal alcohol consumption, maternal smoking, intra-amniotic infection and maternal consumption of sedatives or narcotic drugs. Abnormal growth of the fetal lungs has relevance for postnatal respiratory health as it is now recognised that there may be only a limited capacity after birth for the restoration of normal pulmonary architecture following impaired intra-uterine lung development. PMID:9355800

  15. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death.

  16. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. PMID:24215748

  17. Magnesium and fetal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, K.

    1988-01-01

    Fetal growth retardation and premature labor are major problems in perinatal medicine today and account for a great deal of the observed fetal morbidity. While the neonatal death rate has steadily declined over the past decade, there has been a lack of concommitant decrease in these two leading problems. Magnesium (Mg/sup ++/) plays a major role in both of these areas of concern. The fact that it is used as a treatment for premature labor has led investigators to look at low Mg/sup ++/ as a possible cause of this poorly understood phenomenon. The second major cause of small for gestational age infants is intrauterine growth retardation, a condition which may be of either fetal or maternal origin. In either case, Mg/sup ++/ may be implicated since it exerts a strong influence on the underlying pathophysiology of placental failure and maternal hypertension. Both of these conditions are mediated by vascular and platelet hyperactivity as well as by and increase in the ration of thromboxane to prostacyclin. Studies in both the human and animal species are beginning to show how Mg/sup ++/ interacts in these conditions to produce such a damaging fetal outcome. The recent use of Doppler velocimetry of the developing fetus has shown reduced fetal vascular and maternal uterine vascular compliance as early as 14 weeks of gestation in those who would be so affected.

  18. Sulfate in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A

    2011-08-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) is an important nutrient for human growth and development, and is obtained from the diet and the intra-cellular metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, including methionine and cysteine. During pregnancy, fetal tissues have a limited capacity to produce sulfate, and rely on sulfate obtained from the maternal circulation. Sulfate enters and exits placental and fetal cells via transporters on the plasma membrane, which maintain a sufficient intracellular supply of sulfate and its universal sulfonate donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) for sulfate conjugation (sulfonation) reactions to function effectively. Sulfotransferases mediate sulfonation of numerous endogenous compounds, including proteins and steroids, which biotransforms their biological activities. In addition, sulfonation of proteoglycans is important for maintaining normal structure and development of tissues, as shown for reduced sulfonation of cartilage proteoglycans that leads to developmental dwarfism disorders and four different osteochondrodysplasias (diastrophic dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type II, achondrogenesis type IB and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia). The removal of sulfate via sulfatases is an important step in proteoglycan degradation, and defects in several sulfatases are linked to perturbed fetal bone development, including mesomelia-synostoses syndrome and chondrodysplasia punctata 1. In recent years, interest in sulfate and its role in developmental biology has expanded following the characterisation of sulfate transporters, sulfotransferases and sulfatases and their involvement in fetal growth. This review will focus on the physiological roles of sulfate in fetal development, with links to human and animal pathophysiologies.

  19. Sulfate in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A

    2011-08-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) is an important nutrient for human growth and development, and is obtained from the diet and the intra-cellular metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, including methionine and cysteine. During pregnancy, fetal tissues have a limited capacity to produce sulfate, and rely on sulfate obtained from the maternal circulation. Sulfate enters and exits placental and fetal cells via transporters on the plasma membrane, which maintain a sufficient intracellular supply of sulfate and its universal sulfonate donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) for sulfate conjugation (sulfonation) reactions to function effectively. Sulfotransferases mediate sulfonation of numerous endogenous compounds, including proteins and steroids, which biotransforms their biological activities. In addition, sulfonation of proteoglycans is important for maintaining normal structure and development of tissues, as shown for reduced sulfonation of cartilage proteoglycans that leads to developmental dwarfism disorders and four different osteochondrodysplasias (diastrophic dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type II, achondrogenesis type IB and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia). The removal of sulfate via sulfatases is an important step in proteoglycan degradation, and defects in several sulfatases are linked to perturbed fetal bone development, including mesomelia-synostoses syndrome and chondrodysplasia punctata 1. In recent years, interest in sulfate and its role in developmental biology has expanded following the characterisation of sulfate transporters, sulfotransferases and sulfatases and their involvement in fetal growth. This review will focus on the physiological roles of sulfate in fetal development, with links to human and animal pathophysiologies. PMID:21419855

  20. [Transient abnormal Q-waves].

    PubMed

    Godballe, C; Hoeck, H C; Sørensen, J A

    1990-01-01

    We present a case of transient abnormal Q-waves (TAQ) and a review of the literature. TAQ are defined as abnormal Q-waves, which disappear within ten days. They are most often seen in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) but are also seen in other conditions. Brief episodes of myocardial ischemia giving rise to reversible biochemical and ultrastructural myocardial changes, resulting in transient ECG changes, provide an accepted theory for the pathogenesis of TAO. Investigations have shown that the occurrence of exercise-induced TAQ may be a symptom of IHD. It is impossible to distinguish TAQ from Q-waves induced by myocardial infarction. Appearance of TAQ during exercise-testing frequently indicates IHD. PMID:2301045

  1. Ethanol exposure alters zebrafish development: a novel model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bilotta, Joseph; Barnett, Jalynn A; Hancock, Laura; Saszik, Shannon

    2004-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol has been shown to produce the overt physical and behavioral symptoms known as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) in humans. Also, it is believed that low concentrations and/or short durations of alcohol exposure can produce more subtle effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of embryonic ethanol exposure on the zebrafish (Danio rerio) in order to determine whether this species is a viable animal model for studying FAS. Fertilized embryos were reared in varying concentrations of ethanol (1.5% and 2.9%) and exposure times (e.g., 0-8, 6-24, 12-24, and 48-72 h postfertilization; hpf); anatomical measures including eye diameter and heart rate were compared across groups. Results found that at the highest concentration of ethanol (2.9%), there were more abnormal physical distortions and significantly higher mortality rates than any other group. Embryos exposed to ethanol for a shorter duration period (0-8 hpf) at a concentration of 1.5% exhibited more subtle effects such as significantly smaller eye diameter and lower heart rate than controls. These results indicate that embryonic alcohol exposure affects external and internal physical development and that the severity of these effects is a function of both the amount of ethanol and the timing of ethanol exposure. Thus, the zebrafish represents a useful model for examining basic questions about the effects of embryonic exposure to ethanol on development.

  2. Pete Maravich's incredible heart.

    PubMed

    Choi, J H; Kornblum, R N

    1990-07-01

    Postmortem examination of a former professional basketball player revealed an abnormal heart, most notably a single coronary artery. The literature on single coronary arteries is briefly reviewed, and the possible mechanism which caused the patient's condition is considered. This case is particularly unusual because of the patient's profession, which is so physically demanding.

  3. Fetal MCG with Atomic Magnetometer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deland, Zack; Bulatowicz, Michael D.; Sulai, Ibrahim A.; Wahl, Colin P.; Wakai, Ronald T.; Walker, Thad G.

    2016-05-01

    We present results on the development of 87Rb atomic magnetometers for the detection of a fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG). Operating in the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime, the magnetometers' sensitivities are reported at the 1 fT /√{ Hz } level. Environmental common-mode noise, including the field from the maternal heart, can be suppressed by operating the magnetometers in a gradiometric configuration. We report on schemes from implementing such gradiometers along with recent fMCG measurements. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

  4. [Fetal ocular anomalies: the advantages of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Brémond-Gignac, D; Copin, H; Elmaleh, M; Milazzo, S

    2010-05-01

    Congenital ocular malformations are uncommon and require prenatal diagnosis. Severe anomalies are more often detected by trained teams and minor anomalies are more difficult to identify and must be systematically sought, particularly when multiple malformations or a family and maternal history is known. The prenatal diagnosis-imaging tool most commonly used is ultrasound but it can be completed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which contributes crucial information. Fetal dysmorphism can occur in various types of dysfunction and prenatal diagnosis must recognize fetal ocular anomalies. After systematic morphologic ultrasound imaging, different abnormalities detected by MRI are studied. Classical parameters such as binocular and interorbital measurements are used to detect hypotelorism and hypertelorism. Prenatal ocular anomalies such as cataract microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma have been described. Fetal MRI added to prenatal sonography is essential in detecting cerebral and general anomalies and can give more information on the size and morphology of the eyeball. Fetal abnormality detection includes a detailed family and maternal history, an amniotic fluid sample for karyotype, and other analyses for a better understanding of the images. Each pregnancy must be discussed with all specialists for genetic counseling. With severe malformations, termination of pregnancy is proposed because of risk of blindness and associated cerebral or systemic anomalies. Early prenatal diagnosis of ocular malformations can also detect associated abnormalities, taking congenital cataracts that need surgical treatment into account as early as possible. Finally, various associated syndromes need a pediatric check-up that could lead to emergency treatment.

  5. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-01-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8506352

  6. Developmental Change in Fetal Response to Repeated Low-Intensity Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morokuma, Seiichi; Doria, Valentina; Ierullo, Antonio; Kinukawa, Naoko; Fukushima, Kotaro; Nakano, Hitoo; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam; Papageorghiou, Aris T.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate developmental changes in heart rate response to repeated low-intensity (85 dB) sound stimulation in fetuses between 32 and 37 weeks of gestation. We measured amplitude changes in heart rate as our index of fetal response. At 35 to 37 weeks of gestation, the majority of fetuses showed a deceleratory response…

  7. Fetal thyroid function: diagnosis and management of fetal thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D A

    1997-03-01

    The fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis develops independently of the maternal axis, but it is dependent on the maternal-placental system for adequate supply of iodide substrate. This iodide is supplied by direct transfer of maternal plasma iodide and by placental deiodination of T4. In addition, although placental transport of iodothyronines is limited, significant maternal-fetal transfer of T4 occurs, accounting for approximately 30% of the average 10 ug/dL serum-T4 concentration in fetal-cord blood at term. Current information suggests that this maternal contribution to the fetal-T4 levels is important for normal fetal maturation, particularly of the central nervous system. Combined maternal-fetal hypothyroxinemia can lead to irreversible fetal central nervous system damage. The timing of this fetal T4 dependency is not clear. It may be important in the first half of gestation, before the fetal thyroid gland is capable of T4 production, as well as the latter half of gestation when thyroid hormone effects on multiple organ systems are developing. Management of fetal thyroid dysfunction requires normalization of maternal serum T4 concentrations, avoidance or careful monitoring of potentially goitrogenic drug effects in the fetus, and in some instances, direct or indirect fetal therapy. In most cases fetal hypothyroidism is sporadic and undetected, and prognosis for normal growth and development is excellent if the mother is euthyroid and the hypothyroid state is detected and adequately treated at birth. Fetal treatment by intraamniotic thyroxine injection has been provided in cases of inadvertent maternal radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease between 10 and 20 weeks gestation and for fetal goiter detected by ultrasound. Effective treatment of fetal hyperthyroidism in pregnant women with high titers of thyroid stimulating autoantibody is possible by judicious administration of antithyroid drugs to the mother. Management of the hyperthyroid state in the

  8. Altering hemodynamics leads to congenital heart defects (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Stephanie M.; McPheeters, Matthew T.; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Strainic, James P.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    The role of hemodynamics in early heart development is poorly understood. In order to successfully assess the impact of hemodynamics on development, we need to monitor and perturb blood flow, and quantify the resultant effects on morphology. Here, we have utilized cardiac optical pacing to create regurgitant flow in embryonic hearts and OCT to quantify regurgitation percentage and resultant morphology. Embryonic quail in a shell-less culture were optically paced at 3 Hz (well above the intrinsic rate or 1.33-1.67 Hz) on day 2 of development (3-4 weeks human) for 5 minutes. The pacing fatigued the heart and led to a prolonged period (> 1 hour) of increased regurgitant flow. Embryos were kept alive until day 3 (cardiac looping - 4-5 weeks human) or day 8 (4 chambered heart - 8 weeks human) to quantify resultant morphologic changes with OCT. All paced embryos imaged at day 3 displayed cardiac defects. The extent of regurgitant flow immediately after pacing was correlated with cardiac cushion size 24-hours post pacing (p-value < 0.01) with higher regurgitation leading to smaller cushions. Almost all embryos (16/18) surviving to day 8 exhibited congenital heart defects (CHDs) including 11/18 with valve defects, 5/18 with ventricular septal defects and 5/18 with hypoplastic right ventricles. Our data suggests that regurgitant flow leads to smaller cushions, which develop into abnormal valves and septa. Our model produces similar phenotypes as found in our fetal alcohol syndrome and velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome models suggesting that hemodynamics plays a role in these syndromes as well. Utilizing OCT and optical pacing to understand hemodynamics in development is an important step towards determining CHD mechanisms and ultimately developing earlier treatments.

  9. Sildenafil citrate increases fetal weight in a mouse model of fetal growth restriction with a normal vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, Mark Robert; Andersson, Irene; Renshall, Lewis James; Cowley, Elizabeth; Baker, Philip; Greenwood, Susan; Sibley, Colin Peter; Wareing, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is defined as the inability of a fetus to achieve its genetic growth potential and is associated with a significantly increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Clinically, FGR is diagnosed as a fetus falling below the 5(th) centile of customised growth charts. Sildenafil citrate (SC, Viagra™), a potent and selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, corrects ex vivo placental vascular dysfunction in FGR, demonstrating potential as a therapy for this condition. However, many FGR cases present without an abnormal vascular phenotype, as assessed by Doppler measures of uterine/umbilical artery blood flow velocity. Thus, we hypothesized that SC would not increase fetal growth in a mouse model of FGR, the placental-specific Igf2 knockout mouse, which has altered placental exchange capacity but normal placental blood flow. Fetal weights were increased (by 8%) in P0 mice following maternal SC treatment (0.4 mg/ml) via drinking water. There was also a trend towards increased placental weight in treated P0 mice (P = 0.056). Additionally, 75% of the P0 fetal weights were below the 5(th) centile, the criterion used to define human FGR, of the non-treated WT fetal weights; this was reduced to 51% when dams were treated with SC. Umbilical artery and vein blood flow velocity measures confirmed the lack of an abnormal vascular phenotype in the P0 mouse; and were unaffected by SC treatment. (14)C-methylaminoisobutyric acid transfer (measured to assess effects on placental nutrient transporter activity) per g placenta was unaffected by SC, versus untreated, though total transfer was increased, commensurate with the trend towards larger placentas in this group. These data suggest that SC may improve fetal growth even in the absence of an abnormal placental blood flow, potentially affording use in multiple sub-populations of individuals presenting with FGR.

  10. Fetal myocardium in the kidney capsule: an in vivo model of repopulation of myocytes by bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Eric Y; Xiong, Qiang; Ye, Lei; Suntharalingam, Piradeep; Wang, Xiaohong; Astle, C Michael; Zhang, Jianyi; Harrison, David E

    2012-01-01

    Debate surrounds the question of whether the heart is a post-mitotic organ in part due to the lack of an in vivo model in which myocytes are able to actively regenerate. The current study describes the first such mouse model--a fetal myocardial environment grafted into the adult kidney capsule. Here it is used to test whether cells descended from bone marrow can regenerate cardiac myocytes. One week after receiving the fetal heart grafts, recipients were lethally irradiated and transplanted with marrow from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing C57Bl/6J (B6) donors using normal B6 recipients and fetal donors. Levels of myocyte regeneration from GFP marrow within both fetal myocardium and adult hearts of recipients were evaluated histologically. Fetal myocardium transplants had rich neovascularization and beat regularly after 2 weeks, continuing at checkpoints of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and12 months after transplantation. At each time point, GFP-expressing rod-shaped myocytes were found in the fetal myocardium, but only a few were found in the adult hearts. The average count of repopulated myocardium with green rod-shaped myocytes was 996.8 cells per gram of fetal myocardial tissue, and 28.7 cells per adult heart tissue, representing a thirty-five fold increase in fetal myocardium compared to the adult heart at 12 months (when numbers of green rod-shaped myocytes were normalized to per gram of myocardial tissue). Thus, bone marrow cells can differentiate to myocytes in the fetal myocardial environment. The novel in vivo model of fetal myocardium in the kidney capsule appears to be valuable for testing repopulating abilities of potential cardiac progenitors.

  11. Reproductive decisions after fetal genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Pergament, Eugene; Pergament, Deborah

    2012-10-01

    A broad range of testing modalities for fetal genetic disease has been established. These include carrier screening for single-gene mutations, first-trimester and second-trimester screening for chromosome abnormalities and open neural-tube defects, prenatal diagnosis by means of chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Reproductive decisions before and after fetal genetic counselling represent the culmination of a dynamic interaction between prospective parents, obstetrician and genetic counsellor. The decision to undergo genetic testing before and after genetic counselling is influenced by a host of interrelated factors, including patient-partner and family relationships, patient-physician communication, societal mores, religious beliefs, and the media. Because of the complexity of personal and societal factors involved, it is not surprising that genetic counselling concerning reproductive decision-making must be individualised. A limited number of principles, guidelines and standards apply when counselling about testing for fetal genetic disease. These principles are that genetic counselling should be non-directive and unbiased and that parental decisions should be supported regardless of the reproductive choice. A critical responsibility of the obstetrician and genetic counsellor is to provide accurate and objective information about the implications, advantages, disadvantages and consequences of any genetic testing applied to prospective parents and their fetuses. These principles and responsibilities will be tested as newer technologies, such as array comparative genome hybridisation, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis and sequencing of the entire genome are introduced into the field of reproductive genetics and become routine practice.

  12. Role of fetal DNA in preeclampsia (review).

    PubMed

    Konečná, Barbora; Vlková, Barbora; Celec, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Preeclampsia is an autoimmune disorder characterized by hypertension. It begins with abnormal cytotrophoblast apoptosis, which leads to inflammation and an increase in the levels of anti-angiogenic factors followed by the disruption of the angiogenic status. Increased levels of fetal DNA and RNA coming from the placenta, one of the most commonly affected organs in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, have been found in pregnant women with the condition. However, it remains unknown as to whether this is a cause or a consequence of preeclampsia. Few studies have been carried out on preeclampsia in which an animal model of preeclampsia was induced by an injection of different types of DNA that are mimic fetal DNA and provoke inflammation through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) or cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cGAMP). The specific mechanisms involved in the development of preeclampsia are not yet fully understood. It is hypothesized that the presence of different fragments of fetal DNA in maternal plasma may cause for the development of preeclampsia. The function of DNase during preeclampsia also remains unresolved. Studies have suggested that its activity is decreased or the DNA is protected against its effects. Further research is required to uncover the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and focus more on the condition of patients with the condition.

  13. Histology atlas of the developing mouse heart with emphasis on E11.5 to E18.5.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Saija M; Foley, Julie F; Elmore, Susan A

    2009-06-01

    In humans, congenital heart diseases are common. Since the rapid progression of transgenic technologies, the mouse has become the major animal model of defective cardiovascular development. Moreover, genetically modified mice frequently die in utero, commonly due to abnormal cardiovascular development. A variety of publications address specific developmental stages or structures of the mouse heart, but a single reference reviewing and describing the anatomy and histology of cardiac developmental events, stage by stage, has not been available. The aim of this color atlas, which demonstrates embryonic/fetal heart development, is to provide a tool for pathologists and biomedical scientists to use for detailed histological evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections of the developing mouse heart with emphasis on embryonic days (E) 11.5-18.5. The selected images illustrate the main structures and developmental events at each stage and serve as reference material for the confirmation of the chronological age of the embryo/early fetus and assist in the identification of any abnormalities. An extensive review of the literature covering cardiac development pre-E11.5 is summarized in the introduction. Although the focus of this atlas is on the descriptive anatomic and histological development of the normal mouse heart from E11.5 to E18.5, potential embryonic cardiac lesions are discussed with a list of the most common transgenic pre- and perinatal heart defects. Representative images of hearts at E11.5-15.5 and E18.5 are provided in Figures 2-4, 6, 8, and 9. A complete set of labeled images (Figures E11.5-18.5) is available on the CD enclosed in this issue of Toxicologic Pathology. All digital images can be viewed online at https://niehsimages.epl-inc.com with the username "ToxPath" and the password "embryohearts."

  14. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  15. Cerebellar abnormalities typical of methylmercury poisoning in a fledged saltmarsh sparrow, Ammodramus caudacutus.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Sheila A; Lane, Oksana P

    2013-05-01

    A fledged, 12-15 day-old saltmarsh sparrow, Ammodramus caudacutus, was collected from an accidental kill on Cinder Island, Long Island, NY, USA. The sparrow was assessed for feather mercury levels and the brain analyzed for cerebellar abnormalities by microscopic examination. In humans, fetal Minamata disease is caused by maternal ingestion of mercury. It is characterized by disrupted and disordered cerebellar neuronal migration in the fetus or infant. Results from this sparrow show cerebellar abnormalities typical of Minamata disease. It is the first known avian or mammalian specimen taken from the wild to show the abnormalities typical of the human fetal syndrome.

  16. Support-vector-machines-based multidimensional signal classification for fetal activity characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribes, S.; Voicu, I.; Girault, J. M.; Fournier, M.; Perrotin, F.; Tranquart, F.; Kouamé, D.

    2011-03-01

    Electronic fetal monitoring may be required during the whole pregnancy to closely monitor specific fetal and maternal disorders. Currently used methods suffer from many limitations and are not sufficient to evaluate fetal asphyxia. Fetal activity parameters such as movements, heart rate and associated parameters are essential indicators of the fetus well being, and no current device gives a simultaneous and sufficient estimation of all these parameters to evaluate the fetus well-being. We built for this purpose, a multi-transducer-multi-gate Doppler system and developed dedicated signal processing techniques for fetal activity parameter extraction in order to investigate fetus's asphyxia or well-being through fetal activity parameters. To reach this goal, this paper shows preliminary feasibility of separating normal and compromised fetuses using our system. To do so, data set consisting of two groups of fetal signals (normal and compromised) has been established and provided by physicians. From estimated parameters an instantaneous Manning-like score, referred to as ultrasonic score was introduced and was used together with movements, heart rate and associated parameters in a classification process using Support Vector Machines (SVM) method. The influence of the fetal activity parameters and the performance of the SVM were evaluated using the computation of sensibility, specificity, percentage of support vectors and total classification accuracy. We showed our ability to separate the data into two sets : normal fetuses and compromised fetuses and obtained an excellent matching with the clinical classification performed by physician.

  17. Stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek

    2010-09-01

    The association between stillbirth and fetal growth restriction is strong and supported by a large body of evidence and clinically employed for the stillbirth prediction. However, although assessment of fetal growth is a basis of clinical practice, it is not trivial. Essentially, fetal growth is a result of the genetic growth potential of the fetus and placental function. The growth potential is the driving force of fetal growth, whereas the placenta as the sole source of nutrients and oxygen might become the rate limiting element of fetal growth if its function is impaired. Thus, placental dysfunction may prevent the fetus from reaching its full genetically determined growth potential. In this sense fetal growth and its aberration provides an insight into placental function. Fetal growth is a proxy for the test of the effectiveness of placenta, whose function is otherwise obscured during pregnancy.

  18. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis, cancer... to the miner by MSHA in accordance with section 203 of the act (see 30 CFR part 90)....

  19. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis, cancer... to the miner by MSHA in accordance with section 203 of the act (see 30 CFR part 90)....

  20. Hyperreactio Luteinalis: Maternal and Fetal Effects.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Ann Kinga; Sen, Jonathan; Sermer, Mathew

    2015-08-01

    Hyperreactio luteinalis is a rare condition in which there is massive cystic enlargement of the ovaries, mimicking malignancy, during pregnancy. When confronted with this condition, the fear of missing a cancer diagnosis often leads the physician to react with unnecessary surgical intervention, potentially resulting in impaired future fertility. The literature on the subject contains mainly case reports and one small case series. A recent review attempted to summarize what is currently known, but there has not yet been a pervasive change in the approach to the management of this condition. In order to define the natural history of the condition and its maternal and fetal effects, we examined all case reports available in the English literature from 1993 to 2014, in addition to another as yet unpublished case report. Our analysis suggests that, despite its impressive presentation with ovarian enlargement and hyperandrogenism, hyperreactio luteinalis tends to be self-limiting, with spontaneous postpartum resolution and without untoward maternal or fetal sequelae. In particular, fetal virilization is rare, and dependent on the timing of hyperandrogenism. Adverse pregnancy outcomes are likely a consequence of the abnormally high hCG levels observed in many of these gestations, and the subset of women with these abnormal values should be considered for enhanced surveillance. Vaginal delivery is preferred, and strategies to sustain the potential for breastfeeding must be introduced while maternal androgen levels fall, allowing lactation to be established. Considering its benign nature and postpartum resolution, management of HL must be conservative, and continued education of health care professionals who may encounter this entity is vital. PMID:26474228

  1. Prenatal Ultrasound Screening for External Ear Abnormality in the Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun; Ran, Suzhen; Yang, Zhengchun; Lin, Yun; Tang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the best time of examination and section chosen of routine prenatal ultrasound screening for external ear abnormalities and evaluate the feasibility of examining the fetal external ear with ultrasonography. Methods. From July 2010 until August 2011, 42118 pregnant women with single fetus during 16–40 weeks of pregnancy were enrolled in the study. Fetal auricles and external auditory canal in the second trimester of pregnancy were evaluated by routine color Doppler ultrasound screening and systematic screening. Ultrasound images of fetal external ears were obtained on transverse-incline view at cervical vertebra level and mandible level and on parasagittal view and coronal view at external ear level. Results. Five fetuses had anomalous ears including bilateral malformed auricles with malformed external auditory canal, unilateral deformed external ear, and unilateral microtia. The detection rate of both auricles was negatively correlated with gestational age. Of the 5843 fetuses undergoing a routine ultrasound screening, 5797 (99.21%) had bilateral auricles. Of the 4955 fetuses following systematic screening, all fetuses (100%) had bilateral auricles. The best time for fetal auricles observation with ultrasonography is 20–24 weeks of pregnancy. Conclusions. Detection of external ear abnormalities may assist in the diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:25050343

  2. Paracentric inversion of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7)(q21.2q22)) in a newborn with hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kuforjii, T.A.; Pillers, D.M.; Silberbach, M.

    1994-09-01

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe congenital heart disease that is uniformly fatal without surgical intervention. Fetal echocardiography allows prenatal diagnosis, but this condition may not become apparent until after the mid-second trimester. We report a term baby with severe HLHS who had an 18 week fetal ultrasound that reportedly demonstrated a normal heart. There was no family history of congenital heart disease. She was phenotypically female with no dysmorphic features. Physical examination was otherwise normal. She expired at 48 hours of age. The autopsy was noncontributory. The karyotype was 46,XX, but there was an apparently balanced paracentric inversion of the long arm of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7)(q21.2q22)). The mother`s chromosome study was normal without any inversion, and the father was not available for study. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome has been associated with extracardiac anomalies and chromosomal abnormalities including 45,XO,11q-, and trisomy 18. It has also been reported in 5 members spanning 3 generations of a family with a spectrum of left heart defects suggesting an autosomal dominant pattern with high penetrance. First-degree relatives of infants with HLHS have a thirteen percent incidence of related cardiovascular malformations, a frequency higher than predicted by a multifactorial model of inheritance, suggesting that at least a portion of HLHS have a genetic basis. Karyotype analysis, including high resolution banding, may help define the etiology of this condition. Chromosome 7 has not been implicated in HLHS. This case emphasizes the need for genetic analysis, including a pedigree, of affected families. It also underscores the importance of screening by karyotype analysis to determine whether defects of the long arm of chromosome 7 are important in the pathogenesis of hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of sub-microscopic partial trisomy 10q using chromosomal microarray analysis in a phenotypically abnormal fetus with normal karyotype.

    PubMed

    Browne, P C; Adam, S; Badr, M; Brooks, C R; Edwards, J; Walker, P; Mohamed, S; Gregg, A R

    2016-05-17

    Partial trisomy of the 10q region was originally reported in 1979 [1]. For 25 years, the diagnosis was made microscopically based on large, visible insertions in the region identified by karyotype analysis. Previous case reports have included both unbalanced translocations and large duplications/insertions in the 10q region [2]. Probands with partial trisomy 10q syndrome often have an abnormal phenotype that may include developmental delay [3-5], craniofacial abnormalities [3, 5], talipes (clubfoot) [2], microcephaly [2-4], or congenital heart disease [2-6]. Prenatal diagnoses by karyotype have been made following ultrasound diagnosis of sacrococcygeal teratoma [7], renal pyelectasis [3, 8-10], and other fetal abnormalities [4]. In this case, we report the first prenatal diagnosis of partial trisomy 10q (10q22.3-10q23.2) with a normal karyotype and an abnormal chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). This is the smallest copy number variant (CNV) (7.5 Mb) in the 10q22.3-10q23.2 regions yet reported. PMID:27197934

  4. If Your Child Has a Heart Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... septal defect , atrial septal defect , atrioventricular canal, and patent ductus arteriosus). Or the congestion could be the ... for Congenital Heart Defects Many heart abnormalities (including patent ductus arteriosus , ventricular septal defect , truncus arteriosus, atrioventricular ...

  5. Ultrasound pitfalls and artifacts related to six common fetal findings.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Hanna M; Ankola, Anita; Coleman, Beverly

    2012-06-01

    Routine use of ultrasound (US) in antenatal screening has increased over the past decade among both low- and high-risk pregnancies. Recognition of common US imaging pitfalls and artifacts associated with frequently encountered fetal anomalies on obstetric US is imperative to avoid misdiagnosis. The purpose of this article is to present practical tips on how to accurately diagnose 6 fetal anomalies including choroid plexus cyst, mild ventriculomegaly, echogenic intracardiac focus, prominent thymus, mild renal pelviectasis, and echogenic bowel. A suspected fetal anomaly should always be visualized in the correct plane and confirmed in at least one other plane. If the abnormal finding persists, performance of precise measurements in the relevant planes using appropriate gain settings, color Doppler imaging, and the application of specific criteria is necessary to achieve the correct diagnosis and to recommend appropriate patient referral. PMID:22572863

  6. Cardiorespiratory response to cyanide of arterial chemoreceptors in fetal lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Itskovitz, J.; Rudolph, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Cardiorespiratory response to the stimulation of the carotid and aortic receptors by sodium cyanide was examined in fetal lambs in utero at 0.8 (120 days) gestation. Injections of 50-400 ..mu..g cyanide into the inferior vena cava or the carotid artery of intact fetuses elicited bradycardia and respiratory responses that varied from a single gasp to rhythmic respiratory movements but no significant change in arterial blood pressure. Carotid sinus denervation eliminated the cardiorespiratory response to intracarotid injection of cyanide and sinoaortic denervation abolished the response to inferior vena caval injection. It is concluded that in fetal lamb in utero the aortic and carotid bodies are active, and hypoxic stimulation of these chemoreceptors results in cardiorespiratory response characterized by slowing of fetal heart rate, respiratory effort, and no consistent change in arterial blood pressure.

  7. Unshielded fetal magnetocardiography system using two-dimensional gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Yusuke; Kandori, Akihiko; Kumagai, Yukio; Ohnuma, Mitsuru; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Ishii, Tetsuko; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Horigome, Hitoshi; Chiba, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    We developed a fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) system that uses a pair of two-dimensional gradiometers to achieve high signal-to-noise ratio. The gradiometer, which is based on a low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device, detects the gradient of a magnetic field in two orthogonal directions. Gradiometer position is easy to adjust by operating the gantry to drive the cryostat in both the swinging and axial directions. As a result, a fMCG waveform for 25weeks' gestation was measured under an unshielded environment in real time. Moreover, the P and T waves for 25 and 34weeks' gestation, respectively, were obtained by averaging. These results indicate that this two-dimensional gradiometer is one of the most promising techniques for measuring fetal heart rate and diagnosing fetal arrhythmia.

  8. The placenta in the integrated physiology of fetal volume control.

    PubMed

    Faber, J Job; Anderson, Debra F

    2010-01-01

    Almost all water that enters the conceptus of the sheep enters via the placenta. The forces that drive water are hydrostatic and osmotic. The placental channels that allow water to cross into the fetus have not been identified by microanatomic means. Although an "equivalent pore" system can account for the diffusional entry of small hydrophilic solutes, it can be calculated that the filtration coefficient of this system is too small to account for the demonstrated trans-placental water flows. It is possible that a second much less numerous system of large pores permits the flow of water, but that is by no means certain. The placenta does not control the amount of water that enters the conceptus; nor does any other single fetal structure. And water entry is not dependent on the volume of water already present. However, the combined physiological properties of the fetal heart, kidneys, somatic tissues and placenta constitute a consistent explanation of fetal water volume control.

  9. Circadian rise in maternal glucocorticoid prevents pulmonary dysplasia in fetal mice with adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Venihaki, M; Carrigan, A; Dikkes, P; Majzoub, J A

    2000-06-20

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, including hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and pituitary corticotropin, is one of the first endocrine systems to develop during fetal life, probably because glucocorticoid secretion is necessary for the maturation of many essential fetal organs. Consistent with this, pregnant mice with an inactivating mutation in the Crh gene deliver CRH-deficient offspring that die at birth with dysplastic lungs, which can be prevented by prenatal maternal glucocorticoid treatment. But children lacking the ability to synthesize cortisol (because of various genetic defects in adrenal gland development or steroidogenesis) are not born with respiratory insufficiency or abnormal lung development, suggesting that the transfer of maternal glucocorticoid across the placenta might promote fetal organ maturation in the absence of fetal glucocorticoid production. We used pregnant mice with a normal HPA axis carrying fetuses with CRH deficiency to characterize the relative contributions of the fetal and maternal adrenal to the activity of the fetal HPA axis, and related these findings to fetal lung development. We found that in the presence of fetal adrenal insufficiency, normal fetal lung development is maintained by the transfer of maternal glucocorticoid to the fetus, specifically during the circadian peak in maternal glucocorticoid secretion.

  10. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack treatment works best when it's given right after symptoms occur. Prompt treatment of a heart attack can help prevent or limit damage to the heart and prevent sudden death. Call 9-1-1 Right Away A heart ...

  11. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The ... of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso Heart anatomy illustrations and animations for grades K-6. Heart ...

  12. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  13. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... heart block. Doctors use a test called an EKG (electrocardiogram) to help diagnose heart block. This test ...

  14. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus.

  15. Maternal-fetal conflict.

    PubMed

    Fasouliotis, S J; Schenker, J G

    2000-03-01

    Advances in prenatal care have brought about a greater understanding as to the special status of the fetus to the point that it is considered a patient in its own regard. Pregnant women generally follow the medical recommendations of their physicians that are intended for the benefit of their baby. Any situation where maternal well-being or wishes contradict fetal benefit constitutes a maternal-fetal conflict. Such situations include a broad range of possible interventions, non-interventions, and coercive influences. In such cases, the attending physician is expected to attain an attitude that involves either the respect of the woman's autonomy and right to privacy, which precludes any approach other than to accept her decision, or to modify this absolute for the beneficence of the fetus. Current ethical viewpoints range from absolute respect for maternal autonomy with no persuasion allowed, to gentle persuasion and to others which permit intervention and overriding of the woman's autonomy. Court-ordered decisions enforcing the pregnant woman to undergo a procedure in order to improve fetal outcome have been criticized as an invasion of a woman's privacy, limitation of her autonomy, and taking away of her right to informed consent. PMID:10733034

  16. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus. PMID:26482673

  17. Fetal Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings In Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection With Postnatal Imaging Correlation.

    PubMed

    Averill, Lauren W; Kandula, Vinay V R; Akyol, Yakup; Epelman, Monica

    2015-12-01

    Fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool in the diagnosis of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection, requiring a detailed search for specific features. A combination of anterior temporal lobe abnormalities, white matter lesions, and polymicrogyria is especially predictive. Fetal MRI may provide a unique opportunity to detect anterior temporal cysts and occipital horn septations, as dilation of these areas may decrease later in development. Cortical migration abnormalities, white matter abnormalities, cerebellar dysplasia, and periventricular calcifications are often better depicted on postnatal imaging but can also be detected on fetal MRI. We present the prenatal brain MRI findings seen in congenital cytomegalovirus infection and provide postnatal imaging correlation, highlighting the evolution of findings at different times in prenatal and postnatal developments. PMID:26614131

  18. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy: A Case Report in Medicolegal Autopsy.

    PubMed

    Tangsermkijsakul, Aphinan

    2016-03-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a range of birth defects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the most serious form of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Infants with FAS are prone to death because of various physical abnormalities. Consequently, infants with FAS may be presented in the medicolegal investigation as a form of sudden unexpected death in infancy. The author reported a 6-month-old male infant who was found dead at home. The history of maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy was obtained. The infant was diagnosed with FAS at the autopsy because he was presented with postnatal growth retardation, multiple facial abnormalities, and abnormal brain structures, which met the criteria of FAS. The cause of death was severe aspiration pneumonia. The purposes of this case report are to show an uncommon manifestation of sudden unexpected death in infancy case for the forensic pathologists and to emphasize on the national healthcare problem.

  19. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy: A Case Report in Medicolegal Autopsy.

    PubMed

    Tangsermkijsakul, Aphinan

    2016-03-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a range of birth defects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the most serious form of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Infants with FAS are prone to death because of various physical abnormalities. Consequently, infants with FAS may be presented in the medicolegal investigation as a form of sudden unexpected death in infancy. The author reported a 6-month-old male infant who was found dead at home. The history of maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy was obtained. The infant was diagnosed with FAS at the autopsy because he was presented with postnatal growth retardation, multiple facial abnormalities, and abnormal brain structures, which met the criteria of FAS. The cause of death was severe aspiration pneumonia. The purposes of this case report are to show an uncommon manifestation of sudden unexpected death in infancy case for the forensic pathologists and to emphasize on the national healthcare problem. PMID:26730801

  20. Commercialization and Industrial Development for the Fetal Hear Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The primary objectives for this task were to continue the development and testing of the NASA/ODU passive acoustic fetal heart rate monitor, with the goal of transferring the technology to the commercial sector. Areas of work included: 1. To assist in the development of a new hardware front end electronics box for the fetal heart rate monitor, so as to reduce the size of the electronics box, and also to provide for a "low-frequency" and "high-frequency" mode of operation. To make necessary changes in the operating software to support the two modes of operation. 2. To provide an option for a strip chart recording for the system, so that medical personnel could more easily make comparisons with ultra sound strip chart recordings. and 3. To help with continued testing of the system.

  1. Vein of Galen Aneurysmal Malformation: Prognostic Markers Depicted on Fetal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W; Vaught, Arthur J; Poretti, Andrea; Blakemore, Karin J

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serves a dual role in the prenatal diagnostic work up of a vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM). First, it may confirm the prenatal ultrasound findings and secondly it may identify prognostically important secondary complications of the VGAM. Progressive heart failure with development of fetal hydrops and hemispheric white matter injuries are associated with a poor outcome in children with a VGAM. We present the prenatal findings using both ultrasound and MRI of a fetus with VGAM including bilateral injury of the cerebral hemispheres, severe dilatation of the jugular veins, cardiomegaly, and hydrops fetalis. The neonate died within 30 minutes after delivery. Moreover, fetal MRI revealed complete placenta praevia, uterine fibroids, and wrapping of the umbilical cord around the fetal neck. This additional information is unrelated to the fetal pathology, but could have been of importance to plan the delivery. PMID:25924177

  2. Vein of galen aneurysmal malformation: prognostic markers depicted on fetal MRI.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Matthias W; Vaught, Arthur J; Poretti, Andrea; Blakemore, Karin J; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2015-02-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serves a dual role in the prenatal diagnostic work up of a vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM). First, it may confirm the prenatal ultrasound findings and secondly it may identify prognostically important secondary complications of the VGAM. Progressive heart failure with development of fetal hydrops and hemispheric white matter injuries are associated with a poor outcome in children with a VGAM. We present the prenatal findings using both ultrasound and MRI of a fetus with VGAM including bilateral injury of the cerebral hemispheres, severe dilatation of the jugular veins, cardiomegaly, and hydrops fetalis. The neonate died within 30 minutes after delivery. Moreover, fetal MRI revealed complete placenta praevia, uterine fibroids, and wrapping of the umbilical cord around the fetal neck. This additional information is unrelated to the fetal pathology, but could have been of importance to plan the delivery. PMID:25924177

  3. Maternal high-fat diet is associated with impaired fetal lung development.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Reina S; Finch, Katelyn E; Zehr, Jordan; Morselli, Eugenia; Neinast, Michael D; Frank, Aaron P; Hahner, Lisa D; Wang, Jason; Rakheja, Dinesh; Palmer, Biff F; Rosenfeld, Charles R; Savani, Rashmin C; Clegg, Deborah J

    2015-08-15

    Maternal nutrition has a profound long-term impact on infant health. Poor maternal nutrition influences placental development and fetal growth, resulting in low birth weight, which is strongly associated with the risk of developing chronic diseases, including heart disease, hypertension, asthma, and type 2 diabetes, later in life. Few studies have delineated the mechanisms by which maternal nutrition affects fetal lung development. Here, we report that maternal exposure to a diet high in fat (HFD) causes placental inflammation, resulting in placental insufficiency, fetal growth restriction (FGR), and inhibition of fetal lung development. Notably, pre- and postnatal exposure to maternal HFD also results in persistent alveolar simplification in the postnatal period. Our novel findings provide a strong association between maternal diet and fetal lung development.

  4. Electrophysiologic features of fetal ventricular aneurysms and diverticula

    PubMed Central

    PETERS, CARLI; WACKER-GUSSMANN, ANNETTE; STRASBURGER, JANETTE F; CUNEO, BETTINA F; GOTTEINER, NINA; GULECYUZ, MEHEMET; WAKAI, RONALD T

    2014-01-01

    Objective Congenital ventricular wall defects are very rare and include congenital ventricular aneurysms (CVAs) and diverticula (CVDs). Method We report a series of five fetuses: three with CVAs and two with CVDs referred due to fetal arrhythmia. In addition to routine fetal echocardiography, fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) was used. The literature in CVA and CVD is reviewed. Results Incessant premature ventricular contractions (PVC), mainly bigeminy and trigeminy were found in three fetuses with CVAs and in one with CVD, who also had ventricular couplets. The other fetus with CVD, referred because of PVCs, had only sinus tachycardia. ST elevation was noted in two. Fetal movement had a variable impact on PVC’s. Postnatal evaluation demonstrated two persistent left ventricular aneurysms and one persistent right CVD; one CVD resolved at 35 weeks gestation. Two neonates had incessant PVCs. Both arrhythmias resolved spontaneously while being treated with propranolol. Conclusion FMCG is complementary to echocardiographic imaging. In fetuses with left ventricular wall defects, additional electrophysiological diagnosis can be made by fMCG, including the complexity of ventricular ectopy, arrhythmic response to fetal movement, presence of ST-T wave abnormalities, and atrial amplitude increases. Prenatal risk factor assessment using fMCG can additionally support post-natal treatment and follow-up. PMID:25284224

  5. Breathing in fetal lambs: the effect of brain stem section.

    PubMed

    Dawes, G S; Gardner, W N; Johnston, B M; Walker, D W

    1983-02-01

    The effects of section of the brain stem caudally (through the upper pons or mid-collicular) or rostrally (through the caudal hypothalamus or anterior commissure-suprachiasmatic nucleus) were studied in fetal lambs from 118 days gestation, after recovery in utero. In lambs sectioned caudally, breathing movements and electrocortical activity were dissociated. After some days recovery breathing tended to become continuous, with an abnormal prolongation of inspiratory time. Isocapnic hypoxia caused an increase in the rate and amplitude of breathing. After carotid denervation hypoxia still caused an increase in the amplitude of breathing. In lambs sectioned rostrally, there was also dissociation between breathing movements and electrocortical activity. Breathing remained episodic, with an incidence similar to that of intact fetal lambs. In two lambs after 10 days of recovery the breathing and electrocortical rhythms returned, from time to time, to their normal phasic relationship. Isocapnic hypoxia caused a diminution or arrest of breathing, as in intact lambs. The cardiovascular effects of transection were examined. Baroreflex sensitivity was normal in those lambs sectioned caudally and enhanced in those sectioned rostrally. It is concluded first that as a result of rostral section, independent episodic rhythms of fetal breathing and electrocortical activity can be dissociated. Secondly, moderate isocapnic hypoxia causes arrest of fetal breathing indirectly, requiring the integrity of a suprapontine mechanism. And thirdly, after caudal section of the brain stem, hypoxia causes enhancement of fetal breathing efforts, independently of the carotid chemoreceptors. Possible mechanisms are discussed. PMID:6875894

  6. Physiologic assessment of fetal compromise: biomarkers of toxic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, L.D.

    1987-10-01

    Understanding the physiologic and endocrinologic basis of fetal development is a major goal of perinatal biology. During the past decade a number of technological developments have allowed more precise evaluation of the fetus in utero and diagnosis of abnormalities. Despite these methodological achievements, however, there are no specific biological markers currently available to indicate that exposure to a given xenobiotic is associated with a cellular, subcellular, or pharmacodynamic event. This paper evaluates the following issues: what are some of the unique physiologic and endocrinologic features of the fetal milieu interieur. What problems are peculiar to fetal assessment. What are some examples of validated biomarkers and their applicability. What promising biomarkers are on the horizon. How may molecular probes be of value as biological markers of fetal compromise. What are some of the major research gaps and needs, and how should research priorities be set. Some of these topics are addressed. Moreover, the more general role(s) that various diagnostic methods and biological markers can have in an understanding of the regulation of fetal growth and differentiation and the role of xenobiotics in affecting the normal course of events are discussed.

  7. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  8. Maternal hyperglycemia leads to fetal cardiac hyperplasia and dysfunction in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, Lara; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Laine, V Jukka; Koskinen, Anna; Soukka, Hanna; Kytö, Ville; Määttä, Jorma; Haapsamo, Mervi; Ekholm, Eeva; Räsänen, Juha

    2013-09-01

    Accelerated fetal myocardial growth with altered cardiac function is a well-documented complication of human diabetic pregnancy, but its pathophysiology is still largely unknown. Our aim was to explore the mechanisms of fetal cardiac remodeling and cardiovascular hemodynamics in a rat model of maternal pregestational streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. The hyperglycemic group comprised 107 fetuses (10 dams) and the control group 219 fetuses (20 dams). Fetal cardiac function was assessed serially by Doppler ultrasonography. Fetal cardiac to thoracic area ratio, newborn heart weight, myocardial cell proliferative and apoptotic activities, and cardiac gene expression patterns were determined. Maternal hyperglycemia was associated with increased cardiac size, proliferative, apoptotic and mitotic activities, upregulation of genes encoding A- and B-type natriuretic peptides, myosin heavy chain types 2 and 3, uncoupling proteins 2 and 3, and the angiogenetic tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 12A. The genes encoding Kv channel-interacting protein 2, a regulator of electrical cardiac phenotype, and the insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 were downregulated. The heart rate was lower in fetuses of hyperglycemic dams. At 13-14 gestational days, 98% of fetuses of hyperglycemic dams had holosystolic atrioventricular valve regurgitation and decreased outflow mean velocity, indicating diminished cardiac output. Maternal hyperglycemia may lead to accelerated fetal myocardial growth by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia. In fetuses of hyperglycemic dams, expression of key genes that control and regulate cardiomyocyte electrophysiological properties, contractility, and metabolism are altered and may lead to major functional and clinical implications on the fetal heart. PMID:23839525

  9. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described

  10. A Device for Fetal Monitoring by Means of Control Over Cardiovascular Parameters Based on Acoustic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, L. A.; Seleznev, A. I.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Zemlyakov, I. Yu; Kiseleva, E. Yu

    2016-01-01

    The problem of monitoring fetal health is topical at the moment taking into account a reduction in the level of fertile-age women's health and changes in the concept of perinatal medicine with reconsideration of live birth criteria. Fetal heart rate monitoring is a valuable means of assessing fetal health during pregnancy. The routine clinical measurements are usually carried out by the means of ultrasound cardiotocography. Although the cardiotocography monitoring provides valuable information on the fetal health status, the high quality ultrasound devices are expensive, they are not available for home care use. The recommended number of measurement is also limited. The passive and fully non-invasive acoustic recording provides an alternative low-cost measurement method. The article describes a device for fetal and maternal health monitoring by analyzing the frequency and periodicity of heart beats by means of acoustic signal received on the maternal abdomen. Based on the usage of this device a phonocardiographic fetal telemedicine system, which will allow to reduce the antenatal fetal mortality rate significantly due to continuous monitoring over the state of fetus regardless of mother's location, can be built.

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects in Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pancratz, Diane R.

    This literature review defines Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) and considers their causes, diagnoses, prevalence, and educational ramifications. Effects of alcohol during each of the trimesters of pregnancy are summarized. Specific diagnostic characteristics of FAS are listed: (1) growth deficiency, (2) a…

  12. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  13. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  14. Cytogenetic findings in fifty-five couples with recurrent fetal wastage.

    PubMed

    Byrd, J R; Askew, D E; McDonough, P G

    1977-03-01

    Balanced chromosomal translocations in parents and Müllerian abnormalities constitute defined causes of reproductive wastage. Fifty-nine couples with histories of recurrent abortion with or without fetal malformations were evaluated with cytogenetic studies and gynecography. In 44 of the couples with pure abortion histories of two or more spontaneous abortions, three (6.8%) balanced carrier parents were identified. In 11 couples with a mixed history of abortion plus fetal malformation, 3 (27.3%) had balanced translocations in one of the parents. The over-all incidence of Müllerian abnormalities in the group of 59 patients was 11.9%.

  15. Fetal cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Rychik, J

    2004-01-01

    The cardiovascular system of the fetus is physiologically different than the adult, mature system. Unique characteristics of the myocardium and specific channels of blood flow differentitate the physiology of the fetus from the newborn. Conditions of increased preload and afterload in the fetus, such as sacrococcygeal teratoma and twin-twin transfusion syndrome, result in unique and complex pathophysiological states. Echocardiography has improved our understanding of human fetal cadiovasvular physiology in the normal and diseased states, and has expanded our capability to more effectively treat these disease processes.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  17. Investigating alcohol-induced congenital heart defects using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shi; Peterson, Lindsy M.; Ma, Pei; Karunamuni, Ganga; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome commonly results in neurological and craniofacial defects, additionally, as high as 54% of live-born children with this syndrome also possess cardiac abnormalities. We have previously shown that CNCC-ablated embryos exhibit similar structural and functional phenotypes as ethanol-exposed embryos. Here, we present progress on two fronts toward understanding the association between CNCC dysfunction and FAS-related CHDs. We have developed a technique for measuring the thickness of the cardiac cushions throughout the heart. These values were then mapped onto a surface mesh of the myocardial wall for 3-D visualization. The cushions were observed to be significantly reduced in the outflow tract of CNCC-ablated embryos. We also observed a correlation between abnormal pulsed Doppler waveforms and increased separation of the atrioventricular inferior and superior cushions. This correlation between function and structure will enable rapid phenotyping of perturbed embryos. Finally, we present our preliminary results using methyl donors to rescue ethanol-exposed embryonic CHDs. Betaine was administered along with the ethanol injection to embryos at 21 hours of development. The embryos were then analyzed at day 8 for survival and heart morphology. The administration of betaine resulted in a significant increase in survival and normalization of atrioventricular valve leaflet volume and interventricular septum thickness.

  18. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  20. [Fetal myocarditis associated with maternal anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies in the absence of atrioventricular block with good outcome].

    PubMed

    De La Villeon, C-G; Dulac, Y; Ohanessian, G; Ziani, A; Paranon, S; Acar, P

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of fetal myocarditis without conductive abnormality in a pregnant woman with anti-Ro/La antibodies. Fetal echocardiography showed myocarditis with ventricular and valvular hyperechogenicity, which was confirmed by postnatal transthoracic echography. Treatment with dexamethasone (4 mg/day) was started in the 22nd week of gestation. The outcome was good, with the child remaining asymptomatic 2 years later. This observation describes one of the rare forms of fetal myocarditis with favorable outcome.

  1. Prenatal Depression Restricts Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify whether prenatal depression is a risk factor for fetal growth restriction. Methods Midgestation (18-20 weeks GA) estimated fetal weight and urine cortisol and birth weight and gestational age at birth data were collected on a sample of 40 depressed and 40 non-depressed women. Estimated fetal weight and birthweight data were then used to compute fetal growth rates. Results Depressed women had a 13% greater incidence of premature delivery (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.61) and 15% greater incidence of low birthweight (OR = 4.75) than non-depressed women. Depressed women also had elevated prenatal cortisol levels (p = .006) and fetuses who were smaller (p = .001) and who showed slower fetal growth rates (p = .011) and lower birthweights (p = .008). Mediation analyses further revealed that prenatal maternal cortisol levels were a potential mediator for the relationship between maternal symptoms of depression and both gestational age at birth and the rate of fetal growth. After controlling for maternal demographic variables, prenatal maternal cortisol levels were associated with 30% of the variance in gestational age at birth and 14% of the variance in the rate of fetal growth. Conclusion Prenatal depression was associated with adverse perinatal outcomes, including premature delivery and slower fetal growth rates. Prenatal maternal cortisol levels appear to play a role in mediating these outcomes. PMID:18723301

  2. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  3. Best practice guidelines: fetal surgery.

    PubMed

    Sudhakaran, Nada; Sothinathan, Uma; Patel, Shailesh

    2012-01-01

    Fetal intervention encompasses a range of procedures on the fetus with congenital structural anomalies, whilst still on the placental circulation. The concept of fetal surgery was conceived in order to prevent fetal or early postnatal death, or to prevent permanent irreversible organ damage. The benefit of these procedures has to be balanced with risks to both the mother and the fetus. Open fetal surgery, more commonly conducted in North American centres, involves open surgery to the uterus in order to operate on the fetus. Fetal intervention centres in Europe more commonly use minimally invasive fetoscopic surgery. This paper elaborates on the various strategies used in dealing with anomalies of different organ systems of the fetus. PMID:22196142

  4. [Acquired and congenital heart diseases during pregancy].

    PubMed

    De Feo, Stefania; Iacovoni, Attilio; Faggiano, Pompilio

    2012-05-01

    Heart diseases are the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. The number of patients with congenital heart diseases reaching childbearing age, as well as the proportion of women with acquired conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, becoming pregnant is constantly increasing. All women with known heart disease should have pre-pregnancy counseling, to assess maternal and fetal risk. Women at moderate or high risk should be under the care of a specialist prenatal team with experience in managing women with heart disease during pregnancy. Conditions that are considered at particularly high risk (mortality >10%) include Marfan syndrome with dilated aortic root, severe left ventricular dysfunction, severe left heart obstructive lesions, and pulmonary hypertension. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and potentially fatal disease related to pregnancy and the postnatal period that presents with symptoms of congestion and/or hypoperfusion and may rapidly progress to acute and life-threatening heart failure. However, the majority of women with heart disease can tolerate pregnancy; therefore an adequate multidisciplinary approach with the gynecologist, anesthesiologist and cardiologist should be advocated in order to reduce maternal and fetal risks associated with pregnancy.

  5. A Novel Approach to Track Fetal Movement Using Multi-sensor Magnetocardiographic Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, R. B.; Vairavan, S.; Ulusar, U. D.; Wilson, J. D.; Mckelvey, S. S.; Preissl, H.; Eswaran, H.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in fetal magnetocardiographic (fMCG) signals are indicators for fetal body movement. We propose a novel approach to reliably extract fetal body movements based on the field strength of the fMCG signal independent of its frequency. After attenuating the maternal MCG, we use a Hilbert transform approach to identify the R-wave. At each R-wave, we compute the center-of-gravity (cog) of the coordinate positions of MCG sensors, each weighted by the magnitude of the R-wave amplitude recorded at the corresponding sensor. We then define actogram as the distance between the cog computed at each R-wave and the average of the cog from all the R-waves in a 3-min duration. By applying a linear de-trending approach to the actogram we identify the fetal body movement and compare this with the synchronous occurrence of the acceleration in the fetal heart rate. Finally, we apply this approach to the fMCG recorded simultaneously with ultrasound from a single subject and show its improved performance over the QRS-amplitude based approach in the visually verified movements. This technique could be applied to transform the detection of fetal body movement into an objective measure of fetal health and enhance the predictive value of prevalent clinical testing for fetal wellbeing. PMID:21140290

  6. Nutrition implications for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer K; Giesbrecht, Heather E; Eskin, Michael N; Aliani, Michel; Suh, Miyoung

    2014-11-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure produces a multitude of detrimental alcohol-induced defects in children collectively known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Children with FASD often exhibit delayed or abnormal mental, neural, and physical growth. Socioeconomic status, race, genetics, parity, gravidity, age, smoking, and alcohol consumption patterns are all factors that may influence FASD. Optimal maternal nutritional status is of utmost importance for proper fetal development, yet is often altered with alcohol consumption. It is critical to determine a means to resolve and reduce the physical and neurological malformations that develop in the fetus as a result of prenatal alcohol exposure. Because there is a lack of information on the role of nutrients and prenatal nutrition interventions for FASD, the focus of this review is to provide an overview of nutrients (vitamin A, docosahexaenoic acid, folic acid, zinc, choline, vitamin E, and selenium) that may prevent or alleviate the development of FASD. Results from various nutrient supplementation studies in animal models and FASD-related research conducted in humans provide insight into the plausibility of prenatal nutrition interventions for FASD. Further research is necessary to confirm positive results, to determine optimal amounts of nutrients needed in supplementation, and to investigate the collective effects of multiple-nutrient supplementation. PMID:25398731

  7. Nutrition implications for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer K; Giesbrecht, Heather E; Eskin, Michael N; Aliani, Michel; Suh, Miyoung

    2014-11-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure produces a multitude of detrimental alcohol-induced defects in children collectively known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Children with FASD often exhibit delayed or abnormal mental, neural, and physical growth. Socioeconomic status, race, genetics, parity, gravidity, age, smoking, and alcohol consumption patterns are all factors that may influence FASD. Optimal maternal nutritional status is of utmost importance for proper fetal development, yet is often altered with alcohol consumption. It is critical to determine a means to resolve and reduce the physical and neurological malformations that develop in the fetus as a result of prenatal alcohol exposure. Because there is a lack of information on the role of nutrients and prenatal nutrition interventions for FASD, the focus of this review is to provide an overview of nutrients (vitamin A, docosahexaenoic acid, folic acid, zinc, choline, vitamin E, and selenium) that may prevent or alleviate the development of FASD. Results from various nutrient supplementation studies in animal models and FASD-related research conducted in humans provide insight into the plausibility of prenatal nutrition interventions for FASD. Further research is necessary to confirm positive results, to determine optimal amounts of nutrients needed in supplementation, and to investigate the collective effects of multiple-nutrient supplementation.

  8. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and neuroimmune changes.

    PubMed

    Drew, Paul D; Kane, Cynthia J M

    2014-01-01

    The behavioral consequences of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are serious and persist throughout life. The causative mechanisms underlying FASD are poorly understood. However, much has been learned about FASD from human structural and functional studies as well as from animal models, which have provided a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying FASD. Using animal models of FASD, it has been recently discovered that ethanol induces neuroimmune activation in the developing brain. The resulting microglial activation, production of proinflammatory molecules, and alteration in expression of developmental genes are postulated to alter neuron survival and function and lead to long-term neuropathological and cognitive defects. It has also been discovered that microglial loss occurs, reducing microglia's ability to protect neurons and contribute to neuronal development. This is important, because emerging evidence demonstrates that microglial depletion during brain development leads to long-term neuropathological and cognitive defects. Interestingly, the behavioral consequences of microglial depletion and neuroimmune activation in the fetal brain are particularly relevant to FASD. This chapter reviews the neuropathological and behavioral abnormalities of FASD and delineates correlates in animal models. This serves as a foundation to discuss the role of the neuroimmune system in normal brain development, the consequences of microglial depletion and neuroinflammation, the evidence of ethanol induction of neuroinflammatory processes in animal models of FASD, and the development of anti-inflammatory therapies as a new strategy for prevention or treatment of FASD. Together, this knowledge provides a framework for discussion and further investigation of the role of neuroimmune processes in FASD.

  9. Biotelemeters for Space Flights and Fetal Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundt, Carsten W.; Ricks, Robert D.; Hines, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Pill-shaped biotelemeters originally designed for space flight applications will soon be used for monitoring the health of a fetus during and after in-utero fetal surgery. The authors developed a family of biotelemeters that are not only small enough for rodent studies on board the space shuttle or international space station, but also fit through a 10 mm trocar, a plastic tube that is used in endoscopic fetal surgery to obtain minimally invasive access to the fetus. The first 'pill' measures pressure and temperature, and is currently undergoing long-term leakage and biocompatibility tests. A second pill under development measures pH and temperature. A prototype of the 'pH-pill' has been built and successfully tested and is presently being miniaturized into the same dimensions as the 'pressure pill'. Additional pills measuring heart rate, ECG, other ions such as calcium and potassium, and eventually glucose and blood gases, will follow. All pills are designed for ultra-low power consumption yielding lifetimes of up to 10 months in order to meet the requirements of fetal monitoring, but also to provide the capability of long-term space station experiments. Each pill transmits its pulse-interval-modulated signal on a unique carrier frequency in the frequency range of 174-216MHz. A custom-designed multi-channel receiver demodulates and decodes each pill signal and sends the data to a LabVIEW program that performs real-time data analysis and display. A patent for the pill family and its data analysis system is pending.

  10. The legal effects of fetal monitoring guidelines.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Bernard M; Cook, Rebecca J

    2010-02-01

    The new American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (ACOG) monitoring guidelines introduce a new category of interpretation of fetal heart rate tracings between reassuring and nonreassuring, namely intermediate. The purpose is to reduce unnecessary cesarean deliveries. The legal role of medical guidelines is ambivalent. Providers are expected to be familiar with such guidelines, but also to exercise clinical judgment in their patients' interests. Practice departing from guidelines requires justification, but simple compliance without regard to patients' circumstances may constitute negligence. Some courts defer to medical professional guidelines, but others hold that professional standards are set as a matter of law, not by the profession itself. Unlike conclusions in medical science, which are open to continuing review, courts determine facts in a case only once, at trial. Litigation to compel patients' compliance with medical advice based on guidelines may fail, as may prosecutions, more common in the US, of patients who defy such advice. PMID:19932651

  11. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  12. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  13. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  14. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  15. [Congenital heart diseases in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Ratti, Carlo; Veronesi, Benedetta; Grassi, Laura; Bompani, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Congenital heart diseases are abnormalities in the heart's structure that are present at birth. Some are known to be associated with genetic disorders. They affect 8 out of every 1,000 newborns. They range from simple defects with no symptoms to complex defects. They are divided in two types: cyanotic and not cyanotic.

  16. The Robyn Barst Memorial Lecture: Differences between the fetal, newborn, and adult pulmonary circulations: relevance for age-specific therapies (2013 Grover Conference series).

    PubMed

    Abman, Steven H; Baker, Christopher; Gien, Jason; Mourani, Peter; Galambos, Csaba

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) contributes to poor outcomes in diverse diseases in newborns, infants, and children. Many aspects of pediatric PAH parallel the pathophysiology and disease courses observed in adult patients; however, critical maturational differences exist that contribute to distinct outcomes and therapeutic responses in children. In comparison with adult PAH, disruption of lung vascular growth and development, or angiogenesis, plays an especially prominent role in the pathobiology of pediatric PAH. In children, abnormalities of lung vascular development have consequences well beyond the adverse hemodynamic effects of PAH alone. The developing endothelium also plays critical roles in development of the distal airspace, establishing lung surface area for gas exchange and maintenance of lung structure throughout postnatal life through angiocrine signaling. Impaired functional and structural adaptations of the pulmonary circulation during the transition from fetal to postnatal life contribute significantly to poor outcomes in such disorders as persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Down syndrome, and forms of congenital heart disease. In addition, several studies support the hypothesis that early perinatal events that alter lung vascular growth or function may set the stage for increased susceptibility to PAH in adult patients ("fetal programming"). Thus, insights into basic mechanisms underlying unique features of the developing pulmonary circulation, especially as related to preservation of endothelial survival and function, may provide unique therapeutic windows and distinct strategies to improve short- and long-term outcomes of children with PAH. PMID:25621156

  17. Before the horse is out of the barn: fetal surgery for hydrops.

    PubMed

    Bullard, K M; Harrison, M R

    1995-12-01

    Hydrops fetalis, a condition characterized by abnormal accumulation of fluid and edema in the fetus, is the final common pathway in a number of pathological conditions. The diagnosis of hydrops is based on ultrasonographic findings of generalized edema along with a serous effusion (ascites, pleural effusion, or pericardial effusion). Polyhydramnios and placentomegaly may also be present. Historically, hydrops fetalis has been described in cases of Rh alloimmunization and severe erythroblastosis (immune hydrops). Hydrops is considered "nonimmune" if there is no evidence of fetal-maternal blood group incompatibility. Over the past few decades, nonimmune hydrops has been recognized more frequently. In a number of series, 80% to 90% of hydropic fetuses were considered nonimmune. Incidence ranges from 1 in 1,500 to 1 in 3,800 births. Etiology is diverse and associated conditions include cardiovascular malformations, chromosomal abnormalities, thoracic lesions, infections, metabolic disorders, fetal anemia and twinning. Overall prognosis is poor, with mortality between 50% and 98%. Advances in obstetric ultrasound and prenatal diagnosis have made it possible to diagnose a number of congenital anomalies early in gestation. In some cases, anatomic anomalies diagnosed in utero progress to nonimmune hydrops and almost certain fetal demise. It is these conditions that can be considered for fetal surgical intervention. This article reviews the pathophysiology and rationale behind surgical correction of two conditions that lead to hydrops: fetal thoracic lesions (congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, pulmonary sequestration, and fetal pleural effusions) and sacrococcygeal teratoma (SCT). PMID:8822330

  18. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 per minute or coming in groups of 3 or more). You have risk factors for heart disease, such as high cholesterol, diabetes, or high blood pressure. You have new or different heart palpitations. ...

  19. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with heart disease? What do my cholesterol and triglyceride numbers mean? How can I lower my cholesterol? ... weight Know your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides) You can reduce your chances of getting heart ...

  20. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 28. Bernstein D. Pediatric heart and heart-lung transplantation. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 19th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap ...

  1. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 ounce. Most pacemakers have 2 parts: The generator contains the battery and the information to control ... are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart. ...

  2. Fetal pain perception and pain management.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; Jani, Jacques; De Buck, Frederik; Deprest, J

    2006-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of current science related to the concept of fetal pain. We have answered three important questions: (1) does fetal pain exist? (2) does management of fetal pain benefit the unborn child? and (3) which techniques are available to provide good fetal analgesia?

  3. Sonographically documented disappearance of fetal ascites.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Heubach, E; Mazer, J

    1983-02-01

    Two patients with sonographically documented fetal ascites are described. Workup for immunologic or nonimmunologic causes was negative. Subsequent sonar examinations demonstrated disappearance of fetal ascites. At delivery, previous abdominal distention was apparent. Fetal ascites of unknown etiology in the late second trimester does not necessarily have a poor prognosis. Serial sonographic examinations are indicated for follow-up of fetal ascites.

  4. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed.

  5. Effects of L-glutamine supplementation on maternal and fetal hemodynamics in gestating ewes exposed to alcohol.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Onkar B; Ramadoss, Jayanth; Hankins, Gary D; Wu, Guoyao; Washburn, Shannon E

    2014-08-01

    Not much is known about effects of gestational alcohol exposure on maternal and fetal cardiovascular adaptations. This study determined whether maternal binge alcohol exposure and L-glutamine supplementation could affect maternal-fetal hemodynamics and fetal regional brain blood flow during the brain growth spurt period. Pregnant sheep were randomly assigned to one of four groups: saline control, alcohol (1.75-2.5 g/kg body weight), glutamine (100 mg/kg body weight) or alcohol + glutamine. A chronic weekend binge drinking paradigm between gestational days (GD) 99 and 115 was utilized. Fetuses were surgically instrumented on GD 117 ± 1 and studied on GD 120 ± 1. Binge alcohol exposure caused maternal acidemia, hypercapnea, and hypoxemia. Fetuses were acidemic and hypercapnic, but not hypoxemic. Alcohol exposure increased fetal mean arterial pressure, whereas fetal heart rate was unaltered. Alcohol exposure resulted in ~40 % reduction in maternal uterine artery blood flow. Labeled microsphere analyses showed that alcohol induced >2-fold increases in fetal whole brain blood flow. The elevation in fetal brain blood flow was region-specific, particularly affecting the developing cerebellum, brain stem, and olfactory bulb. Maternal L-glutamine supplementation attenuated alcohol-induced maternal hypercapnea, fetal acidemia and increases in fetal brain blood flow. L-Glutamine supplementation did not affect uterine blood flow. Collectively, alcohol exposure alters maternal and fetal acid-base balance, decreases uterine blood flow, and alters fetal regional brain blood flow. Importantly, L-glutamine supplementation mitigates alcohol-induced acid-base imbalances and alterations in fetal regional brain blood flow. Further studies are warranted to elucidate mechanisms responsible for alcohol-induced programming of maternal uterine artery and fetal circulation adaptations in pregnancy.

  6. Using fetal cells for prenatal diagnosis: History and recent progress.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, Arthur L

    2016-06-01

    The potential to use fetal cells in the mother's circulation during the first or second trimester for prenatal diagnosis was described in 1968, but it has not been possible do develop a routine clinical prenatal test despite extensive commercial and academic research efforts. Early attention focused on the detection of aneuploidy, but more recent technology opens the possibility of high resolution detection of copy number abnormalities and even whole genome or exome sequencing to detect both inherited and de novo mutations. In the interim, cell-free noninvasive prenatal testing NIPT has allowed improved detection of aneuploidy, but this has led to a sharp reduction in the number of amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling (CVS) procedures, which inevitably implies reduced detection of serious de novo deletion abnormalities. Attention has focused of both fetal nucleated red blood cells (fnRBCs) and trophoblasts. Recent progress presented at meetings, but not yet published, suggests that it will soon be possible to perform genome-wide relatively high resolution detection of deletions and duplications by recovering fetal trophoblasts during the first trimester and analyzing them by whole gene genome amplification followed by copy number analysis using arrays or next generation sequencing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27133782

  7. Fluid mechanics of blood flow in human fetal left ventricles based on patient-specific 4D ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Jamil, Muhammad; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Biswas, Arijit; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-10-01

    The mechanics of intracardiac blood flow and the epigenetic influence it exerts over the heart function have been the subjects of intense research lately. Fetal intracardiac flows are especially useful for gaining insights into the development of congenital heart diseases, but have not received due attention thus far, most likely because of technical difficulties in collecting sufficient intracardiac flow data in a safe manner. Here, we circumvent such obstacles by employing 4D STIC ultrasound scans to quantify the fetal heart motion in three normal 20-week fetuses, subsequently performing 3D computational fluid dynamics simulations on the left ventricles based on these patient-specific heart movements. Analysis of the simulation results shows that there are significant differences between fetal and adult ventricular blood flows which arise because of dissimilar heart morphology, E/A ratio, diastolic-systolic duration ratio, and heart rate. The formations of ventricular vortex rings were observed for both E- and A-wave in the flow simulations. These vortices had sufficient momentum to last until the end of diastole and were responsible for generating significant wall shear stresses on the myocardial endothelium, as well as helicity in systolic outflow. Based on findings from previous studies, we hypothesized that these vortex-induced flow properties play an important role in sustaining the efficiency of diastolic filling, systolic pumping, and cardiovascular flow in normal fetal hearts. PMID:26676944

  8. Fluid mechanics of blood flow in human fetal left ventricles based on patient-specific 4D ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Jamil, Muhammad; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Biswas, Arijit; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-10-01

    The mechanics of intracardiac blood flow and the epigenetic influence it exerts over the heart function have been the subjects of intense research lately. Fetal intracardiac flows are especially useful for gaining insights into the development of congenital heart diseases, but have not received due attention thus far, most likely because of technical difficulties in collecting sufficient intracardiac flow data in a safe manner. Here, we circumvent such obstacles by employing 4D STIC ultrasound scans to quantify the fetal heart motion in three normal 20-week fetuses, subsequently performing 3D computational fluid dynamics simulations on the left ventricles based on these patient-specific heart movements. Analysis of the simulation results shows that there are significant differences between fetal and adult ventricular blood flows which arise because of dissimilar heart morphology, E/A ratio, diastolic-systolic duration ratio, and heart rate. The formations of ventricular vortex rings were observed for both E- and A-wave in the flow simulations. These vortices had sufficient momentum to last until the end of diastole and were responsible for generating significant wall shear stresses on the myocardial endothelium, as well as helicity in systolic outflow. Based on findings from previous studies, we hypothesized that these vortex-induced flow properties play an important role in sustaining the efficiency of diastolic filling, systolic pumping, and cardiovascular flow in normal fetal hearts.

  9. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  10. Steady-state maternal and fetal plasma concentrations of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) in the preterm sheep.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Mark A; Farley, Anne E; Bennett, Brian M; Smith, Graeme N

    2003-09-01

    The administration of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN; nitroglycerin) is increasing during preterm pregnancies, yet its disposition and, importantly, the extent of fetal exposure remain to be elucidated. When used as a tocolytic (pharmacological agent that stops uterine contractions), it is administered transdermally (24-48 h). Here, we quantified the maternal and fetal steady-state plasma concentrations of maternal intravenous GTN in preterm sheep and continuously monitored maternal and fetal vascular parameters to observe possible dose-dependent vascular effects. Preterm (120 days gestation) pregnant sheep (n = 6) were instrumented with maternal femoral arterial (MA) and venous (MV) and fetal femoral arterial (FA) and umbilical venous (UV) polyethylene blood-sampling catheters. During maternal GTN infusion (3.0 micro g.kg-1.min-1, 60-min duration) the steady-state GTN concentrations ([GTN]) were as follows: MA, 98.6 +/- 9.0 nM; UV, 17.4 +/- 7.6 nM; and FA, <5 nM. There were no changes in maternal and fetal mean arterial pressure and heart rate or in uterine activity. Overall, the steady-state [GTN] was established by 5 min, and the UV/MA ratio of [GTN] was 0.18. The FA [GTN] (<5 nM) indicates that the fetus cleared essentially all GTN in the UV, and the maternal and fetal heart rate and mean arterial pressure appear to be independent of maternal GTN infusion. PMID:14614525

  11. Steady-state maternal and fetal plasma concentrations of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) in the preterm sheep.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Mark A; Farley, Anne E; Bennett, Brian M; Smith, Graeme N

    2003-09-01

    The administration of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN; nitroglycerin) is increasing during preterm pregnancies, yet its disposition and, importantly, the extent of fetal exposure remain to be elucidated. When used as a tocolytic (pharmacological agent that stops uterine contractions), it is administered transdermally (24-48 h). Here, we quantified the maternal and fetal steady-state plasma concentrations of maternal intravenous GTN in preterm sheep and continuously monitored maternal and fetal vascular parameters to observe possible dose-dependent vascular effects. Preterm (120 days gestation) pregnant sheep (n = 6) were instrumented with maternal femoral arterial (MA) and venous (MV) and fetal femoral arterial (FA) and umbilical venous (UV) polyethylene blood-sampling catheters. During maternal GTN infusion (3.0 micro g.kg-1.min-1, 60-min duration) the steady-state GTN concentrations ([GTN]) were as follows: MA, 98.6 +/- 9.0 nM; UV, 17.4 +/- 7.6 nM; and FA, <5 nM. There were no changes in maternal and fetal mean arterial pressure and heart rate or in uterine activity. Overall, the steady-state [GTN] was established by 5 min, and the UV/MA ratio of [GTN] was 0.18. The FA [GTN] (<5 nM) indicates that the fetus cleared essentially all GTN in the UV, and the maternal and fetal heart rate and mean arterial pressure appear to be independent of maternal GTN infusion.

  12. Sonographic markers for early diagnosis of fetal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Renna, Maria Daniela; Pisani, Paola; Conversano, Francesco; Perrone, Emanuele; Casciaro, Ernesto; Renzo, Gian Carlo Di; Paola, Marco Di; Perrone, Antonio; Casciaro, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Fetal malformations are very frequent in industrialized countries. Although advanced maternal age may affect pregnancy outcome adversely, 80%-90% of fetal malformations occur in the absence of a specific risk factor for parents. The only effective approach for prenatal screening is currently represented by an ultrasound scan. However, ultrasound methods present two important limitations: the substantial absence of quantitative parameters and the dependence on the sonographer experience. In recent years, together with the improvement in transducer technology, quantitative and objective sonographic markers highly predictive of fetal malformations have been developed. These markers can be detected at early gestation (11-14 wk) and generally are not pathological in themselves but have an increased incidence in abnormal fetuses. Thus, prenatal ultrasonography during the second trimester of gestation provides a “genetic sonogram”, including, for instance, nuchal translucency, short humeral length, echogenic bowel, echogenic intracardiac focus and choroid plexus cyst, that is used to identify morphological features of fetal Down’s syndrome with a potential sensitivity of more than 90%. Other specific and sensitive markers can be seen in the case of cardiac defects and skeletal anomalies. In the future, sonographic markers could limit even more the use of invasive and dangerous techniques of prenatal diagnosis (amniocentesis, etc.). PMID:24179631

  13. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Goscik, Joanna; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Lemancewicz, Adam; Laudanski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother's immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th-18th weeks of gestation). For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity) is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients.

  14. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Goscik, Joanna; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Lemancewicz, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother's immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th–18th weeks of gestation). For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity) is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients. PMID:27042674

  15. Mummy was a fetus: motherhood and fetal ovarian transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, J M

    1995-01-01

    Infertility affects 15 per cent of the world's couples. Research at Edinburgh University has been directed at transplanting fetal ovarian tissue into infertile women, thus enabling them to bear children. Fetal ovary transplantation (FOT) has generated substantial controversy; in fact, one ethicist deemed the procedure 'so grotesque as to be unbelievable' (1). Some have suggested that fetal eggs may harbour unknown chromosomal abnormalities: however, there is no evidence that these eggs possess a higher incidence of genetic anomaly than ova found in a healthy adult female. There is also concern that fetal egg children will be psychologically harmed by the knowledge of their special conceptual status. It will be demonstrated that special conceptual status in and of itself does not determine developmental success. Rather, psychological well-being is dependent upon how the family and child cope with the unique challenges inherent in FOT. Lastly, though considering FOT a legitimate method of family building, given the global population crisis the wisdom of procreational rights will be challenged. Inherent to this challenge is a re-evaluation of the treatment of infertility as a significant disease necessitating remedy. PMID:8558545

  16. Fetal laser therapy: applications in the management of fetal pathologies.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Jérôme; Raio, Luigi; Baud, David

    2015-07-01

    Fetoscopic coagulation of placental anastomoses is the treatment of choice for severe twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome. In the present day, fetal laser therapy is also used to treat amniotic bands, chorioangiomas, sacrococcygeal teratomas, lower urinary tract obstructions and chest masses, all of which will be reviewed in this article. Amniotic band syndrome can cause limb amputation by impairing downstream blood flow. Large chorioangiomas (>4 cm), sacrococcygeal teratomas or fetal hyperechoic lung lesions can lead to fetal compromise and hydrops by vascular steal phenomenon or compression. Renal damage, bladder dysfunction and lastly death because of pulmonary hypolasia may be the result of megacystis caused by a posterior urethral valve. The prognosis of these pathologies can be dismal, and therapy options are limited, which has brought fetal laser therapy to the forefront. Management options discussed here are laser release of amniotic bands, laser coagulation of the placental or fetal tumor feeding vessels and laser therapy by fetal cystoscopy. This review, largely based on case reports, does not intend to provide a level of evidence supporting laser therapy over other treatment options. Centralized evaluation by specialists using strict selection criteria and long-term follow-up of these rare cases are now needed to prove the value of endoscopic or ultrasound-guided laser therapy.

  17. Congenital heart block with hydrops fetalis treated with high-dose dexamethasone; a case report.

    PubMed

    Chua, S; Ostman-Smith, I; Sellers, S; Redman, C W

    1991-11-26

    A 32-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus was found to have a fetus with heart block and fetal ascites at 23 weeks gestation. Treatment with high-dose corticosteroids ameliorated the early signs of heart failure, although the fetal heart rate gradually fell from 48 beats/min to 42 beats/min by 34 weeks. Sudden deterioration of the fetal state occurred at 35 weeks, and this only partially responded to digitalisation. Neonatal death occurred on Day 18 from the consequences of severe birth asphyxia. The relationship and pathogenesis of anti-Ro antibodies, congenital heart block and hydrops fetals are discussed, together with the in utero management of this condition. PMID:1765211

  18. Fetal growth according to different reference ranges in twin pregnancies with placental insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Julianny Cavalheiro Nery; Liao, Adolfo Wenjaw; de Lourdes Brizot, Maria; Miyadahira, Mariana; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli Vieira; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different fetal growth curves in twin pregnancies with severe placental insufficiency. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis of 47 twin pregnancies with absent or reverse end diastolic flow in the umbilical artery of one fetus was performed. Pregnancies with major fetal abnormalities, twin-twin transfusion or three or more fetuses were not included. The estimated fetal weight zeta-scores were calculated for both fetuses (abnormal Doppler and co-twin) according to the following criteria: Hadlock, Liao and Araújo. The abdominal circumference zeta-scores were calculated according to Hadlock, Liao, Araújo, Ong and Stirrup. The mean estimates of the zeta-score values were calculated using generalized estimating equation regression analysis. The mean gestational age at inclusion was 27.4±4.7 weeks. The fetal sex and the interaction Doppler findings × criteria correlated significantly with the zeta-score values (p<0.001 for both variables). The estimated fetal weight mean zeta-scores (standard error) according to each criteria were as follows: Hadlock - abnormal Doppler: -2.98 (0.18), co-twin: -1.16 (0.15); Liao - abnormal Doppler: -2.89 (0.24), co-twin: -0.58 (0.19); and Araújo - abnormal Doppler: -3.05 (0.29), co-twin: -0.75 (0.18). Values for abdominal circumference were as follows: Hadlock - abnormal Doppler: -3.14 (0.26), co-twin: -1.13 (0.19); Liao - abnormal Doppler: -2.63 (0.27), co-twin: -0.42 (0.19); Araújo - abnormal Doppler: -2.44 (0.22), co-twin: -0.71 (0.14); Ong - abnormal Doppler: -3.36 (0.34), co-twin: -1.48 (0.23); and Stirrup AD -- -2.36 (0.14), co-twin: -1.18 (0.10). Sex- and plurality-specific charts should be used in the evaluation of fetal growth in twin pregnancies with placental insufficiency. PMID:26735222

  19. The role of ultrasound in the diagnosis of fetal genetic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Shayna N.; Longman, Ryan E.; Cahill, Alison G.

    2014-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in the prenatal diagnosis of fetal genetic syndromes is rapidly evolving. Advancing technology and new research findings are aiding in the increased accuracy of ultrasound-based diagnosis in combination with other methods of non-invasive and invasive fetal testing. Ultrasound as a screening tool for aneuploidy and other anomalies is increasingly being used throughout pregnancy, beginning in the first trimester. Given the number of recorded syndromes, it is important to identify patterns and establish a strategy for identifying abnormalities on ultrasound. These syndromes encompass a wide range of causes from viral, substance-linked, chromosomal, and other genetic syndromes. Despite the ability of those experienced in ultrasound, it is important to note that not all fetal genetic syndromes can be identified prenatally, and even common syndromes often have no associated ultrasound findings. Here, we review the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis of fetal genetic syndromes. PMID:24534428

  20. Placental Dysfunction and Fetal Programming: The Importance of Placental Size, Shape, Histopathology, and Molecular Composition

    PubMed Central

    Longtine, Mark S.; Nelson, D. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Normal function of the placenta is pivotal for optimal fetal growth and development. Fetal programming commonly is associated with placental dysfunction that predisposes to obstetric complications and .suboptimal fetal outcomes. We consider several clinical phenotypes for placental dysfunction that likely predispose to fetal programming. Some of these reflect abnormal development of the chorioallantoic placenta in size, shape, or histopathology. Others result when exogenous stressors in the maternal environment combine with maladaptation of the placental response to yield small placentas with limited reserve, as typical of early-onset intrauterine growth restriction and preeclampsia. Still others reflect epigenetic changes, including altered expression of imprinted genes, altered enzymatic activity, or altered efficiencies in nutrient transport. Although the human placenta is a transient organ that persists only 9 months, the effects of this organ on the offspring remain for a lifetime. PMID:21710395