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Sample records for abnormal formation pressures

  1. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  2. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  3. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  4. Major influencing factors of water flooding in abnormally high-pressure carbonate reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingying, Hou; Kaiyuan, Chen; Zifei, Fan; Libing, Fu; Yefei, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The higher pressure coefficient is the major characteristics of the abnormal high pressure carbonate reservoirs, which the pressure coefficient generally exceeds 1.2 and the initial formation pressure is higher than normal sandstone reservoirs. Due to the large pressure difference between initial formation and saturated pressure, oil wells are capable to production with high flow rate by the natural energy at early production stage. When the formation pressure drops to the saturation pressure, the water or gas is usually injected to stabilize the well productivity and sustain the formation pressure. Based on the characteristics of Kenkiak oilfield, a typical abnormal high pressure carbonate reservoir, a well group model is designed to simulate and analyze the influence factors on water flooding. The conclusion is that permeability, interlayer difference and reserve abundance are the main three factors on the water flooding development in these reservoirs.

  5. Postoperative chronic pressure abnormalities in the vitreon study.

    PubMed

    Adile, S L; Peyman, G A; Greve, M D; Millsap, C M; Verma, L K; Wafapoor, H; Soheilian, M

    1994-01-01

    Perfluoroperhydrophenanthrene (Vitreon) was used as an intraoperative hydrokinetic retinal manipulator, followed by C3F8 or SF6 gases, silicone oil, or Vitreon as postoperative tamponading agents in 234 eyes. Two chronic intraoperative pressure abnormalities were defined: hypotony (5 mm Hg or less) and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) (25 mm Hg or more at three or more postoperative visits). Postoperatively, 28 eyes (12%) had chronically elevated IOP, and 41 (18%) had chronic hypotony. There was no significant difference in the incidence of abnormal IOP among the groups of eyes in which the various tamponading agents had been used. In particular, the use of Vitreon as an intraoperative tool or as a short-term tamponade did not affect the incidence of chronic abnormal IOP any more than did the use of silicone oil, C3F8, or SF6 as tamponading agents.

  6. Pressure induced polymerization of Formates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschauner, Oliver

    2004-03-01

    The discovery of pressure induced polymerization of CO2 inspired us to search for C-O based chain structures forming at high pressure. We used salts of carboxylic acids as starting materials and exposed them to pressures between 10 and 30 GPa. Upon heating to temperatures above 1800 K we observed deprotonation and significant changes in the Raman shifts of C-O streching modes. Structure analysis based on powder diffraction patterns collected at sector 16 of the APS showed formation of extended C-O chain structures with the cations of the salts residing in the interchain spaces. These new high pressure polymers are interesting by their mechanical strength and provide basic molecular patterns of organic metallic conductors.

  7. Cerebral perfusion pressure and abnormal intracranial pressure wave forms: their relation to outcome in birth asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Raju, T N; Vidyasagar, D; Papazafiratou, C

    1981-06-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) studies were carried out in 14 infants with severe birth asphyxia and brain damage. A markedly low cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was noted in infants who died and in 1 infant who survived with cerebral palsy. The long-term ICP tracing revealed negative waves and plateau waves in 2 infants. Cushing response was noted in 2 infants who had elevated ICP. The value and significance of evaluated CPP and of abnormal waveforms are discussed.

  8. Development of abnormal fluid pressures beneath a ramping thrust sheet: Where's the evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltschko, D.V.; Smith, R.E. . Dept. of Geology and Center for Tectonophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Many models for the mechanics of fold and thrust belts hold that fluid pressure is locally, or even everywhere, abnormal, thus aiding both internal deformation and motion along the base. Recent support comes from studies of accretionary prisms where drill-stem measurements of both fluid flow in fault zones and formation pressure are pointed to as evidence for a hydrodynamic system characterized by wide-spread excess fluid pressure. However, despite the general acceptance of high fluid pressure (Pf) as a potentially important controlling mechanism for thrust motion, and despite nearly 30 years of looking, direct evidence for abnormal fluid pressure in ancient continental thrust belts is either rare or ambiguous. The authors have developed a two-dimensional model for the evolution of fluid pressure within and beneath a ramping thrust sheet. In the model, the fluid and heat flow equations are solved and applied at each time step. The model accounts for porosity compaction, thermal pressuring, and fluid flow. Results of this model show, first, that high fluid pressure can be developed during deposition, before thrust motion. The authors used typical rates of deposition, duration of deposition, and a simplified three-layer stratigraphy for North American thrust belts. Second, the models show that high Pf can be maintained and/or further enhanced during thrusting depending upon the permeabilities assigned to the model hydrostratigraphic section. Of the rock properties studied in detail, modes are most sensitive to permeability. Nevertheless, the models show that for best guesses of the relevant rock properties it should be possible to find evidence for high fluid pressure in, (1) the crests of ramp anticlines and, (2) the toe region, especially in the lower plate.

  9. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOEpatents

    Stegemeier, George Leo [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  10. Vagal enhancement linking abnormal blood pressure response and subendocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Sugihara, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    An abnormal blood pressure response to exercise has been reported to be associated with left ventricular subendocardial ischemia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We report a case of HCM with an abnormal blood pressure response and subendocardial ischemia, in which the analysis of heart rate variability revealed exercise-induced vagal enhancement. The present case highlights the possible mechanism linking abnormal blood pressure response and left ventricular subendocardial ischemia in patients with HCM.

  11. Quantification of abnormal intracranial pressure waves and isotope cisternography for diagnosis of occult communicating hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, E.R.; Piatek, D.; Del Bigio, M.R.; Stambrook, M.; Sutherland, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen consecutive patients with suspected occult communicating hydrocephalus were investigated by means of clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, isotope cisternography, computed tomography scanning, and continuous intracranial pressure monitoring. Semi-quantitative grading systems were used in the evaluation of the clinical, neuropsychological, and cisternographic assessments. Clinical examination, neuropsychological testing, and computed tomography scanning were repeated 3 months after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. All patients showed abnormal intracranial pressure waves and all improved after shunting. There was close correlation between number, peak, and pulse pressures of B waves and the mean intracranial pressure. However, quantification of B waves by means of number, frequency, and amplitude did not help in predicting the degree of clinical improvement postshunting. The most sensitive predictor of favorable response to shunting was enlargement of the temporal horns on computed tomography scan. Furthermore, the size of temporal horns correlated with mean intracranial pressure. There was no correlation between abnormalities on isotope cisternography and clinical improvement.

  12. Distribution of pressure-induced fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate optic nerve. An autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1981-07-01

    The distribution of transport abnormalities in primate optic nerve from eyes subjected to five hours of pressure elevation (perfusion pressure of 35 mm Hg) was studied. Tissue autoradiography and electron microscopy were used to localize regions of the lamina cribrosa with increased transport interruption. A preferential involvement by this transport abnormality involved the superior, temporal, and inferior portions, to the exclusion of the nasal portion, of the optic nerve head. This observation supports the hypothesis that transport interruption seen in this model may be pertinent to the study of clinical glaucomatous neuropathy.

  13. Intra-Ocular Pressure Measurement in a Patient with a Thin, Thick or Abnormal Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Colin I.; Parker, Douglas G.A.; Goldberg, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurement of intra-ocular pressure is a fundamental component of the ocular examination. The most common method of measuring IOP is by Goldmann applanation tonometry, the accuracy of which is influenced by the thickness and biomechanical properties of the cornea. Algorithms devised to correct for corneal thickness to estimate IOP oversimplify the effects of corneal biomechanics. The viscous and elastic properties of the cornea influence IOP measurements in unpredictable ways, a finding borne out in studies of patients with inherently abnormal and surgically altered corneal biomechanics. Dynamic contour tonometry, rebound tonometry and the ocular response analyzer provide useful alternatives to GAT in patients with abnormal corneas, such as those who have undergone laser vision correction or keratoplasty. This article reviews the various methods of intra-ocular pressure measurement available to the clinician and the ways in which their utility is influenced by variations in corneal thickness and biomechanics. PMID:27014386

  14. Formation of abnormal structures and their effects on the ductility of eutectoid steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kang-Suk; Jeong, Shin Woong; Bea, Hyeong Jun; Nam, Won Jong

    2016-11-01

    The formation of abnormal structures and their effects on reduction of area (RA) were investigated in eutectoid steels transformed at different temperatures ranging from 560 °C-650 °C. The occurrence of abnormal structures, such as upper bainite, degenerate pearlite, free ferrite, and grain boundary cementite, was confirmed. The volume fraction of upper bainite and degenerate pearlite decreased on increasing the transformation temperature, while the amount of free ferrite increased. As the transformation temperature increased, RA increased, reached a maximum, and then decreased, while the tensile strength continuously decreased. The crack formations during the tensile test could be classified into three types: tearing, shear cracking, and void formation/ coalescence. The decrease of the ductility at low transformation temperatures was attributed to the increased amount of upper bainite and degenerate pearlite, since the formation of cracks occurred by tearing interfaces or by void formation at abnormal structures during the tensile test. Meanwhile, the decrease in RA at high transformation temperatures was attributed to the occurrence of shear cracking rather than the presence of abnormal structures.

  15. Abnormally high fluid pressures in the region of the Coalinga earthquake sequence and their significance

    SciTech Connect

    Yerkes, R.F.; Levine, P.; Wentworth, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Abnormally high fluid pressures (AHP's) permitted or aided thrusting of buried tectonic wedges of Franciscan assemblage eastward beneath coeval Great Valley sequence onto mafic basement and thus contributed to the 1983 Coalinga earthquake sequence. Much of the southwestern San Joaquin Valley and adjoining parts of the Diablo Range are underlain by rocks with pressure/depth (P/D) ratios near or greater than 0.5 psi/ft (the hydrostatic gradient for oil-field waters is about 0.47 psi/ft). Plots of P/D ratio versus depth for more than 300 wells show an average ratio of about 0.6 psi/ft above 14,000-ft depth, a lower bound of 0.47 psi/ft, and an upper bound greater than 0.9 psi/ft; ratios greater than 0.60 psi/ft are interpreted to be abnormally high. Several likely sources of AHP's are recognized, but their relative contributions cannot be determined. Chief of these sources are diagenetic-metamorphic generation of fluids in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks, compaction disequilibrium and aquathermal pressuring in Tertiary strata, and horizontal tectonic compression. Yerkes, Levine, and Wentworth infer the presence of near-lithostatic fluid pressures in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks below the Coalinga anticline on the basis of (1) a mapped seismic low-velocity zone; (2) active generation of metamorphic fluids in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks, which pond below relatively impermeable layers and thus increase fluid pressure; and (3) apparent southward and westward propagation of the 1983 main-shock rupture, which indicates rupture on a gently southwest dipping surface and implies an inverse relation between depth and crustal strength.

  16. Prediction of subsidence: Relationship between lowering of formation pressure and subsidence due to fluid withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Serebryakov, V.A.; Chilingar, G.V.

    2000-06-01

    Abnormally low formation pressures develop in petroleum reservoirs during intensive oil and gas production or in aquifers as a result of water extraction. A simple method is presented for calculating (predicting) the amount of compaction (and resulting subsidence) from the pressure drop in formation due to production, i.e., the increase in the effective pressure p{sub e} (p{sub e} = p{sub t} {minus} p{sub p}, where p{sub t} is the total overburden pressure and p{sub p} is the fluid or pore pressure). This work is based on extensive data collected in Russia. For example, large petroliferous areas in Western Siberia became marshlands as a result of fluid withdrawal. One should remember that sophisticated methods, such as FSMT (direct measurement of rock compaction by wireline tools in situ) and GPS (measurement of surface subsidence by satellite microwave Doppler techniques), are not yet available in many areas of the world.

  17. Abnormalities of plantar pressure distribution in early, intermediate, and late stages of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Isabel C N; Hamamoto, Adriana N; Tonicelli, Lucas M G; Watari, Ricky; Ortega, Neli R S; Sartor, Cristina D

    2014-09-01

    Inconsistent findings with regard to plantar pressure while walking in the diabetic population may be due to the heterogeneity of the studied groups resulting from the classification/grouping criteria adopted. The clinical diagnosis and classification of diabetes have inherent uncertainties that compromise the definition of its onset and the differentiation of its severity stages. A fuzzy system could improve the precision of the diagnosis and classification of diabetic neuropathy because it takes those uncertainties into account and combines different assessment methods. Here, we investigated how plantar pressure abnormalities evolve throughout different severity stages of diabetic polyneuropathy (absent, n=38; mild, n=20; moderate, n=47; severe, n=24). Pressure distribution was analysed over five areas while patients walked barefoot. Patients with mild neuropathy displayed an increase in pressure-time integral at the forefoot and a lower peak pressure at the heel. The peak and pressure-time integral under the forefoot and heel were aggravated in later stages of the disease (moderate and severe) compared with early stages of the disease (absent and mild). In the severe group, lower pressures at the lateral forefoot and hallux were observed, which could be related to symptoms that develop with the aggravation of neuropathy: atrophy of the intrinsic foot muscles, reduction of distal muscle activity, and joint stiffness. Although there were clear alterations over the forefoot and in a number of plantar areas with higher pressures within each severity stage, they did not follow the aggravation evolution of neuropathy classified by the fuzzy model. Based on these results, therapeutic interventions should begin in the early stages of this disease to prevent further consequences of the disease.

  18. Implications of perennial saline springs for abnormally high fluid pressures and active thrusting in western California

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, J.R.; Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.; Moores, E.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Perennial saline springs in the Rumsey Hills area, southwestern Sacramento Valley, California, locally discharge at high elevations and near ridgetops. The springs are cold, are commonly associated with natural gas seeps, and typically emerge along west-vergent thrust faults. Stable isotope analyses indicate that the spring waters are similar to oil-field formation fluids and they have had a significant residence time in the subsurface at moderate temperatures. The nonmeteoric character of the springs demonstrates that they are not being fed by perched water tables. The authors propose that these subsurface formation waters are being forced to the surface by anomalously high porefluid pressures. The Rumsey Hills area is one of Quaternary uplift, thrusting, and crustal shortening, and prospect wells drilled there have encountered anomalously high fluid pressures at shallow depths. They attribute these high fluid pressures to active tectonic compression and shortening of Cretaceous marine sedimentary rocks. The widespread occurrence of anomalously high pore-fluid pressures and perennial saline springs in the Coast Ranges and western Great Valley suggests that much of western California may be characterized as a seismically active, overpressured thrust belt. The emergence of formation waters along thrust faults further suggests that patterns of subsurface fluid flow in western California may be similar to those in overpressured accretionary prisms, and that excess fluid pressures may also play a role in the distribution of seismicity.

  19. Effects of expected-value information and display format on recognition of aircraft subsystem abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Michael T.; Abbott, Kathy H.

    1994-01-01

    This study identifies improved methods to present system parameter information for detecting abnormal conditions and to identify system status. Two workstation experiments were conducted. The first experiment determined if including expected-value-range information in traditional parameter display formats affected subject performance. The second experiment determined if using a nontraditional parameter display format, which presented relative deviation from expected value, was better than traditional formats with expected-value ranges included. The inclusion of expected-value-range information onto traditional parameter formats was found to have essentially no effect. However, subjective results indicated support for including this information. The nontraditional column deviation parameter display format resulted in significantly fewer errors compared with traditional formats with expected-value-ranges included. In addition, error rates for the column deviation parameter display format remained stable as the scenario complexity increased, whereas error rates for the traditional parameter display formats with expected-value ranges increased. Subjective results also indicated that the subjects preferred this new format and thought that their performance was better with it. The column deviation parameter display format is recommended for display applications that require rapid recognition of out-of-tolerance conditions, especially for a large number of parameters.

  20. Effect of a novel calcium channel blocker on abnormal nocturnal blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi; Nariyama, Jin; Kido, Hidenori; Ando, Shin-ichi; Takiuchi, Shin; Eguchi, Kazuo; Niijima, Yawara; Ando, Toshiaki; Noda, Makoto

    2013-07-01

    The authors examined the effect of cilnidipine, a unique L/N-type calcium channel blocker, on abnormal nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping in Japanese hypertensive patients in the real world. The Ambulatory Blood Pressure Control and Home Blood Pressure (Morning and Evening) Lowering by N-Channel Blocker Cilnidipine (ACHIEVE-ONE), a large-scale clinical study, was designed to evaluate the effects of cilnidipine in daily medical practice. Among the study, 24-hour ambulatory BP data were obtained from 615 patients and classified according to their nocturnal dipping status as extreme dippers, dippers, nondippers, or risers. A 12-week treatment with cilnidipine significantly reduced 24-hour BP in all groups (P<.001). Changes in nocturnal systolic BP (SBP) from baseline were -17.9 mm Hg from 154.6 mm Hg in risers and -11.9 mm Hg from 142.1 mm Hg, -6.6 mm Hg from 128.5 mm Hg, and 0.1 mm Hg from 115.8 mm Hg in nondippers, dippers, and extreme dippers, respectively. Changes from baseline in nocturnal SBP reduction rate were 8.2% in risers (P<.001) but -7.0% in extreme dippers (P<.001), while no change was observed in the nighttime SBP reduction rate for the total patients (-0.2%±9.6%, P=.617). Cilnidipine partially, but significantly, restored abnormal nocturnal dipping status toward a normal dipping pattern in hypertensive patients.

  1. Abnormal shortened diastolic time length at increasing heart rates in patients with abnormal exercise-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The degree of pulmonary hypertension is not independently related to the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction but is frequently associated with diastolic filling abnormalities. The aim of this study was to assess diastolic times at increasing heart rates in normal and in patients with and without abnormal exercise-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure (PASP). Methods. We enrolled 109 patients (78 males, age 62 ± 13 years) referred for exercise stress echocardiography and 16 controls. The PASP was derived from the tricuspid Doppler tracing. A cut-off value of PASP ≥ 50 mmHg at peak stress was considered as indicative of abnormal increase in PASP. Diastolic times and the diastolic/systolic time ratio were recorded by a precordial cutaneous force sensor based on a linear accelerometer. Results At baseline, PASP was 30 ± 5 mmHg in patients and 25 ± 4 in controls. At peak stress the PASP was normal in 95 patients (Group 1); 14 patients (Group 2) showed an abnormal increase in PASP (from 35 ± 4 to 62 ± 12 mmHg; P < 0.01). At 100 bpm, an abnormal (< 1) diastolic/systolic time ratio was found in 0/16 (0%) controls, in 12/93 (13%) Group 1 and 7/14 (50%) Group 2 patients (p < 0.05 between groups). Conclusion The first and second heart sound vibrations non-invasively monitored by a force sensor are useful for continuously assessing diastolic time during exercise. Exercise-induced abnormal PASP was associated with reduced diastolic time at heart rates beyond 100 beats per minute. PMID:22104611

  2. Ram pressure induced star formation in Abell 3266

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonsall, Brittany

    An X-ray observation of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3266 was obtained via the ROSAT PSPC. This information, along with spectroscopic data from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-clusters Survey (i.e. WINGS), were used to investigate whether ram pressure is a mechanism that influences star formation. Galaxies exhibiting ongoing star formation are identified by the presence of strong Balmer lines (Hbeta), known to correspond to early type stars. Older galaxies where a rapid increase in star formation has recently ceased, known as E+A galaxies, are identified by strong Hbeta absorption coupled with little to no [OII] emission. The correlation between recent star formation and "high" ram pressure, as defined by Kapferer et al. (2009) as ≥ 5 x 10-11 dyn cm-2, was tested and lead to a contradiction of the previously held belief that ram pressure influences star formation on the global cluster scale.

  3. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  4. Pressure-induced fast axonal transport abnormalities and the anatomy at the lamina cribrosa in primate eyes.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1983-03-01

    In ten owl monkey eyes (Aotus trivirgatus) the location of pressure-induced (perfusion pressure 35 mmHg) axonal transport abnormalities was determined by the examination of serial step cross-section tissue radio autographs from the optic nerve head. The degree of the local transport interruption did not correlate with the fiber bundle cross-section area, the shape of the laminar pores or the density of the inter-bundle septa in that region.

  5. Basaltic Pressure Ridges: Formation and Relationship to Flow Emplacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theilig, E.

    1985-01-01

    Pressure ridges and pressure plateau are common but not ubiquitous surface features on terrestrial basaltic lava flows and may reflect a specific flow emplacement mechanism. Many of the ridges are large enough to be detected on high-resolution orbital images; therefore, understanding these features could provide a means for interpreting volcanic flows on the mechanism of pressure ridge formation and how their formation relates to flow emplacement. Results from detailed field studies indicate that pressure ridges and plateaus: (1) are emplaced as individual flow lobes, (2) can be composed of primary or secondary material, (3) are dependent on duration and volume of activity within the flow unit, (4) are penecontemporaneous in formation, and (5) are indicative of slowly advancing flows with numerous flow lobes continuously forming and overriding each other.

  6. Bundle critical power predictions under normal and abnormal conditions in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.S.; Pei, B.S. ); Lee, C.H. )

    1992-06-01

    In this paper a new approach to bundle critical power predictions is presented. In addition to a very accurate critical heat flux (CHF) model, correction factors that account for the effects of grid spacers, heat flux non-uniformities, and cold walls, which are needed for critical power predictions for practical fuel bundles, are developed. By using the subchannel analysis code COBRA IIIC/MIT-1, local flow conditions needed as input to CHF correlations are obtained. Critical power is therefore obtained iteratively to ensure that the bundle power value from the subchannel analysis will cause CHF at only one point in the bundle. Good agreement with the experimental data is obtained. The accuracy is higher than that of the W-3 and EPRI-1 correlations for the limited data base used in this study. The effects of three types of fuel abnormalities, namely, local heat flux spikes, local flow blockages, and rod bowing, on bundle critical power are also analyzed. The local heat flux spikes and flow blockages have no significant influence on critical power. However, rod bowing phenomena have some effect, the severity of which depends on system pressure, the gap closure between adjacent rods, and the presence or absence of thimble tubes (cold walls). A correlation for the influence of various rod bowing phenomena on bundle critical power is developed. Good agreement with experimental data is shown.

  7. Abnormal Pressure Pain, Touch Sensitivity, Proprioception, and Manual Dexterity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Inmaculada; Hatem, Samar M.

    2016-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often display an abnormal reactivity to tactile stimuli, altered pain perception, and lower motor skills than healthy children. Nevertheless, these motor and sensory deficits have been mostly assessed by using clinical observation and self-report questionnaires. The present study aims to explore somatosensory and motor function in children with ASD by using standardized and objective testing procedures. Methods. Tactile and pressure pain thresholds in hands and lips, stereognosis, proprioception, and fine motor performance of the upper limbs were assessed in high-functioning children with ASD (n = 27) and compared with typically developing peers (n = 30).  Results. Children with ASD showed increased pain sensitivity, increased touch sensitivity in C-tactile afferents innervated areas, and diminished fine motor performance and proprioception compared to healthy children. No group differences were observed for stereognosis. Conclusion. Increased pain sensitivity and increased touch sensitivity in areas classically related to affective touch (C-tactile afferents innervated areas) may explain typical avoiding behaviors associated with hypersensitivity. Both sensory and motor impairments should be assessed and treated in children with ASD. PMID:26881091

  8. Cardiovascular abnormalities with normal blood pressure in tissue kallikrein-deficient mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneton, Pierre; Bloch-Faure, May; Hagege, Albert A.; Ruetten, Hartmut; Huang, Wei; Bergaya, Sonia; Ceiler, Debbie; Gehring, Doris; Martins, Isabelle; Salmon, Georges; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Nussberger, Jürg; Crozatier, Bertrand; Gasc, Jean-Marie; Heudes, Didier; Bruneval, Patrick; Doetschman, Tom; Ménard, Joël; Alhenc-Gelas, François

    2001-02-01

    Tissue kallikrein is a serine protease thought to be involved in the generation of bioactive peptide kinins in many organs like the kidneys, colon, salivary glands, pancreas, and blood vessels. Low renal synthesis and urinary excretion of tissue kallikrein have been repeatedly linked to hypertension in animals and humans, but the exact role of the protease in cardiovascular function has not been established largely because of the lack of specific inhibitors. This study demonstrates that mice lacking tissue kallikrein are unable to generate significant levels of kinins in most tissues and develop cardiovascular abnormalities early in adulthood despite normal blood pressure. The heart exhibits septum and posterior wall thinning and a tendency to dilatation resulting in reduced left ventricular mass. Cardiac function estimated in vivo and in vitro is decreased both under basal conditions and in response to βadrenergic stimulation. Furthermore, flow-induced vasodilatation is impaired in isolated perfused carotid arteries, which express, like the heart, low levels of the protease. These data show that tissue kallikrein is the main kinin-generating enzyme in vivo and that a functional kallikrein-kinin system is necessary for normal cardiac and arterial function in the mouse. They suggest that the kallikrein-kinin system could be involved in the development or progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Ozone formation in pulsed SDBD in a wide pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Nudnova, Maryia; mipt Team

    2011-10-01

    Ozone concentration in surface anode-directed DBD for wide pressure range (150 - 1300 torr) was experimentally measured. Voltage and pressure effect were investigated. Reduced electric field was measured for anode-directed and cathode-directed SDBD. E/n values in cathode-directed SDBD is higher than in cathode-directed on 50 percent at atmospheric pressure. E/n value increase leads to decrease the rate of oxygen dissociation and Ozone formation at lower pressures. Radiating region thickness of sliding discharge was measured. Typical thickness of radiating zone is 0.4-1.0 mm within pressure range 220-740 torr. It was shown that high-voltage pulsed nanosecond discharge due to high E/n value produces less Ozone with compare to other discharges. Kinetic model was proposed to describe Ozone formation in the pulsed nanosecond SDBD.

  10. Carotid Atherosclerosis, Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure, and Retinal Vessel Diameters: The Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities in Community Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing Yan; Yang, Xuan; Li, Yang; Xu, Jie; Zhou, Yong; Wang, An Xin; Gao, Xiang; Xu, Liang; Wu, Shou Ling; Wei, Wen Bin; Zhao, Xing Quan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess relationships between carotid artery atherosclerosis and retinal arteriolar and venular diameters. Methods The community-based longitudinal Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community Study (APAC) included a sub-population of the Kailuan study which consisted of 101,510 employees and retirees of a coal mining industry. Based on the Chinese National Census 2010 and excluding individuals with history of cerebrovascular ischemic events, 4004 individuals were included into the APAC. All participants underwent a detailed clinical examination including blood laboratory tests and carotid artery duplex ultrasound examination. The cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) was estimated using the formula: CSFP[mmHg] = 0.44xBody Mass Index[kg/m2]+0.16xDiastolic Blood Pressure[mmHg]–0.18 x Age[Years]–1.91. Results In multivariable analysis (goodness of fit r2:0.12), thicker retinal arteries were associated with a thinner common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) (P = 0.002; standardized regression coefficient beta:-0.06; non-standardized regression coefficient B:-6.92;95% confidence interval (CI):-11.2,-2.61) after adjusting for thicker retinal nerve fiber layer (P<0.001;beta:0.18;B:0.35;95%CI:0.28,0.42), lower diastolic blood pressure (P<0.001;beta:-0.16;B:-0.17;95%CI:-0.21,-0.3), younger age (P<0.001;beta:-0.08; B:-0.16;95%;CI:-0.25,-0.08), and less abdominal circumference (P = 0.003;beta:-0.06;B:-0.11;95%CI:-0.18,-0.03). Thicker retinal vein diameter was associated (r = 0.40) with higher estimated CSFP (P<0.001;beta:0.09;B:0.78;95%CI:0.47,1.08) after adjusting for wider retinal arteries (P<0.001;beta:0.27;B:0.36;95%CI:0.31,0.41), thicker retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (P = 0.03;beta:0.22;B:0.56;95%CI:0.46,0.65) and male gender (P<0.001;beta:-0.08;B:-3.98;95%CI:-5.88,2.09). Conclusions Thinner retinal artery diameter was significantly, however weakly, associated with increased common carotid artery IMT. It suggests that retinal

  11. Pericellular innervation of neurons expressing abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampal formation of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Defelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered.

  12. Pericellular Innervation of Neurons Expressing Abnormally Hyperphosphorylated Tau in the Hippocampal Formation of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered. PMID:20631843

  13. Magnetically Orchestrated Formation of Diamond at Lower Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Reginald B.; Lochner, Eric; Goddard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Man's curiosity and fascination with diamonds date back to ancient times. The knowledge of the many properties of diamond is recorded during Biblical times. Antoine Lavoisier determined the composition of diamond by burning in O2 to form CO2. With the then existing awareness of graphite as carbon, the race began to convert graphite to diamond. The selective chemical synthesis of diamond has been pursued by Cagniard, Hannay, Moisson and Parson. On the basis of the thermodynamically predicted equilibrium line of diamond and graphite, P W Bridgman attempted extraordinary conditions of high temperature (>2200°C) and pressure (>100,000 atm) for the allotropic conversion of graphite to diamond. H T Hall was the first to successfully form bulk diamond by realizing the kinetic restrictions to Bridgman's (thermodynamic) high pressure high temperature direct allotropic conversion. Moreover, Hall identified catalysts for the faster kinetics of diamond formation. H M Strong determined the import of the liquid catalyst during Hall's catalytic synthesis. W G Eversole discovered the slow metastable low pressure diamond formation by pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition with the molecular hydrogen etching of the rapidly forming stable graphitic carbon. J C Angus determined the import of atomic hydrogen for faster etching for faster diamond growth at low pressure. S Matsumoto has developed plasma and hot filament technology for faster hydrogen and carbon radical generations at low pressure for faster diamond formation. However the metastable low pressure chemical vapor depositions by plasma and hot filament are prone to polycrystalline films. From Bridgman to Hall to Eversole, Angus and Matsumoto, much knowledge has developed of the importance of pressure, temperature, transition metal catalyst, liquid state of metal (metal radicals atoms) and the carbon radical intermediates for diamond synthesis. Here we advance this understanding of diamond formation by demonstrating the external

  14. Pressure effect on soot formation in turbulent diffusion flames.

    PubMed

    Roditcheva, O V; Bai, X S

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation in a methane air turbulent jet diffusion flame is investigated numerically using a semi-empirical model. The temperature, density and species (the soot precursor C2H2) fields are calculated using detailed chemical kinetic mechanism based on the flamelet library approach. The influence of pressure on the soot formation and the behavior of the semi-empirical model in different flame situations are investigated. It is found that the flame shape and the flame temperature can be well predicted by the flamelet library approach. The calculated soot yield is mostly sensitive to the soot surface growth rate and the increase of pressure. The increase of pressure leads to the increase of soot surface growth rate and therefore to the increase of soot volume fraction. By adjusting a model constant in the soot surface growth rate, the soot emissions in both pressure p = 1 atm and p = 3 atm are properly simulated by the current semi-empirical soot model.

  15. Abnormal Ras signaling in Costello syndrome (CS) negatively regulates enamel formation

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Alice F.; Tidyman, William E.; Jheon, Andrew H.; Sharir, Amnon; Zheng, Xu; Charles, Cyril; Fagin, James A.; McMahon, Martin; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.; Ganss, Bernhard; Rauen, Katherine A.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2014-01-01

    RASopathies are syndromes caused by gain-of-function mutations in the Ras signaling pathway. One of these conditions, Costello syndrome (CS), is typically caused by an activating de novo germline mutation in HRAS and is characterized by a wide range of cardiac, musculoskeletal, dermatological and developmental abnormalities. We report that a majority of individuals with CS have hypo-mineralization of enamel, the outer covering of teeth, and that similar defects are present in a CS mouse model. Comprehensive analysis of the mouse model revealed that ameloblasts, the cells that generate enamel, lacked polarity, and the ameloblast progenitor cells were hyperproliferative. Ras signals through two main effector cascades, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. To determine through which pathway Ras affects enamel formation, inhibitors targeting either PI3K or MEK 1 and 2 (MEK 1/2), kinases in the MAPK pathway, were utilized. MEK1/2 inhibition rescued the hypo-mineralized enamel, normalized the ameloblast polarity defect and restored normal progenitor cell proliferation. In contrast, PI3K inhibition only corrected the progenitor cell proliferation phenotype. We demonstrate for the first time the central role of Ras signaling in enamel formation in CS individuals and present the mouse incisor as a model system to dissect the roles of the Ras effector pathways in vivo. PMID:24057668

  16. Comparison of differences in respiratory function and pressure as a predominant abnormal movement of children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hae-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine differences in respiratory function and pressure among three groups of children with cerebral palsy as a predominant abnormal movement which included spastic type, dyskinetic type, and ataxic type. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three children with cerebral palsy of 5–13 years of age in I–III levels according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System, the study subjects were divided by stratified random sampling into three groups of spastic type, dyskinetic type, and ataxic type. For reliability of the measurement results, respiratory function and pressure of the children with cerebral palsy were measured by the same inspector using Spirometer Pony FX (Cosmed Ltd., Italy) equipment, and the subject’s guardians (legal representative) was always made to observe. [Results] In the respiratory function, there were significant differences among three groups in all of forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at one second, and peak expiratory flow. For respiratory pressure, the maximal inspiratory pressure had significant differences among three groups, although the maximal expiratory pressure had no significant difference. [Conclusion] Therefore, pediatric physical therapists could be provided with important clinical information in understanding the differences in respiratory function and pressure for the children with cerebral palsy showing predominantly abnormal movement as a diverse qualitative characteristics of the muscle tone and movement patterns, and in planning intervention programs for improvement of respiratory capacity. PMID:28265153

  17. Comparison of differences in respiratory function and pressure as a predominant abnormal movement of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hae-Yeon

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine differences in respiratory function and pressure among three groups of children with cerebral palsy as a predominant abnormal movement which included spastic type, dyskinetic type, and ataxic type. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three children with cerebral palsy of 5-13 years of age in I-III levels according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System, the study subjects were divided by stratified random sampling into three groups of spastic type, dyskinetic type, and ataxic type. For reliability of the measurement results, respiratory function and pressure of the children with cerebral palsy were measured by the same inspector using Spirometer Pony FX (Cosmed Ltd., Italy) equipment, and the subject's guardians (legal representative) was always made to observe. [Results] In the respiratory function, there were significant differences among three groups in all of forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at one second, and peak expiratory flow. For respiratory pressure, the maximal inspiratory pressure had significant differences among three groups, although the maximal expiratory pressure had no significant difference. [Conclusion] Therefore, pediatric physical therapists could be provided with important clinical information in understanding the differences in respiratory function and pressure for the children with cerebral palsy showing predominantly abnormal movement as a diverse qualitative characteristics of the muscle tone and movement patterns, and in planning intervention programs for improvement of respiratory capacity.

  18. Abnormal tuning of saccade-related cells in pontine reticular formation of strabismic monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mustari, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus is a common disorder, characterized by a chronic misalignment of the eyes and numerous visual and oculomotor abnormalities. For example, saccades are often highly disconjugate. For humans with pattern strabismus, the horizontal and vertical disconjugacies vary with eye position. In monkeys, manipulations that disturb binocular vision during the first several weeks of life result in a chronic strabismus with characteristics that closely match those in human patients. Early onset strabismus is associated with altered binocular sensitivity of neurons in visual cortex. Here we test the hypothesis that brain stem circuits specific to saccadic eye movements are abnormal. We targeted the pontine paramedian reticular formation, a structure that directly projects to the ipsilateral abducens nucleus. In normal animals, neurons in this structure are characterized by a high-frequency burst of spikes associated with ipsiversive saccades. We recorded single-unit activity from 84 neurons from four monkeys (two normal, one exotrope, and one esotrope), while they made saccades to a visual target on a tangent screen. All 24 neurons recorded from the normal animals had preferred directions within 30° of pure horizontal. For the strabismic animals, the distribution of preferred directions was normal on one side of the brain, but highly variable on the other. In fact, 12/60 neurons recorded from the strabismic animals preferred vertical saccades. Many also had unusually weak or strong bursts. These data suggest that the loss of corresponding binocular vision during infancy impairs the development of normal tuning characteristics for saccade-related neurons in brain stem. PMID:26063778

  19. Pressure regimes and core formation in the accreting earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    Recent work suggests that a large degree of melting is required to segregate metal from silicates, suggesting a connection with the formation of magma oceans. At low pressures metallic liquids do not wet silicate minerals, preventing the metal from aggregating into large masses that can sink. At high pressures, above 25 GPa, the dihedral angles of grains in contact with oxygen-rich metallic liquids may be reduced enough to allow percolation of metal, but this has not been confirmed. Physical models of core formation and accretion may therefore involve the formation of magma oceans and the segregation of metal at both high and low pressures. Models of core formation involving different pressure regimes are discussed as well as chemical evidence bearing on the models. Available geophysical data is ambiguous. The nature of the 670 km boundary (chemical difference or strictly phase change) between the upper and lower mantle is in doubt. There is some evidence that plumes are derived from the lower mantle, and seismic tomography strongly indicates that penetration of subducting oceanic crust into the lower mantle, but the tomography data also indicates that the 670 km discontinuity is a significant barrier to general mantle convection. The presence of the D' layer at the base of the lower mantle could be a reaction zone between the mantle and core indicating core-mantle disequilibrium, or D' layer could be subducted material. The abundance of the siderophile elements in the mantle could provide clues to the importance of high pressure processes in Earth, but partition coefficients at high pressures are only beginning to be measured.

  20. Radiolysis gas formation and pressure increase during a criticality excursion

    SciTech Connect

    Barbry, F.; Rozain, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    During a criticality excursion occurring in fissile solution, most of the energy released is transformed into thermal heating and the formation of gas by radiolytic decomposition of water. In addition, for fast kinetics excursions, a pressure increase in the internal solution is observed. This pressure increases and hydrogen generation can pose a safety concern. To understand and to model these phenomena, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) Institute for Nuclear Protection and Safety has carried out specific experiments at the SILENE facility to: measure the pressure increase accompanying the power peak and determine the volume of radiolysis gas formed as a function of the energy and medium. These results are interrelated, and it should be possible to make use of pressure, energy, and radiolysis gas data to set up an equation of state of fissile solution and, consequently, to improve currently existing calculation models.

  1. Pressure regulates osteoclast formation and MCSF expression in marrow culture.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Biskobing, D; Fan, X; Rubin, C; McLeod, K; Taylor, W R

    1997-01-01

    One of the forces generated during skeletal loading is hydrostatic pressure. In the work presented here, the ability of increased pressure to influence recruitment of osteoclasts was evaluated. Murine marrow cultures, with pO2 and pCO2 kept constant, were subjected to either control (1.0 atm) or elevated (1.37 or 2.0 atm) hydrostatic pressure. As compared to control, cultures pressurized for 6 days at 1.37 atm formed less osteoclast-like cells (OCLC) (71 +/- 6% of control, P < 0.0001). A similar degree of inhibition occurred in cultures exposed to pressure during days 2-4 only (62 +/- 6%), while treatment during days 5-7 failed to inhibit the OCLC number relative to control (99 +/- 5%). Delivery of 2.0 atm pressure on days 2-4 generated 52 +/- 4% OCLC compared to control. Since macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCSF)-dependent proliferation of osteoclast precursors occurs during the pressure-sensitive period, semiquantitative RT-PCR for MCSF mRNA was performed after 3 days in 1.37 atm (days 2-4). As compared to controls, pressure caused a decrease in mRNA coding for the membrane bound form of MCSF (71.2 +/- 4% (n = 25, P < or = 0.05), while the MCSF RT-PCR product representing the secreted form showed no consistent change. This lack of response of the soluble MCSF RT-PCR product was expected, as levels of bioassayable MCSF were not altered by pressure. Extrapolating these data to in vivo conditions suggests that load-bearing will inhibit the formation of osteoclasts.

  2. Pressures in Tumuli: A Study of Tumuli Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.

    2005-01-01

    Tumuli form via localized inflation in surface lava flows. These domed features have widths of 10-20 m, lengths of 10-150 m, and heights of 1-9 m. The axial fracture exposes a brittle crust overlying a ductilely deformed layer. The total crustal thickness is typically less than lm. Tumuli are observed on both terrestrial and martian lava flow surfaces, and provide insight on the flow formation processes and rates. Past studies have estimated the inflation pressure using a bending model for a circular, thin elastic plate, assuming small deflection (Rossi and Gudmundson, 1996). This formulation results in unrealistic pressures for some tumuli. We thus examine alternative models, including those with different shapes, bending of the ductile crust, large deflection, plastic deformation, and thick plate bending. Using the thickness of the ductile crust in the equations for thin, circular plates reduces most pressures to reasonable values. Alternative plate shapes do not cause a significant reduction in inflation pressure. Although the large deflection equations should be applicable based on the plate thickness to tumuli height ratios, they give even less realistic pressures. Tumuli with unrealistic pressures appear to have exceeded the critical bending moment, and have relatively thick crusts, requiring thick plate bending models.

  3. 14 CFR 91.144 - Temporary restriction on flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL.... When any information indicates that barometric pressure on the route of flight currently exceeds...

  4. Interpreting fluid pressure anomalies in shallow intraplate argillaceous formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations have revealed several instances of apparently isolated highs or lows in pore fluid potential in shallow (< ~ 1 km depth) argillaceous formations in intraplate settings. Formations with the pressure anomalies are distinguished by (1) smaller ratios of hydraulic conductivity to formation thickness and (2) smaller hydraulic (or pressure) diffusivities than those without anomalies. This is consistent with transient Darcian flow caused by strain at rates of ~ 10−17 to 10-16 s-1, by significant perturbing events in the past 104 to 106 annum or by some combination of the two. Plausible causes include erosional downwasting, tectonic strain, and glaciation. In this conceptualization the anomalies provide constraints on formation-scale flow properties, flow history, and local geological forcing in the last 106 annum and in particular indicate zones of low permeability (10−19–10−22 m2) that could be useful for isolation of nuclear waste.

  5. Formation of silicon nanoparticles by a pressure induced nucleation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Myung-Koo; Kim, Si Joon; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2013-03-01

    Formation of silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs) was achieved using excimer laser crystallization of an amorphous Si (a-Si) thin film using a SiO2 capping layer (C/L) with improved thin-film transistor (TFT) performance due to the enlarged grain size of polycrystalline Si (poly-Si). After laser irradiation of an a-Si thin film covered with C/L, fluctuation in the surface morphology of the C/L was observed above the critical laser energy density (Ecr) with the formation of SiNPs. The grain size of the poly-Si layer after crystallization increased abruptly at the same time. A non-uniform pressure distribution beneath the SiO2 C/L was proposed for the initiation of nucleation, which is named pressure induced nucleation (PIN) mechanism. Following nucleation, the release of latent heat made it difficult for the remnant liquid Si to solidify and the volume increased due to the density difference between the liquid and solid Si. Consequently, the pressure on the liquid Si caused SiNPs to sprout through the SiO2 C/L as grains grew from the low temperature to high temperature point. This study offers not only a simple method to fabricate SiNPs with controllable size/density but also larger grain size with lower laser energy density, which leads to higher TFT performance.

  6. Neon-Bearing Ammonium Metal Formates: Formation and Behaviour under Pressure.

    PubMed

    Collings, Ines E; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Hanfland, Michael; Paliwoda, Damian; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia

    2016-11-04

    The incorporation of noble gas atoms, in particular neon, into the pores of network structures is very challenging due to the weak interactions they experience with the network solid. Using high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction, we demonstrate that neon atoms enter into the extended network of ammonium metal formates, thus forming compounds Nex [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ]. This phenomenon modifies the compressional and structural behaviours of the ammonium metal formates under pressure. The neon atoms can be clearly localised within the centre of [M(HCOO)3 ]5 cages and the total saturation of this site is achieved after ∼1.5 GPa. We find that by using argon as the pressure-transmitting medium, the inclusion inside [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] is inhibited due to the larger size of the argon. This study illustrates the size selectivity of [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] compounds between neon and argon insertion under pressure, and the effect of inclusion on the high-pressure behaviour of neon-bearing ammonium metal formates.

  7. FILAMENT FORMATION BY ESCHERICHIA COLI AT INCREASED HYDROSTATIC PRESSURES1

    PubMed Central

    Zobell, Claude E.; Cobet, Andre B.

    1964-01-01

    ZoBell, Claude E. (University of California, La Jolla), and Andre B. Cobet. Filament formation by Escherichia coli at increased hydrostatic pressures. J. Bacteriol. 87:710–719. 1964.—The reproduction as well as the growth of Escherichia coli is retarded by hydrostatic pressures ranging from 200 to 500 atm. Reproduction was indicated by an increase in the number of cells determined by plating on EMB Agar as well as by direct microscopic counts. Growth, which is not necessarily synonymous with reproduction, was indicated by increase in dry weight and protein content of the bacterial biomass. At increased pressures, cells of three different strains of E. coli tended to form long filaments. Whereas most normal cells of E. coli that developed at 1 atm were only about 2 μ long, the mean length of those that developed at 475 atm was 2.93 μ for strain R4, 3.99 μ for strain S, and 5.82 μ for strain B cells. Nearly 90% of the bacterial biomass produced at 475 atm by strain B was found in filaments exceeding 5 μ in length; 74.7 and 16.4% of the biomass produced at 475 atm by strains S and R4, respectively, occurred in such filaments. Strain R4 formed fewer and shorter (5 to 35 μ) filaments than did the other two strains, whose filaments ranged in length from 5 to >100 μ. The bacterial biomass produced at all pressures had approximately the same content of protein and nucleic acids. But at increased pressures appreciably more ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proportionately less deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was found per unit of biomass. Whereas the RNA content per cell increased with cell length, the amount of DNA was nearly the same in long filaments formed at increased pressure as in cells of normal length formed at 1 atm. The inverse relationship between the concentration of DNA and cell length in all three strains of E. coli suggests that the failure of DNA to replicate at increased pressure may be responsible for a repression of cell division and consequent filament

  8. CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR ORIGIN OF ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN LOW-PERMEABILITY RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Dickinson, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper suggests that overpressured and underpressured gas accumulations of this type have a common origin. In basins containing overpressured gas accumulations, rates of thermogenic gas accumulation exceed gas loss, causing fluid (gas) pressure to rise above the regional hydrostatic pressure. Free water in the larger pores is forced out of the gas generation zone into overlying and updip, normally pressured, water-bearing rocks. While other diagenetic processes continue, a pore network with very low permeability develops. As a result, gas accumulates in these low-permeability reservoirs at rates higher than it is lost. In basins containing underpressured gas accumulations, rates of gas generation and accumulation are less than gas loss. The basin-center gas accumulation persists, but because of changes in the basin dynamics, the overpressured accumulation evolves into an underpressured system.

  9. Fluid pressure and reaction zone formation at a lithological interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Chemical composition variations in reaction zones between two distinct lithologies are generally interpreted in terms of chemical potential gradients and diffusion process. Concentration profiles can then be used to quantify the species diffusion coefficients or the time scale of geological events. However, chemical potential gradients are also functions of temperature and pressure and local variations of these parameters can thus potentially modify the diffusion process. In northern Corsica, a centimeter scale reaction zone formed under blueschist conditions at a serpentinite - marble contact of sedimentary origin. Three sub-zones having chemical compositions evolving from one rock end-member to another divide the reaction zone along sharp interfaces. At the reaction zone - marble interface, marble decarbonation occurs to form wollastonite and carbonaceous matter. Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction and the respective increase in density of 25 % and 7 % in the bulk rock and in the garnet minerals are interpreted as records of a pressure gradient during reaction zone formation. Moreover, the formation of a volatile-free sub-zone in the reaction zone from reaction between the H2O-bearing serpentinite and the CO2-bearing marble released fluids at the contact. The impact of such a release on the fluid pressure was modelled by considering the effects of both the rock compaction and the transport of fluid by hydraulic diffusion. Modelling results indicates that > 0.5 GPa fluid overpressure can be generated at the contact if devolatilization rates are of the order of the one experimentally measured (> 10-5 kg of fluid/m3 of rock/s). The resulting pressure gradient is of the order of magnitude of the one necessary to counter-balance the effect on chemical potential of the chemical composition variations across the contact. Finally, after the reaction has run to completion, the model predicts that fluid rapidly diffuses away from the interface which thus stops

  10. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  11. Increasing Body Mass Index, Blood Pressure, and Acanthosis Nigricans Abnormalities in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Debra E.; Wang, Xiaohui; Garza, Viola; Fuentes, Lilia A.; Rodriguez, Melinda C.; Sullivan, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective quantitative study examined the relationships among gender, Acanthosis Nigricans (AN), body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (BP) in children attending school Grades 1-9 in Southwest Texas. Of the 34,897 health screening records obtained for the secondary analysis, 32,788 were included for the study. A logistic regression…

  12. Abnormal intra-aural pressure waves associated with death in African children with acute nontraumatic coma

    PubMed Central

    Gwer, Samson; Kazungu, Michael; Chengo, Eddie; Ohuma, Eric O.; Idro, Richard; Birch, Tony; Marchbanks, Robert; Kirkham, Fenella J.; Newton, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We explored the relationship between tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) measurements, a tool to monitor intracranial pressure noninvasively, and clinical features and death in children with acute coma in Kilifi, Kenya. Methods: Between November 2007 and September 2009, we made serial TMD measurements and clinical observations on children with acute coma (Blantyre coma score (BCS) ≤ 2) on the pediatric high dependency unit of Kilifi District Hospital, and on well children presenting to the hospital's outpatient department for routine follow-up. We examined middle ear function using tympanometry and measured cardiac pulse (CPA) and respiratory pulse pressure amplitudes (RPA) using the TMD analyzer. Results: We recruited 75 children (32 (43%) females; median age 3.3 (IQR: 2.0, 4.3) years). Twenty-one (28%) children died. Higher TMD measurements predicted death. Adjusting for diagnosis, every 50 nl rise in both semirecumbent and recumbent CPA was associated with increased odds of death associated with intracranial herniation (OR: 1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 2.41; P = 0.02 and OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.66; P ≤ 0.01 respectively). Conclusion: Raised TMD pulse pressure measurements are associated with death and may be useful in detecting and monitoring risk of intracranial herniation and intracranial pressure in childhood coma. PMID:25790276

  13. High prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure regulation and impaired glucose tolerance in adults with hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, K; Schnack, C; Mittermayer, F; Kopp, H P; Hofer, M; Kann, T; Schernthaner, G

    2005-09-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have an increased mortality from cardiovascular events. Reduced nocturnal blood pressure decline (non-dipping) and impaired glucose tolerance are considered as cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the role of these risk factors in patients with hypopituitarism we determined the 24-hour blood pressure regulation and glucose tolerance status in hypopituitary patients with and without growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Sixty-one hypopituitary subjects 5 +/- 3 years after brain surgery because of macroadenoma, 61 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 20 healthy controls were included. Forty-four hypopituitary patients were GH deficient and 28 of these on GH treatment. Non-dipping was observed in 41 % (n = 7) of hypopituitary subjects with normal GH release, in 46 % (n = 13) of patients on GH therapy, and in 69 % (n = 11) of untreated GH deficient patients. Untreated GH deficient patients had a higher systolic night/day ratio (1.00 +/- 0.03) compared to non GH deficient (0.92 +/- 0.02; p < 0.02) and GH treated hypopituitary patients (0.93 +/- 0.01; p < 0.02). The rate of non-dipping in hypopituitarism was comparable to that in T2DM. Pathologic glucose tolerance was diagnosed in 30 % of the hypopituitary patients. The prevalence of non-dipping was independent of glucose metabolism in hypopituitary patients. All controls had normal night time blood pressure fall and glucose metabolism. The high prevalence of nocturnal non-dipping and glucose intolerance detected in this cohort might contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk of hypopituitary patients.

  14. High pulse pressure is not associated with abnormal activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, T A L; Pedersen, E B; Munk, K; Hjortdal, V E; Emmertsen, K; Andersen, N H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between pulse pressure (PP)--a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness-and activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in adult patients with repaired coarctation and normal left ventricular (LV) function. A total of 114 patients (44 (26-74) years, 13 (0.1-40) years at repair) and 20 healthy controls were examined with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography, vasoactive hormone levels and magnetic resonance of the thoracic aorta. Forty-one patients (36%) were taking antihypertensives (28 RAAS inhibitors). Fifty-one had mean 24-h blood pressures >130/80 mm Hg. Hypertension was not associated with age at repair (P=0.257). Patients had higher PP and LV mass compared with controls (52±11 vs. 45±5 mm Hg and 221±71 vs. 154±55 g, respectively; both P<0.05). Differences were more pronounced in the presence of recoarctation, but independently of RAA levels. Even normotensive patients had higher LV mass than controls. LV mass and recoarctation were correlated with PP levels. In conclusion, adult patients with repaired coarctation have increased PP and LV mass compared with controls. PP increased with increasing recoarctation. Hypertension was present also in the absence of recoarctation. These changes could not be explained by abnormal activation of the RAAS.

  15. Cathode fall thickness of abnormal glow discharges between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yangyang; Luo, Haiyun; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-02-15

    In order to investigate the influence of electrode radius on the characteristics of cathode fall thickness, experiments of low-pressure (20 Pa ≤ p ≤ 30 Pa) abnormal glow discharge were carried out between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii keeping gap distance unchanged. Axial distributions of light intensity were obtained from the discharge images captured using a Charge Coupled Device camera. The assumption that the position of the negative glow peak coincides with the edge of cathode fall layer was verified based on a two-dimensional model, and the cathode fall thicknesses, d{sub c}, were calculated from the axial distributions of light intensity. It was observed that the position of peak emission shifts closer to the cathode as current or pressure grows. The dependence of cathode fall thickness on the gas pressure and normalized current J/p{sup 2} was presented, and it was found that for discharges between electrodes in large radius the curves of pd{sub c} against J/p{sup 2} were superimposed on each other, however, this phenomenon will not hold for discharges between the smaller electrodes. The reason for this phenomenon is that the transverse diffusions of charged particles are not the same in two gaps between electrodes with different radii.

  16. The Role of Pressure in GMC Formation II: The H2-Pressure Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blitz, Leo; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2006-10-01

    We show that the ratio of molecular to atomic gas in galaxies is determined by hydrostatic pressure and that the relation between the two is nearly linear. The pressure relation is shown to be good over 3 orders of magnitude for 14 galaxies, including dwarfs, H I-rich, and H2-rich galaxies, as well as the Milky Way. The sample spans a factor of 5 in mean metallicity. The rms scatter of individual points of the relation is only about a factor of 2 for all the galaxies, although some show much more scatter than others. Using these results, we propose a modified star formation prescription based on pressure determining the degree to which the ISM is molecular. The formulation is different in high- and low-pressure regimes, defined by whether the gas is primarily atomic or primarily molecular. This formulation can be implemented in simulations and provides a more appropriate treatment of the outer regions of spiral galaxies and molecule-poor systems, such as dwarf irregulars and damped Lyα systems.

  17. Carbon onions as nanoscopic pressure cells for diamond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banhart, F.; Ajayan, P. M.

    1996-08-01

    SPHERICAL particles of carbon consisting of concentric graphite-like shells ('carbon onions') can be formed by electron irradiation of graphitic carbon materials1,2. Here we report that, when such particles are heated to ~700 °C and irradiated with electrons, their cores can be transformed to diamond. Under these conditions the spacing between layers in the carbon onions decreases from 0.31 in the outer shells (slightly less than the 0.34-nm layer spacing of graphite) to about 0.22 nm in the core, indicating considerable compression towards the particle centres. We find that this compression allows diamond to nucleate-in effect the carbon onions act as nanoscopic pressure cells for diamond formation.

  18. Carbonate formation in Wyoming montmorillonite under high pressure carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Tae-Bong; Baltrus, John P.; Howard, Bret H.; Harbert, William P.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.

    2013-03-01

    Carbonation reaction with silicate minerals that are common components of the host rock and cap rock within geological storage reservoirs and the associated structural deformation were investigated for better understanding of the geochemical reactions associated with geologic CO2 storage. Exposure of a model expanding clay, Wyoming montmorillonite, SWy-2, to high-pressure CO2 resulted in the formation of a mineral carbonate phase via dry CO2–clay mineral interactions at two different temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that the properties of CO2 fluid at 70 °C provide more favorable conditions for carbonate formation at the clay surface less accessible to CO2 at 22 °C. The carbonation reaction occurred predominantly within the first couple of days of exposure to the fluid and then proceeded slower with continuing exposure. As compared to the as-received clay under the same ambient conditions, the (0 0 1) basal spacing of the clay bearing carbonates (after the CO2 exposure) was slightly expanded at a relative humidity (RH) level of 12% but it was slightly collapsed at the RH level of 40%. Finally, experimental observations suggest that the carbonation reaction occurs at the external surface as well as internal surface (interlayer) of the clay particles.

  19. Controlling and assessing pressure conditions during treatment of tar sands formations

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Etuan; Beer, Gary Lee

    2015-11-10

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the tar sands formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A pressure in the portion of the formation is controlled such that the pressure remains below a fracture pressure of the formation overburden while allowing the portion of the formation to heat to a selected average temperature of at least about 280.degree. C. and at most about 300.degree. C. The pressure in the portion of the formation is reduced to a selected pressure after the portion of the formation reaches the selected average temperature.

  20. Melatonin secretion is impaired in women with preeclampsia and an abnormal circadian blood pressure rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bouchlariotou, Sofia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Giannopoulou, Myrto; Arampatzis, Spyridon; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Mertens, Peter R; Zintzaras, Elias; Messinis, Ioannis E; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-08-01

    Non-dipping circadian blood pressure (BP) is a common finding in preeclampsia, accompanied by adverse outcomes. Melatonin plays pivotal role in biological circadian rhythms. This study investigated the relationship between melatonin secretion and circadian BP rhythm in preeclampsia. Cases were women with preeclampsia treated between January 2006 and June 2007 in the University Hospital of Larissa. Volunteers with normal pregnancy, matched for chronological and gestational age, served as controls. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP monitoring was applied. Serum melatonin and urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were determined in day and night time samples by enzyme-linked immunoassays. Measurements were repeated 2 months after delivery. Thirty-one women with preeclampsia and 20 controls were included. Twenty-one of the 31 women with preeclampsia were non-dippers. Compared to normal pregnancy, in preeclampsia there were significantly lower night time melatonin (48.4 ± 24.7 vs. 85.4 ± 26.9 pg/mL, p<0.001) levels. Adjustment for circadian BP rhythm status ascribed this finding exclusively to non-dippers (p<0.01). Two months after delivery, in 11 of the 21 non-dippers both circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm reappeared. In contrast, in cases with retained non-dipping status (n=10) melatonin secretion rhythm remained impaired: daytime versus night time melatonin (33.5 ± 13.0 vs. 28.0 ± 13.8 pg/mL, p=0.386). Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were, overall, similar to serum melatonin. Circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm follow parallel course in preeclampsia, both during pregnancy and, at least 2 months after delivery. Our findings may be not sufficient to implicate a putative therapeutic effect of melatonin, however, they clearly emphasize that its involvement in the pathogenesis of a non-dipping BP in preeclampsia needs intensive further investigation.

  1. Identification of Abnormal Phase and its Formation Mechanism in Synthesizing Chalcogenide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kegao; Ji, Nianjing; Xu, Yong; Liu, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Chalcogenide films can be used in thin-film solar cells due to their high photoelectric conversion efficiencies. It was difficult to identify one abnormal phase with high X-ray diffraction (XRD) intensity and preferred orientation in the samples for preparing chalcogenide films by spin-coating and co-reduction on soda-lime glass (Na2OṡCaOṡ6SiO2) substrates. The raw materials and reductant are metal chlorides and hydrazine hydrate respectively. In order to identify this phase, a series of experiments were done under different conditions. The phases of obtained products were analyzed by XRD and the size and morphology were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). From the experimental results, first it was proved that the abnormal phase was water-soluble by water immersion experiment, then it was identified as NaCl crystal through XRD, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and SEM. The cubic NaCl crystals have high crystallinity with size lengths of about 0.5-2μm and show a <100> preferred orientation. The reaction mechanism of NaCl crystal was proposed as follows: The NaCl crystal was formed by reaction of Na2O and HCl in a certain experimental conditions.

  2. Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Normal and Abnormal 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, P.; Stevenson, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) plays an important role in assessing cardiovascular prognosis, through presence or absence of ABPM-related prognostic features. Objectives. To study relationship between 24-hour ABPM and cardiovascular outcomes in patients from Chesterfield Royal Hospital. Material and Methods. Over 12 months from the 1st of August 2002, 1187 individuals had 24-hour ABPM performed. Cardiovascular outcomes were studied in a subset (297) of the original cohort, made up by every 4th consecutive subject. The following ABPM-related prognostic features were studied—high day time systolic and diastolic BP (≥135, ≥85 mmHg), high night time systolic and diastolic BP (≥120 mmHg, ≥75 mmHg), absence of nocturnal dip (≤10% fall in night time SBP), high early morning SBP (≥140 mmHg), and morning surge (≥20/15 mmHg). The cardiovascular outcomes studied in the fourth table included fatal and nonfatal MI, new diagnosis of angina, acute coronary syndrome, sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmias, acute LVF, cerbrovascular events, peripheral vascular disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and CKD stage 3 or above. Results. Over a followup period of 2015 ± 116 days (1720–2305 days) 82 cardiovascular events occurred in 61 subjects. Cardiac arrhythmias were the most common CV outcome (34 events) followed by cerebrovascular events (15). Statistically significant associations found were between cerebrovascular events and absent nocturnal dip ≤ 10% (P = .05) and high day time DBP (P = .029), peripheral vascular disease and morning surge ≥ 20/15 mmHg (P = .014), cardiac arrhythmias and high day time and night time DBP (P = .009 and .033, resp.). Conclusion. Significant associations were found between cerebrovascular events and absent nocturnal dip ≤ 10% and high day time DBP, peripheral vascular disease and morning surge ≥ 20/15 mmHg, cardiac arrhythmias and high day time and night time DBP. PMID

  3. A ram-pressure threshold for star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    In turbulent fragmentation, star formation occurs in condensations created by converging flows. The condensations must be sufficiently massive, dense and cool to be gravitationally unstable, so that they start to contract; and they must then radiate away thermal energy fast enough for self-gravity to remain dominant, so that they continue to contract. For the metallicities and temperatures in local star-forming clouds, this second requirement is only met robustly when the gas couples thermally to the dust, because this delivers the capacity to radiate across the full bandwidth of the continuum, rather than just in a few discrete spectral lines. This translates into a threshold for vigorous star formation, which can be written as a minimum ram pressure PCRIT ˜ 4 × 10-11 dyne. PCRIT is independent of temperature, and corresponds to flows with molecular hydrogen number density n_{{H_2.FLOW}} and velocity vFLOW satisfying n_{{H_2.FLOW}} v_{FLOW}^2≳ 800 cm^{-3} (km s^{-1})^2. This in turn corresponds to a minimum molecular hydrogen column density for vigorous star formation, N_{{H_2.CRIT}} ˜ 4 × 10^{21} cm^{-2} (ΣCRIT ˜ 100 M⊙ pc-2), and a minimum visual extinction AV, CRIT ˜ 9 mag. The characteristic diameter and line density for a star-forming filament when this threshold is just exceeded - a sweet spot for local star formation regions - are 2RFIL ˜ 0.1 pc and μFIL ˜ 13 M⊙ pc-2. The characteristic diameter and mass for a prestellar core condensing out of such a filament are 2RCORE ˜ 0.1 pc and MCORE ˜ 1 M⊙. We also show that fragmentation of a shock-compressed layer is likely to commence while the convergent flows creating the layer are still ongoing, and we stress that, under this circumstance, the phenomenology and characteristic scales for fragmentation of the layer are fundamentally different from those derived traditionally for pre-existing layers.

  4. Formation of xenon-nitrogen compounds at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Howie, Ross T.; Turnbull, Robin; Binns, Jack; Frost, Mungo; Dalladay-Simpson, Philip; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Molecular nitrogen exhibits one of the strongest known interatomic bonds, while xenon possesses a closed-shell electronic structure: a direct consequence of which renders both chemically unreactive. Through a series of optical spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction experiments, we demonstrate the formation of a novel van der Waals compound formed from binary Xe-N2 mixtures at pressures as low as 5 GPa. At 300 K and 5 GPa Xe(N2)2-I is synthesised, and if further compressed, undergoes a transition to a tetragonal Xe(N2)2-II phase at 14 GPa; this phase appears to be unexpectedly stable at least up to 180 GPa even after heating to above 2000 K. Raman spectroscopy measurements indicate a distinct weakening of the intramolecular bond of the nitrogen molecule above 60 GPa, while transmission measurements in the visible and mid-infrared regime suggest the metallisation of the compound at ~100 GPa. PMID:27748357

  5. Structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampal formation in rats with environmentally induced reductions in prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle.

    PubMed

    Greene, J R; Kerkhoff, J E; Guiver, L; Totterdell, S

    2001-01-01

    The effects of social isolation on prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle (PPI), electrophysiology and morphology of subicular pyramidal neurons and the densities of interneuronal sub-types in the hippocampal formation were examined. Wistar rats (male weanlings) were housed socially (socials, n=8) or individually (isolates, n=7). When tested eight weeks later, PPI was lower in isolates. Rats then received terminal anaesthesia before slices of hippocampal formation were made in which the electrophysiological properties of a total of 108 subicular neurons were characterized. There were no differences in neuronal sub-types recorded in socials compared with isolates. Intrinsically burst-firing and regular spiking pyramidal neurons were examined in detail. There were no differences in resting membrane potential or input resistance in isolates compared with socials but action potential height was reduced and action potential threshold raised in isolates. A limited morphological examination of Neurobiotin-filled intrinsically burst-firing neurons did not reveal differences in cell-body area or in number of primary dendrites. Sections from the contralateral hemispheres of the same rats were stained with antibodies to calretinin, parvalbumin and the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). In isolates, the density of calretinin positive neurons was increased in the dentate gyrus but unchanged in areas CA3, CA1 and subiculum. Parvalbumin and nNOS positive neuronal densities were unchanged. Hence in rats with environmentally induced reductions in PPI there are structural and functional abnormalities in the hippocampal formation. If the reduction in PPI stems from these abnormalities, and reduced PPI in rats is relevant to schizophrenia, then drugs that correct the reported electrophysiological changes might have antipsychotic effects.

  6. Abnormal proplatelet formation and emperipolesis in cultured human megakaryocytes from gray platelet syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Buduo, Christian A.; Alberelli, Maria Adele; Glembostky, Ana C.; Podda, Gianmarco; Lev, Paola R.; Cattaneo, Marco; Landolfi, Raffaele; Heller, Paula G.; Balduini, Alessandra; De Candia, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited bleeding disorder characterized by deficiency of platelet α-granules, macrothrombocytopenia and marrow fibrosis. The autosomal recessive form of GPS is linked to loss of function mutations in NBEAL2, which is predicted to regulate granule trafficking in megakaryocytes, the platelet progenitors. We report the first analysis of cultured megakaryocytes from GPS patients with NBEAL2 mutations. Megakaryocytes cultured from peripheral blood or bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells from four patients were used to investigate megakaryopoiesis, megakaryocyte morphology and platelet formation. In vitro differentiation of megakaryocytes was normal, whereas we observed deficiency of megakaryocyte α-granule proteins and emperipolesis. Importantly, we first demonstrated that platelet formation by GPS megakaryocytes was severely affected, a defect which might be the major cause of thrombocytopenia in patients. These results demonstrate that cultured megakaryocytes from GPS patients provide a valuable model to understand the pathogenesis of GPS in humans. PMID:26987485

  7. ZHOUPI controls embryonic cuticle formation via a signalling pathway involving the subtilisin protease ABNORMAL LEAF-SHAPE1 and the receptor kinases GASSHO1 and GASSHO2.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qian; Creff, Audrey; Waters, Andrew; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Goodrich, Justin; Ingram, Gwyneth C

    2013-02-01

    Seed production in angiosperms requires tight coordination of the development of the embryo and the endosperm. The endosperm-specific transcription factor ZHOUPI has previously been shown to play a key role in this process, by regulating both endosperm breakdown and the formation of the embryonic cuticle. To what extent these processes are functionally linked is, however, unclear. In order to address this issue we have concentrated on the subtilisin-like serine protease encoding gene ABNORMAL LEAF-SHAPE1. Expression of ABNORMAL LEAF-SHAPE1 is endosperm specific, and dramatically decreased in zhoupi mutants. We show that, although ABNORMAL LEAF-SHAPE1 is required for normal embryonic cuticle formation, it plays no role in regulating endosperm breakdown. Furthermore, we show that re-introducing ABNORMAL LEAF-SHAPE1 expression in the endosperm of zhoupi mutants partially rescues embryonic cuticle formation without rescuing their persistent endosperm phenotype. Thus, we conclude that ALE1 can normalize cuticle formation in the absence of endosperm breakdown, and that ZHOUPI thus controls two genetically separable developmental processes. Finally, our genetic study shows that ZHOUPI and ABNORMAL LEAF-SHAPE1 promotes formation of embryonic cuticle via a pathway involving embryonically expressed receptor kinases GASSHO1 and GASSHO2. We therefore provide a molecular framework of inter-tissue communication for embryo-specific cuticle formation during embryogenesis.

  8. Possibility of Abnormal Formation of Pearlite in Medium-Carbon Steel After Short-Term Heating to a Temperature Above Ac 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaev, D. A.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Tereshchenko, N. A.; Urtsev, V. N.

    2017-03-01

    The kinetics of phase recrystallization and formation of structure in medium-carbon steels under short-term heating at a temperature exceeding Ac 1 and accelerated cooling is studied. The conditions of implementation of two mechanisms of abnormal formation of pearlite differing in the lengths of the diffusion paths of carbon are determined, and the morphology of the pearlite is described.

  9. HEADCO: a program for converting observed water levels and pressure measurements to formation pressure and standard hydraulic head

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Mercer, R.B.

    1985-10-01

    Static water-level and fluid pressure measurements are commonly converted in hydrologic studies to formation pressure and hydraulic head, which are used to determine groundwater flow characteristics of aquifer systems. While the direct use of field measurements is usually adequate for determining formation pressure and hydraulic head for shallow flow systems (i.e., <1000 ft), corrections and conversion parameters must be used to properly account for fluid-column density effects, which commonly occur with deep systems. This report presents a program, HEADCO, for converting static water-level and pressure measurements to formation pressure and standard hydraulic head. The HEADCO program corrects field measurements for the effects of fluid-density variation and selected external stresses. Factors that affect density of the fluid column, in which field measurements are made, include temperature, pressure, salinity, suspended solids, and multiphase conditions. External stresses examined in HEADCO include barometric and earth tide fluctuations, and gravitational acceleration variation. A program description and procedures for converting field measurements obtained using field test arrangements commonly employed in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project field program are provided in this report. The report includes user instructions and an illustrative test example. Results of a field example comparison are also provided. This comparison examines observed and HEADCO-calculated pressures for 30 pressure probes recently calibrated in a laboratory and tested under field conditions at borehole DC-8. The test case and field example comparisons indicate that HEADCO provides accurate estimates of formation pressure and standard hydraulic head that are well within the accuracy range of downhole pressure-measuring instrumentation. 44 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. A pressure-induced, magnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of meteorites and diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, S. A.; Egli, R.; Hochleitner, R.; Roud, S. C.; Volk, M. W. R.; Le Goff, M.; de Wit, M.

    2012-04-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high pressures during their formation or subsequent evolution. These materials sometimes contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite. Because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report room temperature magnetic measurements on multi- and single domain pyrrhotite under non-hydrostatic pressure up to 4.5 GPa. We find that the ratio of magnetic coercivity and remanence follows a logarithmic law with respect to pressure, which can potentially be used as a geobarometer. Due to the greater thermal expansion of pyrrhotite with respect to diamond, pyrrhotite inclusions in diamond experience a confining pressure at the Earth's surface. Applying our experimentally derived magnetic geobarometer to pyrrhotite-bearing diamonds from Botswana and the Central African Republic suggests the pressures of the pyrrhotite inclusions in the diamonds range from 1.3 to 2.1 GPa. These overpressures constrain the mantle source pressures from 5.4 to 9.5 GPa, depending on which bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases are used. We are now trying to develop magnetic barometers on other magnetic phases to apply to meteorites, ultimately to constrain the minimum pressure in which the meteorite formed and, hence, information regarding the planetesmal's size, and/or depth, in which the meteorite was derived.

  11. Fuel Structure and Pressure Effects on the Formation of Soot Particles in Diffusion Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    higher values of the pressure power dependence appear to be related to fuel structure effects , the direct nature of which remains to be understood...61102F 2308 A2 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) "Fuel Structure and Pressure Effects on the Formation of Soot Particlesin Diffusion Flames...block number) Studies emphasizing the effects of fuel concentration and operating pressure on the formation of soot particles have been conducted in a

  12. Platelet-derived growth factor over-expression in retinal progenitors results in abnormal retinal vessel formation.

    PubMed

    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D; Niklasson, Mia; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Hallböök, Finn; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) plays an important role in development of the central nervous system, including the retina. Excessive PDGF signaling is associated with proliferative retinal disorders. We reported previously that transgenic mice in which PDGF-B was over-expressed under control of the nestin enhancer, nes/tk-PdgfB-lacZ, exhibited enhanced apoptosis in the developing corpus striatum. These animals display enlarged lateral ventricles after birth as well as behavioral aberrations as adults. Here, we report that in contrast to the relatively mild central nervous system phenotype, development of the retina is severely disturbed in nes/tk-PdgfB-lacZ mice. In transgenic retinas all nuclear layers were disorganized and photoreceptor segments failed to develop properly. Since astrocyte precursor cells did not populate the retina, retinal vascular progenitors could not form a network of vessels. With time, randomly distributed vessels resembling capillaries formed, but there were no large trunk vessels and the intraocular pressure was reduced. In addition, we observed a delayed regression of the hyaloid vasculature. The prolonged presence of this structure may contribute to the other abnormalities observed in the retina, including the defective lamination.

  13. Theoretical assessment of bonaccordite formation in pressurized water reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Rak, Zsolt; O'Brien, Chris; Shin, Dongwon; ...

    2016-03-04

    The free energy of formation of bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) as a function of temperature has been calculated using a technique that combines first principles calculations with experimental free energies of formation of aqueous species. The results suggest that bonaccordite formation from aqueous metal ions (Ni2+ andFe3+) and boric acid is thermodynamically favorable at elevated temperature and pH that have been predicted to exist at the CRUD-clad interface in deposits thicker than 60 μm.

  14. Theoretical assessment of bonaccordite formation in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, Zsolt; O'Brien, Chris; Shin, Dongwon; Andersson, Anders David; Stanek, Christopher; Brenner, Donald

    2016-03-04

    The free energy of formation of bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) as a function of temperature has been calculated using a technique that combines first principles calculations with experimental free energies of formation of aqueous species. The results suggest that bonaccordite formation from aqueous metal ions (Ni2+ andFe3+) and boric acid is thermodynamically favorable at elevated temperature and pH that have been predicted to exist at the CRUD-clad interface in deposits thicker than 60 μm.

  15. Theoretical assessment of bonaccordite formation in pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Zs; O'Brien, C. J.; Shin, D.; Andersson, A. D.; Stanek, C. R.; Brenner, D. W.

    2016-06-01

    The free energy of formation of bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) as a function of temperature has been calculated using a technique that combines first principles calculations with experimental free energies of formation of aqueous species. The results suggest that bonaccordite formation from aqueous metal ions (Ni2+ andFe3+) and boric acid is thermodynamically favorable at elevated temperature and pH that have been predicted to exist at the CRUD-clad interface in deposits thicker than 60 μm.

  16. Carbon Onions as Nanoscopic Pressure Cells for Diamond Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banhart, Florian

    1997-03-01

    Concentric-shell carbon onions form under electron irradiation of different carbon precursors in an electron microscope. Carbon onions under irradiation at high temperature are in a state of high compression with a considerable decrease of the c-plane spacing towards the centre. Under prolonged irradiation at temperatures around 900 K the cores of the graphitic onions transform into diamond crystals (F. Banhart and P.M. Ajayan, Nature 382), 433 (1996). Hence, carbon onions can be thought of as nanoscopic pressure cells for the directly observable nucleation and growth of diamond from graphitic material. The diamond crystals grow under further irradiation until the whole graphitic particles have transformed to diamond. Apparently the conversion of the graphitic structure to diamond starts at high pressure and proceeds at decreasing, possibly even at zero pressure. The experiment is carried out in a transmission electron microscope which enables us to monitor this phase transformation in-situ on an atomic scale.

  17. Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Atrazine and Ametrine Induce Micronuclei Formation and Nuclear Abnormalities in Erythrocytes of Fish.

    PubMed

    Botelho, R G; Monteiro, S H; Christofoletti, C A; Moura-Andrade, G C R; Tornisielo, V L

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and sensitive method using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry triple quadrupole direct aqueous injection for analysis of atrazine and ametrine herbicides in surface waters was developed. According to the validation method, water samples from six different locations in the Piracicaba River were collected monthly from February 2011 to January 2012 and injected into a liquid chromatographer/dual mass spectrometer without the need for sample extraction. The method was validated and shown to be precise and accurate; limits of detection and quantification were 0.07 and 0.10 µg L(-1) for atrazine and 0.09 and 0.14 µg L(-1) for ametrine. During the sampling period, concentrations of atrazine ranged from 0.11 to 1.92 µg L(-1) and ametrine from 0.25 to 1.44 µg L(-1). After analysis of the herbicides, Danio rerio were exposed a range of concentrations found in the river water to check the induction of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities (NAs) in erythrocytes. Concentrations of atrazine and ametrine >1.0 and 1.5 µg L(-1), respectively, induced MN formation in D. rerio. Ametrine was shown to be more genotoxic to D. rerio because a greater incidence of NAs was observed compared with atrazine. Therefore, environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine and ametrine found in the Piracicaba River are dangerous to the aquatic biota.

  18. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-12-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ˜ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2-4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2.

  19. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  20. Anatomy of a pressure-induced, ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, Stuart A.; Egli, Ramon; Hochleitner, Rupert; Roud, Sophie C.; Volk, Michael W. R.; Le Goff, Maxime; de Wit, Maarten

    2011-10-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high pressures during their formation or subsequent evolution. These materials commonly contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite. Because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report room temperature magnetic measurements on multidomain and single-domain pyrrhotite under nonhydrostatic pressure. Magnetic remanence in single-domain pyrrhotite is largely insensitive to pressure until 2 GPa, whereas the remanence of multidomain pyrrhotite increases 50% over that of initial conditions by 2 GPa, and then decreases until only 33% of the original remanence remains by 4.5 GPa. In contrast, magnetic coercivity increases with increasing pressure to 4.5 GPa. Below ˜1.5 GPa, multidomain pyrrhotite obeys Néel theory with a positive correlation between coercivity and remanence; above ˜1.5 GPa, it behaves single domain-like yet distinctly different from uncompressed single-domain pyrrhotite. The ratio of magnetic coercivity and remanence follows a logarithmic law with respect to pressure, which can potentially be used as a geobarometer. Owing to the greater thermal expansion of pyrrhotite with respect to diamond, pyrrhotite inclusions in diamonds experience a confining pressure at Earth's surface. Applying our experimentally derived magnetic geobarometer to pyrrhotite-bearing diamonds from Botswana and the Central African Republic suggests the pressures of the pyrrhotite inclusions in the diamonds range from 1.3 to 2.1 GPa. These overpressures constrain the mantle source pressures from 5.4 to 9.5 GPa, depending on which bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases are used.

  1. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  2. The effect of abnormal birth history on ambulatory blood pressure and disease progression in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Joseph T; Ng, Derek K; Chan, Grace J; Samuels, Joshua; Furth, Susan; Warady, Bradley; Greenbaum, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between abnormal birth history (birth weight [BW] <2500 grams, gestational age <36 weeks, or small for gestational age), BP, and renal function among 332 participants (97 with abnormal and 235 with normal birth history) in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study, a cohort of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Study design Casual and 24-hour ambulatory BP were obtained. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was determined by iohexol disappearance. Confounders (birth and maternal characteristics, socioeconomic status) were used to generate predicted probabilities of abnormal birth history for propensity score matching. Weighted linear and logistic regression models with adjustment for quintiles of propensity scores and CKD diagnosis were used to assess the impact of birth history on BP and GFR. Results Age at enrollment, percent with glomerular disease, and baseline GFR were similar between the groups. Those with abnormal birth history were more likely to be female, of Black race or Hispanic ethnicity, to have low household income, or part of a multiple birth. Unadjusted BP measurements, baseline GFR and change in GFR did not differ significantly between the groups; no differences were seen after adjusting for confounders by propensity score matching. Conclusions Abnormal birth history does not appear to have exerted a significant influence on BP or GFR in this cohort of children with CKD. The absence of an observed association is likely secondary to the dominant effects of underlying CKD and its treatment. PMID:24698454

  3. Prevalence of electrocardiographic abnormalities based on hypertension severity and blood pressure levels: the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke study.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hemal; Gamboa, Christopher M; Safford, Monika M; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Glasser, Stephen P

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of major and minor electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities based on blood pressure (BP) control and hypertension (HTN) treatment resistance. We analyzed data from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke study of 20,932 participants who were divided into presence of major (n = 3782), only minor (n = 8944), or no (n = 8206) ECG abnormalities. The cohort was stratified into normotension (n = 3373), pre-HTN (n = 4142), controlled HTN (n = 8619), uncontrolled HTN (n = 3544), controlled apparent treatment-resistant HTN (aTRH, n = 400), and uncontrolled aTRH (n = 854) groups, and the prevalence ratios (PRs) of major and minor ECG abnormalities were assessed separately for each BP group. The full multivariable adjustment included demographics, risk factors, and HTN duration. Compared with normotension, the PRs of major ECG abnormalities for pre-HTN, controlled HTN, uncontrolled HTN, controlled aTRH, and uncontrolled aTRH groups were 1.01 (0.90-1.14), 1.30 (1.16-1.45), 1.37 (1.23-1.54), 1.42 (1.22-1.64), and 1.44 (1.26-1.65), respectively (P < .001), whereas the PRs of minor ECG abnormalities among each of the above BP groups were similar. Detection of major ECG abnormalities among hypertensive persons with poor control and treatment resistance may help improve their cardiovascular risk stratification and early intervention.

  4. Nonpsychotropic cannabinoids, abnormal cannabidiol and canabigerol-dimethyl heptyl, act at novel cannabinoid receptors to reduce intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Szczesniak, Anna-Maria; Maor, Yehoshua; Robertson, Harold; Hung, Orlando; Kelly, Melanie E M

    2011-10-01

    The objective of our study was to examine the pharmacology of the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering actions of the behaviorally inactive cannabinoids, abnormal cannabidiol (abn-CBD), and a cannabigerol analog, cannabigerol-dimethyl heptyl (CBG-DMH), in comparison to that of the nonselective cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB(1)R) and CB(2)R agonist, WIN55,212-2, in Brown Norway rats. The IOP was measured noninvasively using a hand-held tonometer in nonanesthetized animals. The IOP measurements were taken every 15 min for a period of 2 h after drug administration. All drugs were administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections, and abn-CBD and CBG-DMH were also given topically. Both abn-CBD and CBG-DMH reduced IOP when administrated i.p. at doses of ≥2.5 mg/kg or topically at concentrations of 1%-2%. The IOP-lowering effects of abn-CBD and CBG-DMH were reduced by i.p. administration of O-1918 (2.5 mg/kg), a selective antagonist of the abn-CBD-sensitive cannabinoid-related receptor (CBx), but were unaffected by the CB(1)R antagonist, AM251 (2.5 mg/kg), or the CB(2)R antagonist, AM630 (2.5 mg/kg). In contrast, the IOP-lowering action of WIN55,212-2 was completely blocked by the CB(1)R-selective antagonist, AM251, and was unaffected by the CBx receptor antagonist, O-1918. However, similar to the nonpsychotropic cannabinoids, the ocular hypotensive actions of WIN55,212-2 were also insensitive to block by the CB(2)R antagonist, AM630. Consistent with this, the selective CB(2)R agonist, HU-308 (2 mg/kg) failed to reduce IOP in Brown Norway rats. Concurrent application of a dose of WIN55,212-2 that was subthreshold to reduce IOP (0.25 mg/kg), together with a topical dose of either abn-CBD (0.5%) or CBG-DMH (0.25%), respectively, potentiated the ocular hypotensive effect of either compound applied alone. This study demonstrates that the atypical cannabinoid, abn-CBD, and the cannabigerol analog, CBG-DMH, decrease IOP in the normotensive Brown Norway rat eye independent of CB

  5. A pressure-induced, magnetic transition in pyrrhotite: Implications for the formation pressure of meteorites and diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, S. A.; Egli, R.; Hochleitner, R.; Roud, S. C.; Volk, M.; Le Goff, M.; de Wit, M.

    2010-12-01

    Meteorites and diamonds encounter high-pressures during their geologic histories. These materials commonly contain magnetic inclusions of pyrrhotite, and because magnetic properties are sensitive to strain, pyrrhotite can potentially record the shock or formation pressures of its host. Moreover, pyrrhotite undergoes a pressure-induced phase transition between 1.6 and 6.2 GPa, but the magnetic signature of this transition is poorly known. Here we report magnetic measurements performed at high-pressures on single and multi-domain pyrrhotite. A magnetic hysteresis model based on our observations suggests that multidomain pyrrhotite transforms into single domain-like material, and once in the single domain state, hysteresis loops become progressively squarer and then squatter with increasing pressure, until they ultimately collapse approaching the paramagnetic state at the transition. The ratio of the bulk magnetic coercive force to magnetic remanence for pure pyrrhotite is reversible with pressure and follows a logarithmic law as a function of pressure, which can be used as a magnetic barometer for natural systems.

  6. Predicted formation of superconducting platinum-hydride crystals under pressure in the presence of molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duck Young; Scheicher, Ralph H; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, R J; Ahuja, R

    2011-09-09

    Noble metals adopt close-packed structures at ambient pressure and rarely undergo structural transformation at high pressures. Platinum (Pt) is normally considered to be unreactive and is therefore not expected to form hydrides under pressure. We predict that platinum hydride (PtH) has a lower enthalpy than its constituents solid Pt and molecular hydrogen at pressures above 21.5 GPa. PtH transforms to a hexagonal close-packed or face-centered cubic (fcc) structure between 70 and 80 GPa. Linear response calculations indicate that PtH is a superconductor at these pressures with a critical temperature of about 10-25 K. These findings help to shed light on recent observations of pressure-induced metallization and superconductivity in hydrogen-rich materials. We show that the formation of fcc noble metal hydrides under pressure is common and examine the possibility of superconductivity in these materials.

  7. Formation of an Apokampic Discharge Under Atmospheric Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakun, V. S.; Panarin, V. A.; Pechenitsyn, D. S.; Sosnin, É. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-09-01

    A new phenomenon is observed in a spark discharge developing under normal conditions in air in a discharge circuit with a capacitive decoupling. It consists in the current channel bending becoming a source of a 4-6 cm long plasma jet directed across the channel. The phenomenon is termed an apokampic discharge or an apokamp. Its emission spectrum contains the bands of electron-vibration transitions from the second positive group of molecular nitrogen. The conditions of formation of an apokamp are experimentally determined. A conclusion is drawn that in order construct a physical model of an apokamp, one has to take into account: 1) the presence of a local gas overheating in the site of the current channel bending, 2) the similarity of the current and voltage time dependences in the corona discharge and in the current channel (becoming a source of an apokamp), and 3) the length of the apokamp plasma jet.

  8. Blood pressure changes in spontaneously hypertensive rats correlate with aortic prostacyclin formation.

    PubMed Central

    Fahr, A.; Förster, W.; Taube, C.

    1983-01-01

    1 The relationship between the blood pressure fall, induced by antihypertensive drugs or bleeding, and the formation of prostacyclin (PGI2)-like activity in the thoracic aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rats has been investigated. Inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation was used to assess PGI2-like activity. 2 The decreases in blood pressure produced by clonidine, dihydralazine and prazosin were associated with increases of PGI2-like activity of 50-80%. The increase in PGI2-like activity correlated well with the blood pressure decrease, independently of the mechanism of the fall in blood pressure. PMID:6347301

  9. JET FORMATION FROM MASSIVE YOUNG STARS: MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS VERSUS RADIATION PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-11-20

    Observations indicate that outflows from massive young stars are more collimated during their early evolution compared to later stages. Our paper investigates various physical processes that impact the outflow dynamics, i.e., its acceleration and collimation. We perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations particularly considering the radiation pressure exerted by the star and the disk. We have modified the PLUTO code to include radiative forces in the line-driving approximation. We launch the outflow from the innermost disk region (r < 50 AU) by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. In order to disentangle MHD effects from radiative forces, we start the simulation in pure MHD and later switch on the radiation force. We perform a parameter study considering different stellar masses (thus luminosity), magnetic flux, and line-force strength. For our reference simulation-assuming a 30 M{sub Sun} star-we find substantial de-collimation of 35% due to radiation forces. The opening angle increases from 20 Degree-Sign to 32 Degree-Sign for stellar masses from 20 M{sub Sun} to 60 M{sub Sun }. A small change in the line-force parameter {alpha} from 0.60 to 0.55 changes the opening angle by {approx}8 Degree-Sign . We find that it is mainly the stellar radiation that affects the jet dynamics. Unless the disk extends very close to the star, its force is too small to have much impact. Essentially, our parameter runs with different stellar masses can be understood as a proxy for the time evolution of the star-outflow system. Thus, we have shown that when the stellar mass (thus luminosity) increases with age, the outflows become less collimated.

  10. Mandibular coronoid process in parathyroid hormone-related protein-deficient mice shows ectopic cartilage formation accompanied by abnormal bone modeling.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Shunichi; Suda, Naoto; Fukada, Kenji; Ohyama, Kimie; Yamashita, Yasuo; Hammond, Vicki E

    2003-07-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) null mutant mice were analyzed to investigate an additional role for PTHrP in cell differentiation. We found ectopic cartilage formation in the mandibular coronoid process in newborn mice. While many previous studies involving PTHrP gene knockout mouse have shown that the cartilage in various regions becomes smaller, this is the first report showing an "increase" of cartilage volume. Investigations of mandibular growth using normal mice indicated that coronoid secondary cartilage never formed from E 15 to d 4, but small amount of cartilage temporally formed at d 7, and this also applies to PTHrP-wild type mice. Therefore, PTHrP deficiency consequently advanced the secondary cartilage formation, which is a novel role of PTHrP in chondrocyte differentiation. In situ hybridization of matrix proteins showed that this coronoid cartilage had characteristics of the lower hypertrophic cell zone usually present at the site of endochondral bone formation and/or "chondroid bone" occasionally found in distraction osteogenesis. In addition, the coronoid process in the PTHrP-deficient mouse also showed abnormal expansion of bone marrow and an increase in the number of multinucleated osteoclasts, an indication of abnormal bone modeling. These results indicate that PTHrP is involved in bone modeling as well as in chondrocyte differentiation. In situ hybridization of matrix protein mRNAs in the abnormal mandibular condylar cartilage revealed that this cartilage was proportionally smaller, supporting previous immunohistochemical results.

  11. Relationship between long-term exposure to low-level arsenic in drinking water and the prevalence of abnormal blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanwu; Mao, Guangyun; He, Suxia; Yang, Zuopeng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Qiu, Wenting; Ta, Na; Cao, Li; Yang, Hui; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic increases the risk and incidence of cardiovascular disease. To explore the impact of long-term exposure to low-level arsenic in drinking water on blood pressure including pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), a cross-sectional study was conducted in 2010 in which the blood pressure of 405 villagers was measured, who had been drinking water with an inorganic arsenic content <50 μg/L. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. After adjusting for age, gender, Body Mass Index (BMI), alcohol consumption and smoking, the odds ratios showed a 1.45-fold (95%CI: 0.63-3.35) increase in the group with >30-50 years of arsenic exposure and a 2.95-fold (95%CI: 1.31-6.67) increase in the group with >50 years exposure. Furthermore, the odds ratio for prevalence of abnormal PP and MAP were 1.06 (95%CI: 0.24-4.66) and 0.87 (95%CI: 0.36-2.14) in the group with >30-50 years of exposure, and were 2.46 (95%CI: 0.87-6.97) and 3.75 (95%CI: 1.61-8.71) for the group with >50 years exposure, compared to the group with arsenic exposure ≤ 30 years respectively. Significant trends for Hypertension (p<0.0001), PP (p<0.0001) and MAP (p=0.0016) were found. The prevalence of hypertension and abnormal PP as well as MAP is marked among a low-level arsenic exposure population, and significantly increases with the duration of arsenic exposure.

  12. A NEW MECHANISM FOR MASS ACCRETION UNDER RADIATION PRESSURE IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2010-05-01

    During the formation of a massive star, strong radiation pressure from the central star acts on the dust sublimation front and tends to halt the accretion flow. To overcome this strong radiation pressure, it has been considered that a strong ram pressure produced by a high-mass accretion rate of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} or more is needed. We reinvestigated the necessary condition to overcome the radiation pressure and found a new mechanism for overcoming it. Accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps the mass accretion by its weight. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation. We call this mechanism the 'OMOSHI effect', where OMOSHI is an acronym for 'One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weIght'. Additionally, in Japanese, OMOSHI is a noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. We investigate the generation of the OMOSHI effect using local one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The radiation pressure and the gravitational force are connected through the gas pressure, and to sum up, the radiation pressure is balanced or overcome by the gravitational force. We also discuss the global structure and temporal variation of the accretion flow.

  13. High pressure rheometer for in situ formation and characterization of methane hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Eric B.; Rensing, Patrick J.; Koh, Carolyn A.; Dendy Sloan, E.; Sum, Amadeu K.; Liberatore, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel setup for a high pressure rheometer operating with concentric cylinders geometry for in situ studies of hydrate formation and rheological characterization. The apparatus uses an external high pressure mixing cell to saturate water-in-oil emulsions with methane gas. The capability of mixing combined with a true rheometer design make this apparatus unique in terms of setup and sample formation. We have used the apparatus to form gas hydrates in situ from water-in-oil emulsions and characterize suspension rheological properties such as yield stress and shear-thinning behavior.

  14. Melanin or a Melanin-Like Substance Interacts with the N-Terminal Portion of Prion Protein and Inhibits Abnormal Prion Protein Formation in Prion-Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Taichi; Nishizawa, Keiko; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Oguma, Ayumi; Teruya, Kenta; Kurahashi, Hiroshi; Hara, Hideyuki; Sakaguchi, Suehiro; Doh-Ura, Katsumi

    2017-03-15

    Prion diseases are progressive fatal neurodegenerative illnesses caused by the accumulation of transmissible abnormal prion protein (PrP). To find treatments for prion diseases, we searched for substances from natural resources that inhibit abnormal PrP formation in prion-infected cells. We found that high-molecular-weight components from insect cuticle extracts reduced abnormal PrP levels. The chemical nature of these components was consistent with that of melanin. In fact, synthetic melanin produced from tyrosine or 3-hydroxy-l-tyrosine inhibited abnormal PrP formation. Melanin did not modify cellular or cell surface PrP levels, nor did it modify lipid raft or cellular cholesterol levels. Neither did it enhance autophagy or lysosomal function. Melanin was capable of interacting with PrP at two N-terminal domains. Specifically, it strongly interacted with the PrP region of amino acids 23 to 50 including a positively charged amino acid cluster and weakly interacted with the PrP octarepeat peptide region of residues 51 to 90. However, the in vitro and in vivo data were inconsistent with those of prion-infected cells. Abnormal PrP formation in protein misfolding cyclic amplification was not inhibited by melanin. Survival after prion infection was not significantly altered in albino mice or exogenously melanin-injected mice compared with that of control mice. These data suggest that melanin, a main determinant of skin color, is not likely to modify prion disease pathogenesis, even though racial differences in the incidence of human prion diseases have been reported. Thus, the findings identify an interaction between melanin and the N terminus of PrP, but the pathophysiological roles of the PrP-melanin interaction remain unclear.IMPORTANCE The N-terminal region of PrP is reportedly important for neuroprotection, neurotoxicity, and abnormal PrP formation, as this region is bound by many factors, such as metal ions, lipids, nucleic acids, antiprion compounds, and several

  15. Validation of Noninvasive Indices Of Global Systolic Function in Patients with Normal and Abnormal Loading Conditions: A Simultaneous Echocardiography Pressure-Volume Catheterization Study

    PubMed Central

    Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier; Benito, Yolanda; Sanz, Ricardo; Ripoll, Cristina; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; Péerez del Villar, Candela; Elízaga, Jaime; González-Mansilla, Ana; Barrio, Alicia; Bañares, Rafael; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Background Noninvasive indices based on Doppler-echocardiography are increasingly used in clinical cardiovascular research to evaluate LV global systolic chamber function. Our objectives were 1) to clinically validate ultrasound-based methods of global systolic chamber function to account for differences between patients in conditions of abnormal load, and 2) to assess their sensitivity to load confounders. Methods and Results Twenty-seven patients (8 dilated cardiomyopathy, 10 normal ejection fraction [EF], and 9 end-stage liver disease) underwent simultaneous echocardiography and left heart catheterization with pressure-conductance instrumentation. The reference index, maximal elastance (Emax) was calculated from pressure-volume loop data obtained during acute inferior vena cava occlusion. A wide range of values was observed for LV systolic chamber function (Emax: 2.8 ± 1.0 mmHg/ml), preload, and afterload. Amongst the noninvasive indices tested, the peak ejection intraventricular pressure difference (peak-EIVPD) showed the best correlation with Emax (R=0.75). A significant but weaker correlation with Emax was observed for EF (R=0.41), mid-wall fractional shortening (R=0.51), global circumferential strain(R=−0.53), and strain-rate (R=−0.46). Longitudinal strain and strain-rate failed to correlate with Emax, as did noninvasive single-beat estimations of this index. Principal component and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that peak-EIVPD was less sensitive to load, whereas EF and longitudinal strain and strain-rate were heavily influenced by afterload. Conclusions Current ultrasound methods have limited accuracy to characterize global LV systolic chamber function in a given patient. The Doppler-derived peak-EIVPD should be preferred for this purpose because it best correlates with the reference index and is more robust in conditions of abnormal load. PMID:24173273

  16. Simultaneous formation of inv dup(15) and dup(15q) in a girl with developmental delay: origin of the abnormal chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Abeliovich, D; Dagan, J; Werner, M; Lerer, I; Shapira, Y; Meiner, V

    1995-01-01

    Two de novo abnormal derivatives of chromosome 15, inv dup(15) and dup(15q) were found in a girl with developmental delay and mild dysmorphological signs. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, using DNA probes of the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndromes (PWS/AS) critical region and chromosome-15-specific alpha-satellite, combined with molecular analysis using dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms within the PWS/AS region and the parent-of-origin specific methylation sites at the locus D15S63, shed light on how the abnormal karyotype was formed. We suggest that a translocation between the two homologues of maternal chromosomes 15 resulted in the formation of dup(15q) and two reciprocal products: an acentric fragment of 15q that was lost and a centric fragment that underwent U-type reunion to form inv dup(15).

  17. Tracking CO2 Plume in Deep Saline Formations Utilizing a Time-lapse Pressure Tomography Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Bayer, P.; Brauchler, R.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 storage in deep saline formations is considered as an attractive option to cut down greenhouse gas emissions. Among the major challenges is the development of efficient technologies for controlling and monitoring the evolution of CO2 plumes during and after injection in the underground. As an alternative to the most commonly used geophysical approaches for subsurface characterization, we propose a pressure-based tomographical approach to track CO2 plume history. By taking into account the direct relationship between saturation and flow properties, pressure tomography has the potential not only to detect a plume but also to estimate the saturation of CO2. The experimental set-up of pressure tomography involves injection of brine or CO2 at variable depths (sources). We use a time-lapse approach, considering first the CO2-free formation, and then the multi-phase CO2-brine system. By applying a rapid eikonal-based inversion technique, pressure fluctuations at observation locations (receivers) are utilized to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the apparent single-phase and mixed-phase diffusivity. Evolution of the plume shape is then delineated by comparison of diffusivity tomograms derived from different times. Finally, an integrated value of CO2 saturation within the plume is obtained by means of a single-phase proxy. Applicability of this novel approach is evaluated in different virtual formations. The time-lapse pressure tomographic investigation revealed that knowledge about the spatial heterogeneity of permeability has a remarkable impact on proper characterization of plume shape.

  18. Glass formation and cluster evolution in the rapidly solidified monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dejun; Wen, Dadong; Tian, Zean; Liu, Rangsu

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to examine the glass formation and cluster evolution during the rapid solidification of monatomic metallic liquid Ta under high pressure. The atomic structures in the systems are characterized by the radical distribution function (RDF), Honeycutt-Anderson (H-A) bond-type index method and cluster-type index method (CTIM). It is observed that the defective icosahedra play the critical role in the formation of Ta monatomic metallic glasses (MGs) rather than (12 0 12 0) perfect icosahedra, which have been identified as the basic local atomic units in many multi-component MGs. With the increase of pressure P, the fraction of icosahedral type clusters decreases remarkably in Ta MGs, while the fraction of bcc type clusters rises evidently. The evolution of vitrification degree (DSRO or DMRO) of the rapidly cooled metal Ta system further reveals that a higher pressure P is disadvantageous to the formation of Ta monatomic MGs. The weaker glass forming ability (GFA) of liquid metal Ta obtained under higher pressure P can be contributed to the decrease of DSRO or DMRO which is induced by increasing high pressure P to some extent.

  19. Experimental modeling of pressurized subglacial water flow: Implications for tunnel valley formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelandais, Thomas; Mourgues, Régis; Ravier, Édouard; Pochat, Stéphane; Strzerzynski, Pierre; Bourgeois, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Tunnel valleys are elongated hollows commonly found in formerly glaciated areas and interpreted as resulting from subglacial meltwater erosion beneath ice sheets. Over the past two decades, the number of studies of terrestrial tunnel valleys has continuously increased, and their existence has been hypothesized also on Mars, but their formation mechanisms remain poorly understood. We introduce here an innovative experimental approach to examine erosion by circulation of pressurized meltwater within the substratum and at the ice/substratum interface. We used a permeable substratum (sand) partially covered by a viscous, impermeable, and transparent cap (silicon putty), below which we applied a central injection of pure water. Low water pressures led to groundwater circulation in the substratum only, while water pressures exceeding a threshold that is larger than the sum of the glaciostatic and lithostatic pressures led to additional water circulation and formation of drainage landforms at the cap/substratum interface. The formation of these drainage landforms was monitored through time, and their shapes were analyzed from digital elevation models obtained by stereo-photogrammetry. The experimental landforms include valleys that are similar to natural tunnel valleys in their spatial organization and in a number of diagnostic morphological criteria, such as undulating longitudinal profiles and "tunnel" shapes. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that overpressurized subglacial water circulation controls the formation of tunnel valleys.

  20. Pressure-dependent formation of i-motif and G-quadruplex DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Sugimoto, N

    2015-12-14

    Pressure is an important physical stimulus that can influence the fate of cells by causing structural changes in biomolecules such as DNA. We investigated the effect of high pressure on the folding of duplex, DNA i-motif, and G-quadruplex (G4) structures; the non-canonical structures may be modulators of expression of genes involved in cancer progression. The i-motif structure was stabilized by high pressure, whereas the G4 structure was destabilized. The melting temperature of an intramolecular i-motif formed by 5'-dCGG(CCT)10CGG-3' increased from 38.8 °C at atmospheric pressure to 61.5 °C at 400 MPa. This effect was also observed in the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, a crowding agent. In the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, the G4 structure was less destabilized than in the absence of the crowding agent. P-T stability diagrams of duplex DNA with a telomeric sequence indicated that the duplex is more stable than G4 and i-motif structures under low pressure, but the i-motif dominates the structural composition under high pressure. Under crowding conditions, the P-T diagrams indicated that the duplex does not form under high pressure, and i-motif and G4 structures dominate. Our findings imply that temperature regulates the formation of the duplex structure, whereas pressure triggers the formation of non-canonical DNA structures like i-motif and G4. These results suggest that pressure impacts the function of nucleic acids by stabilizing non-canonical structures; this may be relevant to deep sea organisms and during evolution under prebiotic conditions.

  1. Rogue wave formation under the action of quasi-stationary pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrashkin, A. A.; Oshmarina, O. E.

    2016-05-01

    The process of rogue wave formation on deep water is considered. A wave of extreme amplitude is born against the background of uniform waves (Gerstner waves) under the action of external pressure on free surface. The pressure distribution has a form of a quasi-stationary "pit". The fluid motion is supposed to be a vortex one and is described by an exact solution of equations of 2D hydrodynamics for an ideal fluid in Lagrangian coordinates. Liquid particles are moving around circumferences of different radii in the absence of drift flow. Values of amplitude and wave steepness optimal for rogue wave formation are found numerically. The influence of vorticity distribution and pressure drop on parameters of the fluid is investigated.

  2. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  3. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  4. Effects of hydrogen partial pressure on autotrophic growth and product formation of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Kantzow, Christina; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Low aqueous solubility of the gases for autotrophic fermentations (e.g., hydrogen gas) results in low productivities in bioreactors. A frequently suggested approach to overcome mass transfer limitation is to increase the solubility of the limiting gas in the reaction medium by increasing the partial pressure in the gas phase. An increased inlet hydrogen partial pressure of up to 2.1 bar (total pressure of 3.5 bar) was applied for the autotrophic conversion of hydrogen and carbon dioxide with Acetobacterium woodii in a batch-operated stirred-tank bioreactor with continuous gas supply. Compared to the autotrophic batch process with an inlet hydrogen partial pressure of 0.4 bar (total pressure of 1.0 bar) the final acetate concentration after 3.1 days was reduced to 50 % (29.2 g L(-1) compared to 59.3 g L(-1)), but the final formate concentration was increased by a factor of 18 (7.3 g L(-1) compared to 0.4 g L(-1)). Applying recombinant A. woodii strains overexpressing either genes for enzymes in the methyl branch of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or the genes phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase at an inlet hydrogen partial pressure of 1.4 bar reduced the final formate concentration by up to 40 % and increased the final dry cell mass and acetate concentrations compared to the wild type strain. Solely the overexpression of the two genes for ATP regeneration at the end of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway resulted in an initial switch off of formate production at increased hydrogen partial pressure until the maximum of the hydrogen uptake rate was reached.

  5. Silicon nitride-aluminum oxide solid solution (SiAION) formation and densification by pressure sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Sanders, W. A.; Fiyalko, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Stirred-ball-mill-blended Si3N4 and Al2O3 powders were pressure sintered in order to investigate the mechanism of solid solution formation and densification in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system. Powder blends with Si3N4:Al2O3 mole ratios of 4:1, 3:2, and 2:3 were pressure sintered at 27.6-MN/sq m pressure at temperatures to 17000 C (3090 F). The compaction behavior of the powder blends during pressure sintering was determined by observing the density of the powder compact as a function of temperature and time starting from room temperature. This information, combined with the results of X-ray diffraction and metallographic analyses regarding solutioning and phase transformation phenomena in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system, was used to describe the densification behavior.

  6. Formation mechanisms of rapid pressure recovery around a laminar separation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghwi; Nonomura, Taku; Oyama, Akira; Fujii, Kozo

    2016-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations around 5 % thickness flat plate are conducted at Rec = 5 , 000 , 8 , 000 and 20 , 000 and formation mechanisms of rapid pressure recovery in the surface pressure distribution around laminar separation bubbles are analyzed. Three analyses are applied to investigate the mechanisms of rapid pressure recovery. First, by using the Reynolds averaged streamwise pressure gradient equation, it is confirmed that the "overall Reynolds stress diffusion (ORSD)" is an important factor for inducing rapid pressure recovery. Second, we decompose the ORSD into the "normal Reynolds stress diffusion in the streamwise direction" and the "tangential Reynolds stress diffusion (TRSD) in the wall-normal direction". We show that the TRSD in the wall-normal direction, which corresponds to the momentum transfer in the same direction, is the main contributor to the ORSD. Third, the TRSD in the wall-normal direction is decomposed into two- and three-dimensional components. The results indicate that the rapid pressure recovery is strongly affected by the presence of Reynolds stress rather than by the type of physical phenomena that creates the Reynolds stress. In other words, the three-dimensional turbulent structures are not a necessary condition for the rapid pressure recovery. Grain-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows.

  7. Does Pressure Accentuate General Relativistic Gravitational Collapse and Formation of Trapped Surfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2013-04-01

    It is widely believed that though pressure resists gravitational collapse in Newtonian gravity, it aids the same in general relativity (GR) so that GR collapse should eventually be similar to the monotonous free fall case. But we show that, even in the context of radiationless adiabatic collapse of a perfect fluid, pressure tends to resist GR collapse in a manner which is more pronounced than the corresponding Newtonian case and formation of trapped surfaces is inhibited. In fact there are many works which show such collapse to rebound or become oscillatory implying a tug of war between attractive gravity and repulsive pressure gradient. Furthermore, for an imperfect fluid, the resistive effect of pressure could be significant due to likely dramatic increase of tangential pressure beyond the "photon sphere." Indeed, with inclusion of tangential pressure, in principle, there can be static objects with surface gravitational redshift z → ∞. Therefore, pressure can certainly oppose gravitational contraction in GR in a significant manner in contradiction to the idea of Roger Penrose that GR continued collapse must be unstoppable.

  8. Formation of chemical bonds and morphological studies of a-CNx : Effects of PECVD deposition pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purhanudin, Noorain; Awang, Rozidawati

    2016-11-01

    We report the structural difference and film properties of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films as a function of PECVD deposition pressure using precursor gases of ethane (C2H6) and nitrogen (N2). The Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectra reveal peaks of single C-N (1100 cm-1), double C=C (1500 cm-1), double C=N (1670 cm-1) and triple C≡N (2340 cm-1). A systematic change in the preferential peaks correspond to the C=N and C≡N triple bonds were found to increase as deposition pressure increased. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) provides morphological structure of the film. From the samples prepare at low deposition pressure, the particles tend to agglomerate into clusters with non-homogenous grains distributed over the surface. Higher deposition pressure results in coalescence process of the film, reflecting the formation of grains evenly distributed on the film. The film morphology is increased in voids structure with increase in deposition pressure. Finally, the samples were successfully prepared by PECVD technique with deposition pressure in varied, and the effect of deposition pressure on the chemical bonding and the morphology of the films had been studied.

  9. Friction Stir Welding of Al Alloy 2219-T8: Part I-Evolution of Precipitates and Formation of Abnormal Al2Cu Agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ju; Feng, Zhi-Cao; Frankel, G. S.; Huang, I. Wen; Wang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Ai-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Friction stir welding was performed on AA2219-T8 plates with 6.31 wt pct Cu. The thermal cycles were measured in different regions of the joint during welding. Differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to analyze the evolution of precipitates in the joint. The relationships between welding peak temperature, precipitate evolution, and microhardness distribution are discussed. The temperature in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) ranged from 453 K to 653 K (180 °C to 380 °C). The θ″ and some θ' phases redissolved into the HAZ matrix, while the rest of the θ' phases coarsened. In the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ), the temperature range was from 653 K to 673 K (380 °C to 400 °C), causing both θ″ phase and θ' phase to redissolve. In the weld nugget zone (WNZ), all the θ″, θ', and some of the θ phase (Al2Cu) redissolved. Abnormal θ particles were observed in the WNZ, including agglomerated θ with sizes around 100 to 1000 µm and a ring-shaped distribution of normal size θ particles. The formation of abnormal θ particles resulted from metal plastic flow during welding and the high content of Cu in AA2219. No abnormal θ particles were observed in joints of another AA2219 plate, which had a lower Cu content of 5.83 wt pct.

  10. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  11. Pressure Propagation and Brine Displacement in CO2 Storage Formations: The Role of Sealing Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, C.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Zhou, Q.

    2007-12-01

    If carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies are implemented on a large scale, enormous amounts of CO2 will be injected and sequestered underground, which means that large volumes of native brines will be displaced. Provided that there is hydraulic communication to shallow formations, such brine displacement from deep storage reservoirs may impact the hydrologic conditions in fresh-water aquifers, for example affecting groundwater table levels or discharge and recharge zones. In some cases, brines or brackish water may also be displaced into the capture zone of fresh-water wells. To explore the conditions important for pressure propagation and brine displacement, we conduct a simulation study investigating the multiphase processes resulting from CO2 injection into a large multi-layer geologic system comprising of a storage formation and the confining low- permeability sealing units. The pressure changes and transport patterns within the storage formation are evaluated as a function of time and distance from the injection point. We are particularly interested in the role of pressure mitigation and vertical brine flow through the upper and lower sealing units. Several sensitivity cases are therefore considered varying the permeability of the upper and lower sealing units within reasonable ranges. Our results suggest that seal conductivities on the order of 0.1 to 0.001 millidarcy may allow for considerable pressure attenuation in the storage formation by interlayer brine migration, while still providing an effective barrier to CO2 leakage (since they serve as capillary and permeability seals). It is thus important to fully understand the multi-layer characteristics of a storage site if the possible environmental impacts of CO2 injection on fresh-water aquifers are to be investigated. In addition to conducting detailed simulations of the multi-phase processes, we also investigate whether existing analytical solutions for well drawdown in leaky aquifers can

  12. TURBULENCE SETS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-PRESSURE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y.; Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N.; Jackson, J. M.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2014-11-10

    Despite the simplicity of theoretical models of supersonically turbulent, isothermal media, their predictions successfully match the observed gas structure and star formation activity within low-pressure (P/k < 10{sup 5} K cm{sup –3}) molecular clouds in the solar neighborhood. However, it is unknown whether or not these theories extend to clouds in high-pressure (P/k > 10{sup 7} K cm{sup –3}) environments, like those in the Galaxy's inner 200 pc central molecular zone (CMZ) and in the early universe. Here, we present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array 3 mm dust continuum emission within a cloud, G0.253+0.016, which is immersed in the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. While the log-normal shape and dispersion of its column density probability distribution function (PDF) are strikingly similar to those of solar neighborhood clouds, there is one important quantitative difference: its mean column density is one to two orders of magnitude higher. Both the similarity and difference in the PDF compared to those derived from solar neighborhood clouds match predictions of turbulent cloud models given the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. The PDF shows a small deviation from log-normal at high column densities confirming the youth of G0.253+0.016. Its lack of star formation is consistent with the theoretically predicted, environmentally dependent volume density threshold for star formation which is orders of magnitude higher than that derived for solar neighborhood clouds. Our results provide the first empirical evidence that the current theoretical understanding of molecular cloud structure derived from the solar neighborhood also holds in high-pressure environments. We therefore suggest that these theories may be applicable to understand star formation in the early universe.

  13. Abnormal pressure, natural fractures, and prolific hydrocarbon production in Fall river Sandstone, deep Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenberg, S.A.; Meissner, F.F.

    1986-08-01

    Prolific hydrocarbon production from the Lower Cretaceous Fall River (Dakota) sandstone occurs in several fields in the deep overpressured portion of the Powder River basin. Most of the production to date comes from Buck Draw field at depths greater than 12,000 ft (3657 m). Individual wells in the field are capable of producing more than 2000 BOPD and have cumulatively produced in excess of 1 million bbl. Production comes mainly from stratigraphic traps. The Fall River Formation consists of fluvial, deltaic, and marine sandstones. Most of the productive sandstones in the Buck Draw area are interpreted to be fluvial (point bar) in origin. This interpretation is based upon log-curve shape, mapped subsurface trends, and the vertical sequence of sedimentary structures, lithologic textures, and mineralogic composition that was observed in cores. The fluvial sandstones were deposited by a meandering river that incised through previously deposited delta-front and marine sandstones. The delta-front and marine sandstones are in transitional contact with the underlying Fuson Shale, whereas the fluvial sandstones are in erosional contact with the Fuson. The updip traps to the fluvial sandstones are clay plugs in abandoned meander loops and the less-permeable delta-front and marine sandstones.

  14. Pressure-temperature evolution of Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the Welayati Formation (Kabul Block), Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Stephen; Faryad, Shah Wali

    2015-11-01

    The Welayati Formation, consisting of alternating layers of mica-schist and quartzite with lenses of amphibolite, unconformably overlies the Neoarchean Sherdarwaza Formation of the Kabul Block that underwent Paleoproterozoic granulite-facies and Neoproterozoic amphibolite-facies metamorphic events. To analyze metamorphic history of the Welayati Formation and its relations to the underlying Sherdarwaza Formation, petrographic study and pressure-temperature (P-T) pseudosection modeling were applied to staurolite- and kyanite-bearing mica-schists, which crop out to the south of Kabul City. Prograde metamorphism, identified by inclusion trails and chemical zonation in garnet from the micaschists indicates that the rocks underwent burial from around 6.2 kbar at 525 °C to maximum pressure conditions of around 9.5 kbar at temperatures of around 650 °C. Decompression from peak pressures under isothermal or moderate heating conditions are indicated by formation of biotite and plagioclase porphyroblasts which cross-cut and overgrow the dominant foliation. The lack of sillimanite and/or andalusite suggests that cooling and further decompression occurred in the kyanite stability field. The results of this study indicate a single amphibolite-facies metamorphism that based on P-T conditions and age dating correlates well with the Neoproterozoic metamorphism in the underlying Sherdarwaza Formation. The rocks lack any paragenetic evidence for a preceding granulite-facies overprint or subsequent Paleozoic metamorphism. Owing to the position of the Kabul Block, within the India-Eurasia collision zone, partial replacement of the amphibolite-facies minerals in the micaschist could, in addition to retrogression of the Neoproterozoic metamorphism, relate to deformation associated with the Alpine orogeny.

  15. The formation of chondrules at high gas pressures in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Galy, A; Young, E D; Ash, R D; O'Nions, R K

    2000-12-01

    High-precision magnesium isotope measurements of whole chondrules from the Allende carbonaceous chondrite meteorite show that some aluminum-rich Allende chondrules formed at or near the time of formation of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions and that some others formed later and incorporated precursors previously enriched in magnesium-26. Chondrule magnesium-25/magnesium-24 correlates with [magnesium]/[aluminum] and size, the aluminum-rich, smaller chondrules being the most enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium. These relations imply that high gas pressures prevailed during chondrule formation in the solar nebula.

  16. Formation processes of nanometer sized particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, J.; Vacaresse, G. D. G. J.; Stoffels, W. W.

    2008-09-07

    In this paper, formation and growth processes of nanometer and micrometer sized dust particles in low pressure Ar/CH{sub 4} rf (13.56 MHz) plasmas are investigated as function of temperature in the range 25-100 deg. C. During experiments the pressure was typically 0.8 mbar and the forward power to the plasma was {approx}70 Watt. Measuring the fundamental voltage, current and phase angle together with their harmonics (up to the fourth) gives a good method to monitor the creation and growth of these dust particles in time. Furthermore, laser light scattering measurements are performed to give information about the dust particle density. It has been shown that dust particle formation in these conditions depends greatly on temperature.

  17. Pressure dependence of the compressibility of a micelle and a protein: insights from cavity formation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Brian; Jain, Sandeep; Sarupria, Sapna; Yang, Lu; Garde, Shekhar

    We present results from molecular dynamics simulations of a spherical micelle comprising 80 non-ionic C8E5 surfactants in water, a protein staphylococcal nuclease in water, and bulk n-hexane and water liquids over a range of hydrostatic pressures. We focus specifically on the pressure dependence of the volumetric properties - the partial molar volume and partial molar compressibility - of the micelle, the protein, and bulk liquids. We find that the micelle interior displays properties similar to liquid alkanes over a range of pressures and has a compressibility of ˜100-110×10-6 bar-1 under ambient conditions, which is more than twice that of liquid water. In contrast, the pressure dependence of the protein interior resembles that of solid organic polymeric materials and has a compressibility of ˜ 5-10×10-6 bar-1. We performed extensive analysis of cavity formation in all systems. Interestingly, it is not the average cavity size but the width of the cavity size distribution in a given medium that correlates with the compressibility of that medium over a broad range of pressures up to several kilobars. Correspondingly, the cavity size distribution is most sharply defined in protein interiors and is broadest in the micelle interior and in n-hexane. To explore the correlation between cavity formation and compressibility, we present preliminary calculations using the information theory approach in the bulk water phase. Analysis of cavity formation and, especially, the nature of the cavity size distribution may provide a sensitive probe of the compressibility and flexibility of local molecular environments in inhomogeneous condensed media.

  18. Prediction of Fracture Initiation Pressure and Fracture Geometries in Elastic Isotropic and Anisotropic Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zou, Y. S.; Liu, S.; Liu, G. Q.; Jing, Y. Z.; Ehlig-Economides, C. A.

    2017-03-01

    Laminated formation structures in shale formations may have elastic anisotropic properties, including Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, that impact hydraulic fracturing treatment execution. Fracture initiation pressures and geometries are affected by these properties, especially in cased and in perforated horizontal wells. After initiation, stress concentration around the wellbore may cause the creation of longitudinal fractures (LFs) in the near-wellbore zone that reorient to transverse fractures (TFs) beyond this region. In this case, severe fracture kinking may occur that may hinder the transport of proppants and reduce well productivity. We developed an analytical model based on linear fracture mechanics theory to study the effect of perforation geometries on the initiation fracture pattern. Elastic anisotropy and well deviations were incorporated into simulations. Our simulation results show that when the perforation depth is in a specific range under normal fault regime, the initiation pressures for LFs can be smaller than the maximum horizontal stress σH. This behavior is significant for a smaller σH /σv ratio, but it vanishes for a larger σH /σv ratio. With increasing formation elastic anisotropy (K_{aniso}), the initiation pressures for both LFs and TFs increase, and the critical perforation depth is decreased. Considering the well deviation, the well azimuth and inclination angles affect initiation pressures for both longitudinal and transverse fractures. Results show how perforation depth, shale elastic anisotropy, and well orientation affect fracture initiation patterns. This paper provides a framework for well completion designs and well orientation designs to minimize the fracture kinking in the near-wellbore region in shale formations.

  19. Polymorphism and Formation Mechanism of Nanobipods in Manganese Sulfide Nanocrystals Induced by Temperature or Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Kai; Sui, Yongming; Zhang, Meiguang; Li, Bing; Ma, Yanming; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2012-03-15

    Manganese sulfide (MnS) nanocrystals (NCs) with three different phases were synthesized by one-pot solvent thermal approach. The crystal structures and morphologies were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We found that the crystal structure and morphology of MnS NCs could be controlled by simply varying the reaction temperature. The detailed growth process of MnS nanobipods, including the zinc blende (ZB)-core formation and wurtzite (WZ)-arms growth, provides direct experimental evidence for the polymorphism model. Furthermore, we have studied the stability of metastable ZB- and WZ-MnS NCs under high pressure and found that ZB-nanoparticles and ZB/WZ-nanobipods are stable below their critical pressure, 5.3 and 2.9 GPa, respectively. When pressures exceed the critical point, all these metastable MnS NCs directly convert to the stable rock salt MnS.

  20. Effect of Saturation Pressure Difference on Metal–Silicide Nanopowder Formation in Thermal Plasma Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Shigeta, Masaya; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    A computational investigation using a unique model and a solution algorithm was conducted, changing only the saturation pressure of one material artificially during nanopowder formation in thermal plasma fabrication, to highlight the effects of the saturation pressure difference between a metal and silicon. The model can not only express any profile of particle size–composition distribution for a metal–silicide nanopowder even with widely ranging sizes from sub-nanometers to a few hundred nanometers, but it can also simulate the entire growth process involving binary homogeneous nucleation, binary heterogeneous co-condensation, and coagulation among nanoparticles with different compositions. Greater differences in saturation pressures cause a greater time lag for co-condensation of two material vapors during the collective growth of the metal–silicide nanopowder. The greater time lag for co-condensation results in a wider range of composition of the mature nanopowder.

  1. Explicit modelling of SOA formation from α-pinene photooxidation: sensitivity to vapour pressure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valorso, R.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Raventos-Duran, T.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Ng, N. L.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2011-07-01

    The sensitivity of the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to the estimated vapour pressures of the condensable oxidation products is explored. A highly detailed reaction scheme was generated for α-pinene photooxidation using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A). Vapour pressures (Pvap) were estimated with three commonly used structure activity relationships. The values of Pvap were compared for the set of secondary species generated by GECKO-A to describe α-pinene oxidation. Discrepancies in the predicted vapour pressures were found to increase with the number of functional groups borne by the species. For semi-volatile organic compounds (i.e. organic species of interest for SOA formation), differences in the predicted Pvap range between a factor of 5 to 200 on average. The simulated SOA concentrations were compared to SOA observations in the Caltech chamber during three experiments performed under a range of NOx conditions. While the model captures the qualitative features of SOA formation for the chamber experiments, SOA concentrations are systematically overestimated. For the conditions simulated, the modelled SOA speciation appears to be rather insensitive to the Pvap estimation method.

  2. Explicit modelling of SOA formation from α-pinene photooxidation: sensitivity to vapour pressure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valorso, R.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Raventos-Duran, T.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Ng, N. L.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2011-03-01

    The sensitivity of the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to the estimated vapour pressures of the condensable oxidation products is explored. A highly detailed reaction scheme was generated for α-pinene photooxidation using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A). Vapour pressures (Pvap) were estimated with three commonly used structure activity relationships. The values of Pvap were compared for the set of secondary species generated by GECKO-A to describe α-pinene oxidation. Discrepancies in the predicted vapour pressures were found to increase with the number of functional groups borne by the species. For semi-volatile organic compounds (i.e. organic species of interest for SOA formation), differences in the predicted Pvap range between a factor of 5 to 200 in average. The simulated SOA concentrations were compared to SOA observations in the Caltech chamber during three experiments performed under a range of NOx conditions. While the model captures the qualitative features of SOA formation for the chamber experiments, SOA concentrations are systematically overestimated. For the conditions simulated, the modelled SOA speciation appears to be rather insensitive to the Pvap estimation method.

  3. Star formation in a high-pressure environment: An SMA view of the dust ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    The star formation rate in the Central Molecular Zone is an order of magnitude lower than in the disk of the Galaxy, given the amount of dense gas there. Understanding why star formation is different in this region is crucial if we are to understand the environmental dependence of star formation. Here, we present the detection of high-mass cores in the CMZ's `dust ridge' that have been discovered with the Submillimeter Array. These cores range in mass from ~ 50 - 1800 M⊙ within radii of 0.1 - 0.25 pc. All are young (pre-UCHII), meaning that they are prime candidates for representing the initial conditions of high-mass stars and sub-clusters. We compare these with high-mass cores and clouds in the Galactic disk and find that they are very similar in terms of their masses and sizes, despite being subjected to external pressures that are several magnitudes greater (~ 108 K cm-3). The fact that > 80% of these cores do not show any signs of star-forming activity in such a high-pressure environment leads us to conclude that this is further evidence of the critical density for star formation being heightened in the CMZ due to turbulence.

  4. A runaway slip to the trench due to breaking through abnormally pressurized megathrust under the middle trench slope - The tsunamigenesis of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, G.; Hina, S.; Hamada, Y.; Kameda, J.; Tsuji, T.; Kinoshita, M.; Yamaguchi, A.

    2011-12-01

    The rupture and slip by the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake on March 11 along the plate boundary megathrust propagated upward, broke through the ordinal up-dip limit of the seismogenic zone at a depth of ~15 km, and reached the trench. The extremely large tsumani caused by rapid uplift of the middle to lower slope more than 10 m took place at ~60s after the rise of the earthquake as a result of the runaway slip along the megathrust more than a few tens of meters The 2011 Tohoku earthquake is examined from the point of view of the structure of the forearc before the earthquake, the reflection property of the megathrust around the ordinal up-dip limit of the seismogenic zone, thermal state of the shallow portion of subduction zone, and dehydration process of underthrust sediment. The Pacific plate subducts westward at a dip angle of 4.6°. Middle and lower slopes dip eastward at angles of ~2.5° and ~8.0°, respectively. The prisms beneath the middle and lower slopes are inferred to be under extenionally and compressively critical states, respectively because of clear internal deformation features and aftershock earthquakes. Rapid uplift causing the tsunami during the 2011 earthquake might have associated with the internal deformation of the prism. The critical states of the prisms suggest that effective basal frictions of the plate boundary megathrust might be μb'<0,03 for the middle prism and μb'>0.08 for the lower prism. The megathrust under the middle slope is characterized by a reflector with negative polarity, of which amplitude increases landward. Such seismic character suggests that the megathrust includes abnormally pressurized fluid. Underthrust sediments in this part of the Japan Trench are dominated by pelagic and siliceous diatomaceous silt with clay. Dehydration kinetics of Opal A to quartz, clay transformation of smectite-illite, and thermal condition suggests that maximum dehydration from the sediments would take place from ~50 km to 60 km from the

  5. Ionized gas pressure correlates with star formation intensity in nearby starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tianxing; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Yang, Huan

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the electron density of the ionized gas and thus the thermal pressure in HII regions; and compare that to the SFR (star formation rate) surface density for a combined sample of about 40 green peas and Lyman Break Analogs at z < 0.30. The electron density of the ionized gas is measured from sulfur line ratio ([SII] 6716 / 6731). We find that the SFR surface density is correlated with the electron density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the star-forming galaxies with SFR surface density above a certain threshold. This work shows quantitatively the correlation between SFR surface density and electron density and that between SFR surface density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the nearby starburst galaxies. This is consistent with theoretical models of disks (e.g. Kim et al. (2011) if we assume that the thermal pressure in HII regions is comparable to the total diffuse gas pressure at the midplane of the diffuse neutral gas. It is also in agreement with the results from star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2.5. We might infer that the starburst galaxies at low-redshift (z < 0.3) share similar physical properties to the galaxies at high redshift (z ~ 2.5).

  6. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Pressure dependence of stabilized Criegee intermediate formation from a sequence of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Greg T; Donahue, Neil M

    2011-05-05

    Ozonolysis is a key reaction in atmospheric chemistry, although important details of the behavior of the ozonolysis intermediates are not known. The key intermediate in ozonolysis, the Criegee intermeiate (CI), is known to quickly isomerize, with the favored unimolecular pathway depending on the relative barriers to isomerization. Stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI), those with energy below any barriers to isomerization, may result from initial formation with low energy or collisional stabilization of high energy CI. Bimolecular reactions of SCI have been proposed to play a role in OH formation and nucleation of new particles, but unimolecular reactions of SCI may well be too fast for these to be significant. We present measurements of the pressure dependence of SCI formation for a set of alkenes utilizing a hexafluoroacetone scavenger. We studied four alkenes (2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (TME), trans-5-decene, cyclohexene, α-pinene) to characterize how size and cyclization (endo vs exo) affect the stability of Criegee intermediates formed in ozonolysis. SCI yields in ozonolysis were measured in a high pressure flow reactor within a range of 30-750 Torr. The linear alkenes show considerable stabilization with trans-5-decene showing 100% stabilization at ∼400 Torr and TME having 65% stabilization at 710 Torr. Extrapolation of the yields for linear alkenes to 0 Torr shows yields significantly above zero, indicating that a fraction of their CI are formed below the barrier to isomerization. CI from endocyclic alkenes show little to no stabilization and appear to have neglible stabilization at 0 Torr. Cyclohexene derived CI showed no stabilization even at 650 Torr, while α-pinene CI had ∼15% stabilization at 740 Torr. Our results show a strong dependence of SCI formation on carbon number; adding just 2 to 3 CI carbons in linear alkenes increases stabilization by a factor of 10. Stabilization for endocyclic alkenes, at atmospheric pressure, begins to occur at a carbon

  8. Direct measurement of the differential pressure during drop formation in a co-flow microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Tostado, Chris P; Xu, Jian-Hong; Lu, Yang-Cheng; Luo, Guang-Sheng

    2014-04-07

    In this study, we developed a new method for the direct measurement of differential pressures in a co-flow junction microfluidic device using a Capillary Laplace Gauge (CLG). The CLG - used inside the microchannel device--was designed using a tapered glass-capillary set up in co-flow junction architecture with a three-phase liquid-liquid-gas system with two flowing liquid phases and an entrained gas phase. By taking advantage of the Laplace equation, basic geometric relations and an integrated image analysis program, the movement of the entrained gas phase with the flow of the liquid-phases is tracked and monitored, allowing the gauge to function as an ultra-sensitive, integrated, differential pressure sensor measuring fluctuations in the liquid-dispersed phase channel pressure as small as tens of Pascals caused by droplet formation. The gauge was used to monitor the drop formation and breakup process in a co-flow junction microfluidic device under different flow conditions across a large range (1 × 10(-3) to 2.0 × 10(-1)) of capillary numbers. In addition to being able to monitor short and long term dispersed phase pressure fluctuation trends for both single drop and large droplet populations, the gauge was also used to clearly identify a transition between the dripping and jetting flow regimes. Overall, the combination of a unique, integrated image analysis program with this new type of sensor serves as a powerful tool with great potential for a variety of different research and industrial applications requiring sensitive microchannel pressure measurements.

  9. Analysis of Pore Pressure and Stress Distribution around a Wellbore Drilled in Chemically Active Elastoplastic Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, Hamid; Rahman, S. S.

    2011-09-01

    Drilling in low-permeable reactive shale formations with water-based drilling mud presents significant challenges, particularly in high-pressure and high-temperature environments. In previous studies, several models were proposed to describe the thermodynamic behaviour of shale. Most shale formations under high pressure are expected to undergo plastic deformation. An innovative algorithm including work hardening is proposed in the framework of thermo-chemo-poroelasticity to investigate the effect of plasticity on stresses around the wellbore. For this purpose a finite-element model of coupled thermo-chemo-poro-elastoplasticity is developed. The governing equations are based on the concept of thermodynamics of irreversible processes in discontinuous systems. In order to solve the plastic problem, a single-step backward Euler algorithm containing a yield surface-correction scheme is used to integrate the plastic stress-strain relation. An initial stress method is employed to solve the non-linearity of the plastic equation. In addition, super convergent patch recovery is used to accurately evaluate the time-dependent stress tensor from nodal displacement. The results of this study reveal that thermal and chemical osmosis can significantly affect the fluid flow in low-permeable shale formations. When the salinity of drilling mud is higher than that of pore fluid, fluid is pulled out of the formation by chemical osmotic back flow. Similar results are observed when the temperature of drilling mud is lower than that of the formation fluid. It is found that linear elastic approaches to wellbore stability analysis appear to overestimate the tangential stress around the wellbore and produce more conservative stresses compared to the results of field observation. Therefore, the drilling mud properties obtained from the elastoplastic wellbore stability in shales provide a safer mud weight window and reduce drilling cost.

  10. Use of abnormal and health psychology as topics in a classroom format to reduce alcohol and other drug abuse among college students at risk.

    PubMed

    Miley, W M

    2001-12-01

    This study was done to assess whether classes containing topics derived from two college courses, Abnormal Psychology and Health Psychology, could be used in a class room format to reduce alcohol and other drug abuse among at-risk college students. Topics covered included stress and stress management, alcohol and other drug use and abuse, chronic illnesses and psychological disorders that develop from an unhealthy lifestyle, and factors that play a role in good health and well-being. Students were enrolled in a semester-long course for college credit as an alternative to punitive sanctions for on-campus alcohol violations and other drug violations. The Midwest Institute on Drug Use Survey and the CORE Alcohol and Drug Survey were administered on the first and last days of class. Analysis indicated a significant self-reported reduction in drug use and associated negative symptoms and behavioral effects. Women were more likely to report reductions in drug use than men.

  11. High-pressure soot formation and diffusion flame extinction characteristics of gaseous and liquid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Ahmet Emre

    High-pressure soot formation and flame stability characteristics were studied experimentally in laminar diffusion flames. For the former, radially resolved soot volume fraction and temperature profiles were measured in axisymmetric co-flow laminar diffusion flames of pre-vaporized n-heptane-air, undiluted ethylene-air, and nitrogen and carbon dioxide diluted ethylene-air at elevated pressures. Abel inversion was used to re-construct radially resolved data from the line-of-sight spectral soot emission measurements. For the latter, flame extinction strain rate was measured in counterflow laminar diffusion flames of C1-4 alcohols and hydrocarbon fuels of n-heptane, n-octane, iso-octane, toluene, Jet-A, and biodiesel. The luminous flame height, as marked by visible soot radiation, of the nitrogen- and helium-diluted n-heptane and nitrogen- and carbon dioxide-diluted ethylene flames stayed constant at all pressures. In pure ethylene flames, flame heights initially increased with pressure, but changed little above 5 atm. The maximum soot yield as a function of pressure in nitrogen-diluted n-heptane diffusion flames indicate that n-heptane flames are slightly more sensitive to pressure than gaseous alkane hydrocarbon flames at least up to 7 atm. Ethylene's maximum soot volume fractions were much higher than those of ethane and n-heptane diluted with nitrogen (fuel to nitrogen mass flow ratio is about 0.5). Pressure dependence of the peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel's carbon content converted to soot, was assessed and compared to previous measurements with other gaseous fuels. Maximum soot volume fractions were consistently lower in carbon dioxide-diluted flames between 5 and 15 atm but approached similar values to those in nitrogen-diluted flames at 20 atm. This observation implies that the chemical soot suppression effect of carbon dioxide, previously demonstrated at atmospheric pressure, is also present at elevated pressures up to 15 atm

  12. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  13. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  14. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  15. Formation and properties of water from quartz and hydrogen at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futera, Zdenek; Yong, Xue; Pan, Yuanming; Tse, John S.; English, Niall J.

    2017-03-01

    Quartz, as the most stable low-pressure polymorph of silica (SiO2), is widely abundant in Earth's crust and mantle, exhibiting relatively high chemical stability. Although silica is only slightly soluble in water at ambient conditions, producing silicon-based weakly acidic compounds, Shinozaki et al. (2014) have shown recently that water itself can be formed by dissolution of SiO2 in H2 fluid under high- temperature and pressure conditions. Here, we have simulated this process via molecular-dynamics techniques based on a reactive force-field description of the Si O2 /H2 interface. Diffusion of the H2 fluid into the quartz crystal lattice was observed upon increasing temperature and pressure, followed by interaction of dissociated, atomic hydrogen with oxygen atoms in the SiO2 lattice, disrupting the lattice and leading to the formation of water. Interestingly, water is evolved in the subsurface region of the silica, and it remains confined there, isolated from the hydrogen fluid, which corresponds precisely to the ice-like spectroscopic patterns observed experimentally. The over-pressured water formed from quartz and H2 is a possible trigger for nucleating enigmatic deep earthquakes in the continental mantle lithosphere.

  16. Formation risk of toxic and other unwanted compounds in pressure-assisted thermally processed foods.

    PubMed

    Bravo, K Segovia; Ramírez, R; Durst, R; Escobedo-Avellaneda, Z J; Welti-Chanes, J; Sanz, P D; Torres, J A

    2012-01-01

    Consumers demand, in addition to excellent eating quality, high standards of microbial and chemical safety in shelf-stable foods. This requires improving conventional processing technologies and developing new alternatives such as pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP). Studies in PATP foods on the kinetics of chemical reactions at temperatures (approximately 100 to 120 °C) inactivating bacterial spores in low-acid foods are severely lacking. This review focuses on a specific chemical safety risk in PATP foods: models predicting if the activation volume value (V(a) ) of a chemical reaction is positive or negative, and indicating if the reaction rate constant will decrease or increase with pressure, respectively, are not available. Therefore, the pressure effect on reactions producing toxic compounds must be determined experimentally. A recent model solution study showed that acrylamide formation, a potential risk in PATP foods, is actually inhibited by pressure (that is, its V(a) value must be positive). This favorable finding was not predictable and still needs to be confirmed in food systems. Similar studies are required for other reactions producing toxic compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines, N-nitroso compounds, and hormone like-peptides. Studies on PATP inactivation of prions, and screening methods to detect the presence of other toxicity risks of PATP foods, are also reviewed.

  17. Formation of carbon nanoparticle using Ar+CH4 high pressure nanosecond discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, K.; Dong, X.; Iwashita, S.; Czarnetzki, U.; Shiratani, M.

    2014-06-01

    We have studied formation of carbon nanoparticles using Ar+CH4 high pressure nanosecond discharge non-thermal plasmas. Transition pressure from uniform glow discharges to filamentary ones was clarified to obtain conditions under which uniform glow discharges are sustained. We have produced nanoparticles using the glow discharges, and then we have collected nanoparticles on the grounded electrode by the filtered vacuum collection method. Size distribution analysis reveals that the CH4 concentration is an important parameter in controlling nanoparticle growth. We have also studied film deposition on the powered electrode and the grounded electrode. The deposition rate on the powered electrode is 7 times higher than that on the grounded electrode. Optical emission observations suggest that radical generation rate near the powered electrode is twice higher than that near the grounded electrode, leading to high deposition rate on the powered electrode.

  18. Mixing unmixables: Unexpected formation of Li-Cs alloys at low pressure.

    PubMed

    Desgreniers, Serge; Tse, John S; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Tse, Justin J

    2015-10-01

    Contrary to the empirical Miedema and Hume-Rothery rules and a recent theoretical prediction, we report experimental evidence on the formation of Li-Cs alloys at very low pressure (>0.1 GPa). We also succeeded in synthesizing a pure nonstoichiometric and ordered crystalline phase from an approximately equimolar mixture and resolved its structure using the maximum entropy method. The new alloy has a primitive cubic cell with the Li atom situated in the center and the Cs at the corners. This structure is stable to at least 10 GPa and has an anomalously high coefficient of thermal expansion at low pressure. Analysis of the valence charge density shows that electrons are donated from Cs to the Li "p"-orbitals, resulting in a rare formal oxidation state of -1 for Li. The observation indicates the diversity in the bonding of the seeming simple group I Li element.

  19. Formation of the Yakuno ophiolite; accretionary subduction under medium-pressure-type metamorphic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osozawa, Soichi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Koitabashi, Toru

    2004-11-01

    The notion that the Yakuno ophiolite and overlying Maizuru Group represents an accretionary prism formed during the Permian evolution of Japan on the Yakuno eruptive sequence, association of hemipelagic mudstone with silicic tuff, exotic fossiliferous limestones derived from previously accreted sea-mounts, upward coarsening of sequences terrigenous sandstone and conglomerate, and mildly deformed Permian and Triassic forearc basin formations. The most important indicator, however, is the seaward imbrication and repetition observed in both the Maizuru Group and the ophiolite itself. D1 deformation structures include axial-planar foliations (pressure-solution cleavage for the Maizuru Group and granulite-amphibolite metamorphic layering in the ophiolite), flattening type strain, symmetric pressure shadows and fringes, and isoclinal folds showing axial-planar foliations and thrust faulting at their overturned limb. The exceptional asymmetry observed indicates seaward-directed shearing near the thrust, while D1 structures in the Maizuru zone are explained by off-scraping, above the basal decollement. The later Jurassic D2 kink fold structure includes a first-order asymmetric kink with a brittle thrust at its overturned limb, more-or-less coeval with M2 retrograde metamorphism. Medium-pressure M1 prograde metamorphism in the Yakuno ophiolite produced layering of granulite and amphibolite, and in the Maizuru Group, formation of illite along pressure-solution cleavage of mudstones. The metamorphic grade is controlled by the stratigraphic relationships and appears typical of that in ocean floor regions. However, there was only one episode of M1 prograde metamorphism which occurred contemporaneously with D1 off-scraping. Given that subduction zones are normally characterized by high P/ T metamorphic regimes, the observed P/ T history appears to reflect relatively unusual conditions. Such high thermal gradients may plausibly reflect the approach of a young, hot oceanic plate

  20. Equatorial disk formation around rotating stars due to ram pressure confinement by the stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, J. E.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The axisymmetric 2D supersonic solution of a rotating, radiation-driven stellar wind presently obtained by a simple approximation predicts the formation of a dense equatorial disk, when the star's rotation rate lies above a threshold value that depends on the ratio of the wind's terminal speed to the escape speed of the star. The disk is formed because the trajectories of the wind leaving the stellar surface at high latitudes carry it down to the equatorial plane; there, the material passes through a standing oblique shock atop the disk; it is therefore the ram pressure of the polar wind that compresses and confines the disk.

  1. Suppression of aflatoxin B1-induced lipid abnormalities and macromolecule-adduct formation by L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Sachan, D S; Yatim, A M

    1992-01-01

    The fatty liver and hypolipidemia caused by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats fed Purina Rat Chow with or without L-carnitine supplement for 6 weeks. In Experiment 1, the rats (n = 20) were divided into four groups, i.e., nonsupplemented control (NSC), nonsupplemented AFB1 (NSA), carnitine supplemented control (CSC), and carnitine supplemented AFB1 (CSA). The NSA and CSA groups were given an oral dose of [3H]AFB1 (1 mg/kg) 6 hr before kill. In Experiment 2 (n = 10) there were only NSA and CSA groups and they were killed 24 hr post-AFB1 administration. Hepatic and plasma concentrations of total lipid, triglycerides, AFB1-macromolecules adducts and urinary excretion of AFB1 were determined. Carnitine supplementation ameliorated AFB1-induced hepatic steatosis and hypolipidemia. Supplementary carnitine reduced covalent binding of AFB1 to hepatic DNA, RNA, and protein. The carnitine effect was more pronounced after 24 hr than after 6 hr of AFB1 treatment. We conclude that supplementary carnitine suppressed AFB1-induced fatty liver and AFB1-macromolecule adduct formation in the rat.

  2. Subnanosecond processes in the stage of breakdown formation in gas at a high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Bykov, N. M.; Ivanov, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the prebreakdown stage of a discharge in nitrogen at pressures of a few tens of atmospheres, gap voltages higher than 140 kV, and a voltage rise time of about 1 ns. Breakdown occurs at the front of the voltage pulse; i.e., the time of breakdown formation is shorter than the front duration. It is shown that, in gaps with a nonuniform electric field, the breakdown formation time is mainly determined by the time of avalanche development to the critical number of charge carriers. The subsequent stages of breakdown (the development of the ionization wave and the buildup of the conductivity in the weakly conducting channel bridging the gap) turn out to be shorter than this time or comparable to it.

  3. Self-regulating galaxy formation. Part 1: HII disk and Lyman alpha pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Assuming a simple but physically based prototype for behavior of interstellar material during formation of a disk galaxy, coupled with the lowest order description of infall, a scenario is developed for self-regulated disk galaxy formation. Radiation pressure, particularly that of Lyman depha (from fluorescence conversion Lyman continuum), is an essential component, maintaining an inflated disk and stopping infall when only a small fraction of the overall perturbation has joined the disk. The resulting galaxies consist of a two dimensional family whose typical scales and surface density are expressable in terms of fundamental constants. The model leads naturally to galaxies with a rich circumgalactic environment and flat rotation curves (but is weak in its analysis of the subsequent evolution of halo material).

  4. Periodic seepage face formation and water pressure distribution along a vertical boundary of an aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazayeri Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Nielsen, Peter; Cartwright, Nick; Perrochet, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Detailed measurements of the piezometric head from sand flume experiments of an idealised coastal aquifer forced by a simple harmonic boundary condition across a vertical boundary are presented. The measurements focus on the pore pressures very close to the interface (x = 0.01m) and throw light on the details of the boundary condition, particularly with respect to meniscus suction and seepage face formation during the falling tide. Between the low and the mean water level, the response is consistent with meniscus suction free models in terms of both the vertical mean head and oscillation amplitude profiles and is consistent with the observation that this area of the interface was generally within the seepage face. Above the mean water level, the influence of meniscus formation is significant with the mean pressure head being less than that predicted by capillary free theory and oscillation amplitudes decaying faster than predicted by suction free models. The reduced hydraulic conductivity in this area due to partial drainage of pores on the falling tide also causes a delay in the response to the rising tide. The combined influence of seepage face formation, meniscus suction and reduced hydraulic conductivity generate higher harmonics with amplitudes of up to 26% of the local main harmonic. To model the influence of seepage face formation and meniscus suction a numerical solution of the Richards' equation was developed and evaluated against the data. The model-data comparison shows a good agreement with the behaviour high above the water table sensitive to the choice of moisture retention parameters.

  5. Significant Enhancement of H2 Formation in Disk Galaxies under Strong Ram Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Benjamin; Bekki, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    We show for the first time that H2 formation on dust grains can be enhanced in disk galaxies under strong ram pressure (RP). We numerically investigate how the time evolution of H i and H2 components in disk galaxies orbiting a group/cluster of galaxies can be influenced by the hydrodynamical interaction between the gaseous components of the galaxies and the hot intracluster medium. We find that compression of H i caused by RP increases H2 formation in disk galaxies before RP rapidly strips H i, cutting off the fuel supply and causing a drop in H2 density. We also find that the level of this H2 formation enhancement in a disk galaxy under RP depends on the mass of its host cluster dark matter halo, the initial positions and velocities of the disk galaxy, and the disk inclination angle with respect to the orbital plane. We demonstrate that dust growth is a key factor in the evolution of the H i and H2 mass in disk galaxies under strong RP. We discuss how the correlation between H2 fractions and surface gas densities of disk galaxies evolves with time in the galaxies under RP. We also discuss whether galaxy-wide star formation rates (SFRs) in cluster disk galaxies can be enhanced by RP if the SFRs depend on H2 densities.

  6. A Computational, Tissue-Realistic Model of Pressure Ulcer Formation in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Solovyev, Alexey; Allegretti, Ana; Krishnan, Shilpa; Henzel, M Kristi; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Brienza, David; An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-06-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are predisposed to pressure ulcers (PU). PU remain a significant burden in cost of care and quality of life despite improved mechanistic understanding and advanced interventions. An agent-based model (ABM) of ischemia/reperfusion-induced inflammation and PU (the PUABM) was created, calibrated to serial images of post-SCI PU, and used to investigate potential treatments in silico. Tissue-level features of the PUABM recapitulated visual patterns of ulcer formation in individuals with SCI. These morphological features, along with simulated cell counts and mediator concentrations, suggested that the influence of inflammatory dynamics caused simulations to be committed to "better" vs. "worse" outcomes by 4 days of simulated time and prior to ulcer formation. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters suggested that increasing oxygen availability would reduce PU incidence. Using the PUABM, in silico trials of anti-inflammatory treatments such as corticosteroids and a neutralizing antibody targeted at Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) suggested that, at best, early application at a sufficiently high dose could attenuate local inflammation and reduce pressure-associated tissue damage, but could not reduce PU incidence. The PUABM thus shows promise as an adjunct for mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and design of therapies in the setting of PU.

  7. Preparation of monodisperse microspheres from the Laplace pressure induced droplet formation in micromolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang-Hyung; Kim, Jongmin; Kang, Sung-Min; Lee, Jinkee; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Monodisperse microspheres play critical roles in many applications such as micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), chemical release systems, optical materials and various biological applications. Although microfluidic systems have been developed for producing monodisperse microspheres, it still definitely requires pressure driven flow for continuous fluid injection as well as use of surfactant to achieve their uniformity. Here, we present a novel molding method that generates monodisperse microspheres through surface-tension-induced flow. Two immiscible fluids that consist of photocurable monomer and hydrophobic oil are sequentially applied onto the mold. The mold geometry results in Laplace pressure induced droplet formation, and these droplets formed are individually localized into each micromold. Photopolymerization of the droplets allow for the formation of polymer microspheres with narrow size distribution (CV =1.9%). We obtain the microspheres with diameter ranging from 20 to 300 μm by modulating mold dimensions. We provide a synthesis method to produce microspheres in micromolds for various reaction schemes: UV-polymerization, sol-gel reactions and colloidal assemblies.

  8. Low-pressure clathrate-hydrate formation in amorphous astrophysical ice analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S.; Hudgins, D.; Freund, F.

    1991-01-01

    In modeling cometary ice, the properties of clathrate hydrates were used to explain anomalous gas release at large radial distances from the Sun, and the retention of particular gas inventories at elevated temperatures. Clathrates may also have been important early in solar system history. However, there has never been a reasonable mechanism proposed for clathrate formation under the low pressures typical of these environments. For the first time, it was shown that clathrate hydrates can be formed by warming and annealing amorphous mixed molecular ices at low pressures. The complex microstructures which occur as a result of clathrate formation from the solid state may provide an explanation for a variety of unexplained phenomena. The vacuum and imaging systems of an Hitachi H-500H Analytical Electron Microscope was modified to study mixed molecular ices at temperatures between 12 and 373 K. The resulting ices are characterized by low-electron dose Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). The implications of these results for the mechanical and gas release properties of comets are discussed. Laboratory IR data from similar ices are presented which suggest the possibility of remotely observing and identifying clathrates in astrophysical objects.

  9. High Pressure and Temperature Core Formation as an Alternative to the "Late Veneer" Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Pando, K.; Humayun, M.; Danielson, L.

    2011-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au and the Platinum Group Elements - Pd Pt, Rh, Ru, Ir, Os) are commonly utilized to constrain accretion processes in terrestrial differentiated bodies due to their affinity for FeNi metal [1]. These eight elements exhibit highly siderophile behavior, but nonetheless have highly diverse metal-silicate partition coefficients [2]. Therefore the near chondritic relative concentrations of HSEs in the terrestrial and lunar mantles, as well as some other bodies, are attributed to late accretion rather than core formation [1]. Evaluation of competing theories, such as high pressure metal-silicate partitioning or magma ocean hypotheses has been hindered by a lack of relevant partitioning data for this group of eight elements. In particular, systematic studies isolating the effect of one variable (e.g. temperature or melt compositions) are lacking. Here we undertake new experiments on all eight elements, using Fe metal and FeO-bearing silicate melts at fixed pressure, but variable temperatures. These experiments, as well as some additional planned experiments should allow partition coefficients to be more accurately calculated or estimated at the PT conditions and compositions at which core formation is thought to have occurred.

  10. The collaborative effect of ram pressure and merging on star formation and stripping fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischko, J. C.; Steinhauser, D.; Schindler, S.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the effect of ram pressure stripping (RPS) on several simulations of merging pairs of gas-rich spiral galaxies. We are concerned with the changes in stripping efficiency and the time evolution of the star formation rate. Our goal is to provide an estimate of the combined effect of merging and RPS compared to the influence of the individual processes. Methods: We make use of the combined N-body/hydrodynamic code GADGET-2. The code features a threshold-based statistical recipe for star formation, as well as radiative cooling and modeling of galactic winds. In our simulations, we vary mass ratios between 1:4 and 1:8 in a binary merger. We sample different geometric configurations of the merging systems (edge-on and face-on mergers, different impact parameters). Furthermore, we vary the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) in rough steps: the speed of the merging system relative to the ICM between 500 and 1000 km s-1, the ICM density between 10-29 and 10-27 g cm-3, and the ICM direction relative to the mergers' orbital plane. Ram pressure is kept constant within a simulation time period, as is the ICM temperature of 107 K. Each simulation in the ICM is compared to simulations of the merger in vacuum and the non-merging galaxies with acting ram pressure. Results: Averaged over the simulation time (1 Gyr) the merging pairs show a negligible 5% enhancement in SFR, when compared to single galaxies under the same environmental conditions. The SFRs peak at the time of the galaxies first fly-through. There, our simulations show SFRs of up to 20 M⊙ yr-1 (compared to 3 M⊙ yr-1 of the non-merging galaxies in vacuum). In the most extreme case, this constitutes a short-term (<50 Myr) SFR increase of 50 % over the non-merging galaxies experiencing ram pressure. The wake of merging galaxies in the ICM typically has a third to half the star mass seen in the non-merging galaxies and 5% to 10% less gas mass. The joint effect of RPS and merging, according

  11. Isotope mass balances in deep formations: How to consider the influence of pressure, temperature and salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Veith; Myrttinen, Anssi; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2010-05-01

    Stable carbon isotopes are a sensitive tool to trace migration and to quantify mixing of CO2 from different sources. This technique is well described for application at the surface and under close-to-surface conditions. However, in order to use isotope mass balances when monitoring the fate of CO2 at carbon storage sites, some distinctive characteristics of deep formations have to be considered. High pressures (from 30 to 200 bar), temperatures (up to over 120 ° C) and salinities (approx. 100 to 400 g/L) influence the carbonate equilibrium as activities, fugacities and the stoichiometric equilibrium constants (fCO2, Kcalcite*, K1*, K2*) change with these parameters. Furthermore, isotopic fractionation is also affected by these parameters. Various relations are published, describing these dependencies with approaches of different complexity and exactness. In this field of application, available sampling data is usually limited, so that averaging and interpolation of input data may lead to noticeable error ranges. Under these conditions, the most elaborated algorithms do not necessarily perform better than more simple ones with respect to the overall error of the calculations. This work therefore compares the available approaches to describe temperature, pressure and salinity dependence in carbonate equilibrium calculations, as well as carbon isotope fractionation in this process with respect to the best ratio of accuracy in carbon storage site monitoring applications. It stands out that the fugacity and the stoichiometric constants involved in DIC-speciation are heavily influenced by pressure, temperature and salinity in general, whereas the individual composition of the solution may be simplified, at least for NaCl-type brines. With respect to fractionation, temperature plays a key role; pressure and salinity variations contribute to the species distribution only to a small amount. This study was conducted as a part of the R&D programme CLEAN, which is funded by

  12. Volume and expansivity changes of micelle formation measured by pressure perturbation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Fan, Helen Y; Nazari, Mozhgan; Chowdhury, Saria; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2011-03-01

    We present the application of pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) as a new method for the volumetric characterization of the micelle formation of surfactants. The evaluation is realized by a global fit of PPC curves at different surfactant concentration ranging, if possible, from below to far above the CMC. It is based on the knowledge of the temperature dependence of the CMC, which can for example be characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry. We demonstrate the new approach for decyl-β-maltopyranoside (DM). It shows a strong volume increase upon micelle formation of 16 ± 2.5 mL/mol (+4%) at 25 °C, and changes with temperature by -0.1 mL/(mol K). The apparent molar expansivity (E(S)) decreases upon micelle formation from 0.44 to 0.31 mL/(mol K) at 25 °C. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the expansivity of DM in solution (as compared with that of maltose) does not agree with the principal behavior described for polar (E(S)(T) decreasing) and hydrophobic (E(S)(T) increasing) solutes or moieties before. The results are discussed in terms of changes in hydration of the molecules and internal packing of the micelles and compared with the volumetric effects of transitions of proteins, DNA, lipids, and polymers.

  13. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guerra, Vasco; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents ˜40-120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O_3^{*} , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O_3^{*} is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O2(a 1Δg) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established.

  14. Salt stress induces the formation of a novel type of 'pressure wood' in two Populus species.

    PubMed

    Janz, Dennis; Lautner, Silke; Wildhagen, Henning; Behnke, Katja; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Rennenberg, Heinz; Fromm, Jörg; Polle, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    • Salinity causes osmotic stress and limits biomass production of plants. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms underlying hydraulic adaptation to salinity. • Anatomical, ecophysiological and transcriptional responses to salinity were investigated in the xylem of a salt-sensitive (Populus × canescens) and a salt-tolerant species (Populus euphratica). • Moderate salt stress, which suppressed but did not abolish photosynthesis and radial growth in P. × canescens, resulted in hydraulic adaptation by increased vessel frequencies and decreased vessel lumina. Transcript abundances of a suite of genes (FLA, COB-like, BAM, XET, etc.) previously shown to be activated during tension wood formation, were collectively suppressed in developing xylem, whereas those for stress and defense-related genes increased. A subset of cell wall-related genes was also suppressed in salt-exposed P. euphratica, although this species largely excluded sodium and showed no anatomical alterations. Salt exposure influenced cell wall composition involving increases in the lignin : carbohydrate ratio in both species. • In conclusion, hydraulic stress adaptation involves cell wall modifications reciprocal to tension wood formation that result in the formation of a novel type of reaction wood in upright stems named 'pressure wood'. Our data suggest that transcriptional co-regulation of a core set of genes determines reaction wood composition.

  15. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  16. Effect of pressure on structure and NO sub X formation in CO-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.; Miller, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of nitric oxide formation in a laminar CO-air diffusion flame over a pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The carbon monoxide (CO) issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port coaxially into a coflowing stream of air confined within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. Nitric oxide concentrations from the flame were measured at two carbon monoxide (fuel) flow rates: 73 standard cubic/min and 146 sccm. Comparison of the present data with data in the literature for a methane-air diffusion flame shows that for flames of comparable flame height (8 to 10 mm) and pseudoequivalence ratio (0.162), the molar emission index of a CO-air flame is significantly greater than that of a methane-air flame.

  17. Detection of carbon dioxide leakage during injection in deep saline formations by pressure tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Linwei; Bayer, Peter; Brauchler, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    CO2 injected into storage formations may escape to the overlying permeable layers. Mixed-phase diffusivity, namely the ratio of hydraulic conductivity and specific storage of the phase mixture, declines with increasing CO2 saturation. Thus, it can be an indicator of CO2 leakage. In this study, we perform interference brine or CO2 injection tests in a synthetic model, including a storage reservoir, an above aquifer, and a caprock. Pressure transients derived from an observation well are utilized for a travel-time based inversion technique. Variations of diffusivity are resolved by inverting early travel time diagnostics, providing an insight of plume development. Results demonstrate that the evolution of CO2 leakage in the above aquifer can be inferred by interpreting and comparing the pressure observations, travel times, and diffusivity tomograms from different times. The extent of the plume in reservoir and upper aquifer are reconstructed by clustering the time-lapse data sets of the mixed-phase diffusivity, as the diffusivity cannot be exactly reproduced by the inversion. Furthermore, this approach can be used to address different leaky cases, especially for leakage occurring during the injection.

  18. Soot formation and temperature structure in small methane-oxygen diffusion flames at subcritical and supercritical pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyun I.; Guelder, Oemer L.

    2010-06-15

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the characteristics of laminar methane-oxygen diffusion flames up to 100 atmospheres. The influence of pressure on soot formation and on the structure of the temperature field was investigated over the pressure range of 10-90 atmospheres in a high-pressure combustion chamber using a non-intrusive, line-of-sight spectral soot emission diagnostic technique. Two distinct zones characterized the appearance of a methane and pure oxygen diffusion flame: an inner luminous zone similar to the methane-air diffusion flames, and an outer diffusion flame zone which is mostly blue. The flame height, marked by the visible soot radiation emission, was reduced by over 50% over the pressure range of 10-100 atmospheres. Between 10 and 40 atmospheres, the soot levels increased with increasing pressure; however, above 40 atmospheres the soot concentrations decreased with increasing pressure. (author)

  19. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed methanefoxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt; the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogenabstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames, for reasons that still must be explained.

  20. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed mc1hane/oxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt: the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames. for reasons that still must be explained.

  1. Reducing Mechanical Formation Damage by Minimizing Interfacial Tension and Capillary Pressure in Tight Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Arshad; Talib Shuker, Muhannad; Rehman, Khalil; Bahrami, Hassan; Memon, Muhammad Khan

    2013-12-01

    Tight gas reservoirs incur problems and significant damage caused by low permeability during drilling, completion, stimulation and production. They require advanced improvement techniques to achieve flow gas at optimum rates. Water blocking damage (phase Trapping/retention of fluids) is a form of mechanical formation damage mechanism, which is caused by filtrate invasion in drilling operations mostly in fracturing. Water blocking has a noticeable impact on formation damage in gas reservoirs which tends to decrease relative permeability near the wellbore. Proper evaluation of damage and the factors which influence its severity is essential to optimize well productivity. Reliable data regarding interfacial tension between gas and water is required in order to minimize mechanical formation damage potential and to optimize gas production. This study was based on the laboratory experiments of interfacial tension by rising drop method between gas-brine, gas-condensate and gas-brine. The results showed gas condensate has low interfacial tension value 6 - 11 dynes/cm when compared to gas-brine and gas- diesel which were 44 - 58 dynes/cm and 14 - 19 dynes/cm respectively. In this way, the capillary pressure of brine-gas system was estimated as 0.488 psi, therefore diesel-gas system was noticed about 0.164 psi and 0.098 psi for condensate-gas system. A forecast model was used by using IFT values to predict the phase trapping which shows less severe phase trapping damage in case of condensate than diesel and brine. A reservoir simulation study was also carried out in order to better understand the effect of hysteresis on well productivity and flow efficiency affected due to water blocking damage in tight gas reservoirs.

  2. Heterogeneous Earth Accretion and Incomplete Metal-Silicate Reequilibration at High Pressure During Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubie, D. C.; Mann, U.; Frost, D. J.; Kegler, P.; Holzheid, A.; Palme, H.

    2007-12-01

    We present a new model of core formation, based on the partitioning of siderophile elements, that involves accreting the Earth through a series of collisions with smaller bodies that had already differentiated at low pressure. Each impact results in a magma ocean in which the core of the impactor reequilibrates with silicate liquid at high pressure before merging with the Earth's protocore. The oxygen contents of the chondritic compositions of the proto-Earth and impactors can be varied. The compositions of coexisting metal and silicate are determined through mass balance combined with partitioning equations for Ni, FeO, Si and other siderophile elements. The oxygen fugacity is fixed by the partitioning of FeO and is a function of P, T and bulk oxygen content. An important constraint for core formation is that core-mantle partition coefficients for Ni and Co must both converge to values of 23-28. Based on a recent study of the partitioning of Ni and Co over a wide P-T range (Kegler et al., EPSL, submitted) together with other published data, this constraint is not satisfied by a single- stage core formation model at any conditions because the partition coefficients converge at values that are much too low. In the present multi-stage model, the correct values can be reached if only part of each impactor core reequilibrates with silicate liquid in the magma ocean (as proposed by previous models based on Hf-W isotope studies). Physically, this would mean that impactor cores fail to emulsify completely as they sink through the magma ocean. Incorporating other elements (e.g. V and Cr) in the model requires, in addition, that the bulk composition of the impactors changes during accretion from reduced (FeO-poor) to oxidised FeO-rich). Then, with the resulting increase in fO2, incomplete reequilibration of the cores during the final 20-30% of Earth accretion is required to satisfy the Ni-Co constraint. In addition, this model enables the concentrations of O and Si in the

  3. Possible mechanism underlying high-pressure unfolding of proteins: formation of a short-period high-density hydration shell.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Tomonari; Sekino, Hideo

    2011-09-21

    Hydration effects on high-pressure unfolding of a hydrophobic polymer chain are investigated through a multiscale simulation based on density-functional theory. The results strongly suggest the following: a thermodynamic origin for high-pressure denaturation, i.e., the decrease in volume due to the unfolding can be explained by the formation of a short-period high-density hydration shell.

  4. ABNORMAL POLLEN VACUOLATION1 (APV1) is required for male fertility by contributing to anther cuticle and pollen exine formation in maize.

    PubMed

    Somaratne, Yamuna; Tian, Youhui; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Mingming; Huo, Yanqing; Cao, Fengge; Zhao, Li; Chen, Huabang

    2017-01-12

    Anther cuticle and pollen exine are the major protective barriers against various stresses. The proper functioning of genes expressed in the tapetum is vital for the development of pollen exine and anther cuticle. In this study, we report a tapetum-specific gene, Abnormal Pollen Vacuolation1 (APV1), in maize that affects anther cuticle and pollen exine formation. The apv1 mutant was completely male sterile. Its microspores were swollen, less vacuolated, with a flat and empty anther locule. In the mutant, the anther epidermal surface was smooth, shiny, and plate-shaped compared with the three-dimensional crowded ridges and randomly formed wax crystals on the epidermal surface of the wild-type. The wild-type mature pollen had elaborate exine patterning, whereas the apv1 pollen surface was smooth. Only a few unevenly distributed Ubisch bodies were formed on the apv1 mutant, leading to a more apparent inner surface. A significant reduction in the cutin monomers was observed in the mutant. APV1 encodes a member of the P450 subfamily, CYP703A2-Zm, which contains 530 amino acids. APV1 appeared to be widely expressed in the tapetum at the vacuolation stage, and its protein signal co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) signal. RNA-Seq data revealed that most of the genes in the fatty acid metabolism pathway were differentially expressed in the apv1 mutant. Altogether, we suggest that APV1 functions in the fatty acid hydroxylation pathway which is involved in forming sporopollenin precursors and cutin monomers that are essential for the development of pollen exine and anther cuticle in maize.

  5. The anatomy of a star-forming galaxy: pressure-driven regulation of star formation in simulated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benincasa, S. M.; Wadsley, J.; Couchman, H. M. P.; Keller, B. W.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the regulation of star formation in star-forming galaxies through a suite of high-resolution isolated galaxy simulations. We use the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GASOLINE, including photoelectric heating and metal cooling, which produces a multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM). We show that representative star formation and feedback sub-grid models naturally lead to a weak, sub-linear dependence between the amount of star formation and changes to star formation parameters. We incorporate these sub-grid models into an equilibrium pressure-driven regulation framework. We show that the sub-linear scaling arises as a consequence of the non-linear relationship between scaleheight and the effective pressure generated by stellar feedback. Thus, simulated star formation regulation is sensitive to how well vertical structure in the ISM is resolved. Full galaxy discs experience density waves which drive locally time-dependent star formation. We develop a simple time-dependent, pressure-driven model that reproduces the response extremely well.

  6. Electrohydrodynamic pressure enhanced by free space charge for electrically induced structure formation with high aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hongmiao; Wang, Chunhui; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Xiangming

    2014-10-28

    Electrically induced structure formation (EISF) is an interesting and unique approach for generating a microstructured duplicate from a rheological polymer by a spatially modulated electric field induced by a patterned template. Most of the research on EISF have so far used various dielectric polymers (with an electrical conductivity smaller than 10(-10) S/m that can be considered a perfect dielectric), on which the electric field induces a Maxwell stress only due to the dipoles (or bounded charges) in the polymer molecules, leading to a structure with a small aspect ratio. This paper presents a different approach for improving the aspect ratio allowed in EISF by doping organic salt into the perfect dielectric polymer, i.e., turning the perfect dielectric into a leaky dielectric, considering the fact that the free space charges enriched in the leaky dielectric polymer can make an additional contribution to the Maxwell stress, i.e., electrohydrodynamic pressure, which is desirable for high aspect ratio structuring. Our numerical simulations and experimental tests have shown that a leaky dielectric polymer, with a small conductivity comparable to that of deionized water, can be much more effective at being electrohydrodynamically deformed into a high aspect ratio in comparison with a perfect dielectric polymer when both of them have roughly the same dielectric constant.

  7. Formation and characteristics of patterns in atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lizhen; Liu, Zhongwei; Mao, Zhiguo; Li, Sen; Chen, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The patterns in radio-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (RF DBD) are studied at atmospheric pressure of argon (Ar) or helium (He) mixed with nitrogen (N2) gas. When a small amount of N2 is mixed with He or Ar gas, discharge patterns are formed. In a N2/He gas mixture, besides the filament discharge that forms patterns, a glow background discharge is also observed, whereas only the filament discharge forms patterns in a N2/Ar gas mixture. The resolution of the hexagonal pattern as a function of applied power and gas flow rate is then explored. On the basis of spatial-temporal images taken using an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), we find that there is no interleaving of two transient hexagon sublattices in N2/Ar or N2/He plasma in RF DBD patterns, which are totally different from those in which surface charges dominated in the mid-frequency DBD plasma. This supports our hypothesis that the bulk charges dominate the pattern formation in RF DBD.

  8. Isomekes: A fundamental tool to determine the formation pressure for diamond-inclusion pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvaro, Matteo; Angel, Ross; Mazzucchelli, Mattia; Nestola, Fabrizio; Domeneghetti, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    Because diamond is almost chemically pure carbon and extremely chemically inert, the structure and chemistry of diamond reveals very little about its conditions of formation. Much of what is believed about the genesis and distribution of diamond in the Earth's mantle has therefore been deduced indirectly from the characterisation of its mineral inclusions. The possible depths of entrapment of an inclusion within a host phase (and hence the depth of growth of the host diamond) can be determined if (1) the final pressure of the inclusion can be measured, (2) the Equations of State (EoS) of the host and inclusion phases are known, and (3) the elastic interaction between the host and inclusion can be calculated without gross assumptions. Given knowledge of all three, an isomeke line in P-T space (from the Greek "equal" and "length", Adams et al. 1975) can be calculated. The isomeke defines the conditions at which the host and inclusion would have had the same P, T and volume, and thus represents possible entrapment conditions. The recent application (Nestola et al. 2011; Howell et al. 2012) of in-situ diffraction techniques to the measurement of entrapped inclusions provides accurate final inclusion pressures. We have reformulated the elasticity problem so that, unlike previous work, these calculations can be performed with any form of equation of state and thermal expansion, and are not restricted to linear elasticity or just invertible EoS. This alone has significant advantages in the precision of the calculated depths of formation. Numerical calculations have been performed with a new module of EoS routines (Angel et al. 2014) that has been added to the publicly-available CrysFML library. The question remains as to what uncertainties in calculated depths of formation arise from uncertainties in experimentally-determined EoS. We will present two geologically-relevant examples, for olivine and garnet in diamond. Our calculations show that there is still a clear need

  9. Diagenesis, compaction, and fluid chemistry modeling of a sandstone near a pressure seal: Lower Tuscaloosa Formation, Gulf Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weedman, S.D.; Brantley, S.L.; Shiraki, R.; Poulson, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    Petrographic, isotopic, and fluid-inclusion evidence from normally and overpressured sandstones of the lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in the Gulf Coast documents quartz-overgrowth precipitation at 90??C or less, calcite cement precipitation at approximately 100?? and 135??C, and prismatic quartz cement precipitation at about 125??C. Textural evidence suggests that carbonate cement dissolution occurred before the second phases of calcite and quartz precipitation, and was followed by precipitation of grain-rimming chlorite and pore-filling kaolinite. Geochemical calculations demonstrate that present-day lower Tuscaloosa Formation water from 5500 m depth could either dissolve or precipitate calcite cements in model simulations of upward water flow. Calcite dissolution or precipitation depends on PCO2 variability with depth (i.e., whether there is one or two-phase flow) or on the rate of generation of CO2 with depth. Calculations suggest that 105-106 rock volumes of water are required to flow through the section to precipitate 1-10% calcite cement. Compaction analysis suggests that late-stage compaction occurred in normally pressured sandstones after dissolution of carbonate cements, but was hindered in overpressured sandstones despite the presence of high porosity. These results document the inhibition of compaction by overpressured fluids and constrain the timing of pressure seal formation. Modeling results demonstrate that the proposed paragenesis used to constrain timing of pressure seal formation is feasible, and that most of the cement diagenesis occurred before the pressure seal became effective as a permeability barrier.

  10. Pressure-driven assembly of spherical nanoparticles and formation of 1D nanostructure arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huimeng

    2010-08-01

    External pressure was used to engineer nanoparticle assembly. Reversible manipulation of the unit-cell dimensions of a 3D ordered nanoparticle array under a hydrostatic pressure field enabled the fine-tuning of the interparticle distance. Under a uniaxial pressure field, nanoparticles were forced to contact and coalesce into nanorods or nanowires and ordered ultrahigh-density arrays (see picture; small arrows denote pressure).

  11. Soot volume fraction measurement in low-pressure methane flames by combining laser-induced incandescence and cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Effect of pressure on soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Desgroux, P.; Mercier, X.; Lefort, B.; Lemaire, R.; Therssen, E.; Pauwels, J.F.

    2008-10-15

    Soot volume fraction (f{sub v}) profiles are recorded in low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen flat flames using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Experiments are performed from 20 to 28 kPa in flames having the same equivalence ratio (2.32). Calibration is performed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and indicates a very weak soot volume fraction (0.066 ppb at 21.33 kPa and 0.8 ppb at 26.66 kPa in the burnt gases). Soot volume fraction is found to increase continuously after a given distance above the burner (HAB) and tends to level off in the burnt gases. The reaction time resolution available in low-pressure flames makes it possible to examine the early steps of soot formation. The variation of the LII signal with laser energy before the LII ''plateau'' region is much weaker at the beginning of soot formation than after a given reaction time. The LII time decays are nearly constant within the first millimetres, whereas an increase in the decay, correlated with the growth of the primary soot particle, is observed later. The growth of soot volume fraction is then analysed by considering the variation of the derivative function df{sub v}/dt with f{sub v}. Three regimes having respectively a positive slope, a constant slope, and a negative slope are observed and are interpreted with respect to the soot inception process. Finally, a very important sensitivity of f{sub v} with pressure P (at 30 mm HAB) is observed, leading to a power law, f{sub v}=KP{sup 11}, confirmed by extinction measurements (by CRDS). The observed dependence of f{sub v} with pressure could be a result of the prominence of the early soot inception process in the investigated low-pressure flames. (author)

  12. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  13. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Ethylene/Air Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation was studied within laminar premixed ethylene/air flames (C/O ratios of 0.78-0.98) stabilized on a flat-flame burner operating at atmospheric pressure. Measurements included soot volume fractions by both laser extinction and gravimetric methods, temperatures by multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscopy, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of condensable hydrocarbons by gravimetric sampling. and velocities by laser velocimetry. These data were used to find soot surface growth rates and primary soot particle nucleation rates along the axes of the flames. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates were correlated successfully by predictions based on typical hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall. These results suavest that reduced soot surface growth rates with increasing residence time seen in the present and other similar flames were mainly caused by reduced rates of surface activation due to reduced H atom concentrations as temperatures decrease as a result of radiative heat losses. Primary soot particle nucleation rates exhibited variations with temperature and acetylene concentrations that were similar to recent observations for diffusion flames; however, nucleation rates in the premixed flames were significantly lower than in, the diffusion flames for reasons that still must be explained. Finally, predictions of yields of major gas species based on mechanisms from both Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt were in good agreement with present measurements and suggest that H atom concentrations (relevant to HACA mechanisms) approximate estimates based on local thermodynamic equilibrium in the present flames.

  14. High positive end-expiratory pressure: only a dam against oedema formation?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Healthy piglets ventilated with no positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and with tidal volume (VT) close to inspiratory capacity (IC) develop fatal pulmonary oedema within 36 h. In contrast, those ventilated with high PEEP and low VT, resulting in the same volume of gas inflated (close to IC), do not. If the real threat to the blood-gas barrier is lung overinflation, then a similar damage will occur with the two settings. If PEEP only hydrostatically counteracts fluid filtration, then its removal will lead to oedema formation, thus revealing the deleterious effects of overinflation. Methods Following baseline lung computed tomography (CT), five healthy piglets were ventilated with high PEEP (volume of gas around 75% of IC) and low VT (25% of IC) for 36 h. PEEP was then suddenly zeroed and low VT was maintained for 18 h. Oedema was diagnosed if final lung weight (measured on a balance following autopsy) exceeded the initial one (CT). Results Animals were ventilated with PEEP 18 ± 1 cmH2O (volume of gas 875 ± 178 ml, 89 ± 7% of IC) and VT 213 ± 10 ml (22 ± 5% of IC) for the first 36 h, and with no PEEP and VT 213 ± 10 ml for the last 18 h. On average, final lung weight was not higher, and actually it was even lower, than the initial one (284 ± 62 vs. 347 ± 36 g; P = 0.01). Conclusions High PEEP (and low VT) do not merely impede fluid extravasation but rather preserve the integrity of the blood-gas barrier in healthy lungs. PMID:23844622

  15. Methane hydrate synthesis from ice: Influence of pressurization and ethanol on optimizing formation rates and hydrate yield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Po-Chun.; Huang, Wuu-Liang; Stern, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline methane gas hydrate (MGH) was synthesized using an ice-seeding method to investigate the influence of pressurization and ethanol on the hydrate formation rate and gas yield of the resulting samples. When the reactor is pressurized with CH4 gas without external heating, methane hydrate can be formed from ice grains with yields up to 25% under otherwise static conditions. The rapid temperature rise caused by pressurization partially melts the granular ice, which reacts with methane to form hydrate rinds around the ice grains. The heat generated by the exothermic reaction of methane hydrate formation buffers the sample temperature near the melting point of ice for enough time to allow for continuous hydrate growth at high rates. Surprisingly, faster rates and higher yields of methane hydrate were found in runs with lower initial temperatures, slower rates of pressurization, higher porosity of the granular ice samples, or mixtures with sediments. The addition of ethanol also dramatically enhanced the formation of polycrystalline MGH. This study demonstrates that polycrystalline MGH with varied physical properties suitable for different laboratory tests can be manufactured by controlling synthesis procedures or parameters. Subsequent dissociation experiments using a gas collection apparatus and flowmeter confirmed high methane saturation (CH 4·2O, with n = 5.82 ± 0.03) in the MGH. Dissociation rates of the various samples synthesized at diverse conditions may be fitted to different rate laws, including zero and first order.

  16. In Situ Formation and Evolution of Gas Hydrates in Water-in-Oil Emulsions Using Pressure Rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensing, P. J.; Liberatore, M. W.; Tonmukayakul, N.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D.

    2008-07-01

    In oil and gas production and transportation a major concern is the formation of gas hydrates (crystalline gas-water inclusion compounds that are stable at high pressures and low temperatures). Gas hydrates have a tenacious ability to plug pipelines, and may lead to unscheduled shut downs. The successful operation of pipeline transport with gas hydrates particles will depend on the ability to control gas hydrate agglomerations and depositions. Gas hydrates can be thermodynamically inhibited but this is proving cost ineffective and environmentally unfriendly. For this reason the oil/gas industry is moving to hydrate management rather than traditional methods of thermodynamic inhibition. One intriguing possibility would be to convert the water in the pipelines to non-agglomerating gas hydrates and then flow the slurry. However, this cannot be reliably achieved until basic understanding of hydrate slurry rheology is gained. To develop this fundamental understanding, in situ pressurized gas hydrate formation and rheological measurements from a water-in-oil emulsion have been conducted. In this work, small amplitude oscillatory and steady shear techniques have been used to characterize the rheological properties of these systems. The results demonstrate that hydrate formation can be detected in steady shear and oscillatory measurements, where a large viscosity (and elastic modulus) increase coincides with hydrate formation. Since temperature and pressure affect the thermodynamic stability of hydrates these are particular key variables that need to be tuned for this system.

  17. Abnormal Central Pulsatile Hemodynamics in Adolescents With Obesity: Higher Aortic Forward Pressure Wave Amplitude Is Independently Associated With Greater Left Ventricular Mass.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Gary L; Pajaniappan, Mohanasundari; DiPietro, Amy; Darracott-Woei-A-Sack, Kathryn; Kapuku, Gaston K

    2016-11-01

    We hypothesized that increased aortic forward pressure wave amplitude (Pf), which is determined by characteristic impedance (Zc) in the proximal aorta, is the primary hemodynamic determinant of obesity-associated higher left ventricular (LV) mass in adolescents. Aortic pulsatile hemodynamics were measured noninvasively in 60 healthy adolescents (age 14-19 years; 42% male; 50% black) by sequential recordings of pulse waveforms via tonometry, brachial blood pressure, and pulsed Doppler and diameter of the LV outflow tract using 2-dimensional echocardiography. Adolescents who were overweight/obese (n=23; age 16.0±0.3 years; body mass index ≥85th percentile) had higher LV mass index, brachial and carotid systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, normalized Zc and Pf compared with adolescents with healthy weight (n=37; 16.7±0.3 years; body mass index <85th percentile, all P<0.01). In contrast, there was no difference in mean or diastolic blood pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid augmentation index, or aortic backward wave amplitude (all P>0.05). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis that included age, sex, race, normalized Zc, and brachial systolic blood pressure revealed that body mass index (B±SE; 0.49±0.20, P=0.02, R(2)=0.26), aortic Pf (0.22±0.07; P<0.02, R(2) change=0.11), and cardiac output (2.82±1.02, P<0.01; R(2) change=0.08) were significant correlates of LV mass index (total R(2)=0.44, P<0.01). These findings suggest that higher aortic Pf is a major hemodynamic determinant of increased LV mass in adolescents with elevated adiposity. Improper matching between aortic diameter and pulsatile flow during early systole potentially contributes to the early development of LV hypertrophy in childhood obesity.

  18. Cenosphere formation from heavy fuel oil: a numerical analysis accounting for the balance between porous shells and internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Vanteru M.; Rahman, Mustafa M.; Gandi, Appala N.; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Schrecengost, Robert A.; Roberts, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) as a fuel in industrial and power generation plants ensures the availability of energy at economy. Coke and cenosphere emissions from HFO combustion need to be controlled by particulate control equipment such as electrostatic precipitators, and collection effectiveness is impacted by the properties of these particulates. The cenosphere formation is a function of HFO composition, which varies depending on the source of the HFO. Numerical modelling of the cenosphere formation mechanism presented in this paper is an economical method of characterising cenosphere formation potential for HFO in comparison to experimental analysis of individual HFO samples, leading to better control and collection. In the present work, a novel numerical model is developed for understanding the global cenosphere formation mechanism. The critical diameter of the cenosphere is modelled based on the balance between two pressures developed in an HFO droplet. First is the pressure (Prpf) developed at the interface of the liquid surface and the inner surface of the accumulated coke due to the flow restriction of volatile components from the interior of the droplet. Second is the pressure due to the outer shell strength (PrC) gained from van der Walls energy of the coke layers and surface energy. In this present study it is considered that when PrC ≥ Prpf the outer shell starts to harden. The internal motion in the shell layer ceases and the outer diameter (DSOut) of the shell is then fixed. The entire process of cenosphere formation in this study is analysed in three phases: regression, shell formation and hardening, and post shell hardening. Variations in pressures during shell formation are analysed. Shell (cenosphere) dimensions are evaluated at the completion of droplet evaporation. The rate of fuel evaporation, rate of coke formation and coke accumulation are analysed. The model predicts shell outer diameters of 650, 860 and 1040 µm, and inner diameters are 360, 410

  19. Interpretation of in-situ pressure and flow measurements of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.; Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Lie, K.; Finley, S.J.; Nowak, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary interpretation of in-situ pressure and flow measurements of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP facility is located 660 m underground in the Salado, a bedded salt deposit. Shut-in pressure tests were conducted prior to, and subsequent to, the mining of a circular drift in order to evaluate excavation effects on pore pressure, permeability, and host rock heterogeneity. Borehole deformation was measured during these tests and used to correct for changes in the test region volume due to salt creep effects. Preliminary pre-excavation results indicate that the flow properties of this layered host rock are heterogeneous. Resulting pore pressures range from 1 to 14 MPa and permeabilities range from below measurable to about 1 nanodarcy. Normalized borehole diameter change rates were between {minus}4 and 63 microstrains/day. Shut-in pressures and borehole diameters in all test boreholes were affected by the excavation of Room Q coincident with the advances of the boring machine. Preliminary results from post-excavation test results show decreased pore pressures compared to pre-excavation values.

  20. Biogenic amines formation in high-pressure processed pike flesh (Esox lucius) during storage.

    PubMed

    Křížek, Martin; Matějková, Kateřina; Vácha, František; Dadáková, Eva

    2014-05-15

    The effects of vacuum packaging followed by high pressure processing on the shelf-life of fillets of pike (Esox lucius) were examined. Samples were pressure-treated at 300 and 500 MPa and stored at 3.5 and 12 °C for up to 70 days. The content of eight biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, histamine, tyramine, tryptamine and phenylethylamine) were determined. Putrescine showed very good correspondence with the level of applied pressure and organoleptic properties. Polyamines spermidine and spermine did not show statistically significant changes with the level of applied pressure and the time of storage. Increased cadaverine and tyramine contents were found in samples with good sensory signs, stored for longer time and/or kept at 12 °C, thus indicating the loss of freshness. Tryptamine and phenylethylamine were not detected in pressure-treated samples kept at 3.5 °C. Histamine was not detected in samples of good quality.

  1. "Real-time" core formation experiments using X-ray tomography at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, H. C.; Anzures, B.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The process of differentiation is a defining moment in a planet's history. Direct observation of this process at work is impossible in our solar system because it was complete within the first few tens of millions of years. Geochemical and geophysical evidence points to magma ocean scenarios to explain differentiation of large planets such as Earth. Smaller planets and planetesimals likely never achieved the high temperatures necessary for wide scale melting. In these smaller bodies, silicates may have only partially melted, or not melted at all. Furthermore, isotopic signatures in meteorites suggest that some planetesimals differentiated within just a few million years. Achieving efficient core segregation on this rapid timescale is difficult, particularly in a solid or semi-solid silicate matrix. Direct measurements of metallic melt migration velocities have been difficult due to experimental limitations and most previous work has relied on geometric models based on 2-D observations in quenched samples. We have employed a relatively new technique of in-situ, high pressure, high temperature, X-ray micro-tomography coupled with 3-D numerical simulations to evaluate the efficiency of melt percolation in metal/silicate systems. From this, we can place constraints on the timing of core formation in early solar system bodies. Mixtures of olivine and KLB-1 peridotite and up to 12 vol% FeS were pre-synthesized to achieve an initial equilibrium microstructure of silicate and sulfide. The samples were then were then pressed again to ~2GPa, and heated to ~1300°C to collect X-ray tomography images as the partially molten samples were undergoing shear deformation. The reconstructed 3-D images of melt distribution were used as the input for lattice Boltzmann simulations of fluid flow through the melt network and calculations of permeability and melt migration velocity. Our in-situ x-ray tomography results are complemented by traditional 2-D image analysis and high

  2. A sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin prevents abnormality of circadian rhythm of blood pressure in salt-treated obese rats.

    PubMed

    Takeshige, Yui; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Rahman, Asadur; Kittikulsuth, Wararat; Nakano, Daisuke; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ohmori, Koji; Kohno, Masakazu; Ogata, Hiroaki; Nishiyama, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Studies were performed to examine the effects of the selective sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor empagliflozin on urinary sodium excretion and circadian blood pressure in salt-treated obese Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Fifteen-week-old obese OLETF rats were treated with 1% NaCl (in drinking water), and vehicle (0.5% carboxymethylcellulose, n=10) or empagliflozin (10 mg kg(-1)per day, p.o., n=11) for 5 weeks. Blood pressure was continuously measured by telemetry system. Glucose metabolism and urinary sodium excretion were evaluated by oral glucose tolerance test and high salt challenge test, respectively. Vehicle-treated OLETF rats developed non-dipper type blood pressure elevation with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Compared with vehicle-treated animals, empagliflozin-treated OLETF rats showed an approximately 1000-fold increase in urinary glucose excretion and improved glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. Furthermore, empagliflozin prevented the development of blood pressure elevation with normalization of its circadian rhythm to a dipper profile, which was associated with increased urinary sodium excretion. These data suggest that empagliflozin elicits beneficial effects on both glucose homeostasis and hypertension in salt-replete obese states.

  3. On Porosity Formation in Metal Matrix Composites Made with Dual-Scale Fiber Reinforcements Using Pressure Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadi, Reihaneh; Pillai, Krishna M.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    This is the first such study on porosity formation phenomena observed in dual-scale fiber preforms during the synthesis of metal matrix composites (MMCs) using the gas pressure infiltration process. In this paper, different mechanisms of porosity formation during pressure infiltration of Al-Si alloys into Nextel™ 3D-woven ceramic fabric reinforcements (a dual-porosity or dual-scale porous medium) are studied. The effect of processing conditions on porosity content of the ceramic fabric infiltrated by the alloys through the gas PIP (PIP stands for "Pressure Infiltration Process" in which liquid metal is injected under pressure into a mold packed with reinforcing fibers.) is investigated. Relative density (RD), defined as the ratio of the actual MMC density and the density obtained at ideal 100 pct saturation of the preform, was used to quantify the overall porosity. Increasing the infiltration temperature led to an increase in RD due to reduced viscosity of liquid metal and enhanced wettability leading to improved feedability of the liquid metal. Similarly, increasing the infiltration pressure led to enhanced penetration of fiber tows and resulted in higher RD and reduced porosity. For the first time, the modified Capillary number ( Ca*), which is found to predict formation of porosity in polymer matrix composites quite well, is employed to study porosity in MMCs made using PIP. It is observed that in the high Ca* regime which is common in PIP, the overall porosity shows a strong downward trend with increasing Ca*. In addition, the effect of matrix shrinkage on porosity content of the samples is studied through using a zero-shrinkage Al-Si alloy as the matrix; usage of this alloy as the matrix led to a reduction in porosity content.

  4. Influence of ambient pressure on the hole formation in laser deep drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, S.; Richter, S.; Heisler, F.; Ullsperger, T.; Tünnermann, A.; Nolte, S.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the temporal evolution of the hole depth and shape for percussion drilling at different ambient pressure conditions. Deep drilling is performed in silicon as target material by ultrashort laser pulses at 1030 nm and a duration of 8 ps. Simultaneously, the backlit silhouette of the hole is imaged perpendicular to the drilling direction. While typical process phases like depth development and shape evolution are very similar for atmospheric pressure down to vacuum conditions (10-2 mbar), the ablation rate in the initial process phase is significantly increased for reduced pressure. The number of pulses till the stop of the drilling process also increases by a pressure reduction and exceeds drilling at atmospheric conditions by two orders of magnitude for a pressure of ca. 10-2 mbar. Accordingly, the maximum achievable hole depth is more than doubled. We attribute this behavior to an enlarged mean free path for ablation products at reduced pressure and therefore lower or no deposition of particles inside the hole capillary under vacuum conditions while debris fills the hole already after a few thousand pulses at atmospheric pressure. This is supported by scanning electron cross section images of the holes.

  5. The effect of ram-pressure stripping and starvation on the star formation properties of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.

    2009-12-01

    We have combined UV to radio centimetric observations of resolved galaxies in the Virgo cluster with multizone, chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution especially tailored to take into account the effects of the cluster environment (ram pressure stripping and starvation). This exercise has shown that anemic spirals with truncated radial profiles of the gas component and of the young stellar populations, typical in rich clusters of galaxies, have been perturbed by a recent (˜100 Myr) ram pressure stripping event induced by their interaction with the cluster intergalactic medium. Starvation is not able to reproduce the observed truncated radial profiles. Both ram pressure and starvation induce a decrease of the stellar surface brightness of the perturbed disc, and thus can hardly be invoked to explain the formation of lenticular galaxies inhabiting rich clusters, which are characterised by higher surface brightnesses than early type spirals of similar luminosity. In dwarfs the ram pressure stripping event is so efficient to totally remove their gas thus stopping on short time scales (<2 Gyr) their star formation activity. Low luminosity star forming discs can be transformed in dE galaxies.

  6. Buffer arrangement with back flushing of a quartz pressure transducer in a formation testing device

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, G.J.

    1993-08-03

    For use with a pressure sensor located in a sensor chamber in a sonde wherein the pressure sensor forms measurements of ambient pressure, an apparatus is described which comprises an elongate flow path from said sensor chamber to a source of fluid to be measured and wherein said fluid flow path comprises a passage within the threads of first and second threaded sonde components threaded together to define a helical flow path, wherein said helical flow path comprises first and second helical flow path segments serially connected.

  7. Durability of SRP Waste Glass - Effects of Pressure and Formation of Surface Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    2001-10-17

    This report discusses results of an assessment of pressure at anticipated storage temperature on the chemical durability of Savannah River Plant waste glass. Surface interactions were also examined and corrosion mechanisms discussed.

  8. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)

  9. Active CO2 Reservoir Management: A Strategy for Controlling Pressure, CO2 and Brine Migration in Saline-Formation CCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Sun, Y.; Hao, Y.; Court, B.; Celia, M. A.; Wolery, T.; Tompson, A. F.; Aines, R. D.; Friedmann, J.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations is regarded as a promising means of lowering the amount of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere and thereby mitigate global warming. The most promising systems for CCS are depleted oil reservoirs, particularly those suited to CO2-based Enhanced Oil Recovery (CCS-EOR), and deep saline formations, both of which are well separated from the atmosphere. For conventional, industrial-scale, saline-formation CCS, pressure buildup can have a limiting effect on CO2 storage capacity. To address this concern, we analyze Active CO2 Reservoir Management (ACRM), which combines brine extraction and residual-brine reinjection with CO2 injection, comparing it with conventional saline-formation CCS. We investigate the influence of brine extraction on pressure response and CO2 and brine migration using the NUFT code. By extracting brine from the lower portion of the storage formation, from locations progressively further from the center of injection, we can counteract buoyancy that drives CO2 to the top of the formation, which is useful in dipping formations. Using “push-pull” manipulation of the CO2 plume, we expose less of the caprock seal to CO2 and more of the storage formation to CO2, with more of the formation utilized for trapping mechanisms. Plume manipulation can also counteract the influence of heterogeneity. We consider the impact of extraction ratio, defined as net extracted brine volume (extraction minus reinjection) divided by injected CO2 volume. Pressure buildup is reduced with increasing extraction ratio, which reduces CO2 and brine migration, increases CO2 storage capacity, and reduces other risks, such as leakage up abandoned wells, caprock fracturing, fault activation, and induced seismicity. For a 100-yr injection period, a 10-yr delay in brine extraction does not diminish the magnitude of pressure reduction. Moreover, it is possible to achieve pressure management with just a few brine-extraction wells

  10. Polymerization of cyanoacetylene under pressure: Formation of carbon nitride polymers and bulk structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaei, Mohammad; Liang, Yunye; Venkataramanan, Natarajan S.; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    High-pressure phase transitions of polar and nonpolar molecular structures of cyanoacetylene (HC3N) are studied by using first-principles simulations at constant pressure. In both polar and nonpolar crystals, at pressure ˜20 GPa, the cyanoacetylene molecules are interconnected together and form polyacrylonitrile (PA) polymers. At pressure ˜30 GPa, PA polymers are transformed to polymers with fused pyridine rings (FPR's). The individual geometrical structures of PA and FPR polymers obtained from polar and nonpolar molecular crystals of cyanoacetylene are identical, but their stacking is different. At pressures above 40 GPa, the FPR polymers are interconnected together and new three-dimensional (3D) carbon nitride systems are formed. At ambient pressure, the long-length PA and FPR polymers are metallic, and the created 3D structures are an insulator with energy band gaps around 2.85 eV. The electron transport characteristics of FPR polymers with different lengths are investigated at finite biases by using the nonequilibrium Green's function technique combined with density functional theory (DFT) by connecting the polymers to gold electrodes. The results show that FPR polymers have negative differential resistance behavior. Our time-dependent DFT calculations reveal that FPR polymers can absorb light in the visible region. From our results, it is expected that the FPR polymers will be a good material for optoelectronic applications.

  11. Abiotic Formation of Valine Peptides Under Conditions of High Temperature and High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Ishiguro, Takato; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the oligomerization of solid valine and the stabilities of valine and valine peptides under conditions of high temperature (150-200 °C) and high pressure (50-150 MPa). Experiments were performed under non-aqueous condition in order to promote dehydration reaction. After prolonged exposure of monomeric valine to elevated temperatures and pressures, the products were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry comparing their retention times and masses. We identified linear peptides that ranged in size from dimer to hexamer, as well as a cyclic dimer. Previous studies that attempted abiotic oligomerization of valine in the absence of a catalyst have never reported valine peptides larger than a dimer. Increased reaction temperature increased the dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides to products such as glycine, β-alanine, ammonia, and amines by processes such as deamination, decarboxylation, and cracking. The amount of residual valine and peptide yields was greater at higher pressures at a given temperature, pressure, and reaction time. This suggests that dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides is reduced by pressure. Our findings are relevant to the investigation of diagenetic processes in prebiotic marine sediments where similar pressures occur under water-poor conditions. These findings also suggest that amino acids, such as valine, could have been polymerized to peptides in deep prebiotic marine sediments within a few hundred million years.

  12. Hybrid equation/agent-based model of ischemia-induced hyperemia and pressure ulcer formation predicts greater propensity to ulcerate in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Alexey; Mi, Qi; Tzen, Yi-Ting; Brienza, David; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are costly and life-threatening complications for people with spinal cord injury (SCI). People with SCI also exhibit differential blood flow properties in non-ulcerated skin. We hypothesized that a computer simulation of the pressure ulcer formation process, informed by data regarding skin blood flow and reactive hyperemia in response to pressure, could provide insights into the pathogenesis and effective treatment of post-SCI pressure ulcers. Agent-Based Models (ABM) are useful in settings such as pressure ulcers, in which spatial realism is important. Ordinary Differential Equation-based (ODE) models are useful when modeling physiological phenomena such as reactive hyperemia. Accordingly, we constructed a hybrid model that combines ODEs related to blood flow along with an ABM of skin injury, inflammation, and ulcer formation. The relationship between pressure and the course of ulcer formation, as well as several other important characteristic patterns of pressure ulcer formation, was demonstrated in this model. The ODE portion of this model was calibrated to data related to blood flow following experimental pressure responses in non-injured human subjects or to data from people with SCI. This model predicted a higher propensity to form ulcers in response to pressure in people with SCI vs. non-injured control subjects, and thus may serve as novel diagnostic platform for post-SCI ulcer formation.

  13. Investigation Of Adhesion Formation In New Stainless Steel Trim Spring Operated Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Robert E.; Bukowski, Julia V.; Goble, William M.

    2013-04-16

    Examination of proof test data for new (not previously installed) stainless steel (SS) trim spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) reveals that adhesions form between the seat and disc in about 46% of all such SOPRV. The forces needed to overcome these adhesions can be sufficiently large to cause the SOPRV to fail its proof test (FPT) prior to installation. Furthermore, a significant percentage of SOPRV which are found to FPT are also found to ''fail to open'' (FTO) meaning they would not relief excess pressure in the event of an overpressure event. The cases where adhesions result in FTO or FPT appear to be confined to SOPRV with diameters < 1 in and set pressures < 150 psig and the FTO are estimated to occur in 0.31% to 2.00% of this subpopulation of SS trim SOPRV. The reliability and safety implications of these finding for end-users who do not perform pre-installation testing of SOPRV are discussed.

  14. A nonsynonymous SNP in the ITGB3 gene disrupts the conserved membrane-proximal cytoplasmic salt bridge in the alphaIIbbeta3 integrin and cosegregates dominantly with abnormal proplatelet formation and macrothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Ghevaert, Cedric; Salsmann, Alexandre; Watkins, Nicholas A; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Rankin, Angela; Garner, Stephen F; Stephens, Jonathan; Smith, Graham A; Debili, Najet; Vainchenker, William; de Groot, Philip G; Huntington, James A; Laffan, Mike; Kieffer, Nelly; Ouwehand, Willem H

    2008-04-01

    We report a 3-generation pedigree with 5 individuals affected with a dominantly inherited macrothrombocytopenia. All 5 carry 2 nonsynonymous mutations resulting in a D723H mutation in the beta3 integrin and a P53L mutation in glycoprotein (GP) Ibalpha. We show that GPIbalpha-L53 is phenotypically silent, being also present in 3 unaffected pedigree members and in 7 of 1639 healthy controls. The beta3-H723 causes constitutive, albeit partial, activation of the alphaIIbbeta3 complex by disruption of the highly conserved cytoplasmic salt bridge with arginine 995 in the alphaIIb integrin as evidenced by increased PAC-1 but not fibrinogen binding to the patients' resting platelets. This was confirmed in CHO alphaIIbbeta3-H723 transfectants, which also exhibited increased PAC-1 binding, increased adhesion to von Willebrand factor (VWF) in static conditions and to fibrinogen under shear stress. Crucially, we show that in the presence of fibrinogen, alphaIIbbeta3-H723, but not wild-type alphaIIbbeta3, generates a signal that leads to the formation of proplatelet-like protrusions in transfected CHO cells. Abnormal proplatelet formation was confirmed in the propositus's CD34+ stem cell-derived megakaryocytes. We conclude that the constitutive activation of the alphaIIbbeta3-H723 receptor causes abnormal proplatelet formation, leading to incorrect sizing of platelets and the thrombocytopenia observed in the pedigree.

  15. Dissociation of CH4 at high pressures and temperatures: diamond formation in giant planet interiors?

    PubMed

    Benedetti, L R; Nguyen, J H; Caldwell, W A; Liu, H; Kruger, M; Jeanloz, R

    1999-10-01

    Experiments using laser-heated diamond anvil cells show that methane (CH4) breaks down to form diamond at pressures between 10 and 50 gigapascals and temperatures of about 2000 to 3000 kelvin. Infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy, along with x-ray diffraction, indicate the presence of polymeric hydrocarbons in addition to the diamond, which is in agreement with theoretical predictions. Dissociation of CH4 at high pressures and temperatures can influence the energy budgets of planets containing substantial amounts of CH4, water, and ammonia, such as Uranus and Neptune.

  16. Enhancing Magnesite Formation at Low Temperature and High CO2 Pressure: The Impact of Seed Crystals and Minor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Liu, Jia; Perea, Daniel E.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2015-02-24

    The formation of magnesite was followed in aqueous solution containing initially added Mg(OH)2 equilibrated with supercritical carbon dioxide (90 atm pressure, 50°C) in the presence of introduced magnesite particles and minor components, Co(II). As expected, the introduction of magnesite particles accelerated the formation of magnesite from solution. However, the formation rate of magnesite was even greater when small concentrations of Co(II) were introduced, indicating that the increased rate of magnesite formation in the presence of Co(II) was not solely due to the addition of a growth promoting surface. Detailed analysis of the magnesite particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and atom probe tomography (APT) revealed that the originally added Co(II) was concentrated in the center but also present throughout the growing magnesite particles. Addition of the Co(II) in different chemical forms (i.e. as solid phase CoCO3 or Co(OH)2) could alter the growth rate of magnesite depending upon the addition of bicarbonate to the starting solution. Geochemical modeling calculations indicate that this difference is related to the thermodynamic stability of these different phases in the initial solutions. More broadly, these results indicate that the presence of even small concentrations of foreign ions that form carbonate compounds with a similar structure as magnesite can be incorporated into the magnesite lattice, accelerating the formation of anhydrous carbonates in natural environments.

  17. First Evidence of Rh Nano-Hydride Formation at Low Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zlotea, Claudia; Oumellal, Yassine; Msakni, Mariem; Bourgon, Julie; Bastide, Stéphane; Cachet-Vivier, Christine; Latroche, Michel

    2015-07-08

    Rh-based nanoparticles supported on a porous carbon host were prepared with tunable average sizes ranging from 1.3 to 3.0 nm. Depending on the vacuum or hydrogen environment during thermal treatment, either Rh metal or hydride is formed at nanoscale, respectively. In contrast to bulk Rh that can form a hydride phase under 4 GPa pressure, the metallic Rh nanoparticles (∼2.3 nm) absorb hydrogen and form a hydride phase at pressure below 0.1 MPa, as evidenced by the presence of a plateau pressure in the pressure-composition isotherm curves at room temperature. Larger metal nanoparticles (∼3.0 nm) form only a solid solution with hydrogen under similar conditions. This suggests a nanoscale effect that drastically changes the Rh-H thermodynamics. The nanosized Rh hydride phase is stable at room temperature and only desorbs hydrogen above 175 °C. Within the present hydride particle size range (1.3-2.3 nm), the hydrogen desorption is size-dependent, as proven by different thermal analysis techniques.

  18. Magnesite formation from MgO and CO2 at the pressures and temperatures of Earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Henry P.; Doczy, Vincent M.; Frank, Mark R.; Hasan, Maggie; Lin, Jung-Fu; Yang, Jing

    2013-08-02

    Magnesite (MgCO3) is an important phase for the carbon cycle in and out of the Earth’s mantle. Its comparably large P-T stability has been inferred for several years based on the absence of its decomposition in experiments. Here we report the first experimental evidence for synthesis of magnesite out of its oxide components (MgO and CO2) at P-T conditions relevant to the Earth’s mantle. Magnesite formation was observed in situ using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, coupled with laser-heated diamond-anvil cells (DACs), at pressures and temperatures of Earth’s mantle. Despite the existence of multiple high-pressure CO2 polymorphs, the magnesite-forming reaction was observed to proceed at pressures ranging from 5 to 40 GPa and temperatures between 1400 and 1800 K. No other pressure-quenchable materials were observed to form via the MgO + CO2 = MgCO3 reaction. This work further strengthens the notion that magnesite may indeed be the primary host phase for oxidized carbon in the deep Earth.

  19. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  20. Kinetics of microstructure formation of high-pressure induced gel from a whey protein isolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin-Song; Yang, Hongwei; Zhu, Wanpeng; Mu, Tai-Hua

    2010-03-01

    The kinetic process of pressure-induced gelation of whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied using in situ light scattering. The relationship of the logarithm of scattered light intensity (I) versus time (t) was linear after the induced time and could be described by the Cahn-Hilliard linear theory. With increasing time, the scattered intensity deviated from the exponential relationship, and the time evolution of the scattered light intensity maximum Im and the corresponding wavenumber qm could be described in terms of the power-law relationship as Im~fβ and qm~f-α, respectively. These results indicated that phase separation occurred during the gelation of WPI solutions under high pressure.

  1. Selective Formation of Trimethylene Carbonate (TMC): Atmospheric Pressure Carbon Dioxide Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Benjamin R; Patel, Anish P; Wijayantha, K G Upul

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide utilisation (CDU) is currently gaining increased interest due to the abundance of CO2 and its possible application as a C1 building block. We herein report the first example of atmospheric pressure carbon dioxide incorporation into oxetane to selectively form trimethylene carbonate (TMC), which is a significant challenge as TMC is thermodynamically less favoured than its corresponding co-polymer. PMID:26213485

  2. Rapid Association Reactions at Low Pressure: Impact on the Formation of Hydrocarbons on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuitton, V.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere predict that three-body association reactions are the main production route for several major hydrocarbons. The kinetic rate constants of these reactions strongly depend on density and are therefore only important in Titan's lower atmosphere. However, radiative association reactions do not depend on pressure. The possible existence of large rates at low density suggests that association reactions could significantly affect the chemistry of Titan's upper atmosphere and better constraints for them are required. The kinetic parameters of these reactions are extremely difficult to constrain by experimental measurements as the low pressure of Titan's upper atmosphere cannot be reproduced in the laboratory. However, in the recent years, theoretical calculations of kinetics parameters have become more and more reliable. We therefore calculated several radical-radical and radical-molecule association reaction rates using transition state theory. The calculations indicate that association reactions are fast even at low pressure for adducts having as few as four C atoms. These drastic changes have however only moderate consequences for Titan's composition. Locally, mole fractions can vary by as much as one order of magnitude but the column-integrated production and condensation rates of hydrocarbons change only by a factor of a few. We discuss the impact of these results for the organic chemistry. It would be very interesting to check the impact of these new rate constants on other environments, such as giant and extrasolar planets as well as the interstellar medium.

  3. RAPID ASSOCIATION REACTIONS AT LOW PRESSURE: IMPACT ON THE FORMATION OF HYDROCARBONS ON TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Vuitton, V.; Klippenstein, S. J. E-mail: yelle@lpl.arizona.edu E-mail: sjk@anl.gov

    2012-01-01

    Photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere predict that three-body association reactions are the main production route for several major hydrocarbons. The kinetic rate constants of these reactions strongly depend on density and are therefore only important in Titan's lower atmosphere. However, radiative association reactions do not depend on pressure. The possible existence of large rates at low density suggests that association reactions could significantly affect the chemistry of Titan's upper atmosphere and better constraints for them are required. The kinetic parameters of these reactions are extremely difficult to constrain by experimental measurements as the low pressure of Titan's upper atmosphere cannot be reproduced in the laboratory. However, in the recent years, theoretical calculations of kinetics parameters have become more and more reliable. We therefore calculated several radical-radical and radical-molecule association reaction rates using transition state theory. The calculations indicate that association reactions are fast even at low pressure for adducts having as few as four C atoms. These drastic changes have however only moderate consequences for Titan's composition. Locally, mole fractions can vary by as much as one order of magnitude but the column-integrated production and condensation rates of hydrocarbons change only by a factor of a few. We discuss the impact of these results for the organic chemistry. It would be very interesting to check the impact of these new rate constants on other environments, such as giant and extrasolar planets as well as the interstellar medium.

  4. Experimental study of fractal clusters formation from nanoparticles synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Maxim V.; Protopopova, Vera S.; Alexandrov, Sergey E.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the experimental results from the fractal structures formation from nanoparticles of silicone dioxide deposited on the silicon substrate surface. Nanoparticles are synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with the use of capacitively coupled radio frequency (13.56 MHz) discharge sustained in helium atmosphere. Tetraethoxysilane is chosen as the test precursor. Correlation between the morphology of obtained deposits and the process parameters is found. The capability of nanoparticles movement along the deposit surface in local near-surface electric field is demonstrated. The empirical model that satisfactorily explained the mechanism of fractal clusters formation from nanoparticles on the substrate surface is developed. The model indicates that the dynamics of deposit morphology variations is determined by two competing processes: electrical charge transfer by nanoparticles to the deposit surface and electrical charge running off over the surface under conditions of changeable conductivity of the deposit surface.

  5. Surface pressure affects B-hordein network formation at the air-water interface in relation to gastric digestibility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingqi; Huang, Jun; Zeng, Hongbo; Chen, Lingyun

    2015-11-01

    Protein interfacial network formation under mechanical pressure and its influence on degradation was investigated at molecular level using Langmuir-Blodgett B-hordein monolayer as a 2D model. Surface properties, such as surface pressure, dilatational and shear rheology and the surface pressure--area (π-A) isotherm, of B-hordein at air-water interface were analyzed by tensiometer, rheometer and a Langmuir-Blodgett trough respectively. B-Hordein conformation and orientation under different surface pressures were determined by polarization modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). The interfacial network morphology was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). B-Hordein could reduce the air-water surface tension rapidly to ∼ 45 mN/m and form a solid-like network with high rheological elasticity and compressibility at interface, which could be a result of interactions developed by intermolecular β-sheets. The results also revealed that B-hordein interfacial network switched from an expanded liquid phase to a solid-like film with increasing compression pressure. The orientation of B-hordein was parallel to the surface when in expended liquid phase, whereas upon compression, the hydrophobic repetitive region tilted away from water phase. When compressed to 30 mN/m, a strong elastic network was formed at the interface, and it was resistant to a harsh gastric-like environment of low pH and pepsin. This work generated fundamental knowledge, which suggested the potential to design B-hordein stabilized emulsions and encapsulations with controllable digestibility for small intestine targeted delivery of bioactive compounds.

  6. Soot Formation and Destruction in High-Pressure Flames with Real Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-18

    Optical investigations on soot forming methane - oxygen flames,‟ Combust. Sci. Tech. 5, 263 (1972). D‟Anna, D. and Kent, J.H., „Aromatic formation...07/31/2013 8.00 Wei Jing, William L. Roberts, Tiegang Fang. Effects of Temperature and Oxygen on Spray and Combustion Characteristics of Diesel and...Temperature and Oxygen Concentration on Diesel Spray Combustion Using a Single-Nozzle Injector in a Constant Volume Combustion Chamber, Combustion

  7. Carbon dioxide storage in marine sediments - dissolution, transport and hydrate formation kinetics from high-pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigalke, N. K.; Savy, J. P.; Pansegrau, M.; Aloisi, G.; Kossel, E.; Haeckel, M.

    2009-12-01

    By satisfying thermodynamic framework conditions for CO2 hydrate formation, pressures and temperatures of the deep marine environment are unique assets for sequestering CO2 in clathrates below the seabed. However, feasibility and safety of this storage option require an accurate knowledge of the rate constants governing the speed of physicochemical reactions following the injection of the liquefied gas into the sediments. High-pressure experiments designed to simulate the deep marine environment open the possibility to obtain the required parameters for a wide range of oceanic conditions. In an effort to constrain mass transfer coefficients and transport rates of CO2 in(to) the pore water of marine sediments first experiments were targeted at quantifying the rate of CO2 uptake by de-ionized water and seawater across a two-phase interface. The nature of the interface was controlled by selecting p and T to conditions within and outside the hydrate stability field (HSF) while considering both liquid and gaseous CO2. Concentration increase and hydrate growth were monitored by Raman spectroscopy. The experiments revealed anomalously fast transport rates of dissolved CO2 at conditions both inside and outside the HSF. While future experiments will further elucidate kinetics of CO2 transport and hydrate formation, these first results could have major significance to safety-related issues in the discussion of carbon storage in the marine environment.

  8. Formation and stability of D-limonene organogel-based nanoemulsion prepared by a high-pressure homogenizer.

    PubMed

    Zahi, Mohamed Reda; Wan, Pingyu; Liang, Hao; Yuan, Qipeng

    2014-12-31

    D-limonene organogel-based nanoemulsion was prepared by high-pressure homogenization technology. The organogelator type had a major role on the formation of the formulations, in which stearic acid has given nanoemulsions with the smallest droplet size. The surfactant type and concentration also had an appreciable effect on droplet formation, with Tween 80 giving a mean droplet diameter (d ≈ 112 nm) among a range of non-ionic surfactants (Tween 20, 40, 60, 80, and 85). In addition, high-pressure homogenization conditions played a key role in the nanoemulsion preparation. The stability of d-limonene organogel-based nanoemulsion was also investigated under two different temperatures (4 and 28 °C) through 2 weeks of storage. Results showed a good stability of the formulations, which is maybe due to the incorporation of D-limonene into the organogel prior to homogenization. This study may have a valuable contribution for the design and use of organogel-based nanoemulsion as a delivery system in food.

  9. Formation and characterization of hydrophobic glass surface treated by atmospheric pressure He/CH4 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sooryun; Youn Moon, Se

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure helium plasmas, generated in the open air by 13.56 MHz rf power, were applied for the glass surface wettability modification. The plasma gas temperature, measured by the spectroscopic method, was under 400 K which is low enough to treat the samples without thermal damages. The hydrophobicity of the samples determined by the water droplet contact angle method was dependent on the methane gas content and the plasma exposure time. Adding the methane gas by a small amount of 0.25%, the contact angle was remarkably increased from 10° to 83° after the 10 s plasma treatment. From the analysis of the treated surface and the plasma, it was shown that the deposition of alkane functional groups such as C-H stretch, CH2 bend, and CH3 bend was one of the contributing factors for the hydrophobicity development. In addition, the hydrophobic properties lasted over 2 months even after the single treatment. From the results, the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment promises the fast and low-cost method for the thermally-weak surface modification.

  10. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-05-01

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices.

  11. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices. PMID:27230981

  12. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Yoko; Ijiri, Akira; Ikegawa, Yojiro; Tsutsumi, Masazumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Uramoto, Go-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Morono, Yuki; Sakai, Sanae; Saito, Yumi; Tanikawa, Wataru; Hirose, Takehiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Geological CO2 sequestration in unmineable subsurface oil/gas fields and coal formations has been proposed as a means of reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. However, the feasibility of injecting CO2 into subsurface depends upon a variety of geological and economic conditions, and the ecological consequences are largely unpredictable. In this study, we developed a new flow-through-type reactor system to examine potential geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impacts associated with CO2 injection by simulating in-situ pressure (0-100 MPa) and temperature (0-70°C) conditions. Using the reactor system, anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 ml/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into a column comprised of bituminous coal and sand under a pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. 16S rRNA gene analysis of the bacterial components showed distinct spatial separation of the predominant taxa in the coal and sand over the course of the experiment. Cultivation experiments using sub-sampled fluids revealed that some microbes survived, or were metabolically active, under CO2-rich conditions. However, no methanogens were activated during the experiment, even though hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens were obtained from conventional batch-type cultivation at 20°C. During the reactor experiment, the acetate and methanol concentration in the fluids increased while the δ(13)Cacetate, H2 and CO2 concentrations decreased, indicating the occurrence of homo-acetogenesis. 16S rRNA genes of homo-acetogenic spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Sporomusa were consistently detected from the sandstone after the reactor experiment. Our results suggest that the injection of CO2 into a natural coal-sand formation preferentially stimulates homo-acetogenesis rather than methanogenesis, and that this process is accompanied by biogenic CO2 conversion to acetate.

  13. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system

    PubMed Central

    Ohtomo, Yoko; Ijiri, Akira; Ikegawa, Yojiro; Tsutsumi, Masazumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Uramoto, Go-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Morono, Yuki; Sakai, Sanae; Saito, Yumi; Tanikawa, Wataru; Hirose, Takehiro; Inagaki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Geological CO2 sequestration in unmineable subsurface oil/gas fields and coal formations has been proposed as a means of reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. However, the feasibility of injecting CO2 into subsurface depends upon a variety of geological and economic conditions, and the ecological consequences are largely unpredictable. In this study, we developed a new flow-through-type reactor system to examine potential geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impacts associated with CO2 injection by simulating in-situ pressure (0–100 MPa) and temperature (0–70°C) conditions. Using the reactor system, anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 ml/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into a column comprised of bituminous coal and sand under a pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. 16S rRNA gene analysis of the bacterial components showed distinct spatial separation of the predominant taxa in the coal and sand over the course of the experiment. Cultivation experiments using sub-sampled fluids revealed that some microbes survived, or were metabolically active, under CO2-rich conditions. However, no methanogens were activated during the experiment, even though hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens were obtained from conventional batch-type cultivation at 20°C. During the reactor experiment, the acetate and methanol concentration in the fluids increased while the δ13Cacetate, H2 and CO2 concentrations decreased, indicating the occurrence of homo-acetogenesis. 16S rRNA genes of homo-acetogenic spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Sporomusa were consistently detected from the sandstone after the reactor experiment. Our results suggest that the injection of CO2 into a natural coal-sand formation preferentially stimulates homo-acetogenesis rather than methanogenesis, and that this process is accompanied by biogenic CO2 conversion to acetate. PMID

  14. Skeletal abnormalities in homocystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Brenton, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The skeletal changes of thirty-four patients with the biochemical and clinical features of cystathionine synthase deficiency are described. It is emphasized that there is clinical evidence of excessive bone growth and the formation for bone which is structurally weaker than normal. The similarities and differences between this condition and Marfan's syndrome are stressed and the possible nature of the connective tissue defect leading to the skeletal changes discussed. The most characteristic skeletal changes in homocystinuria are the skeletal disproportion (pubis-heel length greater than crown-pubis length), the abnormal vertebrae, sternal deformities, genu valgum and large metaphyses and epiphyses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917963

  15. Abnormal bone formation induced by implantation of osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance in the X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, H.; Masuhara, K.; Takaoka, K.; Ono, K.; Tanaka, H.; Seino, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse (Hyp) has been proposed as a model for the human familial hypophosphatemia (the most common form of vitamin D-resistant rickets). An osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance was subcutaneously implanted into the Hyp mouse. The implant was consistently replaced by cartilage tissue at 2 weeks after implantation. The cartilage matrix seemed to be normal, according to the histological examination, and 35sulphur (TVS) uptake was also normal. Up to 4 weeks after implantation the cartilage matrix was completely replaced by unmineralized bone matrix and hematopoietic bone marrow. Osteoid tissue arising from the implantation of bone inducing substance in the Hyp mouse showed no radiologic or histologic sign of calcification. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of endochondral ossification in the Hyp mouse might be characterized by the failure of mineralization in cartilage and bone matrix. Analysis of the effects of bone-inducing substance on the Hyp mouse may help to give greater insight into the mechanism and treatment of human familial hypophosphatemia.

  16. Diagnostics and active species formation in an atmospheric pressure helium sterilization plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.; Anghel, S. D.; Papiu, M.; Dinu, O.

    2009-01-01

    Systematic spectroscopic studies and diagnostics of an atmospheric pressure radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) He plasma is presented. The discharge is an intrinsic part of the resonant circuit of the radiofrequency oscillator and was obtained using a monoelectrode type torch, at various gas flow-rates (0.1-6.0 l/min) and power levels (0-2 W). As function of He flow-rate and power the discharge has three developing stages: point-like plasma, spherical plasma and ellipsoidal plasma. The emission spectra of the plasma were recorded and investigated as function of developing stages, flow-rates and plasma power. The most important atomic and molecular components were identified and their evolution was studied as function of He flow-rate and plasma power towards understanding basic mechanisms occurring in this type of plasma. The characteristic temperatures (vibrational Tvibr, rotational Trot and excitation Texc) and the electron number density (ne) were determined.

  17. Formation of hydrocarbons on Titan: Impact of rapid association reactions at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuitton, V.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2011-10-01

    In the 1980's, Voyager revealed that complex organic molecules were present in Titan's atmosphere but the actual mechanisms leading to this rich chemistry were largely unknown. The recent Cassini results indicate that the chemistry ocurring in Titan's upper atmosphere is far more complex than anticipated. The detection of heavy positive and negative ions [13] reveals that much of the molecular growth occurs in the upper atmosphere rather than at lower altitudes [5, 12]. Photochemical models predict that three-body association reactions (A + B + M!AB + M) are the main production route for several hydrocarbons, including alkanes [2, 3]. The kinetic parameters of these reactions strongly depend on density and are therefore extremely difficult to constrain by experimental measurements as the low pressure of Titan's upper atmosphere cannot be reproduced in the laboratory. As a consequence, they have to be extrapolated outside the range of measurements, leading to high uncertainties. According to these extrapolations, three-body association reactions are only efficient in Titan's lower atmosphere. However, radiative association reactions (A + B ! AB + h) do not depend on pressure and can therefore still be efficient in the upper atmosphere. Unfortunately, they are largely uncharacterized and have consequently been neglected in photochemical models so far. Because of their potential importance at higher altitude, association reactions can have an important contribution to our understanding of molecular growth and better constraints for them are required. In the recent years, theoretical calculations of kinetics parameters have become more and more reliable [7]. We therefore performed ab initio transition state theory based master equation calculations for several radical-radical and radical-molecule association reactions. The computed kinetics parameters were included in our photochemical model of Titan. We present here the main results and discuss their impact for the

  18. Three dimensional simulations of pattern formation during high-pressure, freely localized microwave breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtzanidis, K. Boeuf, J. P.; Rogier, F.

    2014-12-15

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that a freely localized 100 GHz microwave discharge can propagate towards the microwave source with high speed, forming a complex pattern of self-organized filaments. We present three-dimensional simulations of the formation and propagation of such patterns that reveal more information on their nature and interaction with the electromagnetic waves. The developed three-dimensional Maxwell-plasma solver permits the study of different forms of incident field polarization. Results for linear and circular polarization of the wave are presented and comparisons with recent experiments show a good overall agreement. The three dimensional simulations provide a quantitative analysis of the parameters controlling the time and length scales of the strongly non-linear plasma dynamics and could be useful for potential microwave plasma applications such as aerodynamic flow and combustion control.

  19. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  20. Under pressure: quenching star formation in low-mass satellite galaxies via stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingham, Sean P.; Cooper, Michael C.; Pace, Andrew B.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Wheeler, Coral

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of galaxies in the local Universe, including those in the Local Group, find that the efficiency of environmental (or satellite) quenching increases dramatically at satellite stellar masses below ˜108 M⊙. This suggest a physical scale where quenching transitions from a slow `starvation' mode to a rapid `stripping' mode at low masses. We investigate the plausibility of this scenario using observed H I surface density profiles for a sample of 66 nearby galaxies as inputs to analytic calculations of ram-pressure and turbulent viscous stripping. Across a broad range of host properties, we find that stripping becomes increasingly effective at M* ≲ 108 - 9 M⊙, reproducing the critical mass scale observed. However, for canonical values of the circumgalactic medium density (nhalo < 10-3.5 cm-3), we find that stripping is not fully effective; infalling satellites are, on average, stripped of only ≲ 40-60 per cent of their cold gas reservoir, which is insufficient to match observations. By including a host halo gas distribution that is clumpy and therefore contains regions of higher density, we are able to reproduce the observed H I gas fractions (and thus the high quenched fraction and short quenching time-scale) of Local Group satellites, suggesting that a host halo with clumpy gas may be crucial for quenching low-mass systems in Local Group-like (and more massive) host haloes.

  1. Formation of hydroxyl and water layers on MgO films studied with ambient pressure XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, John T.; Starr, David E.; Yamamoto, Susumu; Kaya, Sarp; Kendelewicz, Tom; Mysak, Erin R.; Porsgaard, Soeren; Salmeron, Miquel B.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Nilsson, Anders; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    To understand the interaction of water with MgO(100), a detailed quantitative assessment of the interfacial chemistry is necessary. We have used ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure molecular (H 2O) and dissociative (OH) water adsorption on a 4 monolayer (ML) thick MgO(100)/Ag(100) film under ambient conditions. Since the entire 4 ML metal oxide (Ox) film is probed by XPS, the reaction of the MgO film with water can be quantitatively studied. Using a multilayer model (Model 1) that measures changes in Ox thickness from O 1s (film) and Ag 3d (substrate) spectra, it is shown that the oxide portion of the MgO film becomes thinner upon hydroxylation. A reaction mechanism is postulated in which the top-most layer of MgO converts to Mg(OH) 2 upon dissociation of water. Based on this mechanism a second model (Model 2) is developed to calculate Ox and OH thickness changes based on OH/Ox intensity ratios from O 1s spectra measured in situ, with the known initial Ox thickness prior to hydroxylation. Models 1 and 2 are applied to a 0.15 Torr isobar experiment, yielding similar results for H 2O, OH and Ox thickness changes as a function of relative humidity.

  2. Formation of Hydroxyl and Water Layers on MgO Films Studied with Ambient Pressure XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, J.T.; Starr, D.; Yamamoto, S.; Kaya, S.; Kendelewicz, T.; Mysak, E.R.; Porsgaard, S.; Salmeron, M.B.; Brown Jr., G.E.; Nilsson, A.; Bluhm, H.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the interaction of water with MgO(100), a detailed quantitative assessment of the interfacial chemistry is necessary. We have used ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure molecular (H{sub 2}O) and dissociative (OH) water adsorption on a 4 monolayer (ML) thick MgO(100)/Ag(100) film under ambient conditions. Since the entire 4 ML metal oxide (Ox) film is probed by XPS, the reaction of the MgO film with water can be quantitatively studied. Using a multilayer model (Model 1) that measures changes in Ox thickness from O 1s (film) and Ag 3d (substrate) spectra, it is shown that the oxide portion of the MgO film becomes thinner upon hydroxylation. A reaction mechanism is postulated in which the top-most layer of MgO converts to Mg(OH)2 upon dissociation of water. Based on this mechanism a second model (Model 2) is developed to calculate Ox and OH thickness changes based on OH/Ox intensity ratios from O 1s spectra measured in situ, with the known initial Ox thickness prior to hydroxylation. Models 1 and 2 are applied to a 0.15 Torr isobar experiment, yielding similar results for H{sub 2}O, OH and Ox thickness changes as a function of relative humidity.

  3. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtomo, Y.; Ijiri, A.; Ikegawa, Y.; Tsutsumi, M.; Imachi, H.; Uramoto, G.; Hoshino, T.; Morono, Y.; Tanikawa, W.; Hirose, T.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    The geological CO2 sequestration into subsurface unmineable oil/gas fields and coal formations has been considered as one of the possible ways to reduce dispersal of anthropogenic greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. However, feasibility of CO2 injection largely depends on a variety of geological and economical settings, and its ecological consequences have remained largely unpredictable. To address these issues, we developed a new flow-through-type CO2 injection system designated as the 'geobio-reactor system' to examine possible geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impact caused by CO2 injection under in-situ pressure (0-100 MPa) and temperature (0-70°C) conditions. In this study, we investigated Eocene bituminous coal-sandstones in the northwestern Pacific coast, Hokkaido, Japan, using the geobio-reactor system. Anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 mL/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into the coal-sand column under the pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. Molecular analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that predominant bacterial components were physically dispersed from coal to sand as the intact form during experiment. Cultivation experiments from sub-sampling fluids indicated that some terrestrial microbes could preserve their survival in subsurface condition. Molecular analysis of archaeal 16S rRNA genes also showed that no methanogens were activated during experiment. We also anaerobically incubated the coal sample using conventional batch-type cultivation technique with a medium for methanogens. After one year of the batch incubation at 20°C, methane could be detected from the cultures except for the acetate-fed culture. The sequence of archaeal 16S rRNA genes via PCR amplification obtained from the H2 plus formate-fed culture was affiliated with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen within the genus Methanobacterium, whereas the methanol plus trimethylamine culture

  4. An Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Setup to Investigate the Reactive Species Formation.

    PubMed

    Gorbanev, Yury; Soriano, Robert; O'Connell, Deborah; Chechik, Victor

    2016-11-03

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure ('cold') plasmas have received increased attention in recent years due to their significant biomedical potential. The reactions of cold plasma with the surrounding atmosphere yield a variety of reactive species, which can define its effectiveness. While efficient development of cold plasma therapy requires kinetic models, model benchmarking needs empirical data. Experimental studies of the source of reactive species detected in aqueous solutions exposed to plasma are still scarce. Biomedical plasma is often operated with He or Ar feed gas, and a specific interest lies in investigation of the reactive species generated by plasma with various gas admixtures (O2, N2, air, H2O vapor, etc.) Such investigations are very complex due to difficulties in controlling the ambient atmosphere in contact with the plasma effluent. In this work, we addressed common issues of 'high' voltage kHz frequency driven plasma jet experimental studies. A reactor was developed allowing the exclusion of ambient atmosphere from the plasma-liquid system. The system thus comprised the feed gas with admixtures and the components of the liquid sample. This controlled atmosphere allowed the investigation of the source of the reactive oxygen species induced in aqueous solutions by He-water vapor plasma. The use of isotopically labelled water allowed distinguishing between the species originating in the gas phase and those formed in the liquid. The plasma equipment was contained inside a Faraday cage to eliminate possible influence of any external field. The setup is versatile and can aid in further understanding the cold plasma-liquid interactions chemistry.

  5. An Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Setup to Investigate the Reactive Species Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gorbanev, Yury; Soriano, Robert; O'Connell, Deborah; Chechik, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure ('cold') plasmas have received increased attention in recent years due to their significant biomedical potential. The reactions of cold plasma with the surrounding atmosphere yield a variety of reactive species, which can define its effectiveness. While efficient development of cold plasma therapy requires kinetic models, model benchmarking needs empirical data. Experimental studies of the source of reactive species detected in aqueous solutions exposed to plasma are still scarce. Biomedical plasma is often operated with He or Ar feed gas, and a specific interest lies in investigation of the reactive species generated by plasma with various gas admixtures (O2, N2, air, H2O vapor, etc.) Such investigations are very complex due to difficulties in controlling the ambient atmosphere in contact with the plasma effluent. In this work, we addressed common issues of 'high' voltage kHz frequency driven plasma jet experimental studies. A reactor was developed allowing the exclusion of ambient atmosphere from the plasma-liquid system. The system thus comprised the feed gas with admixtures and the components of the liquid sample. This controlled atmosphere allowed the investigation of the source of the reactive oxygen species induced in aqueous solutions by He-water vapor plasma. The use of isotopically labelled water allowed distinguishing between the species originating in the gas phase and those formed in the liquid. The plasma equipment was contained inside a Faraday cage to eliminate possible influence of any external field. The setup is versatile and can aid in further understanding the cold plasma-liquid interactions chemistry. PMID:27842375

  6. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  8. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  9. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  10. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  11. Initial stages of oxide formation on the Zr surface at low oxygen pressure: An in situ FIM and XPS study

    PubMed Central

    Bespalov, I.; Datler, M.; Buhr, S.; Drachsel, W.; Rupprechter, G.; Suchorski, Y.

    2015-01-01

    An improved methodology of the Zr specimen preparation was developed which allows fabrication of stable Zr nanotips suitable for FIM and AP applications. Initial oxidation of the Zr surface was studied on a Zr nanotip by FIM and on a polycrystalline Zr foil by XPS, both at low oxygen pressure (10−8–10−7 mbar). The XPS data reveal that in a first, fast stage of oxidation, a Zr suboxide interlayer is formed which contains three suboxide components (Zr+1, Zr+2 and Zr+3) and is located between the Zr surface and a stoichiometric ZrO2 overlayer that grows in a second, slow oxidation stage. The sole suboxide layer has been observed for the first time at very early states of the oxidation (oxygen exposure ≤4 L). The Ne+ FIM observations are in accord with a two stage process of Zr oxide formation. PMID:25766998

  12. Mechanisms of a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy involving atmospheric pressure plasma-mediated apoptosis and DNA strand break formation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed for a variety of biomedical applications due to its chemically reactive components. Recently, the plasma has emerged as a promising novel cancer therapy based on its ability to selectively ablate cancer cells while leaving normal cells essentially unaffected. The therapeutic effect of plasma is attributed to intracellular generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint signaling pathway via severe DNA strand break formation. However, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for appropriate activation of these physiological events and which pathway is more crucial for plasma-mediated cytotoxicity have not been clarified. Understanding the molecular link between ROS/RNS-mediated apoptosis and DNA damage-involved chromosome instability is critical for the development of more efficacious therapeutic strategies for selective killing of diverse cancer cells.

  13. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  14. Studies on the tempo of bubble formation in recently cavitated vessels: a model to predict the pressure of air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-06-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84 K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above.

  15. Modification of polypropylene foils by low pressure oxygen plasma and its influence on the formation of titanium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, Rafal; Macyk, Wojciech

    2014-10-01

    Commercially available polypropylene foils were pre-treated with low pressure, room temperature radio frequency (RF) oxygen plasma at constant power and pressure. Various durations of pre-treatment process were applied. Afterwards the samples were covered with titanium dioxide thin film by dip-coating technique and photosensitized by titanium(IV) surface complexes formed upon impregnation with catechol-like ligands. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements were used for determining plasma species. The surface properties before and after plasma treatment were characterized by contact angle measurements, FTIR-ATR, UV-Vis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Titanium dioxide thin films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The photoactivity of TiO2 films was tested by photocurrent measurements. It was shown that plasma pre-treatment is essential for oxygen groups formation which contribute to titanium dioxide binding to polymer surface. The support from National Science Centre within the DEC-2012/05/N/ST5/01497 grant is highly acknowledged.

  16. The Role of Carbides in Formation of Surface Layer on Steel X153CrMoV12 Due to Low-Pressure Nitriding (Vacuum Nitriding)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewicz, B.; Wołowiec, E.; Kula, P.

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of formation of surface layer on steel X153CrMoV12 in the process of vacuum nitriding (low-pressure nitriding) in a universal vacuum furnace in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia at a pressure of 30 × 102 Pa (30 mbar) is studied by the methods of light microscopy and measurement of microhardness. The chemical composition of the nitrided layers is determined.

  17. Formation of As-As Interlayer Bonding in the collapsed tetragonal phase of NaFe2As2 under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Oganov, Artem R.; Wang, A. F.; Yan, Y. J.; Luo, X. G.; Chen, X. H.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    NaFe2As2 is investigated experimentally using powder x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy at pressures up to 23 GPa at room temperature and using ab-initio calculations. The results reveal a pressure-induced structural modification at 4 GPa from the starting tetragonal to a collapsed tetragonal phase. We determined the changes in interatomic distances under pressure that allowed us to connect the structural changes and superconductivity. The transition is related to the formation of interlayer As-As bonds at the expense of weakening of Fe-As bonds in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26014105

  18. Effect of Negative Pressure on Proliferation, Virulence Factor Secretion, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence-Regulated Gene Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Qi; Li, Tong-Tong; Li, Zhi-Rui; Zhang, Li-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of negative pressure conditions induced by NPWT on P. aeruginosa. Methods. P. aeruginosa was cultured in a Luria–Bertani medium at negative pressure of −125 mmHg for 24 h in the experimental group and at atmospheric pressure in the control group. The diameters of the colonies of P. aeruginosa were measured after 24 h. ELISA kit, orcinol method, and elastin-Congo red assay were used to quantify the virulence factors. Biofilm formation was observed by staining with Alexa Fluor® 647 conjugate of concanavalin A (Con A). Virulence-regulated genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results. As compared with the control group, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited by negative pressure. The colony size under negative pressure was significantly smaller in the experimental group than that in the controls (p < 0.01). Besides, reductions in the total amount of virulence factors were observed in the negative pressure group, including exotoxin A, rhamnolipid, and elastase. RT-PCR results revealed a significant inhibition in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes. Conclusion. Negative pressure could significantly inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa. It led to a decrease in the virulence factor secretion, biofilm formation, and a reduction in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes. PMID:28074188

  19. Genetic abnormality of the visual pathways in a "white" tiger.

    PubMed

    Guillery, R W; Kaas, J H

    1973-06-22

    "White"tigers show an inherited reduction of pigment, produced by an autosomal recessive gene. The brain of one of these tigers shows an abnormality of the visual pathways similar to abnormalities that are associated with albinism in many other mammals. There is a close relationship between the reduced pigment formation, the pathway abnormality, and strabismus.

  20. Reversal of abnormal cardiac parameters following mitral valve replacement for severe mitral stenosis in relation to pulmonary artery pressure: A retrospective study of noninvasive parameters – Early and late pattern

    PubMed Central

    Parvathy, Usha T.; Rajan, Rajesh; Faybushevich, Alexander Georgevich

    2016-01-01

    relative to PAP. The higher pressure group showed greater regression, but greater prevalence of residual abnormalities, suggesting that the pathologic changes in them might take longer to resolve, necessitating further evaluation. PMID:28386460

  1. Multi-wavelength studies of spectacular ram-pressure stripping of a galaxy. II. Star formation in the tail

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Masafumi; Gu, Liyi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Makishima, Kazuo; Fujita, Yutaka; Akahori, Takuya; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2013-12-01

    With multiband photometric data in public archives, we detected four intracluster star-forming regions in the Virgo Cluster. Two of them were at a projected distance of 35 kpc from NGC 4388 and the other two were 66 kpc away. Our new spectroscopic observations revealed that their recessional velocities were comparable to the ram-pressure-stripped tail of NGC 4388 and confirmed the association. The stellar mass of the star-forming regions ranged from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 4.5} M {sub ☉} except for that of the faintest one, which was <10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. The metallicity was comparable to a solar abundance and the age of the stars was ∼10{sup 6.8} yr. Their young stellar age meant that the star formation should have started after the gas was stripped from NGC 4388. This implied in situ condensation of the stripped gas. We also found that two star-forming regions were located near the leading edge of a filamentary dark cloud. The extinction of the filament was smaller than that derived from the Balmer decrement of the star-forming regions, implying that the dust in the filament would be locally dense around the star-forming regions.

  2. Electron ranaway and ion-ion plasma formation in afterglow low-pressure plasma of oxygen-containing gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Kosykh, Nikolay; Gutsev, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigation of temporal evolution of charged plasma species in afterglow plasma of oxygen-containing mixtures have been investigated. The probe VAC and the time dependence of the saturation positive and negative particles currents to a probe in a fixed bias voltage were performed. The decay of afterglow low-pressure electronegative gas plasmas take place in two distinct stages (the electron-ion stage, and the ion-ion stage) as it was shown in [1] for pure oxygen. In the first stage, the negative ions are locked within a discharge volume and plasma is depleted of electrons and positive ions. The electron density decay is faster, than exponential, and practically all electrons leave plasma volume during finite time followed by the ion--ion (electron-free) plasma formation. The decay of the ion-ion plasma depends on the presence of detachment. With a large content of electronegative gas (oxygen) in a mixture, when there is a ``detachment particles,'' a small fraction of the electrons appearing as a result of the detachment continue to hold all negative ions in the discharge volume. In this case, the densities of all charged plasma components decay according to the same exponential law with a characteristic detachment time. At a low oxygen content in the gas mixture there is no detachment and plasma decays by an ion--ion ambipolar diffusion mechanism.[4pt][1]. S.A.Gutsev, A.A.Kudryavtsev, V.A.Romanenko. Tech.Phys. 40, 1131, (1995).

  3. Partitioning of Pd Between Fe-S-C and Mantle Liquids at High Pressure and Temperature: Implications for Core Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Humayun, M.; Danielson, L.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most elusive geochemical aspects of the early Earth has been explaining the near chondritic relative abundances of the highly siderophile elements (HSE; Au, Re and the platinum group elements) in Earth's primitive upper mantle (PUM). Perhaps they were delivered to the Earth after core formation, by late addition of carbonaceous chondrite material. However, the recognition that many moderately siderophile elements can be explained by high pressure and temperature (PT) metal-silicate equilibrium, leads to the question whether high PT equilibrium can also explain the HSE concentrations. Answers to this question have been slowed by experimental difficulties (nugget effect and very low solubilities). But two different perspectives have emerged from recent studies. One perspective is that D(M/S) for HSE at high PT are not low enough to explain terrestrial mantle depletions of these elements (for Pd and Pt). A second perspective is D(M/S) are reduced substantially at high PT and even low enough to explain terrestrial mantle depletions (for Au and Pt). Issues complicating interpretation of all experiments include use of MgO- and FeO-free silicate melts, and S-free and FeNi metal-free systems. In addition, conclusions for Pt rest on an interpretation that the tiny metallic nuggets plaguing many such experiments, were formed upon quench. There is not agreement on this issue, and the general question of HSE solubility at high PT remains unresolved

  4. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  6. Thermal decomposition of gaseous ammonium nitrate at low pressure: kinetic modeling of product formation and heterogeneous decomposition of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Lin, M C

    2009-12-03

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH(4)NO(3) (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH(4)NO(3) at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH(3) and HNO(3), followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO(3), HNO(3) + M --> OH + NO(2) + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, and NH(3), which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH(3)-NO(2) (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO(3) itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO(3) in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO(3), HNO(3) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)) --> OH + NO(2) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH(3) and H(2)O; the rate could be represented by k(2b) = 7.91 x 10(7) exp(-12 600/T) s(-1), which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO(3) decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  7. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  8. Optimal heating condition of mouthguard sheet in vacuum-pressure formation: part 2 Olefin-based thermoplastic elastomer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Koide, Kaoru

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to clarify the suitable heating conditions during vacuum-pressure formation of olefin copolymer sheets and to examine the sheet temperature at molding and the thickness of the molded mouthguard. Mouthguards were fabricated using 4.0-mm-thick olefin copolymer sheets utilizing a vacuum-pressure forming device, and then, 10 s of vacuum forming and 2 min of compression molding were applied. Three heating conditions were investigated. They were, defined by the degree of sagging observed at the center of the softened sheet (10, 15, or 20 mm lower than the clamp (H-10, H-15, or H-20, respectively)). The working model was trimmed to the height of 20 mm at the maxillary central incisor and 15 mm at the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar. The temperature on both the directly heated and the non-heated surfaces of the mouthguard sheet was measured by the radiation thermometer for each condition. The thickness of mouthguard sheets after fabrication was determined for the incisal portion (incisal edge and labial surface) and molar portion (cusp and buccal surface), and dimensional measurements were obtained using a measuring device. Differences in the thickness due to the heating condition of the sheets were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests. The temperature difference between the heated and non-heated surfaces was highest under H-10. Sheet temperature under H-15 and H-20 was almost the same. The thickness differences were noted at incisal edge, cusp, and buccal surface, and H-15 was the greatest. This study demonstrated that heating of the sheet resulting in sag of 15 mm or more was necessary for sufficient softening of the sheet and that the mouthguard thickness decreased with increased sag. In conclusion, sag of 15 mm can be recommended as a good indicator of appropriate molding timing for this material.

  9. Application of Formation Testing While Drilling (GeoTap) for acquiring formation pressure data from the Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    A new technology to acquire wireline quality pressure tests using a Logging While Drilling approach has been successfully implemented few years ago in Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic. The Formation Tester While Drilling tool (GeoTap) uses a testing sequence similar to wireline tools. A single probe is extended to the borehole wall and a small pretest volume withdrawn from the formation. The resulting pressure transient is then analyzed for formation pressure, formation permeability and mobility information. Up-link and down-link capabilities have been added to achieve test control and quality feedback. An efficient downlink algorithm is used downhole to analyze the data. The parameters and pressure data are transmitted to the surface in real-time for continuous monitoring of the test. More detailed pressure data is recorded and retrieved after returning to surface. Use of a quartz gauge allows excellent accuracy. Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli fields consist of layered sand reservoirs alternation with shale sequences and detailed pressure data is acquired on a high percentage of wells in order to understand lateral and vertical continuity of different flow units. The formation tester can be utilized with the 'triple combo' Logging While Drilling string which eliminates the need to rig up wireline on many wells. Wireline formation tester runs are time consuming - particularly if high deviation or high overbalance conditions are encountered requiring pipe conveyed techniques. Non-Productive Time is high when the wireline tools are stuck and fishing operations are required. The Sperry Drilling GeoTap formation pressure tester service provides real-time formation pressure measurements. It bridges the critical gap between drilling safety and optimization, by providing early and reliable measurements of key reservoir properties, while improving reservoir understanding and completion design in real

  10. Grapevine species from varied native habitats exhibit differences in embolism formation/repair associated with leaf gas exchange and root pressure.

    PubMed

    Knipfer, Thorsten; Eustis, Ashley; Brodersen, Craig; Walker, Andrew M; McElrone, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Drought induces xylem embolism formation, but grapevines can refill non-functional vessels to restore transport capacity. It is unknown whether vulnerability to embolism formation and ability to repair differ among grapevine species. We analysed in vivo embolism formation and repair using x-ray computed microtomography in three wild grapevine species from varied native habitats (Vitis riparia, V. arizonica, V. champinii) and related responses to measurements of leaf gas exchange and root pressure. Vulnerability to embolism formation was greatest in V. riparia, intermediate in V. arizonica and lowest in V. champinii. After re-watering, embolism repair was rapid and pronounced in V. riparia and V. arizonica, but limited or negligible in V. champinii even after numerous days. Similarly, root pressure measured after re-watering was positively correlated with drought stress severity for V. riparia and V. arizonica (species exhibiting embolism repair) but not for V. champinii. Drought-induced reductions in transpiration were greatest for V. riparia and least in V. champinii. Recovery of transpiration after re-watering was delayed for all species, but was greatest for V. champinii and most rapid in V. arizonica. These species exhibit varied responses to drought stress that involve maintenance/recovery of xylem transport capacity coordinated with root pressure and gas exchange responses.

  11. The Combined Effect of High Hydrostatic Pressure and Calcium Salts on the Stability, Solubility and Gel Formation of β-Lactoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Saalfeld, Daniel; Riegel, Ina; Kulozik, Ulrich; Gebhardt, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Stability, aggregation and gelation of β-Lactoglobulin are affected by high pressure and salts of the Hofmeister series. Little is known about their combined effects on structure formation processes of β-Lactoglobulin, mainly because many salts of the series are not suitable for use in food. Here, we investigate the effect of calcium salts on the strength of pressure-induced gels, inspired by the fact that high pressure and salts change the water structure in a similar way. We find that the larger the applied pressures, the higher the strength of the gels. In addition to pressure, there is a significant influence by the type of anions and the amount of added calcium salts. Gel strength increases in the order CaCl2 < Ca (NO3)2 < CaI2. This trend correlates with the position of the salts in the Hofmeister series. The results are explained by analogy with the thermal aggregate formation by taking reaction rates for unfolding and aggregation, as well as specific/non-specific salts effect into consideration. PMID:28231200

  12. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  13. Microstructure development, compositional/physical gradient formation and related mechanical properties of gas-pressure-sintered silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiegs, Terry Norman

    Three inter-related aspects in the fabrication of silicon nitride ceramics were performed for the thesis work. The topics included: (1) an analysis of the composition and physical gradients in bulk silicon nitride, (2) the effect of sintering parameters on microstructure development and the resulting mechanical properties, and (3) an investigation of ss-Sisb3Nsb4 nucleation and initial stage microstructure development. The composition and physical gradients in bulk silicon nitride are due to the furnace conditions and the environment adjacent to the samples. Loss of SiO from the exposed surfaces results in the formation of nitrogen-rich phases, such as melilite on the as-sintered surfaces. The high nitrogen concentration in the near-surface region promotes ss-Sisb3Nsb4 grain growth. Along with the compositional gradients, mechanical property differences also exist between the as-sintered surfaces and the bulk materials. For example, the strengths of as-sintered surfaces of Sisb3Nsb4-Ysb2Osb3-Alsb2Osb3 were observed to be reduced by more than 30% compared to the bulk material. Gas-pressure sintering (GPS) was used to densify silicon nitride two types of sintering additives: Sisb3Nsb4-6% Ysb2Osb3-2% Alsb2Osb3 and Sisb3Nsb4-Srsb2Lasb4Ybsb4(SiOsb4)sb6Osb2. For both compositions a lower densification temperature (1900sp°C in the present tests) was the most significant factor affecting the fracture toughness and promoting a bimodal grain structure. The low significance of the other process parameters implies the microstructure (and therefore properties) are essentially 'locked-in' during the densification stage. The kinetics of the alpha-to-ss Sisb3Nsb4 transformation are dependent on several characteristics of the starting silicon nitride powder. Most importantly, are the silicon nitride powder surface area and initial ss-Sisb3Nsb4 content which both tend to increase the transformation rate. Other factors, such as lattice oxygen or carbon contents, appear to contribute

  14. Formation pressure testing at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Operational summary, history matching, and interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, B.; Hancock, S.; Wilson, S.; Enger, C.; Collett, T.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.

    2011-01-01

    In February 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy, BP Exploration (Alaska), and the U.S. Geological Survey, collected open-hole pressure-response data, as well as gas and water sample collection, in a gas hydrate reservoir (the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well) using Schlumberger's Modular Dynamics Formation Tester (MDT) wireline tool. Four such MDT tests, ranging from six to twelve hours duration, and including a series of flow, sampling, and shut-in periods of various durations, were conducted. Locations for the testing were selected based on NMR and other log data to assure sufficient isolation from reservoir boundaries and zones of excess free water. Test stages in which pressure was reduced sufficiently to mobilize free water in the formation (yet not cause gas hydrate dissociation) produced readily interpretable pressure build-up profiles. Build-ups following larger drawdowns consistently showed gas-hydrate dissociation and gas release (as confirmed by optical fluid analyzer data), as well as progressive dampening of reservoir pressure build-up during sequential tests at a given MDT test station.History matches of one multi-stage, 12-h test (the C2 test) were accomplished using five different reservoir simulators: CMG-STARS, HydrateResSim, MH21-HYDRES, STOMP-HYD, and TOUGH. +. HYDRATE. Simulations utilized detailed information collected across the reservoir either obtained or determined from geophysical well logs, including thickness (11.3. m, 37 ft.), porosity (35%), hydrate saturation (65%), both mobile and immobile water saturations, intrinsic permeability (1000 mD), pore water salinity (5 ppt), and formation temperature (3.3-3.9 ??C). This paper will present the approach and preliminary results of the history-matching efforts, including estimates of initial formation permeability and analyses of the various unique features exhibited by the MDT results. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Effect of inlet-air humidity, temperature, pressure, and reference Mach number on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.; Diehl, L. A.; Trout, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from a gas turbine combustor. Combustor inlet air temperature ranged from 506 K (450 F) to 838 K (1050 F). The tests were primarily run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NOx emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet air humidity at a constant exponential rate: NOx = NOx0e-19H (where H is the humidity and the subscript 0 denotes the value at zero humidity). the emission index increased exponentially with increasing normalized inlet air temperature to the 1.14 power. Additional tests made to determine the effect of pressure and reference Mach number on NOx showed that the NOx emission index varies directly with pressure to the 0.5 power and inversely with reference Mach number.

  16. A Differential Pressure Laminar Flow Reactor Supports Osteogenic Differentiation and Extracellular Matrix Formation from Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Macroporous Ceramic Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Cornelia; Israelowitz, Meir; Gille, Christoph; von Schroeder, Herbert P.; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We present a laminar flow reactor for bone tissue engineering that was developed based on a computational fluid dynamics model. The bioreactor design permits a laminar flow field through its specific internal shape. An integrated bypass system that prevents pressure build-up through bypass openings for pressure release allows for a constant pressure environment during the changing of permeability values that are caused by cellular growth within a porous scaffold. A macroporous ceramic scaffold, composed of zirconium dioxide, was used as a test biomaterial that studies adipose stem cell behavior within a controlled three-dimensional (3D) flow and pressure environment. The topographic structure of the material provided a basis for stem cell proliferation and differentiation toward the osteogenic lineage. Dynamic culture conditions in the bioreactor supported cell viability during long-term culture and induced cell cluster formation and extra-cellular matrix deposition within the porous scaffold, though no complete closure of the pores with new-formed tissue was observed. We postulate that our system is suitable for studying fluid shear stress effects on stem cell proliferation and differentiation toward bone formation in tissue-engineered 3D constructs. PMID:23515420

  17. A high-pressure premixed flat-flame burner for chemical process studies. [of pollutant formation in hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    A premixed flat-flame burner was designed and tested with methane-air mixtures at pressures from 1.1 to 20 atm and equivalence ratios from 0.7 to 1.1. Reactant velocity in the burner mixing chamber was used to characterize the range of stable flames at each pressure-equivalence-ratio condition. Color photographs of the flames were used to determine flame zone thickness and flame height. The results show that this burner can be used for chemical process studies in premixed high pressure methane-air flames up to 20 atm.

  18. The gaseous enthalpy of formation of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide from combustion calorimetry, vapor pressure measurements, and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Verevkin, Sergey P; Heintz, Andreas

    2007-04-04

    Ionic liquids are attracting growing interest as alternatives to conventional molecular solvents. Experimental values of vapor pressure, enthalpy of vaporization, and enthalpy of formation of ionic liquids are the key thermodynamic quantities, which are required for the validation and development of the molecular modeling and ab initio methods toward this new class of solvents. In this work, the molar enthalpy of formation of the liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide, 206.2 +/- 2.5 kJ.mol-1, was measured by means of combustion calorimetry. The molar enthalpy of vaporization of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide, 157.2 +/- 1.1 kJ.mol-1, was obtained from the temperature dependence of the vapor pressure measured using the transpiration method. The latter method has been checked with measurements of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, where data are available from the effusion technique. The first experimental determination of the gaseous enthalpy of formation of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide, 363.4 +/- 2.7 kJ.mol-1, from thermochemical measurements (combustion and transpiration) is presented. Ab initio calculations of the enthalpy of formation in the gaseous phase have been performed for 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide using the G3MP2 theory. Excellent agreement with experimental results has been observed. The method developed opens a new way to obtain thermodynamic properties of ionic liquids which have not been available so far.

  19. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  20. Generation of field-aligned current (FAC) and convection through the formation of pressure regimes: Correction for the concept of Dungey's convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Watanabe, M.; Den, M.; Fujita, S.; Ebihara, Y.; Kikuchi, T.; Hashimoto, K. K.; Kataoka, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we try to elucidate the generation mechanism of the field-aligned current (FAC) and coexisting convection. From the comparison between the theoretical prediction and the state of numerical solution from the high-resolution global simulation, we obtain the following conclusions about the distribution of dynamo, the magnetic field structure along the flow path that diverges Poynting flux, and energy conversion promoting the generation of electromagnetic energy. The dynamo for the region 1 FAC, which is in the high-latitude-side cusp-mantle region, has a structure in which magnetic field is compressed along the convection path by the slow mode motion. The dynamo for the region 2 FAC is in the ring current region at the inner edge of the plasma sheet, and has a structure in which magnetic field is curved outward along the convection path. Under these structures, electromagnetic energy is generated from the work done by pressure gradient force, in both dynamos for the region 1 and region 2 FACs. In these generation processes of the FACs, the excitation of convection and the formation of pressure regimes occur as interdependent processes. This structure leads to a modification in the way of understanding the Dungey's convection. Generation of the FAC through the formation of pressure regimes is essential even for the case of substorm onset.

  1. Anionic chemistry of noble gases: formation of Mg-NG (NG = Xe, Kr, Ar) compounds under pressure.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mao-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Li; Brgoch, Jakoah; Spera, Frank; Jackson, Matthew G; Kresse, Georg; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-11-11

    While often considered to be chemically inert, the reactivity of noble gas elements at elevated pressures is an important aspect of fundamental chemistry. The discovery of Xe oxidation transformed the doctrinal boundary of chemistry by showing that a complete electron shell is not inert to reaction. However, the reductive propensity, i.e., gaining electrons and forming anions, has not been proposed or examined for noble gas elements. In this work, we demonstrate, using first-principles electronic structure calculations coupled to an efficient structure prediction method, that Xe, Kr, and Ar can form thermodynamically stable compounds with Mg at high pressure (≥125, ≥250, and ≥250 GPa, respectively). The resulting compounds are metallic and the noble gas atoms are negatively charged, suggesting that chemical species with a completely filled shell can gain electrons, filling their outermost shell(s). Moreover, this work indicates that Mg2NG (NG = Xe, Kr, Ar) are high-pressure electrides with some of the electrons localized at interstitial sites enclosed by the surrounding atoms. Previous predictions showed that such electrides only form in Mg and its compounds at very high pressures (>500 GPa). These calculations also demonstrate strong chemical interactions between the Xe 5d orbitals and the quantized interstitial quasiatom (ISQ) orbitals, including the strong chemical bonding and electron transfer, revealing the chemical nature of the ISQ.

  2. Effects of the nozzle design on the properties of plasma jet and formation of YSZ coatings under low pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chengqi; Gao, Yang; Yang, Deming; Fu, Yingqing

    2016-09-01

    How to control the quality of the coatings has become a major problem during the plasma spraying. Because nozzle contour has a great influence on the characteristic of the plasma jet, two kinds of plasma torches equipped with a standard cylindrical nozzle and a converging-diverging nozzle are designed for low pressure plasma spraying(LPPS) and very low pressure plasma spraying(VLPPS). Yttria stabilized zirconia(YSZ) coatings are obtained in the reducing pressure environment. The properties of the plasma jet without or with powder injection are analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy, and the electron temperature is calculated based on the ratio of the relative intensity of two Ar I spectral lines. The results show that some of the YSZ powder can be vaporized in the low pressure enlarged plasma jet, and the long anode nozzle may improve the characteristics of the plasma jet. The coatings deposited by LPPS are mainly composed of the equiaxed grains and while the unmelted powder particles and large scalar pores appear in the coatings made by VLPPS. The long anode nozzle could improve the melting of the powders and deposition efficiency, and enhance the coatings' hardness. At the same time, the long anode nozzle could lead to a decrease in the overspray phenomenon. Through the comparison of the two different size's nozzle, the long anode is much more suitable for making the YSZ coatings.

  3. Pressure increases, the formation of chromite seams, and the development of the ultramafic series in the Stillwater Complex, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipin, B.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the hypothesis that chromate seams in the Stillwater Complex formed in response to periodic increases in total pressure in the chamber. Total pressure increased because of the positive ??V of nucleation of CO2 bubbles in the melt and their subsequent rise through the magma chamber, during which the bubbles increased in volume by a factor of 4-6. By analogy with the pressure changes in the summit chambers of Kilauea and Krafla volcanoes, the maximum variation was 0.2-0.25 kbar, or 5-10% of the total pressure in the Stillwater chamber. An evaluation of the likelihood of fountaining and mixing of a new, primitive liquid that entered the chamber with the somewhat more evolved liquid already in the chamber is based upon calculations using observed and inferred velocities and flow rates of basaltic magmas moving through volcanic fissures. The calculations indicate that hot, dense magma would have oozed, rather than fountained into the chamber, and early mixing of the new and residual magmas that could have resulted in chromite crystallizing alone did not take place. -from Author

  4. On the Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Lean Partially Premixed Combustion, Burning Speed, Flame Instability and Plasma Formation of Alternative Fuels at High Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, Omid

    This dissertation investigates the combustion and injection fundamental characteristics of different alternative fuels both experimentally and theoretically. The subjects such as lean partially premixed combustion of methane/hydrogen/air/diluent, methane high pressure direct-injection, thermal plasma formation, thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air mixtures at high temperatures, laminar flames and flame morphology of synthetic gas (syngas) and Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuels were extensively studied in this work. These subjects will be summarized in three following paragraphs. The fundamentals of spray and partially premixed combustion characteristics of directly injected methane in a constant volume combustion chamber have been experimentally studied. The injected fuel jet generates turbulence in the vessel and forms a turbulent heterogeneous fuel-air mixture in the vessel, similar to that in a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Direct-Injection (DI) engines. The effect of different characteristics parameters such as spark delay time, stratification ratio, turbulence intensity, fuel injection pressure, chamber pressure, chamber temperature, Exhaust Gas recirculation (EGR) addition, hydrogen addition and equivalence ratio on flame propagation and emission concentrations were analyzed. As a part of this work and for the purpose of control and calibration of high pressure injector, spray development and characteristics including spray tip penetration, spray cone angle and overall equivalence ratio were evaluated under a wide range of fuel injection pressures of 30 to 90 atm and different chamber pressures of 1 to 5 atm. Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon/air plasma mixtures at ultra-high temperatures must be precisely calculated due to important influence on the flame kernel formation and propagation in combusting flows and spark discharge applications. A new algorithm based on the statistical thermodynamics was developed to calculate the ultra-high temperature plasma

  5. Effect of Low-Pressurized Perfusion with Different Concentration of Elastase on the Aneurysm Formation Rate in the Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Model in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nie, Maoxiao; Yan, Yunfeng; Li, Xinhe; Feng, Tingting; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Mingduo; Zhao, Quanming

    2016-01-01

    Establishing an animal model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the key to study the pathogenesis and the pathophysiological features of AAAs. We investigated the effects of low-pressurized perfusion with different concentrations of elastase on aneurysm formation rate in the AAA model. Fifty male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, C, D, and E groups. 10 μL of normal saline was perfused into the abdominal aorta in group A and 1 U/mL, 10 U/mL, 100 U/mL, or 200 U/mL of elastase was, respectively, perfused for the other four groups. All the animals were perfused for 7 min. Doppler ultrasound examinations of the abdominal aorta were performed before surgery and on day 14 after surgery. The rabbits were sacrificed and the perfused segment of the abdominal aorta was observed visually and after staining. The aneurysm formation rate of group A, group B, group C, group D, and group E was, respectively, 0%, 0%, 33.3%, 102.5-146.8%, and 241.5-255.2%. The survival rate of five groups was 90%, 90%, 90%, 90%, and 40%, respectively. So, we concluded that low-pressurized perfusion with 100 U/mL of elastase can effectively establish AAAs in rabbits with a high aneurysm formation rate.

  6. Effect of Low-Pressurized Perfusion with Different Concentration of Elastase on the Aneurysm Formation Rate in the Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Model in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Maoxiao; Yan, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Establishing an animal model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the key to study the pathogenesis and the pathophysiological features of AAAs. We investigated the effects of low-pressurized perfusion with different concentrations of elastase on aneurysm formation rate in the AAA model. Fifty male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, C, D, and E groups. 10 μL of normal saline was perfused into the abdominal aorta in group A and 1 U/mL, 10 U/mL, 100 U/mL, or 200 U/mL of elastase was, respectively, perfused for the other four groups. All the animals were perfused for 7 min. Doppler ultrasound examinations of the abdominal aorta were performed before surgery and on day 14 after surgery. The rabbits were sacrificed and the perfused segment of the abdominal aorta was observed visually and after staining. The aneurysm formation rate of group A, group B, group C, group D, and group E was, respectively, 0%, 0%, 33.3%, 102.5–146.8%, and 241.5–255.2%. The survival rate of five groups was 90%, 90%, 90%, 90%, and 40%, respectively. So, we concluded that low-pressurized perfusion with 100 U/mL of elastase can effectively establish AAAs in rabbits with a high aneurysm formation rate. PMID:27965979

  7. The inviscid pressure field on the tip of a semi-infinite wing and its application to the formation of a tip vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. F.; Shamroth, S. J.; Mcdonald, H.; Briley, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed for determining the aerodynamic loads on the tip of an infinitely thin, swept, cambered semi-infinite wing at an angle of attack which is operating subsonically in an inviscid medium and is subjected to a sinusoidal gust. Under the assumption of linearized aerodynamics, the loads on the tip are obtained by superposition of the steady aerodynamic results for angle of attack and camber, and the unsteady results for the response to the sinusoidal gust. The near field disturbance pressures in the fluid surrounding the tip are obtained by assuming a dipole representation for the loading on the tip and calculating the pressures accordingly. The near field pressures are used to drive a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations which yield the tip vortex formation. The combined viscid-inviscid analysis is applied to determining the pressures and examining the vortex rollup in the vicinity of an unswept, uncambered wing moving steadily at a Mach number of 0.2 at an angle of attack of 0.1 rad. The viscous tip flow calculation shows features expected in the tip flow such as the qualitatively proper development of boundary layers on both the upper and lower airfoil surfaces. In addition, application of the viscous solution leads to the generation of a circular type flow pattern above the airfoil suction surface.

  8. 08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John Morse; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

  9. Visualizing how cancer chromosome abnormalities form in living cells

    Cancer.gov

    For the first time, scientists have directly observed events that lead to the formation of a chromosome abnormality that is often found in cancer cells. The abnormality, called a translocation, occurs when part of a chromosome breaks off and becomes attac

  10. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  11. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  12. In Situ Visualization of the Dynamics in Xylem Embolism Formation and Removal in the Absence of Root Pressure: A Study on Excised Grapevine Stems1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Knipfer, Thorsten; Cuneo, Italo F.; Brodersen, Craig R.; McElrone, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas embolisms formed during drought can disrupt long-distance water transport through plant xylem vessels, but some species have the ability to remove these blockages. Despite evidence suggesting that embolism removal is linked to the presence of vessel-associated parenchyma, the underlying mechanism remains controversial and is thought to involve positive pressure generated by roots. Here, we used in situ x-ray microtomography on excised grapevine stems to determine if embolism removal is possible without root pressure, and if the embolism formation/removal affects vessel functional status after sample excision. Our data show that embolism removal in excised stems was driven by water droplet growth and was qualitatively identical to refilling in intact plants. When stem segments were rehydrated with H2O after excision, vessel refilling occurred rapidly (<1 h). The refilling process was substantially slower when polyethylene glycol was added to the H2O source, thereby providing new support for an osmotically driven refilling mechanism. In contrast, segments not supplied with H2O showed no refilling and increased embolism formation. Dynamic changes in liquid/wall contact angles indicated that the processes of embolism removal (i.e. vessel refilling) by water influx and embolism formation by water efflux were directly linked to the activity of vessel-associated living tissue. Overall, our results emphasize that root pressure is not required as a driving force for vessel refilling, and care should be taken when performing hydraulics measurements on excised plant organs containing living vessel-associated tissue, because the vessel behavior may not be static. PMID:27208267

  13. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  14. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  15. Studies of the mechanism of the cluster formation in a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Sascha Stroh, Fred; Klopotowski, Sebastian Derpmann, Valerie Klee, Sonja Brockmann, Klaus J. Benter, Thorsten

    2014-01-15

    In this study a thermally sampling atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer is described and characterized. The ion transfer stage offers the capability to sample cluster ions at thermal equilibrium and during this transfer fundamental processes possibly affecting the cluster distribution are also readily identified. Additionally, the transfer stage combines optional collision-induced dissociation (CID) analysis of the cluster composition with thermal equilibrium sampling of clusters. The performance of the setup is demonstrated with regard to the proton-bound water cluster system. The benefit of the studied processes is that they can help to improve future transfer stages and to understand cluster ion reactions in ion mobility tubes and high-pressure ion sources. In addition, the instrument allows for the identification of fragmentation and protonation reactions caused by CID.

  16. Pressure dependent low temperature kinetics for CN + CH3CN: competition between chemical reaction and van der Waals complex formation.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Chantal; González, Sergio; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Talbi, Dahbia; El Dib, Gisèle; Canosa, André

    2016-06-01

    The gas phase reaction between the CN radical and acetonitrile CH3CN was investigated experimentally, at low temperatures, with the CRESU apparatus and a slow flow reactor to explore the temperature dependence of its rate coefficient from 354 K down to 23 K. Whereas a standard Arrhenius behavior was found at T > 200 K, indicating the presence of an activation barrier, a dramatic increase in the rate coefficient by a factor of 130 was observed when the temperature was decreased from 168 to 123 K. The reaction was found to be pressure independent at 297 K unlike the experiments carried out at 52 and 132 K. The work was complemented by ab initio transition state theory based master equation calculations using reaction pathways investigated with highly accurate thermochemical protocols. The role of collisional stabilization of a CNCH3CN van der Waals complex and of tunneling induced H atom abstractions were also considered. The experimental pressure dependence at 52 and 132 K is well reproduced by the theoretical calculations provided that an anharmonic state density is considered for the van der Waals complex CH3CNCN and its Lennard-Jones radius is adjusted. Furthermore, these calculations indicate that the experimental observations correspond to the fall-off regime and that tunneling remains small in the low-pressure regime. Hence, the studied reaction is essentially an association process at very low temperature. Implications for the chemistry of interstellar clouds and Titan are discussed.

  17. Formation of the -N(NO)N(NO)- polymer at high pressure and stabilization at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hai; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Liu, Wei-Guang; Zybin, Sergey V

    2013-04-02

    A number of exotic structures have been formed through high-pressure chemistry, but applications have been hindered by difficulties in recovering the high-pressure phase to ambient conditions (i.e., one atmosphere and 300 K). Here we use dispersion-corrected density functional theory [PBE-ulg (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor of DFT with the universal low gradient correction for long range London dispersion)] to predict that above 60 gigapascal (GPa) the most stable form of N2O (the laughing gas in its molecular form) is a one-dimensional polymer with an all-nitrogen backbone analogous to cis-polyacetylene in which alternate N are bonded (ionic covalent) to O. The analogous trans-polymer is only 0.03∼0.10 eV/molecular unit less stable. Upon relaxation to ambient conditions, both polymers relax below 14 GPa to the same stable nonplanar trans-polymer. The predicted phonon spectrum and dissociation kinetics validates the stability of this trans-poly-NNO at ambient conditions, which has potential applications as a type of conducting nonlinear optical polymer with all-nitrogen chains and as a high-energy oxidizer for rocket propulsion. This work illustrates in silico materials discovery particularly in the realm of extreme conditions (very high pressure or temperature).

  18. Formation of the –N(NO)N(NO)– polymer at high pressure and stabilization at ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hai; An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Liu, Wei-Guang; Zybin, Sergey V.

    2013-01-01

    A number of exotic structures have been formed through high-pressure chemistry, but applications have been hindered by difficulties in recovering the high-pressure phase to ambient conditions (i.e., one atmosphere and 300 K). Here we use dispersion-corrected density functional theory [PBE-ulg (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor of DFT with the universal low gradient correction for long range London dispersion)] to predict that above 60 gigapascal (GPa) the most stable form of N2O (the laughing gas in its molecular form) is a one-dimensional polymer with an all-nitrogen backbone analogous to cis-polyacetylene in which alternate N are bonded (ionic covalent) to O. The analogous trans-polymer is only 0.03∼0.10 eV/molecular unit less stable. Upon relaxation to ambient conditions, both polymers relax below 14 GPa to the same stable nonplanar trans-polymer. The predicted phonon spectrum and dissociation kinetics validates the stability of this trans-poly-NNO at ambient conditions, which has potential applications as a type of conducting nonlinear optical polymer with all-nitrogen chains and as a high-energy oxidizer for rocket propulsion. This work illustrates in silico materials discovery particularly in the realm of extreme conditions (very high pressure or temperature). PMID:23503849

  19. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  20. Volatilization of low vapor pressure--volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities: Potential contributions to ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E; Bennett, Deborah H

    2016-06-01

    There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use.

  1. Morphology transition of raft-model membrane induced by osmotic pressure: Formation of double-layered vesicle similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onai, Teruaki; Hirai, Mitsuhiro

    2010-10-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on the structure of large uni-lamellar vesicle (LUV) of the lipid mixtures of monosialoganglioside (GM1)-cholesterol-dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studies by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) method. The molar ratios of the mixtures were 0.1/0.1/1, 0/0.1/1, and 0/0/1. The ternary lipid mixture is a model of lipid rafts. The value of osmotic pressure was varied from 0 to 4.16×105 N/m2 by adding the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the range from 0 to 25 % w/v. In the case of the mixtures without GM1, the rise of the osmotic pressure just enhances the multi-lamellar stacking with deceasing the inter-lamellar spacing. On the other hand, the mixture containing GM1 shows the structural transition from a uni-lamellar vesicle to a double-layered vesicle (a liposome including a smaller one inside) by the rise of osmotic pressure. In this morphology transition the total surface area of the double-layered vesicle is mostly as same as that of the LUV at the initial state. The polar head region of GM1 is bulky and highly hydrophilic due to the oligosaccharide chain containing a sialic acid residue. Then, the present results suggest that the existence of GM1 in the outer-leaflet of the LUV is essentially important for such a double-layered vesicle formation. Alternatively, a phenomenon similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis in cells can be caused simply by a variation of osmotic pressure.

  2. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  3. Effect of total pressure on the formation and size evolution of silicon quantum dots in silicon nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Rezgui, B.; Sibai, A.; Nychyporuk, T.; Lemiti, M.; Bremond, G.; Maestre, D.; Palais, O.

    2010-05-03

    The size of silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) embedded in silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) has been controlled by varying the total pressure in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) reactor. This is evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and results in a shift in the light emission peak of the quantum dots. We show that the luminescence in our structures is attributed to the quantum confinement effect. These findings give a strong indication that the quality (density and size distribution) of Si QDs can be improved by optimizing the deposition parameters which opens a route to the fabrication of an all-Si tandem solar cell.

  4. Discontinuous phase formation and selective attack of SiC materials exposed to low oxygen partial pressure environments

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, D.P.; Tressler, R.E.; Spear, K.E.

    1993-09-01

    Three SiC materials were exposed to gas mixtures containing N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO at 1000-1300C, 1-740 torr for a few to 1000 h. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that CO is the predominant oxidizing species. A variety of corrosion processes were observed, including surface and internal pit formation, needle growth, grain boundary attack, and attack of impurities and surrounding material. In the case of a siliconized SiC, impurities such as Ca, Al, and Fe diffused rapidly through the Si matrix forming complex calcium aluminosilicates on the surface, leaving behind internal voids. Evaluation of the mechanical properties, including fractography, revealed a variety of degradative phenomena. Efforts to identify causes of pit formation suggested that the overall process was complex. Pits formed during attack of grain boundaries and regions containing transition metal impurities. Studies of single crystals showed preferential attack near impurities and crystalline defects, indicating that damaged crystals or certain crystal orientations in the polycrystalline materials are susceptible to attack. In addition, under some conditions where pit formation was observed, the strength of certain materials increased apparently due to flaw healing. It is suggested that flaws can heal in the absence of mechanical stress due to their high surface energy. However, second phases observed within partially healed surface cracks suggest impurities also contribute to the flaw healing processes.

  5. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  6. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Synthesis, Direct Formation under High Pressure, Structure, and Electronic Properties of LiNbO3-type Oxide PbZnO3.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daisuke; Tanaka, Kie; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Kikegawa, Takumi; Inaguma, Yoshiyuki

    2015-12-07

    A novel LiNbO3-type (LN-type) lead zinc oxide, PbZnO3, was successfully synthesized under high pressure and temperature. Rietveld structure refinement using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data demonstrated that LN-type PbZnO3 crystallized into a trigonal structure with a polar space group (R3c). The bond valence sum estimated from the interatomic distances indicated that the sample possesses a Pb(4+)Zn(2+)O3 valence state. Polarization could evolve as a result of the repulsion between constituent cations because PbZnO3 does not contain a stereochemical 6s(2) cation or a Jahn-Teller active d(0) cation. Distortion of ZnO6 octahedra resulting from cation shift is comparable with that of d(0) TiO6 in ZnTiO3 and MnTiO3 with LN-type oxides, which leads to stabilization of the polar structure. PbZnO3 exhibited metallic behavior and temperature-independent diamagnetic character. In situ XRD measurement revealed that the formation of LN-type PbZnO3 occurred directly without the formation of a perovskite phase, which is unusual among LN-type materials obtained by high-pressure synthesis.

  8. Dimethylamine, trimethylamine, and biogenic amine formation in high-pressure processed semidried squid (Todarodes pacificius) during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Gou, Jingyu; Choi, Kun-Pyo; He, Xinlong; Ahn, Juhee

    2010-09-01

    The quality properties of semidried squid treated with high-pressure processing (HPP) were investigated during refrigerated storage. The vacuum-packed semidried squid samples were subjected to 500 MPa for 0 min (HPP-0), 5 min (HPP-5), and 10 min (HPP-10) by using a custom-made high-pressure processor and stored at a refrigerated temperature for 28 d. The populations of indigenous psychrotrophic and mesophilic bacteria were effectively reduced by approximately 1 and 2 log CFU/g at the HPP-10 treatment, respectively. Compared to the control, the bacterial counts in HPP-treated semidried squid samples were maintained at low levels throughout the storage period. The increase in the amounts of dimethylamine (DMA) and trimethylamine (TMA) was more pronounced at the unpressurized control than at the HPP treatments. The production of biogenic amines (BAs) varied with HPP treatment during refrigerated storage. Therefore, the application of HPP may provide a significant improvement in the safety and quality of semidried squid.

  9. Phase formation in the (1-y)BiFeO3-yBiScO3 system under ambient and high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salak, A. N.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Pushkarev, A. V.; Radyush, Yu. V.; Olekhnovich, N. M.; Shilin, A. D.; Rubanik, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    Formation and thermal stability of perovskite phases in the BiFe1-yScyO3 system (0≤y≤0.70) were studied. When the iron-to-scandium substitution rate does not exceed about 15 at%, the single-phase perovskite ceramics with the rhombohedral R3c symmetry (as that of the parent compound, BiFeO3) can be prepared from the stoichiometric mixture of the respective oxides at ambient pressure. Thermal treatment of the oxide mixtures with a higher content of scandium results in formation of two main phases, namely a BiFeO3-like R3c phase and a cubic (I23) sillenite-type phase based on γ-Bi2O3. Single-phase perovskite ceramics of the BiFe1-yScyO3 composition were synthesized under high pressure from the thermally treated oxide mixtures. When y is between 0 and 0.25 the high-pressure prepared phase is the rhombohedral R3c with the √2ap×√2ap×2√3ap superstructure (ap 4 Å is the pseudocubic perovskite unit-cell parameter). The orthorhombic Pnma phase (√2ap×4ap×2√2ap) was obtained in the range of 0.30≤y≤0.60, while the monoclinic C2/c phase (√6ap×√2ap×√6ap) is formed when y=0.70. The normalized unit-cell volume drops at the crossover from the rhombohedral to the orthorhombic composition range. The perovskite BiFe1-yScyO3 phases prepared under high pressure are metastable regardless of their symmetry. At ambient pressure, the phases with the compositions in the ranges of 0.20≤y≤0.25, 0.30≤y<0.50 and 0.50≤y≤0.70 start to decompose above 970, 920 and 870 K, respectively.

  10. Autonomic correlations with MRI are abnormal in the brainstem vasomotor centre in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barnden, Leighton R; Kwiatek, Richard; Crouch, Benjamin; Burnet, Richard; Del Fante, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Autonomic changes are often associated with the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but their pathogenetic role is unclear and brain imaging investigations are lacking. The vasomotor centre and, through it, nuclei in the midbrain and hypothalamus play a key role in autonomic nervous system regulation of steady state blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). In this exploratory cross-sectional study, BP and HR, as indicators of autonomic function, were correlated with volumetric and T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo (T1w and T2w) brain MRI in 25 CFS subjects and 25 normal controls (NC). Steady state BP (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) and HR in two postures were extracted from 24 h blood pressure monitoring. We performed (1) MRI versus autonomic score interaction-with-group regressions to detect locations where regression slopes differed in the CFS and NC groups (collectively indicating abnormality in CFS), and (2) MRI regressions in the CFS and NC groups alone to detect additional locations with abnormal correlations in CFS. Significant CFS regressions were repeated controlling for anxiety and depression (A&D). Abnormal regressions were detected in nuclei of the brainstem vasomotor centre, midbrain reticular formation and hypothalamus, but also in limbic nuclei involved in stress responses and in prefrontal white matter. Group comparisons of CFS and NC did not find MRI differences in these locations. We propose therefore that these regulatory nuclei are functioning correctly, but that two-way communication between them is impaired in CFS and this affects signalling to/from peripheral effectors/sensors, culminating in inverted or magnified correlations. This single explanation for the diverse abnormal correlations detected here consolidates the conclusion for a brainstem/midbrain nerve conduction deficit inferred earlier (Barnden et al., 2015). Strong correlations were also detected in isolated NC regressions.

  11. Autonomic correlations with MRI are abnormal in the brainstem vasomotor centre in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barnden, Leighton R.; Kwiatek, Richard; Crouch, Benjamin; Burnet, Richard; Del Fante, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Autonomic changes are often associated with the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but their pathogenetic role is unclear and brain imaging investigations are lacking. The vasomotor centre and, through it, nuclei in the midbrain and hypothalamus play a key role in autonomic nervous system regulation of steady state blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). In this exploratory cross-sectional study, BP and HR, as indicators of autonomic function, were correlated with volumetric and T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo (T1w and T2w) brain MRI in 25 CFS subjects and 25 normal controls (NC). Steady state BP (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) and HR in two postures were extracted from 24 h blood pressure monitoring. We performed (1) MRI versus autonomic score interaction-with-group regressions to detect locations where regression slopes differed in the CFS and NC groups (collectively indicating abnormality in CFS), and (2) MRI regressions in the CFS and NC groups alone to detect additional locations with abnormal correlations in CFS. Significant CFS regressions were repeated controlling for anxiety and depression (A&D). Abnormal regressions were detected in nuclei of the brainstem vasomotor centre, midbrain reticular formation and hypothalamus, but also in limbic nuclei involved in stress responses and in prefrontal white matter. Group comparisons of CFS and NC did not find MRI differences in these locations. We propose therefore that these regulatory nuclei are functioning correctly, but that two-way communication between them is impaired in CFS and this affects signalling to/from peripheral effectors/sensors, culminating in inverted or magnified correlations. This single explanation for the diverse abnormal correlations detected here consolidates the conclusion for a brainstem/midbrain nerve conduction deficit inferred earlier (Barnden et al., 2015). Strong correlations were also detected in isolated NC regressions. PMID:27114901

  12. First-principles high-pressure unreacted equation of state and heat of formation of crystal 2,6-diamino-3, 5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105)

    SciTech Connect

    Manaa, M. Riad Kuo, I-Feng W.; Fried, Laurence E.

    2014-08-14

    We report dispersion-corrected density functional theoretical calculations of the unreacted equation of state (EOS) of crystal 2,6-diamino-3, 5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) under hydrostatic compression of up to 45 GPa. Convergence tests for k-points sampling in the Brillouin zone show that a 3 × 1 × 2 mesh is required to reproduce the X-ray crystal structure at ambient conditions, and we confirm our finding with a separate supercell calculation. Our high-pressure EOS yields a bulk modulus of 19.2 GPa, and indicates a tendency towards anisotropic compression along the b lattice vector due to molecular orientations within the lattice. We find that the electronic energy band gap decreases from a semiconductor type of 1.3 eV at 0 GPa to quasi-metallic type of 0.6 eV at 45 GPa. The extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds involving the oxide (–NO) and dioxide (–NO{sub 2}) interactions with the amine (–NH{sub 2}) group showed enhanced interactions with increasing pressure that should be discernible in the mid IR spectral region. We do not find evidence for structural phase transitions or chemically induced transformations within the pressure range of our study. The gas phase heat of formation is calculated at the G4 level of theory to be 22.48 kcal/mol, while we obtain 25.92 kcal/mol using the ccCA-PS3 method. Density functional theory calculations of the crystal and the gas phases provided an estimate for the heat of sublimation of 32.4 kcal/mol. We thus determine the room-temperature solid heat of formation of LLM-105 to be −9.9 or −6.5 kcal/mol based on the G4 or ccCA-PS3 methods, respectively.

  13. First-principles high-pressure unreacted equation of state and heat of formation of crystal 2,6-diamino-3, 5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105).

    PubMed

    Manaa, M Riad; Kuo, I-Feng W; Fried, Laurence E

    2014-08-14

    We report dispersion-corrected density functional theoretical calculations of the unreacted equation of state (EOS) of crystal 2,6-diamino-3, 5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) under hydrostatic compression of up to 45 GPa. Convergence tests for k-points sampling in the Brillouin zone show that a 3 × 1 × 2 mesh is required to reproduce the X-ray crystal structure at ambient conditions, and we confirm our finding with a separate supercell calculation. Our high-pressure EOS yields a bulk modulus of 19.2 GPa, and indicates a tendency towards anisotropic compression along the b lattice vector due to molecular orientations within the lattice. We find that the electronic energy band gap decreases from a semiconductor type of 1.3 eV at 0 GPa to quasi-metallic type of 0.6 eV at 45 GPa. The extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds involving the oxide (-NO) and dioxide (-NO2) interactions with the amine (-NH2) group showed enhanced interactions with increasing pressure that should be discernible in the mid IR spectral region. We do not find evidence for structural phase transitions or chemically induced transformations within the pressure range of our study. The gas phase heat of formation is calculated at the G4 level of theory to be 22.48 kcal/mol, while we obtain 25.92 kcal/mol using the ccCA-PS3 method. Density functional theory calculations of the crystal and the gas phases provided an estimate for the heat of sublimation of 32.4 kcal/mol. We thus determine the room-temperature solid heat of formation of LLM-105 to be -9.9 or -6.5 kcal/mol based on the G4 or ccCA-PS3 methods, respectively.

  14. New Insights into the Formation of Viable but Nonculturable Escherichia coli O157:H7 Induced by High-Pressure CO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng; Wang, Yongtao; An, Haoran; Hu, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Escherichia coli O157:H7 induced by high-pressure CO2 (HPCD) was investigated using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) transcriptomics and isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomic methods. The analyses revealed that 97 genes and 56 proteins were significantly changed upon VBNC state entry. Genes and proteins related to membrane transport, central metabolisms, DNA replication, and cell division were mainly downregulated in the VBNC cells. This caused low metabolic activity concurrently with a division arrest in cells, which may be related to VBNC state formation. Cell division repression and outer membrane overexpression were confirmed to be involved in VBNC state formation by homologous expression of z2046 coding for transcriptional repressor and ompF encoding outer membrane protein F. Upon VBNC state entry, pyruvate catabolism in the cells shifted from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle toward the fermentative route; this led to a low level of ATP. Combating the low energy supply, ATP production in the VBNC cells was compensated by the degradation of l-serine and l-threonine, the increased AMP generation, and the enhanced electron transfer. Furthermore, tolerance of the cells with respect to HPCD-induced acid, oxidation, and high CO2 stresses was enhanced by promoting the production of ammonia and NADPH and by reducing CO2 production during VBNC state formation. Most genes and proteins related to pathogenicity were downregulated in the VBNC cells. This would decrease the cell pathogenicity, which was confirmed by adhesion assays. In conclusion, the decreased metabolic activity, repressed cell division, and enhanced survival ability in E. coli O157:H7 might cause HPCD-induced VBNC state formation. PMID:27578754

  15. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  16. Towards a fully kinetic 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell model of streamer formation and dynamics in high-pressure electronegative gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Thoma, C.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Bruner, N.; Rambo, P. K.; Atherton, B. W.

    2011-09-01

    Streamer and leader formation in high pressure devices is dynamic process involving a broad range of physical phenomena. These include elastic and inelastic particle collisions in the gas, radiation generation, transport and absorption, and electrode interactions. Accurate modeling of these physical processes is essential for a number of applications, including high-current, laser-triggered gas switches. Towards this end, we present a new 3D implicit particle-in-cell simulation model of gas breakdown leading to streamer formation in electronegative gases. The model uses a Monte Carlo treatment for all particle interactions and includes discrete photon generation, transport, and absorption for ultra-violet and soft x-ray radiation. Central to the realization of this fully kinetic particle treatment is an algorithm that manages the total particle count by species while preserving the local momentum distribution functions and conserving charge [D. R. Welch, T. C. Genoni, R. E. Clark, and D. V. Rose, J. Comput. Phys. 227, 143 (2007)]. The simulation model is fully electromagnetic, making it capable of following, for example, the evolution of a gas switch from the point of laser-induced localized breakdown of the gas between electrodes through the successive stages of streamer propagation, initial electrode current connection, and high-current conduction channel evolution, where self-magnetic field effects are likely to be important. We describe the model details and underlying assumptions used and present sample results from 3D simulations of streamer formation and propagation in SF6.

  17. Formation of Metal-Adducted Analyte Ions by Flame-Induced Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Wang, Chin-Hsiung; Shiea, Jentaie

    2016-05-17

    A flame-induced atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) source, consisting of a miniflame, nebulizer, and heated tube, was developed to ionize analytes. The ionization was performed by reacting analytes with a charged species generated in a flame. A stainless steel needle deposited with saturated alkali chloride solution was introduced into the mini oxyacetylene flame to generate alkali ions, which were reacted with analytes (M) generated in a heated nebulizer. The alkali-adducted 18-crown-6 ether ions, including (M + Li)(+), (M + Na)(+), (M + K)(+), (M + Rb)(+), and (M + Cs)(+), were successfully detected on the FAPCI mass spectra when the corresponding alkali chloride solutions were separately introduced to the flame. When an alkali chloride mixture was introduced, all alkali-adducted analyte ions were simultaneously detected. Their intensity order was as follows: (M + Cs)(+) > (M + Rb)(+) > (M + K)(+) > (M + Na)(+) > (M + Li)(+), and this trend agreed with the lattice energies of alkali chlorides. Besides alkali ions, other transition metal ions such as Ni(+), Cu(+), and Ag(+) were generated in a flame for analyte ionization. Other than metal ions, the reactive species generated in the fossil fuel flame could also be used to ionize analytes, which formed protonated analyte ions (M + H)(+) in positive ion mode and deprotonated analyte ions (M - H)(-) in negative ion mode.

  18. The formation of supersaturated solid solutions in Fe–Cu alloys deformed by high-pressure torsion

    PubMed Central

    Bachmaier, A.; Kerber, M.; Setman, D.; Pippan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Fully dense bulk nanocomposites have been obtained by a novel two-step severe plastic deformation process in the immiscible Fe–Cu system. Elemental micrometer-sized Cu and Fe powders were first mixed in different compositions and subsequently high-pressure-torsion-consolidated and deformed in a two-step deformation process. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and atom probe investigations were performed to study the evolving far-from-equilibrium nanostructures which were observed at all compositions. For lower and higher Cu contents complete solid solutions of Cu in Fe and Fe in Cu, respectively, are obtained. In the near 50% regime a solid solution face-centred cubic and solid solution body-centred cubic nanograined composite has been formed. After an annealing treatment, these solid solutions decompose and form two-phase nanostructured Fe–Cu composites with a high hardness and an enhanced thermal stability. The grain size of the composites retained nanocrystalline up to high annealing temperatures. PMID:22368454

  19. Formation of carbonaceous nano-layers under high interfacial pressures during lubrication with mineral and bio-based oils

    SciTech Connect

    Baltrus, John P.

    2014-01-01

    In order to better protect steel surfaces against wear under high loads, understanding of chemical reactions between lubricants and metal at high interfacial pressures and elevated temperatures needs to be improved. Solutions at 5 to 20 wt. % of zinc di-2-ethylhexyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) and chlorinated paraffins (CP) in inhibited paraffinic mineral oil (IPMO) and inhibited soy bean oil (ISBO) were compared on a Twist Compression Tribotester (TCT) at 200 MPa. Microscopy of wear tracks after 10 seconds tribotesting showed much smoother surface profiles than those of unworn areas. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with Ar-ion sputtering demonstrated that additive solutions in ISBO formed 2–3 times thicker carbon-containing nano-layers compared to IPMO. The amounts of Cl, S or P were unexpectedly low and detectable only on the top surface with less than 5 nm penetration. CP blends in IPMO formed more inorganic chlorides than those in ISBO. It can be concluded that base oils are primarily responsible for the thickness of carbonaceous nano-layers during early stages of severe boundary lubrication, while CP or ZDDP additive contributions are important, but less significant.

  20. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  1. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  2. Concomitant formation of different nature clusters and hardening in reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Fukuya, K.; Hojo, T.

    2013-11-01

    Specimens of A533B steels containing 0.04, 0.09 and 0.21 wt%Cu were irradiated at 290 °C to 3 dpa with 3 MeV Fe ions and subjected to atom probe analyses, transmission electron microscopy observations and hardness measurements. The atom probe analysis results showed that two types of solute clusters were formed: Cu-enriched clusters containing Mn, Ni and Si atoms as irradiation-enhanced solute atom clusters and Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters as irradiation-induced solute atom clusters. Both cluster types occurred in the highest Cu-content steel and the ratio of Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters to Cu-enriched clusters increased with irradiation doses. It was confirmed that the cluster formation was a key factor in the microstructure evolution until the high dose irradiation was reached even in the low Cu content steels though the dislocation loops with much lower density than that of the clusters were observed as matrix damage. The difference in the hardening efficiency due to the difference in the nature of the clusters was small. The irradiation-induced clustering of undersized Si atoms suggested that a clustering driving force other than vacancy-driven diffusion, probably an interstitial mechanism, may become important at higher dose rates.

  3. Effects of alloying elements on radiation hardening based on loop formation of electron-irradiated light water reactor pressure vessel model steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Takakuni; Hashimoto, N.; Ohnuki, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G. R.

    2011-10-01

    Electron irradiations using a high voltage electron microscope were conducted on several reactor pressure vessel model alloys in order to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the formation and development of defect clusters. In addition, the effects of alloying elements on yield stress change after irradiation were considered, comparing the mean size and number density of dislocation loops with the irradiation-induced hardening. High Cu alloys formed Cu and Mn-Ni-Si rich clusters, and these are important in determining the yield stress increase. High Ni alloys formed a high density of small dislocation loops and probably Mn-Ni-Si rich cluster, which have the effect of increasing the yield stress. High P enhanced radiation-induced segregation on grain boundary, helping prevent dislocation movement.

  4. Assessment of pH shock as a method for controlling sulfide and methane formation in pressure main sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Oriol; Sudarjanto, Gatut; Ren, Guo; Ganigué, Ramon; Jiang, Guangming; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    Caustic dosing to raise pH above 10.0 for short periods (hours) is often used by water utilities for controlling sulfide formation in sewers. However the effectiveness of this strategy is rarely reported and the impact of pH level and exposure time on the effectiveness is largely unknown. The effectiveness of this strategy under various pH levels (10.5-12.5) and exposure time (0.5-6.0 h) in controlling sulfide and methane production was evaluated in laboratory scale anaerobic sewer reactors and then in a real sewer system. Laboratory studies showed that the sulfide production rate of the laboratory sewer biofilm was reduced by 70-90% upon the completion of the pH shock, while the methane production rate decreased by 95-100%. It took approximately one week for the sulfate-reducing activity to recover to normal levels. In comparison, the methanogenic activities recovered to only about 10% in 4 weeks. The slow recovery is explained by the substantially loss of cell viability upon pH shocks, which recovered slowly after the shocks. Laboratory studies further revealed that a pH level of 10.5 for 1-2 h represent cost-effective conditions for the pH shock treatment. However, field trials showed a higher pH (11.5) and larger dosing times are needed due to the pH decreases along the sewer line and at the two ends of the caustic-receiving wastewater slugs due to dilution. To have effective sulfide and methane control, it is important to ensure effective conditions (pH > 10.5 and duration >1-2 h) for the entire sewer line.

  5. Studies on the Tempo of Bubble Formation in Recently Cavitated Vessels: A Model to Predict the Pressure of Air Bubbles1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. PMID:25907963

  6. Defect formation in aqueous environment: Theoretical assessment of boron incorporation in nickel ferrite under conditions of an operating pressurized-water nuclear reactor (PWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rák, Zs.; Bucholz, E. W.; Brenner, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    A serious concern in the safety and economy of a pressurized water nuclear reactor is related to the accumulation of boron inside the metal oxide (mostly NiFe2O4 spinel) deposits on the upper regions of the fuel rods. Boron, being a potent neutron absorber, can alter the neutron flux causing anomalous shifts and fluctuations in the power output of the reactor core. This phenomenon reduces the operational flexibility of the plant and may force the down-rating of the reactor. In this work an innovative approach is used to combine first-principles calculations with thermodynamic data to evaluate the possibility of B incorporation into the crystal structure of NiFe2O4 , under conditions typical to operating nuclear pressurized water nuclear reactors. Analyses of temperature and pH dependence of the defect formation energies indicate that B can accumulate in NiFe2O4 as an interstitial impurity and may therefore be a major contributor to the anomalous axial power shift observed in nuclear reactors. This computational approach is quite general and applicable to a large variety of solids in equilibrium with aqueous solutions.

  7. Management of post-ethmoidectomy crust formation: randomized single-blind clinical trial comparing pressurized seawater versus antiseptic/mucolytic saline.

    PubMed

    Pigret, D; Jankowski, R

    1996-03-01

    This study compared the efficacy of mechanical nasal lavages with pressurized seawater versus nasal irrigations with saline plus benzododecinium (antiseptic) plus oleosorbate (mucolytic). Twenty patients agreed to participate in a randomized, single-blind clinical trial. All patients underwent endoscopic endonasal ethmoidectomy for nasal polyps. The packing was removed after 48 h and patients were asked to start the same day nasal lavages three times a day. Clinical evaluations were performed: (1) by weighing residual nasal crusts and secretions after 21 +/- 2 days; and (2) by using visual analogue scales to daily record symptom scores. Data are presented as mean +/- SEM. T-test statistics for two independent groups were applied. The mean residual crust and secretion weights were 1,756 +/- 688 mg and 1,033 +/- 422 mg in the pressurized seawater group, 932 +/- 414 mg and 1,222 +/- 435 mg in the antiseptic-mucolytic saline group. No statistical differences were found. Sample size calculations showed that 100 subjects in each group would be necessary to confirm a 700-mg reduction in residual crusts in the antiseptic/mucolytic saline group (power = 0.80; two-sided type-I error = 0.05). Daily symptom score curves were similar in both groups and allowed us to give a description of post-operative complaints. The role of antiseptic, mucolytic and mechanical lavages in preventing post-ethmoidectomy crust formation is discussed.

  8. Contribution of low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) from consumer products to ozone formation in urban atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E.; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    Because recent laboratory testing indicates that some low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOC) solvents readily evaporate at ambient conditions, LVP-VOCs used in some consumer product formulations may contribute to ozone formation. The goal of this study is to determine the fraction of LVP-VOCs available for ozone formation from the use of consumer products for two hypothetical emissions. This study calculates and compares the fraction of consumed product available for ozone formation as a result of (a) volatilization to air during use and (b) down-the-drain disposal. The study also investigates the impact of different modes of releases on the overall fraction available in ambient air for ozone formation. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs volatilized to air during use, we applied a multi-compartment mass-balance model to track the fate of emitted LVP-VOCs in a multimedia urban environment. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain, we used a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) fate model to predict the emission rates of LVP-VOCs to ambient air at WWTPs or at the discharge zone of the facilities and then used these results as emissions in the multimedia urban environment model. In a WWTP, the LVP-VOCs selected in this study are primarily either biodegraded or removed via sorption to sludge depending on the magnitude of the biodegradation half-life and the octanol-water partition coefficient. Less than 0.2% of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain are available for ozone formation. In contrast, when the LVP-VOC in a consumer product is volatilized from the surface to which it has been applied, greater than 90% is available for photochemical reactions either at the source location or in the downwind areas. Comparing results from these two modes of releases allows us to understand the importance of determining the fraction of LVP-VOCs volatilized versus disposed down the drain when the product is used by consumers. The results from this study

  9. Deformation microstructures and mechanisms in the high-pressure granulites of the Bacariza Formation (Cabo Ortegal, NW Spain): going up to the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puelles, P.; Abalos, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Cabo Ortegal complex is a nappe stack formed by fragments of subducted continental and oceanic lithosphere emplaced onto the Gondwana edge during the Variscan orogeny. The nappe units of Cabo Ortegal were metamorphosed under different high-pressure (HP) conditions and currently are separated by ductile tectonic contacts. They include mappable ultramafic massifs, N-MORB eclogites, metagabbros, metaserpentinites, metaperidotites, ortho- and paragneisses, and the Bacariza Formation granulites. The primary structure consists of the ultramafic massifs tectonically resting on top of the granulites of the Bacariza Formation, which overlie eclogites and HP gneisses with eclogite boudins. Granulites of the Bacariza Formation are mainly basic to intermediate in composition, although granulitic, carbonate-rich or mineralogically more exotic varieties also exist. On the basis of modal variations in the abundance of mafic and felsic mineral several lithotypes have been differentiated in order of decreasing outcrop area: (G1) plagio-pyrigarnites or common mafic granulites, (G2) intermediate to felsic, plagioclase-rich granulites, (G3) Mg-rich mafic granulites, (G4) pyrigarnite, or plagioclase-poor ultramafic granulites, and (G5) granulitic orthogneisses. The Bacariza Formation recorded a high-pressure metamorphic event. This event was polyphasic and two deformational phases are differentiated, D1 and D2, namely. D2 is associated to amalgamation of eclogite, high-pressure granulitic rocks and ultramafic sheets in deep portions of a subduction channel during the initial exhumation of the complex. As a result, transposition of the previous D1 fabrics took place due to the development of spectacular shear zones at the contacts with the bounding units. Pressure and temperature conditions estimated from the D2 mineral assemblage in equilibrium yield values of ca. 1.4 GPa and 740 °C, respectively. In this work we present a detailed study of a D2 shear zone located at the contact

  10. Detection of abnormalities in a human gait using smart shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Bae, Joonbum; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2008-03-01

    Health monitoring systems require a means for detecting and quantifying abnormalities from measured signals. In this paper, a new method for detecting abnormalities in a human gait is proposed for an improved gait monitoring system for patients with walking problems. In the previous work, we introduced a fuzzy logic algorithm for detecting phases in a human gait based on four foot pressure sensors for each of the right and left foot. The fuzzy logic algorithm detects the gait phases smoothly and continuously, and retains all information obtained from sensors. In this paper, a higher level algorithm for detecting abnormalities in the gait phases obtained from the fuzzy logic is discussed. In the proposed algorithm, two major abnormalities are detected 1) when the sensors measure improper foot pressure patterns, and 2) when the human does not follow a natural sequence of gait phases. For mathematical realization of the algorithm, the gait phases are dealt with by a vector analysis method. The proposed detection algorithm is verified by experiments on abnormal gaits as well as normal gaits. The experiment makes use of the Smart Shoes that embeds four bladders filled with air, the pressure changes in which are detected by pressure transducers.

  11. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  12. Melting in the FeOsbnd SiO2 system to deep lower-mantle pressures: Implications for subducted Banded Iron Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Chie; Hirose, Kei; Nomura, Ryuichi; Ballmer, Maxim D.; Miyake, Akira; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-04-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs), consisting of layers of iron oxide and silica, are far denser than normal mantle material and should have been subducted and sunk into the deep lower mantle. We performed melting experiments on Fe2SiO4 from 26 to 131 GPa in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC). The textural and chemical characterization of a sample recovered from the DAC revealed that SiO2 is the liquidus phase for the whole pressure range examined in this study. The chemical compositions of partial melts are very rich in FeO, indicating that the eutectic melt compositions in the FeOsbnd SiO2 binary system are very close to the FeO end-member. The eutectic temperature is estimated to be 3540 ± 150 K at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), which is likely to be lower than the temperature at the top of the core at least in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic eons, suggesting that subducted BIFs underwent partial melting in a thermal boundary layer above the CMB. The FeO-rich melts formed by partial melting of the BIFs were exceedingly dense and therefore migrated downward. We infer that such partial melts have caused iron enrichment in the bottom part of the mantle, which may have contributed to the formation of ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs) observed today. On the other hand, solid residues left after the segregation of the FeO-rich partial melts have been almost pure SiO2, and therefore buoyant in the deep lower mantle to be entrained in mantle upwellings. They have likely been stretched and folded repeatedly by mantle flow, forming SiO2 streaks within the mantle "marble cake". Mantle packages enhanced by SiO2 streaks may be the origin of seismic scatterers in the mid-lower mantle.

  13. Chromosomal abnormalities and mental illness.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, D J; Blackwood, D H R; Porteous, D J; Pickard, B S; Muir, W J

    2003-03-01

    Linkage studies of mental illness have provided suggestive evidence of susceptibility loci over many broad chromosomal regions. Pinpointing causative gene mutations by conventional linkage strategies alone is problematic. The breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in patients with mental illness may be more direct pointers to the relevant gene locus. Publications that describe patients where chromosomal abnormalities co-exist with mental illness are reviewed along with supporting evidence that this may amount to an association. Chromosomal abnormalities are considered to be of possible significance if (a) the abnormality is rare and there are independent reports of its coexistence with psychiatric illness, or (b) there is colocalisation of the abnormality with a region of suggestive linkage findings, or (c) there is an apparent cosegregation of the abnormality with psychiatric illness within the individual's family. Breakpoints have been described within many of the loci suggested by linkage studies and these findings support the hypothesis that shared susceptibility factors for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may exist. If these abnormalities directly disrupt coding regions, then combining molecular genetic breakpoint cloning with bioinformatic sequence analysis may be a method of rapidly identifying candidate genes. Full karyotyping of individuals with psychotic illness especially where this coexists with mild learning disability, dysmorphism or a strong family history of mental disorder is encouraged.

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  15. Congenital lymphatic hypoplasia in unilateral lower limb with abnormal technetium-99m sulphur colloid uptake in both breasts

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with Meige like lymphedema (left lower limb hypoplasia) with asymptomatic minimal accumulation of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid in bilateral breasts. We attribute the possible pathology to accumulation of interstitial fluid in hypoplastic left lower limb leading to dilatation of the remaining outflow tracts and valvular incompetence. This may be causing reversal of flow from subcutaneous tissues into the dermal plexus involving the breast. Other possibilities include formation of spontaneous lymphovenous shunt or lymphatic intercommunication at lower trunk level as a result of increased pressure leading to minimal lymph accumulation in breasts. Later a mammogram was performed which was found to be normal. MR also confirmed no cisterna chyli abnormalities or aberrant lymphatic channels in lower thorax region that may be the explanation for the abnormal sulphur colloid uptake in both breasts. PMID:25400372

  16. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  17. Diamond formation in the deep lower mantle: a high-pressure reaction of MgCO3 and SiO2

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Fumiya; Ohtani, Eiji; Kamada, Seiji; Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    Diamond is an evidence for carbon existing in the deep Earth. Some diamonds are considered to have originated at various depth ranges from the mantle transition zone to the lower mantle. These diamonds are expected to carry significant information about the deep Earth. Here, we determined the phase relations in the MgCO3-SiO2 system up to 152 GPa and 3,100 K using a double sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. MgCO3 transforms from magnesite to the high-pressure polymorph of MgCO3, phase II, above 80 GPa. A reaction between MgCO3 phase II and SiO2 (CaCl2-type SiO2 or seifertite) to form diamond and MgSiO3 (bridgmanite or post-perovsktite) was identified in the deep lower mantle conditions. These observations suggested that the reaction of the MgCO3 phase II with SiO2 causes formation of super-deep diamond in cold slabs descending into the deep lower mantle. PMID:28084421

  18. The effect of pressure and excitation energy on the isotopic fractionation in the formation of ozone by discharge of O2. [in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jongmann; Epstein, Samuel

    1987-01-01

    Isotopic fractionation processes in the formation of O3 by discharge (at 20 kV and 3 MHz) of O2 in a fused silica container at 77 K are investigated experimentally, with a focus on the effects of changes in the isotopic abundances in the predischarge O2, the O2 pressure, and the excitation energy on the isotope abundances in the postdischarge O2 and O3. The results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail, and good general agreement is found with data obtained using 60-kHz excitation (Yang and Epstein, 1987). It is shown that O-17 and O-18 enrichment of the residual O2 (when the predischarge gas is enriched) or of the O3 (when atmospheric isotope abundances are used) can occur independently of one another. It is inferred that the rate of anharmonic predissociation of vibrationally hot O3 depends on the symmetry and mass of the O3 molecules. The significance of the present findings for studies of anomalous oxygen isotope abundances in meteorites is indicated.

  19. Diamond formation in the deep lower mantle: a high-pressure reaction of MgCO3 and SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Fumiya; Ohtani, Eiji; Kamada, Seiji; Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    Diamond is an evidence for carbon existing in the deep Earth. Some diamonds are considered to have originated at various depth ranges from the mantle transition zone to the lower mantle. These diamonds are expected to carry significant information about the deep Earth. Here, we determined the phase relations in the MgCO3-SiO2 system up to 152 GPa and 3,100 K using a double sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. MgCO3 transforms from magnesite to the high-pressure polymorph of MgCO3, phase II, above 80 GPa. A reaction between MgCO3 phase II and SiO2 (CaCl2-type SiO2 or seifertite) to form diamond and MgSiO3 (bridgmanite or post-perovsktite) was identified in the deep lower mantle conditions. These observations suggested that the reaction of the MgCO3 phase II with SiO2 causes formation of super-deep diamond in cold slabs descending into the deep lower mantle.

  20. Liquid-liquid miscibility gaps and hydrate formation in drug-water binary systems: pressure-temperature phase diagram of lidocaine and pressure-temperature-composition phase diagram of the lidocaine-water system.

    PubMed

    Ceolin, René; Barrio, Maria; Tamarit, Josep-Lluis; Veglio, Nestor; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Espeau, Philippe

    2010-06-01

    The pressure-temperature (P-T) melting curve of lidocaine was determined (dP/dT = 3.56 MPa K(-1)), and the lidocaine-water system was investigated as a function of temperature and pressure. The lidocaine-water system exhibits a monotectic equilibrium at 321 K (ordinary pressure) whose temperature increases as the pressure increases until the two liquids become miscible. A hydrate, unstable at ordinary pressure, was shown to form, on increasing the pressure, from about 70 MPa at low temperatures (200-300 K). The thermodynamic conditions of its stability were inferred from the location of the three-phase equilibria involving the hydrate in the lidocaine-water pressure-temperature-mole fraction (P-T-x) diagram.

  1. Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations: Linking the Chemical and Physical Effects to Elastic and Transport Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Vanorio, T.; Vialle, S.; Saxena, N.

    2014-03-31

    advection: because of an efficient mass transfer of reactants and products, the fluid remains acidic, far from thermodynamical equilibrium and the dissolution of calcite is important. These conclusions are consistent with the lab observations. Sandstones from the Tuscaloosa formation in Mississippi were also subjected to injection under representative in situ stress and pore pressure conditions. Again, both P- and S-wave velocities decreased with injection. Time-lapse SEM images indicated permanent changes induced in the sandstone microstructure by chamosite dissolution upon injection of CO2-rich brine. After injection, the sandstone showed an overall cleaner microstructure. Two main changes are involved: (a) clay dissolution between grains and at the grain contact and (b) rearrangement of grains due to compaction under pressure Theoretical and empirical models were developed to quantify the elastic changes associated with injection. Permanent changes to the rock frame resulted in seismic velocity-porosity trends that mimic natural diagenetic changes. Hence, when laboratory measurments are not available for a candidate site, these trends can be estimated from depth trends in well logs. New theoretical equations were developed to predict the changes in elastic moduli upon substitution of pore-filling material. These equations reduce to Gassmann’s equations for the case of constant frame properties, low seismic frequencies, and fluid changes in the pore space. The new models also predict the change dissolution or precipitation of mineral, which cannot be described with the conventional Gassmann theory.

  2. Congenital abnormalities and selective abortion.

    PubMed

    Seller, M J

    1976-09-01

    The technique of amniocentesis, by which an abnormal fetus can be detected in utero, has brought a technological advance in medical science but attendant medical and moral problems. Dr Seller describes those congenital disabilities which can be detected in the fetus before birth, for which the "remedy" is selective abortion. She then discusses the arguments for and against selective abortion, for the issue is not simple, even in the strictly genetic sense of attempting to ensure a population free of congenital abnormality.

  3. [Abnormal daytime drowsiness--attempt at typology].

    PubMed

    Meier-Ewert, K

    1991-11-01

    Abnormal drowsiness during the day is defined on the basis of three criteria: 1. subjective feeling of increased tiredness, 2. objective observation of attacks of falling asleep, 3. detection of premature falling asleep in the multiple sleep latency test. About 3 to 4% of the population of modern industrial countries complain of this symptom which very quickly leads to inability to work in numerous occupations (driving instructors, lorry drivers, airline pilots). In many cases, the symptoms can be eliminated by effective methods of treatment. Early diagnosis and therapy is hence an important task of physicians. Clinically suitable tools and methods of measurement for appraising the phenomena are at present: 1. the multiple sleep latency test (Richardson et al., 1978), 2. the multiple staying awake test (Mitler et al., 1982), 3. the vigilance test according to Quatember and Maly from the Vienna test system. In neurophysiological terms, an attempt is made to differentiate between: REM drowsiness, non-REM drowsiness, hypofunction of the arousal systems of the reticular formation, and hyperfunction and overstimulation of the arousal systems of the reticular formation (over-aroused tiredness). Approaches to a clinical typology of abnormal drowsiness are available from two points of departure: 1. Forms of permanent somnolence which are not alleviated but intensified by a brief restorative sleep and resemble the 'oversleeping syndrome' of the healthy individual. 2. Attacks of imperative falling asleep in narcoleptic patients. The characteristic of this form of abnormal drowsiness during the day is that in the interval between the attacks of falling asleep patients can take on any healthy person with regard to alertness, reaction capacity and ready wit. After a brief restorative sleep of less than 5 min., they immediately feel fresh, alert and fit again.

  4. Abnormalities of proximal femoral growth after severe Perthes' disease.

    PubMed

    Sponseller, P D; Desai, S S; Millis, M B

    1989-08-01

    We studied the pattern of proximal femoral growth after severe Perthes' disease (Catterall grade III or IV) by retrospective analysis of serial radiographs in 52 hips (46 patients). Our aim was to determine the relationship between proximal femoral growth abnormalities and metaphyseal cysts, epiphyseal extrusion, physeal narrowing, and extensive epiphyseal necrosis. The average follow-up after treatment was 9.8 years (range 4 to 16 years), and 37 of the hips were followed to skeletal maturity. Slowing of proximal femoral growth was common: symmetrical abnormality was seen in 26 hips and asymmetrical abnormality in nine. However, definite premature closure of the proximal femoral physis was seen in only three hips. Abnormality seemed to be due to altered growth velocity rather than to bar formation in most cases. Metaphyseal cysts, epiphyseal extrusion and physeal narrowing during the active stage of the disease, alone or in combination, were found to be neither sensitive nor specific predictors of the subsequent growth pattern.

  5. Basic Equations in Statics and Kinetics of Protein Polymerization and the Mechanism of the Formation and Dissociation of Amyloid Fibrils Revealed by Pressure Perturbation.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the pressure-dissociation of several amyloid or amyloid-like fibrils have shown that the fibril state is considerably voluminous. Quantitative characterization of the protein fibrillation reaction with respect to volumetric parameters is necessary to elucidate mechanisms of amyloid fibrillation in molecular terms such as protein cavity and hydration. Here we discuss, firstly, basic equations in statics and kinetics of protein polymerization as employed to obtain thermodynamic, volumetric, and kinetic parameters. Equilibrium treatment of the reactions with the scheme such as one-step polymerization, linear-association polymerization, or nucleation-dependent polymerization, and kinetic treatment of seeded linear-polymerization or spontaneous nucleation-elongation polymerization are described. In particular we will detail kinetics of the dissociation of fibrils which have been produced under the linear-association mechanism and therefore the length-distribution of which conforms to a geometric sequence in the degree of polymerization with a common ratio r, which is less than, and usually very close to, unity. In this case, an observed macroscopic rate of dissociation is shown to be a product of the microscopic elementary dissociation rate constant and a factor (1-r), extremely reduced compared with the intrinsic elementary rate. Secondly, we discuss protein conformational states in fibrillogenesis with molecular and volumetric observations reported, such as the unfolded state responsible for the association with seeds and the extension of amyloid fibrils, the transition state in which protein cavity formation and dehydration occur to intermediate levels, and the fibril state in which they occur to final respective levels which, in some cases, depend on the maturity of the fibril.

  6. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  7. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  8. Ectodermal dysplasia and abnormal thumbs.

    PubMed

    Lucky, A W; Esterly, N B; Tunnessen, W W

    1980-05-01

    Two unrelated children, a girl and a boy, with alopecia, anomalous cutaneous pigmentation, abnormal thumbs, and endocrine disorders, including short stature and delayed bone age in one patient and juvenile onset diabetes mellitus in the other, are described. In one instance, the mother and the maternal grandmother had similar abnormalities, although of a less severe nature. Both children had normal nails and no unusual susceptibility to infections. We believe these two patients represent a previously undescribed syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia that may be inherited as an autosomal-dominant trait.

  9. Grapevine species from varied native habitats exhibit differences in embolism formation/repair associated with leaf gas exchange and root pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought induces xylem embolism formation, but grapevines can refill blocked conduits to restore transport capacity. It is unknown whether vulnerability to embolism formation and ability to repair differ among grapevine species. We analyzed in vivo embolism formation and repair using x-ray microtomog...

  10. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  11. Electron Tomographic Analysis of Somatic Cell Plate Formation in Meristematic Cells of Arabidopsis Preserved by High-Pressure FreezingW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Seguí-Simarro, José M.; Austin, Jotham R.; White, Erin A.; Staehelin, L. Andrew

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the process of somatic-type cytokinesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) meristem cells with a three-dimensional resolution of ∼7 nm by electron tomography of high-pressure frozen/freeze-substituted samples. Our data demonstrate that this process can be divided into four phases: phragmoplast initials, solid phragmoplast, transitional phragmoplast, and ring-shaped phragmoplast. Phragmoplast initials arise from clusters of polar microtubules (MTs) during late anaphase. At their equatorial planes, cell plate assembly sites are formed, consisting of a filamentous ribosome-excluding cell plate assembly matrix (CPAM) and Golgi-derived vesicles. The CPAM, which is found only around growing cell plate regions, is suggested to be responsible for regulating cell plate growth. Virtually all phragmoplast MTs terminate inside the CPAM. This association directs vesicles to the CPAM and thereby to the growing cell plate. Cell plate formation within the CPAM appears to be initiated by the tethering of vesicles by exocyst-like complexes. After vesicle fusion, hourglass-shaped vesicle intermediates are stretched to dumbbells by a mechanism that appears to involve the expansion of dynamin-like springs. This stretching process reduces vesicle volume by ∼50%. At the same time, the lateral expansion of the phragmoplast initials and their CPAMs gives rise to the solid phragmoplast. Later arriving vesicles begin to fuse to the bulbous ends of the dumbbells, giving rise to the tubulo-vesicular membrane network (TVN). During the transitional phragmoplast stage, the CPAM and MTs disassemble and then reform in a peripheral ring phragmoplast configuration. This creates the centrifugally expanding peripheral cell plate growth zone, which leads to cell plate fusion with the cell wall. Simultaneously, the central TVN begins to mature into a tubular network, and ultimately into a planar fenestrated sheet (PFS), through the removal of membrane via clathrin

  12. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF DENSE CORES IN THE {rho} OPHIUCHI MAIN CLOUD AND A SIGNIFICANT ROLE OF EXTERNAL PRESSURES IN CLUSTERED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Maruta, Hajime; Nishi, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Ikeda, Norio; Kitamura, Yoshimi

    2010-05-01

    Using the archive data of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +} (J = 1-0) line emission taken with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope with a spatial resolution of {approx} 0.01 pc, we have identified 68 dense cores in the central dense region of the {rho} Ophiuchi main cloud. The H{sup 13}CO{sup +} data also indicate that the fractional abundance of H{sup 13}CO{sup +} relative to H{sub 2} is roughly inversely proportional to the square root of the H{sub 2} column density with a mean of 1.72 x 10{sup -11}. The mean radius, FWHM line width, and LTE mass of the identified cores are estimated to be 0.045 {+-} 0.011 pc, 0.49 {+-} 0.14 km s{sup -1}, and 3.4 {+-} 3.6 M{sub sun}, respectively. The majority of the identified cores have subsonic internal motions. The virial ratio, the ratio of the virial mass to the LTE mass, tends to decrease with increasing LTE mass and about 60% of the cores have virial ratios smaller than 2, indicating that these cores are not transient structures but self-gravitating. The detailed virial analysis suggests that the surface pressure often dominates over the self-gravity and thus plays a crucial role in regulating core formation and evolution. By comparing the {rho} Oph cores with those in the Orion A molecular cloud observed with the same telescope, we found that the statistical properties of the core physical quantities are similar between the two clouds if the effect of the different spatial resolutions is corrected. The line widths of the {rho} Oph cores appear to be nearly independent of the core radii over the range of 0.01-0.1 pc and deviate upward from the Heyer and Brunt relation. This may be evidence that turbulent motions are driven by protostellar outflows in the cluster environment.

  13. Evaluation of siderite and magnetite formation in BIFs by pressure-temperature experiments of Fe(III) minerals and microbial biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halama, Maximilian; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria potentially contributed to the deposition of Archean banded iron formations (BIFs), before the evolution of cyanobacterially-generated molecular oxygen (O2), by using sunlight to oxidize aqueous Fe(II) and precipitate Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. Once deposited at the seafloor, diagenetic reduction of the Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides by heterotrophic bacteria produced secondary Fe(II)-bearing minerals, such as siderite (FeCO3) and magnetite (Fe3O4), via the oxidation of microbial organic carbon (i.e., cellular biomass). During deeper burial at temperatures above the threshold for life, thermochemical Fe(III) reduction has the potential to form BIF-like minerals. However, the role of thermochemical Fe(III) reduction of primary BIF minerals during metamorphism, and its impact on mineralogy and geochemical signatures in BIFs, is poorly understood. Consequently, we simulated the metamorphism of the precursor and diagenetic iron-rich minerals (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite) at low-grade metamorphic conditions (170 °C, 1.2 kbar) for 14 days by using (1) mixtures of abiotically synthesized Fe(III) minerals and either microbial biomass or glucose as a proxy for biomass, and (2) using biogenic minerals formed by phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Mössbauer spectroscopy and μXRD showed that thermochemical magnetite formation was limited to samples containing ferrihydrite and glucose, or goethite and glucose. No magnetite was formed from Fe(III) minerals when microbial biomass was present as the carbon and electron sources for thermochemical Fe(III) reduction. This could be due to biomass-derived organic molecules binding to the mineral surfaces and preventing solid-state conversion to magnetite. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed siderite contents of up to 17% after only 14 days of incubation at elevated temperature and pressure for all samples with synthetic Fe(III) minerals and biomass, whereas 6% of the initial Fe(III) was

  14. Abnormal distribution of pulmonary blood flow in aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodenday, Lucy S.; Simon, George; Craig, Hazel; Dalby, Lola

    1970-01-01

    Wasted ventilatory volume (VD) and its ratio to tidal volume (VD/VT) were measured at rest and during exertion in 17 patients with aortic valve disease. We considered VD/VT to indicate abnormal ventilation: perfusion relations if it did not decrease on exertion, or if the exercising value was greater than 40 per cent. Plain chest radiographs were independently examined for evidence of diversion of pulmonary blood to the upper lobes. There was significant agreement (p<0·05) between radiographic and pulmonary function estimations of abnormality. This suggests that the raised pulmonary venous pressure associated with left ventricular failure creates an abnormal pattern of blood flow through the lung, which is responsible for causing inadequate perfusion with respect to ventilation. Images PMID:5420086

  15. High prevalence of thyroid ultrasonographic abnormalities in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Nacamulli, Davide; Scaroni, Carla; Lumachi, Franco; Selice, Riccardo; Fiore, Cristina; Favia, Gennaro; Mantero, Franco

    2003-11-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thyroid abnormalities detected by ultrasonography and, in particular, of multinodular nontoxic goiter in primary aldosteronism. We analyzed 80 consecutive of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (40 with unilateral adenoma and 40 with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism) and 80 normotensive healthy controls, comparable for age, sex, iodine intake, and geographical area. Blood pressure, thyroid palpation, thyroid function, and ultrasonography were evaluated. The prevalence of ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities was 60% in primary aldosteronism and 27% in controls (p < 0.0001). There was a statistically significant difference in prevalence of these abnormalities in unilateral adenoma and idiopathic hyperaldosteronism with respect to controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The prevalence of multinodular nontoxic goiter in idiopathic hyperaldosteronism was higher than in controls (p < 0.001) and, in particular, in female patients. From these data it seems to be worth considering the existence of primary hyperaldosteronism in patients with multinodular goiter and hypertension.

  16. Nanosize-induced drastic drop in equilibrium hydrogen pressure for hydride formation and structural stabilization in Pd-Rh solid-solution alloys.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Morita, Hitoshi; Yamauchi, Miho; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo

    2012-08-01

    We have synthesized and characterized homogeneous solid-solution alloy nanoparticles of Pd and Rh, which are immiscible with each other in the equilibrium bulk state at around room temperature. The Pd-Rh alloy nanoparticles can absorb hydrogen at ambient pressure and the hydrogen pressure of Pd-Rh alloys for hydrogen storage is dramatically decreased by more than 4 orders of magnitude from the corresponding pressure in the metastable bulk state. The solid-solution state is still maintained in the nanoparticles even after hydrogen absorption/desorption, in contrast to the metastable bulks which are separated into Pd and Rh during the process.

  17. Wellbore pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1979-01-01

    Subterranean earth formations containing energy values are subjected to hydraulic fracturing procedures to enhance the recovery of the energy values. These fractures are induced in the earth formation by pumping liquid into the wellbore penetrating the earth formation until the pressure of the liquid is sufficient to fracture the earth formation adjacent to the wellbore. The present invention is directed to a transducer which is positionable within the wellbore to generate a signal indicative of the fracture initiation useful for providing a timing signal to equipment for seismic mapping of the fracture as it occurs and for providing a measurement of the pressure at which the fracture is initiated.

  18. Endocrine abnormalities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disease associated with notable medical complications and increased mortality. Endocrine abnormalities, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, growth hormone resistance and sick euthyroid syndrome, mediate the clinical manifestations of this disease. Alterations in anorexigenic and orexigenic appetite-regulating pathways have also been described. Decreases in fat mass result in adipokine abnormalities. Although most of the endocrine changes that occur in AN represent physiologic adaptation to starvation, some persist after recovery and might contribute to susceptibility to AN recurrence. In this Review, we summarize key endocrine alterations in AN, with a particular focus on the profound bone loss that can occur in this disease. Although AN is increasingly prevalent among boys and men, the disorder predominantly affects girls and women who are, therefore, the focus of this Review.

  19. Eye abnormalities in Fryns syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Diane M; Taboada, Eugenio; Butler, Merlin G

    2004-03-15

    Fryns syndrome is a rare, generally lethal, autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome first described in 1979. Patients with the syndrome present with the classical findings of cloudy cornea, brain malformations, diaphragmatic defects, and distal limb deformities. Over 70 patients have been reported revealing a wide variety of phenotypic features. Although initially considered a major feature of Fryns syndrome, cloudy cornea has been relegated as a minor diagnostic sign and not commonly reported in patients since the original description. However, eye findings per se are not uncommon. Abnormal eye findings occasionally reported in Fryns syndrome potentially result in amblyopia and blindness, profoundly affecting neurologic outcome of those who survive the neonatal period. We reviewed 77 reported patients with Fryns syndrome and summarized the abnormal eye findings identified in 12 of the reported cases. In addition, we contribute three new patients with Fryns syndrome, one of which demonstrated unilateral microphthalmia and cloudy cornea.

  20. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  1. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  2. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  3. Congenital abnormalities of the goat.

    PubMed

    Basrur, P K

    1993-03-01

    Congenital abnormalities of genetic and environmental causes constitute a striking proportion of the afflictions seen in goats. These include a variety of malformations and metabolic diseases that could occur in all breeds but tend to exhibit predisposition in some breeds of goats. Genetic abnormalities for which the carrier state is detectable with the aid of enzymes and surface protein markers can be eliminated from goat populations, whereas common polygenic disorders including udder problems in does and gynecomastia in bucks are more difficult to eradicate because the mutant genes responsible for these traits generally do not declare themselves until inbreeding brings together a critical concentration of liability genes to create a crisis. A substantial reduction of common abnormalities in this species, such as intersexuality in dairy breeds, abortion in Angora breed, and arthritis in the Pygmy breed, will require a change in breeders' preference and selection practice. In making these changes, however, the beneficial traits will have to be balanced against the undesirable effects of the selected mutant genes (pleiotropy), which hold the key to success or failure of a breed under domestication.

  4. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  5. Insular and caudate lesions release abnormal yawning in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Heinz; Weisstanner, Christian; Hess, Christian W; Bassetti, Claudio L; Nirkko, Arto; Wiest, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal yawning is an underappreciated phenomenon in patients with ischemic stroke. We aimed at identifying frequently affected core regions in the supratentorial brain of stroke patients with abnormal yawning and contributing to the anatomical network concept of yawning control. Ten patients with acute anterior circulation stroke and ≥3 yawns/15 min without obvious cause were analyzed. The NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), symptom onset, period with abnormal yawning, blood oxygen saturation, glucose, body temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, and modified Rankin scale (mRS) were assessed for all patients. MRI lesion maps were segmented on diffusion-weighted images, spatially normalized, and the extent of overlap between the different stroke patterns was determined. Correlations between the period with abnormal yawning and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the overlapping regions, total stroke volume, NIHSS and mRS were performed. Periods in which patients presented with episodes of abnormal yawning lasted on average for 58 h. Average GCS, NIHSS, and mRS scores were 12.6, 11.6, and 3.5, respectively. Clinical parameters were within normal limits. Ischemic brain lesions overlapped in nine out of ten patients: in seven patients in the insula and in seven in the caudate nucleus. The decrease of the ADC within the lesions correlated with the period with abnormal yawing (r = -0.76, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.02). The stroke lesion intensity of the common overlapping regions in the insula and the caudate nucleus correlates with the period with abnormal yawning. The insula might be the long sought-after brain region for serotonin-mediated yawning.

  6. Visual pathway abnormalities in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Sharma, Lalit; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Ophthalmological complications are common and disabling in patients with tuberculous meningitis. We aimed to study the visual pathway abnormalities in patients with tuberculous meningitis. Forty-three patients with tuberculous meningitis were subjected to visual evoked responses (VER) and neuroophthalmologic assessment. Neuroophthalmologic assessment revealed abnormalities in 22 (51.3%) patients. VER were found to be abnormal in 27 (62.8%) patients. The VER abnormalities included prolonged P100 latencies with relatively normal amplitude and significant interocular latency differences. Visual pathways abnormalities are common in patients with tuberculous meningitis and are often subclinical. Pathophysiologic explanations for electrophysiological abnormalities on VER in these patients are incompletely understood and needs further exploration.

  7. Renal abnormalities in the Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tieder, M; Levy, M; Gubler, M C; Gagnadoux, M F; Broyer, M

    1982-09-01

    Four cases of BARDET-Biedl syndrome (BBS) are described which all suffer from renal abnormalities. Polyuria or polydipsia with impairment of renal concentration capacity were the earliest signs of renal dysfunction. Renal insufficiency developed in 3 cases and hypertension in two. Urographic abnormalities were demonstrated in all patients. The most remarkable features were cystic spaces communicating with the calices and lobulation of kidney. Caliceal clubbing and caliectasis surrounded by narrowed, unscarred parenchyma were frequent findings. Previous investigators reported various renal histological pictures in BBS. We found tubulo- interstitial lesions in all cases. Features of dysplasia and cystic formations were less frequent. Mesangial proliferation was not noted. Ultra-structural changes in the glomerular basement membrane were not observed in this study. Thirty-one of 32 recently reported cases of BBS included renal lesions which are the major cause of death. It is therefore suggested that renal abnormalities are accepted as the cardinal feature of this syndrome.

  8. Pressure-Induced Amorphization of Small Pore Zeolites—the Role of Cation-H2O Topology and Anti-glass Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chan Hwang, Gil; Joo Shin, Tae; Blom, Douglas A.; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2015-01-01

    Systematic studies of pressure-induced amorphization of natrolites (PIA) containing monovalent extra-framework cations (EFC) Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+ allow us to assess the role of two different EFC-H2O configurations within the pores of a zeolite: one arrangement has H2O molecules (NATI) and the other the EFC (NATII) in closer proximity to the aluminosilicate framework. We show that NATI materials have a lower onset pressure of PIA than the NATII materials containing Rb and Cs as EFC. The onset pressure of amorphization (PA) of NATII materials increases linearly with the size of the EFC, whereas their initial bulk moduli (P1 phase) decrease linearly. Only Cs- and Rb-NAT reveal a phase separation into a dense form (P2 phase) under pressure. High-Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) imaging shows that after recovery from pressures near 25 and 20 GPa long-range ordered Rb-Rb and Cs-Cs correlations continue to be present over length scales up to 100 nm while short-range ordering of the aluminosilicate framework is significantly reduced—this opens a new way to form anti-glass structures. PMID:26455345

  9. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  10. Submarine rescue decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar of absolute pressure in man: effects on bubble formation and pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Hugon, Julien; Castagna, Olivier; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Jammes, Yves; Hugon, Michel; Risberg, Jan; Pény, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in submarine rescue systems have allowed a transfer under pressure of crew members being rescued from a disabled submarine. The choice of a safe decompression procedure for pressurised rescuees has been previously discussed, but no schedule has been validated when the internal submarine pressure is significantly increased i.e. exceeding 2.8 bar absolute pressure. This study tested a saturation decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar, the maximum operating pressure of the NATO submarine rescue system. The objective was to investigate the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) and clinical and spirometric indices of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Two groups were exposed to a Nitrogen-Oxygen atmosphere (pO2 = 0.5 bar) at either 5 bar (N = 14) or 6 bar (N = 12) for 12 h followed by 56 h 40 min resp. 60 h of decompression. When chamber pressure reached 2.5 bar, the subjects breathed oxygen intermittently, otherwise compressed air. Repeated clinical examinations, ultrasound monitoring of venous gas embolism and spirometry were performed during decompression. During exposures to 5 bar, 3 subjects had minor subjective symptoms i.e. sensation of joint discomfort, regressing spontaneously, and after surfacing 2 subjects also experienced joint discomfort disappearing without treatment. Only 3 subjects had detectable intravascular bubbles during decompression (low grades). No bubbles were detected after surfacing. About 40% of subjects felt chest tightness when inspiring deeply during the initial phase of decompression. Precordial burning sensations were reported during oxygen periods. During decompression, vital capacity decreased by about 8% and forced expiratory flow rates decreased significantly. After surfacing, changes in the peripheral airways were still noticed; Lung Diffusion for carbon monoxide was slightly reduced by 1% while vital capacity was normalized. The procedure did not result in serious symptoms of DCS or

  11. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... most cases, a health care provider finds pinna abnormalities during the first well-baby exam. This exam ...

  12. Abnormal megakaryocyte development and platelet function in Nbeal2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Kahr, Walter H A; Lo, Richard W; Li, Ling; Pluthero, Fred G; Christensen, Hilary; Ni, Ran; Vaezzadeh, Nima; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Weyrich, Andrew S; Di Paola, Jorge; Landolt-Marticorena, Carolina; Gross, Peter L

    2013-11-07

    Gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is an inherited bleeding disorder associated with macrothrombocytopenia and α-granule-deficient platelets. GPS has been linked to loss of function mutations in NEABL2 (neurobeachin-like 2), and we describe here a murine GPS model, the Nbeal2(-/-) mouse. As in GPS, Nbeal2(-/-) mice exhibit splenomegaly, macrothrombocytopenia, and a deficiency of platelet α-granules and their cargo, including von Willebrand factor (VWF), thrombospondin-1, and platelet factor 4. The platelet α-granule membrane protein P-selectin is expressed at 48% of wild-type levels and externalized upon platelet activation. The presence of P-selectin and normal levels of VPS33B and VPS16B in Nbeal2(-/-) platelets suggests that NBEAL2 acts independently of VPS33B/VPS16B at a later stage of α-granule biogenesis. Impaired Nbeal2(-/-) platelet function was shown by flow cytometry, platelet aggregometry, bleeding assays, and intravital imaging of laser-induced arterial thrombus formation. Microscopic analysis detected marked abnormalities in Nbeal2(-/-) bone marrow megakaryocytes, which when cultured showed delayed maturation, decreased survival, decreased ploidy, and developmental abnormalities, including abnormal extracellular distribution of VWF. Our results confirm that α-granule secretion plays a significant role in platelet function, and they also indicate that abnormal α-granule formation in Nbeal2(-/-) mice has deleterious effects on megakaryocyte survival, development, and platelet production.

  13. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  14. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  15. Ultrafine aerosol size distributions and sulfuric acid vapor pressures: Implications for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Year 2 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.

    1993-07-01

    This project has two components: (1) measurement of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor pressures in air under temperature/relative humidity conditions similar to atmospheric, and (2) measurement of ultrafine aerosol size distributions. During Year 2, more effort was put on size distribution measurements. 4 figs.

  16. Revealing the Formation Mechanism and Effect of Pressure on the Magnetic Order of Multiferroic BiMn2O5 Through Neutron Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, N. T.; Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Jabarov, S. G.; Mammadov, A. I.; Mekhtieva, R. Z.; Phan, T. L.; Smotrakov, V. G.; Eremkin, V. V.; Savenko, B. N.

    2017-02-01

    The crystal and magnetic structures of the strong magnetoelectric BiMn2O5 have been studied as a function of pressure up to 5.7 GPa in the temperature range from 10 K to 60 K by means of neutron powder diffraction. The results reveal that the Pbam orthorhombic crystal structure remains unchanged in the investigated thermodynamic range. At ambient pressure, a long-range commensurate antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase with propagation vector q = (1/2, 0, 1/2) formed below T N = 41(2) K, accompanied by anomalies in the temperature dependence of structural parameters including the lattice parameters, interatomic distances, and bond angles. This AFM phase remained stable in the studied pressure range, and the relevant pressure coefficient of the Néel temperature was determined to be 3.0(4) K/GPa. No incommensurate AFM phase was detected. The magnetic properties of BiMn2O5 and their difference from most other RMn2O5 compounds were analyzed in terms of competing exchange interactions.

  17. Lower extremity abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Sass, Pamela; Hassan, Ghinwa

    2003-08-01

    Rotational and angular problems are two types of lower extremity abnormalities common in children. Rotational problems include intoeing and out-toeing. Intoeing is caused by one of three types of deformity: metatarsus adductus, internal tibial torsion, and increased femoral anteversion. Out-toeing is less common than intoeing, and its causes are similar but opposite to those of intoeing. These include femoral retroversion and external tibial torsion. Angular problems include bowlegs and knock-knees. An accurate diagnosis can be made with careful history and physical examination, which includes torsional profile (a four-component composite of measurements of the lower extremities). Charts of normal values and values with two standard deviations for each component of the torsional profile are available. In most cases, the abnormality improves with time. A careful physical examination, explanation of the natural history, and serial measurements are usually reassuring to the parents. Treatment is usually conservative. Special shoes, cast, or braces are rarely beneficial and have no proven efficacy. Surgery is reserved for older children with deformity from three to four standard deviations from the normal.

  18. Normal and abnormal lid function.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Janet C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter on lid function is comprised of two primary sections, the first on normal eyelid anatomy, neurological innervation, and physiology, and the second on abnormal eyelid function in disease states. The eyelids serve several important ocular functions, the primary objectives of which are protection of the anterior globe from injury and maintenance of the ocular tear film. Typical eyelid behaviors to perform these functions include blinking (voluntary, spontaneous, or reflexive), voluntary eye closure (gentle or forced), partial lid lowering during squinting, normal lid retraction during emotional states such as surprise or fear (startle reflex), and coordination of lid movements with vertical eye movements for maximal eye protection. Detailed description of the neurological innervation patterns and neurophysiology of each of these lid behaviors is provided. Abnormal lid function is divided by conditions resulting in excessive lid closure (cerebral ptosis, apraxia of lid opening, blepharospasm, oculomotor palsy, Horner's syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and mechanical) and those resulting in excessive lid opening (midbrain lid retraction, facial nerve palsy, and lid retraction due to orbital disease).

  19. Dissipation of anomalous pressures in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggeridge, Ann; Abacioglu, Yafes; England, William; Smalley, Craig

    2004-11-01

    Zones of anomalous pressure, higher and lower than hydrostatic pressure, have been observed in many sedimentary basins around the world. These normally consist of groups of pressure compartments: volumes of higher-permeability rock surrounded on all sides by lower-permeability barriers. Knowledge of the timescales over which these abnormal pressures are maintained and the mechanisms by which they dissipate is critical for understanding how fluids, such as oil and gas, move in the subsurface. Existing analytic solutions investigate pressure dissipation through low-permeability barriers on top of or underneath an isolated pressure compartment. There are no analytic solutions describing pressure dissipation through lateral barriers, such as faults, or investigating the impact of groups of pressure compartments on the rate of pressure dissipation. This paper presents simple analytic models to investigate pressure dissipation through barriers, such as faults, forming the sides of pressure compartments. The timescales are compared with a solution for pressure dissipation through barriers on top of and underneath the compartment. It also investigates analytically the rate of pressure dissipation from groups of pressure compartments. Lateral seal permeabilities of 10-19 m2 may delay pressure equilibration for millions of years provided the compartment has a sufficiently high fluid storage capacity. Factors contributing toward a high fluid storage capacity include a high fluid compressibility (as is the case in hydrocarbon reservoirs) and a high porosity. The grouping of abnormally pressured compartments into "megacompartment complexes" may delay pressure dissipation for hundreds of millions of years.

  20. Boundary pressure of inter-connection of Fe-Ni-S melt in olivine based on in-situ X-ray tomography: Implication to core formation in asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Uesugi, K.; Nakatsuka, A.; Funakoshi, K.; Ohtani, E.

    2011-12-01

    Interconnectivity of Fe-alloy melt in crystalline silicates is important property for the core formation mechanism in planetary interior. In previous studies, the interconnectivity of Fe-alloy melt has been studied based on textural observation of recovered samples from high pressure and temperature. However, there is no observation under high pressure and temperature. We have developed 80-ton uni-axial press for X-ray computed micro-tomography (X-CT) and performed X-CT measurement under high pressure (Urakawa et al. 2010). Here we report X-CT measurement of Fe-Ni-S melt in crystalline olivine and interconnectivity of the melt up to 3.5 GPa and 1273 K. X-CT measurements were carried out at BL20B2 beamline, SPring-8 synchrotron facility. The sample was powder mixture of Fe-Ni-S and olivine, which was enclosed in graphite capsule. Heating was performed using a cylindrical graphite furnace. Pressure was generated using opposed toroidal-shape WC anvil. The uni-axial press was set on the rotational stage and X-ray radiography image of the sample was collected using CCD camera from 0°to 180°with 0.3° step. 3-D image of the sample was obtained by reconstructing the 2-D radiography image. The 3-D CT image shows that the size of the Fe-Ni-S melt increased significantly compared to that before melting below 2.5 GPa, suggesting that the melt was interconnected in olivine crystals. On the other hand, 3-D texture of the sample at 3.5 GPa did not show difference from that before melting. Therefore, the boundary of inter-connection of Fe-Ni-S melt is likely to locate between 2.5 and 3.5 GPa. This result is important application for the core formation mechanism especially in small bodies, such as differentiated asteroids.

  1. Influence of the oxygen concentration on the formation of crystalline phases of TiO2 during the low-pressure arc-discharge plasma synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, A. V.; Karpov, I. V.; Lepeshev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The synthesis of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles with different percentage of anatase and rutile phases is investigated. The synthesis is performed by controlling the oxygen percentage in the gas mixture in the plasmachemical evaporation-condensation process employing a low-pressure arc discharge. In all our experiments, the pressure in the plasmachemical reactor and the average size of particles remain constant and are 60 Pa and 6 nm, respectively. The crystal structure of synthesized TiO2 is studied using X-ray diffraction; the morphology of the particles is analyzed employing transmission electron microscopy. Using X-ray phase analysis, it is established that the concentration of the TiO2 anatase phase decreases upon a decrease in the oxygen concentration in the gas mixture. It is shown that the TiO2 anatase phase is more efficient for photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue than the rutile phase.

  2. Effect of pressure on the formation of superelastic hard particles in a metal-fullerene system and the tribological properties of composite materials reinforced with such particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, O. P.; Drozdova, E. I.; Blinov, V. M.; Ovchinnikova, I. N.

    2011-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness and modulus of elasticity measurements are used to study the influence of compacting pressure (5, 8 GPa) on the structure and properties of the phases prepared from fullerene soot extract (mixture of C60 and C70 crystallites) in a mixture with a cobalt powder. Carbon particles synthesized during high-temperature treatment at a pressure of 5 or 8 GPa and reinforcing composite samples have a universal hardness H u (hardness measured from the total (elastic and plastic) strain under loading) of 12 or 25 GPa, respectively. After heating of samples to 900°C, the values of H u of the particles decrease to 9-11 GPa at elastic recovery of the phase more than 85%. The dry friction coefficients of iron- and cobalt-based composite materials in contact with tool steel are 0.08 and 0.04, respectively.

  3. In situ TEM observation of the Boudouard reaction: multi-layered graphene formation from CO on cobalt nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, G Marien; Zacharaki, Eirini; Sjåstad, Anja O; Navarro, Violeta; Frenken, Joost W M; Kooyman, Patricia J

    2017-02-09

    Using a MEMS nanoreactor in combination with a specially designed in situ Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) holder and gas supply system, we imaged the formation of multiple layers of graphene encapsulating a cobalt nanoparticle, at 1 bar CO : N2 (1 : 1) and 500 °C. The cobalt nanoparticle was imaged live in a TEM during the Boudouard reaction. The in situ/operando TEM studies give insight into the behaviour of the catalyst at the nanometer-scale, under industrially relevant conditions. When switching from Fischer-Tropsch syngas conditions (CO : H2 : N2 1 : 2 : 3 at 1 bar) to CO-rich conditions (CO : N2 1 : 1 at 1 bar), we observed the formation of multi-layered graphene on Co nanoparticles at 500 °C. Due to the high temperature, the surface of the Co nanoparticles facilitated the Boudouard reaction, causing CO dissociation and the formation of layers of graphene. After the formation of the first patches of graphene at the surface of the nanoparticle, more and more layers grew over the course of about 40 minutes. In its final state, around 10 layers of carbon capped the nanoparticle. During this process, the carbon shell caused mechanical stress in the nanoparticle, inducing permanent deformation.

  4. Effect of solvent, temperature and pressure on the stability of chiral and perovskite metal formate frameworks of [NH2NH3][M(HCOO)3] (M = Mn, Fe, Zn).

    PubMed

    Mączka, Mirosław; Pasińska, Katarzyna; Ptak, Maciej; Paraguassu, Waldeci; da Silva, Tercio Almeida; Sieradzki, Adam; Pikul, Adam

    2016-11-23

    We report the synthesis, crystal structure, and thermal, Raman, infrared and magnetic properties of [NH2NH3][M(HCOO)3] (HyM) compounds (M = Mn, Zn, Fe). Our results show that synthesis from methanol solution leads to perovskite polymorphs while that from 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or its mixture with methanol allows obtaining chiral polymorphs. Perovskite HyFe, chiral HyFe and chiral HyMn undergo phase transitions at 347, 336 and 296 K, respectively, with symmetry changes from Pnma to Pna21, P63 to P212121 and P63 to P21. X-ray diffraction and Raman studies show that the phase transitions are governed by dynamics of the hydrazinium ions. Low-temperature magnetic studies show that these compounds exhibit magnetic ordering below 9-12.5 K. Since the low-temperature structures of chiral HyMn and perovskite HyFe are polar, these compounds are possible multiferroic materials. We also report high-pressure Raman scattering studies of chiral and perovskite HyZn, which show much larger stiffness of the latter phase. These studies also show that the ambient pressure polar phases are stable up to at least 1.4 and 4.1 GPa for the chiral and perovskite phase, respectively. Between 1.4 and 2.0 GPa (for chiral HyZn) and 4.1 and 5.2 GPa (for perovskite HyZn) pressure-induced transitions are observed associated with changes in the zinc-formate framework. Strong broadening of Raman bands and the decrease in their number for the high-pressure phase of chiral HyZn suggest that this phase is disordered and has higher symmetry than the ambient pressure one.

  5. Abnormal osmotic regulation in trpv4-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, Wolfgang; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    Osmotic homeostasis is one of the most aggressively defended physiological parameters in vertebrates. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying osmotic regulation are poorly understood. The transient receptor potential channel, vanilloid subfamily (TRPV4), is an osmotically activated ion channel that is expressed in circumventricular organs in the mammalian CNS, which is an important site of osmotic sensing. We have generated trpv4-null mice and observed abnormalities of their osmotic regulation. trpv4-/- mice drank less water and became more hyperosmolar than did wild-type littermates, a finding that was seen with and without administration of hypertonic saline. In addition, plasma levels of antidiuretic hormone were significantly lower in trpv4-/- mice than in wild-type littermates after a hyperosmotic challenge. Continuous s.c. infusion of the antidiuretic hormone analogue, dDAVP, resulted in systemic hypotonicity in trpv4-/- mice, despite the fact that their renal water reabsorption capacity was normal. Thus, the response to both hyper- and hypoosmolar stimuli is impaired in trpv4-/- mice. After a hyperosmolar challenge, there was markedly reduced expression of c-FOS in the circumventricular organ, the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, of trpv4-/- mice compared with wild-type mice. This finding suggests that there is an impairment of osmotic sensing in the CNS of trpv4-/- mice. These data indicate that TRPV4 is necessary for the normal response to changes in osmotic pressure and functions as an osmotic sensor in the CNS. PMID:14581612

  6. Cardiovascular Abnormalities in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Sachdev, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by recurrent episodes of ischemia-reperfusion injury to multiple vital organ systems and a chronic hemolytic anemia, both contributing to progressive organ dysfunction. The introduction of treatments that induce protective fetal hemoglobin and reduce infectious complications has greatly prolonged survival. However, with increased longevity, cardiovascular complications are increasingly evident, with the notable development of a progressive proliferative systemic vasculopathy, pulmonary hypertension (PH) and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Pulmonary hypertension is reported in autopsy studies and numerous clinical studies have shown that increased pulmonary pressures are an important risk marker for mortality in these patients. In epidemiological studies, the development of PH is associated with intravascular hemolysis, cutaneous leg ulceration, renal insufficiency, iron overload and liver dysfunction. Chronic anemia in sickle cell disease results in cardiac chamber dilation and a compensatory increase in left ventricular mass. This is often accompanied by left ventricular diastolic dysfunction which has also been a strong independent predictor of mortality patients with sickle cell disease. Both PH and diastolic dysfunction are associated with marked abnormalities in exercise capacity in these patients. Sudden death is an increasingly recognized problem and further cardiac investigations are necessary to recognize and treat high-risk patients. PMID:22440212

  7. Abnormal gastrointestinal motility in patients with celiac sprue.

    PubMed

    Bassotti, G; Castellucci, G; Betti, C; Fusaro, C; Cavalletti, M L; Bertotto, A; Spinozzi, F; Morelli, A; Pelli, M A

    1994-09-01

    No study to date has objectively investigated whether the motor behavior of the small bowel is abnormal in celiac sprue. The purpose of this study was to systematically address this topic by means of intraluminal pressure recordings in a series of such patients. Sixteen subjects (nine adults, seven children, age range 2-69 years) with celiac sprue were recruited and studied while untreated. Manometric examination was carried out for 6 hr during fasting and 3 hr after a meal. Adult celiac patients displayed a significantly (mean +/- SEM) greater frequency of migrating motor complexes in comparison to controls during fasting (4.44 +/- 1.6 vs 2.45 +/- 0.20, P < 0.01), whereas no differences were found in the pediatric group with respect to this variable. Fasting motor abnormalities, chiefly represented by discrete clustered contractions, giant jejunal contractions, and bursts of nonpropagated contractions, were discovered in a high percentage in both groups of celiac subjects (89% in adults and 44% in children, respectively). Similar abnormalities were observed in the postprandial period, especially in adults. In conclusion, patients with celiac sprue frequently display discrete gastrointestinal motor abnormalities, which though perhaps nonspecific may account for several symptoms complained of by such patients.

  8. Abundant molecular gas and inefficient star formation in intracluster regions: ram pressure stripped tail of the Norma galaxy ESO137-001

    SciTech Connect

    Jáchym, Pavel; Combes, Françoise; Cortese, Luca; Sun, Ming; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    2014-09-01

    For the first time, we reveal large amounts of cold molecular gas in a ram-pressure-stripped tail, out to a large 'intracluster' distance from the galaxy. With the Actama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope, we have detected {sup 12}CO(2-1) emission corresponding to more than 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} of H{sub 2} in three Hα bright regions along the tail of the Norma cluster galaxy ESO 137-001, out to a projected distance of 40 kpc from the disk. ESO 137-001 has an 80 kpc long and bright X-ray tail associated with a shorter (40 kpc) and broader tail of numerous star forming H II regions. The amount of ∼1.5 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} of H{sub 2} found in the most distant region is similar to molecular masses of tidal dwarf galaxies, though the standard Galactic CO-to-H{sub 2} factor could overestimate the H{sub 2} content. Along the tail, we find the amount of molecular gas to drop, while masses of the X-ray-emitting and diffuse ionized components stay roughly constant. Moreover, the amounts of hot and cold gas are large and similar, and together nearly account for the missing gas from the disk. We find a very low SFE (τ{sub dep} > 10{sup 10} yr) in the stripped gas in ESO 137-001 and suggest that this is due to a low average gas density in the tail, or turbulent heating of the interstellar medium that is induced by a ram pressure shock. The unprecedented bulk of observed H{sub 2} in the ESO 137-001 tail suggests that some stripped gas may survive ram pressure stripping in the molecular phase.

  9. Feasibility of observing small differences in friction mean effective pressure between different lubricating oil formations using small, single-cylinder motored engine rig

    DOE PAGES

    Rohr, William F.; Nguyen, Ke; Bunting, Bruce G.; ...

    2015-09-01

    Here, the feasibility of using a motored single-cylinder 517 cc diesel engine to observe small frictional differences between oil formulations is investigated. Friction mean effective pressure (FMEP) is measured and compared for an SAE 10W-30 and an SAE 5W-20 oil in three stages of production: base oil, commercial oil without a friction and wear reducing additive, and fully formulated commercial oil. In addition, a commercial SAE 5W-30 engine oil is investigated. Friction mean effective pressure is plotted versus oil dynamic viscosity to compare the lubricant FMEP at a given viscosity. Linear regressions and average friction mean effective pressure are usedmore » as a secondary means of comparing FMEP for the various oil formulations. Differences between the oils are observed with the base oil having higher friction at a given viscosity but a lower average FMEP due to the temperature distribution of the test and lower viscosities reached by the base oil. The commercial oil is shown to have both a higher FMEP at a given viscosity and a higher average FMEP than the commercial oil without a friction and wear reducing additive. The increase in friction for the oil without a friction and wear reduction additive indicates that the operational regime of the engine may be out of the bounds of the optimal regime for the additive or that the additive is more optimized for wear reduction. Results show that it is feasible to observe small differences in FMEP between lubricating oil formulations using a small, single-cylinder motored engine.« less

  10. Abundant Molecular Gas and Inefficient Star Formation in Intracluster Regions: Ram Pressure Stripped Tail of the Norma Galaxy ESO137-001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáchym, Pavel; Combes, Françoise; Cortese, Luca; Sun, Ming; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    2014-09-01

    For the first time, we reveal large amounts of cold molecular gas in a ram-pressure-stripped tail, out to a large "intracluster" distance from the galaxy. With the Actama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope, we have detected 12CO(2-1) emission corresponding to more than 109 M ⊙ of H2 in three Hα bright regions along the tail of the Norma cluster galaxy ESO 137-001, out to a projected distance of 40 kpc from the disk. ESO 137-001 has an 80 kpc long and bright X-ray tail associated with a shorter (40 kpc) and broader tail of numerous star forming H II regions. The amount of ~1.5 × 108 M ⊙ of H2 found in the most distant region is similar to molecular masses of tidal dwarf galaxies, though the standard Galactic CO-to-H2 factor could overestimate the H2 content. Along the tail, we find the amount of molecular gas to drop, while masses of the X-ray-emitting and diffuse ionized components stay roughly constant. Moreover, the amounts of hot and cold gas are large and similar, and together nearly account for the missing gas from the disk. We find a very low SFE (τdep > 1010 yr) in the stripped gas in ESO 137-001 and suggest that this is due to a low average gas density in the tail, or turbulent heating of the interstellar medium that is induced by a ram pressure shock. The unprecedented bulk of observed H2 in the ESO 137-001 tail suggests that some stripped gas may survive ram pressure stripping in the molecular phase. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 088.B-0934.

  11. Feasibility of observing small differences in friction mean effective pressure between different lubricating oil formations using small, single-cylinder motored engine rig

    SciTech Connect

    Rohr, William F.; Nguyen, Ke; Bunting, Bruce G.; Qu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Here, the feasibility of using a motored single-cylinder 517 cc diesel engine to observe small frictional differences between oil formulations is investigated. Friction mean effective pressure (FMEP) is measured and compared for an SAE 10W-30 and an SAE 5W-20 oil in three stages of production: base oil, commercial oil without a friction and wear reducing additive, and fully formulated commercial oil. In addition, a commercial SAE 5W-30 engine oil is investigated. Friction mean effective pressure is plotted versus oil dynamic viscosity to compare the lubricant FMEP at a given viscosity. Linear regressions and average friction mean effective pressure are used as a secondary means of comparing FMEP for the various oil formulations. Differences between the oils are observed with the base oil having higher friction at a given viscosity but a lower average FMEP due to the temperature distribution of the test and lower viscosities reached by the base oil. The commercial oil is shown to have both a higher FMEP at a given viscosity and a higher average FMEP than the commercial oil without a friction and wear reducing additive. The increase in friction for the oil without a friction and wear reduction additive indicates that the operational regime of the engine may be out of the bounds of the optimal regime for the additive or that the additive is more optimized for wear reduction. Results show that it is feasible to observe small differences in FMEP between lubricating oil formulations using a small, single-cylinder motored engine.

  12. X-ray-induced dissociation of H.sub.2O and formation of an O.sub.2-H.sub.2 alloy at high pressure

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Ho-kwang [Washington, DC; Mao, Wendy L [Washington, DC

    2011-11-29

    A novel molecular alloy of O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 and a method of producing such a molecular alloy are provided. When subjected to high pressure and extensive x-radiation, H.sub.2O molecules cleaved, forming O--O and H--H bonds. In the method of the present invention, the O and H framework in ice VII was converted into a molecular alloy of O.sub.2 and H.sub.2. X-ray diffraction, x-ray Raman scattering, and optical Raman spectroscopy demonstrate that this crystalline solid differs from previously known phases.

  13. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Teens > Peer Pressure A A A ... for the school play. previous continue When the Pressure's On Sometimes, though, the stresses in your life ...

  14. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  15. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: A new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, W.J.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Yang, M.Z.

    2006-01-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition. ?? 2006 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  16. Raman scattering studies of pressure-induced phase transitions in perovskite formates [(CH3)2NH2][Mg(HCOO)3] and [(CH3)2NH2][Cd(HCOO)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mączka, M.; Almeida da Silva, T.; Paraguassu, W.; Pereira da Silva, K.

    2016-03-01

    Pressure-dependent Raman studies were preformed on two dimethylammonium metal formates, [(CH3)2NH2][Mg(HCOO)3] (DMMg) and [(CH3)2NH2][Cd(HCOO)3] (DMCd). They revealed three pressure-induced transitions in the DMMg near 2.2, 4.0 and 5.6 GPa. These transitions are associated with significant distortion of the anionic framework and the phase transition at 5.6 GPa has also great impact on the DMA+ cation. The DMCd undergoes two pressure-induced phase transitions. The first transition occurred between 1.2 and 2.0 GPa and the second one near 3.6 GPa. The first transition leads to subtle structural changes associated with distortion of anionic framework and the later leads to significant distortion of the framework. In contrast to the DMMg, the third transition associated with distortion of DMA+ cation is not observed for the DMCd up to 7.8 GPa. This difference can be most likely associated with larger volume of the cavity occupied by DMA+ cation in the DMCd and thus weaker interactions between anionic framework and DMA+ cations.

  17. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: a new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, W J; Chou, I M; Burruss, R C; Yang, M Z

    2006-02-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition.

  18. Stability and breakdown of Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3} melt associated with formation of {sup 13}C-diamond in static high pressure experiments up to 43 GPa and 3900 K

    SciTech Connect

    Spivak, A.V.; Litvin, Yu.A.; Ovsyannikov, S.V.; Dubrovinskaia, N.A.; Dubrovinsky, L.S.

    2012-07-15

    Melting of calcium carbonate Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3}, stability of the melt and its decomposition were studied in static high pressure experiments at pressures of 11-43 GPa and temperatures of 1600-3900 K using diamond anvil cell technique with laser heating. We observed formation of {sup 13}C-graphite (below 16 GPa) and {sup 13}C-diamond (between 16 and 43 GPa) on decomposition of the Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3} melt at temperatures above 3400 K. At temperatures below 3400 K congruent melting of calcium carbonate was confirmed. The experimental results were applied to construction of the phase diagram of CaCO{sub 3} up to 43 GPa and 3900 K focusing at the melting curve of calcium carbonate and the decomposition phase boundary of CaCO{sub 3} melt. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase states of CaCO{sub 3} were studied at P=11-43 GPa and T=1600-3900 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 13}C-diamond easily crystallizes in carbonate-carbon (Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3-}{sup 13}C-graphite) melt-solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca-carbonate melts congruently that was observed in experiments in DAC with laser heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} melt, indicated by formation of graphite and/or diamond. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} was observed at temperatures above 3400 K in the pressure interval studied.

  19. Coagulation abnormalities in the cirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Muciño-Bermejo, Jimena; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2013-01-01

    The clotting process is a dynamic array of multiple processes which can be described in four phases: platelet plug initiation and formation, clotting process propagation by the coagulation cascade, clotting termination by antithrombotic mechanisms and clot removal by fibrinolysis. The liver plays a central role in each of these phases of clotting process, as it synthesizes the majority of coagulation factors and proteins involved in fibrinolysis as well as thrombopoeitin, which is responsible for platelet production from megakaryocytes. Many pathological processes associated with cirrhosis, such as portal hypertension and endothelial dysfunction, as well as co-morbid conditions, may also alter the coagulation process. Consequently, patients with liver disease have a disturbed balance of procoagulant and anti-coagulant factors which deviates from the normal coagulation cascade. This situation poses an additional problem in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to this group of patients, since traditional coagulation test may not be reliable for assessing bleeding or thrombotic risk and traditional transfusional strategies may not be applicable in cirrhotic patients. In this article, we review the pathophysiological bases of coagulation abnormalities, in cirrhotic patients, the diagnostic therapeutic strategies to be followed and its impact on the clinical outcome in the cirrhotic patient.

  20. Formation and emission characteristics of CN molecules in laser induced low pressure He plasma and its applications to N analysis in coal and fossilization study.

    PubMed

    Lahna, Kurnia; Idroes, Rinaldi; Idris, Nasrullah; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Tjia, May On; Pardede, Marincan; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2016-03-01

    Presented in this paper are the results of an experimental study on the laser induced plasma emission of a number of CN free samples (urea, sucrose) with 40 mJ pulse energy using He and N₂ ambient gases. It is shown that the CN emission has its exclusive sources in the molecules produced as the result of chemical bonding either between the ablated C and N ions in the He plasma or between the ablated C and dissociated N from the N₂ ambient gas. The emission intensities in both cases are found to have the highest values at the low gas pressure of 2 kPa. The emission in He gas is shown to exhibit the typical characteristics related to a shockwave generated excitation mechanism. The experiments using He ambient gas further demonstrate the feasible laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy application to quantitative and sensitive N analysis of coal and promising application for practical in situ carbon dating of fossils.

  1. Influence of a magnetic field on the formation of carbon dust particles in very low-pressure high-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdessi, G. Al; Glad, X.; Dap, S.; Rojo, M.; Clergereaux, R.; Margot, J.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon dust particles with radius of a few hundreds of nanometers are formed in a steady-state plasma produced by an electromagnetic surface wave at 200 MHz in very low-pressure conditions. The influence of an applied magnetic field is evidenced by ex situ methods (scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy). The observed spherical dust particles are formed of aggregates of graphite nanocrystals embedded in amorphous carbon shells. In addition, the size of the dust particles increases with the magnetic field intensity. Growth occurs as the particles are confined near the sheath edge and their confinement is improved by applying a magnetic field as the corresponding electric field increases in this region. As a consequence, the average dust particle radius is directly related to the magnetic field intensity.

  2. Pressure-volume regulation in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Guyton, A C; Brands, M W

    1996-06-01

    In all forms of hypertension, including human essential hypertension, pressure natriuresis is abnormal because sodium excretion is the same as in normotension despite increased arterial pressure. Considerable evidence indicates that this resetting of pressure natriuresis plays a key role in causing hypertension, rather than merely occurring as an adaptation to increased blood pressure. Because human essential hypertension is a heterogeneous disease, it is likely that multiple neurohumoral and intrarenal defects contribute to abnormal pressure natriuresis and increased blood pressure. Physiological studies have shown that renal abnormalities that cause increased distal and collecting tubule reabsorption, decreased glomerular filtration coefficient or loss of nephrons also cause decreased slope of pressure natriuresis (salt-sensitive hypertension), whereas increased preglomerular resistance causes a parallel shift of pressure natriuresis (salt-insensitive hypertension). Comparison of the characteristics of pressure natriuresis (such as salt-sensitivity of blood pressure) in hypertensive subjects with those forms of experimental hypertension of known origin can provide insight into the etiology of human hypertension. With long-standing hypertension, pathological changes in the glomeruli and renal arterioles may further shift pressure natriuresis and exacerbate hypertension.

  3. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients with Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D; Bennett, D; Fisher-Hoch, S P; Farrar, B; McCormick, J B

    1989-10-01

    Electrocardiograms from 32 patients with acute Lassa fever were abnormal in over 70% of cases. The changes noted included non-specific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, ST-segment elevation, generalized low-voltage complexes, and changes reflecting electrolyte disturbance. None of the abnormalities correlated with clinical severity of infection, serum transaminase levels, or eventual outcome. ECG changes are common in Lassa fever, but usually unassociated with clinical manifestations of myocarditis.

  4. Porewater pressure control on subglacial soft sediment remobilization and tunnel valley formation: A case study from the Alnif tunnel valley (Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravier, Edouard; Buoncristiani, Jean-François; Guiraud, Michel; Menzies, John; Clerc, Sylvain; Goupy, Bastien; Portier, Eric

    2014-05-01

    In the eastern part of the Moroccan Anti-Atlas Mountains, the Alnif area exposes a buried Ordovician glacial tunnel valley (5 km wide, 180 m deep) cut into preglacial marine sediments. The preglacial sedimentary sequence, deposited in a marine environment, is characterized by a typical "layer-cake" configuration of permeable (sand) and impermeable (clays and early-cemented sandstones) layers. At the base of the tunnel valley, a discontinuous and fan-shaped glacial conglomeratic unit 10 to 15 m thick occurs, erosively deposited over preglacial marine sediments. The conglomeratic unit is composed of preglacial intraclasts embedded within a sandy matrix. Both preglacial and glacial sediments display soft-sediment deformation structures related to fluctuating porewater pressure and strain rates, including ball structures, clastic dykes, fluted surfaces, turbate structures, folds and radial extensional normal faults. Kinematics and relative chronology of these deformation structures allow the role of porewater pressure in the process of tunnel valley genesis on soft beds to be understood. The tunnel valley formed through multi-phased episodes of intense hydrofracturing of the preglacial bed due to overpressure development promoted by ice sheet growth over the study area, and configuration of the substratum. Transport of the resulting conglomerate composed of preglacial intraclasts and fluidized sand occurred through subglacial pipes. The brecciated material is deposited in subglacial cavities, forming fans of massive sandy conglomerate infilling the base of the tunnel valley. The conglomeratic unit is partially reworked by meltwater and exhibits intense soft-sediment deformations, due to episodes of ice-bed coupling and decoupling.

  5. The Effect of Air Preheat at Atmospheric Pressure on the Formation of NO(x) in the Quick-Mix Sections of an Axially Staged Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vardakas, M. A.; Leong, M. Y.; Brouwer, J.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept has been proposed to minimize the formation of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) in gas turbine systems. The success of this combustor strategy is dependent upon the efficiency of the mixing section bridging the fuel-rich and fuel-lean stages. Note that although these results were obtained from an experiment designed to study an RQL mixer, the link between mixing and NOx signatures is considerably broader than this application, in that the need to understand this link exists in most advanced combustors. The experiment reported herein was designed to study the effects of inlet air temperature on NO(x) formation in a mixing section. The results indicate that NO(x) emission is increased for all preheated cases compared to non-preheated cases. When comparing the various mixing modules, the affect of jet penetration is important, as this determines where NO(x) concentrations peak, and affects overall NO(x) production. Although jet air comprises 70 percent of the total airflow, the impact that jet air preheat has on overall NO(x) emissions is small compared to preheating both main and jet air flow.

  6. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  7. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  8. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  9. Abnormal band of lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Brian; Goldblatt, John

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a case of an "abnormal band" of the lateral meniscus, extending from the posterior horn of the true lateral meniscus to its antero-mid portion, observed during arthroscopy in a 45-year-old white man of Bosnian descent. The periphery of the aberrant lateral meniscus was freely mobile, and not connected to the underlying true lateral meniscus. Preoperative physical examination findings were consistent with medial-sided meniscal pathology only; however, evidence of an anomalous lateral meniscus was seen with magnetic resonance imaging. This anatomical pattern is rare and has been reported in the literature only once, in a report of 2 Asian patients. This article illustrates an anatomical variant of the lateral meniscus in a non-Asian patient with a clinical presentation that has not been previously described. In addition to the case report, the article presents a comprehensive review of the existing body of literature on anomalous lateral meniscus patterns. We believe that the definitions of the types of aberrant meniscus can be clarified to establish improved accuracy in reporting.

  10. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  11. Radiologic atlas of pulmonary abnormalities in children

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, E.B.; Wagner, M.L.; Dutton, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an atlas about thoracic abnormalities in infants and children. The authors include computed tomographic, digital subtraction angiographic, ultrasonographic, and a few magnetic resonance (MR) images. They recognize and discuss how changes in the medical treatment of premature infants and the management of infection and pediatric tumors have altered some of the appearances and considerations in these diseases. Oriented toward all aspects of pulmonary abnormalities, the book starts with radiographic techniques and then discusses the normal chest, the newborn, infections, tumors, and pulmonary vascular diseases. There is comprehensive treatment of mediastinal abnormalities and a discussion of airway abnormalities.

  12. Spent fuel behavior under abnormal thermal transients during dry storage

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, D.; Landow, M.P.; Burian, R.J.; Pasupathi, V.

    1986-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of abnormally high temperatures on spent fuel behavior. Prior to testing, calculations using the CIRFI3 code were used to determine the steady-state fuel and cask component temperatures. The TRUMP code was used to determine transient heating rates under postulated abnormal events during which convection cooling of the cask surfaces was obstructed by a debris bed covering the cask. The peak rate of temperature rise during the first 6 h was calculated to be about 15/sup 0/C/h, followed by a rate of about 1/sup 0/C/h. A Turkey Point spent fuel rod segment was heated to approx. 800/sup 0/C. The segment deformed uniformly with an average strain of 17% at failure and a local strain of 60%. Pretest characterization of the spent fuel consisted of visual examination, profilometry, eddy-current examination, gamma scanning, fission gas collection, void volume measurement, fission gas analysis, hydrogen analysis of the cladding, burnup analysis, cladding metallography, and fuel ceramography. Post-test characterization showed that the failure was a pinhole cladding breach. The results of the tests showed that spent fuel temperatures in excess of 700/sup 0/C are required to produce a cladding breach in fuel rods pressurized to 500 psing (3.45 MPa) under postulated abnormal thermal transient cask conditions. The pinhole cladding breach that developed would be too small to compromise the confinement of spent fuel particles during an abnormal event or after normal cooling conditions are restored. This behavior is similar to that found in other slow ramp tests with irradiated and nonirradiated rod sections and nonirradiated whole rods under conditions that bracketed postulated abnormal heating rates. This similarity is attributed to annealing of the irradiation-strengthened Zircaloy cladding during heating. In both cases, the failure was a benign, ductile pinhole rupture.

  13. High-pressure greenschist to blueschist facies transition in the Maimón Formation (Dominican Republic) suggests mid-Cretaceous subduction of the Early Cretaceous Caribbean arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torró, L.; Garcia-Casco, A.; Proenza, J. A.; Blanco-Quintero, I. F.; Gutiérrez-Alonso, G.; Lewis, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Maimón Formation (Cordillera Central, Dominican Republic) is formed of metamorphosed bi-modal mafic-felsic volcanic rocks and sedimentary horizons of Early Cretaceous age deposited in the forearc of the nascent Caribbean island arc. Two structural-metamorphic zones depict an inverted metamorphic gradient: the Ozama shear zone, which records intense mylonitic and phyllonitic deformation and ubiquitous metamorphic recrystallization, tectonically overlies the much less deformed and variably recrystallized rocks of the El Altar zone. The presence of ferri-winchite and high-Si phengite, first reported in this paper, in the peak metamorphic assemblage of rocks of the Ozama shear zone (actinolite + phengite + chlorite + epidote + quartz + albite ± ferri-winchite ± stilpnomelane) point to subduction-related metamorphism. Pseudosection calculations and intersection of isopleths indicate peak metamorphic conditions of 8.2 kbar at 380 °C. These figures are consistent with metamorphism in the greenschist/blueschist facies transition, burial depths of 25-29 km and a thermal gradient of 13-16 °C/km. Our new data dispute previous models pointing to metamorphism of Maimón rocks under a steep thermal gradient related to burial under a hot peridotite slice. Instead, we contextualize the metamorphism of the Maimón Formation in a subduction scenario in which a coherent slice of the (warm) Early Cretaceous forearc was engulfed due to intra-arc complexities and regional-scale-driven tectonic processes operating in the late Early Cretaceous. Integration of our findings with previous studies on metamorphic complexes in Hispaniola suggests that a major tectonic event affecting the whole arc system took place at c. 120-110 Ma.

  14. Changes and roles of secondary structures of whey protein for the formation of protein membrane at soy oil/water interface under high-pressure homogenization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Lefèvre, Thiery; Subirade, Muriel; Paquin, Paul

    2007-12-26

    The conformational changes of whey proteins upon adsorption at the soy oil/water interface were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Significant changes were observed in the bands assigned to beta-sheets and alpha-helix structures following the adsorption of proteins at the oil/water interface. The remaining interfacial proteins after Tween 20 desorption revealed small changes in beta-sheet and alpha-helical structures, whereas in the desorbed whey proteins the unordered structures largely increased, and beta-sheet structures almost disappeared. These FT-IR results provide important knowledge about the conformational modifications in whey proteins occurring upon adsorption at the oil/water interface. Finally, specific conformational changes are necessary to stabilize emulsions: adsorption-induced unfolding, increase in alpha-helical structures to establish interactions with the oil phase, and aggregation between adsorbed whey proteins to form protein membranes. Moreover, the structural changes in whey protein adsorbed at the oil/water interface under high-pressure homogenization are irreversible.

  15. Analysis of supratentorial cystic abnormalities using in utero MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Hannah M

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our anecdotal experience from foetal neuroimaging studies suggests that there are often significant disagreements between the findings of ultrasonography (USS) and in utero MR (iuMR) imaging in cases of antenatally detected supratentorial extra-axial cysts. Although this is a relatively rare clinical situation, it warrants further investigation because of the high risk of other intracranial abnormalities that are likely to cause long-term neurodevelopmental problems. Methods: We reviewed 957 consecutive referrals for iuMR of the foetal brain over a 3.5-year period and studied all cases where the referral from USS described supratentorial extra-axial cysts in the foetus. The iuMR imaging was reviewed, and a comparison between the results of the two examinations was made. Results: Supratentorial extra-axial cysts were an unusual referral for iuMR occurring in only 13/957 (1.4%) of cases. The findings on USS and iuMR imaging were conflicting in all 13 cases with intracranial pathology being excluded on iuMR imaging in 4 cases and more significant pathology being shown in 9 cases. Abnormalities of the corpus callosum were recognized in association with a cyst in eight cases, and this was recognized in only two cases on USS. Six of those cases also had abnormalities of cortical formation. Conclusion: iuMR imaging should be used in the assessment of pregnancies in which a supratentorial extra-axial cyst has been detected on USS. This is based on the improved primary diagnosis and a high rate of associated brain abnormalities not detected on USS. Advances in knowledge: Our retrospective observational study examines a range of foetal intracranial abnormalities which are better defined using iuMRI. This is a previously described spectrum of neurodevelopmental anomalies which we suggest would benefit from MRI. PMID:26577541

  16. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  17. Immune Abnormalities in Patients with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Reed P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study of 31 autistic patients (3-28 years old) has revealed several immune-system abnormalities, including decreased numbers of T lymphocytes and an altered ratio of helper-to-suppressor T cells. Immune-system abnormalities may be directly related to underlying biologic processes of autism or an indirect reflection of the actual pathologic…

  18. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo*

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. Methods This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Results Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study. PMID:27579738

  19. Formation of Superhexagonal Chromium Hydride by Exposure of Chromium Thin Film to High Temperature, High Pressure Hydrogen in a Ballistic Compressor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi.

    This dissertation describes a novel, non-equilibrium method which was used to synthesize a new chromium hydride phase. Single crystal, body centered cubic Cr thin films were prepared by vacuum evaporation. These films were exposed to high temperature (close to the melting point of Cr), high pressure hydrogen gas in a ballistic compressor. This was followed by rapid cooling (>10^5^ circC/s) to room temperature. Using the transmission electron microscope (TEM), second phase particles of superhexagonal structure, which has lattice constant A = 4.77A and C/A = 1.84, are found in the films. This structure has a volume per Cr atom slightly larger than that of hexagonal closed packed CrH, so that the superhexagonal structure may contain more hydrogen than the hexagonal close packed CrH. The superhexagonal particles have a definite orientation relationship with the matrix: (021) _{rm sh} // (001) _{rm b} and (212)_{rm sh} // (110)_{rm b} . The superhexagonal structure is quite stable in air and at room temperature, but decomposes to body centered cubic Cr when bombarded by the electron beam in the TEM. No such particles were observed in Cr films exposed to pure argon under similar conditions in the ballistic compressor. Positive identification of hydrogen content was obtained by high-temperature vacuum extraction in a discharge tube. After vacuum extraction, hydrogen spectrum was observed, and the intensity of electron diffraction from superhexagonal structure decreased. Using an energy dispersive spectrometer with the capability of detecting elements down to atomic number six (carbon), no changes in composition of the films were found by comparing the characteristic x-ray spectra of the same film before and after exposure to hot, dense hydrogen in the ballistic compressor. This result suggests that this non-equilibrium method may be used for other metal-hydrogen system to obtain new structural phases that are of scientific or technological interest.

  20. Low pressure UV/H2O2 treatment for the degradation of the pesticides metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop - Kinetics and reaction product formation.

    PubMed

    Semitsoglou-Tsiapou, Sofia; Templeton, Michael R; Graham, Nigel J D; Hernández Leal, Lucía; Martijn, Bram J; Royce, Alan; Kruithof, Joop C

    2016-03-15

    The degradation kinetics of three pesticides - metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop - by ultraviolet photolysis and hydroxyl radical oxidation by low pressure ultraviolet hydrogen peroxide (LP-UV/H2O2) advanced oxidation was determined. Mecoprop was susceptible to both LP-UV photolysis and hydroxyl radical oxidation, and exhibited the fastest degradation kinetics, achieving 99.6% (2.4-log) degradation with a UV fluence of 800 mJ/cm(2) and 5 mg/L hydrogen peroxide. Metaldehyde was poorly degraded by LP-UV photolysis while 97.7% (1.6-log) degradation was achieved with LP-UV/H2O2 treatment at the maximum tested UV fluence of 1000 mJ/cm(2) and 15 mg/L hydrogen peroxide. Clopyralid was hardly susceptible to LP-UV photolysis and exhibited the lowest degradation by LP-UV/H2O2 among the three pesticides. The second-order reaction rate constants for the reactions between the pesticides and OH-radicals were calculated applying a kinetic model for LP-UV/H2O2 treatment to be 3.6 × 10(8), 2.0 × 10(8) and 1.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for metaldehyde, clopyralid and mecoprop, respectively. The main LP-UV photolysis reaction product from mecoprop was 2-(4-hydroxy-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid, while photo-oxidation by LP-UV/H2O2 treatment formed several oxidation products. The photo-oxidation of clopyralid involved either hydroxylation or dechlorination of the ring, while metaldehyde underwent hydroxylation and produced acetic acid as a major end product. Based on the findings, degradation pathways for the three pesticides by LP-UV/H2O2 treatment were proposed.

  1. N-6 and N-3 PUFA in liver lipids, thromboxane formation and blood pressure from SHR during diets supplemented with evening primrose, sunflowerseed or fish oil.

    PubMed

    Singer, P; Berger, I; Moritz, V; Förster, D; Taube, C

    1990-03-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) after weaning (at 4 weeks of age) were fed diets supplemented with either sunflowerseed oil (SO), evening primrose oil (EPO), fish oil (FO) or EPO + FO (50%: 50%, v/v) for 22 weeks. A diet with commercially available pellets served as control. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the dietary groups receiving FO, EPO and FO + EPO, the former being most effective. In liver triglycerides (TG) EPO resulted in a markedly increased percentage of linoleic acid (LA; C 18:2, n-6), alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-LNA; C 18:3, n-6) and especially of arachidonic acid (AA; C 20:4, n-6), whereas the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C 20:5, n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C 22:6 n-3), were depressed to undetectable and significantly lower levels, respectively. In liver phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) only slight changes of LA and AA were observed. Feeding of FO led to a significant rise of EPA and DHA in liver TG, PC and PE at the expense of n-6 PUFA (except LA in PC and PE). With a combination of both EPO and FO a significant increase of EPA and DHA, but on lower levels as compared to FO alone, was associated with a significant rise of LA, but with a slight decline of AA as compared to the control animals. Nevertheless, the levels of AA in the group fed EPO + FO were still higher than in the FO-group. In the SO-group the increase of LA was even higher when compared with the EPO-group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Can transcutaneous recordings detect gastric electrical abnormalities?

    PubMed Central

    Familoni, B O; Bowes, K L; Kingma, Y J; Cote, K R

    1991-01-01

    The ability of transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity to detect gastric electrical abnormalities was determined by simultaneous measurements of gastric electrical activity with surgically implanted serosal electrodes and cutaneous electrodes in six patients undergoing abdominal operations. Transient abnormalities in gastric electrical activity were seen in five of the six patients during the postoperative period. Recognition of normal gastric electrical activity by visual analysis was possible 67% of the time and with computer analysis 95% of the time. Ninety four per cent of abnormalities in frequency were detected by visual analysis and 93.7% by computer analysis. Abnormalities involving a loss of coupling, however, were not recognised by transcutaneous recordings. Transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity assessed by computer analysis can usually recognise normal gastric electrical activity and tachygastria. Current techniques, however, are unable to detect abnormalities in electrical coupling. PMID:1864531

  3. The effect of pressure on sulphur speciation in mid- to deep-crustal arc magmas and implications for the formation of porphyry copper deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matjuschkin, Vladimir; Blundy, Jon D.; Brooker, Richard A.

    2016-07-01

    Piston cylinder experiments are used to investigate the effect of oxygen fugacity (ƒO2) on sulphur speciation and phase relations in arc magmas at 0.5-1.5 GPa and 840-950 °C. The experimental starting composition is a synthetic trachyandesite containing 6.0 wt% H2O, 2880 ppm S, 1500 ppm Cl and 3800 ppm C. Redox conditions ranging from 1.7 log units below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO - 1.7) to NNO + 4.7 were imposed by solid-state buffers: Co-CoO, Ni-NiO, Re-ReO2 and haematite-magnetite. All experiments are saturated with a COH fluid. Experiments produced crystal-bearing trachydacitic melts (SiO2 from 60 to 69 wt%) for which major and volatile element concentrations were measured. Experimental results demonstrate a powerful effect of oxidation state on phase relations. For example, plagioclase was stable above NNO, but absent at more reduced conditions. Suppression of plagioclase stability produces higher Al2O3 and CaO melts. The solid sulphur-bearing phases and sulphur speciation in the melt are strong functions of ƒO2, as expected, but also of pressure. At 0.5 GPa, the anhydrite stability field is intersected at NNO ≥ +2, but at 1.0 and 1.5 GPa, experiments at the same ƒO2 produce sulphides and the stability field of sulphate moves towards higher ƒO2 by ~1 log unit at 1.0 GPa and ~1.5 log units at 1.5 GPa. As a result, models that appeal to high oxidation state as an important control on the mobility of Cu (and other chalcophiles) during crustal differentiation must also consider the enhanced stability of sulphide in deep- to mid-crustal cumulates even for relatively oxidized (NNO + 2) magmas. Experimental glasses reproduce the commonly observed minimum in sulphur solubility between the S2- and S6+ stability fields. The solubility minimum is not related to the Fe content (Fe2+/Fe3+ or total) of the melt. Instead, we propose this minimum results from an unidentified, but relatively insoluble, S-species of intermediate oxidation state.

  4. Investigation of reactivity and structure formation in a K-Te-U oxo-system under high-temperature/high-pressure conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bin; Kegler, Philip; Bosbach, Dirk; Alekseev, Evgeny V

    2016-09-27

    The high-temperature/high-pressure treatment of the K-Te-U oxo-family at 1100 °C and 3.5 GPa results in the crystallization of a series of novel uranyl tellurium compounds, K2[(UO2)3(Te(IV)O3)4], K2[(UO2)TeO14], α-K2[(UO2)Te(VI)O5] and β-K2[(UO2)Te(VI)O5]. In contrast to most of the reported uranyl compounds which are favorable in layered structures, we found that under extreme conditions, the potassium uranyl oxo-tellurium compounds preferably crystallized in three-dimensional (3D) framework structures with complex topologies. Anion topology analysis indicates that the 3D uranyl tellurite anionic framework observed in K2[(UO2)3(Te(IV)O3)4] is attributable to the additional linkages of TeO3 polyhedra connecting with TeO4 disphenoids from the neighboring U-Te layers. The structure of K2[(UO2)TeO14] can be described based on [UTe6O26](22-) clusters, where six TeO5 polyhedra enclose a hexagonal cavity in which a UO8 polyhedron is located. The [UTe6O26](22-) clusters are further linked by TeO5 square pyramids to form the 3D network. Similar to uranyl tellurates, both α-K2[(UO2)Te(VI)O5] and β-K2[(UO2)Te(VI)O5] contain TeO6 octahedra which share a common face to form a dimeric Te2O10 unit. However, in α-K2[(UO2)Te(VI)O5], these Te2O10 units connect with UO6 tetragonal bipyramids to form a 3D structural framework, while in β-K2[(UO2)Te(VI)O5], the same Te2O10 dimers are observed to link with UO7 pentagonal bipyramids, forming 2D layers. Raman measurements were carried out and the vibration bands related to Te(IV)-O, Te(VI)-O and U(VI)-O bonds are discussed.

  5. Thermodynamic, electrochemical, high-pressure kinetic, and mechanistic studies of the formation of oxo Fe(IV)-TAML species in water.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Delia-Laura; Vrabel, Melanie; Brausam, Ariane; Madsen, Peter; Lente, Gabor; Fabian, Istvan; Ryabov, Alexander D; van Eldik, Rudi; Collins, Terrence J

    2010-12-20

    Stopped-flow kinetic studies of the oxidation of Fe(III)-TAML catalysts, [ F e{1,2-X(2)C(6)H(2)-4,5-( NCOCMe(2) NCO)(2)CMe(2)}(OH(2))](-) (1), by t-BuOOH and H(2)O(2) in water affording Fe(IV) species has helped to clarify the mechanism of the interaction of 1 with primary oxidants. The data collected for substituted Fe(III)-TAMLs at pH 6.0-13.8 and 17-45 °C has confirmed that the reaction is first order both in 1 and in peroxides. Bell-shaped pH profiles of the effective second-order rate constants k(I) have maximum values in the pH range of 10.5-12.5 depending on the nature of 1 and the selected peroxide. The "acidic" part is governed by the deprotonation of the diaqua form of 1 and therefore electron-withdrawing groups move the lower pH limit of the reactivity toward neutral pH, although the rate constants k(I) do not change much. The dissection of k(I) into individual intrinsic rate constants k(1) ([FeL(OH(2))(2)](-) + ROOH), k(2) ([FeL(OH(2))OH)](2-) + ROOH), k(3) ([FeL(OH(2))(2)](-) + ROO(-)), and k(4) ([FeL(OH(2))OH)](2-) + ROO(-)) provides a model for understanding the bell-shaped pH-profiles. Analysis of the pressure and substituent effects on the reaction kinetics suggest that the k(2) pathway is (i) more probable than the kinetically indistinguishable k(3) pathway, and (ii) presumably mechanistically similar to the induced cleavage of the peroxide O-O bond postulated for cytochrome P450 enzymes. The redox titration of 1 by Ir(IV) and electrochemical data suggest that under basic conditions the reduction potential for the half-reaction [Fe(IV)L(=O)(OH(2))](2-) + e(-) + H(2)O → [Fe(III)L(OH)(OH(2))](2-) + OH(-) is close to 0.87 V (vs NHE).

  6. Comet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  7. Powder formation in SiH{sub 4}-H{sub 2} discharge in large area capacitively coupled reactors: A study of the combined effect of interelectrode distance and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Strahm, B.; Hollenstein, Ch.

    2010-01-15

    One of the main challenges for silicon thin film deposition for solar cell applications is to achieve high rate deposition in order to reduce the manufacturing costs. However, when silane and hydrogen are used as precursor gas in parallel plate plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, high rate deposition is generally synonymous of powdery discharge. In this work, time- and space-resolved light scattering experiments are presented. These were performed in an industrial-type large area reactor with a variable interelectrode distance. Results show that with a standard 25 mm interelectrode distance, the fraction of silane transformed into powder can be as high as 50% and that reducing the interelectrode distance shifts to higher pressure the appearance of powder in the discharge. From a standard 25 mm interelectrode distance to a 10 mm narrow gap reactor, the threshold pressure was increased from 2 to 7 mbars. More generally, it is proposed that the onset of powder formation depends mainly on the product of the interelectrode distance and the gas residence time in the discharge.

  8. Liver Abnormalities in Cardiac Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Alicia M.; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is characterized by the inability of systemic perfusion to meet the body's metabolic demands and is usually caused by cardiac pump dysfunction and may occasionally present with symptoms of a noncardiac disorder such as hepatic dysfunction. The primary pathophysiology involved in hepatic dysfunction from HF is either passive congestion from increased filling pressures or low cardiac output and the consequences of impaired perfusion. Passive hepatic congestion due to increased central venous pressure may cause elevations of liver enzymes and both direct and indirect serum bilirubin. Impaired perfusion from decreased cardiac output may be associated with acute hepatocellular necrosis with marked elevations in serum aminotransferases. Cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis (“shock liver”) may ensue following an episode of profound hypotension in patients with acute HF. We discuss pathophysiology and identification of liver abnormalities that are commonly seen in patients with HF. PMID:22942628

  9. Induction of Embryogenesis in Brassica Napus Microspores Produces a Callosic Subintinal Layer and Abnormal Cell Walls with Altered Levels of Callose and Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Vega, Verónica; Corral-Martínez, Patricia; Rivas-Sendra, Alba; Seguí-Simarro, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The induction of microspore embryogenesis produces dramatic changes in different aspects of the cell physiology and structure. Changes at the cell wall level are among the most intriguing and poorly understood. In this work, we used high pressure freezing and freeze substitution, immunolocalization, confocal, and electron microscopy to analyze the structure and composition of the first cell walls formed during conventional Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis, and in cultures treated to alter the intracellular Ca2+ levels. Our results revealed that one of the first signs of embryogenic commitment is the formation of a callose-rich, cellulose-deficient layer beneath the intine (the subintinal layer), and of irregular, incomplete cell walls. In these events, Ca2+ may have a role. We propose that abnormal cell walls are due to a massive callose synthesis and deposition of excreted cytoplasmic material, and the parallel inhibition of cellulose synthesis. These features were absent in pollen-like structures and in microspore-derived embryos, few days after the end of the heat shock, where abnormal cell walls were no longer produced. Together, our results provide an explanation to a series of relevant aspects of microspore embryogenesis including the role of Ca2+ and the occurrence of abnormal cell walls. In addition, our discovery may be the explanation to why nuclear fusions take place during microspore embryogenesis. PMID:26635844

  10. Etiologic factors in long-term respiratory function abnormalities following esophageal atresia repair.

    PubMed

    LeSouëf, P N; Myers, N A; Landau, L I

    1987-10-01

    Recurrent respiratory illnesses are frequent in infants following repair of esophageal atresia and functional abnormalities of respiratory and esophageal function are often seen in older children. Recurrent aspiration is a potential cause of these respiratory abnormalities, but a relationship between abnormalities of gastrointestinal and respiratory mechanics has not been adequately investigated. We sought an association between lower esophageal sphincter (LES) incompetence, gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and respiratory function abnormalities in 18 subjects (age 12 to 21 years) following repair of esophageal atresia (Vogt type 111B). In each subject, measurements were made of spirometry, lung volumes assessed by plethysmography, esophageal manometry recorded using a constantly infused fluid-filled trilumen catheter to assess LES pressure and esophageal motility, and esophageal pH monitoring to detect GER. Subjects were grouped according to the presence or absence of a radiologically supported diagnosis of pneumonia in the first 4 years of life. Lung volumes were mildly but significantly decreased in the "pneumonia" group compared with the "nonpneumonia" group. There was no association between abnormalities of respiratory function and abnormal LES pressure or the presence of GER. These data suggest that pneumonia in esophageal atresia infants is associated with mild long-term lung damage. LES dysfunction and GER do not appear to play a major role in this process.

  11. The p in p-T is for pressure: Movement of the gas hydrate stability field during glacial sealevel lowering and its possible link to pockmark formation on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Wood, R.; Carter, L.; Gohl, K.

    2010-12-01

    The discussion on a possible destabilization of gas hydrates caused by climate fluctuations has in recent years focused on the role of a sub-seafloor temperature increase following bottom-water warming. We here revisit the scenario that a pressure drop during glacial sealevel lowering could lead to gas hydrate dissociation. A >20,000 km2 field of seafloor depressions that we interpret as pockmarks has been identified on the southern flanks of the Chatham Rise. Three classes of pockmarks are present in two distinct water-depth ranges. The shallowest class of pockmarks with a diameter of ~150 m are present in a water-depth range of 500-700 m, close to the current top of the gas hydrate stability field. Sub-bottom profiler data show evidence for a bottom simulating reflection making it likely that gas hydrates are present beneath the seafloor. Furthermore, buried pockmarks are identified on horizons that we correlate with sealevel lowstands suggesting that pockmark formation is linked to sealevel lowering. Assuming constant bottom-water temperatures, a glacial sealevel drop by 120 m would move much of the seafloor that is covered with these pockmarks out of the gas hydrate stability field. We therefore suggest these pockmarks were formed by gas from dissociating gas hydrate due to depressurization following sealevel lowering. Two larger classes of pockmarks with diameters of 1-5 and ~10 km, respectively, are present in water depths of 800-1100 m. Here, the seafloor has probably remained within the gas hydrate stability field during sealevel lowstands. However, the associated pressure drop has moved the base of gas hydrate stability upwards by ~30 m. It is unclear whether bottom-water temperatures have changed significantly in our study area during glacial cycles - changes of 1-3° C would be required to have a similar effect on gas hydrate stability as sealevel fluctuations. The boundary between warmer subtropical and cold subantarctic waters, the subtropical front

  12. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  13. Myocardial metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrocardiographic significance of reversible thallium-201 abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Dilsizian, V.; O'Gara, P.T.; Udelson, J.E.; Schenke, W.H.; Quyyumi, A.; Fananapazir, L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Exercise-induced abnormalities during thallium-201 scintigraphy that normalize at rest frequently occur in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, it is not known whether these abnormalities are indicative of myocardial ischemia. Fifty patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy underwent exercise {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy and, during the same week, measurement of myocardial lactate metabolism and hemodynamics during pacing stress. Thirty-seven patients (74%) had one or more {sup 201}Tl abnormalities that completely normalized after 3 hours of rest; 26 had regional myocardial {sup 201}Tl defects, and 26 had apparent left ventricular cavity dilatation with exercise, with 15 having coexistence of these abnormal findings. Of the 37 patients with reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, 27 (73%) had metabolic evidence of myocardial ischemia during rapid atrial pacing compared with four of 13 patients (31%) with normal {sup 201}Tl scans (p less than 0.01). Eleven patients had apparent cavity dilatation as their only {sup 201}Tl abnormality; their mean postpacing left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly higher than that of the 13 patients with normal {sup 201}Tl studies (33 +/- 5 versus 21 +/- 10 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the angiographic presence of systolic septal or epicardial coronary arterial compression and the presence or distribution of {sup 201}Tl abnormalities. Patients with ischemic ST segment responses to exercise had an 80% prevalence rate of reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities and a 70% prevalence rate of pacing-induced ischemia. However, 69% of patients with nonischemic ST segment responses had reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, and 55% had pacing-induced ischemia. Reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities during exercise stress are markers of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most likely identify relatively underperfused myocardium.

  14. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  15. Mud Volcanoes Formation And Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, I. S.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are natural phenomena, which occur throughout the globe. They are found at a greater or lesser scale in Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, on the Kerch and Taman peninsulas, on Sakhalin Island, in West Kuban, Italy, Romania, Iran, Pakistan, India, Burma, China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Ecuador. Mud volcanoes are most well-developed in Eastern Azerbaijan, where more than 30% of all the volcanoes in the world are concentrated. More than 300 mud volcanoes have already been recognized here onshore or offshore, 220 of which lie within an area of 16,000 km2. Many of these mud volcanoes are particularly large (up to 400 m high). The volcanoes of the South Caspian form permanent or temporary islands, and numerous submarine banks. Many hypotheses have been developed regarding the origin of mud volcanoes. Some of those hypotheses will be examined in the present paper. Model of spontaneous excitation-decompaction (proposed by Ivanov and Guliev, 1988, 2002). It is supposed that one of major factors of the movement of sedimentary masses and formation of hydrocarbon deposits are phase transitions in sedimentary basin. At phase transitions there are abnormal changes of physical and chemical parameters of rocks. Abnormal (high and negative) pressure takes place. This process is called as excitation of the underground environment with periodicity from several tens to several hundreds, or thousand years. The relationship between mud volcanism and the generation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane, is considered to be a critical factor in mud volcano formation. At high flow rates the gas and sediment develops into a pseudo-liquid state and as flow increases the mass reaches the "so-called hover velocity" where mass transport begins. The mass of fluid moves as a quasi-uniform viscous mass through the sediment pile in a piston like manner until expelled from the surface as a "catastrophic eruption

  16. Sleep Physiology, Abnormal States, and Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wickboldt, Alvah T.; Bowen, Alex F.; Kaye, Aaron J.; Kaye, Adam M.; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  17. Congenital abnormalities of the ovine paramesonephric ducts.

    PubMed

    Smith, K C; Long, S E; Parkinson, T J

    1995-01-01

    A 15 month survey of ovine reproductive tracts was undertaken in slaughterhouses in southwest England. A total of 33506 tracts were examined; 23536 from lambs and 9970 from adults. In total, 3.4% of tracts were pregnant and 3.3% exhibited abnormalities. Twenty cases of uterus unicornis, six of uterus didelphys and 11 of segmental aplasia were encountered, such that partial aplasia of the paramesonephric ducts accounted for 3.3% of all abnormalities. Although developmental abnormalities of the ovine female genital system are relatively uncommon, a substantial proportion of these can be accounted for by development defects of the paramesonephric ducts.

  18. [Radionuclide studies of congenital kidney abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Vlakhov, N

    1984-06-01

    Using the potentialities of isotope nephrograms as a screening test a total of 4746 patients suspected of renal abnormalities were examined. The author established pathological deviations in 561 cases (11.8%). During further verification using scintigraphy unsuspected congenital renal abnormalities (aplasia, hypoplasia, dystopia, double kidney, horseshoe kidney, solitary cyst and polycystic renal disease) were found in 46 patients (8.2%). The diagnosis was confirmed at subsequent venous x-ray urography. A conclusion has been made as to the role of comprehensive nephrographic-scintigraphic examination in the diagnosis of congenital renal abnormalities.

  19. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Use of ammonium formate in QuEChERS for high-throughput analysis of pesticides in food by fast, low-pressure gas chromatography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González-Curbelo, Miguel Ángel; Lehotay, Steven J; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2014-09-05

    The "quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe" (QuEChERS) approach to sample preparation is widely applied in pesticide residue analysis, but the use of magnesium sulfate and other nonvolatile compounds for salting out in the method is not ideal for mass spectrometry. In this study, we developed and evaluated three new different versions of the QuEChERS method using more volatile salts (ammonium chloride and ammonium formate and acetate buffers) to induce phase separation and extraction of 43 representative pesticide analytes of different classes. Fast low-pressure gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LPGC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS were used for analysis. The QuEChERS AOAC Official Method 2007.01 was also tested for comparison purposes. Of the studied methods, formate buffering using 7.5g of ammonium formate and 15mL of 5% (v/v) formic acid in acetonitrile for the extraction of 15g of sample (5g for wheat grain) provided the best performance and practical considerations. Method validation was carried out with and without the use of dispersive solid-phase extraction for cleanup, and no significant differences were observed for the majority of pesticides. The method was demonstrated in quantitative analysis for GC- and LC-amenable pesticides in 4 representative food matrices (apple, lemon, lettuce, and wheat grain). With the typical exceptions of certain pH-dependent and labile pesticides, 90-110% recoveries and <10% RSD were obtained. Detection limits were mostly <5ng/g, which met the general need to determine pesticide concentrations as low as 10ng/g for monitoring purposes in food applications.

  1. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  2. Induced abnormality in Mir- and Earth grown Super Dwarf wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, D. L.; Stieber, J.; Campbell, W. F.; Salisbury, F. B.; Levinski, M.; Sytchev, V.; Podolsky, I.; Chernova, L.; Pdolsky, I.

    2003-01-01

    Super-dwarf wheat grown on the Mir space station using the Svet "Greenhouse" exhibited morphological, metabolic and reproductive abnormalities compared with Earth-grown wheat. Of prominent importance were the abnormalities associated with reproductive ontogeny and the total absence of seed formation on Mir. Changes in the apical meristem associated with transition from the vegetative phase to floral initiation and development of the reproductive spike were all typical of 'Super-Dwarf' wheat up to the point of anthesis. Observation of ruptured anthers from the Mir-grown plants revealed what appeared to be normally developed pollen. These pollen gains, however, contained only one nuclei, while normal viable pollen is tri-nucleate. A potentially important difference in the flight experiment, compared with ground reference studies, was the presence of a high level of atmospheric ethylene (1,200 ppb). Ground studies conducted by exposing 'Super-Dwarf' wheat to ethylene just prior to anthesis resulted in manifestation of the same abnormalities observed in the space flight samples. c2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  3. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identified an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 through December 31, 1990. The report discusses five abnormal occurrences, none of which involved a nuclear power plant. Two involved significant overexposures to the hands of two radiographers, two involved medical therapy misadministrations, and one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration. No abnormal occurrences were reported by the Agreement States. The report also contains information that updates a previously reported abnormal occurrence. 8 refs.

  4. MRI Helps Assess Fetal Brain Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about their pregnancy," said lead author Paul Griffiths. He's a professor of radiology at the University ... the fetus may have a suspected brain abnormality," Griffiths said in a journal news release. In this ...

  5. Abnormal Position and Presentation of the Fetus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interest (Quiz) Breast Cancer (Video) Overview of the Female Reproductive System (News) Study: Plenty of IV Fluids May Make Childbirth Safer, Easier (News) Zejula Approved for Certain Female Cancers Additional Content Medical News Abnormal Position and ...

  6. Abnormalities of lung function in hay fever.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, E J; Hall, D R

    1976-01-01

    Twenty subjects with symptoms of hay fever were studied to see whether abnormalities could be detected in the function of small airways. The investigations included dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies, closing capacity, residual volume, transfer factor, and maximal expiratory flow-volume curves. The tests were repeated in the winter when symptoms had resolved. Frequency dependence of compliance was found in eight subjects with symptoms (40%), closing capacities being abnormal in only two instances. Conventional pulmonary function tests, including expiratory flow rates at mid vital capacity, were within the predicted range of all subjects. When tests were repeated in the winter, frequency dependence of compliance was no longer present in subjects whose symptoms had resolved. The study suggests that reversible small airway abnormalities are present in a significant proportion of subjects with symptoms of hay fever and that such abnormalities are best detected by the measurement of dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies. PMID:769243

  7. Medial medullary infarction: abnormal ocular motor findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Soo; Choi, K-D; Oh, S-Y; Park, S-H; Han, M-K; Yoon, B-W; Roh, J-K

    2005-10-25

    In 20 consecutive patients with isolated medial medullary infarction, abnormal ocular motor findings included nystagmus (n = 8), ocular contrapulsion (n = 5), and contralesional ocular tilt reaction (n = 2). The nystagmus was ipsilesional (n = 4), gaze-evoked (n = 5), upbeating (n = 4), and hemiseesaw (n = 1). The ocular motor abnormalities may be explained by involvements of the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi, medial longitudinal fasciculus or efferent fibers from the vestibular nuclei, climbing fibers, and cells of the paramedian tracts.

  8. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin. PMID:869567

  9. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-05-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin.

  10. Basilar artery migraine and reversible imaging abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Maytal, J; Libman, R B; Lustrin, E S

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of a basilar artery migraine in a 17-year-old boy with transient CT and MR abnormalities after each of two migraine episodes. A repeat MR study 6 months after the last event showed complete resolution of the lesion. Transient abnormalities on brain images similar to those shown in our case have been reported in patients with migraine and other neurologic conditions and are most likely related to cerebral vasogenic edema.

  11. Abnormal early cleavage events predict early embryo demise: sperm oxidative stress and early abnormal cleavage.

    PubMed

    Burruel, Victoria; Klooster, Katie; Barker, Christopher M; Pera, Renee Reijo; Meyers, Stuart

    2014-10-13

    Human embryos resulting from abnormal early cleavage can result in aneuploidy and failure to develop normally to the blastocyst stage. The nature of paternal influence on early embryo development has not been directly demonstrated although many studies have suggested effects from spermatozoal chromatin packaging, DNA damage, centriolar and mitotic spindle integrity, and plasma membrane integrity. The goal of this study was to determine whether early developmental events were affected by oxidative damage to the fertilizing sperm. Survival analysis was used to compare patterns of blastocyst formation based on P2 duration. Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrate that relatively few embryos with short (<1 hr) P2 times reached blastocysts, and the two curves diverged beginning on day 4, with nearly all of the embryos with longer P2 times reaching blastocysts by day 6 (p < .01). We determined that duration of the 2nd to 3rd mitoses were sensitive periods in the presence of spermatozoal oxidative stress. Embryos that displayed either too long or too short cytokineses demonstrated an increased failure to reach blastocyst stage and therefore survive for further development. Although paternal-derived gene expression occurs later in development, this study suggests a specific role in early mitosis that is highly influenced by paternal factors.

  12. CNS involvement in hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Tackenberg, B; Möller, J C; Rindock, H; Bien, S; Sommer, N; Oertel, W H; Rosenow, F; Schepelmann, K; Hamer, H M; Bandmann, O

    2006-12-26

    We assessed seven patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with 16 electrophysiological tests and cranial MRI for CNS abnormalities. Mean latencies differed between patients with HNPP and controls for the blink reflex, the jaw-opening reflex, and acoustic evoked potentials. MRI abnormalities were observed in four patients. Our study suggests subclinical but functionally relevant CNS myelin damage in HNPP.

  13. Pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, S.

    1985-04-02

    A pressure receiving element for receiving an external pressure is attached to one end of a body and a temperature compensating diaphragm is attached to the other end of the body. A coupling shaft disposed in the body is fixed at both ends to the pressure receiving element and the diaphragm, respectively. A liquid is sealed in the body and means is provided for detecting displacement or force applied to the coupling shaft in accordance with a pressure received by the pressure receiving element. The diaphragm has corrugations of concentric circles and the crests of a plurality of them are made flat and one of the flat crests is fixed to the body. The effective area of the diaphragm inside of the flat crest that is fixed to the body is selected substantially to be equal to the effective area of the pressure receiving element.

  14. Mechanism of [m+h]+ formation in atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry: identification of propionitrile in acetonitrile with high mass accuracy measurement and tandem mass spectrometry and evidence for its involvement in the protonation phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Amin; Jeanville, Patrick; Colizza, Kevin; J-Rivera, Lauren Elizabeth

    2008-11-01

    The role of propionitrile in the production of [M+H]+ under atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) was investigated. In dopant-assisted APPI using acetone and anisole, protonated acetone and anisole radical cations were the most prominent ions observed. In dopant-free or direct APPI in acetonitrile, however, a major ion in acetonitrile was detected and identified as propionitrile, using high accuracy mass measurement and collision induced dissociation studies. Vaporizing ca. 10(-5) M althiazide and bendroflumethazide under direct APPI in acetonitrile produced their corresponding protonated species [M+H]+. In addition to protonated acetonitrile, its dimers, and acetonitrile/water clusters, protonated propionitrile, propionitrile dimer, and propionitrile/water clusters were also observed. The role of propionitrile, an impurity in acetonitrile and/or a possible product of ion-molecule reaction, in the production of [M+H]+ of althiazide and bendroflumethazide was further investigated in the absence of dopant using propionitrile-d5. The formation of [M+D]+ species was observed, suggesting a possible role of propionitrile in the protonation process. Additionally, an increase in the [M+H]+ signal of althiazide and bendroflumethazide was observed as a function of propionitrile concentration in acetonitrile. Theoretical data from the literature supported the assumption that one possible mechanism, among others, for the formation of [M+H]+ could be attributed to photo-initiated isomerization of propionitrile. The most stable isomers of propionitrile, based on their calculated ionization energy (IE) and relative energy (DeltaE), were assumed to undergo proton transfer to the analytes, and mechanisms were proposed.

  15. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than..., tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant abnormal findings, NIOSH...

  16. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings... shape or size, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant...

  17. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  18. 4-Diamond Formation from Amorphouse Carbon and Graphite in the Presence of COH Fluids : An InSitu High-Pressure and -Temperature Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Prakapenka, V.; Kubo, A.; Kavner, A.; Green, H.W.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L.

    2011-10-14

    Microdiamonds from orogenic belts contain nanometer-size fluid inclusions suggesting diamond formation from supercritical carbon - oxygen - hydrogen (COH) fluids. Here we report experimental results of diamond nucleation from amorphous carbon and polycrystalline graphite in the presence of COH fluids in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our results show that: (i) diamonds can nucleate from graphite or amorphous carbon at pressures of 9-11 GPa and temperatures of 1200-1400 K in the presence of COH fluids; (ii) it is easier to nucleate diamond from amorphous carbon than from graphite with or without the COH fluids; and (iii) the fluid from decomposition of glucose is more efficient in promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation than the fluid from decomposition of oxalic acid dihydrate. Carbon crystallinity has strong effects on the kinetics of diamond nucleation and growth. The experimental results demonstrated the critical role of presence and composition of supercritical COH fluids for promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation.

  19. Magnetic fluctuations and possible formation of a spin-singlet cluster under pressure in the heavy-fermion spinel LiV2O4 probed by 7Li and 51V NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hikaru; Kato, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Itoh, Masayuki; Niitaka, Seiji; Takagi, Hidenori

    2015-07-01

    7Li and 51V NMR measurements up to 9.8 GPa have been made to elucidate local magnetic properties of a heavy-fermion spinel oxide LiV2O4 which undergoes a metal-insulator transition above ˜7 GPa. The temperature T and pressure P dependences of the 7Li and 51V Knight shifts and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates 1 /T1 show that in the metallic phase, there is a crossover from a high-T region with weak ferromagnetic fluctuations to a low-T one with antiferromagnetic (AFM) fluctuations. The AFM fluctuations are enhanced below 20 K and 1.5 GPa, where a heavy Fermi-liquid state with the modified Korringa relation is formed. The evolution of the magnetic fluctuations is discussed from the aspect of the competition among several magnetic interactions. Above PMI˜6.7 GPa, we find the coexistence of metallic and insulating phases due to the first-order metal-insulator transition. The 7Li and 51V NMR spectra coming from the insulating phase have T -independent small Knight shifts and 7(1 /T1 ) with the thermally activated T dependence, indicating the formation of a spin-singlet cluster. We propose a model of a spin-singlet tetramer as discussed in geometrically frustrated materials.

  20. XYY chromosome abnormality in sexual homicide perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Habermann, Niels; Berner, Wolfgang; Hill, Andreas

    2006-03-05

    In a retrospective investigation of the court reports about sexual homicide perpetrators chromosome analysis had been carried out in 13 of 166 (7.8%) men. Three men (1.8%) with XYY chromosome abnormality were found. This rate is much higher than that found in unselected samples of prisoners (0.7-0.9%) or in the general population (0.01%). The three men had shown prepubescent abnormalities, school problems, and had suffered from physical abuse. The chromosome analysis in all cases had been carried out in connection with the forensic psychiatric court report due to the sexual homicide. However, two men had earlier psychiatric referrals. All were diagnosed as sexual sadistic, showed a psychopathic syndrome or psychopathy according to the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised [Hare RD, 1991, The Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Multi-Health Systems]. Two were multiple murderers. Especially forensic psychiatrists should be vigilant of the possibility of XYY chromosome abnormalities in sexual offenders.

  1. Visual perceptual abnormalities: hallucinations and illusions.

    PubMed

    Norton, J W; Corbett, J J

    2000-01-01

    Visual perceptual abnormalities may be caused by diverse etiologies which span the fields of psychiatry and neurology. This article reviews the differential diagnosis of visual perceptual abnormalities from both a neurological and a psychiatric perspective. Psychiatric etiologies include mania, depression, substance dependence, and schizophrenia. Common neurological causes include migraine, epilepsy, delirium, dementia, tumor, and stroke. The phenomena of palinopsia, oscillopsia, dysmetropsia, and polyopia among others are also reviewed. A systematic approach to the many causes of illusions and hallucinations may help to achieve an accurate diagnosis, and a more focused evaluation and treatment plan for patients who develop visual perceptual abnormalities. This article provides the practicing neurologist with a practical understanding and approach to patients with these clinical symptoms.

  2. Abnormal Head Position in Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Noval, Susana; González-Manrique, Mar; Rodríguez-Del Valle, José María; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José María

    2011-01-01

    Infantile nystagmus is an involuntary, bilateral, conjugate, and rhythmic oscillation of the eyes which is present at birth or develops within the first 6 months of life. It may be pendular or jerk-like and, its intensity usually increases in lateral gaze, decreasing with convergence. Up to 64% of all patients with nystagmus also present strabismus, and even more patients have an abnormal head position. The abnormal head positions are more often horizontal, but they may also be vertical or take the form of a tilt, even though the nystagmus itself is horizontal. The aim of this article is to review available information about the origin and treatment of the abnormal head position associated to nystagmus, and to describe our treatment strategies. PMID:24533187

  3. Parsing abnormal grain growth in specialty aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Abigail Kremer

    Grain growth in alumina is strongly affected by the impurities present in the material. Certain impurity elements are known to have characteristic effects on abnormal grain growth in alumina. Specialty alumina powders contain multiple impurity species including MgO, CaO, SiO2, and Na 2O. In this work, sintered samples made from alumina powders containing various amounts of the impurities in question were characterized by their grain size and aspect ratio distributions. Multiple quantitative methods were used to characterize and classify samples with varying microstructures. The grain size distributions were used to partition the grain size population into subpopulations depending on the observed deviation from normal behavior. Using both grain size and aspect ratio a new visual representation for a microstructure was introduced called a morphology frequency map that gives a fingerprint for the material. The number of subpopulations within a sample and the shape of the distribution on the morphology map provided the basis for a classification scheme for different types of microstructures. Also using the two parameters a series of five metrics were calculated that describe the character of the abnormal grains in the sample, these were called abnormal character values. The abnormal character values describe the fraction of grains that are considered abnormal, the average magnitude of abnormality (including both grain size and aspect ratio), the average size, and variance in size. The final metric is the correlation between grain size and aspect ratio for the entire population of grains. The abnormal character values give a sense of how different from "normal" the sample is, given the assumption that a normal sample has a lognormal distribution of grain size and a Gaussian distribution of aspect ratios. In the second part of the work the quantified measures of abnormality were correlated with processing parameters such as composition and heat treatment conditions. A

  4. Schizophrenia and abnormal brain network hubs.

    PubMed

    Rubinov, Mikail; Bullmore, Ed

    2013-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder of unknown cause or characteristic pathology. Clinical neuroscientists increasingly postulate that schizophrenia is a disorder of brain network organization. In this article we discuss the conceptual framework of this dysconnection hypothesis, describe the predominant methodological paradigm for testing this hypothesis, and review recent evidence for disruption of central/hub brain regions, as a promising example of this hypothesis. We summarize studies of brain hubs in large-scale structural and functional brain networks and find strong evidence for network abnormalities of prefrontal hubs, and moderate evidence for network abnormalities of limbic, temporal, and parietal hubs. Future studies are needed to differentiate network dysfunction from previously observed gray- and white-matter abnormalities of these hubs, and to link endogenous network dysfunction phenotypes with perceptual, behavioral, and cognitive clinical phenotypes of schizophrenia.

  5. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy.

  6. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Bhoiwala, Devang L.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: thalassemia major, β-TI: thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelium degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-TM are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy (ICT) in order to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by ICT. Some who were never treated with ICT exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving ICT had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-TM viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  7. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  8. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  9. Chromosome abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Less information is available on the cytogenetic abnormalities in marrow cells of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than on abnormalities in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL); nonetheless, some patterns of karyotypic change in ALL are evident. Even with banding, about 50% of patients appear to have a normal karyotype. The modal chromosome number tends to be higher in ALL than in ANLL. Every patient with B-cell ALL has had an abnormality of one chromosome No. 14 that involved the translocation of material to the end of the long arm. Among seven reported cases, the translocation was from 8q in three patients and 11q in one. Cells with a haploid or near-haploid (24 to 35) chromosome number have been reported in five patients with ALL and in four patients in a lymphoid blast crisis of chronic myelogeneous leukemia. The karyotype in the four ALL patients whose cells were analyzed with banding was remarkably consistent. All patients had the haploid number, usually with both sex chromosomes, plus an additional No. 10, 18, and 21. Evolution of the karyotype, which occurs in the leukemic cells of about 50% of patients, involves cells of patients who had an initially normal or an initially abnormal karyotype. The evidence regarding a correlation between the presence of an abnormal clone prior to treatment and response to treatment is contradictory at present. Some chromosome abnormalities, such as the presence of a Philadelphia (Ph/sup 1/) chromosome, a 14q+chromosome, or a haploid clone, are associated with a relatively short survival.

  10. The influence of pressure on petroleum generation and maturation as suggested by aqueous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, L.C.; Wenger, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Because fluid pressures are transient in sedimentary basins over geologic time, the effect of increasing fluid pressure on organic-matter metamorphism is difficult to determine, and conflicting opinions exist concerning its influence. Properly-performed aqueous-pyrolysis experiments can closely simulate hydrocarbon generation and maturation in nature, and thus offer an excellent way to study the influence of pressure. Such experiments, carried out on the Retort Phosphatic Shale Member of the Lower Permian Phosphoria Formation (type II-S organic matter) at different constant temperatures, demonstrated that increasing pressure significantly retards all aspects of organic matter metamorphism, including hydrocarbon generation, maturation and thermal destruction. This conclusion results from detailed quantitative and qualitative analyses of all products from hydrocarbon generation, from the C1 to C4 hydrocarbon gases to the asphaltenes, and also from analyses of the reacted rocks. We have documented that our aqueous-pyrolysis experiments closely simulated natural hydrocarbon generation and maturation. Thus the data taken as a function of pressure have relevance to the influence of normal and abnormal fluid pressures as related to: 1) depths and temperatures of mainstage hydrocarbon generation; 2) the thermal destruction of deposits of gas or light oil, or their preservation to unexpectedly high maturation ranks; and 3) the persistence of measurable to moderate concentrations of C15+ hydrocarbons in fine-grained rocks even to ultra-high maturation ranks. ?? 1992.

  11. Temporal abnormalities in children with developmental dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Rappo, Gaetano; Pepi, Annamaria; Pavan, Andrea; Martino, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have associated Developmental dyscalculia (DD) to structural and functional alterations corresponding Parietal and the Prefrontal cortex (PFC). Since these areas were shown also to be involved in timing abilities, we hypothesized that time processing is abnormal in DD. We compared time processing abilities between 10 children with pure DD (8 years old) and 11 age-matched healthy children. Results show that the DD group underestimated duration of a sub-second scale when asked to perform a time comparison task. The timing abnormality observed in our DD participants is consistent with evidence of a shared fronto-parietal neural network for representing time and quantity.

  12. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  13. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research.

  14. Roentgenographic abnormalities in Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    McCook, T A; Briley, C; Ravin, C E

    1982-02-01

    Rock Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne rickettsial disease which produces a widespread vasculitis. A mortality of 7% to 13% has been reported in the United States which is due at least in part to delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The classic features of this disease include a history of tick bite with the clinical presentation of skin rash and fever in association with thrombocytopenia. Few reports have emphasized the radiologic chest abnormalities in this disease or their relationship to thrombocytopenia. We review 70 cases of RMSF with abnormal roentgenographic features and their pathologic correlation.

  15. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  16. Pressure garment design tool to monitor exerted pressures.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, Lisa; Ferguson, Rhona

    2013-09-01

    Pressure garments are used in the treatment of hypertrophic scarring following serious burns. The use of pressure garments is believed to hasten the maturation process, reduce pruritus associated with immature hypertrophic scars and prevent the formation of contractures over flexor joints. Pressure garments are normally made to measure for individual patients from elastic fabrics and are worn continuously for up to 2 years or until scar maturation. There are 2 methods of constructing pressure garments. The most common method, called the Reduction Factor method, involves reducing the patient's circumferential measurements by a certain percentage. The second method uses the Laplace Law to calculate the dimensions of pressure garments based on the circumferential measurements of the patient and the tension profile of the fabric. The Laplace Law method is complicated to utilise manually and no design tool is currently available to aid this process. This paper presents the development and suggested use of 2 new pressure garment design tools that will aid pressure garment design using the Reduction Factor and Laplace Law methods. Both tools calculate the pressure garment dimensions and the mean pressure that will be exerted around the body at each measurement point. Monitoring the pressures exerted by pressure garments and noting the clinical outcome would enable clinicians to build an understanding of the implications of particular pressures on scar outcome, maturation times and patient compliance rates. Once the optimum pressure for particular treatments is known, the Laplace Law method described in this paper can be used to deliver those average pressures to all patients. This paper also presents the results of a small scale audit of measurements taken for the fabrication of pressure garments in two UK hospitals. This audit highlights the wide range of pressures that are exerted using the Reduction Factor method and that manual pattern 'smoothing' can dramatically

  17. Early blood gas abnormalities and the preterm brain.

    PubMed

    Leviton, Alan; Allred, Elizabeth; Kuban, Karl C K; Dammann, Olaf; O'Shea, T Michael; Hirtz, Deborah; Schreiber, Michael D; Paneth, Nigel

    2010-10-15

    The authors explored associations between blood gas abnormalities in more than 1,000 preterm infants during the first postnatal days and indicators of neonatal brain damage. During 2002-2004, women delivering infants before 28 weeks' gestation at one of 14 participating institutions in 5 US states were asked to enroll in the study. The authors compared infants with blood gas values in the highest or lowest quintile for gestational age and postnatal day (extreme value) on at least 1 of the first 3 postnatal days with the remainder of the subjects, with separate analyses for blood gas abnormalities on multiple days and for partial pressure of oxygen in the alveolar gas of <35. Outcomes analyzed were ventriculomegaly and an echolucent lesion on an ultrasound scan in the neonatal intensive care unit, and cerebral palsy, microcephaly, and a low score on a Bayley Scale of Infant Development at 24 months. Every blood gas derangement (hypoxemia, hyperoxemia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and acidosis) was associated with multiple indicators of brain damage. However, for some, the associations were seen with only 1 day of exposure; others were evident with 2 or more days' exposure. Findings suggest that individual blood gas derangements do not increase brain damage risk. Rather, the multiple derangements associated with indicators of brain damage might be indicators of immaturity/vulnerability and illness severity.

  18. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  19. Recurrent chromosome 6 abnormalities in malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Ribotta, M; Roseo, F; Salvio, M; Castagneto, B; Carbone, M; Procopio, A; Giordano, A; Mutti, L

    1998-04-01

    The long latency period between asbestos exposure and the onset of malignant mesothelioma (MM) suggests that a multistep tumorigenesis process occurs whilst the capability of asbestos fibres to interfere directly with chromosomes focuses on the critical role of the chromosomal abnormalities in this neoplasm. The aim of our study was to identify any recurrent chromosomal changes in ten primary MM cell cultures derived from pleural effusions of patients with MM from the same geographic area and environmental and/or occupational exposure to asbestos fibers. Cytogenetic analysis was performed in accordance with International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature. Our results confirmed a great number of cytogenetic abnormalities in MM cells. Recurrent loss of the long arms of chromosome 6 (6q-) was the most frequent abnormality detected (four epithelial and two mixed subtypes) while, on the whole, abnormalities of chromosome 6 were found in nine out of ten cases whereas chromosome 6 was normal only in the case with fibromatous subtype. Monosomy 13 and 17 was found in five cases, monosomy 14 in four cases and 22 in three cases. Since deletion of 6q- was detected even in relatively undisturbed karyotype, we hypothesize a multistep carcinogenic process in which deletion of 6q- is an early event in the development and progression of malignant mesothelioma.

  20. Schizophrenogenic Parenting in Abnormal Psychology Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Otto F.

    1989-01-01

    Considers the treatment of family causation of schizophrenia in undergraduate abnormal psychology textbooks. Reviews texts published only after 1986. Points out a number of implications for psychologists which arise from the inclusion in these texts of the idea that parents cause schizophrenia, not the least of which is the potential for…

  1. Teaching Abnormal Psychology in a Multimedia Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, JoAnne

    1996-01-01

    Examines the techniques used in teaching an abnormal psychology class in a multimedia environment with two computers and a variety of audiovisual equipment. Students respond anonymously to various questions via keypads mounted on their desks, then immediately view and discuss summaries of their responses. (MJP)

  2. Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Refractory Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Philip J.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2015-11-01

    High-temperature plastic deformation of the body-centered cubic (BCC) refractory metals Mo and Ta can initiate and propagate abnormal grains at significantly lower temperatures and faster rates than is possible by static annealing alone. This discovery reveals a new and potentially important aspect of abnormal grain growth (AGG) phenomena. The process of AGG during plastic deformation at elevated temperatures, termed dynamic abnormal grain growth (DAGG), was observed at homologous temperatures between 0.52 and 0.72 in both Mo and Ta sheet materials; these temperatures are much lower than those for previous observations of AGG in these materials during static annealing. DAGG was used to repeatedly grow single crystals several centimeters in length. Investigations to date have produced a basic understanding of the conditions that lead to DAGG and how DAGG is affected by microstructure in BCC refractory metals. The current state of understanding for DAGG is reviewed in this paper. Attention is given to the roles of temperature, plastic strain, boundary mobility and preexisting microstructure. DAGG is considered for its potential useful applications in solid-state crystal growth and its possibly detrimental role in creating undesired abnormal grains during thermomechanical processing.

  3. Abnormal activated partial thromboplastin time and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Delicata, M; Hambley, H

    2011-08-01

    Malignancy often results in clotting abnormalities. The aetiology of haemostasis problems in cancer is complex, and is still not completely understood. We describe a case of a patient with malignant mesothelioma, who was found to have elevated activated partial thromboplastin time, due to lupus anticoagulant. We suggest that patients with malignancy should have their coagulation checked prior to any invasive procedures.

  4. First-Trimester Detection of Surface Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Rousian, Melek; Koning, Anton H. J.; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Eggink, Alex J.; Cornette, Jérôme M. J.; Schoonderwaldt, Ernst M.; Husen-Ebbinge, Margreet; Teunissen, Katinka K.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Exalto, Niek

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to determine the diagnostic performance of 3-dimensional virtual reality ultrasound (3D_VR_US) and conventional 2- and 3-dimensional ultrasound (2D/3D_US) for first-trimester detection of structural abnormalities. Forty-eight first trimester cases (gold standard available, 22 normal, 26 abnormal) were evaluated offline using both techniques by 5 experienced, blinded sonographers. In each case, we analyzed whether each organ category was correctly indicated as normal or abnormal and whether the specific diagnosis was correctly made. Sensitivity in terms of normal or abnormal was comparable for both techniques (P = .24). The general sensitivity for specific diagnoses was 62.6% using 3D_VR_US and 52.2% using 2D/3D_US (P = .075). The 3D_VR_US more often correctly diagnosed skeleton/limb malformations (36.7% vs 10%; P = .013). Mean evaluation time in 3D_VR_US was 4:24 minutes and in 2D/3D_US 2:53 minutes (P < .001). General diagnostic performance of 3D_VR_US and 2D/3D_US apparently is comparable. Malformations of skeleton and limbs are more often detected using 3D_VR_US. Evaluation time is longer in 3D_VR_US. PMID:24440996

  5. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  6. Abnormal Web Usage Control by Proxy Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hsiang-Fu; Tseng, Li-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Approaches to designing a proxy server with Web usage control and to making the proxy server effective on local area networks are proposed to prevent abnormal Web access and to prioritize Web usage. A system is implemented to demonstrate the approaches. The implementation reveals that the proposed approaches are effective, such that the abnormal…

  7. Engineering molecular crystals with abnormally weak cohesion.

    PubMed

    Maly, Kenneth E; Gagnon, Eric; Wuest, James D

    2011-05-14

    Adding astutely placed methyl groups to hexaphenylbenzene increases molecular weight but simultaneously weakens key C-H···π interactions, thereby leading to decreased enthalpies of sublimation and showing that materials with abnormally weak cohesion can be made by identifying and then obstructing interactions that help control association.

  8. Eye movement abnormalities in essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Plinta, Klaudia; Krzak-Kubica, Agnieszka; Zajdel, Katarzyna; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Dylak, Jacek; Ober, Jan; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Rudzińska, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Essential tremor (ET) is the most prevalent movement disorder, characterized mainly by an action tremor of the arms. Only a few studies published as yet have assessed oculomotor abnormalities in ET and their results are unequivocal. The aim of this study was to assess the oculomotor abnormalities in ET patients compared with the control group and to find the relationship between oculomotor abnormalities and clinical features of ET patients. We studied 50 ET patients and 42 matched by age and gender healthy controls. Saccadometer Advanced (Ober Consulting, Poland) was used to investigate reflexive, pace-induced and cued saccades and conventional electrooculography for evaluation of smooth pursuit and fixation. The severity of the tremor was assessed by the Clinical Rating Scale for Tremor. Significant differences between ET patients and controls were found for the incidence of reflexive saccades dysmetria and deficit of smooth pursuit. Reflexive saccades dysmetria was more frequent in patients in the second and third phase of ET compared to the first phase. The reflexive saccades latency increase was correlated with severity of the tremor. In conclusion, oculomotor abnormalities were significantly more common in ET patients than in healthy subjects. The most common oculomotor disturbances in ET were reflexive saccades dysmetria and slowing of smooth pursuit. The frequency of reflexive saccades dysmetria increased with progression of ET. The reflexive saccades latency increase was related to the severity of tremor. PMID:28149393

  9. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  10. Abnormal Saccadic Eye Movements in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemner, C.; Verbaten, M. N.; Cuperus, J. M.; Camfferman, G.; van Engeland, H.

    1998-01-01

    The saccadic eye movements, generated during a visual oddball task, were compared for 10 autistic children, 10 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, 10 dyslexic children, and 10 typically developing children. Several abnormal patterns of saccades were found in the autistic group. (DB)

  11. Pathways to abnormal revenge and forgiveness.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Pat

    2013-02-01

    The target article’s important point is easily misunderstood to claim that all revenge is adaptive. Revenge and forgiveness can overstretch (or understretch) the bounds of utility due to misperceptions, minimization of costly errors, a breakdown within our evolved revenge systems, or natural genetic and developmental variation. Together, these factors can compound to produce highly abnormal instances of revenge and forgiveness.

  12. Meiotic chromosome abnormalities in human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Renée H

    2006-08-01

    The last few years have witnessed an explosion in the information about chromosome abnormalities in human sperm and the meiotic events that predispose to these abnormalities. We have determined that all chromosomes are susceptible to nondisjunction, but chromosomes 21 and 22 and, especially, the sex chromosomes have an increased frequency of aneuploidy. Studies are just beginning on the effects of potential mutagens on the chromosomal constitution of human sperm. The effects of pesticides and cancer therapeutic agents have been reviewed. In the last decade, there has been a great impetus to study chromosome abnormalities in sperm from infertile men because the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) made it possible for these men to father pregnancies. A large number of studies have demonstrated that infertile men have an increased frequency of chromosomally abnormal sperm and children, even when they have a normal somatic karyotype. Meiotic studies on the pachytene stage of spermatogenesis have demonstrated that infertile men have impaired chromosome synapsis, a significantly decreased frequency of recombination, and an increased frequency of chromosomes completely lacking a recombination site. Such errors make these cells susceptible to meiotic arrest and the production of aneuploid gametes.

  13. Sensory Abnormalities in Autism: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klintwall Lars; Holm, Anette; Eriksson, Mats; Carlsson, Lotta Hoglund; Olsson, Martina Barnevik; Hedvall, Asa; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Sensory abnormalities were assessed in a population-based group of 208 20-54-month-old children, diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and referred to a specialized habilitation centre for early intervention. The children were subgrouped based upon degree of autistic symptoms and cognitive level by a research team at the centre. Parents…

  14. [Y chromosome structural abnormalities and Turner's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ravel, C; Siffroi, J-P

    2009-06-01

    Although specifically male, the human Y chromosome may be observed in female karyotypes, mostly in women with Turner syndrome stigmata. In women with isolated gonadal dysgenesis but otherwise normal stature, the testis determining factor or SRY gene may have been removed from the Y chromosome or may be mutated. In other women with Turner syndrome, the karyotype is usually abnormal and shows a frequent 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. In these cases, the phenotype depends on the ratio between Y positive and 45,X cell lines in the body. When in mosaicism, Y chromosomes are likely to carry structural abnormalities which explain mitotic instability, such as the existence of two centromeres. Dicentric Y isochromosomes for the short arm (idic[Yp]) or ring Y chromosomes (r[Y]) are the most frequent abnormal Y chromosomes found in infertile patients and in Turner syndrome in mosaic with 45,X cells. Although monocentric, deleted Y chromosomes for the long arm and those carrying microdeletions in the AZF region are also instable and are frequently associated with a 45,X cell line. Management of infertile patients carrying such abnormal Y chromosomes must take into account the risk and the consequences of a mosaicism in the offspring.

  15. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S.; De Jesus, Danilo R.; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Schutter, Dennis J.L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. Results We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. Limitations The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders. PMID:23937798

  16. Abnormal Selective Attention Normalizes P3 Amplitudes in PDD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeksma, Marco R.; Kemner, Chantal; Kenemans, J. Leon; van Engeland, Herman

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied whether abnormal P3 amplitudes in PDD are a corollary of abnormalities in ERP components related to selective attention in visual and auditory tasks. Furthermore, this study sought to clarify possible age differences in such abnormalities. Children with PDD showed smaller P3 amplitudes than controls, but no abnormalities in…

  17. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  18. Pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  19. Pressure regulator

    DOEpatents

    Ebeling, Jr., Robert W.; Weaver, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure within a pressurized flow reactor operated under harsh environmental conditions is controlled by establishing and maintaining a fluidized bed of uniformly sized granular material of selected density by passing the gas from the reactor upwardly therethrough at a rate sufficient to fluidize the bed and varying the height of the bed by adding granular material thereto or removing granular material therefrom to adjust the backpressure on the flow reactor.

  20. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  1. Autosomal recessive micrencephaly with simplified gyral pattern, abnormal myelination and arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Sztriha, L; Al-Gazali, L I; Várady, E; Goebel, H H; Nork, M

    1999-06-01

    The clinical courses, neuroimaging and muscle biopsy findings of two infants born to an inbred Arab family are described. They had a syndrome of micrencephaly with simplified gyral pattern, abnormal myelin formation and arthrogryposis. Increased variation of fiber size was seen in the muscle biopsy, creatine kinase, however was normal. Large areas of muscle were replaced by adipofibrous tissue. The infants had dysmorphic features consistent with the fetal akinesia/hypokinesia sequence. The abnormalities were suggestive of microlissencephaly probably associated with a dysgenetic process in the muscles. The syndrome showed an autosomal recessive inheritance.

  2. Generation of abnormal trace element abundances in Antarctic eucrites by weathering processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1991-01-01

    Data were obtained on the trace- and major-element compositions of 16 Antarctic abnormal eucrites, many of which exhibiting positive (but sometimes negative) Ce anomalies, positive Eu anomalies, and low abundances of the remainder of the REEs. The results of data analysis suggest that the unusual REE patterns of abnormal Antarctic eucrites arise from weathering effects generated in or on the Antarctic ice. The suggested scenario involves the formation of melt water and its equilibration with the atmosphere, promoting the dissolution of REE-rich phosphates and the oxidation of Ce. As a result, tetravalent Ce is fractionated from the trivalent REE in solution.

  3. CHRONIC PERCHLORATE EXPOSURE CAUSES MORPHOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN DEVELOPING STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; Von Hippel, Frank A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of chronic perchlorate exposure during growth and development, and fewer still have analyzed the effects of perchlorate over multiple generations. We describe morphological and developmental characteristics for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that were spawned and raised to sexual maturity in perchlorate-treated water (G1,2003) and for their offspring (G2,2004) that were not directly treated with perchlorate. The G1,2003 displayed a variety of abnormalities, including impaired formation of calcified traits, slower growth rates, aberrant sexual development, poor survivorship, and reduced pigmentation that allowed internal organs to be visible. Yet these conditions were absent when the offspring of contaminated fish (G2,2004) were raised in untreated water, suggesting a lack of transgenerational effects and that surviving populations may be able to recover following remediation of perchlorate-contaminated sites PMID:21465539

  4. The Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology at 25.

    PubMed

    Wasserstein, S B; Lopez, N; Routh, D K

    1997-02-01

    This issue, redesigned in a new format, marks the beginning of Volume 25, the beginning of the "silver anniversary" year of the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. Data were compiled from the first 24 volumes to study changes over time, and Pearson correlations were calculated to determine linear trends in the journal's development. The number of articles per volume has doubled, from about 25 to 50. In recent years the first authors of articles were more likely to be located outside the U.S. (up from about 5% to about 25%). Also, in recent years the first authors of articles were less likely to be affiliated with nonmedical school university departments and more likely to be affiliated with medical schools or research institutes. An introduction to this special 25th anniversary issue is provided.

  5. Abnormal Eye Movements in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael P.; Cohen, Mark; Petersen, Robert B.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McDougall, Alan; Tusa, Ronald J.; Leigh, R. John

    1993-01-01

    We report 3 patients with autopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease who, early in their course, developed abnormal eye movements that included periodic alternating nystagmus and slow vertical saccades. These findings suggested involvement of the cerebellar nodulus and uvula, and the brainstem reticular formation, respectively. Cerebellar ataxia was also an early manifestation and, in one patient, a frontal lobe brain biopsy was normal at a time when ocular motor and cerebellar signs were conspicuous. As the disease progressed, all saccades and quick phases of nystagmus were lost, but periodic alternating gaze deviation persisted. At autopsy, 2 of the 3 patients had pronounced involvement of the cerebellum, especially of the midline structures. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease should be considered in patients with subacute progressive neurological disease when cognitive changes are overshadowed by ocular motor findings or ataxia.

  6. Developmental pragmatics in normal and abnormal children.

    PubMed

    Bara, B G; Bosco, F M; Bucciarelli, M

    1999-07-01

    We propose a critical review of current theories of developmental pragmatics. The underlying assumption is that such a theory ought to account for both normal and abnormal development. From a clinical point of view, we are concerned with the effects of brain damage on the emergence of pragmatic competence. In particular, the paper deals with direct speech acts, indirect speech acts, irony, and deceit in children with head injury, closed head injury, hydrocephalus, focal brain damage, and autism. Since no single theory covers systematically the emergence of pragmatic capacity in normal children, it is not surprising that we have not found a systematic account of deficits in the communicative performance of brain injured children. In our view, the challenge for a pragmatic theory is the determination of the normal developmental pattern within which different pragmatic phenomena may find a precise role. Such a framework of normal behavior would then permit the systematic study of abnormal pragmatic development.

  7. Abnormal single or composite dissipative solitons generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xianqiong; Liu, Dingyao; Cheng, Ke; Sheng, Jianan

    2016-12-01

    The evolution dynamics of the initial finite energy Airy pulses and Airy pulse pairs are numerically investigated in the cubic-quintic complex Ginzberg-Laudau equation governed dissipative system. Depending on different initial excitations and system parameters, abnormal double, triple, and quadruple composite dissipative solitons as well as single dissipative solitons can be observed. The composite dissipative solitons may consist of identical or different types of pulsating solitons. Moreover, the creeping solitons and the single ordinary pulsating solitons can even appear in the parameter regions where originally the other types of pulsating solitons exist. Besides, before evolving into each abnormal dissipative soliton, the initial finite energy Airy pulse or pulse pairs generally exhibit very interesting and unique early evolution behavior.

  8. [Abnormal hemoglobins in Negroid Ecuadorian populations].

    PubMed

    Jara, N O; Guevara Espinoza, A; Guderian, R H

    1989-02-01

    The prevalence of hemoglobinopathies was determined in the black race located in two distinct geographical areas in Ecuador; in the coastal province of Esmeraldas, particularly the Santiago basin (Rio Cayapas and Rio Onzoles) and in the province of Imbabura, particularly in the intermoutain valley, Valle de Chota. A total of 2038 blood samples were analyzed, 1734 in Esmeraldas and 304 in Inbabura, of which 23.2% (473 individuals) were found to be carriers of abnormal hemoglobins, 25.4% (441) in Esmeraldas and 10.5% (32) in Imbabura. The abnormal hemoglobins found in Esmeraldas were Hb AS (19.2%), Hb AC (5.0%), Hb SS (0.6%) and Hb SC (0.5%) while in Imbabura only Hb AS (9.5%) and Hb AC (0.9%) were found. The factors that could influence the difference in prevalence found in the two geographical areas are discussed.

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Gastric emptying abnormalities in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, K.; Magyar, L.; Lange, R.; McCallum, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied gastric emptying (GE) in patients with peripheral manifestations of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) using a radionuclide method. 18 patients underwent esophageal manometry and a GE study using chicken liver labeled in vivo with Tc-99m sulfur colloid as a marker of solid emptying. GE was also measured in 13 normal volunteers. 4 PSS patients with normal esophageal motility also had normal GE. The GE of 14 PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility was significantly (p < 0.05) delayed; with 67.4% retention of isotope after 2 hours compared to 49.8 in normals. The authors conclude that GE of solids is slow in approximately 2/3 of PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility but is normal if the esophagus is uninvolved; Delayed GE may contribute to the severity of gastroesophageal reflux in PSS patients and the degree of dysphasgia; and Metoclopramide accelerates GE in PSS patients and should have a valuable therapeutic role.

  11. Varenicline and Abnormal Sleep Related Events

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Ruth L.; Zekarias, Alem; Caduff-Janosa, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess adverse drug reaction reports of “abnormal sleep related events” associated with varenicline, a partial agonist to the α4β2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on neurones, indicated for smoking cessation. Design: Twenty-seven reports of “abnormal sleep related events” often associated with abnormal dreams, nightmares, or somnambulism, which are known to be associated with varenicline use, were identified in the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Individual Case Safety Reports Database. Original anonymous reports were obtained from the four national pharmacovigilance centers that submitted these reports and assessed for reaction description and causality. Measurements and Results: These 27 reports include 10 of aggressive activity occurring during sleep and seven of other sleep related harmful or potentially harmful activities, such as apparently deliberate self-harm, moving a child or a car, or lighting a stove or a cigarette. Assessment of these 17 reports of aggression or other actual or potential harm showed that nine patients recovered or were recovering on varenicline withdrawal and there were no consistent alternative explanations. Thirteen patients experienced single events, and two had multiple events. Frequency was not stated for the remaining two patients. Conclusions: The descriptions of the reports of aggression during sleep with violent dreaming are similar to those of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and also nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias in some adults. Patients who experience somnambulism or dreams of a violent nature while taking varenicline should be advised to consult their health providers. Consideration should be given to clarifying the term sleep disorders in varenicline product information and including sleep related harmful and potentially harmful events. Citation: Savage RL, Zekarias A, Caduff-Janosa P. Varenicline and abnormal sleep related events. SLEEP 2015

  12. CT of trauma to the abnormal kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Rhyner, P.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1984-04-01

    Traumatic injuries to already abnormal kidneys are difficult to assess by excretory urography and clinical evaluation. Bleeding and urinary extravasation may accompany minor trauma; conversely, underlying tumors, perirenal hemorrhage, and extravasation may be missed on urography. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in eight cases including three neoplasms, one adult polycystic disease, one simple renal cyst, two hydronephrotic kidneys, and one horseshoe kidney. CT provided specific and clinically useful information in each case that was not apparent on excretory urography.

  13. Computed tomography of the abnormal pericardium

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Harell, G.S.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-06-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 18 patients with documented pericardial disease are reported. The pericardium appears as a thin, curvilinear, 1- to 2-mm-thick density best seen anterior to the right ventricular part of the heart. Pericardial abnormalities detected by CT include effusions, thickening, calcification, and cystic and solid masses. Computed tomography is complimentary to echocardiography in its ability to more accurately characterize pericardial effusions, masses, and pericardial thickening.

  14. Binocular combination in abnormal binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M

    2013-02-08

    We investigated suprathreshold binocular combination in humans with abnormal binocular visual experience early in life. In the first experiment we presented the two eyes with equal but opposite phase shifted sine waves and measured the perceived phase of the cyclopean sine wave. Normal observers have balanced vision between the two eyes when the two eyes' images have equal contrast (i.e., both eyes contribute equally to the perceived image and perceived phase = 0°). However, in observers with strabismus and/or amblyopia, balanced vision requires a higher contrast image in the nondominant eye (NDE) than the dominant eye (DE). This asymmetry between the two eyes is larger than predicted from the contrast sensitivities or monocular perceived contrast of the two eyes and is dependent on contrast and spatial frequency: more asymmetric with higher contrast and/or spatial frequency. Our results also revealed a surprising NDE-to-DE enhancement in some of our abnormal observers. This enhancement is not evident in normal vision because it is normally masked by interocular suppression. However, in these abnormal observers the NDE-to-DE suppression was weak or absent. In the second experiment, we used the identical stimuli to measure the perceived contrast of a cyclopean grating by matching the binocular combined contrast to a standard contrast presented to the DE. These measures provide strong constraints for model fitting. We found asymmetric interocular interactions in binocular contrast perception, which was dependent on both contrast and spatial frequency in the same way as in phase perception. By introducing asymmetric parameters to the modified Ding-Sperling model including interocular contrast gain enhancement, we succeeded in accounting for both binocular combined phase and contrast simultaneously. Adding binocular contrast gain control to the modified Ding-Sperling model enabled us to predict the results of dichoptic and binocular contrast discrimination experiments

  15. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... at higher than normal pressures. What Is Blood Pressure? Click for more information Blood pressure is the ...

  16. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... reading; Measuring blood pressure; Hypertension - blood pressure measurement; High blood pressure - blood pressure measurement ... High blood pressure has no symptoms so you may not know if you have this problem. High blood pressure ...

  17. Sensory abnormalities in autism. A brief report.

    PubMed

    Klintwall, Lars; Holm, Anette; Eriksson, Mats; Carlsson, Lotta Höglund; Olsson, Martina Barnevik; Hedvall, Asa; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Sensory abnormalities were assessed in a population-based group of 208 20-54-month-old children, diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and referred to a specialized habilitation centre for early intervention. The children were subgrouped based upon degree of autistic symptoms and cognitive level by a research team at the centre. Parents were interviewed systematically about any abnormal sensory reactions in the child. In the whole group, pain and hearing were the most commonly affected modalities. Children in the most typical autism subgroup (nuclear autism with no learning disability) had the highest number of affected modalities. The children who were classified in an "autistic features" subgroup had the lowest number of affected modalities. There were no group differences in number of affected sensory modalities between groups of different cognitive levels or level of expressive speech. The findings provide support for the notion that sensory abnormality is very common in young children with autism. This symptom has been proposed for inclusion among the diagnostic criteria for ASD in the upcoming DSM-V.

  18. Abnormal parietal encephalomalacia associated with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fen; Wang, Jun-Yuan; Xu, Yi; Huang, Man-Li

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: It is widely believed that structural abnormalities of the brain contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The parietal lobe is a central hub of multisensory integration, and abnormities in this region might account for the clinical features of schizophrenia. However, few cases of parietal encephalomalacia associated with schizophrenia have been described. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: In this paper, we present a case of a 25-year-old schizophrenia patient with abnormal parietal encephalomalacia. The patient had poor nutrition and frequently had upper respiratory infections during childhood and adolescence. She showed severe schizophrenic symptoms such as visual hallucinations for 2 years. After examining all her possible medical conditions, we found that the patient had a lesion consistent with the diagnosis of encephalomalacia in her right parietal lobe and slight brain atrophy. Interventions: The patient was prescribed olanzapine (10 mg per day). Outcomes: Her symptoms significantly improved after antipsychotic treatment and were still well controlled 1 year later. Lessons: This case suggested that parietal encephalomalacia, which might be caused by inflammatory and infectious conditions in early life and be aggravated by undernutrition, might be implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia. PMID:28272261

  19. Abnormal hippocampal shape in offenders with psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Marina; Ganzola, Rossana; Rossi, Roberta; Sabattoli, Francesca; Laakso, Mikko P; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Vaurio, Olli; Könönen, Mervi; Aronen, Hannu J; Thompson, Paul M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Tiihonen, Jari

    2010-03-01

    Posterior hippocampal volumes correlate negatively with the severity of psychopathy, but local morphological features are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate hippocampal morphology in habitually violent offenders having psychopathy. Manual tracings of hippocampi from magnetic resonance images of 26 offenders (age: 32.5 +/- 8.4), with different degrees of psychopathy (12 high, 14 medium psychopathy based on the Psychopathy Checklist Revised), and 25 healthy controls (age: 34.6 +/- 10.8) were used for statistical modelling of local changes with a surface-based radial distance mapping method. Both offenders and controls had similar hippocampal volume and asymmetry ratios. Local analysis showed that the high psychopathy group had a significant depression along the longitudinal hippocampal axis, on both the dorsal and ventral aspects, when compared with the healthy controls and the medium psychopathy group. The opposite comparison revealed abnormal enlargement of the lateral borders in both the right and left hippocampi of both high and medium psychopathy groups versus controls, throughout CA1, CA2-3 and the subicular regions. These enlargement and reduction effects survived statistical correction for multiple comparisons in the main contrast (26 offenders vs. 25 controls) and in most subgroup comparisons. A statistical check excluded a possible confounding effect from amphetamine and polysubstance abuse. These results indicate that habitually violent offenders exhibit a specific abnormal hippocampal morphology, in the absence of total gray matter volume changes, that may relate to different autonomic modulation and abnormal fear-conditioning.

  20. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-06-03

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.