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Sample records for abnormal fragile histidine

  1. In silico analysis of fragile histidine triad involved in regression of carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Muhammad Asif; Tariq, Fatima; Afzal, Sara; Mannanv, Shazia

    2017-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCCa) is a primary malignancy of the liver. Many different proteins are involved in HCCa including insulin growth factor (IGF) II , signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) 3, STAT4, mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (SMAD 4), fragile histidine triad (FHIT) and selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) etc. The present study is based on the bioinformatics analysis of FHIT protein in order to understand the proteomics aspect and improvement of the diagnosis of the disease based on the protein. Different information related to protein were gathered from different databases, including National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene, Protein and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) databases, Uniprot database, String database and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. Moreover, the structure of the protein and evaluation of the quality of the structure were included from Easy modeler programme. Hence, this analysis not only helped to gather information related to the protein at one place, but also analysed the structure and quality of the protein to conclude that the protein has a role in carcinoma.

  2. Molecular Abnormalities Underlying Bone Fragility in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yoshiko; Kazama, Junichiro James

    2017-01-01

    Prevention of bone fractures is one goal of therapy for patients with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), as indicated by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. CKD patients, including those on hemodialysis, are at higher risk for fractures and fracture-related death compared to people with normal kidney function. However, few clinicians focus on this issue as it is very difficult to estimate bone fragility. Additionally, uremia-related bone fragility has a more complicated pathological process compared to osteoporosis. There are many uremia-associated factors that contribute to bone fragility, including severe secondary hyperparathyroidism, skeletal resistance to parathyroid hormone, and bone mineralization disorders. Uremia also aggravates bone volume loss, disarranges microarchitecture, and increases the deterioration of material properties of bone through abnormal bone cells or excess oxidative stress. In this review, we outline the prevalence of fractures, the interaction of CKD-MBD with osteoporosis in CKD patients, and discuss possible factors that exacerbate the mechanical properties of bone. PMID:28421193

  3. Early White-Matter Abnormalities of the Ventral Frontostriatal Pathway in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Brian W.; Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Lightbody, Amy A.; Patnaik, Swetapadma S.; Hoeft, Fumiko; Hazlett, Heather; Piven, Joseph; Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Fragile X syndrome is associated with cognitive deficits in inhibitory control and with abnormal neuronal morphology and development. Method: In this study, we used a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography approach to reconstruct white-matter fibers in the ventral frontostriatal pathway in young males with fragile X syndrome (n = 17;…

  4. Abnormal neural precursor cell regulation in the early postnatal Fragile X mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sourial, Mary; Doering, Laurie C

    2017-07-01

    The regulation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) is indispensable for a properly functioning brain. Abnormalities in NPC proliferation, differentiation, survival, or integration have been linked to various neurological diseases including Fragile X syndrome. Yet, no studies have examined NPCs from the early postnatal Fragile X mouse hippocampus despite the importance of this developmental time point, which marks the highest expression level of FMRP, the protein missing in Fragile X, in the rodent hippocampus and is when hippocampal NPCs have migrated to the dentate gyrus (DG) to give rise to lifelong neurogenesis. In this study, we examined NPCs from the early postnatal hippocampus and DG of Fragile X mice (Fmr1-KO). Immunocytochemistry on neurospheres showed increased Nestin expression and decreased Ki67 expression, which collectively indicated aberrant NPC biology. Intriguingly, flow cytometric analysis of the expression of the antigens CD15, CD24, CD133, GLAST, and PSA-NCAM showed a decreased proportion of neural stem cells (GLAST + CD15 + CD133 + ) and an increased proportion of neuroblasts (PSA-NCAM + CD15 + ) in the DG of P7 Fmr1-KO mice. This was mirrored by lower expression levels of Nestin and the mitotic marker phospho-histone H3 in vivo in the P9 hippocampus, as well as a decreased proportion of cells in the G 2 /M phases of the P7 DG. Thus, the absence of FMRP leads to fewer actively cycling NPCs, coinciding with a decrease in neural stem cells and an increase in neuroblasts. Together, these results show the importance of FMRP in the developing hippocampal formation and suggest abnormalities in cell cycle regulation in Fragile X. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Astrocytic Contributions to Synaptic and Learning Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Jennifer L; Yu, Xinzhu; Gilmore, Anthony; Bennett, Hannah; Tjia, Michelle; Perna, James F; Chen, Chia-Chien; Li, Xiang; Lu, Ju; Zuo, Yi

    2017-07-15

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common type of mental retardation attributable to a single-gene mutation. It is caused by FMR1 gene silencing and the consequent loss of its protein product, fragile X mental retardation protein. Fmr1 global knockout (KO) mice recapitulate many behavioral and synaptic phenotypes associated with FXS. Abundant evidence suggests that astrocytes are important contributors to neurological diseases. This study investigates astrocytic contributions to the progression of synaptic abnormalities and learning impairments associated with FXS. Taking advantage of the Cre-lox system, we generated and characterized mice in which fragile X mental retardation protein is selectively deleted or exclusively expressed in astrocytes. We performed in vivo two-photon imaging to track spine dynamics/morphology along dendrites of neurons in the motor cortex and examined associated behavioral defects. We found that adult astrocyte-specific Fmr1 KO mice displayed increased spine density in the motor cortex and impaired motor-skill learning. The learning defect coincided with a lack of enhanced spine dynamics in the motor cortex that normally occurs in response to motor skill acquisition. Although spine density was normal at 1 month of age in astrocyte-specific Fmr1 KO mice, new spines formed at an elevated rate. Furthermore, fragile X mental retardation protein expression in only astrocytes was insufficient to rescue most spine or behavioral defects. Our work suggests a joint astrocytic-neuronal contribution to FXS pathogenesis and reveals that heightened spine formation during adolescence precedes the overabundance of spines and behavioral defects found in adult Fmr1 KO mice. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D PATTERN OF BRAIN ABNORMALITIES IN FRAGILE X SYNDROME VISUALIZED USING TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Agatha D.; Leow, Alex D.; Lu, Allen; Reiss, Allan L.; Hall, Scott; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FraX), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder, results in impaired cognition with particular deficits in executive function and visuo-spatial skills. Here we report the first detailed 3D maps of the effects of the Fragile X mutation on brain structure, using tensor-based morphometry. TBM visualizes structural brain deficits automatically, without time-consuming specification of regions-of-interest. We compared 36 subjects with FraX (age: 14.66+/−1.58SD, 18 females/18 males), and 33 age-matched healthy controls (age: 14.67+/−2.2SD, 17 females/16 males), using high-dimensional elastic image registration. All 69 subjects' 3D T1-weighted brain MRIs were spatially deformed to match a high-resolution single-subject average MRI scan in ICBM space, whose geometry was optimized to produce a minimal deformation target. Maps of the local Jacobian determinant (expansion factor) were computed from the deformation fields. Statistical maps showed increased caudate (10% higher; p=0.001) and lateral ventricle volumes (19% higher; p=0.003), and trend-level parietal and temporal white matter excesses (10% higher locally; p=0.04). In affected females, volume abnormalities correlated with reduction in systemically measured levels of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP; Spearman's r<−0.5 locally). Decreased FMRP correlated with ventricular expansion (p=0.042; permutation test), and anterior cingulate tissue reductions (p=0.0026; permutation test) supporting theories that FMRP is required for normal dendritic pruning in fronto-striatal-limbic pathways. No sex differences were found; findings were confirmed using traditional volumetric measures in regions of interest. Deficit patterns were replicated using Lie group statistics optimized for tensor-valued data. Investigation of how these anomalies emerge over time will accelerate our understanding of FraX and its treatment. PMID:17161622

  7. Genetic manipulation of STEP reverses behavioral abnormalities in a fragile X syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Goebel-Goody, S M; Wilson-Wallis, E D; Royston, S; Tagliatela, S M; Naegele, J R; Lombroso, P J

    2012-07-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited form of intellectual disability and prevailing known genetic basis of autism, is caused by an expansion in the Fmr1 gene that prevents transcription and translation of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP binds to and controls translation of mRNAs downstream of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation. Recent work shows that FMRP interacts with the transcript encoding striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP; Ptpn5). STEP opposes synaptic strengthening and promotes synaptic weakening by dephosphorylating its substrates, including ERK1/2, p38, Fyn and Pyk2, and subunits of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and AMPA receptors. Here, we show that basal levels of STEP are elevated and mGluR-dependent STEP synthesis is absent in Fmr1(KO) mice. We hypothesized that the weakened synaptic strength and behavioral abnormalities reported in FXS may be linked to excess levels of STEP. To test this hypothesis, we reduced or eliminated STEP genetically in Fmr1(KO) mice and assessed mice in a battery of behavioral tests. In addition to attenuating audiogenic seizures and seizure-induced c-Fos activation in the periaqueductal gray, genetically reducing STEP in Fmr1(KO) mice reversed characteristic social abnormalities, including approach, investigation and anxiety. Loss of STEP also corrected select nonsocial anxiety-related behaviors in Fmr1(KO) mice, such as light-side exploration in the light/dark box. Our findings indicate that genetically reducing STEP significantly diminishes seizures and restores select social and nonsocial anxiety-related behaviors in Fmr1(KO) mice, suggesting that strategies to inhibit STEP activity may be effective for treating patients with FXS. © 2012 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  8. Abnormal intrinsic dynamics of dendritic spines in a fragile X syndrome mouse model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Akira; Takehara, Hiroaki; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Noguchi, Jun; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Shirai, Fukutoshi; Yagishita, Sho; Akagi, Takanori; Ichiki, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo

    2016-05-25

    Dendritic spine generation and elimination play an important role in learning and memory, the dynamics of which have been examined within the neocortex in vivo. Spine turnover has also been detected in the absence of specific learning tasks, and is frequently exaggerated in animal models of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study aimed to examine whether the baseline rate of spine turnover was activity-dependent. This was achieved using a microfluidic brain interface and open-dura surgery, with the goal of abolishing neuronal Ca(2+) signaling in the visual cortex of wild-type mice and rodent models of fragile X syndrome (Fmr1 knockout [KO]). In wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, the majority of baseline turnover was found to be activity-independent. Accordingly, the application of matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitors selectively restored the abnormal spine dynamics observed in Fmr1 KO mice, without affecting the intrinsic dynamics of spine turnover in wild-type mice. Such findings indicate that the baseline turnover of dendritic spines is mediated by activity-independent intrinsic dynamics. Furthermore, these results suggest that the targeting of abnormal intrinsic dynamics might pose a novel therapy for ASD.

  9. Granulosa cell and oocyte mitochondrial abnormalities in a mouse model of fragile X primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Conca Dioguardi, Carola; Uslu, Bahar; Haynes, Monique; Kurus, Meltem; Gul, Mehmet; Miao, De-Qiang; De Santis, Lucia; Ferrari, Maurizio; Bellone, Stefania; Santin, Alessandro; Giulivi, Cecilia; Hoffman, Gloria; Usdin, Karen; Johnson, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesized that the mitochondria of granulosa cells (GC) and/or oocytes might be abnormal in a mouse model of fragile X premutation (FXPM). Mice heterozygous and homozygous for the FXPM have increased death (atresia) of large ovarian follicles, fewer corpora lutea with a gene dosage effect manifesting in decreased litter size(s). Furthermore, granulosa cells (GC) and oocytes of FXPM mice have decreased mitochondrial content, structurally abnormal mitochondria, and reduced expression of critical mitochondrial genes. Because this mouse allele produces the mutant Fragile X mental retardation 1 (Fmr1) transcript and reduced levels of wild-type (WT) Fmr1 protein (FMRP), but does not produce a Repeat Associated Non-ATG Translation (RAN)-translation product, our data lend support to the idea that Fmr1 mRNA with large numbers of CGG-repeats is intrinsically deleterious in the ovary. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been detected in somatic cells of human and mouse FX PM carriers and mitochondria are essential for oogenesis and ovarian follicle development, FX-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) is seen in women with FXPM alleles. These alleles have 55-200 CGG repeats in the 5' UTR of an X-linked gene known as FMR1. The molecular basis of the pathology seen in this disorder is unclear but is thought to involve either some deleterious consequence of overexpression of RNA with long CGG-repeat tracts or of the generation of a repeat-associated non-AUG translation (RAN translation) product that is toxic. Analysis of ovarian function in a knock-in FXPM mouse model carrying 130 CGG repeats was performed as follows on WT, PM/+, and PM/PM genotypes. Histomorphometric assessment of follicle and corpora lutea numbers in ovaries from 8-month-old mice was executed, along with litter size analysis. Mitochondrial DNA copy number was quantified in oocytes and GC using quantitative PCR, and cumulus granulosa mitochondrial content was measured by flow cytometric analysis

  10. Hippocampal neuronal subtypes develop abnormal dendritic arbors in the presence of Fragile X astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S; Cheng, C; Doering, L C

    2016-06-02

    Astrocytes are now recognized as key players in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome. However, the nature of Fragile X astrocyte-mediated control of dendrite development in subtypes of hippocampal neurons is not yet known. We used a co-culture procedure in which wildtype primary hippocampal neurons were cultured with astrocytes from either a wildtype or Fragile X mouse, for either 7, 14 or 21 days. The neurons were processed for immunocytochemistry with the dendritic marker MAP2, classified by morphological criteria into one of five neuronal subtypes, and subjected to Sholl analyses. Both linear and semi-log methods of Sholl analyses were applied to the neurons in order to provide an in depth analysis of the dendritic arborizations. We found that Fragile X astrocytes affect the development of dendritic arborization of all subtypes of wildtype hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we show that hippocampal neurons with spiny stellate neuron morphology exhibit the most pervasive developmental delays, with significant dendritic arbor alterations persisting at 21 days in culture. The results further dictate the critical role astrocytes play in governing neuronal morphology including altered dendrite development in Fragile X. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Fragile X syndrome and white matter abnormalities: Case study of two brothers].

    PubMed

    Wallach, E; Bieth, E; Sevely, A; Cances, C

    2017-03-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most usual cause of hereditary intellectual deficiency. Typical symptoms combine intellectual deficiency, social anxiety, intense emotional vigilance, and a characteristic facial dysmorphy. This is subsequent to a complete mutation of the FMR1 gene, considering a semidominant transmission linked to the unstable X. The expansion of the CGG triplet greater than 200 units combined with a high methylation pattern lead to a transcriptional silence of the FMR1 gene, and the protein product, the FMRP, is not synthesized. This protein is involved in synaptic plasticity. Brain MRI can show an increased volume of the caudate nucleus and hippocampus, combined with hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. Fragile X Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS) syndrome is a neurodegenerative disorder occurring in carriers of the premutation in FMR1. Brain MRI shows an increased T2 signal in the middle cerebellar peduncles. This syndrome is linked to a premutation in the FMR1 gene. We report here the case of two brothers presenting a typical fragile X symptomatology. Brain MRI showed hyperintensities of the middle cerebellar peduncles. Such MRI findings support the assumption of a genetic mosaicism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Abnormal presynaptic short-term plasticity and information processing in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Sojka, David; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2011-07-27

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability and the leading genetic cause of autism. It is associated with the lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a regulator of protein synthesis in axons and dendrites. Studies on FXS have extensively focused on the postsynaptic changes underlying dysfunctions in long-term plasticity. In contrast, the presynaptic mechanisms of FXS have garnered relatively little attention and are poorly understood. Activity-dependent presynaptic processes give rise to several forms of short-term plasticity (STP), which is believed to control some of essential neural functions, including information processing, working memory, and decision making. The extent of STP defects and their contributions to the pathophysiology of FXS remain essentially unknown, however. Here we report marked presynaptic abnormalities at excitatory hippocampal synapses in Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mice leading to defects in STP and information processing. Loss of FMRP led to enhanced responses to high-frequency stimulation. Fmr1 KO mice also exhibited abnormal synaptic processing of natural stimulus trains, specifically excessive enhancement during the high-frequency spike discharges associated with hippocampal place fields. Analysis of individual STP components revealed strongly increased augmentation and reduced short-term depression attributable to loss of FMRP. These changes were associated with exaggerated calcium influx in presynaptic neurons during high-frequency stimulation, enhanced synaptic vesicle recycling, and enlarged readily-releasable and reserved vesicle pools. These data suggest that loss of FMRP causes abnormal STP and information processing, which may represent a novel mechanism contributing to cognitive impairments in FXS.

  13. Fragile X-like behaviors and abnormal cortical dendritic spines in cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 2-mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Kihoon; Chen, Hogmei; Gennarino, Vincenzo A; Richman, Ronald; Lu, Hui-Chen; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-04-01

    Silencing of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene and loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) cause fragile X syndrome (FXS), a genetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability and autistic behaviors. FMRP is an mRNA-binding protein regulating neuronal translation of target mRNAs. Abnormalities in actin-rich dendritic spines are major neuronal features in FXS, but the molecular mechanism and identity of FMRP targets mediating this phenotype remain largely unknown. Cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 2 (Cyfip2) was identified as an interactor of FMRP, and its mRNA is a highly ranked FMRP target in mouse brain. Importantly, Cyfip2 is a component of WAVE regulatory complex, a key regulator of actin cytoskeleton, suggesting that Cyfip2 could be implicated in the dendritic spine phenotype of FXS. Here, we generated and characterized Cyfip2-mutant (Cyfip2(+/-)) mice. We found that Cyfip2(+/-) mice exhibited behavioral phenotypes similar to Fmr1-null (Fmr1(-/y)) mice, an animal model of FXS. Synaptic plasticity and dendritic spines were normal in Cyfip2(+/-) hippocampus. However, dendritic spines were altered in Cyfip2(+/-) cortex, and the dendritic spine phenotype of Fmr1(-/y) cortex was aggravated in Fmr1(-/y); Cyfip2(+/-) double-mutant mice. In addition to the spine changes at basal state, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-induced dendritic spine regulation was impaired in both Fmr1(-/y) and Cyfip2(+/-) cortical neurons. Mechanistically, mGluR activation induced mRNA translation-dependent increase of Cyfip2 in wild-type cortical neurons, but not in Fmr1(-/y) or Cyfip2(+/-) neurons. These results suggest that misregulation of Cyfip2 function and its mGluR-induced expression contribute to the neurobehavioral phenotypes of FXS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Hyperactive locomotion in a Drosophila model is a functional readout for the synaptic abnormalities underlying fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Risa; Redmond, Patrick L; Ghatpande, Prajakta; Roy, Sougata; Kornberg, Thomas B; Hanke, Thomas; Knapp, Stefan; Lagna, Giorgio; Hata, Akiko

    2017-05-02

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common cause of heritable intellectual disability and autism and affects ~1 in 4000 males and 1 in 8000 females. The discovery of effective treatments for FXS has been hampered by the lack of effective animal models and phenotypic readouts for drug screening. FXS ensues from the epigenetic silencing or loss-of-function mutation of the fragile X mental retardation 1 ( FMR1 ) gene, which encodes an RNA binding protein that associates with and represses the translation of target mRNAs. We previously found that the activation of LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1) downstream of augmented synthesis of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type 2 receptor (BMPR2) promotes aberrant synaptic development in mouse and Drosophila models of FXS and that these molecular and cellular markers were correlated in patients with FXS. We report that larval locomotion is augmented in a Drosophila FXS model. Genetic or pharmacological intervention on the BMPR2-LIMK pathway ameliorated the synaptic abnormality and locomotion phenotypes of FXS larvae, as well as hyperactivity in an FXS mouse model. Our study demonstrates that (i) the BMPR2-LIMK pathway is a promising therapeutic target for FXS and (ii) the locomotion phenotype of FXS larvae is a quantitative functional readout for the neuromorphological phenotype associated with FXS and is amenable to the screening novel FXS therapeutics. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Abnormal trajectories in cerebellum and brainstem volumes in carriers of the fragile X premutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun Yi; Hessl, David; Hagerman, Randi J; Simon, Tony J; Tassone, Flora; Ferrer, Emilio; Rivera, Susan M

    2017-07-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder typically affecting male premutation carriers with 55-200 CGG trinucleotide repeat expansions in the FMR1 gene after age 50. The aim of this study was to examine whether cerebellar and brainstem changes emerge during development or aging in late life. We retrospectively analyzed magnetic resonance imaging scans from 322 males (age 8-81 years). Volume changes in the cerebellum and brainstem were contrasted with those in the ventricles and whole brain. Compared to the controls, premutation carriers without FXTAS showed significantly accelerated volume decrease in the cerebellum and whole brain, flatter inverted U-shaped trajectory of the brainstem, and larger ventricles. Compared to both older controls and premutation carriers without FXTAS, carriers with FXTAS exhibited significant volume decrease in the cerebellum and whole brain and accelerated volume decrease in the brainstem. We therefore conclude that cerebellar and brainstem volumes were likely affected during both development and progression of neurodegeneration in premutation carriers, suggesting that interventions may need to start early in adulthood to be most effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gastrointestinal motility and sensory abnormalities may contribute to food refusal in medically fragile toddlers.

    PubMed

    Zangen, Tsili; Ciarla, Carla; Zangen, Samuel; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Flores, Alex F; Cocjin, Jose; Reddy, Sarabudla Narasimha; Rowhani, Anita; Schwankovsky, Lenore; Hyman, Paul E

    2003-09-01

    In chronically ill children who refuse to eat, surgery to correct anatomic problems and behavioral treatments to overcome oral aversion often succeed. A few patients fail with standard treatments. The aims of the study were to: 1) investigate motility and gastric sensory abnormalities and 2) describe treatment that was individualized based on pathophysiology in children who failed surgery and behavioral treatments. We studied 14 patients (age 1.5-6; mean 2.5; M/F: 7/7). All had a lifelong history of food aversion and retching or vomiting persisting after feeding therapy and fundoplication. All were fed through gastrostomy or gastro-jejunostomy tubes. We studied esophageal and antroduodenal manometry, and gastric volume threshold for retching. We identified when gastric antral contractions were associated with retching and pain. A multidisciplinary treatment program included a variable combination of continuous post-pyloric feedings, drugs to decrease visceral pain, drugs for motility disorders, and behavioral, cognitive, and family therapy. We interviewed parents 2-6 months following testing to evaluate symptoms, mode of feeding and emotional health. We found a motility disorder alone in 2, decreased threshold for retching alone in 5 and both motility and sensory abnormalities in 7. After treatment, 6 of 14 (43%) began eating orally and 80% had improved emotional health. Retching decreased from 15 episodes per day to an average of 1.4 per day (p <0.01). Upper gastrointestinal motor and/or sensory disorders contributed to reduced quality of life for a majority of children and families with persistent feeding problems. A multidisciplinary approach improved symptoms and problems in these children

  17. Early social enrichment rescues adult behavioral and brain abnormalities in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oddi, Diego; Subashi, Enejda; Middei, Silvia; Bellocchio, Luigi; Lemaire-Mayo, Valerie; Guzmán, Manuel; Crusio, Wim E; D'Amato, Francesca R; Pietropaolo, Susanna

    2015-03-13

    Converging lines of evidence support the use of environmental stimulation to ameliorate the symptoms of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. Applying these interventions at very early ages is critical to achieve a marked reduction of the pathological phenotypes. Here we evaluated the impact of early social enrichment in Fmr1-KO mice, a genetic mouse model of fragile X syndrome (FXS), a major developmental disorder and the most frequent monogenic cause of autism. Enrichment was achieved by providing male KO pups and their WT littermates with enhanced social stimulation, housing them from birth until weaning with the mother and an additional nonlactating female. At adulthood they were tested for locomotor, social, and cognitive abilities; furthermore, dendritic alterations were assessed in the hippocampus and amygdala, two brain regions known to be involved in the control of the examined behaviors and affected by spine pathology in Fmr1-KOs. Enrichment rescued the behavioral FXS-like deficits displayed in adulthood by Fmr1-KO mice, that is, hyperactivity, reduced social interactions, and cognitive deficits. Early social enrichment also eliminated the abnormalities shown by adult KO mice in the morphology of hippocampal and amygdala dendritic spines, namely an enhanced density of immature vs mature types. Importantly, enrichment did not induce neurobehavioral changes in WT mice, thus supporting specific effects on FXS-like pathology. These findings show that early environmental stimulation has profound and long-term beneficial effects on the pathological FXS phenotype, thereby encouraging the use of nonpharmacological interventions for the treatment of this and perhaps other neurodevelopmental diseases.

  18. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Cabello, Elena; Garcia-Guirado, Francisco; Calvo-Medina, Rocio; el Bekay, Rajaa; Perez-Costillas, Lucia; Quintero-Navarro, Carolina; Sanchez-Salido, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome. PMID:26788253

  19. Disrupted Homer scaffolds mediate abnormal mGluR5 function in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ronesi, Jennifer A; Collins, Katie A; Hays, Seth A; Tsai, Nien-Pei; Guo, Weirui; Birnbaum, Shari G; Hu, Jia-Hua; Worley, Paul F; Gibson, Jay R; Huber, Kimberly M

    2012-01-22

    Enhanced metabotropic glutamate receptor subunit 5 (mGluR5) function is causally associated with the pathophysiology of fragile X syndrome, a leading inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism. Here we provide evidence that altered mGluR5-Homer scaffolds contribute to mGluR5 dysfunction and phenotypes in the fragile X syndrome mouse model, Fmr1 knockout (Fmr1(-/y)). In Fmr1(-/y) mice, mGluR5 was less associated with long Homer isoforms but more associated with the short Homer1a. Genetic deletion of Homer1a restored mGluR5-long Homer scaffolds and corrected several phenotypes in Fmr1(-/y) mice, including altered mGluR5 signaling, neocortical circuit dysfunction and behavior. Acute, peptide-mediated disruption of mGluR5-Homer scaffolds in wild-type mice mimicked many Fmr1(-/y) phenotypes. In contrast, Homer1a deletion did not rescue altered mGluR-dependent long-term synaptic depression or translational control of target mRNAs of fragile X mental retardation protein, the gene product of Fmr1. Our findings reveal new functions for mGluR5-Homer interactions in the brain and delineate distinct mechanisms of mGluR5 dysfunction in a mouse model of cognitive dysfunction and autism.

  20. Excessive Astrocyte-Derived Neurotrophin-3 Contributes to the Abnormal Neuronal Dendritic Development in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan-yan; Liu, Shui-bing; Wu, Yu-mei; Li, Xiao-qiang; Zhao, Ming-gao

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a form of inherited mental retardation in humans that results from expansion of a CGG repeat in the Fmr1 gene. Recent studies suggest a role of astrocytes in neuronal development. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation process of astrocytes from FXS remain unclear. In this study, we found that astrocytes derived from a Fragile X model, the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse which lacks FMRP expression, inhibited the proper elaboration of dendritic processes of neurons in vitro. Furthermore, astrocytic conditioned medium (ACM) from KO astrocytes inhibited proper dendritic growth of both wild-type (WT) and KO neurons. Inducing expression of FMRP by transfection of FMRP vectors in KO astrocytes restored dendritic morphology and levels of synaptic proteins. Further experiments revealed elevated levels of the neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in KO ACM and the prefrontal cortex of Fmr1 KO mice. However, the levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) were normal. FMRP has multiple RNA–binding motifs and is involved in translational regulation. RNA–binding protein immunoprecipitation (RIP) showed the NT-3 mRNA interacted with FMRP in WT astrocytes. Addition of high concentrations of exogenous NT-3 to culture medium reduced the dendrites of neurons and synaptic protein levels, whereas these measures were ameliorated by neutralizing antibody to NT-3 or knockdown of NT-3 expression in KO astrocytes through short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Prefrontal cortex microinjection of WT astrocytes or NT-3 shRNA infected KO astrocytes rescued the deficit of trace fear memory in KO mice, concomitantly decreased the NT-3 levels in the prefrontal cortex. This study indicates that excessive NT-3 from astrocytes contributes to the abnormal neuronal dendritic development and that astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target for FXS. PMID:23300470

  1. White matter microstructural abnormalities in girls with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Fragile X or Turner syndrome as evidenced by diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Villalon, Julio; Jahanshad, Neda; Beaton, Elliott; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Children with chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS), Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), or Turner Syndrome (TS) are considered to belong to distinct genetic groups, as each disorder is caused by separate genetic alterations. Even so, they have similar cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions, particularly in visuospatial and numerical abilities. To assess evidence for common underlying neural microstructural alterations, we set out to determine whether these groups have partially overlapping white matter abnormalities, relative to typically developing controls. We scanned 101 female children between 7 and 14 years old: 25 with 22q11.2DS, 18 with FXS, 17 with TS, and 41 aged-matched controls using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Anisotropy and diffusivity measures were calculated and all brain scans were nonlinearly aligned to population and site-specific templates. We performed voxel-based statistical comparisons of the DTI-derived metrics between each disease group and the controls, while adjusting for age. Girls with 22q11.2DS showed lower fractional anisotropy (FA) than controls in the association fibers of the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, the splenium of the corpus callosum, and the corticospinal tract. FA was abnormally lower in girls with FXS in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule, posterior thalami, and precentral gyrus. Girls with TS had lower FA in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right internal capsule and left cerebellar peduncle. Partially overlapping neurodevelopmental anomalies were detected in all three neurogenetic disorders. Altered white matter integrity in the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi and thalamic to frontal tracts may contribute to the behavioral characteristics of all of these disorders. PMID:23602925

  2. Reversing the Effects of Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogren, Marilee P.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    A research on how synaptic plasticity is abnormally regulated in fragile X syndrome and how this abnormality can be reversed by therapeutic interventions is presented. Fragile X syndrome is a disorder of synaptic plasticity that contributes to abnormal development and interferes with normal learning and memory.

  3. Visualizing autophosphorylation in histidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the most widespread regulatory mechanism in signal transduction. Autophosphorylation in a dimeric sensor histidine kinase is the first step in two-component signalling, the predominant signal-transduction device in bacteria. Despite being the most abundant sensor kinases in nature, the molecular bases of the histidine kinase autophosphorylation mechanism are still unknown. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that autophosphorylation can occur in two directions, cis (intrasubunit) or trans (intersubunit) within the dimeric histidine kinase. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete catalytic machinery of a chimeric histidine kinase. The structure shows an asymmetric histidine kinase dimer where one subunit is caught performing the autophosphorylation reaction. A structure-guided functional analysis on HK853 and EnvZ, two prototypical cis- and trans-phosphorylating histidine kinases, has allowed us to decipher the catalytic mechanism of histidine kinase autophosphorylation, which seems to be common independently of the reaction directionality.

  4. Fragile X spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Reymundo; Rosero, Carolina Alba; Hagerman, Randi J

    2014-01-01

    Summary The fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1), which codes for the fragile X mental retardation 1 protein (FMRP), is located at Xp27.3. The normal allele of the FMR1 gene typically has 5 to 40 CGG repeats in the 5′ untranslated region; abnormal alleles of dynamic mutations include the full mutation (> 200 CGG repeats), premutation (55–200 CGG repeats) and the gray zone mutation (45–54 CGG repeats). Premutation carriers are common in the general population with approximately 1 in 130–250 females and 1 in 250–810 males, whereas the full mutation and Fragile X syndrome (FXS) occur in approximately 1 in 4000 to 1 in 7000. FMR1 mutations account for a variety of phenotypes including the most common monogenetic cause of inherited intellectual disability (ID) and autism (FXS), the most common genetic form of ovarian failure, the fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI, premutation); and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS, premutation). The premutation can also cause developmental problems including ASD and ADHD especially in boys and psychopathology including anxiety and depression in children and adults. Some premutation carriers can have a deficit of FMRP and some unmethylated full mutation individuals can have elevated FMR1 mRNA that is considered a premutation problem. Therefore the term “Fragile X Spectrum Disorder” (FXSD) should be used to include the wide range of overlapping phenotypes observed in affected individuals with FMR1 mutations. In this review we focus on the phenotypes and genotypes of children with FXSD. PMID:25606363

  5. Fragile X spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Reymundo; Rosero, Carolina Alba; Hagerman, Randi J

    2014-11-01

    The fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1), which codes for the fragile X mental retardation 1 protein (FMRP), is located at Xp27.3. The normal allele of the FMR1 gene typically has 5 to 40 CGG repeats in the 5' untranslated region; abnormal alleles of dynamic mutations include the full mutation (> 200 CGG repeats), premutation (55-200 CGG repeats) and the gray zone mutation (45-54 CGG repeats). Premutation carriers are common in the general population with approximately 1 in 130-250 females and 1 in 250-810 males, whereas the full mutation and Fragile X syndrome (FXS) occur in approximately 1 in 4000 to 1 in 7000. FMR1 mutations account for a variety of phenotypes including the most common monogenetic cause of inherited intellectual disability (ID) and autism (FXS), the most common genetic form of ovarian failure, the fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI, premutation); and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS, premutation). The premutation can also cause developmental problems including ASD and ADHD especially in boys and psychopathology including anxiety and depression in children and adults. Some premutation carriers can have a deficit of FMRP and some unmethylated full mutation individuals can have elevated FMR1 mRNA that is considered a premutation problem. Therefore the term "Fragile X Spectrum Disorder" (FXSD) should be used to include the wide range of overlapping phenotypes observed in affected individuals with FMR1 mutations. In this review we focus on the phenotypes and genotypes of children with FXSD.

  6. Osmotic fragility test

    MedlinePlus

    Spherocytosis - osmotic fragility; Thalassemia - osmotic fragility ... done to detect conditions called hereditary spherocytosis and thalassemia . Hereditary spherocytosis makes red blood cells more fragile ...

  7. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the brominemore » form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are

  8. Prebiotic synthesis of histidine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C.; Yang, L.; Miller, S. L.; Oro, J.

    1990-01-01

    The prebiotic formation of histidine (His) has been accomplished experimentally by the reaction of erythrose with formamidine followed by a Strecker synthesis. In the first step of this reaction sequence, the formation of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde took place by the condensation of erythrose and formamidine, two compounds that are known to be formed under prebiotic conditions. In a second step, the imidazole-4-acetaldehyde was converted to His, without isolation of the reaction products by adding HCN and ammonia to the reaction mixture. LC, HPLC, thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify the product, which was obtained in a yield of 3.5% based on the ratio of His/erythrose. This is a new chemical synthesis of one of the basic amino acids which had not been synthesized prebiotically until now.

  9. Disrupted mGluR5-Homer scaffolds mediate abnormal mGluR5 signaling, circuit function and behavior in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ronesi, Jennifer A.; Collins, Katie A.; Hays, Seth A.; Tsai, Nien-Pei; Guo, Weirui; Birnbaum, Shari G.; Hu, Jia-Hua; Worley, Paul F.; Gibson, Jay R.; Huber, Kimberly M.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced mGluR5 function is causally associated with the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), a leading inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism. Here we provide evidence that altered mGluR5-Homer scaffolds contribute to mGluR5 dysfunction and phenotypes in the FXS mouse model, Fmr1 KO. In Fmr1 KO mice mGluR5 is less associated with long Homer isoforms, but more associated with the short Homer1a. Genetic deletion of Homer1a restores mGluR5- long Homer scaffolds and corrects multiple phenotypes in Fmr1 KO mice including altered mGluR5 signaling, neocortical circuit dysfunction, and behavior. Acute, peptide-mediated disruption of mGluR5-Homer scaffolds in wildtype mice mimics many Fmr1 KO phenotypes. In contrast, Homer1a deletion does not rescue altered mGluR-dependent long-term synaptic depression or translational control of FMRP target mRNAs. Our findings reveal novel functions for mGluR5-Homer interactions in the brain and delineate distinct mechanisms of mGluR5 dysfunction in a mouse model of cognitive dysfunction and autism. PMID:22267161

  10. Fragile X Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited developmental disability. A problem with a specific gene causes ... the protein. This causes the symptoms of Fragile X. People with only a small change in the ...

  11. Side Effects of Minocycline Treatment in Patients with Fragile X Syndrome and Exploration of Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utari, Agustini; Chonchaiya, Weerasak; Rivera, Susan M.; Schneider, Andrea; Hagerman, Randi J.; Faradz, Sultana M. H.; Ethell, Iryna M.; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2010-01-01

    Minocycline can rescue the dendritic spine and synaptic structural abnormalities in the fragile X knock-out mouse. This is a review and preliminary survey to document side effects and potential outcome measures for minocycline use in the treatment of individuals with fragile X syndrome. We surveyed 50 patients with fragile X syndrome who received…

  12. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... free histidine (an amino acid) in plasma and urine. Histidine measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary histidinemia characterized by excess histidine in the blood and urine...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... free histidine (an amino acid) in plasma and urine. Histidine measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary histidinemia characterized by excess histidine in the blood and urine...

  14. Fragile X syndrome and fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Fragile X-associated disorders encompass several conditions, which are caused by expansion mutations in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited etiology of intellectual disability and results from a full mutation or >200 CGG repeats in FMR1. It is associated with developmental delay, autism spectrum disorder, and seizures. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in premutation carriers of 55-200 CGG repeats in FMR1 and is characterized by kinetic tremor, gait ataxia, parkinsonism, executive dysfunction, and neuropathy. Fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency also occurs in premutation carrier women and manifests with infertility and early menopause. The diseases constituting fragile X-associated disorders differ mechanistically, due to the distinct molecular properties of premutation versus full mutations. Fragile X syndrome occurs when there is a lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) due to FMR1 methylation and silencing. In fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome, a toxic gain of function is postulated with the production of excess CGG repeat-containing FMR1 mRNA, abnormal translation of the repeat sequence leading to production of polyglycine, polyalanine, and other polypeptides and to outright deficits in translation leading to reduced FMRP at larger premutation sizes. The changes in underlying brain chemistry due to FMR1 mutations have led to therapeutic studies in these disorders, with some progress being made in fragile X syndrome. This paper also summarizes indications for testing, genetic counseling issues, and what the future holds for these disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chiral recognition of proteins having L-histidine residues on the surface with lanthanide ion complex incorporated-molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Lokman; Uzek, Recep; Senel, Serap; Say, Ridvan; Denizli, Adil

    2013-08-01

    In this study, lanthanide ion complex incorporated molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles were synthesized. A combination of three novel approaches was applied for the purpose. First, lanthanide ions [Terbium(III)] were complexed with N-methacryloyl-L-histidine (MAH), polymerizable derivative of L-histidine amino acid, in order to incorporate the complex directly into the polymeric backbone. At the second stage, L-histidine molecules imprinted nanoparticles were utilized instead of whole protein imprinting in order to avoid whole drawbacks such as fragility, complexity, denaturation tendency, and conformation dependency. At the third stage following the first two steps mentioned above, imprinted L-histidine was coordinated with cupric ions [Cu(II)] to conduct the study under mild conditions. Then, molecularly imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles synthesized were used for L-histidine adsorption from aqueous solution to optimize conditions for adsorption and fluorimetric detection. Finally, usability of nanoparticles was investigated for chiral biorecognition using stereoisomer, D-histidine, racemic mixture, D,L-histidine, proteins with surface L-histidine residue, lysozyme, cytochrome C, or without ribonuclease A. The results revealed that the proposed polymerization strategy could make significant contribution to the solution of chronic problems of fluorescent component introduction into polymers. Additionally, the fluorescent nanoparticles reported here could be used for selective separation and fluorescent monitoring purposes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. BDNF in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Castrén, Maija L; Castrén, Eero

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a monogenic disorder that is caused by the absence of FMR1 protein (FMRP). FXS serves as an excellent model disorder for studies investigating disturbed molecular mechanisms and synapse function underlying cognitive impairment, autism, and behavioral disturbance. Abnormalities in dendritic spines and synaptic transmission in the brain of FXS individuals and mouse models for FXS indicate perturbations in the development, maintenance, and plasticity of neuronal network connectivity. However, numerous alterations are found during the early development in FXS, including abnormal differentiation of neural progenitors and impaired migration of newly born neurons. Several aspects of FMRP function are modulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. Here, we review the evidence of the role for BDNF in the developing and adult FXS brain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'BDNF Regulation of Synaptic Structure, Function, and Plasticity'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarte, Andrea R.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current research on Fragile X Syndrome, and how that knowledge can be used to guide successful intervention. The genetic etiology of Fragile X is reviewed and the physical, cognitive, adaptive, behavioral, and emotional phenotypes of children with the disorder are described, highlighting the differences in…

  18. Auditory Brainstem Responses in Young Males with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Joanne; Hennon, Elizabeth A.; Anderson, Kathleen; Roush, Jackson; Gravel, Judith; Skinner, Martie; Misenheimer, Jan; Reitz, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited cause of mental retardation resulting in developmental delays in males. Atypical outer ear morphology is characteristic of FXS and may serve as a marker for abnormal auditory function. Despite this abnormality, studies of the hearing of young males with FXS are generally lacking. A few studies…

  19. Histidine in Continuum Electrostatics Protonation State Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Vernon; Stuchebruckhov, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    A modification to the standard continuum electrostatics approach to calculate protein pKas which allows for the decoupling of histidine tautomers within a two state model is presented. Histidine with four intrinsically coupled protonation states cannot be easily incorporated into a two state formalism because the interaction between the two protonatable sites of the imidazole ring is not purely electrostatic. The presented treatment, based on a single approximation of the interrelation between histidine’s charge states, allows for a natural separation of the two protonatable sites associated with the imidazole ring as well as the inclusion of all protonation states within the calculation. PMID:22072521

  20. The protein histidine phosphatase LHPP is a tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Hindupur, Sravanth K; Colombi, Marco; Fuhs, Stephen R; Matter, Matthias S; Guri, Yakir; Adam, Kevin; Cornu, Marion; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Betz, Charles; Liko, Dritan; Quagliata, Luca; Moes, Suzette; Jenoe, Paul; Terracciano, Luigi M; Heim, Markus H; Hunter, Tony; Hall, Michael N

    2018-03-29

    Histidine phosphorylation, the so-called hidden phosphoproteome, is a poorly characterized post-translational modification of proteins. Here we describe a role of histidine phosphorylation in tumorigenesis. Proteomic analysis of 12 tumours from an mTOR-driven hepatocellular carcinoma mouse model revealed that NME1 and NME2, the only known mammalian histidine kinases, were upregulated. Conversely, expression of the putative histidine phosphatase LHPP was downregulated specifically in the tumours. We demonstrate that LHPP is indeed a protein histidine phosphatase. Consistent with these observations, global histidine phosphorylation was significantly upregulated in the liver tumours. Sustained, hepatic expression of LHPP in the hepatocellular carcinoma mouse model reduced tumour burden and prevented the loss of liver function. Finally, in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, low expression of LHPP correlated with increased tumour severity and reduced overall survival. Thus, LHPP is a protein histidine phosphatase and tumour suppressor, suggesting that deregulated histidine phosphorylation is oncogenic.

  1. Incarceration in Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildeman, Christopher; Western, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s the U.S. imprisonment rate has increased roughly fivefold. As Christopher Wildeman and Bruce Western explain, the effects of this sea change in the imprisonment rate--commonly called mass imprisonment or the prison boom--have been concentrated among those most likely to form fragile families: poor and minority men with little…

  2. Package for fragile objects

    DOEpatents

    Burgeson, Duane A.

    1977-01-01

    A package for fragile objects such as radioactive fusion pellets of micron size shipped in mounted condition or unmounted condition with a frangible inner container which is supported in a second inner container which in turn is supported in a final outer container, the second inner container having recesses for supporting alternate design inner containers.

  3. Fragile X syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Martin-Bell syndrome; Marker X syndrome ... Fragile X syndrome is caused by a change in a gene called FMR1 . A small part of the gene ... repeated several times in one area of the X chromosome. The more repeats, the more likely the ...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... free histidine (an amino acid) in plasma and urine. Histidine measurements are used in the diagnosis... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Histidine test system. 862.1375 Section 862.1375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... free histidine (an amino acid) in plasma and urine. Histidine measurements are used in the diagnosis... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Histidine test system. 862.1375 Section 862.1375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...

  11. Effect of dietary electrolytes and histidine on histidine metabolism and acid-base balance in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiu, Y.N.; Austic, R.E.; Rumsey, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    1. Rainbow trout fingerlings were fed diets containing 1.2, 1.8 and 2.6% histidine and two mixtures of Na, K and Cl (Na + K - Cl = 0 or -200 meq/kgdiet) in a factorial design.2. Growth and efficiency of feed conversion were not affected by histidine in the diet when it contained the −200 meq/kg electrolyte mixture, but with the 0 meq/kg level, 2.6% histidine depressed both measures of response.3. Histidine increased plasma and muscle histidine levels, increased hepatic histidase activity, but did not affect hepatic histidine-pyruvate aminotransferase activity.4. Muscle-free histidine concentrations were markedly higher and lysine concentrations were lower in trout receiving 0 meq/kg than those receiving the −200 meq/kg electrolyte mixture.5. The electrolyte balance of the diet has a marked effect on the metabolism of histidine in trout.

  12. Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tassone, Flora; González-Teshima, Laura Yuriko; Forero-Forero, Jose Vicente; Ayala-Zapata, Sebastián; Hagerman, Randi

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disease due to a CGG trinucleotide expansion, named full mutation (greater than 200 CGG repeats), in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene locus Xq27.3; which leads to an hypermethylated region in the gene promoter therefore silencing it and lowering the expression levels of the fragile X mental retardation 1, a protein involved in synaptic plasticity and maturation. Individuals with FXS present with intellectual disability, autism, hyperactivity, long face, large or prominent ears and macroorchidism at puberty and thereafter. Most of the young children with FXS will present with language delay, sensory hyper arousal and anxiety. Girls are less affected than boys, only 25% have intellectual disability. Given the genomic features of the syndrome, there are patients with a number of triplet repeats between 55 and 200, known as premutation carriers. Most carriers have a normal IQ but some have developmental problems. The diagnosis of FXS has evolved from karyotype with special culture medium, to molecular techniques that are more sensitive and specific including PCR and Southern Blot. During the last decade, the advances in the knowledge of FXS, has led to the development of investigations on pharmaceutical management or targeted treatments for FXS. Minocycline and sertraline have shown efficacy in children. PMID:25767309

  13. Implicit Procedural Learning in Fragile X and Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussy, G.; Charrin, E.; Brun, A.; Curie, A.; des Portes, V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Procedural learning refers to rule-based motor skill learning and storage. It involves the cerebellum, striatum and motor areas of the frontal lobe network. Fragile X syndrome, which has been linked with anatomical abnormalities within the striatum, may result in implicit procedural learning deficit. Methods: To address this issue, a…

  14. Fragility Extraordinaire: Unsolved Mysteries of Chromosome Fragile Sites.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenyi; Chakraborty, Arijita

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome fragile sites are a fascinating cytogenetic phenomenon now widely implicated in a slew of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancer. Yet, the paths leading to these revelations were far from direct, and the number of fragile sites that have been molecularly cloned with known disease-associated genes remains modest. Moreover, as more fragile sites were being discovered, research interests in some of the earliest discovered fragile sites ebbed away, leaving a number of unsolved mysteries in chromosome biology. In this review we attempt to recount some of the early discoveries of fragile sites and highlight those phenomena that have eluded intense scrutiny but remain extremely relevant in our understanding of the mechanisms of chromosome fragility. We then survey the literature for disease association for a comprehensive list of fragile sites. We also review recent studies addressing the underlying cause of chromosome fragility while highlighting some ongoing debates. We report an observed enrichment for R-loop forming sequences in fragile site-associated genes than genomic average. Finally, we will leave the reader with some lingering questions to provoke discussion and inspire further scientific inquiries.

  15. Fragile X Syndrome and Targeted Treatment Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lauterborn, Julie; Au, Jacky; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Work in recent years has revealed an abundance of possible new treatment targets for fragile X syndrome (FXS). The use of animal models, including the fragile X knockout mouse which manifests a phenotype very similar to FXS in humans, has resulted in great strides in this direction of research. The lack of Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) in FXS causes dysregulation and usually overexpression of a number of its target genes, which can cause imbalances of neurotransmission and deficits in synaptic plasticity. The use of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) blockers and gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) agonists have been shown to be efficacious in reversing cellular and behavioral phenotypes, and restoring proper brain connectivity in the mouse and fly models. Proposed new pharmacological treatments and educational interventions are discussed in this chapter. In combination, these various targeted treatments show promising preliminary results in mitigating or even reversing the neurobiological abnormalities caused by loss of FMRP, with possible translational applications to other neurodevelopmental disorders including autism. PMID:22009360

  16. Fragile X syndrome and targeted treatment trials.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, Randi; Lauterborn, Julie; Au, Jacky; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Work in recent years has revealed an abundance of possible new treatment targets for fragile X syndrome (FXS). The use of animal models, including the fragile X knockout mouse which manifests a phenotype very similar to FXS in humans, has resulted in great strides in this direction of research. The lack of Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) in FXS causes dysregulation and usually overexpression of a number of its target genes, which can cause imbalances of neurotransmission and deficits in synaptic plasticity. The use of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) blockers and gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) agonists have been shown to be efficacious in reversing cellular and behavioral phenotypes, and restoring proper brain connectivity in the mouse and fly models. Proposed new pharmacological treatments and educational interventions are discussed in this chapter. In combination, these various targeted treatments show promising preliminary results in mitigating or even reversing the neurobiological abnormalities caused by loss of FMRP, with possible translational applications to other neurodevelopmental disorders including autism.

  17. Fragile x syndrome.

    PubMed

    McLennan, Yingratana; Polussa, Jonathan; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi

    2011-05-01

    Recent data from a national survey highlighted a significant difference in obesity rates in young fragile X males (31%) compared to age matched controls (18%). Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common cause of intellectual disability in males and the most common single gene cause of autism. This X-linked disorder is caused by an expansion of a trinucleotide CGG repeat (>200) on the promotor region of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1). As a result, the promotor region often becomes methylated which leads to a deficiency or absence of the FMR1 protein (FMRP). Common characteristics of FXS include mild to severe cognitive impairments in males but less severe cognitive impairment in females. Physical features of FXS include an elongated face, prominent ears, and post-pubertal macroorchidism. Severe obesity in full mutation males is often associated with the Prader-Willi phenotype (PWP) which includes hyperphagia, lack of satiation after meals, and hypogonadism or delayed puberty; however, there is no deletion at 15q11-q13 nor uniparental maternal disomy. Herein, we discuss the molecular mechanisms leading to FXS and the Prader-Willi phenotype with an emphasis on mouse FMR1 knockout studies that have shown the reversal of weight increase through mGluR antagonists. Finally, we review the current medications used in treatment of FXS including the atypical antipsychotics that can lead to weight gain and the research regarding the use of targeted treatments in FXS that will hopefully have a significantly beneficial effect on cognition and behavior without weight gain.

  18. Generation of a proton motive force by histidine decarboxylation and electrogenic histidine/histamine antiport in Lactobacillus buchneri.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, D; Bosscher, J S; ten Brink, B; Driessen, A J; Konings, W N

    1993-05-01

    Lactobacillus buchneri ST2A vigorously decarboxylates histidine to the biogenic amine histamine, which is excreted into the medium. Cells grown in the presence of histidine generate both a transmembrane pH gradient, inside alkaline, and an electrical potential (delta psi), inside negative, upon addition of histidine. Studies of the mechanism of histidine uptake and histamine excretion in membrane vesicles and proteoliposomes devoid of cytosolic histidine decarboxylase activity demonstrate that histidine uptake, histamine efflux, and histidine/histamine exchange are electrogenic processes. Histidine/histamine exchange is much faster than the unidirectional fluxes of these substrates, is inhibited by an inside-negative delta psi and is stimulated by an inside positive delta psi. These data suggest that the generation of metabolic energy from histidine decarboxylation results from an electrogenic histidine/histamine exchange and indirect proton extrusion due to the combined action of the decarboxylase and carrier-mediated exchange. The abundance of amino acid decarboxylation reactions among bacteria suggests that this mechanism of metabolic energy generation and/or pH regulation is widespread.

  19. Management of Medically Fragile Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueda, Dawn; Caulfield, Rick

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the role of the Child Life Specialist in helping to meet the special needs of medically fragile children. Argues that since many child care professionals may come into contact with medically fragile children at some point in their careers, it is important to examine child life as a specialization in the health care profession. (SD)

  20. The multiple roles of histidine in protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Among the 20 natural amino acids histidine is the most active and versatile member that plays the multiple roles in protein interactions, often the key residue in enzyme catalytic reactions. A theoretical and comprehensive study on the structural features and interaction properties of histidine is certainly helpful. Results Four interaction types of histidine are quantitatively calculated, including: (1) Cation-π interactions, in which the histidine acts as the aromatic π-motif in neutral form (His), or plays the cation role in protonated form (His+); (2) π-π stacking interactions between histidine and other aromatic amino acids; (3) Hydrogen-π interactions between histidine and other aromatic amino acids; (4) Coordinate interactions between histidine and metallic cations. The energies of π-π stacking interactions and hydrogen-π interactions are calculated using CCSD/6-31+G(d,p). The energies of cation-π interactions and coordinate interactions are calculated using B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method and adjusted by empirical method for dispersion energy. Conclusions The coordinate interactions between histidine and metallic cations are the strongest one acting in broad range, followed by the cation-π, hydrogen-π, and π-π stacking interactions. When the histidine is in neutral form, the cation-π interactions are attractive; when it is protonated (His+), the interactions turn to repulsive. The two protonation forms (and pKa values) of histidine are reversibly switched by the attractive and repulsive cation-π interactions. In proteins the π-π stacking interaction between neutral histidine and aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, Trp) are in the range from -3.0 to -4.0 kcal/mol, significantly larger than the van der Waals energies. PMID:23452343

  1. Characterization of ultrasonic vocalizations of Fragile X mice.

    PubMed

    Belagodu, Amogh P; Johnson, Aaron M; Galvez, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the leading form of inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by the transcriptional silencing of FMR1, the gene which codes for the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). Patients who have FXS exhibit numerous behavioral and cognitive impairments, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autistic-like behaviors. In addition to these behavioral abnormalities, FXS patients have also been shown to exhibit various deficits in communication such as abnormal sentence structures, increased utterances, repetition of sounds and words, and reduced articulation. These deficits can dramatically hinder communication for FXS patients, exacerbating learning and cognition impairments while decreasing their quality of life. To examine the biological underpinnings of these communication abnormalities, studies have used a mouse model of the Fragile X Syndrome; however, these vocalization studies have resulted in inconsistent findings that often do not correlate with abnormalities observed in FXS patients. Interestingly, a detailed examination of frequency modulated vocalizations that are believed to be a better assessment of rodent communication has never been conducted. The following study used courtship separation to conduct a detailed examination of frequency modulated ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) in FXS mice. Our analyses of frequency modulated USVs demonstrated that adult FXS mice exhibited longer phrases and more motifs. Phrases are vocalizations consisting of multiple frequency modulated ultrasonic vocalizations, while motifs are repeated frequency modulated USV patterns. Fragile X mice had a higher proportion of "u" syllables in all USVs and phrases while their wildtype counterparts preferred isolated "h" syllables. Although the specific importance of these syllables towards communication deficits still needs to be evaluated, these findings in production of USVs are consistent with the

  2. Biological functions of histidine-dipeptides and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Song, Byeng Chun; Joo, Nam-Seok; Aldini, Giancarlo; Yeum, Kyung-Jin

    2014-02-01

    The rapid increase in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, which is associated with a state of elevated systemic oxidative stress and inflammation, is expected to cause future increases in the prevalence of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sugars produces reactive carbonyl species, which, due to their electrophilic nature, react with the nucleophilic sites of certain amino acids. This leads to formation of protein adducts such as advanced glycoxidation/lipoxidation end products (AGEs/ALEs), resulting in cellular dysfunction. Therefore, an effective reactive carbonyl species and AGEs/ALEs sequestering agent may be able to prevent such cellular dysfunction. There is accumulating evidence that histidine containing dipeptides such as carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) and anserine (β-alanyl-methyl-L-histidine) detoxify cytotoxic reactive carbonyls by forming unreactive adducts and are able to reverse glycated protein. In this review, 1) reaction mechanism of oxidative stress and certain chronic diseases, 2) interrelation between oxidative stress and inflammation, 3) effective reactive carbonyl species and AGEs/ALEs sequestering actions of histidine-dipeptides and their metabolism, 4) effects of carnosinase encoding gene on the effectiveness of histidine-dipeptides, and 5) protective effects of histidine-dipeptides against progression of metabolic syndrome are discussed. Overall, this review highlights the potential beneficial effects of histidine-dipeptides against metabolic syndrome. Randomized controlled human studies may provide essential information regarding whether histidine-dipeptides attenuate metabolic syndrome in humans.

  3. Flooding Fragility Experiments and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis L.; Tahhan, Antonio; Muchmore, Cody

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the work that has been performed on flooding fragility, both the experimental tests being carried out and the probabilistic fragility predictive models being produced in order to use the text results. Flooding experiments involving full-scale doors have commenced in the Portal Evaluation Tank. The goal of these experiments is to develop a full-scale component flooding experiment protocol and to acquire data that can be used to create Bayesian regression models representing the fragility of these components. This work is in support of the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway external hazards evaluation research and development.

  4. A Fragile Line

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, Stuart

    1972-01-01

    The brutal murders carried out by Charles Manson and his 'family' seemed bizarre and abnormal in the extreme. But was Manson so uniquely evil or did his environment just happen to provide opportunities where a philosophy of violence could flourish unchecked? PMID:27671265

  5. Incarceration in fragile families.

    PubMed

    Wildeman, Christopher; Western, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s the U.S. imprisonment rate has increased roughly fivefold. As Christopher Wildeman and Bruce Western explain, the effects of this sea change in the imprisonment rate--commonly called mass imprisonment or the prison boom--have been concentrated among those most likely to form fragile families: poor and minority men with little schooling. Imprisonment diminishes the earnings of adult men, compromises their health, reduces familial resources, and contributes to family breakup. It also adds to the deficits of poor children, thus ensuring that the effects of imprisonment on inequality are transferred intergenerationally. Perversely, incarceration has its most corrosive effects on families whose fathers were involved in neither domestic violence nor violent crime before being imprisoned. Because having a parent go to prison is now so common for poor, minority children and so negatively affects them, the authors argue that mass imprisonment may increase future racial and class inequality--and may even lead to more crime in the long-term, thereby undoing any benefits of the prison boom. U.S. crime policy has thus, in the name of public safety, produced more vulnerable families and reduced the life chances of their children. Wildeman and Western advocate several policy reforms, such as limiting prison time for drug offenders and for parolees who violate the technical conditions of their parole, reconsidering sentence enhancements for repeat offenders, and expanding supports for prisoners and ex-prisoners. But Wildeman and Western argue that criminal justice reform alone will not solve the problems of school failure, joblessness, untreated addiction, and mental illness that pave the way to prison. In fact, focusing solely on criminal justice reforms would repeat the mistakes the nation made during the prison boom: trying to solve deep social problems with criminal justice policies. Addressing those broad problems, they say, requires a greater social

  6. Learning about Fragile X Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical problems that have been seen include eye, orthopedic, heart and skin problems. Girls who have the ... to their sons. Top of page NHGRI Clinical Research on Fragile X Syndrome Currently, NHGRI is not ...

  7. Shocks in fragile matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Non-linear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they unjam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit vanishing elastic moduli and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are continuously compressed, and demonstrate that the resulting excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than linear waves. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and compression speed by a surprisingly simple analytical model. We also treat shear shocks within a simplified viscoelastic model of nearly-isostatic random networks comprised of harmonic springs. In this case, anharmonicity does not originate locally from nonlinear interactions between particles, as in granular media; instead, it emerges from the global architecture of the network. As a result, the diverging width of the shear shocks bears a nonlinear signature of the diverging isostatic length associated with the loss of rigidity in these floppy networks.

  8. Three Faces of Fragile X.

    PubMed

    Lieb-Lundell, Cornelia C E

    2016-11-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the first of 3 syndromes identified as a health condition related to fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene dysfunction. The other 2 syndromes are fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency syndrome (FXPOI) and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), which together are referred to as fragile X-associated disorders (FXDs). Collectively, this group comprises the 3 faces of fragile X. Even though the 3 conditions share a common genetic defect, each one is a separate health condition that results in a variety of body function impairments such as motor delay, musculoskeletal issues related to low muscle tone, coordination limitations, ataxia, tremor, undefined muscle aches and pains, and, for FXTAS, a late-onset neurodegeneration. Although each FXD condition may benefit from physical therapy intervention, available evidence as to the efficacy of intervention appropriate to FXDs is lacking. This perspective article will discuss the genetic basis of FMR1 gene dysfunction and describe health conditions related to this mutation, which have a range of expressions within a family. Physical therapy concerns and possible assessment and intervention strategies will be introduced. Understanding the intergenerational effect of the FMR1 mutation with potential life-span expression is a key component to identifying and treating the health conditions related to this specific genetic condition. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  9. Molecular mechanism: the human dopamine transporter histidine 547 regulates basal and HIV-1 Tat protein-inhibited dopamine transport

    PubMed Central

    Quizon, Pamela M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yuan, Yaxia; Midde, Narasimha M.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal dopaminergic transmission has been implicated as a risk determinant of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. HIV-1 Tat protein increases synaptic dopamine (DA) levels by directly inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) activity, ultimately leading to dopaminergic neuron damage. Through integrated computational modeling prediction and experimental validation, we identified that histidine547 on human DAT (hDAT) is critical for regulation of basal DA uptake and Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport. Compared to wild type hDAT (WT hDAT), mutation of histidine547 (H547A) displayed a 196% increase in DA uptake. Other substitutions of histidine547 showed that DA uptake was not altered in H547R but decreased by 99% in H547P and 60% in H547D, respectively. These mutants did not alter DAT surface expression or surface DAT binding sites. H547 mutants attenuated Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport observed in WT hDAT. H547A displays a differential sensitivity to PMA- or BIM-induced activation or inhibition of DAT function relative to WT hDAT, indicating a change in basal PKC activity in H547A. These findings demonstrate that histidine547 on hDAT plays a crucial role in stabilizing basal DA transport and Tat-DAT interaction. This study provides mechanistic insights into identifying targets on DAT for Tat binding and improving DAT-mediated dysfunction of DA transmission. PMID:27966610

  10. Pharmacokinetics of stable isotopically labeled L-histidine in humans and the assessment of in vivo histidine ammonia lyase activities.

    PubMed

    Furuta, T; Okamiya, K; Shibasaki, H; Kasuya, Y

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of L-histidine in humans has been investigated to evaluate the in vivo histidine ammonia lyase system for the conversion of L-histidine to urocanic acid. Two healthy volunteers (subjects A and B) received a single 100-mg oral dose of L-[3,3-2H2,1',3'-15N2]histidine. Blood and urine samples were obtained over 24 hr after the administration and analyzed by stable isotope dilution ms. Labeled L-histidine was rapidly absorbed, and a maximum plasma concentration of L-histidine was observed at 30 min (1057.6 ng/ml) in subject A and at 60 min (1635.6 ng/ml) in subject B after oral administration. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated based on a two-compartment model. Labeled L-histidine in subject A (t1/2 = 1.0 hr) was eliminated approximately twice faster than that in subject B (t1/2 = 1.9 hr). Total body clearances were 70.0 liters/hr in subject A and 30.0 liters/hr in subject B. The low ratios of the renal clearance to the total body clearance (1.04% for subject A and 0.43% for subject B) indicated that most of L-histidine was eliminated via the nonrenal processes. L-Histidine was rapidly metabolized to urocanic acid. Maximum plasma concentrations of urocanic acid were 59.61 ng/ml at 30 min for subject A and 46.10 ng/ml at 60 min for subject B. The slope of the plot of urinary excretion rate of urocanic acid vs. the plasma concentration of unchanged L-histidine was demonstrated to reflect the metabolic clearance of L-histidine to urocanic acid. The method of evaluating the in vivo human histidine ammonia lyase activities discussed in this study offers a significant value with regard to the biochemical and clinical elucidations of the heterogeneity of histidinemia.

  11. Hybrid histidine kinases in pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Defosse, Tatiana A; Sharma, Anupam; Mondal, Alok K; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Calderone, Richard; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courdavault, Vincent; Clastre, Marc; Papon, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Histidine kinases (HK) sense and transduce via phosphorylation events many intra- and extracellular signals in bacteria, archaea, slime moulds and plants. HK are also widespread in the fungal kingdom, but their precise roles in the regulation of physiological processes remain largely obscure. Expanding genomic resources have recently given the opportunity to identify uncharacterised HK family members in yeasts and moulds and now allow proposing a complex classification of Basidiomycota, Ascomycota and lower fungi HK. A growing number of genetic approaches have progressively provided new insight into the role of several groups of HK in prominent fungal pathogens. In particular, a series of studies have revealed that members of group III HK, which occur in the highest number of fungal species and contain a unique N-terminus region consisting of multiple HAMP domain repeats, regulate morphogenesis and virulence in various human, plant and insect pathogenic fungi. This research field is further supported by recent shape-function studies providing clear correlation between structural properties and signalling states in group III HK. Since HK are absent in mammals, these represent interesting fungal target for the discovery of new antifungal drugs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Potassium sensing histidine kinase in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    López, Daniel; Gontang, Erin A; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The soil-dwelling organism Bacillus subtilis is able to form multicellular aggregates known as biofilms. It was recently reported that the process of biofilm formation is activated in response to the presence of various, structurally diverse small-molecule natural products. All of these small-molecule natural products made pores in the membrane of the bacterium, causing the leakage of potassium cations from the cytoplasm of the cell. The potassium cation leakage was sensed by the membrane histidine kinase KinC, triggering the genetic pathway to the production of the extracellular matrix that holds cells within the biofilm. This chapter presents the methodology used to characterize the leakage of cytoplasmic potassium as the signal that induces biofilm formation in B. subtilis via activation of KinC. Development of novel techniques to monitor activation of gene expression in microbial populations led us to discover the differentiation of a subpopulation of cells specialized to produce the matrix that holds all cells together within the biofilm. This phenomenon of cell differentiation was previously missed by conventional techniques used to monitor transcriptional gene expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hemoglobin istanbul: substitution of glutamine for histidine in a proximal histidine (F8(92)β)

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, M.; Erdem, S.; Efremov, G. D.; Wilson, J. B.; Huisman, T. H. J.; Schroeder, W. A.; Shelton, J. R.; Shelton, J. B.; Ulitin, O. N.; Müftüoğlu, A.

    1972-01-01

    A presumably spontaneous mutation has resulted in the formation of Hemoglobin (Hb) Istanbul in which glutamine is substituted for histidine in the proximal position of the β-chain (F8(92)). The anemia and other physiological effects that occur in the presence of Hb Istanbul were much ameliorated by splenectomy. Hb Istanbul is a relatively unstable molecule which produces a rather moderate case of “unstable hemoglobin hemolytic anemia.” In the determination of structure, a method of preferential cleavage of an aspartyl-proline bond at residues 99-100 of the β-chain was used. Images PMID:4639022

  14. Genetics Home Reference: fragile X syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Citation on PubMed Koukoui SD, Chaudhuri A. Neuroanatomical, molecular genetic, and behavioral correlates of fragile X syndrome. Brain ... GJ, Dictenberg J. The fragile X syndrome: from molecular genetics to neurobiology. Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev. ...

  15. Systems fragility: The sociology of chaos.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Lori R

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the concept of community fragility in emergency management from a systems perspective. Using literature that addresses fragility in four areas of complex systems, including ecosystems, social systems, sociotechnical systems, and complex adaptive systems, a theoretical framework focused on the emergency management field is created. These findings illustrate how community fragility factors can be used in the emergency management field to not only improve overall outcomes after disaster but also build less fragile systems and communities in preparation for future disasters.

  16. Parental Relationships in Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLanahan, Sara; Beck, Audrey N.

    2010-01-01

    As nonmarital childbearing escalated in the United States over the past half century, fragile families--defined as unmarried couples with children--drew increased interest from researchers and policy makers. Sara McLanahan and Audrey Beck discuss four aspects of parental relationships in these families: the quality of parents' intimate…

  17. Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldfogel, Jane; Craigie, Terry-Ann; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    Jane Waldfogel, Terry-Ann Craigie, and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn review recent studies that use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS) to examine why children who grow up in single-mother and cohabiting families fare worse than children born into married-couple households. They also present findings from their own new research.…

  18. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Roles of histidine residues in plant vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi Y; Van, Ru C; Hung, Shu H; Lin, Hsin H; Pan, Rong L

    2004-02-15

    Vacuolar proton pumping pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) plays a pivotal role in electrogenic translocation of protons from cytosol to the vacuolar lumen at the expense of PP(i) hydrolysis. Alignment analysis on amino acid sequence demonstrates that vacuolar H(+)-PPase of mung bean contains six highly conserved histidine residues. Previous evidence indicated possible involvement of histidine residue(s) in enzymatic activity and H(+)-translocation of vacuolar H(+)-PPase as determined by using histidine specific modifier, diethylpyrocarbonate [J. Protein Chem. 21 (2002) 51]. In this study, we further attempted to identify the roles of histidine residues in mung bean vacuolar H(+)-PPase by site-directed mutagenesis. A line of mutants with histidine residues singly replaced by alanine was constructed, over-expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and then used to determine their enzymatic activities and proton translocations. Among the mutants scrutinized, only the mutation of H716 significantly decreased the enzymatic activity, the proton transport, and the coupling ratio of vacuolar H(+)-PPase. The enzymatic activity of H716A is relatively resistant to inhibition by diethylpyrocarbonate as compared to wild-type and other mutants, indicating that H716 is probably the target residue for the attack by this modifier. The mutation at H716 of V-PPase shifted the optimum pH value but not the T(1/2) (pretreatment temperature at which half enzymatic activity is observed) for PP(i) hydrolytic activity. Mutation of histidine residues obviously induced conformational changes of vacuolar H(+)-PPase as determined by immunoblotting analysis after limited trypsin digestion. Furthermore, mutation of these histidine residues modified the inhibitory effects of F(-) and Na(+), but not that of Ca(2+). Single substitution of H704, H716 and H758 by alanine partially released the effect of K(+) stimulation, indicating possible location of K(+) binding in the vicinity of domains

  20. Degraded speech sound processing in a rat model of fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Engineer, Crystal T.; Centanni, Tracy M.; Im, Kwok W.; Rahebi, Kimiya C.; Buell, Elizabeth P.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability and the leading genetic cause of autism. Impaired phonological processing in fragile X syndrome interferes with the development of language skills. Although auditory cortex responses are known to be abnormal in fragile X syndrome, it is not clear how these differences impact speech sound processing. This study provides the first evidence that the cortical representation of speech sounds is impaired in Fmr1 knockout rats, despite normal speech discrimination behavior. Evoked potentials and spiking activity in response to speech sounds, noise burst trains, and tones were significantly degraded in primary auditory cortex, anterior auditory field and the ventral auditory field. Neurometric analysis of speech evoked activity using a pattern classifier confirmed that activity in these fields contains significantly less information about speech sound identity in Fmr1 knockout rats compared to control rats. Responses were normal in the posterior auditory field, which is associated with sound localization. The greatest impairment was observed in the ventral auditory field, which is related to emotional regulation. Dysfunction in the ventral auditory field may contribute to poor emotional regulation in fragile X syndrome and may help explain the observation that later auditory evoked responses are more disturbed in fragile X syndrome compared to earlier responses. Rodent models of fragile X syndrome are likely to prove useful for understanding the biological basis of fragile X syndrome and for testing candidate therapies. PMID:24713347

  1. Parental relationships in fragile families.

    PubMed

    McLanahan, Sara; Beck, Audrey N

    2010-01-01

    As nonmarital childbearing escalated in the United States over the past half century, fragile families--defined as unmarried couples with children--drew increased interest from researchers and policy makers. Sara McLanahan and Audrey Beck discuss four aspects of parental relationships in these families: the quality of parents' intimate relationship, the stability of that relationship, the quality of the co-parenting relationship among parents who live apart, and nonresident fathers' involvement with their child. At the time of their child's birth, half of the parents in fragile families are living together and another third are living apart but romantically involved. Despite high hopes at birth, five years later only a third of parents are still together, and new partners and new children are common, leading to high levels of instability and complexity in these families. Drawing on findings from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, McLanahan and Beck highlight a number of predictors of low relationship quality and stability in these families, including low economic resources, government policies that discourage marriage, gender distrust and acceptance of single motherhood, sex ratios that favor men, children from previous unions, and psychological factors that make it difficult for parents to maintain healthy relationships. No single factor appears to have a dominant effect. The authors next discuss two types of experiments that attempt to establish causal effects on parental relationships: those aimed at altering economic resources and those aimed at improving relationships. What can be done to strengthen parental relationships in fragile families? The authors note that although economic resources are a consistent predictor of stable relationships, researchers and policy makers lack good causal information on whether increasing fathers' employment and earnings will increase relationship quality and union stability. They also note that analysts need to

  2. Parental Relationships in Fragile Families

    PubMed Central

    McLanahan, Sara; Beck, Audrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As nonmarital childbearing escalated in the United States over the past half century, fragile families—defined as unmarried couples with children—drew increased interest from researchers and policy makers. Sara McLanahan and Audrey Beck discuss four aspects of parental relationships in these families: the quality of parents’ intimate relationship, the stability of that relationship, the quality of the co-parenting relationship among parents who live apart, and nonresident fathers’ involvement with their child. At the time of their child’s birth, half of the parents in fragile families are living together and another third are living apart but romantically involved. Despite high hopes at birth, five years later only a third of parents are still together, and new partners and new children are common, leading to high levels of instability and complexity in these families. Drawing on findings from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, McLanahan and Beck highlight a number of predictors of low relationship quality and stability in these families, including low economic resources, government policies that discourage marriage, gender distrust and acceptance of single motherhood, sex ratios that favor men, children from previous unions, and psychological factors that make it difficult for parents to maintain healthy relationships. No single factor appears to have a dominant effect. The authors next discuss two types of experiments that attempt to establish causal effects on parental relationships: those aimed at altering economic resources and those aimed at improving relationships. What can be done to strengthen parental relationships in fragile families? The authors note that although economic resources are a consistent predictor of stable relationships, researchers and policy makers lack good causal information on whether increasing fathers’ employment and earnings will increase relationship quality and union stability. They also note that

  3. Fragile X syndrome in incestuous families

    SciTech Connect

    Seemanova, E.

    1996-11-11

    Reed suggested the investigation of children 219 from incestuous unions as a method for calculation of the detrimental heterozygosity of man. Some studies of latent genetics load in man have been based on the comparison of health status of incestuous children with their half-sibs born to the same mothers in matings with nonconsanguineous partners. These studies were limited to the detection of autosomal-recessive genes leading to abnormal phenotypes or mental deficiency in homozygotes. The highest coefficient of inbreeding in human beings is 1/4 in offspring of incestuous matings: hence, the high proportion of affected homozygotes and low incidence of affectedmore » individuals among their maternal half-sibs. Mental deficiency in incestuous children represents not only cases of simple recessive inheritance. Recently, we observed three incestuous families in which fragile X syndrome was detected. The fra(X) children were born to carriers from incestuous unions as well as to unrelated partners. Therefore, we recommend use of incestuous children and their maternal half-sibs as a control group for studies estimating latent genetic load after investigation for fra(X). The incidence of fra(X) syndrome is high, and mental retardation in heterozygotes is uncommon. Both of these factors can play a role in the occurrence of incest, and in pregnancy at young age, as well as in multiple partnerships. Families of heterozygotes for fragile X should be excluded from the material for the calculation of human latent detrimental (autosomal-recessive) genetic load. 3 refs., 3 figs.« less

  4. Targeted treatments for fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Knox, Andrew; Hervey, Crystal

    2011-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common identifiable genetic cause of intellectual disability and autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), with up to 50% of males and some females with FXS meeting criteria for ASD. Autistic features are present in a very high percent of individuals with FXS, even those who do not meet full criteria for ASD. Recent major advances have been made in the understanding of the neurobiology and functions of FMRP, the FMR1 (fragile X mental retardation 1) gene product, which is absent or reduced in FXS, largely based on work in the fmr1 knockout mouse model. FXS has emerged as a disorder of synaptic plasticity associated with abnormalities of long-term depression and long-term potentiation and immature dendritic spine architecture, related to the dysregulation of dendritic translation typically activated by group I mGluR and other receptors. This work has led to efforts to develop treatments for FXS with neuroactive molecules targeted to the dysregulated translational pathway. These agents have been shown to rescue molecular, spine, and behavioral phenotypes in the FXS mouse model at multiple stages of development. Clinical trials are underway to translate findings in animal models of FXS to humans, raising complex issues about trial design and outcome measures to assess cognitive change that might be associated with treatment. Genes known to be causes of ASD interact with the translational pathway defective in FXS, and it has been hypothesized that there will be substantial overlap in molecular pathways and mechanisms of synaptic dysfunction between FXS and ASD. Therefore, targeted treatments developed for FXS may also target subgroups of ASD, and clinical trials in FXS may serve as a model for the development of clinical trial strategies for ASD and other cognitive disorders.

  5. Epilepsy in fragile-X-syndrome mimicking panayiotopoulos syndrome: Description of three patients.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Paolo; Casellato, Susanna; Fabbro, Franco; Negrin, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Fragile-X-syndrome is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. Epilepsy is reported to occur in 10-20% of individuals with Fragile-X-syndrome. A frequent seizure/electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern resembles that of benign rolandic epilepsy. We describe the clinical features, EEG findings and evolution in three patients affected by Fragile-X-syndrome and epilepsy mimicking Panayiotopoulos syndrome. Age at seizure onset was between 4 and about 7 years. Seizures pattern comprised a constellation of autonomic symptoms with unilateral deviation of the eyes and ictal syncope. Duration of the seizures could be brief or lengthy. Interictal EEGs revealed functional multifocal abnormalities. The evolution was benign in all patients with seizures remission before the age of 14. This observation expands the spectrum of benign epileptic phenotypes present in Fragile-X-syndrome and may be quite helpful in guiding anticonvulsant management and counseling families as to expectations regarding seizure remission. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The histidine permease gene (HIP1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, J; Fink, G R

    1985-01-01

    The histidine-specific permease gene (HIP1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been mapped, cloned, and sequenced. The HIP1 gene maps to the right arm of chromosome VII, approx. 11 cM distal to the ADE3 gene. The gene was isolated as an 8.6-kb BamHI-Sau3A fragment by complementation of the histidine-specific permease deficiency in recipient yeast cells. We sequenced a 2.4-kb subfragment of this BamHI-Sau3A fragment containing the HIP1 gene and identified a 1596-bp open reading frame (ORF). We confirmed the assignment of the 1596-bp ORF as the HIP1 coding sequence by sequencing a hip1 nonsense mutation. Analysis of the amino acid (aa) sequence of the HIP1 gene reveals several hydrophobic stretches, but shows no obvious N-terminal signal peptide. We have constructed a deletion of the HIP1 gene in vitro and replaced the wild-type copy of the gene with this deletion. The hip1 deletion mutant can grow when it is supplemented with 30 mM histidine, 50 times the amount required for the growth of HIP1 cells. Revertants of this deletion mutant able to grow on a normal level of histidine arise by mutation in unlinked genes. Both these observations suggest that there are additional, low-affinity pathways for histidine uptake.

  7. Structure and synthesis of histopine, a histidine derivative produced by crown gall tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, H.A.; Kaushal, A.; Deng, P.N.

    1984-07-03

    Histopine, an unusual amino acid derivative of histidine isolated from crown gall tumors of sunflowers (Helianthus annus) inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain B/sub 6/, was previously assigned the gross structure N-(1-carboxyethyl)histidine. A diastereomeric mixture containing histopine was readily prepared by reductive alkylation of (S)-histidine with pyruvic acid and sodium cyanoborohydride. The individual diastereomers were prepared by reaction of (S)-histidine with (R)- and (S)-2-bromopropionic acid. (R)-N-(1-Carboxyethyl)-(S)-histidine supports the growth of A. tumefaciens whereas (S)-N-(1-carboxyethyl)-(S)-histidine is inactive.

  8. Preserved entropy and fragile magnetism

    DOE PAGES

    Canfield, Paul C.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.

    2016-07-05

    Here, a large swath of quantum critical and strongly correlated electron systems can be associated with the phenomena of preserved entropy and fragile magnetism. In this overview we present our thoughts and plans for the discovery and development of lanthanide and transition metal based, strongly correlated systems that are revealed by suppressed, fragile magnetism, quantum criticality, or grow out of preserved entropy. We will present and discuss current examples such as YbBiPt, YbAgGe, YbFe 2Zn 20, PrAg 2In, BaFe 2As 2, CaFe 2As 2, LaCrSb 3 and LaCrGe 3 as part of our motivation and to provide illustrative examples.

  9. Visual Processing of Faces in Individuals with Fragile X Syndrome: An Eye Tracking Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farzin, Faraz; Rivera, Susan M.; Hessl, David

    2009-01-01

    Gaze avoidance is a hallmark behavioral feature of fragile X syndrome (FXS), but little is known about whether abnormalities in the visual processing of faces, including disrupted autonomic reactivity, may underlie this behavior. Eye tracking was used to record fixations and pupil diameter while adolescents and young adults with FXS and sex- and…

  10. Viewing Social Scenes: A Visual Scan-Path Study Comparing Fragile X Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tracey A.; Porter, Melanie A.; Langdon, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and Williams syndrome (WS) are both genetic disorders which present with similar cognitive-behavioral problems, but distinct social phenotypes. Despite these social differences both syndromes display poor social relations which may result from abnormal social processing. This study aimed to manipulate the location of…

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awarenessmore » to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.« less

  12. Mechanism-based treatments in neurodevelopmental disorders: fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common identifiable genetic cause of intellectual disability and autistic spectrum disorders. Recent major advances have been made in the understanding of the neurobiology and functions of fragile X mental retardation protein, the FMR1 gene product, which is absent or reduced in FXS, largely based on work in the fmr1 knockout mouse model. FXS has emerged as a disorder of synaptic plasticity associated with abnormalities of long-term depression and long-term potentiation and immature dendritic spine architecture, related to dysregulation of dendritic translation typically activated by group I mGluR and other receptors. This work has led to efforts to develop treatments for FXS with neuroactive molecules targeted to pathways dysregulated in the absence of fragile X mental retardation protein. These agents have been shown to rescue molecular, spine, and behavioral phenotypes in the FXS mouse model, and clinical trials are underway to translate findings in animal models of FXS to humans, raising complex issues about trial design and outcome measures to assess disease-modifying changes that might be associated with treatment. Genes known to be causes of autistic spectrum disorders interact with the translational pathway defective in FXS and it is likely that there will be substantial overlap in molecular pathways and mechanisms of synaptic dysfunction. Thus targeted treatment and clinical trial strategies in FXS may serve as a model for ASD and other cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Histidine test system. 862.1375 Section 862.1375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862...

  14. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  15. Synthesis and activity of histidine-containing catalytic peptide dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Delort, Estelle; Nguyen-Trung, Nhat-Quang; Darbre, Tamis; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2006-06-09

    Peptide dendrimers built by iteration of the diamino acid dendron Dap-His-Ser (His = histidine, Ser = Serine, Dap = diamino propionic acid) display a strong positive dendritic effect for the catalytic hydrolysis of 8-acyloxypyrene 1,3,6-trisulfonates, which proceeds with enzyme-like kinetics in aqueous medium (Delort, E.; Darbre, T.; Reymond, J.-L. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 15642-3). Thirty-two mutants of the original third generation dendrimer A3 ((Ac-His-Ser)8(Dap-His-Ser)4(Dap-His-Ser)2Dap-His-Ser-NH2) were prepared by manual synthesis or by automated synthesis with use of a Chemspeed PSW1100 peptide synthesizer. Dendrimer catalysis was specific for 8-acyloxypyrene 1,3,6-trisulfonates, and there was no activity with other types of esters. While dendrimers with hydrophobic residues at the core and histidine residues at the surface only showed weak activity, exchanging serine residues in dendrimer A3 against alanine (A3A), beta-alanine (A3B), or threonine (A3C) improved catalytic efficiency. Substrate binding was correlated with the total number of histidines per dendrimer, with an average of three histidines per substrate binding site. The catalytic rate constant kcat depended on the placement of histidines within the dendrimers and the nature of the other amino acid residues. The fastest catalyst was the threonine mutant A3C ((Ac-His-Thr)8(Dap-His-Thr)4(Dap-His-Thr)2Dap-His-Thr-NH2), with kcat = 1.3 min(-1), kcat/k(uncat) = 90'000, KM = 160 microM for 8-bytyryloxypyrene 1,3,6-trisulfonate, corresponding to a rate acceleration of 18'000 per catalytic site and a 5-fold improvement over the original sequence A3.

  16. Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing

    PubMed Central

    Waldfogel, Jane; Craigie, Terry-Ann; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Summary Jane Waldfogel, Terry-Ann Craigie, and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn review recent studies that use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS) to examine why children who grow up in single-mother and cohabiting families fare worse than children born into married-couple households. They also present findings from their own new research. Analysts have investigated five key pathways through which family structure might influence child well-being: parental resources, parental mental health, parental relationship quality, parenting quality, and father involvement. It is also important to consider the role of the selection of different types of men and women into different family types, as well as family stability. But analysts remain uncertain how each of these elements shapes children's outcomes. In addition to providing an overview of findings from other studies using FFCWS, Waldfogel, Craigie, and Brooks-Gunn report their own estimates of the effect of a consistently defined set of family structure and stability categories on cognitive, behavioral, and health outcomes of children in the FFCWS study at age five. The authors find that the links between fragile families and child outcomes are not uniform. Family instability, for example, seems to matter more than family structure for cognitive and health outcomes, whereas growing up with a single mother (whether that family structure is stable or unstable over time) seems to matter more than instability for behavior problems. Overall, their results are consistent with other research findings that children raised by stable single or cohabiting parents are at less risk than those raised by unstable single or cohabiting parents. The authors conclude by pointing to three types of policy reforms that could improve outcomes for children. The first is to reduce the share of children growing up in fragile families (for example, through reducing the rate of unwed births or promoting family stability among

  17. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of fragile X syndrome and other fragile X-associated disorders

    PubMed Central

    Biancalana, Valérie; Glaeser, Dieter; McQuaid, Shirley; Steinbach, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Different mutations occurring in the unstable CGG repeat in 5' untranslated region of FMR1 gene are responsible for three fragile X-associated disorders. An expansion of over ∼200 CGG repeats when associated with abnormal methylation and inactivation of the promoter is the mutation termed ‘full mutation' and is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a neurodevelopmental disorder described as the most common cause of inherited intellectual impairment. The term ‘abnormal methylation' is used here to distinguish the DNA methylation induced by the expanded repeat from the ‘normal methylation' occurring on the inactive X chromosomes in females with normal, premutation, and full mutation alleles. All male and roughly half of the female full mutation carriers have FXS. Another anomaly termed ‘premutation' is characterized by the presence of 55 to ∼200 CGGs without abnormal methylation, and is the cause of two other diseases with incomplete penetrance. One is fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI), which is characterized by a large spectrum of ovarian dysfunction phenotypes and possible early menopause as the end stage. The other is fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), which is a late onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting males and females. Because of the particular pattern and transmission of the CGG repeat, appropriate molecular testing and reporting is very important for the optimal genetic counselling in the three fragile X-associated disorders. Here, we describe best practice guidelines for genetic analysis and reporting in FXS, FXPOI, and FXTAS, including carrier and prenatal testing. PMID:25227148

  18. Rescue of Synaptic Phenotypes and Spatial Memory in Young Fragile X Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Miao-Kun; Hongpaisan, Jarin; Alkon, Daniel L

    2016-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is characterized by synaptic immaturity, cognitive impairment, and behavioral changes. The disorder is caused by transcriptional shutdown in neurons of thefragile X mental retardation 1gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein. Fragile X mental retardation protein is a repressor of dendritic mRNA translation and its silencing leads to dysregulation of synaptically driven protein synthesis and impairments of intellect, cognition, and behavior, and FXS is a disorder that currently has no effective therapeutics. Here, young fragile X mice were treated with chronic bryostatin-1, a relatively selective protein kinase Cεactivator, which induces synaptogenesis and synaptic maturation/repair. Chronic treatment with bryostatin-1 rescues young fragile X mice from the disorder phenotypes, including normalization of most FXS abnormalities in 1) hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression, 2) postsynaptic density-95 levels, 3) transformation of immature dendritic spines to mature synapses, 4) densities of the presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes, and 5) spatial learning and memory. The therapeutic effects were achieved without downregulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 5 in the hippocampus and are more dramatic than those of a late-onset treatment in adult fragile X mice. mGluR5 expression was in fact lower in fragile X mice and its expression was restored with the bryostatin-1 treatment. Our results show that synaptic and cognitive function of young FXS mice can be normalized through pharmacological treatment without downregulation of mGluR5 and that bryostatin-1-like agents may represent a novel class of drugs to treat fragile X mental retardation at a young age and in adults. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Exogenous addition of histidine reduces copper availability in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Kikushima, Rie; Aitoku, Miho; Nishimura, Akira; Ohtsu, Iwao; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2014-07-07

    The basic amino acid histidine inhibited yeast cell growth more severely than lysine and arginine. Overexpression of CTR1 , which encodes a high-affinity copper transporter on the plasma membrane, or addition of copper to the medium alleviated this cytotoxicity. However, the intracellular level of copper ions was not decreased in the presence of excess histidine. These results indicate that histidine cytotoxicity is associated with low copper availability inside cells, not with impaired copper uptake. Furthermore, histidine did not affect cell growth under limited respiration conditions, suggesting that histidine cytotoxicity is involved in deficiency of mitochondrial copper.

  20. Screening for fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murray, J; Cuckle, H; Taylor, G; Hewison, J

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF REVIEW. In 1991, the gene responsible for fragile X syndrome, a common cause of learning disability, was discovered. As a result, diagnosis of the disorder has improved and its molecular genetics are now understood. This report seems to provide the information needed to decide whether to use DNA testing to screen for the disorder. HOW THE RESEARCH WAS CONDUCTED. A literature search of electronic reference databases of published and 'grey' literature was undertaken together with hand searching of the most recent publications. RESEARCH FINDINGS. NATURAL HISTORY. Physical characteristics of fragile X syndrome include facial atypia, joint laxity and, in boys, macro-orchidism. Most affected males have moderate-to-severe learning disabilities with IQs under 50 whereas most females have borderline IQs of 70-85. Behavioural problems are similar to those seen with autism and attention-deficit disorders. Although fragile X syndrome is not curable there are a number of medical, educational, psychological and social interventions that can improve the symptoms. About 6% of those with learning disabilities tested in institutions have fragile X syndrome. Population prevalence figures are 1 in 4000 in males and 1 in 8000 in females. GENETICS. The disorder is caused by a mutation in a gene on the X chromosome which includes a trinucleotide repeat sequence. The mutation is characterized by hyper-expansion of the repeat sequence leading to down-regulation of the gene. In males an allele with repeat size in excess of 200, termed a full mutation (FM), is always associated with the affected phenotype, whereas in females only half are affected. Individuals with alleles having repeat size in the range 55-199 are unaffected but in females the sequence is heritably unstable so that it is at high risk of expansion to an FM in her offspring. This allele is known as a pre-mutation (PM) to contrast it with the FM found in the affected individual. No spontaneous expansions

  1. Newborn Screening for Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Newborn screening for fragile X syndrome (FXS) is technically possible, and in the relatively near future accurate and inexpensive screening technologies are likely to be available. When that happens, will America's public health system adopt newborn screening for fragile X syndrome? This article addresses this issue by first placing screening for…

  2. Speech Fluency in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Dor, Orianne; Rondal, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the dysfluencies in the speech of nine French speaking individuals with fragile X syndrome. Type, number, and loci of dysfluencies were analysed. The study confirms that dysfluencies are a common feature of the speech of individuals with fragile X syndrome but also indicates that the dysfluency pattern displayed is…

  3. The quest for fragile X biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Westmark, Cara J

    2014-12-01

    Fragile X is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and the leading known genetic cause of autism. There is currently no cure or approved medication for fragile X although various drugs target specific disease symptoms and a large number of therapeutics are in various stages of clinical development. Multiple recent clinical trials have failed on their primary endpoints indicating that there is a compelling need for validated biomarkers and outcome measures in fragile X. There are currently no validated blood-based biomarkers to assess disease severity or to monitor drug efficacy in fragile X syndrome. Herein, we review candidate blood protein biomarkers including extracellular-regulated kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, matrix metalloproteinase 9, amyloid-beta and amyloid-beta protein precursor. Bench-to-bedside plans for fragile X syndrome are severely limited by the lack of validated outcome measures. The reviewed candidate biomarkers are at early stages of validation and deserve further investigation.

  4. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how different HK domains undergo asymmetric-to-symmetric transitions during signal transduction and catalysis. A thermodynamic framework for signaling that encompasses these various properties is presented and the consequences of weak thermodynamic coupling are discussed. The synthesis of observations from enzymology, structural biology, protein engineering and thermodynamics paves the way for a deeper molecular understanding of histidine kinase signal transduction. PMID:25982528

  5. Histidine-lysine peptides as carriers of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Leng, Qixin; Goldgeier, Lisa; Zhu, Jingsong; Cambell, Patricia; Ambulos, Nicholas; Mixson, A James

    2007-03-01

    With their biodegradability and diversity of permutations, peptides have significant potential as carriers of nucleic acids. This review will focus on the sequence and branching patterns of peptide carriers composed primarily of histidines and lysines. While lysines within peptides are important for binding to the negatively charged phosphates, histidines are critical for endosomal lysis enabling nucleic acids to reach the cytosol. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymers by either covalent or ionic bonds with liposomes augment transfection compared to liposome carriers alone. More recently, we have examined peptides as sole carriers of nucleic acids because of their intrinsic advantages compared to the bipartite HK/liposome carriers. With a protocol change and addition of a histidine-rich tail, HK peptides as sole carriers were more effective than liposomes alone in several cell lines. While four-branched polymers with a primary repeating sequence pattern of -HHK- were more effective as carriers of plasmids, eight-branched polymers with a sequence pattern of -HHHK- were more effective as carriers of siRNA. Compared to polyethylenimine, HK carriers of siRNA and plasmids had reduced toxicity. When injected intravenously, HK polymers in complex with plasmids encoding antiangiogenic proteins significantly decreased tumor growth. Furthermore, modification of HK polymers with polyethylene glycol and vascular-specific ligands increased specificity of the polyplex to the tumor by more than 40-fold. Together with further development and insight on the structure of HK polyplexes, HK peptides may prove to be useful as carriers of different forms of nucleic acids both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Genome Organization Drives Chromosome Fragility.

    PubMed

    Canela, Andres; Maman, Yaakov; Jung, Seolkyoung; Wong, Nancy; Callen, Elsa; Day, Amanda; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Zhang, Hongliang; Rao, Suhas S P; Huang, Su-Chen; Mckinnon, Peter J; Aplan, Peter D; Pommier, Yves; Aiden, Erez Lieberman; Casellas, Rafael; Nussenzweig, André

    2017-07-27

    In this study, we show that evolutionarily conserved chromosome loop anchors bound by CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and cohesin are vulnerable to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) mediated by topoisomerase 2B (TOP2B). Polymorphisms in the genome that redistribute CTCF/cohesin occupancy rewire DNA cleavage sites to novel loop anchors. While transcription- and replication-coupled genomic rearrangements have been well documented, we demonstrate that DSBs formed at loop anchors are largely transcription-, replication-, and cell-type-independent. DSBs are continuously formed throughout interphase, are enriched on both sides of strong topological domain borders, and frequently occur at breakpoint clusters commonly translocated in cancer. Thus, loop anchors serve as fragile sites that generate DSBs and chromosomal rearrangements. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Samuel T; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal placentation poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge for all providers caring for pregnant women. As one of the leading causes of postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation involves the attachment of placental villi directly to the myometrium with potentially deeper invasion into the uterine wall or surrounding organs. Surgical procedures that disrupt the integrity of uterus, including cesarean section, dilatation and curettage, and myomectomy, have been implicated as key risk factors for placenta accreta. The diagnosis is typically made by gray-scale ultrasound and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, which may better delineate the extent of placental invasion. It is critical to make the diagnosis before delivery because preoperative planning can significantly decrease blood loss and avoid substantial morbidity associated with placenta accreta. Aggressive management of hemorrhage through the use of uterotonics, fluid resuscitation, blood products, planned hysterectomy, and surgical hemostatic agents can be life-saving for these patients. Conservative management, including the use of uterine and placental preservation and subsequent methotrexate therapy or pelvic artery embolization, may be considered when a focal accreta is suspected; however, surgical management remains the current standard of care.

  8. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase

    DOE PAGES

    Childers, W. Seth; Xu, Qingping; Mann, Thomas H.; ...

    2014-10-28

    One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR) DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK~P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interactionmore » between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK)-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.« less

  9. Fragile X premutation in women: recognizing the health challenges beyond primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Luis R; Thakur, Mili

    2017-03-01

    Fragile X premutation carriers have 55-200 CGG repeats in the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. Women with this premutation face many physical and emotional challenges in their life. Approximately 20% of these women will develop fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI). In addition, they suffer from increased rates of menstrual dysfunction, diminished ovarian reserve, reduction in age of menopause, infertility, dizygotic twinning, and risk of having an offspring with a premutation or full mutation. Consequent chronic hypoestrogenism may result in impaired bone health and increased cardiovascular risk. Neuropsychiatric issues include risk of developing fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, neuropathy, musculoskeletal problems, increased prevalence of anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances independent of the stress of raising an offspring with fragile X syndrome and higher risk of postpartum depression. Some studies have reported a higher prevalence of thyroid abnormalities and hypertension in these women. Reproductive health providers play an important role in the health supervision of women with fragile X premutation. Awareness of these risks and correlation of the various manifestations could help in early diagnosis and coordination of care and services for these women and their families. This paper reviews current evidence regarding the possible conditions that may present in women with premutation-sized repeats beyond FXPOI.

  10. Fragile X mental retardation protein participates in non-coding RNA pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, En-Hui; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Ce; Liu, Wei

    2018-02-20

    Fragile X syndrome is one of the most common forms of inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by mutations of the Fragile X mental retardation 1(FMR1) gene, resulting in either the loss or abnormal expression of the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Recent research showed that FMRP participates in non-coding RNA pathways and plays various important roles in physiology, thereby extending our knowledge of the pathogenesis of the Fragile X syndrome. Initial studies showed that the Drosophila FMRP participates in siRNA and miRNA pathways by interacting with Dicer, Ago1 and Ago2, involved in neural activity and the fate determination of the germline stem cells. Subsequent studies showed that the Drosophila FMRP participates in piRNA pathway by interacting with Aub, Ago1 and Piwi in the maintenance of normal chromatin structures and genomic stability. More recent studies showed that FMRP is associated with lncRNA pathway, suggesting a potential role for the involvement in the clinical manifestations. In this review, we summarize the novel findings and explore the relationship between FMRP and non-coding RNA pathways, particularly the piRNA pathway, thereby providing critical insights on the molecular pathogenesis of Fragile X syndrome, and potential translational applications in clinical management of the disease.

  11. Molecular medicine of fragile X syndrome: based on known molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shi-Yu; Wu, Ling-Qian; Duan, Ran-Hui

    2016-02-01

    Extensive research on fragile X mental retardation gene knockout mice and mutant Drosophila models has largely expanded our knowledge on mechanism-based treatment of fragile X syndrome (FXS). In light of these findings, several clinical trials are now underway for therapeutic translation to humans. Electronic literature searches were conducted using the PubMed database and ClinicalTrials.gov. The search terms included "fragile X syndrome", "FXS and medication", "FXS and therapeutics" and "FXS and treatment". Based on the publications identified in this search, we reviewed the neuroanatomical abnormalities in FXS patients and the potential pathogenic mechanisms to monitor the progress of FXS research, from basic studies to clinical trials. The pathological mechanisms of FXS were categorized on the basis of neuroanatomy, synaptic structure, synaptic transmission and fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) loss of function. The neuroanatomical abnormalities in FXS were described to motivate extensive research into the region-specific pathologies in the brain responsible for FXS behavioural manifestations. Mechanism-directed molecular medicines were classified according to their target pathological mechanisms, and the most recent progress in clinical trials was discussed. Current mechanism-based studies and clinical trials have greatly contributed to the development of FXS pharmacological therapeutics. Research examining the extent to which these treatments provided a rescue effect or FMRP compensation for the developmental impairments in FXS patients may help to improve the efficacy of treatments.

  12. Muscle abnormalities in osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, L-N.; Trejo, P.; Rauch, F.

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is mainly characterized by bone fragility but muscle abnormalities have been reported both in OI mouse models and in children with OI. Muscle mass is decreased in OI, even when short stature is taken into account. Dynamic muscle tests aiming at maximal eccentric force production reveal functional deficits that can not be explained by low muscle mass alone. However, it appears that diaphyseal bone mass is normally adapted to muscle force. At present the determinants of muscle mass and function in OI have not been clearly defined. Physiotherapy interventions and bisphosphonate treatment appear to have some effect on muscle function in OI. Interventions targeting muscle mass have shown encouraging results in OI animal models and are an interesting area for further research. PMID:28574406

  13. Behavioral Phenotype of Fragile X Syndrome in Adolescence and Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Leann E.; Barker, Erin T.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Abbeduto, Leonard; Greenberg, Jan S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored the behavioral profile of individuals with fragile X syndrome during adolescence and adulthood. Individuals with both fragile X syndrome and autism (n = 30) were compared with (a) individuals diagnosed with fragile X syndrome (but not autism; n = 106) and (b) individuals diagnosed with autism (but not fragile X syndrome;…

  14. Genetics Home Reference: fragile XE syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... are so mild that the individuals function normally. Learning disabilities are the most common sign of impaired cognitive function in people with fragile XE syndrome . The learning disabilities are likely a result of communication and behavioral ...

  15. Germline mosaicism at the fragile X locus

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.

    We have identified a fragile X syndrome pedigree where the disorder is associated with a molecular deletion. The deletion was present in the DNA of 2 sons but was absent in the mother`s somatic cell (lymphocyte) DNA. The results are consistent with the deletion arising as a postzygotic event in the mother, who therefore is germinally mosaic. This finding has important implications for counseling fragile X families with deletion mutations. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Aggression in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, A C; Raspa, M; Bishop, E; Bailey, D B

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS), especially men, have long been described as presenting with significant behavioural challenges. Despite this known aspect of the phenotype, there has been little research exploring the prevalence, frequency, nature or consequences of aggressive behaviour in FXS. This study used survey methodology to gather caregiver reports on the types, frequency and severity of aggressive behaviour in 774 individuals with FXS. Based on caregiver report, nearly all (>90%) male and female individuals were reported to have engaged in some aggression over the previous 12 months, with a third of male cases and slightly fewer than 20% of female cases being described as engaging in moderate to severe aggression or being diagnosed or treated for aggression. Further, aggressive behaviours in male individuals were serious enough that 30% had caused injuries to caregivers and 22% had caused injuries to peers or friends. Sensory issues and hyperactivity were significant predictors of the frequency of aggressive acts, while sensory issues and anxiety were predictive of the severity of aggression. Traditional behaviour management techniques as well as medication was described as the most common and successful treatment options. Aggressive behaviours are a significant concern for a subsample of both male and female individuals with FXS. Given that sensory concerns were predictive of both the frequency and the severity of aggression suggests these behaviours may be a reactive means of escaping uncomfortable situations. © 2015 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Regioselective copper-catalyzed N(1)-(hetero)arylation of protected histidine.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Krishna K; Mandloi, Meenakshi; Jain, Rahul

    2016-09-26

    We report regioselective N(1)-arylation of protected histidine using copper(i) iodide as a catalyst, trans-N,N'-dimethylcyclohexane-1,2-diamine as a ligand and readily available aryl iodides as coupling partners under microwave irradiation at 130 °C for 40 min. The reaction provides rapid access to electron-donating, electron-withdrawing and bulky group substituted N-arylated histidines in high yields, including previously inaccessible N-heteroaryl histidines. These N(1)-(hetero)aryl histidines are promising building blocks in peptide-based drug design and discovery.

  18. Regulation of GABAA receptors by fragile X mental retardation protein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baosong; Li, Lijun; Chen, Juan; Wang, Zefen; Li, Zhiqiang; Wan, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). The deficiency of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) is implicated in FXS. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To investigate the effect of FMRP on GABAARs, we transfected FMRP cDNAs in rat cortical neurons. We measured the protein expression of GABAARs and phosphatase PTEN, and recorded GABAAR-mediated whole-cell currents in the transfected neurons. We show that the transfection of FMRP cDNAs causes increased protein expression of GABAARs in cortical neurons, but GABAAR-mediated whole-cell currents are not potentiated by FMRP transfection. These results suggest the possibility that intracellular signaling antagonizing GABAAR activity may play a role in inhibiting GABAAR function in FMRP-transfected neurons. We further show that FMRP transfection results in an enhanced protein expression of PTEN, which contributes to the inhibition of GABAAR function in FMRP-transfected neurons. These results indicate that GABAARs are regulated by FMRP through both an up-regulation of GABAAR expression and a PTEN enhancement-induced inhibition of GABAAR function, suggesting that an abnormal regulation of GABAAR and PTEN by the loss of FMRP underlies the pathogenesis of FXS. PMID:24044036

  19. Neurological and endocrine phenotypes of fragile X carrier women.

    PubMed

    Hall, D; Todorova-Koteva, K; Pandya, S; Bernard, B; Ouyang, B; Walsh, M; Pounardjian, T; Deburghraeve, C; Zhou, L; Losh, M; Leehey, M; Berry-Kravis, E

    2016-01-01

    Women who carry fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1)gene premutation expansions frequently report neurological or endocrine symptoms and prior studies have predominantly focused on questionnaire report of medical issues. Premutation carrier (PMC) women (n = 33) and non-carrier controls (n = 13) were recruited and evaluated by a neurologist, neuropsychologist, and endocrinologist. Blood and skin biopsies were collected for molecular measures. Scales for movement disorders, neuropathy, cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, sleep, and quality of life were completed. The average age of the women was 51 years (n = 46) and average CGG repeat size was 91 ± 24.9 in the FMR1 PMC women. Seventy percent of the PMC women had an abnormal neurological examination. PMC women had significantly higher scores on the Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS) rating scale, more neuropathy, and difficulty with tandem gait compared to controls. Central sensitivity syndromes, a neuroticism profile on the NEO Personality Profile, and sleep disorders were also prevalent. Discrepancies between subject report and examination findings were also seen. This pilot study suggests that women with the FMR1 premutation may have a phenotype that overlaps with that seen in FXTAS. Additional research with larger sample sizes is warranted to better delineate the clinical features. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Raman spectra of complexes of rare earth nitrate with histidine].

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Ji, M; Liu, J; Hou, Y; Chen, S

    1999-12-01

    Raman spectra of solid complexes RE(His)(NO3)3 x H2O (RE = La-Nd, Sm-Lu, Y; His = L-alpha-histidine ) have been investigated. The results indicate that RE3+ coordinates with one O atome of carboxyl group in the complex, while amino group and imidazole ring do not take part in coordination and NO3 is double coordination. The vibration peaks of carboxyl group delta(v)COO-(as-s) were plotted against the atomic number of the lanthanoids, which obeys Oddo-Harkins law.

  1. Substrate uptake and protein stability relationship in mammalian histidine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Pino-Angeles, A; Morreale, A; Negri, A; Sánchez-Jiménez, F; Moya-García, A A

    2010-01-01

    There is some evidence linking the substrate entrance in the active site of mammalian histidine decarboxylase and an increased stability against proteolytic degradation. In this work, we study the basis of this relationship by means of protein structure network analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the substrate binding to the active site influences the conformation of a flexible region sensible to proteolytic degradation and observe how formation of the Michaelis-Menten complex increases stability in the conformation of this region. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Quantification of Histidine-Rich Protein 3 of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Palani, Balraj

    2018-04-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening infectious disease and continues to be a major public health crisis in many parts of the tropical world. Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for the majority of mortality and morbidity associated with malaria. During the intraerythrocytic cycle, P. falciparum releases three proteins with high histidine content as follows: histidine-rich protein 1 (HRP1), histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2), and histidine-rich protein 3 (HRP3). Currently, most of the diagnostic tests of P. falciparum infection target HRP2, and a number of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against HRP2 have been developed for use in HRP2 detection and quantification. When parasites have HRP2 deletions, the detection of HRP3 could augment the sensitivity of the detection system. The combination of both HRP2 and HRP3 mAbs in the detection system will enhance the test sensitivity. In the HRP quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), both HRP2 and HRP3 contribute to the result, but the relative contribution of HRP2 and HRP3 was unable to investigate, because of the nonavailability of HRP3 specific antibody ELISA. Hence an ELISA test system based on HRP3 is also essential for detection and quantification. There is not much documented in the literature on HRP3 antigen and HRP3 specific mAbs and polyclonal antibodies (pAbs). In the present study, recombinant HRP3 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified with Ni-NTA agarose column. The purified rHRP3 was used for the generation and characterization of monoclonal and pAbs. The purification of monoclonal and pAbs was done using a mixed-mode chromatography sorbent, phenylpropylamine HyperCel™. With the purified antibodies, a sandwich ELISA was developed. The sandwich ELISA method was explored to detect and quantify HRP3 of P. falciparum in the spent medium. The generated mAbs could be potentially used for the detection and quantification of P. falciparum HRP3.

  3. Wild-type male offspring of fmr-1+/- mothers exhibit characteristics of the fragile X phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Bojana; Toth, Miklos

    2008-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome is an X-linked disorder caused by the inactivation of the FMR-1 gene with symptoms ranging from impaired cognitive functions to seizures, anxiety, sensory abnormalities, and hyperactivity. Males are more severely affected than heterozygote (H) females, who, as carriers, have a 50% chance of transmitting the mutated allele in each pregnancy. fmr-1 knockout (KO) mice reproduce fragile X symptoms, including hyperactivity, seizures, and abnormal sensory processing. In contrast to the expectation that wild-type (WT) males born to H (fmr-1(+/-)) mothers (H>WT) are behaviorally normal and indistinguishable from WT males born to WT mothers (WT>WT); here, we show that H>WT offspring are more active than WT>WT offspring and that their hyperactivity is similar to male KO mice born to H or KO (fmr-1(-/-)) mothers (H>KO/KO>KO). H>WT mice, however, do not exhibit seizures or abnormal sensory processing. Consistent with their hyperactivity, the effect of the D2 agonist quinpirole is reduced in H>WT as well as in H>KO and KO>KO mice compared to WT>WT offspring, suggesting a diminished feedback inhibition of dopamine release. Our data indicate that some aspects of hyperactivity and associated dopaminergic changes in 'fragile X' mice are a maternal fmr-1 genotype rather than an offspring fmr-1 genotype effect.

  4. Cognitive, Behavioral, and Adaptive Functioning in Fragile X and Non-Fragile X Retarded Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykens, Elisabeth; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Evaluation of the cognitive, behavioral, and adaptive functioning of 12 retarded men with fragile X syndrome indicated that fragile X men were largely indistinguishable from comparison groups. They were, however, significantly more likely to have achieved levels of adaptive functioning commensurate with their intellectual abilities. (Author/DB)

  5. Medically Fragile Children: Report from State Committee on Medically Fragile Child Referent Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Special Education Services.

    This report is the product of a committee charged to define "medically fragile," explore the array of educational services available and/or needed for children in Michigan considered medically fragile, identify current information and gaps in the information, and identify areas of interagency collaboration. The report discusses critical…

  6. Distal histidine conformational flexibility in dehaloperoxidase from Amphitrite ornata

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zuxu; de Serrano, Vesna; Betts, Laurie

    2009-01-28

    The enzyme dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from the terebellid polychaete Amphitrite ornata is a heme protein which has a globin fold but can function as both a hemoglobin and a peroxidase. As a peroxidase, DHP is capable of converting 2,4,6-trihalophenols to the corresponding 2,6-dihaloquinones in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. As a hemoglobin, DHP cycles between the oxy and deoxy states as it reversibly binds oxygen for storage. Here, it is reported that the distal histidine, His55, exhibits conformational flexibility in the deoxy form and is consequently observed in two solvent-exposed conformations more than 9.5 {angstrom} away from the heme. These conformationsmore » are analogous to the open conformation of sperm whale myoglobin. The heme iron in deoxy ferrous DHP is five-coordinate and has an out-of-plane displacement of 0.25 {angstrom} from the heme plane. The observation of five-coordinate heme iron with His55 in a remote solvent-exposed conformation is consistent with the hypothesis that His55 interacts with heme iron ligands through hydrogen bonding in the closed conformation. Since His55 is also displaced by the binding of 4-iodophenol in an internal pocket, these results provide new insight into the correlation between heme iron ligation, molecular binding in the distal pocket and the conformation of the distal histidine in DHP.« less

  7. Bacterial hybrid histidine kinases in plant-bacteria interactions.

    PubMed

    Borland, Stéphanie; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2016-10-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are essential for many bacteria to maintain homeostasis and adapt to environmental changes. Two-component signal transduction systems typically involve a membrane-bound histidine kinase that senses stimuli, autophosphorylates in the transmitter region and then transfers the phosphoryl group to the receiver domain of a cytoplasmic response regulator that mediates appropriate changes in bacterial physiology. Although usually found on distinct proteins, the transmitter and receiver modules are sometimes fused into a so-called hybrid histidine kinase (HyHK). Such structure results in multiple phosphate transfers that are believed to provide extra-fine-tuning mechanisms and more regulatory checkpoints than classical phosphotransfers. HyHK-based regulation may be crucial for finely tuning gene expression in a heterogeneous environment such as the rhizosphere, where intricate plant-bacteria interactions occur. In this review, we focus on roles fulfilled by bacterial HyHKs in plant-associated bacteria, providing recent findings on the mechanistic of their signalling properties. Recent insights into understanding additive regulatory properties fulfilled by the tethered receiver domain of HyHKs are also addressed.

  8. Axonal neuropathy in female carriers of the fragile X premutation with fragile x-associated tremor ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ram, Suresh; Devapriya, Inoka A; Fenton, Grace; Mcvay, Lindsey; Nguyen, Danh V; Tassone, Flora; Maselli, Ricardo A; Hagerman, Randi J

    2015-08-01

    In this study we examined whether females with the fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and non-FXTAS premutation carriers have electrophysiological signs of underlying peripheral neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) were performed on 19 women with FXTAS, 20 non-FXTAS carriers, and 26 age-matched controls. The results were compared with existing data on corresponding male carriers. Women with FXTAS and non-FXTAS carriers had reduced sensory nerve action potential amplitudes. Also, there was a strong trend for reduced compound muscle action potential amplitudes in women with FXTAS, but not in non-FXTAS carriers. No significant slowing of nerve conduction velocities, prolongation of F-wave latencies, or associations with molecular measures was observed. This study suggests an underlying axonal neuropathy in women with FXTAS. However, in comparison to men with FXTAS, the NCS abnormalities in women were less severe, possibly due to the effect of a normal X chromosome. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Development of "fragility" in relaxor ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-zhen; Chen, Lan; Wang, Hai-yan; Frank Zhang, X.; Fu, Jun; Xiong, Xiao-min; Zhang, Jin-xiu

    2014-02-01

    Relaxor ferroelectrics (RFs), a special class of the disordered crystals or ceramics, exhibit a pronounced slowdown of their dynamics upon cooling as glass-forming liquids, called the "Super-Arrhenius (SA)" relaxation. Despite great progress in glass-forming liquids, the "fragility" property of the SA relaxation in RFs remains unclear so far. By measuring the temperature-dependent dielectric relaxation in the typical relaxor Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-x%PbTiO3 (PMN - x%PT) with 0 ≤ x ≤ 20.0, we in-depth study the "fragility" properties of the SA relaxation in PMN - x%PT. Such fascinating issues as the mechanism of the "fragility" at an atomic scale, the roles of the systematic configurational entropy change and interaction among relaxing units (RUs, including polar nanoregions and free dipoles) and the relation between "fragility" and ferroelectric order are investigated. Our results show that both the "fragility" of the temperature-dependent SA relaxation and ferroelectric order in the PMN - x%PT systems investigated arise thermodynamically from the configurational-entropy loss due to the attractive interaction among RUs, and develops as a power law, possibly diverging at the finite critical temperature Tc. A reasonable physical scenario, based on our "configurational-entropy-loss" theory and Nowick's "stress-induced-ordering" theory, was proposed.

  10. Histidine kinases mediate differentiation, stress response, and pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Stefan; Foster, Andrew J; Yemelin, Alexander; Thines, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is a functional characterization of 10 putative histidine kinases (HIKs)-encoding genes in the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Two HIKs were found to be required for pathogenicity in the fungus. It was found that the mutant strains ΔMohik5 and ΔMohik8 show abnormal conidial morphology and furthermore ΔMohik5 is unable to form appressoria. Both HIKs MoHik5p and MoHik8p appear to be essential for pathogenicity since the mutants fail to infect rice plants. MoSln1p and MoHik1p were previously reported to be components of the HOG pathway in M. oryzae. The ΔMosln1 mutant is more susceptible to salt stress compared to ΔMohik1, whereas ΔMohik1 appears to be stronger affected by osmotic or sugar stress. In contrast to yeast, the HOG signaling cascade in phytopathogenic fungi apparently comprises more elements. Furthermore, vegetative growth of the mutants ΔMohik5 and ΔMohik9 was found to be sensitive to hypoxia-inducing NaNO2-treatment. Additionally, it was monitored that NaNO2-treatment resulted in MoHog1p phosphorylation. As a consequence we assume a first simplified model for hypoxia signaling in M. oryzae including the HOG pathway and the HIKs MoHik5p and MoHik9p. PMID:25103193

  11. Histidine biosynthesis plays a crucial role in metal homeostasis and virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Dietl, Anna-Maria; Amich, Jorge; Leal, Sixto; Beckmann, Nicola; Binder, Ulrike; Beilhack, Andreas; Pearlman, Eric; Haas, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing invasive fungal infections in immunosuppressed individuals. The histidine biosynthetic pathway is found in bacteria, archaebacteria, lower eukaryotes, and plants, but is absent in mammals. Here we demonstrate that deletion of the gene encoding imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase (HisB) in A. fumigatus causes (i) histidine auxotrophy, (ii) decreased resistance to both starvation and excess of various heavy metals, including iron, copper and zinc, which play a pivotal role in antimicrobial host defense, (iii) attenuation of pathogenicity in 4 virulence models: murine pulmonary infection, murine systemic infection, murine corneal infection, and wax moth larvae. In agreement with the in vivo importance of histidine biosynthesis, the HisB inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole reduced the virulence of the A. fumigatus wild type and histidine supplementation partially rescued virulence of the histidine-auxotrophic mutant in the wax moth model. Taken together, this study reveals limited histidine availability in diverse A. fumigatus host niches, a crucial role for histidine in metal homeostasis, and the histidine biosynthetic pathway as being an attractive target for development of novel antifungal therapy approaches. PMID:26854126

  12. Histidine biosynthesis plays a crucial role in metal homeostasis and virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Dietl, Anna-Maria; Amich, Jorge; Leal, Sixto; Beckmann, Nicola; Binder, Ulrike; Beilhack, Andreas; Pearlman, Eric; Haas, Hubertus

    2016-05-18

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing invasive fungal infections in immunosuppressed individuals. The histidine biosynthetic pathway is found in bacteria, archaebacteria, lower eukaryotes, and plants, but is absent in mammals. Here we demonstrate that deletion of the gene encoding imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase (HisB) in A. fumigatus causes (i) histidine auxotrophy, (ii) decreased resistance to both starvation and excess of various heavy metals, including iron, copper and zinc, which play a pivotal role in antimicrobial host defense, (iii) attenuation of pathogenicity in 4 virulence models: murine pulmonary infection, murine systemic infection, murine corneal infection, and wax moth larvae. In agreement with the in vivo importance of histidine biosynthesis, the HisB inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole reduced the virulence of the A. fumigatus wild type and histidine supplementation partially rescued virulence of the histidine-auxotrophic mutant in the wax moth model. Taken together, this study reveals limited histidine availability in diverse A. fumigatus host niches, a crucial role for histidine in metal homeostasis, and the histidine biosynthetic pathway as being an attractive target for development of novel antifungal therapy approaches.

  13. Histidine augments the suppression of hepatic glucose production by central insulin action.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Inaba, Yuka; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Asahara, Shun-Ichiro; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maeda, Akifumi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Mukai, Chisato; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Ota, Tsuguhito; Nakabayashi, Hajime; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    Glucose intolerance in type 2 diabetes is related to enhanced hepatic glucose production (HGP) due to the increased expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. Previously, we revealed that hepatic STAT3 decreases the expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes and suppresses HGP. Here, we show that increased plasma histidine results in hepatic STAT3 activation. Intravenous and intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of histidine-activated hepatic STAT3 reduced G6Pase protein and mRNA levels and augmented HGP suppression by insulin. This suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis by histidine was abolished by hepatic STAT3 deficiency or hepatic Kupffer cell depletion. Inhibition of HGP by histidine was also blocked by ICV administration of a histamine H1 receptor antagonist. Therefore, histidine activates hepatic STAT3 and suppresses HGP via central histamine action. Hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation after histidine ICV administration was attenuated in histamine H1 receptor knockout (Hrh1KO) mice but not in neuron-specific insulin receptor knockout (NIRKO) mice. Conversely, hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation after insulin ICV administration was attenuated in NIRKO but not in Hrh1KO mice. These findings suggest that central histidine action is independent of central insulin action, while both have additive effects on HGP suppression. Our results indicate that central histidine/histamine-mediated suppression of HGP is a potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Histidine Augments the Suppression of Hepatic Glucose Production by Central Insulin Action

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Inaba, Yuka; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maeda, Akifumi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Mukai, Chisato; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Ota, Tsuguhito; Nakabayashi, Hajime; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Glucose intolerance in type 2 diabetes is related to enhanced hepatic glucose production (HGP) due to the increased expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. Previously, we revealed that hepatic STAT3 decreases the expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes and suppresses HGP. Here, we show that increased plasma histidine results in hepatic STAT3 activation. Intravenous and intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of histidine-activated hepatic STAT3 reduced G6Pase protein and mRNA levels and augmented HGP suppression by insulin. This suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis by histidine was abolished by hepatic STAT3 deficiency or hepatic Kupffer cell depletion. Inhibition of HGP by histidine was also blocked by ICV administration of a histamine H1 receptor antagonist. Therefore, histidine activates hepatic STAT3 and suppresses HGP via central histamine action. Hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation after histidine ICV administration was attenuated in histamine H1 receptor knockout (Hrh1KO) mice but not in neuron-specific insulin receptor knockout (NIRKO) mice. Conversely, hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation after insulin ICV administration was attenuated in NIRKO but not in Hrh1KO mice. These findings suggest that central histidine action is independent of central insulin action, while both have additive effects on HGP suppression. Our results indicate that central histidine/histamine-mediated suppression of HGP is a potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23474485

  15. Structural Insights into the HWE Histidine Kinase Family: The Brucella Blue Light-Activated Histidine Kinase Domain.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Jimena; Arrar, Mehrnoosh; Sycz, Gabriela; Cerutti, María Laura; Berguer, Paula M; Paris, Gastón; Estrín, Darío Ariel; Martí, Marcelo Adrián; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto

    2016-03-27

    In response to light, as part of a two-component system, the Brucella blue light-activated histidine kinase (LOV-HK) increases its autophosphorylation, modulating the virulence of this microorganism. The Brucella histidine kinase (HK) domain belongs to the HWE family, for which there is no structural information. The HWE family is exclusively present in proteobacteria and usually coupled to a wide diversity of light sensor domains. This work reports the crystal structure of the Brucella HK domain, which presents two different dimeric assemblies in the asymmetric unit: one similar to the already described canonical parallel homodimers (C) and the other, an antiparallel non-canonical (NC) dimer, each with distinct relative subdomain orientations and dimerization interfaces. Contrary to these crystallographic structures and unlike other HKs, in solution, the Brucella HK domain is monomeric and still active, showing an astonishing instability of the dimeric interface. Despite this instability, using cross-linking experiments, we show that the C dimer is the functionally relevant species. Mutational analysis demonstrates that the autophosphorylation activity occurs in cis. The different relative subdomain orientations observed for the NC and C states highlight the large conformational flexibility of the HK domain. Through the analysis of these alternative conformations by means of molecular dynamics simulations, we also propose a catalytic mechanism for Brucella LOV-HK. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Crystal Structure of a Histidine Kinase Sensor Domain with Similarity to Periplasmic Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J.; Le-Khac, M; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Histidine kinase receptors are elements of the two-component signal transduction systems commonly found in bacteria and lower eukaryotes, where they are crucial for environmental adaption through the coupling of extracellular changes to intracellular responses. The typical two-component system consists of a membrane-spanning histidine kinase sensor and a cytoplasmic response regulator. In the calssic system, extracellular signals such as small molecule ligands and ions are detected by the periplasmic sensor domain of the histidine kinase receptor, which modulates the catalytic activity of the cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain and promotes ATP-dependent autophosphorylation of a conserved histidine residue. G. sulfurreducens genomic DNA wasmore » used.« less

  17. Fragile Families in the American Welfare State

    PubMed Central

    Garfinkel, Irwin; Zilanawala, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    The proportion of children born out of wedlock is now over 40 percent. At birth, about half of these parents are co-habiting. This paper examines data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study (N = 4,271) to describe for the first time the role of welfare state benefits in the economic lives of married, cohabiting, and single parent families with young children. Surprisingly, total welfare state benefits received by the three family types are relatively similar. Nearly half of the full incomes of fragile families come from welfare state transfers. For single parent families the proportion is slightly more than two thirds. Though aggregate welfare state transfers are approximately equal across family type and thus change very little as marital status changes, these transfers and the taxes required to finance them cushion family status changes and substantially narrow the gap in full income between married and fragile families. PMID:27114616

  18. Cell-type-specific replication initiation programs set fragility of the FRA3B fragile site.

    PubMed

    Letessier, Anne; Millot, Gaël A; Koundrioukoff, Stéphane; Lachagès, Anne-Marie; Vogt, Nicolas; Hansen, R Scott; Malfoy, Bernard; Brison, Olivier; Debatisse, Michelle

    2011-02-03

    Common fragile sites have long been identified by cytogeneticists as chromosomal regions prone to breakage upon replication stress. They are increasingly recognized to be preferential targets for oncogene-induced DNA damage in pre-neoplastic lesions and hotspots for chromosomal rearrangements in various cancers. Common fragile site instability was attributed to the fact that they contain sequences prone to form secondary structures that may impair replication fork movement, possibly leading to fork collapse resulting in DNA breaks. Here we show, in contrast to this view, that the fragility of FRA3B--the most active common fragile site in human lymphocytes--does not rely on fork slowing or stalling but on a paucity of initiation events. Indeed, in lymphoblastoid cells, but not in fibroblasts, initiation events are excluded from a FRA3B core extending approximately 700 kilobases, which forces forks coming from flanking regions to cover long distances in order to complete replication. We also show that origins of the flanking regions fire in mid-S phase, leaving the site incompletely replicated upon fork slowing. Notably, FRA3B instability is specific to cells showing this particular initiation pattern. The fact that both origin setting and replication timing are highly plastic in mammalian cells explains the tissue specificity of common fragile site instability we observed. Thus, we propose that common fragile sites correspond to the latest initiation-poor regions to complete replication in a given cell type. For historical reasons, common fragile sites have been essentially mapped in lymphocytes. Therefore, common fragile site contribution to chromosomal rearrangements in tumours should be reassessed after mapping fragile sites in the cell type from which each tumour originates.

  19. Structure and Liquid Fragility in Sodium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Wilding, Martin C; Benmore, Chris; Weber, J K R; Alderman, Oliver; Tamalonis, Anthony; Parise, J B

    2018-02-01

    The relationship between local structure and dynamics is explored for molten sodium carbonate. A flexible fluctuating-charge model, which allows for changes in the shape and charge distribution of the carbonate molecular anion, is developed. The system shows the evolution of highly temperature-dependent complex low-dimensional structures which control the dynamics (and hence the liquid fragility). By varying the molecular anion charge distribution, the key interactions responsible for the formation of these structures can be identified and rationalized. An increase in the mean charge separation within the carbonate ions increases the connectivity of the emerging structures and leads to an increase in the system fragility.

  20. Clinical aspects of the fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Ted

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome patients express a wide array of cognitive and other gender-specific phenotypic features. These manifestations result not only from molecular mechanisms that are altered as a result of the expansion of a CGG-repeat region in the FMR1 promoter, but also genetic factors such as founder effects and mosaicism. In this chapter, I will summarize the many and varied features of fragile X syndrome as they present themselves in a clinical setting and describe the procedures that are used to diagnose patients. Finally, I will briefly touch on recent developments that will affect patient screening in the future.

  1. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  2. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding is any heavy or unusual bleeding from the uterus (through your ... one symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding. Having extremely heavy bleeding during your period can also be considered ...

  3. Prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chun; Yang, Lily; Miller, Stanley L.; Oró, J.

    1987-09-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose and formamidine has been demonstrated as well as the prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-ethanol and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose, formaldehyde and ammonia. The products were identified by TLC, HPLC, and LC-MS by comparison with authentic samples. The maximum yields of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde, imidazole-4-ethanol, and imidazole-4-glycol obtained in these reactions are 1.6, 5.4, 6.8% respectively, based on the erythrose. Imidazole-4-acetaldehyde would have been converted to histidine on the primitive earth by a Strecker synthesis, and several prebiotic reactions would convert imidazole-4-glycol and imidazole-4-ethanol to imidazole-4-acetaldehyde.

  4. A Trial of Metformin in Individuals With Fragile X Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-05

    Fragile X Syndrome; Fragile X Mental Retardation Syndrome; Mental Retardation, X Linked; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion; Fra(X) Syndrome; Intellectual Disability; FXS; Neurobehavioral Manifestations; Sex Chromosome Disorders

  5. Psychiatric and autistic comorbidity in fragile X syndrome across ages.

    PubMed

    Gabis, Lidia V; Baruch, Yael Kesner; Jokel, Ariela; Raz, Raanan

    2011-08-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by CGG trinucleotide repeat expansion within the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene, when repeat number exceeds 200. The typical psychiatric profile of fragile X syndrome patients includes cognitive and behavioral deficits, psychiatric comorbidity, and autistic characteristics. Specific psychiatric features have not yet been clarified, specifically in relationship to age and genetic characteristics. The objective of this study was to characterize psychiatric comorbidities in subjects with fragile X syndrome at different ages. Subjects with fragile X syndrome and their unaffected siblings were recruited and their parents filled out functional-behavioral and psychiatric comorbidities questionnaires. Adolescents with fragile X syndrome showed decreased prevalence of functional-behavioral deficits. Incidence and severity of most psychiatric comorbidities were lower in older subjects. Incidence of generalized anxiety disorder increased with age in the fragile X syndrome group. The typical profile of patients with fragile X syndrome changes with age. Unaffected siblings exhibit anxiety and motor tics.

  6. Emotion Potentiated Startle in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballinger, Elizabeth C.; Cordeiro, Lisa; Chavez, Alyssa D.; Hagerman, Randi J.; Hessl, David

    2014-01-01

    Social avoidance and anxiety are prevalent in fragile X syndrome (FXS) and are potentially mediated by the amygdala, a brain region critical for social behavior. Unfortunately, functional brain resonance imaging investigation of the amygdala in FXS is limited by the difficulties experienced by intellectually impaired and anxious participants. We…

  7. Attention and Language in Fragile X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Kim; Sudhalter, Vicki; Turk, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a well-recognized cause of mental retardation and developmental delay in males. Alongside the well-documented clinical characteristics of the condition, recent advances in technology and methodology have begun to define FXS at a number of different levels: genetic, brain structure and function, cognition, and behavior.…

  8. Introduction--Understanding Education, Fragility and Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchert, Lene

    2013-01-01

    This Introduction discusses approaches to and perspectives on analyzing the complex relationship between education, fragility, and conflict and its underlying causes and dynamics. It argues for the need for contextual and time-bound multi-level analyses of interlinked societal dimensions in order to address the ultimate purposes of education…

  9. Race and Ethnicity in Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummer, Robert A.; Hamilton, Erin R.

    2010-01-01

    Robert Hummer and Erin Hamilton note that the prevalence of fragile families varies substantially by race and ethnicity. African Americans and Hispanics have the highest prevalence; Asian Americans, the lowest; and whites fall somewhere in the middle. The share of unmarried births is lower among most foreign-born mothers than among their U.S.-born…

  10. Multipartnered Fertility and Depression among Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turney, Kristin; Carlson, Marcia J.

    2011-01-01

    We used data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to examine the association between multipartnered fertility (MPF)--when parents have children with more than one partner--and depression. Random-effects models suggested that MPF is associated with a greater likelihood of depression, net of family structure and other covariates.…

  11. Modeling Family Adaptation to Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspa, Melissa; Bailey, Donald, Jr.; Bann, Carla; Bishop, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Using data from a survey of 1,099 families who have a child with Fragile X syndrome, we examined adaptation across 7 dimensions of family life: parenting knowledge, social support, social life, financial impact, well-being, quality of life, and overall impact. Results illustrate that although families report a high quality of life, they struggle…

  12. Compaction of Ductile and Fragile Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creissac, S.; Pouliquen, O.; Dalloz-Dubrujeaud, B.

    2009-06-01

    The compaction of powders into tablets is widely used in several industries (cosmetics, food, pharmaceutics…). In all these industries, the composition of the initial powder is complex, and the behaviour under compaction is not well known, also the mechanical behaviour of the tablets. The aim of this paper is to understand the behaviour (pressure vs density) of a simplified media made of fragile and ductile powders, varying the relative ratio of each powder. Some compaction experiments were carried out with glass beads (fragile) and Polyethylen Glycol powder (ductile). We observe two typical behaviours, depending on the relative volumic fraction of each component. A transition is pointed out, observing the evolution of the slope of the curve pressure/density. This transition is explained by geometrical considerations during compaction. A model is proposed, based on the assumption that the studied media can be compare to a diphasic material with a continuous phase (the ductile powder) and a discrete phase (the fragile powder). The result of this model is compare to the experimental results of compaction, and give a good prediction of the behaviour of the different mixing, knowing the behaviour of the ductile and the fragile phase separately. These results were also interpreted in terms of Heckel parameter which characterizes the ability of the powder to deform plastically under compaction. Some mechanical tests were also performed to compare the mechanical resitance of the obtained tablets.

  13. Fragile X Syndrome: Genetic Predisposition to Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bregman, Joel D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Psychiatric evaluation of 14 males (ages 3-27 years) with the fragile X syndrome found pervasive hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attentional deficits, and a significant degree of anxiety. However, diagnostic criteria for persistent pervasive developmental disorder and autism were not met. (Author/DB)

  14. Brief Report: Acamprosate in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Craig A.; Mullett, Jennifer E.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamatergic dysfunction is implicated in the pathophysiology of fragile X syndrome (FXS). We report on the first trial of acamprosate, a drug with putative mGluR5 antagonism, in three adults with FXS and autism. Medical records describing open-label treatment with acamprosate in 3 patients with FXS and a comorbid diagnosis of autistic disorder…

  15. Strengthening Fragile Families through Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembry, James X.

    2011-01-01

    Almost one third of all children in the United States are born to unmarried parents. This figure is even higher among poor and minority populations. Because of their heightened risk for economic and social problems and family dissolution, disadvantaged, unmarried parents have been called "fragile families." In 2002 the Bush administration…

  16. Fragile X Syndrome: An Aging Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Andrea; Ligsay, Andrew; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive and behavioral correlates of molecular variations related to the FMR1 gene have been studied rather extensively, but research about the long-term outcome in individuals with fragile X spectrum disorders remains sparse. In this review, we present an overview of aging research and recent findings in regard to cellular and clinical…

  17. Attendance at Fragile X Specialty Clinics: Facilitators and Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Sharon A.; Raspa, Melissa; Clark, Renée; Usrey-Roos, Holly; Wheeler, Anne C.; Liu, Jessica A.; Wylie, Amanda; Sherman, Stephanie L.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were to describe the demographic characteristics of children with Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and to determine predictors of attendance at Fragile X (FX) clinics. Findings from the Community Support Network (CSN) and Our Fragile X World (OFXW) samples showed that children who attended FX Clinics were mostly male, high-school aged or…

  18. Protein-induced geometric constraints and charge transfer in bacteriochlorophyll-histidine complexes in LH2.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Piotr K; Alia, A; Schaap, Roland G; Heemskerk, Mattijs M; de Groot, Huub J M; Buda, Francesco

    2008-12-14

    Bacteriochlorophyll-histidine complexes are ubiquitous in nature and are essential structural motifs supporting the conversion of solar energy into chemically useful compounds in a wide range of photosynthesis processes. A systematic density functional theory study of the NMR chemical shifts for histidine and for bacteriochlorophyll-a-histidine complexes in the light-harvesting complex II (LH2) is performed using the BLYP functional in combination with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The computed chemical shift patterns are consistent with available experimental data for positive and neutral(tau) (N(tau) protonated) crystalline histidines. The results for the bacteriochlorophyll-a-histidine complexes in LH2 provide evidence that the protein environment is stabilizing the histidine close to the Mg ion, thereby inducing a large charge transfer of approximately 0.5 electronic equivalent. Due to this protein-induced geometric constraint, the Mg-coordinated histidine in LH2 appears to be in a frustrated state very different from the formal neutral(pi) (N(pi) protonated) form. This finding could be important for the understanding of basic functional mechanisms involved in tuning the electronic properties and exciton coupling in LH2.

  19. L-histidine inhibits biofilm formation and FLO11-associated phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    PubMed

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Zara, Giacomo; Viti, Carlo; Decorosi, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Budroni, Marilena; Giovannetti, Luciana; Zara, Severino

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of Flo11p which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling Flo11p alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce Flo11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides as the sole nitrogen source, although with some exceptions regarding L-histidine and histidine containing dipeptides. L-histidine completely inhibited growth and its effect on viability was inversely related to Flo11p expression. Accordingly, L-histidine did not affect the viability of the Δflo11 and S288c strains. Also, L-histidine dramatically decreased air-liquid biofilm formation and adhesion to polystyrene of the flor yeasts with no effect on the transcription level of the Flo11p gene. Moreover, L-histidine modified the chitin and glycans content on the cell-wall of flor yeasts. These findings reveal a novel biological activity of L-histidine in controlling the multicellular behavior of yeasts [corrected].

  20. L-Histidine Inhibits Biofilm Formation and FLO11-Associated Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Flor Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Zara, Giacomo; Viti, Carlo; Decorosi, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Budroni, Marilena; Giovannetti, Luciana; Zara, Severino

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of FLO11 which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling FLO11 alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce FLO11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides as the sole nitrogen source, although with some exceptions regarding L-histidine and histidine containing dipeptides. L-histidine completely inhibited growth and its effect on viability was inversely related to FLO11 expression. Accordingly, L-histidine did not affect the viability of the Δflo11 and S288c strains. Also, L-histidine dramatically decreased air–liquid biofilm formation and adhesion to polystyrene of the flor yeasts with no effect on the transcription level of the FLO11 gene. Moreover, L-histidine modified the chitin and glycans content on the cell-wall of flor yeasts. These findings reveal a novel biological activity of L-histidine in controlling the multicellular behavior of yeasts. PMID:25369456

  1. Effects of the location of distal histidine in the reaction of myoglobin with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Ozaki, S i; Liong, E; Phillips, G N; Watanabe, Y

    1999-01-29

    To clarify how the location of distal histidine affects the activation process of H2O2 by heme proteins, we have characterized reactions with H2O2 for the L29H/H64L and F43H/H64L mutants of sperm whale myoglobin (Mb), designed to locate the histidine farther from the heme iron. Whereas the L29H/H64L double substitution retarded the reaction with H2O2, an 11-fold rate increase versus wild-type Mb was observed for the F43H/H64L mutant. The Vmax values for 1-electron oxidations by the myoglobins correlate well with the varied reactivities with H2O2. The functions of the distal histidine as a general acid-base catalyst were examined based on the reactions with cumene hydroperoxide and cyanide, and only the histidine in F43H/H64L Mb was suggested to facilitate heterolysis of the peroxide bond. The x-ray crystal structures of the mutants confirmed that the distal histidines in F43H/H64L Mb and peroxidase are similar in distance from the heme iron, whereas the distal histidine in L29H/H64L Mb is located too far to enhance heterolysis. Our results indicate that the proper positioning of the distal histidine is essential for the activation of H2O2 by heme enzymes.

  2. Fragile X syndrome and an isodicentric X chromosome in a woman with multiple anomalies, developmental delay, and normal pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Freedenberg, D L; Gane, L W; Richards, C S; Lampe, M; Hills, J; O'Connor, R; Manchester, D; Taylor, A; Tassone, F; Hulseberg, D; Hagerman, R J; Patil, S R

    1999-07-30

    We report on an individual with developmental delays, short stature, skeletal abnormalities, normal pubertal development, expansion of the fragile X triplet repeat, as well as an isodicentric X chromosome. S is a 19-year-old woman who presented for evaluation of developmental delay. Pregnancy was complicated by a threatened miscarriage. She was a healthy child with intellectual impairment noted in infancy. Although she had global delays, speech was noted to be disproportionately delayed with few words until age 3.5 years. Facial appearance was consistent with fragile X syndrome. Age of onset of menses was 11 years with normal breast development. A maternal male second cousin had been identified with fragile X syndrome based on DNA studies. The mother of this child (S's maternal first cousin) and the grandfather (S's maternal uncle) were both intellectually normal but were identified as carrying triplet expansions in the premutation range. S's mother had some school difficulties but was not identified as having global delays. Molecular analysis of S's fragile X alleles noted an expansion of more than 400 CGG repeats in one allele. Routine cytogenetic studies of peripheral blood noted the presence of an isodicentric X in 81of 86 cells scored. Five of 86 cells were noted to be 45,X. Cytogenetic fra(X) studies from peripheral blood showed that the structurally normal chromosome had the fragile site in approximately 16% of the cells. Analysis of maternal fragile X alleles identified an allele with an expansion to approximately 110 repeats. FMRP studies detected the expression of the protein in 24% of cells studied. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported with an isodicentric X and fragile X syndrome. Whereas her clinical phenotype is suggestive of fragile X syndrome, her skeletal abnormalities may represent the presence of the isodicentric X. Treatment of S with 20 mg/day of Prozac improved her behavior. In the climate of cost con trol, this individual

  3. Skin fragility syndrome in a cat with cholangiohepatitis and hepatic lipidosis.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Alexandre G T; Lucas, Sílvia R R; Júnior, Archivaldo R; Monteiro, Paula R G; Ramos, Daniela; Pires, Carolina G; Sinhorini, Idércio L

    2010-02-01

    A case of acquired skin fragility syndrome associated with hepatic disease in a 9-year-old, spayed female, domestic shorthair cat is described. The cat was admitted to the veterinary hospital of the University of São Paulo (Brazil) with a 6-week history of vomiting, inappetence and weight loss. Remarkable signs were weakness, lethargy and profound jaundice that had been present for 10 days according to the owner. On completion of the physical examination, when the cat was gently manipulated for blood collection the thoracic limb and interscapular skin tore. Liver enzymes and bilirubin levels were all above the normal range. On histological examination of skin and liver, Masson's trichrome stain showed collagen fibre alteration and major hepatocyte abnormalities. Findings were consistent with feline skin fragility syndrome associated with cholangiohepatitis and hepatic lipidosis. Copyright 2009 ESFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Insights into material and structural basis of bone fragility from diseases associated with fractures: how determinants of the biomechanical properties of bone are compromised by disease.

    PubMed

    Chavassieux, P; Seeman, E; Delmas, P D

    2007-04-01

    Minimal trauma fractures in bone diseases are the result of bone fragility. Rather than considering bone fragility as being the result of a reduced amount of bone, we recognize that bone fragility is the result of changes in the material and structural properties of bone. A better understanding of the contribution of each component of the material composition and structure and how these interact to maintain whole bone strength is obtained by the study of metabolic bone diseases. Disorders of collagen (osteogenesis imperfecta and Paget's disease of bone), mineral content, composition and distribution (fluorosis and osteomalacia); diseases of high remodeling (postmenopausal osteoporosis, hyperparathyroidism, and hyperthyroidism) and low remodeling (osteopetrosis, pycnodysostosis); and other diseases (idiopathic male osteoporosis, corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis) produce abnormalities in the material composition and structure that lead to bone fragility. Observations in patients and in animal models provide insights on the biomechanical consequences of these illnesses and the nature of the qualities of bone that determine its strength.

  5. New mechanisms and targets in the treatment of bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Martin, T John; Seeman, Ego

    2007-01-01

    Bone modelling and remodelling are cell-mediated processes responsible for the construction and reconstruction of the skeleton throughout life. These processes are chiefly mediated by locally generated cytokines and growth factors that regulate the differentiation, activation, work and life span of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, the cells that co-ordinate the volumes of bone resorbed and formed. In this way, the material composition and structural design of bone is regulated in accordance with its loading requirements. Abnormalities in this regulatory system compromise the material and structural determinants of bone strength producing bone fragility. Understanding the intercellular control processes that regulate bone modelling and remodelling is essential in planning therapeutic approaches to prevention and treatment of bone fragility. A great deal has been learnt in the last decade. Clinical trials carried out exclusively with drugs that inhibit bone resorption have identified the importance of reducing the rate of bone remodelling and so the progression of bone fragility to achieved fracture reductions of approx. 50%. These trials have also identified limitations that should be placed upon interpretation of bone mineral density changes in relation to treatment. New resorption inhibitors are being developed, based on mechanisms of action that are different from existing drugs. Some of these might offer resorption inhibition without reducing bone formation. More recent research has provided the first effective anabolic therapy for bone reconstruction. Daily injections of PTH (parathyroid hormone)-(1-34) have been shown in preclinical studies and in a large clinical trial to increase bone tissue mass and reduce the risk of fractures. The action of PTH differs from that of the resorption inhibitors, but whether it is more effective in fracture reduction is not known. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of PTH action, particularly its interactions with

  6. Employment Impact and Financial Burden for Families of Children with Fragile X Syndrome: Findings from the National Fragile X Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouyang, L.; Grosse, S.; Raspa, M.; Bailey, D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The employment impact and financial burden experienced by families of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) has not been quantified in the USA. Method: Using a national fragile X family survey, we analysed data on 1019 families with at least one child who had a full FXS mutation. Out-of-pocket expenditures related to fragile X were…

  7. Fragile X and autism: Intertwined at the molecular level leading to targeted treatments.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, Randi; Hoem, Gry; Hagerman, Paul

    2010-09-21

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by an expanded CGG repeat (> 200 repeats) in the 5' untranslated portion of the fragile mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1), leading to deficiency or absence of the FMR1 protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA carrier protein that controls the translation of several other genes that regulate synaptic development and plasticity. Autism occurs in approximately 30% of FXS cases, and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) occurs in an additional 30% of cases. Premutation repeat expansions (55 to 200 CGG repeats) may also give rise to autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including both autism and PDD-NOS, through a different molecular mechanism that involves a direct toxic effect of the expanded CGG repeat FMR1 mRNA. RNA toxicity can also lead to aging effects including tremor, ataxia and cognitive decline, termed fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), in premutation carriers in late life. In studies of mice bearing premutation expansions, there is evidence of early postnatal neuronal cell toxicity, presenting as reduced cell longevity, decreased dendritic arborization and altered synaptic morphology. There is also evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in premutation carriers. Many of the problems with cellular dysregulation in both premutation and full mutation neurons also parallel the cellular abnormalities that have been documented in autism without fragile X mutations. Research regarding dysregulation of neurotransmitter systems in FXS, including the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)1/5 pathway and γ aminobutyric acid (GABA)A pathways, have led to new targeted treatments for FXS. Preliminary evidence suggests that these new targeted treatments will also be beneficial in non-fragile X forms of autism.

  8. Behavioral Phenotype of Fragile X Syndrome in Adolescence and Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Leann E.; Barker, Erin T.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Abbeduto, Leonard; Greenberg, Jan S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored the behavioral profile of individuals with fragile X syndrome during adolescence and adulthood. Individuals with both fragile X syndrome and autism (n = 30) were compared with (a) individuals diagnosed with fragile X syndrome (but not autism; n = 106) and (b) individuals diagnosed with autism (but not fragile X syndrome; n = 135) on measures of autism symptoms, adaptive functioning, behavior problems, and psychological symptoms. Results indicated that individuals dually diagnosed with fragile X syndrome and autism displayed greater communication and social reciprocity impairments than individuals with fragile X syndrome only. Individuals in the dually diagnosed group also exhibited higher levels of repetitive and challenging behaviors than either comparison group, suggesting a unique profile of vulnerability for those diagnosed with both fragile X syndrome and autism. PMID:22264109

  9. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome: another phenotype of the fragile X gene.

    PubMed

    Hessl, David; Grigsby, Jim

    2016-08-01

    Neuropsychologists have an important role in evaluating patients with fragile X-associated disorders, but most practitioners are unaware of the recently identified neurodegenerative movement disorder known as fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). The objective of this editorial is to orient the reader to FXTAS and highlight the importance of clinical neuropsychology in describing the fragile X premutation phenotype and the role practitioners may have in assessing and monitoring patients with or at risk for neurodegeneration. We issued a call for papers for the special issue, highlighting the primary objective of familiarizing clinical neuropsychologists with FXTAS, and with the neuropsychological phenotype of both male and female asymptomatic carriers. Eight papers are included, including an overview of the fragile X-associated disorders (Grigsby), a review of the neuroradiological and neurological aspects of FXTAS and how the disorder compares to other movement disorders (O'Keefe et al.), a perspective on the prominence of white matter disease and dementia in FXTAS (Filley), and a review of mouse models of FXTAS (Foote). There are four research papers, including one on self-reported memory problems in FXTAS (Birch et al.), and three papers focused on the neuropsychiatric aspects of the fragile X premutation, a review (Bourgeois), an examination of autism-related traits (Schneider), and a research paper on executive functioning and psychopathology (Grigsby). The issue highlights the importance of awareness of fragile X-associated disorders for neuropsychologists, an awareness that must reach beyond neurodevelopmental aspects related to fragile X syndrome into the realm of neurodegenerative disease and aging.

  10. Patterns of funding allocation for tuberculosis control in fragile states.

    PubMed

    Warsame, A; Patel, P; Checchi, F

    2014-01-01

    To assess recent (2006-2010) tuberculosis (TB) funding patterns in conflict and non-conflict-affected fragile states to inform global policy. The Creditor Reporting System was analysed for official development assistance funding disbursements towards TB control in 11 conflict-affected states, 17 non-conflict-affected fragile states and 38 comparable non-fragile states. The amounts of funding, funding relative to burden, funding relative to malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) control, disbursements relative to commitments, sources of funding as well as funding activities were extracted and analysed. Fragile states received on average more per capita for TB control relative to non-fragile states (US0.159 vs. US0.079). However conflict-affected fragile states received on average less per capita than non-conflict-affected states (US0.144 vs. US0.203), despite worse development indicators. Conflict-affected fragile states also received on average only 70% of TB funds already committed. Analysis by burden revealed the least disparity in funding in highest prevalence settings. Analysis of funding activities suggests increasing importance of TB-HIV integration, multidrug-resistant TB and research in both fragile and non-fragile states. Relative to non-conflict-affected fragile states, conflict-affected fragile states received approximately two thirds the per capita funding for TB. This study revealed disparities in TB control funding between fragile and non-fragile as well as between conflict and non-conflict-affected fragile states. Findings suggest possible avenues for improving the allocation of global TB funding.

  11. Chromatographic HPV-16 E6/E7 plasmid vaccine purification employing L-histidine and 1-benzyl-L-histidine affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Lúcia F A; Gaspar, Rita; Pereira, Patrícia; Černigoj, Urh; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João António; Sousa, Ângela

    2017-11-01

    Affinity chromatography based on amino acids as interacting ligands was already indicated as an alternative compared to ion exchange or hydrophobic interaction for plasmid DNA purification. Understanding the recognition mechanisms occurring between histidine-based ligands and nucleic acids enables more efficient purification of a DNA vaccine, as the binding and elution conditions can be adjusted in order to enhance the purification performance. Decreasing pH to slightly acidic conditions increases the positive charge of histidine ligand, what influences the type of interaction between chromatographic support and analytes. This was proven in this work, where hydrophobic effects established in the presence of ammonium sulfate were affected at pH 5.0 in comparison to pH 8.0, while electrostatic and cation-π interactions were intensified. Histidine ligand at pH 5.0 interacts with phosphate groups or aromatic rings of plasmid DNA. Due to different responses of RNA and pDNA on mobile phase changes, the elution order between RNA and pDNA was changed with mobile phase pH decrease from 8.0 to 5.0. The phenomenon was more evident with L-histidine ligand due to more hydrophilic character, leading to an improved selectivity of L-histidine-modified chromatographic monolith, allowing the product recovery with 99% of purity (RNA removal). With the 1-benzyl- L-histidine ligand, stronger and less selective interactions with the nucleic acids were observed due to the additional hydrophobicity associated with the phenyl aromatic ring. Optimization of sample displacement chromatography parameters (especially (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 concentration) at slightly acidic pH enabled excellent isolation of pDNA, by the removal of RNA in a negative mode, with binding capacities above 1.5 mg pDNA per mL of chromatographic support. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Catalysis of peptide bond formation by histidyl-histidine in a fluctuating clay environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Erickson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The condensation of glycine to form oligoglycines during wet-dry fluctuations on clay surfaces was enhanced up to threefold or greater by small amounts of histidyl-histidine. In addition, higher relative yields of the longer oligomers were produced. Other specific dipeptides tested gave no enhancement, and imidazole, histidine, and N-acetylhistidine gave only slight enhancements. Histidyl-histidine apparently acts as a true catalyst (in the sense of repeatedly catalyzing the reaction), since up to 52 nmol of additional glycine were incorporated into oligoglycine for each nmol of catalyst added. This is the first known instance of a peptide or similar molecule demonstrating a catalytic turnover number greater than unity in a prebiotic oligomer synthesis reaction, and suggests that histidyl-histidine is a model for a primitive prebiotic proto-enzyme. Catalysis of peptide bond synthesis by a molecule which is itself a peptide implies that related systems may be capable of exhibiting autocatalytic growth.

  13. Genome-wide transcription analysis of histidine-related cataract in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L)

    PubMed Central

    Waagbø, Rune; Breck, Olav; Stavrum, Anne-Kristin; Petersen, Kjell; Olsvik, Pål A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Elevated levels of dietary histidine have previously been shown to prevent or mitigate cataract formation in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L). The aim of this study was to shed light on the mechanisms by which histidine acts. Applying microarray analysis to the lens transcriptome, we screened for differentially expressed genes in search for a model explaining cataract development in Atlantic salmon and possible markers for early cataract diagnosis. Methods Adult Atlantic salmon (1.7 kg) were fed three standard commercial salmon diets only differing in the histidine content (9, 13, and 17 g histidine/kg diet) for four months. Individual cataract scores for both eyes were assessed by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Lens N-acetyl histidine contents were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Total RNA extracted from whole lenses was analyzed using the GRASP 16K salmonid microarray. The microarray data were analyzed using J-Express Pro 2.7 and validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT–PCR). Results Fish developed cataracts with different severity in response to dietary histidine levels. Lens N-acetyl histidine contents reflected the dietary histidine levels and were negatively correlated to cataract scores. Significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) revealed 248 significantly up-regulated transcripts and 266 significantly down-regulated transcripts in fish that were fed a low level of histidine compared to fish fed a higher histidine level. Among the differentially expressed transcripts were metallothionein A and B as well as transcripts involved in lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, regulation of ion homeostasis, and protein degradation. Hierarchical clustering and correspondence analysis plot confirmed differences in gene expression between the feeding groups. The differentially expressed genes could be categorized as “early” and “late” responsive according to their expression pattern relative to

  14. An histidine covalent receptor/butenolide complex mediates strigolactone perception

    PubMed Central

    Badet-Denisot, Marie-Ange; Pillot, Jean-Paul; Cornu, David; Le Caer, Jean-Pierre; Burger, Marco; Pelissier, Frank; Retailleau, Pascal; Turnbull, Colin; Bonhomme, Sandrine; Chory, Joanne; Rameau, Catherine; Boyer, François-Didier

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactone plant hormones control plant architecture and are key players in both symbiotic and parasitic interactions. They contain an ABC tricyclic lactone connected to a butenolide group, the D-ring. The DWARF14 (D14) strigolactone receptor belongs to the superfamily of α/β-hydrolases and is known to hydrolyze the bond between the ABC lactone and the D-ring. Here we characterize the binding and catalytic functions of RAMOSUS3 (RMS3), the pea (Pisum sativum) ortholog of rice (Oryza sativa) D14 strigolactone receptor. Using novel profluorescent probes with strigolactone-like bioactivity, we show that RMS3 acts as a single-turnover enzyme that explains its apparent low enzymatic rate. We further demonstrate the formation of a covalent RMS3/D-ring complex, essential for bioactivity, in which the D-ring is attached to Histidine 247 of the catalytic triad. These results reveal an undescribed mechanism of plant hormone reception where the receptor performs an irreversible enzymatic reaction to generate its own ligand. PMID:27479744

  15. Preserved Entropy, quantum criticality and fragile magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Paul

    A large swath of strongly correlated electron systems can be associated with the phenomenon of preserved entropy and fragile magnetism. In this talk I will present our thoughts and plans for the discovery and development of lanthanide and transition metal based, strongly correlated systems that are revealed by suppressed, fragile magnetism or grow out of preserved entropy. This talk is based on work published in This work was supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Science, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 as well as by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundations EPiQS Initiative through Grant GBMF4411.

  16. The amino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues of stem bromelain

    PubMed Central

    Husain, S. S.; Lowe, G.

    1970-01-01

    Stem bromelain that had been irreversibly inhibited with 1,3-dibromo[2-14C]-acetone was reduced with sodium borohydride and carboxymethylated with iodoacetic acid. After digestion with trypsin and α-chymotrypsin three radioactive peptides were isolated chromatographically. The amino acid sequences around the cross-linked cysteine and histidine residues were determined and showed a high degree of homology with those around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues of papain and ficin. PMID:5420046

  17. Fragility Analysis of Concrete Gravity Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekie, Paulos B.; Ellingwood, Bruce R.

    2002-09-01

    Concrete gravity dams are an important part ofthe nation's infrastructure. Many dams have been in service for over 50 years, during which time important advances in the methodologies for evaluation of natural phenomena hazards have caused the design-basis events to be revised upwards, in some cases significantly. Many existing dams fail to meet these revised safety criteria and structural rehabilitation to meet newly revised criteria may be costly and difficult. A probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) provides a rational safety assessment and decision-making tool managing the various sources of uncertainty that may impact dam performance. Fragility analysis, which depicts fl%e uncertainty in the safety margin above specified hazard levels, is a fundamental tool in a PSA. This study presents a methodology for developing fragilities of concrete gravity dams to assess their performance against hydrologic and seismic hazards. Models of varying degree of complexity and sophistication were considered and compared. The methodology is illustrated using the Bluestone Dam on the New River in West Virginia, which was designed in the late 1930's. The hydrologic fragilities showed that the Eluestone Dam is unlikely to become unstable at the revised probable maximum flood (PMF), but it is likely that there will be significant cracking at the heel ofthe dam. On the other hand, the seismic fragility analysis indicated that sliding is likely, if the dam were to be subjected to a maximum credible earthquake (MCE). Moreover, there will likely be tensile cracking at the neck of the dam at this level of seismic excitation. Probabilities of relatively severe limit states appear to be only marginally affected by extremely rare events (e.g. the PMF and MCE). Moreover, the risks posed by the extreme floods and earthquakes were not balanced for the Bluestone Dam, with seismic hazard posing a relatively higher risk.

  18. Mechanisms of Normal and Abnormal Endometrial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of coagulation, is enhanced in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. Progesterone also augments a second HESC hemostatic factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In contrast, progestins inhibit HESC matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, 3 and 9 expression to stabilize endometrial stromal and vascular extracellular matrix. Through these mechanisms decidualized endometrium is rendered both hemostatic and resistant to excess trophoblast invasion in the mid-luteal phase and throughout gestation to prevent hemorrhage and accreta. In non-fertile cycles, progesterone withdrawal results in decreased HESC TF and PAI-expression and increased MMP activity and inflammatory cytokine production promoting the controlled hemorrhage of menstruation and related tissue sloughing. In contrast to these well ordered biochemical processes, unpredictable endometrial bleeding associated with anovulation reflects absence of progestational effects on TF, PAI-1 and MMP activity as well as unrestrained angiogenesis rendering the endometrium non-hemostatic, proteolytic and highly vascular. Abnormal bleeding associated with long-term progestin-only contraceptives results not from impaired hemostasis but from unrestrained angiogenesis leading to large fragile endometrial vessels. This abnormal angiogenesis reflects progestational inhibition of endometrial blood flow promoting local hypoxia and generation of reactive oxygen species that increase production of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in HESCs and Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in endometrial endothelial cells while decreasing HESC expression of angiostatic, Ang-1. The resulting vessel fragility promotes bleeding. Aberrant angiogenesis also underlies abnormal bleeding associated with myomas and endometrial polyps however there are gaps in our understanding of this pathology. PMID:21499503

  19. Role of Reversible Histidine Coordination in Hydroxylamine Reduction by Plant Hemoglobins (Phytoglobins).

    PubMed

    Athwal, Navjot Singh; Alagurajan, Jagannathan; Andreotti, Amy H; Hargrove, Mark S

    2016-10-18

    Reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonium by phytoglobin, a plant hexacoordinate hemoglobin, is much faster than that of other hexacoordinate hemoglobins or pentacoordinate hemoglobins such as myoglobin, leghemoglobin, and red blood cell hemoglobin. The reason for differences in reactivity is not known but could be intermolecular electron transfer between protein molecules in support of the required two-electron reduction, hydroxylamine binding, or active site architecture favoring the reaction. Experiments were conducted with phytoglobins from rice, tomato, and soybean along with human neuroglobin and soybean leghemoglobin that reveal hydroxylamine binding as the rate-limiting step. For hexacoordinate hemoglobins, binding is limited by the dissociation rate constant for the distal histidine, while leghemoglobin is limited by an intrinsically low affinity for hydroxylamine. When the distal histidine is removed from rice phytoglobin, a hydroxylamine-bound intermediate is formed and the reaction rate is diminished, indicating that the distal histidine imidazole side chain is critical for the reaction, albeit not for electron transfer but rather for direct interaction with the substrate. Together, these results demonstrate that phytoglobins are superior at hydroxylamine reduction because they have distal histidine coordination affinity constants near 1, and facile rate constants for binding and dissociation of the histidine side chain. Hexacoordinate hemoglobins such as neuroglobin are limited by tighter histidine coordination that blocks hydroxylamine binding, and pentacoordinate hemoglobins have intrinsically lower hydroxylamine affinities.

  20. Effect of starvation on free histidine and amino acids in white muscle of milkfish Chanos chanos.

    PubMed

    Shiau, C Y; Pong, Y P; Chiou, T K; Tin, Y Y

    2001-03-01

    Milkfish (Chanos chanos) decreased their body weight from 47 to 28 g over the 60-day period of starvation. Starvation also resulted in the reduction of muscle lipid and protein, and hepatosomatic index. The predominant free amino acid (FAA) in white muscle of milkfish was histidine, followed by taurine and glycine. In the first 25 days of starvation, no significant change in histidine was found. After 40 days of starvation, however, the histidine concentration was significantly decreased by 46%, and remained unchanged thereafter. As compared to control group fish, the 60-day-starved fish possessed only half the amount of histidine. Taurine and glycine, on the other hand, showed no significant changes throughout starvation. Taurine became the most predominant in the FAA pool after 40 days of starvation, and the concentration of 60-day-starved fish was two times higher than that of control group fish without starvation. The ratios of histidine, taurine, and glycine to total FAAs remained approximately the same although the individual contributions varied considerably to the total FAAs during starvation. The results of this study suggested that a good strategy would be to keep taurine and glycine in milkfish muscle at relatively high levels for physiological function as histidine decreased drastically for energy source under conditions of food deprivation.

  1. The Fragile X Protein and Genome Function.

    PubMed

    Dockendorff, Thomas C; Labrador, Mariano

    2018-05-23

    The fragile X syndrome (FXS) arises from loss of expression or function of the FMR1 gene and is one of the most common monogenic forms of intellectual disability and autism. During the past two decades of FXS research, the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) has been primarily characterized as a cytoplasmic RNA binding protein that facilitates transport of select RNA substrates through neural projections and regulation of translation within synaptic compartments, with the protein products of such mRNAs then modulating cognitive functions. However, the presence of a small fraction of FMRP in the nucleus has long been recognized. Accordingly, recent studies have uncovered several mechanisms or pathways by which FMRP influences nuclear gene expression and genome function. Some of these pathways appear to be independent of the classical role for FMRP as a regulator of translation and point to novel functions, including the possibility that FMRP directly participates in the DNA damage response and in the maintenance of genome stability. In this review, we highlight these advances and discuss how these new findings could contribute to our understanding of FMRP in brain development and function, the neural pathology of fragile X syndrome, and perhaps impact of future therapeutic considerations.

  2. Modeling Fragile X Syndrome in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Drozd, Małgorzata; Bardoni, Barbara; Capovilla, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) and autism are hallmarks of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), a hereditary neurodevelopmental disorder. The gene responsible for FXS is Fragile X Mental Retardation gene 1 (FMR1) encoding the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein involved in RNA metabolism and modulating the expression level of many targets. Most cases of FXS are caused by silencing of FMR1 due to CGG expansions in the 5′-UTR of the gene. Humans also carry the FXR1 and FXR2 paralogs of FMR1 while flies have only one FMR1 gene, here called dFMR1, sharing the same level of sequence homology with all three human genes, but functionally most similar to FMR1. This enables a much easier approach for FMR1 genetic studies. Drosophila has been widely used to investigate FMR1 functions at genetic, cellular, and molecular levels since dFMR1 mutants have many phenotypes in common with the wide spectrum of FMR1 functions that underlay the disease. In this review, we present very recent Drosophila studies investigating FMRP functions at genetic, cellular, molecular, and electrophysiological levels in addition to research on pharmacological treatments in the fly model. These studies have the potential to aid the discovery of pharmacological therapies for FXS. PMID:29713264

  3. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  4. Wild-Type Male Offspring of fmr-1+/− Mothers Exhibit Characteristics of the Fragile X Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zupan, Bojana; Toth, Miklos

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is an X-linked disorder caused by the inactivation of the FMR-1 gene with symptoms ranging from impaired cognitive functions to seizures, anxiety, sensory abnormalities, and hyperactivity. Males are more severely affected than heterozygote (H) females, who, as carriers, have a 50% chance of transmitting the mutated allele in each pregnancy. fmr-1 knockout (KO) mice reproduce fragile X symptoms, including hyperactivity, seizures, and abnormal sensory processing. In contrast to the expectation that wild-type (WT) males born to H (fmr-1+/−) mothers (H> WT) are behaviorally normal and indistinguishable from WT males born to WT mothers (WT> WT); here, we show that H> WT offspring are more active than WT> WT offspring and that their hyperactivity is similar to male KO mice born to H or KO (fmr-1−/−) mothers (H> KO/KO> KO). H> WT mice, however, do not exhibit seizures or abnormal sensory processing. Consistent with their hyperactivity, the effect of the D2 agonist quinpirole is reduced in H> WT as well as in H> KO and KO> KO mice compared to WT> WT offspring, suggesting a diminished feedback inhibition of dopamine release. Our data indicate that some aspects of hyperactivity and associated dopaminergic changes in ‘fragile X’ mice are a maternal fmr-1 genotype rather than an offspring fmr-1 genotype effect. PMID:18172434

  5. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  6. BC RNA Mislocalization in the Fragile X Premutation.

    PubMed

    Muslimov, Ilham A; Eom, Taesun; Iacoangeli, Anna; Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Hukema, Renate K; Willemsen, Rob; Stefanov, Dimitre G; Wong, Robert K S; Tiedge, Henri

    2018-01-01

    Fragile X premutation disorder is caused by CGG triplet repeat expansions in the 5' untranslated region of FMR1 mRNA. The question of how expanded CGG repeats cause disease is a subject of continuing debate. Our work indicates that CGG-repeat structures compete with regulatory BC1 RNA for access to RNA transport factor hnRNP A2. As a result, BC1 RNA is mislocalized in vivo, as its synapto-dendritic presence is severely diminished in brains of CGG-repeat knock-in animals (a premutation mouse model). Lack of BC1 RNA is known to cause seizure activity and cognitive dysfunction. Our working hypothesis thus predicted that absence, or significantly reduced presence, of BC1 RNA in synapto-dendritic domains of premutation animal neurons would engender cognate phenotypic alterations. Testing this prediction, we established epileptogenic susceptibility and cognitive impairments as major phenotypic abnormalities of CGG premutation mice. In CA3 hippocampal neurons of such animals, synaptic release of glutamate elicits neuronal hyperexcitability in the form of group I metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent prolonged epileptiform discharges. CGG-repeat knock-in animals are susceptible to sound-induced seizures and are cognitively impaired as revealed in the Attentional Set Shift Task. These phenotypic disturbances occur in young-adult premutation animals, indicating that a neurodevelopmental deficit is an early-initial manifestation of the disorder. The data are consistent with the notion that RNA mislocalization can contribute to pathogenesis.

  7. The Prader-Willi phenotype of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Stephen T; Tassone, Flora; Ono, Michele Y; Ferranti, Jessica; Croquette, Marie Francoise; Goodlin-Jones, Beth; Hagerman, Randi J

    2007-04-01

    The Prader-Willi phenotype (PWP) of fragile X syndrome (FXS) is associated with obesity and hyperphagia similar to Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), but without cytogenetic or methylation abnormalities at 15q11-13. Thirteen cases of PWP and FXS are reported here that were identified by obesity and hyperphagia. Delayed puberty was seen in 5 of 9 cases who had entered puberty, a small penis or testicles in seven of 13 cases, and infant hypotonia and/or a poor suck in seven of 13 cases. Autism spectrum disorder occurred in 10 of 13 cases, and autism was diagnosed in seven of 13 cases. We investigated cytoplasmic interacting FMR1 protein (CYFIP) expression, which is a protein that interacts with FMR1 protein (FMRP) because the gene for CYFIP is located at 15q11-13. CYFIP mRNA levels were significantly reduced in our patients with the PWP and FXS compared to individuals without FXS (p < .001) and also individuals with FXS without PWP (p = .03).

  8. Treatment of the psychiatric problems associated with fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, Randi J; Polussa, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    This work reviews recent research regarding treatment of fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. The phenotype includes anxiety linked to sensory hyperarousal, hyperactivity, and attentional problems consistent with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and social deficits leading to autism spectrum disorder in 60% of boys and 25% of girls with FXS. Multiple targeted treatments for FXS have rescued the phenotype of the fmr1 knockout mouse, but few have been beneficial to patients with FXS. The failure of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonists falls on the heels of the failure of Arbaclofen's efficacy in children and adults with autism or FXS. In contrast, efficacy has been demonstrated in a controlled trial of minocycline in children with FXS. Minocycline lowers the abnormally elevated levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in FXS. Acamprosate and lovastatin have been beneficial in open-label trials in FXS. The first 5 years of life may be the most efficacious time for intervention when combined with behavioral and/or educational interventions. Minocycline, acamprosate, lovastatin, and sertraline are treatments that can be currently prescribed and have shown benefit in children with FXS. Use of combined medical and behavioral interventions will likely be most efficacious for the treatment of FXS.

  9. Nuclear Power Plant Mechanical Component Flooding Fragility Experiments Status

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, C. L.; Savage, B.; Johnson, B.

    This report describes progress on Nuclear Power Plant mechanical component flooding fragility experiments and supporting research. The progress includes execution of full scale fragility experiments using hollow-core doors, design of improvements to the Portal Evaluation Tank, equipment procurement and initial installation of PET improvements, designation of experiments exploiting the improved PET capabilities, fragility mathematical model development, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulations, wave impact simulation device research, and pipe rupture mechanics research.

  10. Intra- and Interprotein Phosphorylation between Two-hybrid Histidine Kinases Controls Myxococcus xanthus Developmental Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Andreas; Lee, Bongsoo; Higgs, Penelope I.

    2012-01-01

    Histidine-aspartate phosphorelay signaling systems are used to couple stimuli to cellular responses. A hallmark feature is the highly modular signal transmission modules that can form both simple “two-component” systems and sophisticated multicomponent systems that integrate stimuli over time and space to generate coordinated and fine-tuned responses. The deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus contains a large repertoire of signaling proteins, many of which regulate its multicellular developmental program. Here, we assign an orphan hybrid histidine protein kinase, EspC, to the Esp signaling system that negatively regulates progression through the M. xanthus developmental program. The Esp signal system consists of the hybrid histidine protein kinase, EspA, two serine/threonine protein kinases, and a putative transport protein. We demonstrate that EspC is an essential component of this system because ΔespA, ΔespC, and ΔespA ΔespC double mutants share an identical developmental phenotype. Neither substitution of the phosphoaccepting histidine residue nor deletion of the entire catalytic ATPase domain in EspC produces an in vivo mutant developmental phenotype. In contrast, substitution of the receiver phosphoaccepting residue yields the null phenotype. Although the EspC histidine kinase can efficiently autophosphorylate in vitro, it does not act as a phosphodonor to its own receiver domain. Our in vitro and in vivo analyses suggest the phosphodonor is instead the EspA histidine kinase. We propose EspA and EspC participate in a novel hybrid histidine protein kinase signaling mechanism involving both inter- and intraprotein phosphotransfer. The output of this signaling system appears to be the combined phosphorylated state of the EspA and EspC receiver modules. This system regulates the proteolytic turnover of MrpC, an important regulator of the developmental program. PMID:22661709

  11. Self-Injurious Behavior and Fragile X Syndrome: Findings from the National Fragile X Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Frank J.; Byiers, Breanne J.; Raspa, Melissa; Bishop, Ellen; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We used National Fragile X Survey data in order to examine reported self-injurious behavior (SIB) to (a) generate lifetime and point prevalence estimates, (b) document detailed features of SIB (frequency, types, location, severity) in relation to gender, and (c) compare comorbid conditions between matched pairs (SIB vs. no SIB). Results indicate…

  12. Chromosome fragility at FRAXA in human cleavage stage embryos at risk for fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verdyck, Pieter; Berckmoes, Veerle; De Vos, Anick; Verpoest, Willem; Liebaers, Inge; Bonduelle, Maryse; De Rycke, Martine

    2015-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited intellectual disability syndrome, is caused by expansion and hypermethylation of the CGG repeat in the 5' UTR of the FMR1 gene. This expanded repeat, also known as the rare fragile site FRAXA, causes X chromosome fragility in cultured cells from patients but only when induced by perturbing pyrimidine synthesis. We performed preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) on 595 blastomeres biopsied from 442 cleavage stage embryos at risk for FXS using short tandem repeat (STR) markers. In six blastomeres, from five embryos an incomplete haplotype was observed with loss of all alleles telomeric to the CGG repeat. In all five embryos, the incomplete haplotype corresponded to the haplotype carrying the CGG repeat expansion. Subsequent analysis of additional blastomeres from three embryos by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) confirmed the presence of a terminal deletion with a breakpoint close to the CGG repeat in two blastomeres from one embryo. A blastomere from another embryo showed the complementary duplication. We conclude that a CGG repeat expansion at FRAXA causes X chromosome fragility in early human IVF embryos at risk for FXS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Identification of histidine residues that act as zinc ligands in beta-lactamase II by differential tritium exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, G S; Waley, S G; Abraham, E P

    1979-01-01

    1. Four histidine-containing peptides have been isolated from a tryptic digest of the Zn2+-requiring beta-lactamase II from Bacillus cereus. One of these peptides probably contains two histidine residues. 2. The presence of one equivalent of Zn2+ substantially decreases the rate of exchange of the C-2 proton in at least two and probably three of the histidine residues of these peptides for solvent 3H. 3. It is concluded that peptides containing at least two of the three histidine residues acting as Zn2+ ligands at the tighter Zn2+-binding site of beta-lactamase II have been identified. PMID:314287

  14. [Ionization energies and infrared spectra studies of histidine using density functional theory].

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiong; Wang, Guo-Ying; Liu, Gang; Ou, Jia-Ming; Wang, Rui-Li

    2010-05-01

    Histidines provide axial ligands to the primary electron donors in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) and play an important role in the protein environments of these donors. In this paper the authors present a systematic study of ionization energies and vibrational properties of histidine using hybrid density functional theory (DFT). All calculations were undertaken by using B3LYP method in combination with four basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-31G(df, p), 6-31+G(d) and 6-311+G(2d, 2p) with the aim to investigate how the basis sets influence the calculation results. To investigate solvent effects and gain a detailed understanding of marker bands of histidine, the ionization energies of histidine and the vibrational frequencies of histidine which are unlabeled and 13C, 15N, and 2H labeled in the gas phase, CCl4, protein environment, THF and water solution, which span a wide range of dielectric constant, were also calculated. Our results showed that: (1) The main geometry parameters of histidine were impacted by basis sets and mediums, and C2-N3 and N3-C4 bond of imidazole ring of histidine side chain display the maximum bond lengths in the gas phase; (2) single point energies and frequencies calculated were decreased while ionization energies increased with the increasing level of basis sets and diffuse function applied in the same solvent; (3) with the same computational method, the higher the dielectric constant of the solvent used, the lower the ionization energy and vibrational frequency and the higher the intensity obtained. In addition, calculated ionization energy in the gas phase and marker bands of histidine as well as frequency shift upon 13C and 15N labeling at the computationally more expensive 6-311+G(2d, 2p) level are in good agreement with experimental observations available in literatures. All calculations indicated that the results calculated by using higher level basis set with diffuse function were more accurate and closer to the experimental value. In

  15. Ypq3p-dependent histidine uptake by the vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Kunio; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Ikeda, Koichi; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-06-01

    The vacuolar membrane proteins Ypq1p, Ypq2p, and Ypq3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are known as the members of the PQ-loop protein family. We found that the ATP-dependent uptake activities of arginine and histidine by the vacuolar membrane vesicles were decreased by ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ mutations, respectively. YPQ1 and AVT1, which are involved in the vacuolar uptake of lysine/arginine and histidine, respectively, were deleted in addition to ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ. The vacuolar membrane vesicles isolated from the resulting quadruple deletion mutant ypq1Δypq2Δypq3Δavt1Δ completely lost the uptake activity of basic amino acids, and that of histidine, but not lysine and arginine, was evidently enhanced by overexpressing YPQ3 in the mutant. These results suggest that Ypq3p is specifically involved in the vacuolar uptake of histidine in S. cerevisiae. The cellular level of Ypq3p-HA(3) was enhanced by depletion of histidine from culture medium, suggesting that it is regulated by the substrate.

  16. Mussel-inspired histidine-based transient network metal coordination hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E.; He, Lihong; Barrett, Devin G.; Burghardt, Wesley R.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2013-01-01

    Transient network hydrogels cross-linked through histidine-divalent cation coordination bonds were studied by conventional rheologic methods using histidine-modified star poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymers. These materials were inspired by the mussel, which is thought to use histidine-metal coordination bonds to impart self-healing properties in the mussel byssal thread. Hydrogel viscoelastic mechanical properties were studied as a function of metal, pH, concentration, and ionic strength. The equilibrium metal-binding constants were determined by dilute solution potentiometric titration of monofunctional histidine-modified methoxy-PEG and were found to be consistent with binding constants of small molecule analogs previously studied. pH-dependent speciation curves were then calculated using the equilibrium constants determined by potentiometric titration, providing insight into the pH dependence of histidine-metal ion coordination and guiding the design of metal coordination hydrogels. Gel relaxation dynamics were found to be uncorrelated with the equilibrium constants measured, but were correlated to the expected coordination bond dissociation rate constants. PMID:23441102

  17. Histidine phosphorylation relieves copper inhibition in the mammalian potassium channel KCa3.1

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shekhar; Panda, Saswati; Li, Zhai; Fuhs, Stephen R; Hunter, Tony; Thiele, Dennis J; Hubbard, Stevan R; Skolnik, Edward Y

    2016-01-01

    KCa2.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 constitute a family of mammalian small- to intermediate-conductance potassium channels that are activated by calcium-calmodulin. KCa3.1 is unique among these four channels in that activation requires, in addition to calcium, phosphorylation of a single histidine residue (His358) in the cytoplasmic region, by nucleoside diphosphate kinase-B (NDPK-B). The mechanism by which KCa3.1 is activated by histidine phosphorylation is unknown. Histidine phosphorylation is well characterized in prokaryotes but poorly understood in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of His358 activates KCa3.1 by antagonizing copper-mediated inhibition of the channel. Furthermore, we show that activated CD4+ T cells deficient in intracellular copper exhibit increased KCa3.1 histidine phosphorylation and channel activity, leading to increased calcium flux and cytokine production. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for a mammalian potassium channel and for T-cell activation, and highlight a unique feature of histidine versus serine/threonine and tyrosine as a regulatory phosphorylation site. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16093.001 PMID:27542194

  18. The active transport of histidine and its role in ATP production in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Barisón, M J; Damasceno, F S; Mantilla, B S; Silber, A M

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas's disease, metabolizes glucose, and after its exhaustion, degrades amino acids as energy source. Here, we investigate histidine uptake and its participation in energy metabolism. No putative genes for the histidine biosynthetic pathway have been identified in genome databases of T. cruzi, suggesting that its uptake from extracellular medium is a requirement for the viability of the parasite. From this assumption, we characterized the uptake of histidine in T. cruzi, showing that this amino acid is incorporated through a single and saturable active system. We also show that histidine can be completely oxidised to CO2. This finding, together with the fact that genes encoding the putative enzymes for the histidine - glutamate degradation pathway were annotated, led us to infer its participation in the energy metabolism of the parasite. Here, we show that His is capable of restoring cell viability after long-term starvation. We confirm that as an energy source, His provides electrons to the electron transport chain, maintaining mitochondrial inner membrane potential and O2 consumption in a very efficient manner. Additionally, ATP biosynthesis from oxidative phosphorylation was found when His was the only oxidisable metabolite present, showing that this amino acid is involved in bioenergetics and parasite persistence within its invertebrate host.

  19. Alterations of amino acids and monoamine metabolism in male Fmr1 knockout mice: a putative animal model of the human fragile X mental retardation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gruss, M; Braun, K

    2001-01-01

    The Fragile X syndrome, a common form of mental retardation in humans, is caused by silencing the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene leading to the absence of the encoded fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMRP). We describe morphological and behavioral abnormalities for both affected humans and Fmr1 knockout mice, a putative animal model for the human Fragile X syndrome. The aim of the present study was to identify possible neurochemical abnormalities in Fmr1 knockout mice, with particular focus on neurotransmission. Significant region-specific differences of basal neurotransmitter and metabolite levels were found between wildtype and Fmr1 knockout animals, predominantly in juveniles (post-natal days 28 to 31). Adults (postnatal days 209 to 221) showed only few abnormalities as compared with the wildtype. In juvenile knockout mice, aspartate and taurine were especially increased in cortical regions, striatum, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem. In addition, juveniles showed an altered balance between excitatory and inhibitory amino acids in the caudal cortex, hippocampus, and brainstem. We detected very few differences in monoamine turnover in both age stages. The results presented here provide the first evidence that lack of FMRP expression in FMRP knockout mice is accompanied by age-dependent, region-specific alterations in neurotransmission.

  20. Melatonin as a Novel Interventional Candidate for Fragile X Syndrome with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Humans.

    PubMed

    Won, Jinyoung; Jin, Yunho; Choi, Jeonghyun; Park, Sookyoung; Lee, Tae Ho; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2017-06-20

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenic form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). FXS with ASD results from the loss of fragile X mental retardation ( fmr ) gene products, including fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which triggers a variety of physiological and behavioral abnormalities. This disorder is also correlated with clock components underlying behavioral circadian rhythms and, thus, a mutation of the fmr gene can result in disturbed sleep patterns and altered circadian rhythms. As a result, FXS with ASD individuals may experience dysregulation of melatonin synthesis and alterations in melatonin-dependent signaling pathways that can impair vigilance, learning, and memory abilities, and may be linked to autistic behaviors such as abnormal anxiety responses. Although a wide variety of possible causes, symptoms, and clinical features of ASD have been studied, the correlation between altered circadian rhythms and FXS with ASD has yet to be extensively investigated. Recent studies have highlighted the impact of melatonin on the nervous, immune, and metabolic systems and, even though the utilization of melatonin for sleep dysfunctions in ASD has been considered in clinical research, future studies should investigate its neuroprotective role during the developmental period in individuals with ASD. Thus, the present review focuses on the regulatory circuits involved in the dysregulation of melatonin and disruptions in the circadian system in individuals with FXS with ASD. Additionally, the neuroprotective effects of melatonin intervention therapies, including improvements in neuroplasticity and physical capabilities, are discussed and the molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder are reviewed. The authors suggest that melatonin may be a useful treatment for FXS with ASD in terms of alleviating the adverse effects of variations in the circadian rhythm.

  1. Melatonin as a Novel Interventional Candidate for Fragile X Syndrome with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jinyoung; Jin, Yunho; Choi, Jeonghyun; Park, Sookyoung; Lee, Tae Ho; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2017-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenic form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). FXS with ASD results from the loss of fragile X mental retardation (fmr) gene products, including fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which triggers a variety of physiological and behavioral abnormalities. This disorder is also correlated with clock components underlying behavioral circadian rhythms and, thus, a mutation of the fmr gene can result in disturbed sleep patterns and altered circadian rhythms. As a result, FXS with ASD individuals may experience dysregulation of melatonin synthesis and alterations in melatonin-dependent signaling pathways that can impair vigilance, learning, and memory abilities, and may be linked to autistic behaviors such as abnormal anxiety responses. Although a wide variety of possible causes, symptoms, and clinical features of ASD have been studied, the correlation between altered circadian rhythms and FXS with ASD has yet to be extensively investigated. Recent studies have highlighted the impact of melatonin on the nervous, immune, and metabolic systems and, even though the utilization of melatonin for sleep dysfunctions in ASD has been considered in clinical research, future studies should investigate its neuroprotective role during the developmental period in individuals with ASD. Thus, the present review focuses on the regulatory circuits involved in the dysregulation of melatonin and disruptions in the circadian system in individuals with FXS with ASD. Additionally, the neuroprotective effects of melatonin intervention therapies, including improvements in neuroplasticity and physical capabilities, are discussed and the molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder are reviewed. The authors suggest that melatonin may be a useful treatment for FXS with ASD in terms of alleviating the adverse effects of variations in the circadian rhythm. PMID:28632163

  2. Security of fragile authentication watermarks with localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrich, Jessica

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, we study the security of fragile image authentication watermarks that can localize tampered areas. We start by comparing the goals, capabilities, and advantages of image authentication based on watermarking and cryptography. Then we point out some common security problems of current fragile authentication watermarks with localization and classify attacks on authentication watermarks into five categories. By investigating the attacks and vulnerabilities of current schemes, we propose a variation of the Wong scheme18 that is fast, simple, cryptographically secure, and resistant to all known attacks, including the Holliman-Memon attack9. In the new scheme, a special symmetry structure in the logo is used to authenticate the block content, while the logo itself carries information about the block origin (block index, the image index or time stamp, author ID, etc.). Because the authentication of the content and its origin are separated, it is possible to easily identify swapped blocks between images and accurately detect cropped areas, while being able to accurately localize tampered pixels.

  3. Autism, Alzheimer disease, and fragile X

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, D.K.; Maloney, B.; Long, J.M.; Ray, B.

    2011-01-01

    The present review highlights an association between autism, Alzheimer disease (AD), and fragile X syndrome (FXS). We propose a conceptual framework involving the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), Aβ precursor protein (APP), and fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) based on experimental evidence. The anabolic (growth-promoting) effect of the secreted α form of the amyloid-β precursor protein (sAPPα) may contribute to the state of brain overgrowth implicated in autism and FXS. Our previous report demonstrated that higher plasma sAPPα levels associate with more severe symptoms of autism, including aggression. This molecular effect could contribute to intellectual disability due to repression of cell–cell adhesion, promotion of dense, long, thin dendritic spines, and the potential for disorganized brain structure as a result of disrupted neurogenesis and migration. At the molecular level, APP and FMRP are linked via the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Specifically, mGluR5 activation releases FMRP repression of APP mRNA translation and stimulates sAPP secretion. The relatively lower sAPPα level in AD may contribute to AD symptoms that significantly contrast with those of FXS and autism. Low sAPPα and production of insoluble Aβ would favor a degenerative process, with the brain atrophy seen in AD. Treatment with mGluR antagonists may help repress APP mRNA translation and reduce secretion of sAPP in FXS and perhaps autism. PMID:21482951

  4. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  5. Capture and separation of l-histidine through optimized zinc-decorated magnetic silica spheres.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Vanessa F; Sebastián, Víctor; Silva, Carlos J R; Botelho, Gabriela; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2017-09-01

    Zinc-decorated magnetic silica spheres were developed, optimized and tested for the capture and separation of l-histidine. The magnetic silica spheres were prepared using a simple sol-gel method and show excellent magnetic characteristics, adsorption capacity toward metal ions, and stability in aqueous solution in a wide pH range. The binding capacity of zinc-decorated magnetic silica spheres to histidine proved to be strongly influenced by the morphology, composition and concentration of metal at the surface of the magnetic silica spheres and therefore these parameters should be carefully controlled in order to maximize the performance for protein purification purposes. Optimized zinc-decorated magnetic silica spheres demonstrate a binding capacity to l-histidine of approximately 44mgg -1 at the optimum binding pH buffer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Attentional Set-Shifting in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, M. J. W.; Van der Molen, M. W.; Ridderinkhof, K. R.; Hamel, B. C. J.; Curfs, L. M. G.; Ramakers, G. J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to flexibly adapt to the changing demands of the environment is often reported as a core deficit in fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, the cognitive processes that determine this attentional set-shifting deficit remain elusive. The present study investigated attentional set-shifting ability in fragile X syndrome males with the…

  7. Cellular Basis for Learning Impairment in Fragile X Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and results in cognitive impairment, hyperactivity , attention deficits , seizure disorders ...impairment, hyperactivity , attention deficits and seizure disorders . Previous studies using a mouse model for FXS (Fmr1- KO) have described impairments in...neurogenesis in adult fragile X mice, test fragile X mice for learning deficits in hippocampal-independent tasks, and determine how synaptic

  8. Cholinergic Dysfunction in Fragile X Syndrome and Potential Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kesler, Shelli R; Lightbody, Amy A; Reiss, Allan L

    2009-01-01

    Males with fragile X syndrome are at risk for significant cognitive and behavioral deficits, particularly those involving executive prefrontal systems. Disruption of the cholinergic system secondary to fragile X mental retardation protein deficiency may contribute to the cognitive-behavioral impairments associated with fragile X. We measured choline in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of 9 males with fragile X syndrome and 9 age-matched typically developing controls using 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Right choline/creatine was significantly reduced in the fragile X group compared to controls. In controls, both left and right choline was significantly positively correlated with intelligence and age was significantly negatively correlated with left choline. There were no correlations in the fragile X group. Subjects with fragile X syndrome participating in a pilot open-label trial of donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, demonstrated significantly improved cognitive-behavioral function. Studies utilizing biochemical neuroimaging techniques such as these have the potential to significantly impact the design of treatment strategies for fragile X syndrome and other genetic disorders by helping identify neurochemical targets for intervention as well as serving as metrics for treatment efficacy. PMID:19215057

  9. The Fragile X Syndrome: From Molecular Genetics to Neurobiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willemsen, Rob; Oostra, Ben A.; Bassell, Gary J.; Dictenberg, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Since the identification of the FMR1 gene basic research has been focused on the molecular characterization of the FMR1 gene product, the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Recent developments in fragile X research have provided new insights and knowledge about the physiological function of FMRP in the cell and the nerve cell in…

  10. Fragile X-Associated Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (FXPOI): Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Turner Syndrome Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a Study ... fragilex.org/fragile-x-associated-disorders/fragile-x-syndrome/ ... W., York Moore. D., & Turner, G. M. (1996). Confirmation of early menopause in ...

  11. Study on the Progress of Ecological Fragility Assessment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei; Hou, Kang; Chang, Yue; Li, Xuxiang; Zhang, Yunwei

    2018-02-01

    The basic elements of human survival are based on the ecological environment. The development of social economic and the security of the ecological environment are closely linked and interact with each other. The fragility of the environment directly affects the stability of the regional ecosystem and the sustainable development of the ecological environment. As part of the division of the national ecological security, the assessment of ecological fragility has become a hot and difficult issue in environmental research, and researchers at home and abroad have systematically studied the causes and states of ecological fragility. The assessment of regional ecological fragility is a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the unbalanced distribution of ecological environment factors caused by human socio-economic activities or changes in ecosystems. At present, researches on ecological fragility has not formed a complete and unified index assessment system, and the unity of the assessment model has a direct impact on the accuracy of the index weights. Therefore, the discussion on selection of ecological fragility indexes and the improvement of ecological fragility assessment model is necessary, which is good for the improvement of ecological fragility assessment system in China.

  12. Finiteness Marking in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Audra M.; Rice, Mabel L.; Warren, Steven F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The current study investigated finiteness marking (e.g., he walk "s", he walk "ed") in boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS); the boys were grouped based on receptive vocabulary (i.e., borderline, impaired). Method: Twenty-one boys with the full mutation of fragile X, between the ages of 8 and 16 years participated. The…

  13. Babies at Double Jeopardy: Medically Fragile Infants and Child Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullar, Suzanne A.

    2008-01-01

    Medically fragile infants, those born prematurely or with other complex medical or genetic problems, are at risk of long-term health and developmental problems. When a medically fragile infant comes home to a family with significant social problems such as domestic violence, mental illness, or substance abuse, the infant is at double jeopardy--at…

  14. Global Identification of Disease Associated Genes in Fragile X Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    for this study listed as follows: 1) Validate the co-localized R-loop formation and chromosome fragility in Fragile X cells, particularly at the brain ...retardation protein February 2016, NGS Data Analysis & Informatics Conference, San Diego, California (Poster presentation) Title: Global detection

  15. The Medically Fragile Child in the School Setting. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Teachers, Washington, DC.

    This guide for teachers whose classes include a medically fragile child considers roles and responsibilities of teachers with these students, teachers' rights as school employees, and possible solutions and protections for local unions to pursue. Chapter 1 provides an overview. It defines "medically fragile," summarizes legal…

  16. The Fragile X Continuum: New Advances and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, K.; Turk, J.; Hagerman, R.

    2008-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the world's most common hereditary cause of intellectual disability in men and to a lesser extent in women. The disorder is caused by the silencing of a single gene on the X chromosome, the Fragile X Mental Retardation Gene-1. A substantial body of research across the disciplines of molecular genetics, child psychiatry and…

  17. Memory Skills of Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Peter A.; Schaaf, Jennifer M.; Hooper, Stephen R.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Mirrett, Penny; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple aspects of memory were examined in 42 boys with fragile X syndrome and a comparison group of 42 typically developing boys matched on MA. Working memory, incidental memory, and deliberate memory were assessed with a battery that included both free-recall and recognition tasks. Findings indicated that boys with fragile X syndrome performed…

  18. Male-Female Characteristics of Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caron, Jackie

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of mental retardation next to Down syndrome. The syndrome is more prevalent in males because they only have one X chromosome, where the gene for fragile X is carried, while women have two X chromosomes and the normal gene can compensate for the affected chromosome. Certain physical features are…

  19. Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagerman, Paul J.; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2004-01-01

    Carriers of fragile X mental retardation 1 ("FMR1") premutation alleles (55 to 200 CGG repeats) are generally spared the more serious neurodevelopmental problems associated with the full-mutation carriers (greater than 200 repeats) of fragile X syndrome. However, some adult male premutation carriers (55-200 repeats) develop a neurological syndrome…

  20. Fragile X Syndrome in Males: Diagnostic, Behavioral, and Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellinger, Diane; And Others

    This paper reviews the research on fragile X syndrome, the second most common cause of mental retardation related to chromosomal anomaly. It notes that far more males than females are affected by the fragile X syndrome, which typically results in craniofacial changes, delays in growth and development, speech/language difficulties, and cognitive…

  1. The Role of Fragile Sites in Sporadic Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Laura W.; Lehman, Christine E.; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing, especially papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), making it currently the fastest-growing cancer among women. Reasons for this increase remain unclear, but several risk factors including radiation exposure and improved detection techniques have been suggested. Recently, the induction of chromosomal fragile site breakage was found to result in the formation of RET/PTC1 rearrangements, a common cause of PTC. Chromosomal fragile sites are regions of the genome with a high susceptibility to forming DNA breaks and are often associated with cancer. Exposure to a variety of external agents can induce fragile site breakage, which may account for some of the observed increase in PTC. This paper discusses the role of fragile site breakage in PTC development, external fragile site-inducing agents that may be potential risk factors for PTC, and how these factors are especially targeting women. PMID:22762011

  2. Understanding the role of histidine in the GHSxG acyltransferase active site motif: Evidence for histidine stabilization of the malonyl-enzyme intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Poust, Sean; Yoon, Isu; Adams, Paul D.

    Acyltransferases determine which extender units are incorporated into polyketide and fatty acid products. Thus, the ping-pong acyltransferase mechanism utilizes a serine in a conserved GHSxG motif. However, the role of the conserved histidine in this motif is poorly understood. We observed that a histidine to alanine mutation (H640A) in the GHSxG motif of the malonyl-CoA specific yersiniabactin acyltransferase results in an approximately seven-fold higher hydrolysis rate over the wildtype enzyme, while retaining transacylation activity. We propose two possibilities for the reduction in hydrolysis rate: either H640 structurally stabilizes the protein by hydrogen bonding with a conserved asparagine in the ferredoxin-likemore » subdomain of the protein, or a water-mediated hydrogen bond between H640 and the malonyl moiety stabilizes the malonyl-O-AT ester intermediate.« less

  3. Understanding the role of histidine in the GHSxG acyltransferase active site motif: Evidence for histidine stabilization of the malonyl-enzyme intermediate

    DOE PAGES

    Poust, Sean; Yoon, Isu; Adams, Paul D.; ...

    2014-10-06

    Acyltransferases determine which extender units are incorporated into polyketide and fatty acid products. Thus, the ping-pong acyltransferase mechanism utilizes a serine in a conserved GHSxG motif. However, the role of the conserved histidine in this motif is poorly understood. We observed that a histidine to alanine mutation (H640A) in the GHSxG motif of the malonyl-CoA specific yersiniabactin acyltransferase results in an approximately seven-fold higher hydrolysis rate over the wildtype enzyme, while retaining transacylation activity. We propose two possibilities for the reduction in hydrolysis rate: either H640 structurally stabilizes the protein by hydrogen bonding with a conserved asparagine in the ferredoxin-likemore » subdomain of the protein, or a water-mediated hydrogen bond between H640 and the malonyl moiety stabilizes the malonyl-O-AT ester intermediate.« less

  4. Neighbor-directed histidine N(τ) alkylation. A route to imidazolium-containing phosphopeptide macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Wen-Jian; Park, Jung-Eun; Grant, Robert

    2015-07-07

    Our recently discovered, selective, on-resin route to N(τ)-alkylated imidazolium-containing histidine residues affords new strategies for peptide mimetic design. In this, we demonstrate the use of this chemistry to prepare a series of macrocyclic phosphopeptides, in which imidazolium groups serve as ring-forming junctions. These cationic moieties subsequently serve to charge-mask the phosphoamino acid group that directed their formation. Furthermore, neighbor-directed histidine N(τ)-alkylation opens the door to new families of phosphopeptidomimetics for use in a range of chemical biology contexts.

  5. Cresyl saligenin phosphate makes multiple adducts on free histidine, but does not form an adduct on histidine 438 of human butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Liyasova, Mariya S; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-03-25

    Cresyl saligenin phosphate (CBDP) is a suspected causative agent of "aerotoxic syndrome", affecting pilots, crew members and passengers. CBDP is produced in vivo from ortho-containing isomers of tricresyl phosphate (TCP), a component of jet engine lubricants and hydraulic fluids. CBDP irreversibly inhibits butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in human plasma by forming adducts on the active site serine (Ser-198). Inhibited BChE undergoes aging to release saligenin and o-cresol. The active site histidine (His-438) was hypothesized to abstract o-hydroxybenzyl moiety from the initial adduct on Ser-198. Our goal was to test this hypothesis. Mass spectral analysis of CBDP-inhibited BChE digested with Glu-C showed an o-hydroxybenzyl adduct (+106 amu) on lysine 499, a residue far from the active site, but not on His-438. Nevertheless, the nitrogen of the imidazole ring of free L-histidine formed a variety of adducts upon reaction with CBDP, including the o-hydroxybenzyl adduct, suggesting that histidine-CBDP adducts may form on other proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cresyl saligenin phosphate makes multiple adducts on free histidine, but does not form an adduct on histidine 438 of human butyrylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Liyasova, Mariya S.; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2012-01-01

    Cresyl saligenin phosphate (CBDP) is a suspected causative agent of “aerotoxic syndrome”, affecting pilots, crew members and passengers. CBDP is produced in vivo from ortho-containing isomers of tricresyl phosphate (TCP), a component of jet engine lubricants and hydraulic fluids. CBDP irreversibly inhibits butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in human plasma by forming adducts on the active site serine (Ser-198). Inhibited BChE undergoes aging to release saligenin and o-cresol. The active site histidine (His-438) was hypothesized to abstract o-hydroxybenzyl moiety from the initial adduct on Ser-198. Our goal was to test this hypothesis. Mass spectral analysis of CBDP-inhibited BChE digested with Glu-C showed an o-hydroxybenzyl adduct (+106 amu) on lysine 499, a residue far from the active site, but not on His-438. Nevertheless, the nitrogen of the imidazole ring of free L-histidine formed a variety of adducts upon reaction with CBDP, including the o-hydroxybenzyl adduct, suggesting that histidine-CBDP adducts may form on other proteins. PMID:22898212

  7. Fragility fracture risk and skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, F R; Ara, I

    2016-01-01

    Low-intensity fractures are closely related with age-related musculoskeletal disorders, including osteoporosis, muscle dysfunction and sarcopenia, age-related chronic diseases, and pharmacological treatments. During the last years, a huge amount of information and recommendations has been released in relation to bone metabolism and mineral content. Muscle dysfunction and sarcopenia are highly prevalent during the second half of life, especially in older subjects. The development of sarcopenia may be slowed through healthy lifestyle changes, which include adequate dietary protein, vitamin D and mineral intakes, and regular physical activity. Prevention of falls should be integral, including correction in major involved factors in order to reduce fragility fracture, improve quality of life and appropriately focus clinical and economic resources. Therefore, to obtain better results a global approach is needed to prevent age-related fractures in frail patients that is not only centered on bone metabolism and antiresorptive drugs.

  8. Language in boys with fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yonata; Gottesman, Riki; Borochowitz, Zvi; Frydman, Moshe; Sagi, Michal

    2006-02-01

    The current paper reports of language production in 15 Hebrew-speaking boys, aged 9;0-13;0, with fully methylated, non-mosaic fragile X syndrome and no concomitant diagnosis of autism. Contrary to expectations, seven children were non-verbal. Language production in the verbal children was studied in free conversations and in context-bound speech. Despite extra caution in calculating MLU, participants' language level was not predicted by mean utterance length. Context bound speech resulted in grammatically more advanced performance than free conversation, and performance in both contexts differed in important ways from performance of typically developing MLU-matched controls. The relevance of MLU as a predictor of productive grammar in disordered populations is briefly discussed.

  9. High functioning male with fragile X syndrome and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basuta, Kirin; Schneider, Andrea; Gane, Louise; Polussa, Jonathan; Woodruff, Bryan; Pretto, Dalyir; Hagerman, Randi; Tassone, Flora

    2015-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) affects individuals with more than 200 CGG repeats (full mutation) in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Those born with FXS experience cognitive and social impairments, developmental delays, and some features of autism spectrum disorders. Carriers of a premutation (55-200 CGG repeats) are generally not severely affected early in life; however, are at high risk of developing the late onset neurodegenerative disorder, Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS), or Fragile X-associated Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (FXPOI), and may have other medical conditions such as developmental delay, autism spectrum disorders, hypertension, anxiety, and immune-mediated disorders. Here we present a case of a 58-year-old man with a borderline IQ, average memory skills, and executive function deficits. He met criteria for multiple psychiatric diagnoses and presented with tremor and ataxia, meeting criteria for FXTAS. Molecular testing unveiled a completely unmethylated FMR1 full mutation in peripheral blood mononucleated cells with elevated FMR1 mRNA and premutation alleles of different sizes in two other tissues (primary fibroblasts and sperm), indicating the presence of allele instability based on both inter- and intra-tissue mosaicism. The observation of FXTAS in this case of a full mutation mosaic man suggests that the pathogenic mechanism underlying this disorder is not observed exclusively in premutation carriers as it was originally thought. The concomitant presence of features of FXS and late onset neurological deterioration with probable FXTAS likely result from a combined molecular pathology of elevated FMR1 mRNA levels, a molecular hallmark of FXTAS and low FMRP expression that leads to FXS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Molecular fragil X screening in normal populations

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, W.C.; Black, S.H.; Fallon, L.

    In December, 1993, we initiated a pilot project in which DNA fragile X (fraX) testing was offered during routine prenatal or genetic counseling to all pregnant women seen at the Genetics & IVF Institute, most of whom were referred for the indication of advanced maternal age. A brochure on fragile X syndrome was sent to each patient prior to her appointment and was reviewed by a counselor or physician during the counseling session. As of June 1995, 3,345 patients were offered testing; 474 women with no identified family history of mental retardation or learning disability and 214 women with amore » positive family history accepted the test on a self-pay basis. The second population screened was 271 potential donors in our anonymous egg donor program. DNA from blood was tested by Southern blot using EcoRI/EagI and StB12.3. If an expansion was detected, CGG repeat number was determined by PCR-based analysis. Among the 474 patients with unremarkable family histories, three fraX carriers were identified (repeat sizes = 60+), whereas none were found in the 214 patients with a positive family history. Among the potential egg donors, two high borderline patients were identified (repeat sizes = between 50 and 59). Our ongoing study indicates that screening of pregnant or preconceptual populations for fraX carrier status using DNA testing is accepted by many patients and is an important addition to current medical practice. 12 refs., 1 tab.« less

  11. Divergent effects of obesity on fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carla; Alessi, Chiara; Nuti, Ranuccio; Gonnelli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Obesity was commonly thought to be advantageous for maintaining healthy bones due to the higher bone mineral density observed in overweight individuals. However, several recent studies have challenged the widespread belief that obesity is protective against fracture and have suggested that obesity is a risk factor for certain fractures. The effect of obesity on fracture risk is site-dependent, the risk being increased for some fractures (humerus, ankle, upper arm) and decreased for others (hip, pelvis, wrist). Moreover, the relationship between obesity and fracture may also vary by sex, age, and ethnicity. Risk factors for fracture in obese individuals appear to be similar to those in nonobese populations, although patterns of falling are particularly important in the obese. Research is needed to determine if and how visceral fat and metabolic complications of obesity (type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, etc) are causally associated with bone status and fragility fracture risk. Vitamin D deficiency and hypogonadism may also influence fracture risk in obese individuals. Fracture algorithms such as FRAX(®) might be expected to underestimate fracture probability. Studies specifically designed to evaluate the antifracture efficacy of different drugs in obese patients are not available; however, literature data may suggest that in obese patients higher doses of the bisphosphonates might be required in order to maintain efficacy against nonvertebral fractures. Therefore, the search for better methods for the identification of fragility fracture risk in the growing population of adult and elderly subjects with obesity might be considered a clinical priority which could improve the prevention of fracture in obese individuals.

  12. Programming social behavior by the maternal fragile X protein.

    PubMed

    Zupan, B; Sharma, A; Frazier, A; Klein, S; Toth, M

    2016-07-01

    The developing fetus and neonate are highly sensitive to maternal environment. Besides the well-documented effects of maternal stress, nutrition and infections, maternal mutations, by altering the fetal, perinatal and/or early postnatal environment, can impact the behavior of genetically normal offspring. Mutation/premutation in the X-linked FMR1 (encoding the translational regulator FMRP) in females, although primarily responsible for causing fragile X syndrome (FXS) in their children, may also elicit such maternal effects. We showed that a deficit in maternal FMRP in mice results in hyperactivity in the genetically normal offspring. To test if maternal FMRP has a broader intergenerational effect, we measured social behavior, a core dimension of neurodevelopmental disorders, in offspring of FMRP-deficient dams. We found that male offspring of Fmr1(+/-) mothers, independent of their own Fmr1 genotype, exhibit increased approach and reduced avoidance toward conspecific strangers, reminiscent of 'indiscriminate friendliness' or the lack of stranger anxiety, diagnosed in neglected children and in patients with Asperger's and Williams syndrome. Furthermore, social interaction failed to activate mesolimbic/amygdala regions, encoding social aversion, in these mice, providing a neurobiological basis for the behavioral abnormality. This work identifies a novel role for FMRP that extends its function beyond the well-established genetic function into intergenerational non-genetic inheritance/programming of social behavior and the corresponding neuronal circuit. As FXS premutation and some psychiatric conditions that can be associated with reduced FMRP expression are more prevalent in mothers than full FMR1 mutation, our findings potentially broaden the significance of FMRP-dependent programming of social behavior beyond the FXS population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  13. Conceptualizing neurodevelopmental disorders through a mechanistic understanding of fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fung, Lawrence K; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Haas, Brian W; Reiss, Allan L

    2012-04-01

    The overarching goal of this review is to compare and contrast the cognitive-behavioral features of fragile X syndrome (FraX) and Williams syndrome and to review the putative neural and molecular underpinnings of these features. Information is presented in a framework that provides guiding principles for conceptualizing gene-brain-behavior associations in neurodevelopmental disorders. Abnormalities, in particular cognitive-behavioral domains with similarities in underlying neurodevelopmental correlates, occur in both FraX and Williams syndrome including aberrant frontostriatal pathways leading to executive function deficits, and magnocellular/dorsal visual stream, superior parietal lobe, inferior parietal lobe, and postcentral gyrus abnormalities contributing to deficits in visuospatial function. Compelling cognitive-behavioral and neurodevelopmental contrasts also exist in these two disorders, for example, aberrant amygdala and fusiform cortex structure and function occurring in the context of contrasting social behavioral phenotypes, and temporal cortical and cerebellar abnormalities potentially underlying differences in language function. Abnormal dendritic development is a shared neurodevelopmental morphologic feature between FraX and Williams syndrome. Commonalities in molecular machinery and processes across FraX and Williams syndrome occur as well - microRNAs involved in translational regulation of major synaptic proteins; scaffolding proteins in excitatory synapses; and proteins involved in axonal development. Although the genetic variations leading to FraX and Williams syndrome are different, important similarities and contrasts in the phenotype, neurocircuitry, molecular machinery, and cellular processes in these two disorders allow for a unique approach to conceptualizing gene-brain-behavior links occurring in neurodevelopmental disorders.

  14. Fragile X-associated disorders: Don't miss them.

    PubMed

    Birch, Rachael C; Cohen, Jonathan; Trollor, Julian N

    2017-01-01

    Fragile X-associated disorders are a family of inherited disorders caused by expansions in the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Premutation expansions of the FMR1 gene confer risk for fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency and fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome, as well as other medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Premutation expansions of the FMR1 gene are common in the general population. However, fragile X-associated disorders are frequently under-recognised and often misdiagnosed. The aim of this article is to describe fragile X-associated disorders and identify specific considerations for general practitioners (GPs) during identification and management of these disorders. GPs have a critical role in the identification of fragile X-associated disorders, as well as coordination of complex care needs. Prompt recognition and appropriate management of these disorders and potential medical and psychiatric comorbidities will have important implications not only for the affected patient, but also other family members who may be at risk.

  15. [Monilethrix--rare syndrome of structural hair abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Brzezińska-Wcisło, L; Bogdanowski, T; Szeremeta-Bazylewicz, G; Pierzchała, E

    1999-11-01

    Monilethrix is a rare structural disorder of hair. Characteristic abnormalities in the form of alternating thinning and fusiform thickening are observed in most of hair shafts that we call beaded hair. Macroscopic estimation shows lustreless, dry, rough, fragile hair. Trichological examination usually reveals a considerable percentage of anagenic hair. According to our own experiences and literature data systemic therapy (vitamins) and topical treatment (desquamative ointments) are not effective sufficiently. Spontaneous regression of symptoms often appears with time. Five cases of familial occurrence of monilethrix have been presented.

  16. Strategies for the depyrogenation of contaminated immunoglobulin G solutions by histidine-immobilized hollow fiber membrane.

    PubMed

    Legallais, C; Anspach, F B; Bueno, S M; Haupt, K; Vijayalakshmi, M A

    1997-03-28

    The depyrogenation of different IgG solutions using the histidine-linked hollow fiber membrane developed in our laboratory is presented here. Three strategies for endotoxin (ET) removal were investigated according to the immobilized histidine's ability to bind different immunoglobulins: (1) ET removal from 1 mg/ml non histidine-binding mouse monoclonal IgG1 (MabCD4) solution was achieved in the presence of acetate buffer (pH 5.0) without any protein loss. (2) For contaminated human IgG, combined adsorption of ET and IgG in the presence of MOPS of Tris buffer was tested, followed by differential elution using increasing salt concentrations. This attempt was not successful since ET were quantitatively found in the IgG elution fraction. (3) Alternatively, it was proposed to adsorb selectively ET in the presence of acetate buffer (pH 5.0) under non binding conditions for human IgG. Human IgG could then be purified if necessary with the same membrane in the presence of MOPS buffer (pH 6.5). With a 1 m2 histidine-PEVA module under these operating conditions, it is estimated that the depyrogenation of 3 l of 1 mg/ml IgG (human or murine) solution containing 80 EU/ml of ET should be possible.

  17. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characterizations. Superior photocatalytic activity relative to that of pure CdS is observed on the flower-like CdS photocatalyst under visible light irradiation, which is nearly 13 times of pure CdS. On the basis of the results from SEM studies and our analysis, a growth mechanism of flower-like CdS is proposed by capturing the shape evolution. The imidazole ring of L-Histidine captures the Cd ions from the solution, and prevents the growth of the CdS nanoparticles. Furthermore, the photocatalytic contrast experiments illustrate that the as-synthesized flower-like CdS with L-Histidine is more stable than CdS without L-Histidine in the hydrogen generation. PMID:26337119

  18. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-09-01

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characterizations. Superior photocatalytic activity relative to that of pure CdS is observed on the flower-like CdS photocatalyst under visible light irradiation, which is nearly 13 times of pure CdS. On the basis of the results from SEM studies and our analysis, a growth mechanism of flower-like CdS is proposed by capturing the shape evolution. The imidazole ring of L-Histidine captures the Cd ions from the solution, and prevents the growth of the CdS nanoparticles. Furthermore, the photocatalytic contrast experiments illustrate that the as-synthesized flower-like CdS with L-Histidine is more stable than CdS without L-Histidine in the hydrogen generation.

  19. Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production of Flower-like Cadmium Sulfide Decorated by Histidine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qizhao; Lian, Juhong; Li, Jiajia; Wang, Rongfang; Huang, Haohao; Su, Bitao; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-09-04

    Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdS can significantly enhance the efficiency of its photocatalytic hydrogen production. In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) flower-like CdS is synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal process using Cd(NO3)2•4H2O and thiourea as precursors and L-Histidine as a chelating agent. The morphology, crystal phase, and photoelectrochemical performance of the flower-like CdS and pure CdS nanocrystals are carefully investigated via various characterizations. Superior photocatalytic activity relative to that of pure CdS is observed on the flower-like CdS photocatalyst under visible light irradiation, which is nearly 13 times of pure CdS. On the basis of the results from SEM studies and our analysis, a growth mechanism of flower-like CdS is proposed by capturing the shape evolution. The imidazole ring of L-Histidine captures the Cd ions from the solution, and prevents the growth of the CdS nanoparticles. Furthermore, the photocatalytic contrast experiments illustrate that the as-synthesized flower-like CdS with L-Histidine is more stable than CdS without L-Histidine in the hydrogen generation.

  20. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization.

  1. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E.; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P.; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization. PMID:26442018

  2. Isotope effect studies of the pyruvate-dependent histidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-08-09

    The decarboxylation of histidine by the pyruvate-dependent histidine decarboxylase of Lactobacillus 30 a shows a carbon isotope effect k/sup 12//k/sup 13/ = 1.0334 +/- 0.0005 and a nitrogen isotope effect k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9799 +/- 0.0006 at pH 4.8, 37/sup 0/C. The carbon isotope effect is slightly increased by deuteriation of the substrate and slightly decreased in D/sub 2/O. The observed nitrogen isotope effect indicates that the imine nitrogen in the substrate-Schiff base intermediate complex is ordinarily protonated, and the pH dependence of the carbon isotope effect indicates that both protonated and unprotonated forms of this intermediate are capablemore » of undergoing decarboxylation. As with the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme, Schiff base formation and decarboxylation are jointly rate-limiting, with the intermediate histidine-pyruvate Schiff base showing a decarboxylation/Schiff base hydrolysis ratio of 0.5-1.0 at pH 4.8. The decarboxylation transition state is more reactant-like for the pyruvate-dependent enzyme than for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme. These studies find no particular energetic or catalytic advantage to the use of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate over covalently bound pyruvate in catalysis of the decarboxylation of histidine.« less

  3. Heat-induced gelation of myosin in a low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, T; Yoshida, Y; Yasui, M; Ito, T; Iwasaki, T; Wakamatsu, J; Hattori, A; Nishimura, T

    2012-01-01

    Binding properties are important for meat products and are substantially derived from the heat-induced gelation of myosin. We have shown that myosin is solubilized in a low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine. To clarify its processing characteristics, we investigated properties and structures of heat-induced gels of myosin solubilized in a low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine. Myosin in a low ionic strength solution formed transparent gels at 40-50°C, while myosin in a high ionic strength solution formed opaque gels at 60-70°C. The gel of myosin in a low ionic strength solution with L-histidine showed a fine network consisting of thin strands and its viscosity was lower than that of myosin in a high ionic strength solution at 40-50°C. The rheological properties of heat-induced gels of myosin at low ionic strength are different from those at high ionic strength. This difference might be caused by structural changes in the rod region of myosin in a low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of peptide histidine valine on cardiovascular and respiratory function in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Chilvers, E R; Dixon, C M; Yiangou, Y; Bloom, S R; Ind, P W

    1988-01-01

    Non-adrenergic inhibitory nerves may have an important role in regulating airway calibre. A recently discovered peptide, peptide histidine valine, is a potent relaxer of airway smooth muscle in vitro and has been proposed as a possible neurotransmitter in this tissue. The cardiovascular and respiratory effects of graded infusions of this peptide (2.5-10 pmol kg-1 min-1) have been examined in six normal subjects in a placebo controlled, randomised double blind study. The mean (SEM) peak plasma concentration of peptide histidine valine during the highest infusion rate was 2392 (170) pmol/l, representing a 29 fold increase above the basal concentration. This was accompanied by flushing, a significant increase in heart rate of 28 (3.7) beats/min and skin temperature of 1.8 degrees (0.16 degrees) C, but no effect on systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Despite these high plasma concentrations of the peptide and the substantial tachycardia and increase in skin blood flow, there was no change in partial expiratory flow at 40% of vital capacity (Vp40) or in the airway response to inhaled histamine (geometric PD40 9.37 and 9.73 mumol during saline and peptide histidine valine infusion respectively). Although these findings provide no support for a physiological role of peptide histidine valine in controlling airway function in healthy subjects, important effects of locally released peptides in the vasoactive intestinal peptide family cannot be excluded. PMID:3206383

  5. Effect of peptide histidine valine on cardiovascular and respiratory function in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Chilvers, E R; Dixon, C M; Yiangou, Y; Bloom, S R; Ind, P W

    1988-10-01

    Non-adrenergic inhibitory nerves may have an important role in regulating airway calibre. A recently discovered peptide, peptide histidine valine, is a potent relaxer of airway smooth muscle in vitro and has been proposed as a possible neurotransmitter in this tissue. The cardiovascular and respiratory effects of graded infusions of this peptide (2.5-10 pmol kg-1 min-1) have been examined in six normal subjects in a placebo controlled, randomised double blind study. The mean (SEM) peak plasma concentration of peptide histidine valine during the highest infusion rate was 2392 (170) pmol/l, representing a 29 fold increase above the basal concentration. This was accompanied by flushing, a significant increase in heart rate of 28 (3.7) beats/min and skin temperature of 1.8 degrees (0.16 degrees) C, but no effect on systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Despite these high plasma concentrations of the peptide and the substantial tachycardia and increase in skin blood flow, there was no change in partial expiratory flow at 40% of vital capacity (Vp40) or in the airway response to inhaled histamine (geometric PD40 9.37 and 9.73 mumol during saline and peptide histidine valine infusion respectively). Although these findings provide no support for a physiological role of peptide histidine valine in controlling airway function in healthy subjects, important effects of locally released peptides in the vasoactive intestinal peptide family cannot be excluded.

  6. Fragility correlates thermodynamic and kinetic properties of glass forming liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, C.Narayana; Viswanatha, R.; Chethana, B.K.

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: The suggested new fragility parameter correlates viscosity and configurational entropy. - Highlights: • A new fragility function, F=ΔT/ΔC{sub p}×C{sub p}{sup l}/T{sub g} has been proposed. • A three parameter viscosity function using the new F reproduces Angell fragility plot. • A new ΔC{sub p} function is derived which directly relates Adam–Gibbs function with the fragility based viscosity function. - Abstract: In our earlier communication we proposed a simple fragility determining function, ([NBO]/V{sub m}{sup 3}T{sub g}), which we have now used to analyze several glass systems using available thermal data. A comparison with similar fragility determining function, ΔC{sub p}/C{submore » p}{sup l}, introduced by Chryssikos et al. in their investigation of lithium borate glasses has also been performed and found to be more convenient quantity for discussing fragilities. We now propose a new function which uses both ΔC{sub p} and ΔT and which gives a numerical fragility parameter, F whose value lies between 0 and 1 for glass forming liquids. F can be calculated through the use of measured thermal parameters ΔC{sub p}, C{sub p}{sup l}, T{sub g} and T{sub m}. Use of the new fragility values in reduced viscosity equation reproduces the whole range of viscosity curves of the Angell plot. The reduced viscosity equation can be directly compared with the Adam–Gibbs viscosity equation and a heat capacity function can be formulated which reproduces satisfactorily the ΔC{sub p} versus ln(T{sub r}) curves and hence the configurational entropy.« less

  7. Open-label add-on treatment trial of minocycline in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Paribello, Carlo; Tao, Leeping; Folino, Anthony; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Tranfaglia, Michael; Ethell, Iryna M; Ethell, Douglas W

    2010-10-11

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of disabilities, including cognitive deficits, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, and other socio-emotional problems. It is hypothesized that the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) leads to higher levels of matrix metallo-proteinase-9 activity (MMP-9) in the brain. Minocycline inhibits MMP-9 activity, and alleviates behavioural and synapse abnormalities in fmr1 knockout mice, an established model for FXS. This open-label add-on pilot trial was conducted to evaluate safety and efficacy of minocycline in treating behavioural abnormalities that occur in humans with FXS. Twenty individuals with FXS, ages 13-32, were randomly assigned to receive 100 mg or 200 mg of minocycline daily. Behavioural evaluations were made prior to treatment (baseline) and again 8 weeks after daily minocycline treatment. The primary outcome measure was the Aberrant Behaviour Checklist-Community Edition (ABC-C) Irritability Subscale, and the secondary outcome measures were the other ABC-C subscales, clinical global improvement scale (CGI), and the visual analog scale for behaviour (VAS). Side effects were assessed using an adverse events checklist, a complete blood count (CBC), hepatic and renal function tests, and antinuclear antibody screen (ANA), done at baseline and at 8 weeks. The ABC-C Irritability Subscale scores showed significant improvement (p < 0.001), as did the VAS (p = 0.003) and the CGI (p < 0.001). The only significant treatment-related side effects were minor diarrhea (n = 3) and seroconversion to a positive ANA (n = 2). Results from this study demonstrate that minocycline provides significant functional benefits to FXS patients and that it is well-tolerated. These findings are consistent with the fmr1 knockout mouse model results, suggesting that minocycline modifies underlying neural defects that account for behavioural abnormalities. A placebo-controlled trial of

  8. Molecular switch-modulated fluorescent copper nanoclusters for selective and sensitive detection of histidine and cysteine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zefeng; Cao, Zhijuan

    2018-06-07

    A novel assay for histidine and cysteine has been constructed based on modulation of fluorescent copper nanoclusters (CuNCs) by molecular switches. In our previous work, a dumbbell DNA template with a poly-T (thymine) loop has been developed as an excellent template for the formation of strongly fluorescent CuNCs. Herein, for the first time, we established this biosensor for sensing two amino acids by using dumbbell DNA-templated CuNCs as the single probe. Among 20 natural amino acids, only histidine and cysteine can selectively quench fluorescence emission of CuNCs, because of the specific interaction of these compounds with copper ions. Furthermore, by using nickel ions (Ni 2+ ) and N-ethylmaleimide as the masking agents for histidine and cysteine respectively, an integrated logic gate system was designed by coupling with the fluorescent CuNCs and demonstrated selective and sensitive detection of cysteine and histidine. Under optimal conditions, cysteine can be detected in the concentration ranges of 0.01-10.0 μM with the detection limit (DL) of as low as 98 pM, while histidine can be detected in the ranges of 0.05-40.0 μM with DL of 1.6 nM. In addition, histidine and cysteine can be observed with the naked eye under a hand-held UV lamp (DL, 50 nM), which can be easily adapted to automated high-throughput screening. Finally, the strategy has been successfully utilized for biological fluids. The proposed system can be conducted in homogeneous solution, eliminating the need for organic cosolvents, separation processes of nanomaterials, or any chemical modifications. Overall, the assay provides an alternative method for simultaneous detection of cysteine and histidine by taking the advantages of high speed, no label and enzyme requirement, and good sensitivity and specificity, and will satisfy the great demand for determination of amino acids in fields such as food processing, biochemistry, pharmaceuticals, and clinical analysis. Graphical abstract.

  9. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  10. Neurosteroids Reverse Tonic Inhibition Deficits in Fragile X Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0190 TITLE: Neurosteroids Reverse Tonic Inhibition Deficits in Fragile X Syndrome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...14 July 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Neurosteroids Reverse Tonic Inhibition Deficits in Fragile X Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER...18 9. Appendices……………………………………………………………18 2 1. Introduction Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited

  11. Neurosteroids Reverse Tonic Inhibition Deficits in Fragile X Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0190 TITLE: Neurosteroids Reverse Tonic Inhibition Deficits in Fragile X Syndrome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Paul...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Neurosteroids Reverse Tonic Inhibition Deficits in Fragile X Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Appendices……………………………………………………………11 2 1. Introduction Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. In addition

  12. Effect of histidine on sorafenib-induced vascular damage: Analysis using novel medaka fish model.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa-Kobayashi, Yoko; Kamimura, Kenya; Goto, Ryo; Ogawa, Kohei; Inoue, Ryosuke; Yokoo, Takeshi; Sakai, Norihiro; Nagoya, Takuro; Sakamaki, Akira; Abe, Satoshi; Sugitani, Soichi; Yanagi, Masahiko; Fujisawa, Koichi; Nozawa, Yoshizu; Koyama, Naoto; Nishina, Hiroshi; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Sakaida, Isao; Terai, Shuji

    2018-02-05

    Sorafenib (SFN) is an anti-angiogenic chemotherapeutic that prolongs survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); its side effects, including vascular damages such as hand-foot syndrome (HFS), are a major cause of therapy discontinuation. We previously reported that maintenance of peripheral blood flow by intake of dried bonito broth (DBB) significantly prevented HFS and prolonged the administration period. The amino acids contained in DBB probably contribute to its effects, but the mechanism has not been clarified. We hypothesized that histidine, the largest component among the amino acids contained in DBB, has effects on SFN-induced vascular damage, and evaluated this possibility using a novel medaka fish model. The fli::GFP transgenic medaka fish model has a fluorescently visible systemic vasculature. We fed the fish with SFN with and without histidine to compare blood flow and vascular structure among the differently fed models. The vascular cross-sectional area of each fish was measured to determine vascular diameter changes. Our results demonstrated that SFN-fed medaka developed a narrower vascular diameter. In addition, this narrowing was counteracted by addition of histidine to the medaka diet. We observed no positive effect of histidine on regeneration of cut vessels or on cell growth of endothelial cells and HCC cell lines. We proved the efficacy of the medaka model to assess vascular changes after administration of specific chemicals. And our results suggest that SFN causes vascular damage by narrowing peripheral vessel diameter, and that histidine effectively counteracts these changes to maintain blood flow. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antioxidant status of turkey breast meat and blood after feeding a diet enriched with histidine.

    PubMed

    Kopec, W; Wiliczkiewicz, A; Jamroz, D; Biazik, E; Pudlo, A; Hikawczuk, T; Skiba, T; Korzeniowska, M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 1) spray dried blood cells rich in histidine and 2) pure histidine added to feed on the antioxidant status and concentration of carnosine related components in the blood and breast meat of female turkeys. The experiment was performed on 168 Big7 turkey females randomly assigned to 3 dietary treatments: control; control with the addition of 0.18% L-histidine (His); and control with the addition of spray dried blood cells (SDBC). Birds were raised for 103 d on a floor with sawdust litter, with drinking water and feed ad libitum. The antioxidant status of blood plasma and breast muscle was analyzed by ferric reducing ability (FRAP) and by 2,2-Azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging ability. The activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was analyzed in the blood and breast meat, with the content of carnosine and anserine quantified by HPLC. Proximate analysis as well as amino acid profiling were carried out for the feed and breast muscles. Growth performance parameters also were calculated. Histidine supplementation of the turkey diet resulted in increased DPPH radical scavenging capacity in the breast muscles and blood, but did not result in higher histidine dipeptide concentrations. The enzymatic antioxidant system of turkey blood was affected by the diet with SDBC. In the plasma, the SDBC addition increased both SOD and GPx activity, and decreased GPx activity in the erythrocytes. Feeding turkeys with an SDBC containing diet increased BW and the content of isoleucine and valine in breast muscles. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  14. Arginine in the salt-induced peptide formation reaction: enantioselectivity facilitated by glycine, L- and D-histidine.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Fitz, Daniel; Fraser, Donald G; Rode, Bernd M

    2010-07-01

    The salt-induced peptide formation reaction has been proposed as a conceivable preliminary to the prebiotic evolution of peptides. In the present paper, the behaviour of arginine is reported for this reaction together with a discussion of the catalytic effects of glycine, and L- and D-histidine. Importantly, the behaviour of the two histidine enantiomers is different. Both histidine enantiomers perform better than glycine in enhancing the yields of arginine dipeptide with L-histidine being more effective than D-histidine. Yields in the presence of histidine are up to 70 times greater than for arginine solutions alone. This compares with 4.2 times higher in the presence of glycine. This difference is most pronounced in the most concentrated (containing 80 mM arginine) reaction solution where arginine has the lowest reactivity. A distinct preference for dimerisation of L-arginine also appears in the 80 mM cases for catalyses of other amino acids. This phenomenon is different from the behaviour of aliphatic amino acids, which display obvious inherent enantioselectivity for the L-stereomers in the SIPF reaction on their own rather than when catalysed by glycine or histidine.

  15. Advances in the Treatment of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hagerman, Randi J.; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Ono, Michele Y.; Tartaglia, Nicole; Lachiewicz, Ave; Kronk, Rebecca; Delahunty, Carol; Hessl, David; Visootsak, Jeannie; Picker, Jonathan; Gane, Louise; Tranfaglia, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The FMR1 mutations can cause a variety of disabilities, including cognitive deficits, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, and other socioemotional problems, in individuals with the full mutation form (fragile X syndrome) and distinct difficulties, including primary ovarian insufficiency, neuropathy and the fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, in some older premutation carriers. Therefore, multigenerational family involvement is commonly encountered when a proband is identified with a FMR1 mutation. Studies of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 pathway antagonists in animal models of fragile X syndrome have demonstrated benefits in reducing seizures, improving behavior, and enhancing cognition. Trials of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonists are beginning with individuals with fragile X syndrome. Targeted treatments, medical and behavioral interventions, genetic counseling, and family supports are reviewed here. PMID:19117905

  16. Fragile X-Associated Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (FXPOI)

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Contact PS3G Home About About Us Finances 2016 Annual Impact Report Learn Fragile X Syndrome FXS Resources by Age Group Clinical Practice Consensus Documents FXPOI FXTAS Newly Diagnosed Premutation Carriers ...

  17. Autism Is Associated with the Fragile-X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, W. Ted.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The authors describe their methods for establishing the presence or absence of the fragile-X chromosome and discuss some of the clinical implications of their findings in relation to the clinical diagnosis of autism. (SW)

  18. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) controls diacylglycerol kinase activity in neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabet, Ricardos; Moutin, Enora; Becker, Jérôme A J; Heintz, Dimitri; Fouillen, Laetitia; Flatter, Eric; Krężel, Wojciech; Alunni, Violaine; Koebel, Pascale; Dembélé, Doulaye; Tassone, Flora; Bardoni, Barbara; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Vitale, Nicolas; Muller, Dominique; Le Merrer, Julie; Moine, Hervé

    2016-06-28

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the absence of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) in neurons. In the mouse, the lack of FMRP is associated with an excessive translation of hundreds of neuronal proteins, notably including postsynaptic proteins. This local protein synthesis deregulation is proposed to underlie the observed defects of glutamatergic synapse maturation and function and to affect preferentially the hundreds of mRNA species that were reported to bind to FMRP. How FMRP impacts synaptic protein translation and which mRNAs are most important for the pathology remain unclear. Here we show by cross-linking immunoprecipitation in cortical neurons that FMRP is mostly associated with one unique mRNA: diacylglycerol kinase kappa (Dgkκ), a master regulator that controls the switch between diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways. The absence of FMRP in neurons abolishes group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent DGK activity combined with a loss of Dgkκ expression. The reduction of Dgkκ in neurons is sufficient to cause dendritic spine abnormalities, synaptic plasticity alterations, and behavior disorders similar to those observed in the FXS mouse model. Overexpression of Dgkκ in neurons is able to rescue the dendritic spine defects of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 gene KO neurons. Together, these data suggest that Dgkκ deregulation contributes to FXS pathology and support a model where FMRP, by controlling the translation of Dgkκ, indirectly controls synaptic proteins translation and membrane properties by impacting lipid signaling in dendritic spine.

  19. Sonoran Desert: Fragile Land of Extremes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Produced and Directed by Wessells, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    'Sonoran Desert: Fragile Land of Extremes' shows how biologists with the U.S. Geological Survey work with other scientists in an effort to better understand native plants and animals such as desert tortoises, saguaro cacti, and Gila monsters. Much of the program was shot in and around Saguaro National Park near Tucson, Arizona. Genetic detective work, using DNA, focuses on understanding the lives of tortoises. Studies of saguaros over many decades clarify how these amazing plants reproduce and thrive in the desert. Threats from fire, diseases in tortoises, and a growing human population motivate the scientists. Their work to identify how these organisms live and survive is a crucial step for the sound management of biological resources on public lands. This 28-minute program, USGS Open-File Report 03-305, was shot entirely in high definition video and produced by the USGS Western Ecological Research Center and Southwest Biological Science Center; produced and directed by Stephen Wessells, Western Region Office of Communications.

  20. Longitudinal Profiles of Adaptive Behavior in Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Quintin, Eve-Marie; Jo, Booil; Lightbody, Amy A.; Hazlett, Heather Cody; Piven, Joseph; Hall, Scott S.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine longitudinally the adaptive behavior patterns in fragile X syndrome. METHOD: Caregivers of 275 children and adolescents with fragile X syndrome and 225 typically developing children and adolescents (2–18 years) were interviewed with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales every 2 to 4 years as part of a prospective longitudinal study. RESULTS: Standard scores of adaptive behavior in people with fragile X syndrome are marked by a significant decline over time in all domains for males and in communication for females. Socialization skills are a relative strength as compared with the other domains for males with fragile X syndrome. Females with fragile X syndrome did not show a discernible pattern of developmental strengths and weaknesses. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first large-scale longitudinal study to show that the acquisition of adaptive behavior slows as individuals with fragile X syndrome age. It is imperative to ensure that assessments of adaptive behavior skills are part of intervention programs focusing on childhood and adolescence in this condition. PMID:25070318

  1. Diethylpyrocarbonate inhibition of vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase possibly involves a histidine residue.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi Yuong; Van, Ru Chuan; Hung, Hsiao Hui; Pan, Rong Long

    2002-01-01

    Vacuolar proton pumping pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) plays a pivotal role in electrogenic translocation of protons from cytosol to the vacuolar lumen at the expense of PPi hydrolysis. A histidine-specific modifier, diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC), could substantially inhibit enzymic activity and H+-translocation of vacuolar H+-PPase in a concentration-dependent manner. Absorbance of vacuolar H+-PPase at 240 nm was increased upon incubation with DEPC, demonstrating that an N-carbethoxyhistidine moiety was probably formed. On the other hand, hydroxylamine, a reagent that can deacylate N-carbethoxyhistidine, could reverse the absorption change at 240 nm and partially restore PPi hydrolysis activity as well. The pKa of modified residues of the enzyme was determined to be 6.4, a value close to that of histidine. Thus, we speculate that inhibition of vacuolar H+-PPase by DEPC possibly could be attributed to the modification of histidyl residues on the enzyme. Furthermore, inhibition of vacuolar H+-PPase by DEPC follows pseudo-first-order rate kinetics. A reaction order of 0.85 was calculated from a double logarithmic plot of the apparent reaction constant against DEPC concentration, suggesting that the modification of one single histidine residue on the enzyme suffices to inhibit vacuolar H+-PPase. Inhibition of vacuolar H+-PPase by DEPC changes Vmax but not Km values. Moreover, DEPC inhibition of vacuolar H+-PPase could be substantially protected against by its physiological substrate, Mg2+-PPi. These results indicated that DEPC specifically competes with the substrate at the active site and the DEPC-labeled histidine residue might locate in or near the catalytic domain of the enzyme. Besides, pretreatment of the enzyme with N-ethylmaleimide decreased the degree of subsequent labeling of H+-PPase by DEPC. Taken together, we suggest that vacuolar H+-PPase likely contains a substrate-protectable histidine residue contributing to the inhibition of its activity by

  2. Mouse model of fragile X syndrome: behavioral and hormonal response to stressors.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Darci M; Evans, Jeffrey J; Derber, William J; Johnston, Kenzie A; Laudenslager, Mark L; Crnic, Linda S; Maclean, Kenneth N

    2009-06-01

    Fragile X syndrome, a form of mental retardation caused by inadequate levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), is characterized by extreme sensitivity to sensory stimuli and increased behavioral and hormonal reactivity to stressors. Fmr1 knockout mice lack FMRP and exhibit abnormal responses to auditory stimuli. This study sought to determine whether Fmr1 knockout mice on an F1 hybrid background are normal in their response to footshock. Knockout mice were also examined for signs of hyperexcitation across an extended trial range, and serum corticosterone levels were evaluated in response to various stressors. The ability to acquire conditioned taste aversion was also assessed. Knockout mice exhibited no impairment in associative aversive learning or memory, since they successfully expressed conditioned taste aversion. Footshock-sensitivity, freezing behavior, and corticosterone response to various stressors did not differ between knockout and wild-type mice. However, knockout mice exhibited significantly increased responses during the extended test. The knockout mice's increased responsiveness to footshock in the extended test may be an indication of increased vulnerability to stress or enhanced emotional reactivity. Copyright (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Skin fragility syndrome in a cat with feline infectious peritonitis and hepatic lipidosis.

    PubMed

    Trotman, Tara K; Mauldin, Elizabeth; Hoffmann, Vickie; Del Piero, Fabio; Hess, Rebecka S

    2007-10-01

    A 6-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat with a 3-week history of inappetence, weight loss, and hiding was examined. A palpable abdominal fluid wave, dehydration, and a small tear on the left flank were noted during initial examination. When the cat was gently restrained for blood sampling, the skin on the dorsal neck tore, leaving a 15 cm x 7 cm flap of skin. Clinicopathological abnormalities included nonregenerative anaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, increased globulin concentration, and mildly elevated aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities. Abdominal fluid was viscous and had a total protein of 5.3 g dL(-1) with 316 cells microL(-1), consistent with a modified transudate. Cytology of the abdominal fluid revealed 86% nondegenerate neutrophils, 13% macrophages, and 1% small lymphocytes. Histopathological evaluation and indirect immunohistochemistry confirmed a diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis, hepatic lipidosis and feline skin fragility syndrome. Feline skin fragility syndrome has not previously been reported in association with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Its inclusion as a clinical sign associated with FIP may facilitate a diagnosis.

  4. Integrative cortical dysfunction and pervasive motion perception deficit in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kogan, C S; Bertone, A; Cornish, K; Boutet, I; Der Kaloustian, V M; Andermann, E; Faubert, J; Chaudhuri, A

    2004-11-09

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is associated with neurologic deficits recently attributed to the magnocellular pathway of the lateral geniculate nucleus. To test the hypotheses that FXS individuals 1) have a pervasive visual motion perception impairment affecting neocortical circuits in the parietal lobe and 2) have deficits in integrative neocortical mechanisms necessary for perception of complex stimuli. Psychophysical tests of visual motion and form perception defined by either first-order (luminance) or second-order (texture) attributes were used to probe early and later occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal functioning. When compared to developmental- and age-matched controls, FXS individuals displayed severe impairments in first- and second-order motion perception. This deficit was accompanied by near normal perception for first-order form stimuli but not second-order form stimuli. Impaired visual motion processing for first- and second-order stimuli suggests that both early- and later-level neurologic function of the parietal lobe are affected in Fragile X syndrome (FXS). Furthermore, this deficit likely stems from abnormal input from the magnocellular compartment of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Impaired visual form and motion processing for complex visual stimuli with normal processing for simple (i.e., first-order) form stimuli suggests that FXS individuals have normal early form processing accompanied by a generalized impairment in neurologic mechanisms necessary for integrating all early visual input.

  5. Fragile X Mental Retardation Syndrome: Structure of the KH1-KH2 Domains of Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Valverde,R.; Poznyakova, I.; Kajander, T.

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation in humans, with an estimated prevalence of about 1 in 4000 males. Although several observations indicate that the absence of functional Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) is the underlying basis of Fragile X syndrome, the structure and function of FMRP are currently unknown. Here, we present an X-ray crystal structure of the tandem KH domains of human FMRP, which reveals the relative orientation of the KH1 and KH2 domains and the location of residue Ile304, whose mutation to Asn is associated with a particularly severe incidence ofmore » Fragile X syndrome. We show that the Ile304Asn mutation both perturbs the structure and destabilizes the protein.« less

  6. Lenticular abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Agarwal, Tushar; Kumar, Gaurav; Kushmesh, Rakhi; Tejwani, Lalit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    To study the lenticular problems in children presenting at an apex institute. Retrospective analysis of records (< 14 years) of new lens clinic cases was done. Of 1,047 children, 687 were males. Mean age at presentation was 6.35 ± 4.13 years. Developmental cataract was seen in 45.6% and posttraumatic cataract in 29.7% of patients. Other abnormalities were cataract with retinal detachment, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, subluxated lens, micro/spherophakia, cataract secondary to uveitis, intraocular lens complications, cataract with choroidal coloboma, and visual axis opacification. Developmental and posttraumatic cataracts were the most common abnormalities. Delayed presentation is of concern. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Viewing social scenes: a visual scan-path study comparing fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tracey A; Porter, Melanie A; Langdon, Robyn

    2013-08-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and Williams syndrome (WS) are both genetic disorders which present with similar cognitive-behavioral problems, but distinct social phenotypes. Despite these social differences both syndromes display poor social relations which may result from abnormal social processing. This study aimed to manipulate the location of socially salient information within scenes to investigate the visual attentional mechanisms of: capture, disengagement, and/or general engagement. Findings revealed that individuals with FXS avoid social information presented centrally, at least initially. The WS findings, on the other hand, provided some evidence that difficulties with attentional disengagement, rather than attentional capture, may play a role in the WS social phenotype. These findings are discussed in relation to the distinct social phenotypes of these two disorders.

  8. Early development in males with Fragile X syndrome: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kau, Alice S M; Meyer, Walter A; Kaufmann, Walter E

    2002-05-01

    This article reviews the current bibliographic knowledge on early neurobehavioral development and milestones in Fragile X syndrome (FraX), with emphasis on males affected by the condition. Three broad areas of early development were examined: (1) gross and fine motor, (2) speech and language, and (3) social. The result of the current review indicates very limited information on the developmental milestones in all three areas. The scarce literature on motor development shows that in FraX there is an early developmental delay. Research on speech and language demonstrates pervasive deficits in conversational skills and severe developmental delay, with increasing discrepancy between language level and chronological age in young males with FraX. Finally, deficits in social development in FraX include abnormal gaze, approach and avoidance conflict, and high incidence of autistic spectrum disorders. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Thiamin Pyrimidine Biosynthesis in Candida albicans: A Remarkable Reaction between Histidine and Pyridoxal Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Rung-Yi; Huang, Siyu; Fenwick, Michael K.

    2012-06-26

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thiamin pyrimidine is formed from histidine and pyridoxal phosphate (PLP). The origin of all of the pyrimidine atoms has been previously determined using labeling studies and suggests that the pyrimidine is formed using remarkable chemistry that is without chemical or biochemical precedent. Here we report the overexpression of the closely related Candida albicans pyrimidine synthase (THI5p) and the reconstitution and preliminary characterization of the enzymatic activity. A structure of the C. albicans THI5p shows PLP bound at the active site via an imine with Lys62 and His66 in close proximity to the PLP. Our data suggest thatmore » His66 of the THI5 protein is the histidine source for pyrimidine formation and that the pyrimidine synthase is a single-turnover enzyme.« less

  10. Characterization of PhPRP1, a histidine domain arabinogalactan protein from Petunia hybrida pistils.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Megan C; Brooks, Jenna K; Corey, Jillaine M; Singh-Cundy, Anu

    2013-10-15

    An arabinogalactan protein, PhPRP1, was purified from Petunia hybrida pistils and shown to be orthologous to TTS-1 and TTS-2 from Nicotiana tabacum and NaTTS from Nicotiana alata. Sequence comparisons among these proteins, and CaPRP1 from Capsicum annuum, reveal a conserved histidine-rich domain and two hypervariable domains. Immunoblots show that TTS-1 and PhPRP1 are also expressed in vegetative tissues of tobacco and petunia respectively. In contrast to the molecular mass heterogeneity displayed by the pistil proteins, the different isoforms found in seedlings, roots, and leaves each has a discrete size (37, 80, 160, and 200 kDa) on SDS-PAGE gels. On the basis of their chemistry, distinctive domain architecture, and the unique pattern of expression, we have named this group of proteins HD-AGPs (histidine domain-arabinogalactan proteins). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Mammalian histidine decarboxylase; changes in molecular properties induced by oxidation and reduction.

    PubMed

    Hammar, L; Hjertén, S

    1980-04-01

    Histidine decarboxylase from a murine mastocytoma has been submitted to different separation methods. In these experiments the activity peaks were often very broad. This heterogeneity of the enzyme is traced back to the formation of aggregates, differing in apparent molecular weight by a multiple of about 55,000, as a result of oxidation. Under non-oxidative conditions the histidine decarboxylase activity is confined to one peak in both molecular sieve chromatography, hydrophic interaction chromatography, chromatography on hydroxy apatite, pore gradient electrophoresis and electrofocusing. The molecular weight of the enzyme is estimated to be 110,000 by pore gradient electrophoresis (alkylated enzyme). The isoelectric point is pH 4.9--5.0, determined by electrofocusing under reducing conditions.

  12. Evidence for histidine in the active sites of ficin and stem-bromelain

    PubMed Central

    Husain, S. S.; Lowe, G.

    1968-01-01

    1. Ficin and stem-bromelain are irreversibly inhibited by 1,3-dibromoacetone, a reagent designed to react first with the active-site cysteine residue and subsequently with a second nucleophile. Evidence is presented that establishes that a histidine residue is within a 5Å locus of the active-site cysteine residue in both enzymes. The histidine residue in both enzymes is alkylated at N-1 by dibromoacetone. It is suggested that, as with papain, the thiol and imidazole groups act in concert in the hydrolysis of substrates by these enzymes. 2. The inhibition of thiol-subtilisin with 1,3-dibromoacetone is shown to be due to the alkylation of a cysteine residue only. PMID:5722692

  13. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    PubMed

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  14. Proton affinity of the histidine-tryptophan cluster motif from the influenza A virus from ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Klein, Michael L.; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have been used to compare and contrast the deprotonation reaction of a histidine residue in aqueous solution with the situation arising in a histidine-tryptophan cluster. The latter is used as a model of the proton storage unit present in the pore of the M2 proton conducting ion channel. We compute potentials of mean force for the dissociation of a proton from the Nδ and Nɛ positions of the imidazole group to estimate the pKas. Anticipating our results, we will see that the estimated pKa for the first protonation event of the M2 channel is in good agreement with experimental estimates. Surprisingly, despite the fact that the histidine is partially desolvated in the M2 channel, the affinity for protons is similar to that of a histidine in aqueous solution. Importantly, the electrostatic environment provided by the indoles is responsible for the stabilization of the charged imidazolium.

  15. CMP‑N‑acetylneuraminic acid synthetase interacts with fragile X related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun; Tian, Shuai; Wang, Zongbao; Wang, Changbo; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; He, Shuya

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), fragile X related 1 protein (FXR1P) and FXR2P are the members of the FMR protein family. These proteins contain two KH domains and a RGG box, which are characteristic of RNA binding proteins. The absence of FMRP, causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of hereditary mental retardation. FXR1P is expressed throughout the body and important for normal muscle development, and its absence causes cardiac abnormality. To investigate the functions of FXR1P, a screen was performed to identify FXR1P‑interacting proteins and determine the biological effect of the interaction. The current study identified CMP‑N‑acetylneuraminic acid synthetase (CMAS) as an interacting protein using the yeast two‑hybrid system, and the interaction between FXR1P and CMAS was validated in yeast using a β‑galactosidase assay and growth studies with selective media. Furthermore, co‑immunoprecipitation was used to analyze the FXR1P/CMAS association and immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect expression and intracellular localization of the proteins. The results of the current study indicated that FXR1P and CMAS interact, and colocalize in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of HEK293T and HeLa cells. Accordingly, a fragile X related 1 (FXR1) gene overexpression vector was constructed to investigate the effect of FXR1 overexpression on the level of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside 1 (GM1). The results of the current study suggested that FXR1P is a tissue‑specific regulator of GM1 levels in SH‑SY5Y cells, but not in HEK293T cells. Taken together, the results initially indicate that FXR1P interacts with CMAS, and that FXR1P may enhance the activation of sialic acid via interaction with CMAS, and increase GM1 levels to affect the development of the nervous system, thus providing evidence for further research into the pathogenesis of FXS.

  16. A combinatorial histidine scanning library approach to engineer highly pH-dependent protein switches

    SciTech Connect

    Murtaugh, Megan L.; Fanning, Sean W.; Sharma, Tressa M.

    2012-09-05

    There is growing interest in the development of protein switches, which are proteins whose function, such as binding a target molecule, can be modulated through environmental triggers. Efforts to engineer highly pH sensitive protein-protein interactions typically rely on the rational introduction of ionizable groups in the protein interface. Such experiments are typically time intensive and often sacrifice the protein's affinity at the permissive pH. The underlying thermodynamics of proton-linkage dictate that the presence of multiple ionizable groups, which undergo a pK{sub a} change on protein binding, are necessary to result in highly pH-dependent binding. To test this hypothesis, a novelmore » combinatorial histidine library was developed where every possible combination of histidine and wild-type residue is sampled throughout the interface of a model anti-RNase A single domain VHH antibody. Antibodies were coselected for high-affinity binding and pH-sensitivity using an in vitro, dual-function selection strategy. The resulting antibodies retained near wild-type affinity yet became highly sensitive to small decreases in pH, drastically decreasing their binding affinity, due to the incorporation of multiple histidine groups. Several trends were observed, such as histidine 'hot-spots,' which will help enhance the development of pH switch proteins as well as increase our understanding of the role of ionizable residues in protein interfaces. Overall, the combinatorial approach is rapid, general, and robust and should be capable of producing highly pH-sensitive protein affinity reagents for a number of different applications.« less

  17. Human Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 Protein Avoids Histidine Residues To Decrease pH Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yehong; Zhu, Yuzhen; Zou, Yu; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Qingwen

    2017-01-26

    pH is highly regulated in mammalian central nervous systems. Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) can interact with numerous target proteins. Compared to that in the NCS-1 protein of Caenorhabditis elegans, evolution has avoided the placement of histidine residues at positions 102 and 83 in the NCS-1 protein of humans and Xenopus laevis, possibly to decrease the conformational sensitivity to pH gradients in synaptic processes. We used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effects of amino acid substitutions between species on human NCS-1 by substituting Arg102 and Ser83 for histidine at neutral (R102H and S83H) and acidic pHs (R102H p and S83H p ). Our cumulative 5 μs simulations revealed that the R102H mutation slightly increases the structural flexibility of loop L2 and the R102H p mutation decreases protein stability. Community network analysis illustrates that the R102H and S83H mutations weaken the interdomain and strengthen the intradomain communications. Secondary structure contents in the S83H and S83H p mutants are similar to those in the wild type, whereas the global structural stabilities and salt-bridge probabilities decrease. This study highlights the conformational dynamics effects of the R102H and S83H mutations on the local structural flexibility and global stability of NCS-1, whereas protonated histidine decreases the stability of NCS-1. Thus, histidines at positions 102 and 83 may not be compatible with the function of NCS-1 whether in the neutral or protonated state.

  18. Detoxification of aldehydes by histidine-containing dipeptides: from chemistry to clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhengzhi; Baba, Shahid P.; Sweeney, Brooke R.; Barski, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehydes are generated by oxidized lipids and carbohydrates at increased levels under conditions of metabolic imbalance and oxidative stress during atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebral ischemia, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and trauma. In most tissues, aldehydes are detoxified by oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation or the reduction of aldehydes or enzymatic and nonenzymatic conjugation with low molecular weight thiols and amines, such as glutathione and histidine dipeptides. Histidine dipeptides are present in micromolar to millimolar range in the tissues of vertebrates, where they are involved in a variety of physiological functions such as pH buffering, metal chelation, oxidant and aldehyde scavenging. Histidine dipeptides such as carnosine form Michael adducts with lipid-derived unsaturated aldehydes, and react with carbohydrate-derived oxo- and hydroxy- aldehydes forming products of unknown structure. Although these peptides react with electrophilic molecules at lower rate than glutathione, they can protect glutathione from modification by oxidant and they may be important for aldehyde quenching in glutathione-depleted cells or extracellular space where glutathione is scarce. Consistent with in vitro findings, treatment with carnosine has been shown to diminish ischemic injury, improve glucose control, ameliorate the development of complications in animal models of diabetes and obesity, promote wound healing and decrease atherosclerosis. The protective effects of carnosine have been linked to its anti-oxidant properties, it ability to promote glycolysis, detoxify reactive aldehydes and enhance histamine levels. Thus, treatment with carnosine and related histidine dipeptides may be a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of diseases associated with high carbonyl load. PMID:23313711

  19. Detoxification of aldehydes by histidine-containing dipeptides: from chemistry to clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhengzhi; Baba, Shahid P; Sweeney, Brooke R; Barski, Oleg A

    2013-02-25

    Aldehydes are generated by oxidized lipids and carbohydrates at increased levels under conditions of metabolic imbalance and oxidative stress during atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebral ischemia, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and trauma. In most tissues, aldehydes are detoxified by oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation or the reduction of aldehydes or enzymatic and nonenzymatic conjugation with low molecular weight thiols and amines, such as glutathione and histidine dipeptides. Histidine dipeptides are present in micromolar to millimolar range in the tissues of vertebrates, where they are involved in a variety of physiological functions such as pH buffering, metal chelation, oxidant and aldehyde scavenging. Histidine dipeptides such as carnosine form Michael adducts with lipid-derived unsaturated aldehydes, and react with carbohydrate-derived oxo- and hydroxy-aldehydes forming products of unknown structure. Although these peptides react with electrophilic molecules at lower rate than glutathione, they can protect glutathione from modification by oxidant and they may be important for aldehyde quenching in glutathione-depleted cells or extracellular space where glutathione is scarce. Consistent with in vitro findings, treatment with carnosine has been shown to diminish ischemic injury, improve glucose control, ameliorate the development of complications in animal models of diabetes and obesity, promote wound healing and decrease atherosclerosis. The protective effects of carnosine have been linked to its anti-oxidant properties, its ability to promote glycolysis, detoxify reactive aldehydes and enhance histamine levels. Thus, treatment with carnosine and related histidine dipeptides may be a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of diseases associated with high carbonyl load. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Why many polymers are so fragile: A new perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dalle-Ferrier, C.; Kisliuk, A.; Hong, L.

    Many polymers exhibit much steeper temperature dependence of their structural relaxation time (higher fragility) than liquids of small molecules, and the mechanism of this unusually high fragility in polymers remains a puzzle. To reveal additional hints for understanding the underlying mechanism, we analyzed correlation of many properties of polymers to their fragility on example of model polymer polystyrene with various molecular weights (MWs). Here, we demonstrate that these correlations work for short chains (oligomers), but fail progressively with increase in MW. Our surprising discovery is that the steepness of the temperature dependence (fragility) of the viscosity that is determined bymore » chain relaxation follows the correlations at all molecular weights. These results suggest that the molecular level relaxation still follows the behavior usual for small molecules even in polymers, and its fragility (chain fragility) falls in the range usual for molecular liquids. It is the segmental relaxation that has this unusually high fragility. We also speculate that many polymers cannot reach an ergodic state on the time scale of segmental dynamics due to chain connectivity and rigidity. This leads to sharper decrease in accessible configurational entropy upon cooling and results in steeper temperature dependence of segmental relaxation. Our proposed scenario provides a new important insight into the specifics of polymer dynamics: the role of ergodicity time and length scale. At the end, we suggest that a similar scenario can be applicable also to other molecular systems with slow intra-molecular degrees of freedom and to chemically complex systems where the time scale of chemical fluctuations can be longer than the time scale of structural relaxation.« less

  1. Why many polymers are so fragile: A new perspective

    DOE PAGES

    Dalle-Ferrier, C.; Kisliuk, A.; Hong, L.; ...

    2016-10-21

    Many polymers exhibit much steeper temperature dependence of their structural relaxation time (higher fragility) than liquids of small molecules, and the mechanism of this unusually high fragility in polymers remains a puzzle. To reveal additional hints for understanding the underlying mechanism, we analyzed correlation of many properties of polymers to their fragility on example of model polymer polystyrene with various molecular weights (MWs). Here, we demonstrate that these correlations work for short chains (oligomers), but fail progressively with increase in MW. Our surprising discovery is that the steepness of the temperature dependence (fragility) of the viscosity that is determined bymore » chain relaxation follows the correlations at all molecular weights. These results suggest that the molecular level relaxation still follows the behavior usual for small molecules even in polymers, and its fragility (chain fragility) falls in the range usual for molecular liquids. It is the segmental relaxation that has this unusually high fragility. We also speculate that many polymers cannot reach an ergodic state on the time scale of segmental dynamics due to chain connectivity and rigidity. This leads to sharper decrease in accessible configurational entropy upon cooling and results in steeper temperature dependence of segmental relaxation. Our proposed scenario provides a new important insight into the specifics of polymer dynamics: the role of ergodicity time and length scale. At the end, we suggest that a similar scenario can be applicable also to other molecular systems with slow intra-molecular degrees of freedom and to chemically complex systems where the time scale of chemical fluctuations can be longer than the time scale of structural relaxation.« less

  2. Aberrant face and gaze habituation in fragile x syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Jennifer Lynn; Garrett, Amy S; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Mazaika, Paul K; Reiss, Allan L

    2014-10-01

    The authors sought to investigate neural system habituation to face and eye gaze in fragile X syndrome, a disorder characterized by eye-gaze aversion, among other social and cognitive deficits. Participants (ages 15-25 years) were 30 individuals with fragile X syndrome (females, N=14) and a comparison group of 25 individuals without fragile X syndrome (females, N=12) matched for general cognitive ability and autism symptoms. Functional MRI (fMRI) was used to assess brain activation during a gaze habituation task. Participants viewed repeated presentations of four unique faces with either direct or averted eye gaze and judged the direction of eye gaze. Four participants (males, N=4/4; fragile X syndrome, N=3) were excluded because of excessive head motion during fMRI scanning. Behavioral performance did not differ between the groups. Less neural habituation (and significant sensitization) in the fragile X syndrome group was found in the cingulate gyrus, fusiform gyrus, and frontal cortex in response to all faces (direct and averted gaze). Left fusiform habituation in female participants was directly correlated with higher, more typical levels of the fragile X mental retardation protein and inversely correlated with autism symptoms. There was no evidence for differential habituation to direct gaze compared with averted gaze within or between groups. Impaired habituation and accentuated sensitization in response to face/eye gaze was distributed across multiple levels of neural processing. These results could help inform interventions, such as desensitization therapy, which may help patients with fragile X syndrome modulate anxiety and arousal associated with eye gaze, thereby improving social functioning.

  3. Impact of Stainless Steel Exposure on the Oxidation of Polysorbate 80 in Histidine Placebo and Active Monoclonal Antibody Formulation.

    PubMed

    Gopalrathnam, Ganapathy; Sharma, Anant Navanithan; Dodd, Steven Witt; Huang, Lihua

    2018-01-01

    Rapid oxidation of polysorbate 80 in histidine buffer was observed upon brief exposure to stainless steel. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicates degradation of both polyoxyethylene sorbitan and polyoxyethylene head groups and unsaturated fatty acid chains, with further confirmation by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography data. Both Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ were shown to induce polysorbate 80 oxidation. The degree of oxidation in polysorbate 20 and polysorbate 80 are comparable for the head groups and saturated fatty acid esters. However, the same phenomenon was not observed with placebo or monoclonal antibody at a threshold protein concentration, formulated in sodium citrate, in combination with histidine and sodium citrate, or with Na 2 ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Further, polysorbate 80 oxidation was not observed with Lilly's antibody containing the active ingredient LY2951742, at or above a threshold concentration. Finally, no major polysorbate 80 degradation was observed in histidine buffer, with or without protein, in containers composed of glass or plastic, or when stainless steel exposure was otherwise completely absent. Finally, the 2-oxo oxidation form of histidine was not observed, but the other oxidation products and modifications of histidine were identified. LAY ABSTRACT: Rapid oxidation of polysorbate 80 in histidine buffer was observed upon brief exposure to stainless steel. The degree of oxidation in polysorbate 80 and polysorbate 20 were comparable. However, the same phenomenon was not observed with placebo when formulated in sodium citrate, in combination with histidine and sodium citrate, or with Na 2 ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polysorbate 80 oxidation was not observed with Lilly's antibody containing the active ingredient, LY2951742, at or above a threshold concentration. No major polysorbate 80 degradation in histidine buffer was observed when stainless steel contact was completely absent.

  4. Association of Rare Loss-Of-Function Alleles in HAL, Serum Histidine: Levels and Incident Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Li, Alexander H; Muzny, Donna; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; de Vries, Paul S; Bis, Joshua C; Musani, Solomon K; Alexander, Danny; Morrison, Alanna C; Franco, Oscar H; Uitterlinden, André; Hofman, Albert; Dehghan, Abbas; Wilson, James G; Psaty, Bruce M; Gibbs, Richard; Wei, Peng; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Histidine is a semiessential amino acid with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Few data are available on the associations between genetic variants, histidine levels, and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. By conducting whole exome sequencing on 1152 African Americans in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study and focusing on loss-of-function (LoF) variants, we identified 3 novel rare LoF variants in HAL, a gene that encodes histidine ammonia-lyase in the first step of histidine catabolism. These LoF variants had large effects on blood histidine levels (β=0.26; P=1.2×10(-13)). The positive association with histidine levels was replicated by genotyping an independent sample of 718 ARIC African Americans (minor allele frequency=1%; P=1.2×10(-4)). In addition, high blood histidine levels were associated with reduced risk of developing incident CHD with an average of 21.5 years of follow-up among African Americans (hazard ratio=0.18; P=1.9×10(-4)). This finding was validated in an independent sample of European Americans from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) Offspring Cohort. However, LoF variants in HAL were not directly significantly associated with incident CHD after meta-analyzing results from the CHARGE Consortium. Three LoF mutations in HAL were associated with increased histidine levels, which in turn were shown to be inversely related to the risk of CHD among both African Americans and European Americans. Future investigations on the association between HAL gene variation and CHD are warranted. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Relationships of Dietary Histidine and Obesity in Northern Chinese Adults, an Internet-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Chuan; Li, Chun-Long; Qi, Jia-Yue; Huang, Li-Na; Shi, Dan; Du, Shan-Shan; Liu, Li-Yan; Feng, Ren-Nan; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2016-07-11

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that histidine supplementation significantly ameliorates inflammation and oxidative stress in obese women and high-fat diet-induced obese rats. However, the effects of dietary histidine on general population are not known. The objective of this Internet-based cross-sectional study was to evaluate the associations between dietary histidine and prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity in northern Chinese population. A total of 2376 participants were randomly recruited and asked to finish our Internet-based dietary questionnaire for the Chinese (IDQC). Afterwards, 88 overweight/obese participants were randomly selected to explore the possible mechanism. Compared with healthy controls, dietary histidine was significantly lower in overweight (p < 0.05) and obese (p < 0.01) participants of both sexes. Dietary histidine was inversely associated with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure in overall population and stronger associations were observed in women and overweight/obese participants. Higher dietary histidine was associated with lower prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity, especially in women. Further studies indicated that higher dietary histidine was associated with lower fasting blood glucose (FBG), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 2-h postprandial glucose (2 h-PG), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), malonaldehyde (MDA) and vaspin and higher glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and adiponectin of overweight/obese individuals of both sexes. In conclusion, higher dietary histidine is inversely associated with energy intake, status of insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight/obese participants and lower prevalence of overweight/obesity in northern Chinese adults.

  6. Relationships of Dietary Histidine and Obesity in Northern Chinese Adults, an Internet-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Chuan; Li, Chun-Long; Qi, Jia-Yue; Huang, Li-Na; Shi, Dan; Du, Shan-Shan; Liu, Li-Yan; Feng, Ren-Nan; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that histidine supplementation significantly ameliorates inflammation and oxidative stress in obese women and high-fat diet-induced obese rats. However, the effects of dietary histidine on general population are not known. The objective of this Internet-based cross-sectional study was to evaluate the associations between dietary histidine and prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity in northern Chinese population. A total of 2376 participants were randomly recruited and asked to finish our Internet-based dietary questionnaire for the Chinese (IDQC). Afterwards, 88 overweight/obese participants were randomly selected to explore the possible mechanism. Compared with healthy controls, dietary histidine was significantly lower in overweight (p < 0.05) and obese (p < 0.01) participants of both sexes. Dietary histidine was inversely associated with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure in overall population and stronger associations were observed in women and overweight/obese participants. Higher dietary histidine was associated with lower prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity, especially in women. Further studies indicated that higher dietary histidine was associated with lower fasting blood glucose (FBG), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 2-h postprandial glucose (2 h-PG), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), malonaldehyde (MDA) and vaspin and higher glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and adiponectin of overweight/obese individuals of both sexes. In conclusion, higher dietary histidine is inversely associated with energy intake, status of insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight/obese participants and lower prevalence of overweight/obesity in northern Chinese adults. PMID:27409634

  7. A rapid and ultrasensitive SERRS assay for histidine and tyrosine based on azo coupling.

    PubMed

    Sui, Huimin; Wang, Yue; Yu, Zhi; Cong, Qian; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhao, Bing

    2016-10-01

    A simple and highly sensitive surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS)-based approach coupled with azo coupling reaction has been put forward for quantitative analysis of histidine and tyrosine. The SERRS-based assay is simple and rapid by mixing the azo reaction products with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for measurements within 2min. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method are as low as 4.33×10(-11) and 8.80×10(-11)M for histidine and tyrosine, respectively. Moreover, the SERRS fingerprint information specific to corresponding amino acids guarantees the selective detection for the target histidine and tyrosine. The results from serum indicated the potential application of the proposed approach into biological samples. Compared with the methods ever reported, the main advantages of this methodology are simpleness, rapidity without time-consuming separation or pretreatment steps, high sensitivity, selectivity and the potential for determination of other molecules containing imidazole or phenol groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Endotoxin depletion of recombinant protein preparations through their preferential binding to histidine tags.

    PubMed

    Mack, Laura; Brill, Boris; Delis, Natalia; Groner, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    The presence of endotoxins in preparations of recombinantly produced therapeutic proteins poses serious problems for patients. Endotoxins can cause fever, respiratory distress syndromes, intravascular coagulation, or endotoxic shock. A number of methods have been devised to remove endotoxins from protein preparations using separation procedures based on molecular mass or charge properties. Most of the methods are limited in their endotoxin removal capacities and lack general applicability. We are describing a biotechnological approach for endotoxin removal. This strategy exploits the observation that endotoxins form micelles that expose negative charges on their surface, leading to preferential binding of endotoxins to cationic surfaces, allowing the separation from their resident protein. Endotoxins exhibit high affinity to stretches of histidines, which are widely used tools to facilitate the purification of recombinant proteins. They bind to nickel ions and are the basis for protein purification from cellular extracts by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. We show that the thrombin-mediated cleavage of two histidine tags from the purified recombinant protein and the adsorption of these histidine tags and their associated endotoxins to a nickel affinity column result in an appreciable depletion of the endotoxins in the purified protein fraction. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Partial purification and characterization of a novel histidine decarboxylase from Enterobacter aerogenes DL-1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu; Hu, Wenzhong; Jiang, Aili; Tian, Mixia

    2015-08-18

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) from Enterobacter aerogenes DL-1 was purified in a three-step procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephadex G-100, and DEAE-Sepharose column chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed a single protein band of 52.4 kD on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimum pH for HDC activity was 6.5, and the enzyme was stable between pH 4 and 8. Enterobacter aerogenes HDC had optimal activity at 40°C and retained most of its activity between 4 and 50°C. HDC activity was reduced in the presence of numerous tested compounds. Particularly with SDS, it significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited enzyme activity. Conversely, Ca(2+) and Mn(2+) showed prominent activation effects (p < 0.01) with activity increasing to 117.20% and 123.42%, respectively. The Lineweaver-Burk plot showed that K m and V max values of the enzyme for L-histidine were 0.21 mM and 71.39 µmol/min, respectively. In comparison with most HDCs from other microorganisms and animals, HDC from E. aerogenes DL-1 displayed higher affinity and greater reaction velocity toward L-histidine.

  10. Structural and physiological studies of the Escherichia coli histidine operon inserted into plasmid vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, C B; Musti, A M; Frunzio, R; Blasi, F

    1980-01-01

    A fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid 5,300 base paris long and containing the promoter-proximal portion of the histidine operon of Escherichia coli K-12, has been cloned in plasmid pBR313 (plasmids pCB2 and pCB3). Restriction mapping, partial nucleotide sequencing, and studies on functional expression in vivo and on protein synthesis in minicells have shown that the fragment contains the regulatory region of the operon, the hisG, hisD genes, and part of the hisC gene. Another plasmid (pCB5) contained the hisG gene and part of the hisD gene. Expression of the hisG gene in the latter plasmid was under control of the tetracycline promoter of the pBR313 plasmid. The in vivo expression of the two groups of plasmids described above, as well as their effect on the expression of the histidine genes not carried by the plasmids but present on the host chromosome, has been studied. The presence of multiple copies of pCB2 or pCB3, but not of pCB5, prevented derepression of the chromosomal histidine operon. Possible interpretations of this phenomenon are discussed. Images PMID:6246067

  11. Evolution of the Structure and Chromosomal Distribution of Histidine Biosynthetic Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fani, Renato; Mori, Elena; Tamburini, Elena; Lazcano, Antonio

    1998-10-01

    A database of more than 100 histidine biosynthetic genes from different organisms belonging to the three primary domains has been analyzed, including those found in the now completely sequenced genomes of Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Synechocystis sp., Methanococcus jannaschii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ubiquity of his genes suggests that it is a highly conserved pathway that was probably already present in the last common ancestor of all extant life. The chromosomal distribution of the his genes shows that the enterobacterial histidine operon structure is not the only possible organization, and that there is a diversity of gene arrays for the his pathway. Analysis of the available sequences shows that gene fusions (like those involved in the origin of the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium hisIE and hisB gene structures) are not universal. In contrast, the elongation event that led to the extant hisA gene from two homologous ancestral modules, as well as the subsequent paralogous duplication that originated hisF, appear to be irreversible and are conserved in all known organisms. The available evidence supports the hypothesis that histidine biosynthesis was assembled by a gene recruitment process.

  12. The effect of histidine ammonia-lyase on some murine tumours.

    PubMed

    Jack, G W; Wiblin, C N; McMahon, P C

    1983-01-01

    The histidine ammonia-lyase from bacterial strain CAMR 5315 was partially purified to assess its effect on the growth of murine tumours. This strain was selected as the source after an extensive screening programme for histidine ammonia-lyases. The enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-150. The enzyme reduced circulating L-histidine levels in Wistar rats and in mice persisted with a half-life of 6-7 h. Neither LDH virus nor chemical modification with ethylacetimidate increased the half-life as observed with L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase. The enzyme was tested in mice against Ehrlich carcinoma, L5178Y lymphoblastic leukaemia, Mc/S sarcoma, B16 melanoma, P8157 mastocytoma, P1798 lymphosarcoma and the Gardner 6C3HED lymphosarcoma. The only tumours to show sensitivity to the enzyme were the Mc/S sarcoma against which a 65% increase in life span was observed at the highest enzyme dose, 1000 U/kg on alternate days over 14 days and the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma where cures were obtained at 250 U/kg on alternate days over 14 days, but only at inocula levels of 10(5) and 10(3) cells/animal respectively.

  13. Molecular characterization and expression study of a histidine auxotrophic mutant (his1-) of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    PubMed

    El Malki, F; Jacobs, M

    2001-01-01

    The histidine auxotroph mutant his 1(-) isolated from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia haploid protoplasts was first characterized to be deficient for the enzyme histidinol phosphate aminotransferase that is responsible for one of the last steps of histidine biosynthesis. Expression of the mutated gene at the RNA level was assessed by northern analysis of various tissues. Transcriptional activity was unimpaired by the mutation and, in contrast, a higher level of expression was obtained when compared to the wild-type. The cDNA sequence encoding the mutated gene was isolated by RT-PCR and compared to the wild-type gene. A single point mutation corresponding to the substitution of a G nucleotide by A was identified at position 1212 starting from the translation site. The alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences from the mutated and wild-type gene showed that this mutation resulted in the substitution of an Arg by a His residue at position 381. This Arg residue is a conserved amino acid for histidinol phosphate aminotransferase of many species. These results indicate that the identified mutation results in an altered histidinol phosphate aminotransferase enzyme that is unable to convert the substrate imidazole acetol phosphate to histidinol phosphate and thereby leads to the blockage of histidine biosynthesis. Possible consequences of this blockage on the expression of other amino acid biosynthesis genes were evaluated by analysing the expression of the dhdps gene encoding dihydrodipicolinate synthase, the first key enzyme of the lysine pathway.

  14. Identification of hepta-histidine as a candidate drug for Huntington’s disease by in silico-in vitro- in vivo-integrated screens of chemical libraries

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Tomomi; Fujita, Kyota; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Ikura, Teikichi; Chen, Xigui; Homma, Hidenori; Tamura, Takuya; Mao, Ying; Taniguchi, Juliana Bosso; Motoki, Kazumi; Nakabayashi, Makoto; Ito, Nobutoshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Tomii, Kentaro; Okano, Hideyuki; Kaye, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steven; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We identified drug seeds for treating Huntington’s disease (HD) by combining in vitro single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, in silico molecular docking simulations, and in vivo fly and mouse HD models to screen for inhibitors of abnormal interactions between mutant Htt and physiological Ku70, an essential DNA damage repair protein in neurons whose function is known to be impaired by mutant Htt. From 19,468 and 3,010,321 chemicals in actual and virtual libraries, fifty-six chemicals were selected from combined in vitro-in silico screens; six of these were further confirmed to have an in vivo effect on lifespan in a fly HD model, and two chemicals exerted an in vivo effect on the lifespan, body weight and motor function in a mouse HD model. Two oligopeptides, hepta-histidine (7H) and Angiotensin III, rescued the morphological abnormalities of primary neurons differentiated from iPS cells of human HD patients. For these selected drug seeds, we proposed a possible common structure. Unexpectedly, the selected chemicals enhanced rather than inhibited Htt aggregation, as indicated by dynamic light scattering analysis. Taken together, these integrated screens revealed a new pathway for the molecular targeted therapy of HD. PMID:27653664

  15. Identification of hepta-histidine as a candidate drug for Huntington’s disease by in silico-in vitro- in vivo-integrated screens of chemical libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Tomomi; Fujita, Kyota; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Ikura, Teikichi; Chen, Xigui; Homma, Hidenori; Tamura, Takuya; Mao, Ying; Taniguchi, Juliana Bosso; Motoki, Kazumi; Nakabayashi, Makoto; Ito, Nobutoshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Tomii, Kentaro; Okano, Hideyuki; Kaye, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steven; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-09-01

    We identified drug seeds for treating Huntington’s disease (HD) by combining in vitro single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, in silico molecular docking simulations, and in vivo fly and mouse HD models to screen for inhibitors of abnormal interactions between mutant Htt and physiological Ku70, an essential DNA damage repair protein in neurons whose function is known to be impaired by mutant Htt. From 19,468 and 3,010,321 chemicals in actual and virtual libraries, fifty-six chemicals were selected from combined in vitro-in silico screens; six of these were further confirmed to have an in vivo effect on lifespan in a fly HD model, and two chemicals exerted an in vivo effect on the lifespan, body weight and motor function in a mouse HD model. Two oligopeptides, hepta-histidine (7H) and Angiotensin III, rescued the morphological abnormalities of primary neurons differentiated from iPS cells of human HD patients. For these selected drug seeds, we proposed a possible common structure. Unexpectedly, the selected chemicals enhanced rather than inhibited Htt aggregation, as indicated by dynamic light scattering analysis. Taken together, these integrated screens revealed a new pathway for the molecular targeted therapy of HD.

  16. Effects of histidine and n-acetylcysteine on experimental lesions induced by doxorubicin in sciatic nerve of rats.

    PubMed

    Farshid, Amir Abbas; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Najafi, Sima

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the effect of separate and combined intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of histidine and n-acetylcysteine were investigated on experimental damage induced by doxorubicin (DOX) in sciatic nerve of rats. DOX was i.p. injected at a dose of 4 mg/kg once weekly for four weeks. Histidine and n-acetylcysteine were i.p. injected at a same dose of 20 mg/kg. Cold and mechanical allodynia were recorded using acetone spray and von Frey filaments tests, respectively. The sciatic nerve damage was evaluated by light microscopy. Plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured. Histidine and especially n-acetylcysteine at a same dose of 20 mg/kg suppressed cold and mechanical allodynia, improved sciatic nerve lesions and reversed MDA and TAC levels in DOX-treated groups. Combination treatment with histidine and n-acetylcysteine showed better responses when compared with them used alone. The results of the present study showed peripheral neuroprotective effects for histidine and n-acetylcysteine. Reduction of free radical-induced toxic effects may have a role in neuroprotective properties of histidine and n-acetylcysteine.

  17. Role of Heavy Meromyosin in Heat-Induced Gelation in Low Ionic Strength Solution Containing L-Histidine.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Toru; Yoshida, Yuri; Yasui, Masanori; Ito, Toshiaki; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Akihito; Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-08-01

    The gelation of myosin has a very important role in meat products. We have already shown that myosin in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine forms a transparent gel after heating. To clarify the mechanism of this unique gelation, we investigated the changes in the nature of myosin subfragments during heating in solutions with low and high ionic strengths with and without L-histidine. The hydrophobicity of myosin and heavy meromyosin (HMM) in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine was lower than in high ionic strength solution. The SH contents of myosin and HMM in low ionic strength solution containing l-histidine did not change during the heating process, whereas in high ionic strength solution they decreased slightly. The heat-induced globular masses of HMM in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine were smaller than those in high ionic strength solution. These findings suggested that the polymerization of HMM molecules by heating was suppressed in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine, resulting in formation of the unique gel. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Enhanced Excitatory Connectivity and Disturbed Sound Processing in the Auditory Brainstem of Fragile X Mice.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Pino, Elisabet; Gessele, Nikodemus; Koch, Ursula

    2017-08-02

    Hypersensitivity to sounds is one of the prevalent symptoms in individuals with Fragile X syndrome (FXS). It manifests behaviorally early during development and is often used as a landmark for treatment efficacy. However, the physiological mechanisms and circuit-level alterations underlying this aberrant behavior remain poorly understood. Using the mouse model of FXS ( Fmr1 KO ), we demonstrate that functional maturation of auditory brainstem synapses is impaired in FXS. Fmr1 KO mice showed a greatly enhanced excitatory synaptic input strength in neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO), a prominent auditory brainstem nucleus, which integrates ipsilateral excitation and contralateral inhibition to compute interaural level differences. Conversely, the glycinergic, inhibitory input properties remained unaffected. The enhanced excitation was the result of an increased number of cochlear nucleus fibers converging onto one LSO neuron, without changing individual synapse properties. Concomitantly, immunolabeling of excitatory ending markers revealed an increase in the immunolabeled area, supporting abnormally elevated excitatory input numbers. Intrinsic firing properties were only slightly enhanced. In line with the disturbed development of LSO circuitry, auditory processing was also affected in adult Fmr1 KO mice as shown with single-unit recordings of LSO neurons. These processing deficits manifested as an increase in firing rate, a broadening of the frequency response area, and a shift in the interaural level difference function of LSO neurons. Our results suggest that this aberrant synaptic development of auditory brainstem circuits might be a major underlying cause of the auditory processing deficits in FXS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common inheritable form of intellectual impairment, including autism. A core symptom of FXS is extreme sensitivity to loud sounds. This is one reason why individuals with FXS tend to avoid social

  19. Reversal of disease-related pathologies in the fragile X mouse model by selective activation of GABAB receptors with arbaclofen.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Christina; Wijetunge, Lasani; Kinoshita, Mika Nakamoto; Shumway, Matthew; Hammond, Rebecca S; Postma, Friso R; Brynczka, Christopher; Rush, Roger; Thomas, Alexia; Paylor, Richard; Warren, Stephen T; Vanderklish, Peter W; Kind, Peter C; Carpenter, Randall L; Bear, Mark F; Healy, Aileen M

    2012-09-19

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism, results from the transcriptional silencing of FMR1 and loss of the mRNA translational repressor protein fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Patients with FXS exhibit changes in neuronal dendritic spine morphology, a pathology associated with altered synaptic function. Studies in the mouse model of fragile X have shown that loss of FMRP causes excessive synaptic protein synthesis, which results in synaptic dysfunction and altered spine morphology. We tested whether the pharmacologic activation of the γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B)) receptor could correct or reverse these phenotypes in Fmr1-knockout mice. Basal protein synthesis, which is elevated in the hippocampus of Fmr1-knockout mice, was corrected by the in vitro application of the selective GABA(B) receptor agonist STX209 (arbaclofen, R-baclofen). STX209 also reduced to wild-type values the elevated AMPA receptor internalization in Fmr1-knockout cultured neurons, a known functional consequence of increased protein synthesis. Acute administration of STX209 in vivo, at doses that modify behavior, decreased mRNA translation in the cortex of Fmr1-knockout mice. Finally, the chronic administration of STX209 in juvenile mice corrected the increased spine density in Fmr1-knockout mice without affecting spine density in wild-type mice. Thus, activation of the GABA(B) receptor with STX209 corrected synaptic abnormalities considered central to fragile X pathophysiology, a finding that suggests that STX209 may be a potentially effective therapy to treat the core symptoms of FXS.

  20. Aging in Fragile X Premutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Reymundo; Saito, Naomi; Reed, Dallas; Eldeeb, Marwa; Schneider, Andrea; Hessl, David; Tassone, Flora; Beckett, Laurel; Hagerman, Randi

    2016-10-01

    It is now recognized that FMR1 premutation carriers (PC) are at risk to develop a range of neurological, psychiatric, and immune-mediated disorders during adulthood. There are conflicting findings regarding the incidence of hypertension, hypothyroidism, diabetes, and cancer in these patients that warrant further study. A retrospective controlled study was performed in a convenience sample of 248 controls (130 men, 118 women) and 397 FMR1 PC with and without fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) (176 men, 221 women); all participants were at least 45 years old (men: mean 62.4, SD 9.5; women: mean 62.8, SD 9.9; p = 0.63). Memory and cognitive assessments (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III), Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III)) and molecular testing (CGG repeats and FMR1-mRNA levels) were performed. Additional data included body mass index (BMI), cholesterol levels, blood pressure, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, and medical history. A higher percentage of PC subjects self-reported having a diagnosis of hypertension (50.0 vs. 35.0 %, p = 0.006) and thyroid problems (20.4 vs. 10.0 %, p = 0.012) than control subjects. When comparing controls versus PC with FXTAS, the association was higher for diabetes (p = 0.043); however, the effect was not significant after adjusting for demographic predictors. Blood pressure, blood glucose levels, HbA1c, and BMI values were not significantly different between the two groups. The PC with FXTAS group performed consistently lower in neuropsychological testing compared with the PC without FXTAS group, but the differences were very small for all but the WAIS full-scale IQ. Based on these findings, it appears that the risk for hypertension, thyroid problems, and diabetes may be more frequent in PC with FXTAS, which will require verification in future studies.

  1. Abnormality, rationality, and sanity.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Ralph; Volz, Kirsten G

    2013-11-01

    A growing body of studies suggests that neurological and mental abnormalities foster conformity to norms of rationality that are widely endorsed in economics and psychology, whereas normality stands in the way of rationality thus defined. Here, we outline the main findings of these studies, discuss their implications for experimental design, and consider how 'sane' some benchmarks of rationality really are. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Single histidine residue in head-group region is sufficient to impart remarkable gene transfection properties to cationic lipids: evidence for histidine-mediated membrane fusion at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V V; Pichon, C; Refregiers, M; Guerin, B; Midoux, P; Chaudhuri, A

    2003-08-01

    Presence of endosome-disrupting multiple histidine functionalities in the molecular architecture of cationic polymers, such as polylysine, has previously been demonstrated to significantly enhance their in vitro gene delivery efficiencies. Towards harnessing improved transfection property through covalent grafting of endosome-disrupting single histidine functionality in the molecular structure of cationic lipids, herein, we report on the design, the synthesis and the transfection efficiency of two novel nonglycerol-based histidylated cationic amphiphiles. We found that L-histidine-(N,N-di-n-hexadecylamine)ethylamide (lipid 1) and L-histidine-(N,N-di-n-hexadecylamine,-N-methyl)ethylamide (lipid 2) in combination with cholesterol gave efficient transfections into various cell lines. The transfection efficiency of Chol/lipid 1 lipoplexes into HepG2 cells was two order of magnitude higher than that of FuGENE(TM)6 and DC-Chol lipoplexes, whereas it was similar into A549, 293T7 and HeLa cells. A better efficiency was obtained with Chol/lipid 2 lipoplexes when using the cytosolic luciferase expression vector (pT7Luc) under the control of the bacterial T7 promoter. Membrane fusion activity measurements using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique showed that the histidine head-groups of Chol/lipid 1 liposomes mediated membrane fusion in the pH range 5-7. In addition, the transgene expression results using the T7Luc expression vector convincingly support the endosome-disrupting role of the presently described mono-histidylated cationic transfection lipids and the release of DNA into the cytosol. We conclude that covalent grafting of a single histidine amino acid residue to suitable twin-chain hydrophobic compounds is able to impart remarkable transfection properties on the resulting mono-histidylated cationic amphiphile, presumably via the endosome-disrupting characteristics of the histidine functionalities.

  3. DNA Secondary Structure at Chromosomal Fragile Sites in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thys, Ryan G; Lehman, Christine E; Pierce, Levi C. T; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures that can interfere with normal cellular processes, and many of these structures have been associated with neurological diseases and cancer. Secondary structure-forming sequences are often found at chromosomal fragile sites, which are hotspots for sister chromatid exchange, chromosomal translocations, and deletions. Structures formed at fragile sites can lead to instability by disrupting normal cellular processes such as DNA replication and transcription. The instability caused by disruption of replication and transcription can lead to DNA breakage, resulting in gene rearrangements and deletions that cause disease. In this review, we discuss the role of DNA secondary structure at fragile sites in human disease. PMID:25937814

  4. Repurposing available drugs for neurodevelopmental disorders: The fragile X experience.

    PubMed

    Tranfaglia, Michael R; Thibodeaux, Clare; Mason, Daniel J; Brown, David; Roberts, Ian; Smith, Richard; Guilliams, Tim; Cogram, Patricia

    2018-05-04

    Many available drugs have been repurposed as treatments for neurodevelopmental disorders. In the specific case of fragile X syndrome, many clinical trials of available drugs have been conducted with the goal of disease modification. In some cases, detailed understanding of basic disease mechanisms has guided the choice of drugs for clinical trials, and several notable successes in fragile X clinical trials have led to common use of drugs such as minocycline in routine medical practice. Newer technologies like Disease-Gene Expression Matching (DGEM) may allow for more rapid identification of promising repurposing candidates. A DGEM study predicted that sulindac could be therapeutic for fragile X, and subsequent preclinical validation studies have shown promising results. The use of combinations of available drugs and nutraceuticals has the potential to greatly expand the options for repurposing, and may even be a viable business strategy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fragile X syndrome: A review of clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Reymundo; Azarang, Atoosa; Wilaisakditipakorn, Tanaporn; Hagerman, Randi J

    2016-01-01

    Summary The fragile X mental retardation 1 gene, which codes for the fragile X mental retardation 1 protein, usually has 5 to 40 CGG repeats in the 5′ untranslated promoter. The full mutation is the almost always the cause of fragile X syndrome (FXS). The prevalence of FXS is about 1 in 4,000 to 1 in 7,000 in the general population although the prevalence varies in different regions of the world. FXS is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism. The understanding of the neurobiology of FXS has led to many targeted treatments, but none have cured this disorder. The treatment of the medical problems and associated behaviors remain the most useful intervention for children with FXS. In this review, we focus on the non-pharmacological and pharmacological management of medical and behavioral problems associated with FXS as well as current recommendations for follow-up and surveillance. PMID:27672537

  6. Fragile X syndrome: from molecular genetics to therapy.

    PubMed

    D'Hulst, C; Kooy, R F

    2009-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the main cause of inherited mental retardation, is caused by transcriptional silencing of the fragile X mental retardation gene, FMR1. Absence of the associated protein FMRP leads to the dysregulation of many genes creating a phenotype of ADHD, anxiety, epilepsy and autism. The core aim of this review is to summarise two decades of molecular research leading to the characterisation of cellular and molecular pathways involved in the pathology of this disease and as a consequence to the identification of two new promising targets for rational therapy of fragile X syndrome, namely the group 1 metabotrope glutamate receptors (Gp1 mGluRs) and the gamma-amino butyric acid A receptors (GABA(A)Rs). As no current clinical treatments are directed specifically at the underlying neuronal defect due to absence of FMRP, this might open new powerful therapeutic strategies.

  7. Mechanism-based approaches to treating fragile X.

    PubMed

    Dölen, Gül; Carpenter, Randall L; Ocain, Timothy D; Bear, Mark F

    2010-07-01

    Fragile X is the leading inherited cause of mental retardation and autism. Recent advances in our mechanistic understanding of the disease have led to the identification of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) as a therapeutic target for the disease. These studies have revealed that core defects in multiple animal models can be corrected by down regulation of mGluR5 signaling. Although it remains to be seen if mGluR5 antagonists or related approaches will succeed in humans with fragile X, the progress in fragile X stands as a strong testament to the power of applying knowledge of basic neurobiology to understand pathophysiology in a genetically validated model of human psychiatric disease. These breakthroughs and several of the resulting drug development efforts are reviewed. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  9. Conceptualizing neurodevelopmental disorders through a mechanistic understanding of fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Lawrence K.; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Haas, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review The overarching goal of this review is to compare and contrast the cognitive-behavioral features of fragile X syndrome (FraX) and Williams syndrome and to review the putative neural and molecular underpinnings of these features. Information is presented in a framework that provides guiding principles for conceptualizing gene-brain-behavior associations in neurodevelopmental disorders. Recent findings Abnormalities, in particular cognitive-behavioral domains with similarities in underlying neurodevelopmental correlates, occur in both FraX and Williams syndrome including aberrant frontostriatal pathways leading to executive function deficits, and magnocellular/dorsal visual stream, superior parietal lobe, inferior parietal lobe, and postcentral gyrus abnormalities contributing to deficits in visuospatial function. Compelling cognitive–behavioral and neurodevelopmental contrasts also exist in these two disorders, for example, aberrant amygdala and fusiform cortex structure and function occurring in the context of contrasting social behavioral phenotypes, and temporal cortical and cerebellar abnormalities potentially underlying differences in language function. Abnormal dendritic development is a shared neurodevelopmental morphologic feature between FraX and Williams syndrome. Commonalities in molecular machinery and processes across FraX and Williams syndrome occur as well – microRNAs involved in translational regulation of major synaptic proteins; scaffolding proteins in excitatory synapses; and proteins involved in axonal development. Summary Although the genetic variations leading to FraX and Williams syndrome are different, important similarities and contrasts in the phenotype, neurocircuitry, molecular machinery, and cellular processes in these two disorders allow for a unique approach to conceptualizing gene–brain–behavior links occurring in neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:22395002

  10. Delayed in vitro development of Up states but normal network plasticity in Fragile X circuits.

    PubMed

    Motanis, Helen; Buonomano, Dean

    2015-09-01

    A broad range of neurophysiological phenotypes have been reported since the generation of the first mouse model of Fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, it remains unclear which phenotypes are causally related to the cognitive deficits associated with FXS. Indeed, because many of these phenotypes are known to be modulated by experience, a confounding factor in the interpretation of many studies is whether some phenotypes are an indirect consequence of abnormal development and experience. To help diminish this confound we first conducted an in vitro developmental study of spontaneous neural dynamics in cortical organotypic cultures. A significant developmental increase in network activity and Up states was observed in both wild-type and Fmr1(-/y) circuits, along with a specific developmental delay in the emergence of Up states in knockout circuits. To determine whether Up state regulation is generally impaired in FXS circuits, we examined Up state plasticity using chronic optogenetic stimulation. Wild-type and Fmr1(-/y) stimulated circuits exhibited a significant decrease in overall spontaneous activity including Up state frequency; however, no significant effect of genotype was observed. These results demonstrate that developmental delays characteristic of FXS are recapitulated during in vitro development, and that Up state abnormalities are probably a direct consequence of the disease, and not an indirect consequence of abnormal experience. However, the fact that Fmr1(-/y) circuits exhibited normal homeostatic modulation of Up states suggests that these plasticity mechanisms are largely intact, and that some of the previously reported plasticity deficits could reflect abnormal experience or the engagement of compensatory mechanisms. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Tirilazad mesylate protects stored erythrocytes against osmotic fragility.

    PubMed

    Epps, D E; Knechtel, T J; Bacznskyj, O; Decker, D; Guido, D M; Buxser, S E; Mathews, W R; Buffenbarger, S L; Lutzke, B S; McCall, J M

    1994-12-01

    The hypoosmotic lysis curve of freshly collected human erythrocytes is consistent with a single Gaussian error function with a mean of 46.5 +/- 0.25 mM NaCl and a standard deviation of 5.0 +/- 0.4 mM NaCl. After extended storage of RBCs under standard blood bank conditions the lysis curve conforms to the sum of two error functions instead of a possible shift in the mean and a broadening of a single error function. Thus, two distinct sub-populations with different fragilities are present instead of a single, broadly distributed population. One population is identical to the freshly collected erythrocytes, whereas the other population consists of osmotically fragile cells. The rate of generation of the new, osmotically fragile, population of cells was used to probe the hypothesis that lipid peroxidation is responsible for the induction of membrane fragility. If it is so, then the antioxidant, tirilazad mesylate (U-74,006f), should protect against this degradation of stored erythrocytes. We found that tirilazad mesylate, at 17 microM (1.5 mol% with respect to membrane lecithin), retards significantly the formation of the osmotically fragile RBCs. Concomitantly, the concentration of free hemoglobin which accumulates during storage is markedly reduced by the drug. Since the presence of the drug also decreases the amount of F2-isoprostanes formed during the storage period, an antioxidant mechanism must be operative. These results demonstrate that tirilazad mesylate significantly decreases the number of fragile erythrocytes formed during storage in the blood bank.

  12. Clinicians' experiences with the fragile X clinical and research consortium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jessica A; Hagerman, Randi J; Miller, Robert M; Craft, Lisa T; Finucane, Brenda; Tartaglia, Nicole; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M; Sherman, Stephanie L; Kidd, Sharon A; Cohen, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    The objectives of the study were to assess the attitudes and experiences of clinicians involved in a consortium of clinics serving people with fragile X-associated disorders to gauge satisfaction with the consortium and its efforts to improve quality of life for patients and the community. An internet survey was sent to 26 fragile X (FX) clinic directors participating in the Fragile X Clinical and Research Consortium (FXCRC). Respondents were asked to complete 19 questions on consortium performance and outcomes relevant for their own clinic. The response rate was 84% (22/26), with two surveys providing incomplete data. Assistance with clinic establishment, opportunities for research collaborations, and access to colleagues and information were highly valued. Approximately 76% of clinicians reported improvements in patient care and 60% reported an increase in patient services. There was a 57% increase in participation in a FX-related clinical trial among clinics since joining the FXCRC (24% vs. 81%). Overall, respondents reported primarily positive experiences from participation in the FXCRC. Common suggestions for improvement included additional financial support and increased utilization of collected patient data for research purposes. Additionally, a Clinic Services Checklist was administered annually to examine changes in services offered over time. There were several important changes regarding the provision of services by clinics, often with multiple clinics changing with respect to a service. In conclusion, the FXCRC has led to the establishment and sustainment of fragile X clinics in the U.S., fostered cooperation among fragile X clinicians, and provided clinics with a platform to share recommendations and best practices to maximize quality of life for their patients and the overall fragile X community. The results from the survey and checklist also provide suggestions to strengthen the FXCRC and enhance future collaborations among FXCRC members. © 2016

  13. Thermalization as an invisibility cloak for fragile quantum superpositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Walter; Fine, Boris V.

    2017-07-01

    We propose a method for protecting fragile quantum superpositions in many-particle systems from dephasing by external classical noise. We call superpositions "fragile" if dephasing occurs particularly fast, because the noise couples very differently to the superposed states. The method consists of letting a quantum superposition evolve under the internal thermalization dynamics of the system, followed by a time-reversal manipulation known as Loschmidt echo. The thermalization dynamics makes the superposed states almost indistinguishable during most of the above procedure. We validate the method by applying it to a cluster of spins ½.

  14. Non-fragile multivariable PID controller design via system augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinrong; Lam, James; Shen, Mouquan; Shu, Zhan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the issue of designing non-fragile H∞ multivariable proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers with derivative filters is investigated. In order to obtain the controller gains, the original system is associated with an extended system such that the PID controller design can be formulated as a static output-feedback control problem. By taking the system augmentation approach, the conditions with slack matrices for solving the non-fragile H∞ multivariable PID controller gains are established. Based on the results, linear matrix inequality -based iterative algorithms are provided to compute the controller gains. Simulations are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  15. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  16. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna; Rosa-E-Silva, Ana Carolina Japur de Sá; Yela, Daniela Angerame; Soares Júnior, José Maria

    2017-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a frequent condition in Gynecology. It may impact physical, emotional sexual and professional aspects of the lives of women, impairing their quality of life. In cases of acute and severe bleeding, women may need urgent treatment with volumetric replacement and prescription of hemostatic substances. In some specific cases with more intense and prolonged bleeding, surgical treatment may be necessary. The objective of this chapter is to describe the main evidence on the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, both acute and chronic. Didactically, the treatment options were based on the current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification system (PALM-COEIN). The etiologies of PALM-COEIN are: uterine Polyp (P), Adenomyosis (A), Leiomyoma (L), precursor and Malignant lesions of the uterine body (M), Coagulopathies (C), Ovulatory dysfunction (O), Endometrial dysfunction (E), Iatrogenic (I), and Not yet classified (N). The articles were selected according to the recommendation grades of the PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases, and those in which the main objective was the reduction of uterine menstrual bleeding were included. Only studies written in English were included. All editorial or complete papers that were not consistent with abnormal uterine bleeding, or studies in animal models, were excluded. The main objective of the treatment is the reduction of menstrual flow and morbidity and the improvement of quality of life. It is important to emphasize that the treatment in the acute phase aims to hemodynamically stabilize the patient and stop excessive bleeding, while the treatment in the chronic phase is based on correcting menstrual dysfunction according to its etiology and clinical manifestations. The treatment may be surgical or pharmacological, and the latter is based mainly on hormonal therapy, anti-inflammatory drugs and antifibrinolytics. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro

  17. Data based abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwar, Yashasvi

    Data based abnormality detection is a growing research field focussed on extracting information from feature rich data. They are considered to be non-intrusive and non-destructive in nature which gives them a clear advantage over conventional methods. In this study, we explore different streams of data based anomalies detection. We propose extension and revisions to existing valve stiction detection algorithm supported with industrial case study. We also explored the area of image analysis and proposed a complete solution for Malaria diagnosis. The proposed method is tested over images provided by pathology laboratory at Alberta Health Service. We also address the robustness and practicality of the solution proposed.

  18. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  19. Fragile X Syndrome: Keys to the Molecular Genetics of Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombroso, Paul J.; Ogren, Marilee P.

    2008-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation is discussed. The relationship between specific impairments in synaptic plasticity and Fragile X syndrome is investigated as it strengthens synaptic contacts between neurons.

  20. Neural synchronization deficits linked to cortical hyper-excitability and auditory hypersensitivity in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ethridge, Lauren E; White, Stormi P; Mosconi, Matthew W; Wang, Jun; Pedapati, Ernest V; Erickson, Craig A; Byerly, Matthew J; Sweeney, John A

    2017-01-01

    Studies in the fmr1 KO mouse demonstrate hyper-excitability and increased high-frequency neuronal activity in sensory cortex. These abnormalities may contribute to prominent and distressing sensory hypersensitivities in patients with fragile X syndrome (FXS). The current study investigated functional properties of auditory cortex using a sensory entrainment task in FXS. EEG recordings were obtained from 17 adolescents and adults with FXS and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Participants heard an auditory chirp stimulus generated using a 1000-Hz tone that was amplitude modulated by a sinusoid linearly increasing in frequency from 0-100 Hz over 2 s. Single trial time-frequency analyses revealed decreased gamma band phase-locking to the chirp stimulus in FXS, which was strongly coupled with broadband increases in gamma power. Abnormalities in gamma phase-locking and power were also associated with theta-gamma amplitude-amplitude coupling during the pre-stimulus period and with parent reports of heightened sensory sensitivities and social communication deficits. This represents the first demonstration of neural entrainment alterations in FXS patients and suggests that fast-spiking interneurons regulating synchronous high-frequency neural activity have reduced functionality. This reduced ability to synchronize high-frequency neural activity was related to the total power of background gamma band activity. These observations extend findings from fmr1 KO models of FXS, characterize a core pathophysiological aspect of FXS, and may provide a translational biomarker strategy for evaluating promising therapeutics.

  1. High MMP-9 activity levels in fragile X syndrome are lowered by minocycline.

    PubMed

    Dziembowska, Magdalena; Pretto, Dalyir I; Janusz, Aleksandra; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Leigh, Mary Jacena; Gabriel, Nielsen; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Hagerman, Randi J; Tassone, Flora

    2013-08-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by lack of the FMR1 protein, FMRP, a translational repressor. Its absence leads to up-regulation of locally translated proteins involved in synaptic transmission and plasticity, including the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). In the Fmr1 knock-out (KO), a mouse model of FXS, an abnormal elevated expression of MMP-9 in the brain was pharmacologically down-regulated after treatment with the tetracycline derivative minocycline. Moreover, the rescue of immature dendritic spine morphology and a significant improvement of abnormal behavior were associated with down-regulation of MMP-9. Here, we report on high plasma activity of MMP-9 in individuals with FXS. In addition, we investigate MMP-9 changes in patients with FXS who have gone through a minocycline controlled clinical trial and correlate MMP-9 activity to clinical observations. The results of this study suggest that, in humans, activity levels of MMP-9 are lowered by minocycline and that, in some cases, changes in MMP-9 activity are positively associated with improvement based on clinical measures. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. GABA-B Agonist Baclofen Normalizes Auditory-Evoked Neural Oscillations and Behavioral Deficits in the Fmr1 Knockout Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Featherstone, R.; Naschek, M.; Nam, J.; Du, A.; Wright, S.; Weger, R.; Akuzawa, S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Fragile X syndrome is a genetic condition resulting from FMR1 gene mutation that leads to intellectual disability, autism-like symptoms, and sensory hypersensitivity. Arbaclofen, a GABA-B agonist, has shown efficacy in some individuals with FXS but has become unavailable after unsuccessful clinical trials, prompting interest in publicly available, racemic baclofen. The present study investigated whether racemic baclofen can remediate abnormalities of neural circuit function, sensory processing, and behavior in Fmr1 knockout mice, a rodent model of fragile X syndrome. Fmr1 knockout mice showed increased baseline and auditory-evoked high-frequency gamma (30–80 Hz) power relative to C57BL/6 controls, as measured by electroencephalography. These deficits were accompanied by decreased T maze spontaneous alternation, decreased social interactions, and increased open field center time, suggestive of diminished working memory, sociability, and anxiety-like behavior, respectively. Abnormal auditory-evoked gamma oscillations, working memory, and anxiety-related behavior were normalized by treatment with baclofen, but impaired sociability was not. Improvements in working memory were evident predominantly in mice whose auditory-evoked gamma oscillations were dampened by baclofen. These findings suggest that racemic baclofen may be useful for targeting sensory and cognitive disturbances in fragile X syndrome. PMID:28451631

  3. Cysteine, histidine and glycine exhibit anti-inflammatory effects in human coronary arterial endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, S; Ichiyama, T; Sonaka, I; Ohsaki, A; Okada, S; Wakiguchi, H; Kudo, K; Kittaka, S; Hara, M; Furukawa, S

    2012-02-01

    The activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in vascular endothelial cells may be involved in vascular pathogeneses such as vasculitis or atherosclerosis. Recently, it has been reported that some amino acids exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the inhibitory effects of a panel of amino acids on cytokine production or expression of adhesion molecules that are involved in inflammatory diseases in various cell types. The activation of NF-κB was determined in human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) because NF-κB modulates the production of many cytokines and the expression of adhesion molecules. We examined the inhibitory effects of the amino acids cysteine, histidine and glycine on the induction of NF-κB activation, expression of CD62E (E-selectin) and the production of interleukin (IL)-6 in HCAECs stimulated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Cysteine, histidine and glycine significantly reduced NF-κB activation and inhibitor κBα (IκBα) degradation in HCAECs stimulated with TNF-α. Additionally, all the amino acids inhibited the expression of E-selectin and the production of IL-6 in HCAECs, and the effects of cysteine were the most significant. Our results show that glycine, histidine and cysteine can inhibit NF-κB activation, IκBα degradation, CD62E expression and IL-6 production in HCAECs, suggesting that these amino acids may exhibit anti-inflammatory effects during endothelial inflammation. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  4. Exploring protein interiors: the role of a buried histidine in the KH module fold.

    PubMed

    Fraternali, F; Amodeo, P; Musco, G; Nilges, M; Pastore, A

    1999-03-01

    The K-homology (KH) module is a novel RNA-binding motif. The structures of a representative KH motif from vigilin (vig-KH6) and of the first KH domain of fmr1 have been recently solved by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and automated assignment-refinement techniques (ARIA). While a hydrophobic residue is found at position 21 in most of the KH modules, a buried His is conserved in all the 15 KH repeats of vigilin. This position must therefore have a key structural role in stabilizing the hydrophobic core. In the present work, we have addressed the following questions in order to obtain a detailed description of the role of His 21: i) what is the exact role of the histidine in the hydrophobic core of vig-KH6? ii) can we define the interactions that allow a conserved buried position to be occupied by a histidine both in vig-KH6 and in the whole vigilin KH sub-family? iii) how is the structure and stability of vig-KH6 influenced by the state of protonation of this histidine? To answer these questions, we have carried out an extensive refinement of the vig-KH6 structure using both an improved ARIA protocol starting from different initial structures and successively running restrained and unrestrained trajectories in water. An analysis of the stability of secondary structural elements, solvent accessibility, and hydrogen bonding patterns allows hypothesis on the structural role of residue His 21 and on the interactions that this residue forms with the environment. The importance of the protonation state of His 21 on the stability of the KH fold was addressed and validated by experimental results.

  5. Expression and GTP sensitivity of peptide histidine isoleucine high-affinity-binding sites in rat.

    PubMed

    Debaigt, Colin; Meunier, Annie-Claire; Goursaud, Stephanie; Montoni, Alicia; Pineau, Nicolas; Couvineau, Alain; Laburthe, Marc; Muller, Jean-Marc; Janet, Thierry

    2006-07-01

    High-affinity-binding sites for the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) analogs peptide histidine/isoleucine-amide (PHI)/carboxyterminal methionine instead of isoleucine (PHM) are expressed in numerous tissues in the body but the nature of their receptors remains to be elucidated. The data presented indicate that PHI discriminated a high-affinity guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-insensitive-binding subtype that represented the totality of the PHI-binding sites in newborn rat tissues but was differentially expressed in adult animals. The GTP-insensitive PHI/PHM-binding sites were also observed in CHO cells over expressing the VPAC2 but not the VPAC1 VIP receptor.

  6. Atomic view of the histidine environment stabilizing higher-pH conformations of pH-dependent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Valéry, Céline; Deville-Foillard, Stéphanie; Lefebvre, Christelle; Taberner, Nuria; Legrand, Pierre; Meneau, Florian; Meriadec, Cristelle; Delvaux, Camille; Bizien, Thomas; Kasotakis, Emmanouil; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Gall, Andrew; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Le Du, Marie-Hélène; Paternostre, Maïté; Artzner, Franck

    2015-01-01

    External stimuli are powerful tools that naturally control protein assemblies and functions. For example, during viral entry and exit changes in pH are known to trigger large protein conformational changes. However, the molecular features stabilizing the higher pH structures remain unclear. Here we elucidate the conformational change of a self-assembling peptide that forms either small or large nanotubes dependent on the pH. The sub-angstrom high-pH peptide structure reveals a globular conformation stabilized through a strong histidine-serine H-bond and a tight histidine-aromatic packing. Lowering the pH induces histidine protonation, disrupts these interactions and triggers a large change to an extended β-sheet-based conformation. Re-visiting available structures of proteins with pH-dependent conformations reveals both histidine-containing aromatic pockets and histidine-serine proximity as key motifs in higher pH structures. The mechanism discovered in this study may thus be generally used by pH-dependent proteins and opens new prospects in the field of nanomaterials. PMID:26190377

  7. Development of hazard-compatible building fragility and vulnerability models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karaca, E.; Luco, N.

    2008-01-01

    We present a methodology for transforming the structural and non-structural fragility functions in HAZUS into a format that is compatible with conventional seismic hazard analysis information. The methodology makes use of the building capacity (or pushover) curves and related building parameters provided in HAZUS. Instead of the capacity spectrum method applied in HAZUS, building response is estimated by inelastic response history analysis of corresponding single-degree-of-freedom systems under a large number of earthquake records. Statistics of the building response are used with the damage state definitions from HAZUS to derive fragility models conditioned on spectral acceleration values. Using the developed fragility models for structural and nonstructural building components, with corresponding damage state loss ratios from HAZUS, we also derive building vulnerability models relating spectral acceleration to repair costs. Whereas in HAZUS the structural and nonstructural damage states are treated as if they are independent, our vulnerability models are derived assuming "complete" nonstructural damage whenever the structural damage state is complete. We show the effects of considering this dependence on the final vulnerability models. The use of spectral acceleration (at selected vibration periods) as the ground motion intensity parameter, coupled with the careful treatment of uncertainty, makes the new fragility and vulnerability models compatible with conventional seismic hazard curves and hence useful for extensions to probabilistic damage and loss assessment.

  8. Arousal Modulation in Females with Fragile X or Turner Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jane; Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Murphy, Melissa M.; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine physiological arousal modulation (heart activity and skin conductance), across baseline and cognitive tasks, in females with fragile X or Turner syndrome and a comparison group of females with neither syndrome. Relative to the comparison group, for whom a greater increase in skin conductance was…

  9. Modeling Family Dynamics in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Scott S.; Burns, David D.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2007-01-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of children with genetic disorders and their unaffected siblings on family functioning. In this study, the reciprocal causal links between problem behaviors and maternal distress were investigated in 150 families containing a child with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and an unaffected sibling. Both children's…

  10. Seizures in Fragile X Syndrome: Characteristics and Comorbid Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Raspa, Melissa; Loggin-Hester, Lisa; Bishop, Ellen; Holiday, David; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A national survey of caregivers of individuals with fragile X syndrome addressed characteristics of epilepsy and co-occurring conditions. Of the 1,394 individuals (1,090 males and 304 females) with the full mutation, 14% of males and 6% of females reported seizures. Seizures were more often partial, began between ages 4 and 10 years, and were…

  11. Treatment of Fragile X Syndrome with a Neuroactive Steroid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    in the fragile X mouse model and the Drosophila (fruit fly) models of FXS that the GABAA system, including multiple receptors, is dramatically down... Drosophila (fruit fly) models of FXS that the GABAA system, including multiple receptors, is dramatically down-regulated. Ganaxolone is a drug that

  12. Brief Report: Autism Symptoms in Infants with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jane E.; Tonnsen, Bridgette L.; McCary, Lindsay M.; Caravella, Kelly E.; Shinkareva, Svetlana V.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common known genetic cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Although 50-75% of children with FXS meet ASD criteria, no studies have compared ASD symptoms in infants with FXS versus other high risk groups, such as siblings of children with ASD (ASIBs). Using the Autism Observation Scale for Infants, our…

  13. Social Cognition in Adolescent Girls with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkstra, Lyn S.; Abbeduto, Leonard; Meulenbroek, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize social cognition, executive functions (EFs), and everyday social functioning in adolescent girls with fragile X syndrome, and identify relationships among these variables. Participants were 20 girls with FXS and 20 age-matched typically developing peers. Results showed significant between-groups differences in…

  14. Social Approach and Emotion Recognition in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tracey A.; Porter, Melanie A.; Langdon, Robyn

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that individuals with Fragile X syndrome (FXS) display emotion recognition deficits, which may contribute to their significant social difficulties. The current study investigated the emotion recognition abilities, and social approachability judgments, of FXS individuals when processing emotional stimuli. Relative to…

  15. The Neuroanatomy and Neuroendocrinology of Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessl, David; Rivera, Susan M.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by a single gene mutation on the X chromosome, offers a unique opportunity for investigation of gene-brain-behavior relationships. Recent advances in molecular genetics, human brain imaging, and behavioral studies have started to unravel the complex pathways leading to the cognitive, psychiatric, and physical…

  16. Language Development in Individuals with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finestack, Lizbeth H.; Richmond, Erica K.; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability. The syndrome is caused by a single gene mutation on the X chromosome. Although individual differences are large, most individuals with FXS display weaknesses across all language and literacy domains compared with peers of the same chronological age with typical…

  17. Fragile X Syndrome--From Genes to Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, A.; Hagerman, R. J.; Hessl, D.

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), a single gene disorder with an expanded CGG allele on the X chromosome, is the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. The cognitive deficit ranges from mild learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability. The phenotype includes hyperactivity, short attention span, emotional problems including…

  18. Mothers' Economic Conditions and Sources of Support in Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalil, Ariel; Ryan, Rebecca M.

    2010-01-01

    Rising rates of nonmarital childbirth in the United States have resulted in a new family type, the fragile family. Such families, which include cohabiting couples as well as single mothers, experience significantly higher rates of poverty and material hardship than their married counterparts. Ariel Kalil and Rebecca Ryan summarize the economic…

  19. Phenotypic Variation and FMRP Levels in Fragile X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loesch, Danuta Z.; Huggins, Richard M.; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2004-01-01

    Data on the relationships between cognitive and physical phenotypes, and a deficit of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene-specific protein product, FMRP, are presented and discussed in context with earlier findings. The previously unpublished results obtained, using standard procedures of regression and correlations, showed highly…

  20. White Religious Educators Resisting White Fragility: Lessons from Mystics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Decades of work in dismantling racism have not yielded the kind of results for which religious educators have hoped. One primary reason has been what scholars term "white fragility," a symptom of the structural racism which confers systemic privilege upon White people. Lessons learned from Christian mystics point to powerful ways to…

  1. Inter-state Variation in the Burden of Fragility Fractures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Demographic differences may produce inter-state variation in the burden of osteoporosis. The objective of this study was to estimate the burden of fragility fractures by race/ethnicity, age, sex, and service site across 5 diverse and populous states. State inpatient databases for 2000 were used to ...

  2. Infant Development in Fragile X Syndrome: Cross-Syndrome Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jane E.; McCary, Lindsay M.; Shinkareva, Svetlana V.; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the developmental profile of male infants with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and its divergence from typical development and development of infants at high risk for autism associated with familial recurrence (ASIBs). Participants included 174 boys ranging in age from 5 to 28 months. Cross-sectional profiles on the Mullen Scales of…

  3. Capacity Development for Education Systems in Fragile Contexts. Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines fragility, capacity development and education and the links between these by analysing relevant research and policy literature. It proposes ways forward for action and reflection at national, regional and international levels. An important element of capacity development in education systems is the establishment of education…

  4. Autism in Fragile X Syndrome: A Category Mistake?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Scott S.; Lightbody, Amy A.; Hirt, Melissa; Rezvani, Ava; Reiss, Allan L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Many investigators now routinely classify children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) according to whether or not they also meet diagnostic criteria for autism. To determine whether this classification is appropriate, we examined the profiles of autistic behaviors shown by boys and girls with FXS. Method: Individuals with FXS, aged 5 to 25…

  5. Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Director NIH awards $35 Million for Centers for Collaborative Research in Fragile X Men’s Health is the Focus in ... Safe to Sleep® National Child & Maternal Health Education Program RELATED WEBSITES NIH.gov HHS.gov USA. ...

  6. Intergenerational Relationships and Union Stability in Fragile Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hognas, Robin S.; Carlson, Marcia J.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2,656), we examined the association between intergenerational relationships and parents' union stability 5 years after a baby's birth. Results showed that more amiable relationships between parents and each partner's parents, and children's spending more time with paternal…

  7. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... test. (a) Identification. An osmotic fragility test is a device used to determine the resistance of red blood cells to hemolysis (destruction) in varying concentrations of hypotonic saline solutions. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). This device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in...

  8. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... test. (a) Identification. An osmotic fragility test is a device used to determine the resistance of red blood cells to hemolysis (destruction) in varying concentrations of hypotonic saline solutions. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). This device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in...

  9. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... test. (a) Identification. An osmotic fragility test is a device used to determine the resistance of red blood cells to hemolysis (destruction) in varying concentrations of hypotonic saline solutions. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). This device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in...

  10. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... test. (a) Identification. An osmotic fragility test is a device used to determine the resistance of red blood cells to hemolysis (destruction) in varying concentrations of hypotonic saline solutions. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). This device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in...

  11. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... test. (a) Identification. An osmotic fragility test is a device used to determine the resistance of red blood cells to hemolysis (destruction) in varying concentrations of hypotonic saline solutions. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). This device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in...

  12. Medically Fragile Students and the Law: Supreme Court Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Frank

    1999-01-01

    In March 1999, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act regulations defining "related services" for disabled children meant paying nursing costs for Garret Frey, a medically fragile student enrolled in the Cedar Rapids (Idaho) Community School District. However, physicians' services are not…

  13. Parenting Young Children with and without Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Audra; Barnum, Leah; Skinner, Debra; Warren, Steven F.; Fleming, Kandace

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine maternal parenting styles across age-matched siblings using a within-family design, in which one child has Fragile X syndrome. Thirteen families participated; children were aged 16 to 71 months. Mothers completed several videotaped activities with each child separately as well as an interview. Mothers used…

  14. Phonological Awareness and Reading in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlof, Suzanne M.; Klusek, Jessica; Shinkareva, Svetlana V.; Robinson, Marissa L.; Roberts, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reading delays are well documented in children with fragile X syndrome (FXS), but few studies have examined linguistic precursors of reading in this population. This study examined the longitudinal development of phonological awareness and its relationship with basic reading in boys with FXS. Individual differences in genetic,…

  15. Developmental Trajectories of Young Girls with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Deborah D.; Wheeler, Anne; Sideris, John; Sullivan, Kelly; Reichardt, Alison; Roberts, Jane; Clark, Renee; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    To describe the early phenotype of girls with full mutation fragile X, we used 54 observations of 15 girls between the ages of 6 months and 9 years to examine developmental trajectories as measured by the Battelle Development Inventory. In this sample, autistic behavior was associated with poorer developmental outcomes, primarily due to…

  16. Growth of Expressive Syntax in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komesidou, Rouzana; Brady, Nancy C.; Fleming, Kandace; Esplund, Amy; Warren, Steven F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This research explored syntactic growth in children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) over a 5-year period, and variability in growth in relation to autism symptoms, nonverbal cognition, maternal responsivity, and gender. Method: Language samples at 4 time points from 39 children with FXS, 31 boys and 8 girls, were analyzed using the Index of…

  17. Reading and Phonological Skills in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klusek, Jessica; Hunt, Anna W.; Mirrett, Penny L.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Hooper, Stephen R.; Roberts, Jane E.; Bailey, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Although reading skills are critical for the success of individuals with intellectual disabilities, literacy has received little attention in fragile X syndrome (FXS). This study examined the literacy profile of FXS. Boys with FXS (n = 51; mean age 10.2 years) and mental age-matched boys with typical development (n = 35) participated in…

  18. Intellectual Functioning in Fragile X Syndrome School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromham, Susan; Jupp, James

    1991-01-01

    Aspects of intellectual function were investigated in a school age sample of 17 Fragile X individuals, employing the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (Revised). The general ability of the sample was substantially below normative average because of the significantly poorer performance by males than females. (Author/DB)

  19. Noncomprehension Signaling in Males and Females with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Angela John; Kover, Sara T.; Brown, W. Ted; Harvey, Danielle J.; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study used a prospective longitudinal design to evaluate the trajectory and predictors of noncomprehension signaling in male and female youth with fragile X syndrome (FXS). Method: A direction-following task in which some of the directions were inadequate was administered. Participants were 52 youth (36 boys, 16 girls) with FXS. Upon…

  20. Hippocampal dysfunction and cognitive impairment in Fragile-X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Crystal; Yau, Suk-Yu; Majaess, Namat; Vetrici, Mariana; Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Christie, Brian R

    2016-09-01

    Fragile-X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and the leading genetic cause of autism spectrum disorder. FXS is caused by transcriptional silencing of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1) gene due to a CGG repeat expansion, resulting in the loss of Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). FMRP is involved in transcriptional regulation and trafficking of mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and distal sites both in pre- and post-synaptic terminals. Consequently, FXS is a multifaceted disorder associated with impaired synaptic plasticity. One region of the brain that is significantly impacted by the loss of FMRP is the hippocampus, a structure that plays a critical role in the regulation of mood and cognition. This review provides an overview of the neuropathology of Fragile-X Syndrome, highlighting how structural and synaptic deficits in hippocampal subregions, including the CA1 exhibiting exaggerated metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression and the dentate gyrus displaying hypofunction of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, contribute to cognitive impairments associated with this neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Autism Profiles of Males With Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Susan W.; Hessl, David; Goodlin-Jones, Beth; Ferranti, Jessica; Bacalman, Susan; Barbato, Ingrid; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Paul J.; Herman, Kristin; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2008-01-01

    Autism, which is common in individuals with fragile X syndrome, is often difficult to diagnose. We compared the diagnostic classifications of two measures for autism diagnosis, the ADOS and the ADI-R, in addition to the DSM-IV-TR in 63 males with this syndrome. Overall, 30% of the subjects met criteria for autistic disorder and 30% met criteria…

  2. Theory of Mind Deficits in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, K.; Burack, J. A.; Rahman, A.; Munir, F.; Russo, N.; Grant, C.

    2005-01-01

    Given the consistent findings of theory of mind deficits in children with autism, it would be extremely beneficial to examine the profile of theory of mind abilities in other clinical groups such as fragile X syndrome (FXS) and Down syndrome (DS). The aim of the present study was to assess whether boys with FXS are impaired in simple social…

  3. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoem, Gry; Koht, Jeanette

    2017-10-31

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation on the X chromosome. The major signs and symptoms are tremor, ataxia and parkinsonism. Up to one in 2 000 persons over 50 years of age will develop the syndrome. There is reason to believe that too few individuals in Norway undergo testing for this condition.

  4. Lifespan Changes in Working Memory in Fragile X Premutation Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Kim M.; Kogan, Cary S.; Li, Lexin; Turk, Jeremy; Jacquemont, Sebastien; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the world's most common hereditary cause of developmental delay in males and is now well characterized at the biological, brain and cognitive levels. The disorder is caused by the silencing of a single gene on the X chromosome, the "FMR1" gene. The premutation (carrier) status, however, is less well documented but has an…

  5. Open-Label Memantine in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Craig A.; Mullett, Jennifer E.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamatergic dysfunction is implicated in the pathophysiology of fragile X syndrome (FXS). The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effectiveness and tolerability of memantine for a number of target symptoms associated with FXS. Medical records describing open-label treatment with memantine in 6 patients with FXS and a comorbid…

  6. Imitation in Fragile X Syndrome: Implications for Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macedoni-Luksic, Marta; Greiss-Hess, Laura; Rogers, Sally J.; Gosar, David; Lemons-Chitwood, Kerrie; Hagerman, Randi

    2009-01-01

    To address the specific impairment of imitation in autism, the imitation abilities of 22 children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) with and without autism were compared. Based on previous research, we predicted that children with FXS and autism would have significantly more difficulty with non-meaningful imitation tasks. After controlling for…

  7. Psychopharmacology in Fragile X Syndrome--Present and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Potanos, Kristina

    2004-01-01

    In addition to cognitive disability, fragile X syndrome (FXS) is associated with behavioral problems that are often functionally limiting. There are few controlled trials to guide treatment; however, available information does suggest that medications can be quite helpful for a number of categories of behavioral disturbance in FXS. Specifically,…

  8. Differential Impact of the "FMR1" Gene on Visual Processing in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Cary S.; Boutet, Isabelle; Cornish, Kim; Zangenehpour, Shahin; Mullen, Kathy T.; Holden, Jeanette J. A.; Kaloustian, Vazken M. Der; Andermann, Eva; Chaudhuri, Avi

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of heritable mental retardation, affecting (~ around) 1 in 4000 males. The syndrome arises from expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the 5'-untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation 1 ("FMR1") gene, leading to methylation of the promoter sequence and lack of the fragile X mental…

  9. Obesity, Food Selectivity, and Physical Activity in Individuals with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspa, Melissa; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.; Bishop, Ellen; Holiday, David; Olmsted, Murrey

    2010-01-01

    National survey data from 884 families were used to examine the overall health of children and adults with fragile X syndrome. Results indicate the rate of obesity in adults with fragile X syndrome is similar to the general population (30%). Male children with fragile X syndrome, however, had higher rates of obesity (31%) when compared with…

  10. Heart Activity and Autistic Behavior in Infants and Toddlers with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jane E.; Tonnsen, Bridgette; Robinson, Ashley; Shinkareva, Svetlana V.

    2012-01-01

    The present study contrasted physiological arousal in infants and toddlers with fragile X syndrome to typically developing control participants and examined physiological predictors early in development to autism severity later in development in fragile X syndrome. Thirty-one males with fragile X syndrome (ages 8-40 months) and 25 age-matched…

  11. Family Environment and Behavior Problems in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Baker, Jason K.; Smith, Leann E.; Warren, Steven F.; Brady, Nancy; Hong, Jinkuk

    2012-01-01

    We examine how the family environment is associated with aspects of the Fragile X syndrome phenotype during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Mothers of children (n = 48), adolescents (n = 85), and adults (n = 34) with Fragile X syndrome participated in a multisite study. For children and adults with Fragile X syndrome, the presence of warmth…

  12. Selective Spatial Processing Deficits in an At-Risk Subgroup of the Fragile X Premutation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocking, Darren R.; Kogan, Cary S.; Cornish, Kim M.

    2012-01-01

    Until a decade ago, it was assumed that males with the fragile X premutation were unaffected by any cognitive phenotype. Here we examined the extent to which CGG repeat toxicity extends to visuospatial functioning in male fragile X premutation carriers who are asymptomatic for a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder, fragile X-associated…

  13. Agricultural Fragility Estimates Subjected to Volcanic Ash Fall Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, H. J.; Lee, S.; Choi, S. H.; Yun, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural Fragility Estimates Subjected to Volcanic Ash Fall Hazards Hee Jung Ham1, Seung-Hun Choi1, Woo-Seok Yun1, Sungsu Lee2 1Department of Architectural Engineering, Kangwon National University, Korea 2Division of Civil Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Korea ABSTRACT In this study, fragility functions are developed to estimate expected volcanic ash damages of the agricultural sector in Korea. The fragility functions are derived from two approaches: 1) empirical approach based on field observations of impacts to agriculture from the 2006 eruption of Merapi volcano in Indonesia and 2) the FOSM (first-order second-moment) analytical approach based on distribution and thickness of volcanic ash observed from the 1980 eruption of Mt. Saint Helens and agricultural facility specifications in Korea. Fragility function to each agricultural commodity class is presented by a cumulative distribution function of the generalized extreme value distribution. Different functions are developed to estimate production losses from outdoor and greenhouse farming. Seasonal climate influences vulnerability of each agricultural crop and is found to be a crucial component in determining fragility of agricultural commodities to an ash fall. In the study, the seasonality coefficient is established as a multiplier of fragility function to consider the seasonal vulnerability. Yields of the different agricultural commodities are obtained from Korean Statistical Information Service to create a baseline for future agricultural volcanic loss estimation. Numerically simulated examples of scenario ash fall events at Mt. Baekdu volcano are utilized to illustrate the application of the developed fragility functions. Acknowledgements This research was supported by a grant 'Development of Advanced Volcanic Disaster Response System considering Potential Volcanic Risk around Korea' [MPSS-NH-2015-81] from the Natural Hazard Mitigation Research Group, Ministry of Public Safety and Security of

  14. Fragility and hysteretic creep in frictional granular jamming.

    PubMed

    Bandi, M M; Rivera, M K; Krzakala, F; Ecke, R E

    2013-04-01

    The granular jamming transition is experimentally investigated in a two-dimensional system of frictional, bidispersed disks subject to quasistatic, uniaxial compression without vibrational disturbances (zero granular temperature). Three primary results are presented in this experimental study. First, using disks with different static friction coefficients (μ), we experimentally verify numerical results that predict jamming onset at progressively lower packing fractions with increasing friction. Second, we show that the first compression cycle measurably differs from subsequent cycles. The first cycle is fragile-a metastable configuration with simultaneous jammed and unjammed clusters-over a small packing fraction interval (φ(1)<φ<φ(2)) and exhibits simultaneous exponential rise in pressure and exponential decrease in disk displacements over the same packing fraction interval. This fragile behavior is explained through a percolation mechanism of stressed contacts where cluster growth exhibits spatial correlation with disk displacements and contributes to recent results emphasizing fragility in frictional jamming. Control experiments show that the fragile state results from the experimental incompatibility between the requirements for zero friction and zero granular temperature. Measurements with several disk materials of varying elastic moduli E and friction coefficients μ show that friction directly controls the start of the fragile state but indirectly controls the exponential pressure rise. Finally, under repetitive loading (compression) and unloading (decompression), we find the system exhibits pressure hysteresis, and the critical packing fraction φ(c) increases slowly with repetition number. This friction-induced hysteretic creep is interpreted as the granular pack's evolution from a metastable to an eventual structurally stable configuration. It is shown to depend on the quasistatic step size Δφ, which provides the only perturbative mechanism in the

  15. Fragility fractures at Auckland City Hospital: we can do better.

    PubMed

    Braatvedt, Geoffrey; Wilkinson, Susan; Scott, Marilyn; Mitchell, Paul; Harris, Roger

    2017-12-01

    This study describes in detail the burden of caring for patients aged ≥ 50 years seen in one year with a fragility fracture in a large urban environment and shows that these fractures result in a long length of stay and significant mortality. Intervention to prevent further fracture was poorly done. To examine the epidemiology of fragility fracture in patients over age 50 years and record the number who received appropriate secondary prevention treatment. All patients aged ≥ 50 years presenting with a fracture during the 12 months following July 1 st 2011, to Auckland City Hospital or residing in central Auckland at the time of their fracture, were identified from hospital and Accident Compensation Corporation records. A random sample of 55% of these patient's records were reviewed to establish the type of fracture, prior fracture and falls history, and use of bisphosphonates in the 12 months before presentation. Their length of stay (LOS) by type of fracture was recorded. The use of bisphosphonate drugs in the following 12 months was obtained from centralised national records of prescriptions. 2729 patients aged ≥ 50 years presented with a fragility fracture in the central Auckland region in one year. Fifty-six percent of these patients were seen at Auckland Hospital and of these, 82% patients required admission with a mean LOS of 20 days (SD ± 24 days).The remaining 44% of patients were looked after in the private outpatient sector. Approximately 30% of the admissions were for hip fracture. Sixty-four percent of patients with a fragility fracture did not receive a potent bisphosphonate, 12% were considered not appropriate for treatment, and 24% received a potent bisphosphonate during their admission or in the next 12 months. Approximately 1 in 18 people aged ≥ 50 years presented in one year with a fragility fracture.Secondary prevention strategies were poorly implemented. Additional resources for identifying and initiating secondary fracture prevention

  16. TARGETED TREATMENTS IN AUTISM AND FRAGILE X SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Gürkan, C. Kağan; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder consisting of a constellation of symptoms that sometimes occur as part of a complex disorder characterized by impairments in social interaction, communication and behavioral domains. It is a highly disabling disorder and there is a need for treatment targeting the core symptoms. Although autism is accepted as highly heritable, there is no genetic cure at this time. Autism is shown to be linked to several genes and is a feature of some complex genetic disorders, including fragile X syndrome (FXS), fragile X premutation involvement, tuberous sclerosis and Rett syndrome. The term autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) covers autism, Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorders (PDD-NOS) and the etiologies are heterogeneous. In recent years, targeted treatments have been developed for several disorders that have a known specific genetic cause leading to autism. Since there are significant molecular and neurobiological overlaps among disorders, targeted treatments developed for a specific disorder may be helpful in ASD of unknown etiology. Examples of this are two drug classes developed to treat FXS, Arbaclofen, a GABAB agonist, and mGluR5 antagonists, and both may be helpful in autism without FXS. The mGluR5 antagonists are also likely to have a benefit in the aging problems of fragile X premutation carriers, the fragile X –associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and the Parkinsonism that can occur in aging patients with fragile X syndrome. Targeted treatments in FXS which has a well known genetic etiology may lead to new targeted treatments in autism. PMID:23162607

  17. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ali; Hoeffer, Charles A; Takayasu, Yukihiro; Miyawaki, Takahiro; McBride, Sean M; Klann, Eric; Zukin, R Suzanne

    2010-01-13

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation and leading genetic cause of autism, is caused by transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene. The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the gene product of Fmr1, is an RNA binding protein that negatively regulates translation in neurons. The Fmr1 knock-out mouse, a model of fragile X syndrome, exhibits cognitive deficits and exaggerated metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-dependent long-term depression at CA1 synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms that link loss of function of FMRP to aberrant synaptic plasticity remain unclear. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling cascade controls initiation of cap-dependent translation and is under control of mGluRs. Here we show that mTOR phosphorylation and activity are elevated in hippocampus of juvenile Fmr1 knock-out mice by four functional readouts: (1) association of mTOR with regulatory associated protein of mTOR; (2) mTOR kinase activity; (3) phosphorylation of mTOR downstream targets S6 kinase and 4E-binding protein; and (4) formation of eukaryotic initiation factor complex 4F, a critical first step in cap-dependent translation. Consistent with this, mGluR long-term depression at CA1 synapses of FMRP-deficient mice is exaggerated and rapamycin insensitive. We further show that the p110 subunit of the upstream kinase phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its upstream activator PI3K enhancer PIKE, predicted targets of FMRP, are upregulated in knock-out mice. Elevated mTOR signaling may provide a functional link between overactivation of group I mGluRs and aberrant synaptic plasticity in the fragile X mouse, mechanisms relevant to impaired cognition in fragile X syndrome.

  18. Fragility non-hip fracture patients are at risk.

    PubMed

    Gosch, M; Druml, T; Nicholas, J A; Hoffmann-Weltin, Y; Roth, T; Zegg, M; Blauth, M; Kammerlander, C

    2015-01-01

    Fragility fractures are a growing worldwide health care problem. Hip fractures have been clearly associated with poor outcomes. Fragility fractures of other bones are common reasons for hospital admission and short-term disability, but specific long-term outcome studies of non-hip fragility fractures are rare. The aim of our trial was to evaluate the 1-year outcomes of non-hip fragility fracture patients. This study is a retrospective cohort review of 307 consecutive older inpatient non-hip fracture patients. Patient data for analysis included fracture location, comorbidity prevalence, pre-fracture functional status, osteoporosis treatments and sociodemographic characteristics. The main outcomes evaluated were 1-year mortality and post-fracture functional status. As compared to the expected mortality, the observed 1-year mortality was increased in the study group (17.6 vs. 12.2 %, P = 0.005). After logistic regression, three variables remained as independent risk factors for 1-year mortality among non-hip fracture patients: malnutrition (OR 3.3, CI 1.5-7.1), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) (OR 1.3, CI 1.1-1.5) and the Parker Mobility Score (PMS) (OR 0.85, CI 0.74-0.98). CCI and PMS were independent risk factors for a high grade of dependency after 1 year. Management of osteoporosis did not significantly improve after hospitalization due to a non-hip fragility fracture. The outcomes of older non-hip fracture patients are comparable to the poor outcomes of older hip fracture patients, and appear to be primarily related to comorbidities, pre-fracture function and nutritional status. The low rate of patients on osteoporosis medications likely reflects the insufficient recognition of the importance of osteoporosis assessment and treatment in non-hip fracture patients. Increased clinical and academic attention to non-hip fracture patients is needed.

  19. Fragile X syndrome: panoramic radiographic evaluation of dental anomalies, dental mineralization stage, and mandibular angle

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh-Haddad, Aida; Haddad, Denise Sabbagh; Michel-Crosato, Edgard; Arita, Emiko Saito

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a disorder linked to the chromosome X long arm (Xq27.3), which is identified by a constriction named fragile site. It determines various changes, such as behavioral or emotional problems, learning difficulties, and intellectual disabilities. Craniofacial abnormalities such as elongated and narrow face, prominent forehead, broad nose, large and prominent ear pavilions, strabismus, and myopia are frequent characteristics. Regarding the oral aspects, deep and high-arched palate, mandibular prognathism, and malocclusion are also observed. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dental radiographic characteristics as described in 40 records of patients with panoramic radiography. Material and Methods: The patients were in the range of 6–17 years old, and were divided into two groups (20 subjects who were compatible with the normality standard and 20 individuals diagnosed with the FXS), which were matched for gender and age. Analysis of the panoramic radiographic examination involved the evaluation of dental mineralization stage, mandibular angle size, and presence of dental anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. Results: The results of radiographic evaluation demonstrated that the chronology of tooth eruption of all third and second lower molars is anticipated in individuals with FXS (p<0.05). In this group, supernumerary deciduous teeth (2.83%), giroversion of permanent teeth (2.31%), and partial anodontia (1.82%) were the most frequent dental anomalies. In addition, an increase was observed in the mandibular angle size in the FXS group (p<0.05). Conclusion: We conclude that knowledge of dental radiographic changes is of great importance for dental surgeons to plan the treatment of these individuals. PMID:27812623

  20. Cotinine administration improves impaired cognition in the mouse model of Fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Marta; Beurel, Eleonore; Jope, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    Cotinine is the major metabolite of nicotine and has displayed some capacity for improving cognition in mouse models following chronic administration. We tested if acute cotinine treatment is capable of improving cognition in the mouse model of Fragile X syndrome, Fmr1 -/- knockout mice, and if this is related to inhibition by cotinine treatment of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), which is abnormally active in Fmr1 -/- mice. Acute cotinine treatment increased the inhibitory serine-phosphorylation of GSK3β and the activating phosphorylation of AKT, which can mediate serine-phosphorylation of GSK3β, in both wild-type and Fmr1 -/- mouse hippocampus. Acute cotinine treatment improved cognitive functions of Fmr1 -/- mice in coordinate and categorical spatial processing, novel object recognition, and temporal ordering. However, cotinine failed to restore impaired cognition in GSK3β knockin mice, in which a serine9-to-alanine9 mutation blocks the inhibitory serine phosphorylation of GSK3β, causing GSK3β to be hyperactive. These results indicate that acute cotinine treatment effectively repairs impairments of these four cognitive tasks in Fmr1 -/- mice, and suggest that this cognition-enhancing effect of cotinine is linked to its induction of inhibitory serine-phosphorylation of GSK3. Taken together, these results show that nicotinic receptor agonists can act as cognitive enhancers in a mouse model of Fragile X syndrome and highlight the potential role of inhibiting GSK3β in mediating the beneficial effects of cotinine on memory. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  2. Metabolism of. cap alpha. -C/sup 14/-histidine in the intact rat. II. Radioactive excretion products in urine

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.; Wu, P.H.L.; Heck, W.W.

    1956-09-01

    The normal metabolic pathways in the intact rat was investigated via the radioactive urinary excretion products following administration of a physiological dose of a radioactive compound such as ..cap alpha..-C/sup 14/-DL-histidine. The major metabolites, except one, excreted in the urine 5 hours after administration of ..cap alpha..-C/sup 14/-DL-histidine were isolated and identified. Glutamic acid and urocanic acids had simlar and low activities, whereas carboxyl-labeled imidazoacetic acid was found to be the principal metabolite with a high level of activity. It was concluded that the main end-product of the catabolism of DL-histidine is imidazoleacetic acid probably formed through imidazolepyruvic acid.

  3. Neuropathologic features in the hippocampus and cerebellum of three older men with fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability, and is the most common single-gene disorder known to be associated with autism. Despite recent advances in functional neuroimaging and our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, only limited neuropathologic information on FXS is available. Methods Neuropathologic examinations were performed on post-mortem brain tissue from three older men (aged 57, 64 and 78 years) who had received a clinical or genetic diagnosis of FXS. In each case, physical and cognitive features were typical of FXS, and one man was also diagnosed with autism. Guided by reports of clinical and neuroimaging abnormalities of the limbic system and cerebellum of individuals with FXS, the current analysis focused on neuropathologic features present in the hippocampus and the cerebellar vermis. Results Histologic and immunologic staining revealed abnormalities in both the hippocampus and cerebellar vermis. Focal thickening of hippocampal CA1 and irregularities in the appearance of the dentate gyrus were identified. All lobules of the cerebellar vermis and the lateral cortex of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum had decreased numbers of Purkinje cells, which were occasionally misplaced, and often lacked proper orientation. There were mild, albeit excessive, undulations of the internal granular cell layer, with patchy foliar white matter axonal and astrocytic abnormalities. Quantitative analysis documented panfoliar atrophy of both the anterior and posterior lobes of the vermis, with preferential atrophy of the posterior lobule (VI to VII) compared with age-matched normal controls. Conclusions Significant morphologic changes in the hippocampus and cerebellum in three adult men with FXS were identified. This pattern of pathologic features supports the idea that primary defects in neuronal migration, neurogenesis and aging may underlie the neuropathology reported in FXS. PMID:21303513

  4. Preparation of silica coated cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles for the purification of histidine-tagged proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygar, Gülfem; Kaya, Murat; Özkan, Necati; Kocabıyık, Semra; Volkan, Mürvet

    2015-12-01

    Surface modified cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles containing Ni-NTA affinity group were synthesized and used for the separation of histidine tag proteins from the complex matrices through the use of imidazole side chains of histidine molecules. Firstly, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were prepared in an aqueous solution using the controlled co-precipitation method. In order to obtain small CoFe2O4 agglomerates, oleic acid and sodium chloride were used as dispersants. The CoFe2O4 particles were coated with silica and subsequently the surface of these silica coated particles (SiO2-CoFe2O4) was modified by amine (NH2) groups in order to add further functional groups on the silica shell. Then, carboxyl (-COOH) functional groups were added to the SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles through the NH2 groups. After that Nα,Nα-Bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine hydrate (NTA) was attached to carboxyl ends of the structure. Finally, the surface modified nanoparticles were labeled with nickel (Ni) (II) ions. Furthermore, the modified SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles were utilized as a new system that allows purification of the N-terminal His-tagged recombinant small heat shock protein, Tpv-sHSP 14.3.

  5. Novel Organotin(IV) Schiff Base Complexes with Histidine Derivatives: Synthesis, Characterization, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Ortiz, Ariadna; Camacho-Camacho, Carlos; Sainz-Espuñes, Teresita; Rojas-Oviedo, Irma; Gutiérrez-Lucas, Luis Raúl; Gutierrez Carrillo, Atilano; Vera Ramirez, Marco A.

    2013-01-01

    Five novel tin Schiff base complexes with histidine analogues (derived from the condensation reaction between L-histidine and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde) have been synthesized and characterized. Characterization has been completed by IR and high-resolution mass spectroscopy, 1D and 2D solution NMR (1H, 13C  and 119Sn), as well as solid state 119Sn NMR. The spectroscopic evidence shows two types of structures: a trigonal bipyramidal stereochemistry with the tin atom coordinated to five donating atoms (two oxygen atoms, one nitrogen atom, and two carbon atoms belonging to the alkyl moieties), where one molecule of ligand is coordinated in a three dentate fashion. The second structure is spectroscopically described as a tetrahedral tin complex with four donating atoms (one oxygen atom coordinated to the metal and three carbon atoms belonging to the alkyl or aryl substituents), with one molecule of ligand attached. The antimicrobial activity of the tin compounds has been tested against the growth of bacteria in vitro to assess their bactericidal properties. While pentacoordinated compounds 1, 2, and 3 are described as moderate effective to noneffective drugs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, tetracoordinated tin(IV) compounds 4 and 5 are considered as moderate effective and most effective compounds, respectively, against the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (Gram-positive). PMID:23864839

  6. An Asymmetry-to-Symmetry Switch in Signal Transmission by the Histidine Kinase Receptor for TMAO

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jason O.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The osmoregulator trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), commonplace in aquatic organisms, is used as the terminal electron acceptor for respiration in many bacterial species. The TMAO reductase (Tor) pathway for respiratory catalysis is controlled by a receptor system that comprises the TMAO-binding protein TorT, the sensor histidine kinase TorS and the response regulator TorR. Here we study the TorS/TorT sensor system to gain mechanistic insight into signaling by histidine kinase receptors. We determined crystal structures for complexes of TorS sensor domains with apo TorT and with TorT(TMAO); we characterized TorS sensor associations with TorT in solution; we analyzed the thermodynamics of TMAO binding to TorT-TorS complexes; and we analyzed in vivo responses to TMAO through the TorT/TorS/TorR system to test structure-inspired hypotheses. TorS-TorT(apo) is an asymmetric 2:2 complex that binds TMAO with negative cooperativity to form a symmetric active kinase. PMID:22483119

  7. An Asymmetry-to-Symmetry Switch in Signal Transmission by the Histidine Kinase Receptor for TMAO

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Jason O.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2012-06-28

    The osmoregulator trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), commonplace in aquatic organisms, is used as the terminal electron acceptor for respiration in many bacterial species. The TMAO reductase (Tor) pathway for respiratory catalysis is controlled by a receptor system that comprises the TMAO-binding protein TorT, the sensor histidine kinase TorS, and the response regulator TorR. Here we study the TorS/TorT sensor system to gain mechanistic insight into signaling by histidine kinase receptors. We determined crystal structures for complexes of TorS sensor domains with apo TorT and with TorT (TMAO); we characterized TorS sensor associations with TorT in solution; we analyzed the thermodynamics of TMAOmore » binding to TorT-TorS complexes; and we analyzed in vivo responses to TMAO through the TorT/TorS/TorR system to test structure-inspired hypotheses. TorS-TorT(apo) is an asymmetric 2:2 complex that binds TMAO with negative cooperativity to form a symmetric active kinase.« less

  8. An asymmetry-to-symmetry switch in signal transmission by the histidine kinase receptor for TMAO.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason O; Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2012-04-04

    The osmoregulator trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), commonplace in aquatic organisms, is used as the terminal electron acceptor for respiration in many bacterial species. The TMAO reductase (Tor) pathway for respiratory catalysis is controlled by a receptor system that comprises the TMAO-binding protein TorT, the sensor histidine kinase TorS, and the response regulator TorR. Here we study the TorS/TorT sensor system to gain mechanistic insight into signaling by histidine kinase receptors. We determined crystal structures for complexes of TorS sensor domains with apo TorT and with TorT (TMAO); we characterized TorS sensor associations with TorT in solution; we analyzed the thermodynamics of TMAO binding to TorT-TorS complexes; and we analyzed in vivo responses to TMAO through the TorT/TorS/TorR system to test structure-inspired hypotheses. TorS-TorT(apo) is an asymmetric 2:2 complex that binds TMAO with negative cooperativity to form a symmetric active kinase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fungal histidine phosphotransferase plays a crucial role in photomorphogenesis and pathogenesis in Magnaporthe oryzae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanan, Varsha C.; Chandarana, Pinal M.; Chattoo, Bharat. B.; Patkar, Rajesh N.; Manjrekar, Johannes

    2017-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction (TCST) pathways play crucial roles in many cellular functions such as stress responses, biofilm formation and sporulation. The histidine phosphotransferase (HPt), which is an intermediate phosphotransfer protein in a two-component system, transfers a phosphate group to a phosphorylatable aspartate residue in the target protein(s), and up-regulates stress-activated MAP kinase cascades. Most fungal genomes carry a single copy of the gene coding for HPt, which are potential antifungal targets. However, unlike the histidine kinases (HK) or the downstream response regulators (RR) in two-component system, the HPts have not been well studied in phytopathogenic fungi. In this study, we investigated the role of HPt in the model rice-blast fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. We found that in M. oryzae an additional isoform of the HPT gene YPD1 was expressed specifically in response to light. Further, the expression of light-regulated genes such as those encoding envoy and blue-light-harvesting protein, and PAS domain containing HKs was significantly reduced upon down-regulation of YPD1 in M. oryzae. Importantly, down-regulation of YPD1 led to a significant decrease in the ability to penetrate the host cuticle and in light-dependent conidiation in M. oryzae. Thus, our results indicate that Ypd1 plays an important role in asexual development and host invasion, and suggest that YPD1 isoforms likely have distinct roles to play in the rice-blast pathogen M. oryzae.

  10. Glycyl-alanyl-histidine protects PC12 cells against hydrogen peroxide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Hideki; Tanaka, Ryota; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2017-11-22

    Peptides with cytoprotective functions, including antioxidants and anti-infectives, could be useful therapeutics. Carnosine, β-alanine-histidine, is a dipeptide with anti-oxidant properties. Tripeptides of Ala-His-Lys, Pro-His-His, or Tyr-His-Tyr are also of interest in this respect. We synthesized several histidine-containing peptides including glycine or alanine, and tested their cytoprotective effects on hydrogen peroxide toxicity for PC12 cells. Of all these peptides (Gly-His-His, Ala-His-His, Ala-His-Ala, Ala-Ala-His, Ala-Gly-His, Gly-Ala-His (GAH), Ala-His-Gly, His-Ala-Gly, His-His-His, Gly-His-Ala, and Gly-Gly-His), GAH was found to have the strongest cytoprotective activity. GAH decreased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, apoptosis, morphological changes, and nuclear membrane permeability changes against hydrogen peroxide toxicity in PC12 cells. The cytoprotective activity of GAH was superior to that of carnosine against hydrogen peroxide toxicity in PC12 cells. GAH also protected PC12 cells against damage caused by actinomycin D and staurosporine. Additionally, it was found that GAH also protected SH-SY5Y and Jurkat cells from damage caused by hydrogen peroxide, as assessed by LDH leakage. Thus, a novel tripeptide, GAH, has been identified as having broad cytoprotective effects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell damage.

  11. Full-length structure of a monomeric histidine kinase reveals basis for sensory regulation

    DOE PAGES

    Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Ko, Wen-huang; Tomchick, Diana R.; ...

    2014-12-02

    Although histidine kinases (HKs) are critical sensors of external stimuli in prokaryotes, the mechanisms by which their sensor domains control enzymatic activity remain unclear. In this paper, we report the full-length structure of a blue light-activated HK from Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594 (EL346) and the results of biochemical and biophysical studies that explain how it is activated by light. Contrary to the standard view that signaling occurs within HK dimers, EL346 functions as a monomer. Its structure reveals that the light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) sensor domain both controls kinase activity and prevents dimerization by binding one side of a dimerization/histidine phosphotransfer-like (DHpL) domain.more » The DHpL domain also contacts the catalytic/ATP-binding (CA) domain, keeping EL346 in an inhibited conformation in the dark. Upon light stimulation, interdomain interactions weaken to facilitate activation. Our data suggest that the LOV domain controls kinase activity by affecting the stability of the DHpL/CA interface, releasing the CA domain from an inhibited conformation upon photoactivation. Finally, we suggest parallels between EL346 and dimeric HKs, with sensor-induced movements in the DHp similarly remodeling the DHp/CA interface as part of activation.« less

  12. Structural Characterization of the Predominant Family of Histidine Kinase Sensor Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Hendrickson, W

    2010-01-01

    Histidine kinase (HK) receptors are used ubiquitously by bacteria to monitor environmental changes, and they are also prevalent in plants, fungi, and other protists. Typical HK receptors have an extracellular sensor portion that detects a signal, usually a chemical ligand, and an intracellular transmitter portion that includes both the kinase domain itself and the site for histidine phosphorylation. While kinase domains are highly conserved, sensor domains are diverse. HK receptors function as dimers, but the molecular mechanism for signal transduction across cell membranes remains obscure. In this study, eight crystal structures were determined from five sensor domains representative of themore » most populated family, family HK1, found in a bioinformatic analysis of predicted sensor domains from transmembrane HKs. Each structure contains an inserted repeat of PhoQ/DcuS/CitA (PDC) domains, and similarity between sequence and structure is correlated across these and other double-PDC sensor proteins. Three of the five sensors crystallize as dimers that appear to be physiologically relevant, and comparisons between ligated structures and apo-state structures provide insights into signal transmission. Some HK1 family proteins prove to be sensors for chemotaxis proteins or diguanylate cyclase receptors, implying a combinatorial molecular evolution.« less

  13. Increased adsorption of histidine-tagged proteins onto tissue culture polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Maria; Hansen, Thomas Steen; Lind, Johan Ulrik; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene

    2012-04-01

    In this study we compare histidine-tagged and native proteins with regards to adsorption properties. We observe significantly increased adsorption of proteins with an incorporated polyhistidine amino acid motif (HIS-tag) onto tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) compared to similar proteins without a HIS-tag. The effect is not observed on polystyrene (PS). Adsorption experiments have been performed at physiological pH (7.4) and the effect was only observed for the investigated proteins that have pI values below or around 7.4. Competitive adsorption experiments with imidazole and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), as well as adsorption performed at different pH and ionic strength indicates that the high adsorption is caused by electrostatic interaction between negatively charged carboxylate groups on the TCPS surface and positively charged histidine residues in the proteins. Pre-adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) does not decrease the adsorption of HIS-tagged proteins onto TCPS. Our findings identify a potential problem in using HIS-tagged signalling molecule in assays with cells cultured on TCPS, since the concentration of the molecule in solution might be affected and this could critically influence the assay outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Immobilized metal ion affinity electrophoresis. A study with several model proteins containing histidine.

    PubMed

    Goubran-Botros, H; Nanak, E; Abdul Nour, J; Birkenmeir, G; Vijayalakshmi, M A

    1992-04-24

    Immobilized metal ion affinity electrophoresis (IMA-Elec) is one among the many methods derived from the immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Two approaches for incorporating the metal ligand, were studied. One was in the form of insoluble particulate material based on Sepharose 6B and the other in the form of soluble polymer based on polyethylene glycol (PEG) 5000. Both the polymers coupled with iminodiacetate and metallized with copper or zinc were used as ligands, incorporated into soluble agarose as the electrophoretic gel. Several histidine-containing model proteins were studied with both the systems and their metal binding strengths were determined as the dissociation constants, Kd. The results clearly demonstrated that the mechanism of protein recognition by immobilized copper or zinc via the accessible histidyl residues was maintained in the IMA-Elec system. Proteins with increasing numbers of histidine residues showed increasing binding strength (lower Kd values). While this basic mechanism was conserved, the supporting polymers (Sepharose 6B and the PEG 5000) showed significant differences in the metal binding to the protein. The polysaccharide Sepharose 6B enhanced the binding strength compared with PEG 5000. The optimum electrophoretic parameters were determined to be current intensities up to 20 mA and pH ca. 7.0. At pH greater than 8.0, a significant decrease in the affinity was observed, this decrease being greater with PEG 5000 than Sepharose 6B as supporting material.

  15. The identification of four histidine kinases that influence sporulation in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Mearls, Elizabeth B; Lynd, Lee R

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we sought to identify genes involved in the onset of spore formation in Clostridium thermocellum via targeted gene deletions, gene over-expression, and transcriptional analysis. We determined that three putative histidine kinases, clo1313_0286, clo1313_2735 and clo1313_1942 were positive regulators of sporulation, while a fourth kinase, clo1313_1973, acted as a negative regulator. Unlike Bacillus or other Clostridium species, the deletion of a single positively regulating kinase was sufficient to abolish sporulation in this organism. Sporulation could be restored in these asporogenous strains via overexpression of any one of the positive regulators, indicating a high level of redundancy between these kinases. In addition to having a sporulation defect, deletion of clo1313_2735 produced L-forms. Thus, this kinase may play an additional role in repressing L-form formation. This work suggests that C. thermocellum enters non-growth states based on the sensory input from multiple histidine kinases. The ability to control the development of non-growth states at the genetic level has the potential to inform strategies for improved strain development, as well as provide valuable insight into C. thermocellum biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Crystal structure and tartrate inhibition of Legionella pneumophila histidine acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Reilly, Thomas J; Tanner, John J

    2015-11-01

    Histidine acid phosphatases (HAPs) utilize a nucleophilic histidine residue to catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from phosphomonoesters to water. HAPs function as protein phosphatases and pain suppressors in mammals, are essential for Giardia lamblia excystation, and contribute to virulence of the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis. Herein we report the first crystal structure and steady-state kinetics measurements of the HAP from Legionella pneumophila (LpHAP), also known as Legionella major acid phosphatase. The structure of LpHAP complexed with the inhibitor l(+)-tartrate was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. Kinetics assays show that l(+)-tartrate is a 50-fold more potent inhibitor of LpHAP than of other HAPs. Electrostatic potential calculations provide insight into the basis for the enhanced tartrate potency: the tartrate pocket of LpHAP is more positive than other HAPs because of the absence of an ion pair partner for the second Arg of the conserved RHGXRXP HAP signature sequence. The structure also reveals that LpHAP has an atypically expansive active site entrance and lacks the nucleotide substrate base clamp found in other HAPs. These features imply that nucleoside monophosphates may not be preferred substrates. Kinetics measurements confirm that AMP is a relatively inefficient in vitro substrate of LpHAP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural, evolutionary and genetic analysis of the histidine biosynthetic "core" in the genus Burkholderia.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Maria Cristiana; Russo, Edda; Fondi, Marco; Emiliani, Giovanni; Frandi, Antonio; Brilli, Matteo; Pastorelli, Roberta; Fani, Renato

    2009-12-01

    In this work a detailed analysis of the structure, the expression and the organization of his genes belonging to the core of histidine biosynthesis (hisBHAF) in 40 newly determined and 13 available sequences of Burkholderia strains was carried out. Data obtained revealed a strong conservation of the structure and organization of these genes through the entire genus. The phylogenetic analysis showed the monophyletic origin of this gene cluster and indicated that it did not undergo horizontal gene transfer events. The analysis of the intergenic regions, based on the substitution rate, entropy plot and bendability suggested the existence of a putative transcription promoter upstream of hisB, that was supported by the genetic analysis that showed that this cluster was able to complement Escherichia colihisA, hisB, and hisF mutations. Moreover, a preliminary transcriptional analysis and the analysis of microarray data revealed that the expression of the his core was constitutive. These findings are in agreement with the fact that the entire Burkholderiahis operon is heterogeneous, in that it contains "alien" genes apparently not involved in histidine biosynthesis. Besides, they also support the idea that the proteobacterial his operon was piece-wisely assembled, i.e. through accretion of smaller units containing only some of the genes (eventually together with their own promoters) involved in this biosynthetic route. The correlation existing between the structure, organization and regulation of his "core" genes and the function(s) they perform in cellular metabolism is discussed.

  18. Crystal Structures of Apparent Saccharide Sensors from Histidine Kinase Receptors Prevalent in a Human Gut Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Qun; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    The adult human gut presents a complicated ecosystem where host-bacterium symbiosis plays an important role. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a predominant member of the gut microflora, providing the human digestive tract with a large number of glycolytic enzymes. Expression of many of these enzymes appears to be controlled by histidine kinase receptors that are fused into unusual hybrid two-component systems that share homologous periplasmic sensor domains. These sensor domains belong to the third most populated (HK3) family based on a previous bioinformatics analysis of predicted histidine kinase sensors. Here, we present crystal structures of two sensor domains representative of the HK3 family. Each sensor is folded into three domains: two seven-bladed β-propeller domains and one β-sandwich domain. Both sensors form dimers in crystals and one sensor appears to be physiologically relevant. The folding characteristics in the individual domains, the domain organization, and the oligomeric architecture are all unique to the HK3 sensors. The sequence analysis of the HK3 sensors indicates that these sensors are shared among other signaling molecules, implying a combinatorial molecular evolution. PMID:24995510

  19. Repurposing a Histamine Detection Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Histidine Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Juang, Yu-Chi; Fradera, Xavier; Han, Yongxin; Partridge, Anthony William

    2018-06-01

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) is the primary enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of histidine to histamine. HDC contributes to many physiological responses as histamine plays important roles in allergic reaction, neurological response, gastric acid secretion, and cell proliferation and differentiation. Small-molecule modulation of HDC represents a potential therapeutic strategy for a range of histamine-associated diseases, including inflammatory disease, neurological disorders, gastric ulcers, and select cancers. High-throughput screening (HTS) methods for measuring HDC activity are currently limited. Here, we report the development of a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay for monitoring HDC activity. The assay is based on competition between HDC-generated histamine and fluorophore-labeled histamine for binding to a Europium cryptate (EuK)-labeled anti-histamine antibody. We demonstrated that the assay is highly sensitive and simple to develop. Assay validation experiments were performed using low-volume 384-well plates and resulted in good statistical parameters. A pilot HTS screen gave a Z' score > 0.5 and a hit rate of 1.1%, and led to the identification of a validated hit series. Overall, the presented assay should facilitate the discovery of therapeutic HDC inhibitors by acting as a novel tool suitable for large-scale HTS and subsequent interrogation of compound structure-activity relationships.

  20. Production and structural characterization of amino terminally histidine tagged human oncostatin M in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sporeno, E; Barbato, G; Graziani, R; Pucci, P; Nitti, G; Paonessa, G

    1994-05-01

    Oncostatin M is a cytokine that acts as a growth regulator on a wide variety of cells and has diverse biological activities including acute phase protein induction, LDL receptor up-regulation and cell-specific gene expression. In order to gather information about the Onc M structure, we established a protocol for large scale production and single step purification of this functional cytokine from bacterial cells. The cDNA of human Onc M was cloned by RT-PCR from total RNA of PMA induced U937 cells. After the addition of a six histidine tag at the N-terminus, the coding region of mature Onc M was cloned in the pT7.7 expression vector. Histidine tagged Onc M was overexpressed in bacterial cells and purified to homogeneity in one step on a metal chelating column. We found that recombinant 6xHis-OncM remains fully active in a growth inhibition assay. Structural characterization of the purified protein was performed by electrospray mass spectrometry, automated Edman degradation and peptide mapping by high-pressure liquid chromatography/fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry. Thermal and pH stability dependence of Onc M was assessed by circular dichroism spectroscopy; the helical content is about 50%, in agreement with the four helix bundle fold postulated for cytokines that bind haematopoietic receptors of type I.

  1. Ligand-Induced Asymmetry in Histidine Sensor Kinase Complex Regulates Quorum Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Neiditch,M.; Federle, M.; Pompeani, A.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria sense their environment using receptors of the histidine sensor kinase family, but how kinase activity is regulated by ligand binding is not well understood. Autoinducer-2 (AI-2), a secreted signaling molecule originally identified in studies of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, regulates quorum-sensing responses and allows communication between different bacterial species. AI-2 signal transduction in V. harveyi requires the integral membrane receptor LuxPQ, comprised of periplasmic binding protein (LuxP) and histidine sensor kinase (LuxQ) subunits. Combined X-ray crystallographic and functional studies show that AI-2 binding causes a major conformational change within LuxP, which in turn stabilizes a quaternary arrangement inmore » which two LuxPQ monomers are asymmetrically associated. We propose that formation of this asymmetric quaternary structure is responsible for repressing the kinase activity of both LuxQ subunits and triggering the transition of V. harveyi into quorum-sensing mode.« less

  2. Decreased Plasma Histidine Level Predicts Risk of Relapse in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Ono, Nobukazu; Imaizumi, Akira; Mori, Maiko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Uo, Michihide; Hashimoto, Masaki; Naganuma, Makoto; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Mizuno, Shinta; Kitazume, Mina T.; Yajima, Tomoharu; Ogata, Haruhiko; Iwao, Yasushi; Hibi, Toshifumi; Kanai, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Patients with UC have repeated remission and relapse. Clinical biomarkers that can predict relapse in UC patients in remission have not been identified. To facilitate the prediction of relapse of UC, we investigated the potential of novel multivariate indexes using statistical modeling of plasma free amino acid (PFAA) concentrations. We measured fasting PFAA concentrations in 369 UC patients in clinical remission, and 355 were observed prospectively for up to 1 year. Relapse rate within 1 year was 23% (82 of 355 patients). The age- and gender-adjusted hazard ratio for the lowest quartile compared with the highest quartile of plasma histidine concentration was 2.55 (95% confidence interval: 1.41–4.62; p = 0.0020 (log-rank), p for trend = 0.0005). We demonstrated that plasma amino acid profiles in UC patients in clinical remission can predict the risk of relapse within 1 year. Decreased histidine level in PFAAs was associated with increased risk of relapse. Metabolomics could be promising for the establishment of a non-invasive predictive marker in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26474176

  3. Effects of Histidine Supplementation on Global Serum and Urine 1H NMR-based Metabolomics and Serum Amino Acid Profiles in Obese Women from a Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Du, Shanshan; Sun, Shuhong; Liu, Liyan; Zhang, Qiao; Guo, Fuchuan; Li, Chunlong; Feng, Rennan; Sun, Changhao

    2017-06-02

    The aim of current study was to investigate the metabolic changes associated with histidine supplementation in serum and urine metabolic signatures and serum amino acid (AA) profiles. Serum and urine 1 H NMR-based metabolomics and serum AA profiles were employed in 32 and 37 obese women with metabolic syndrome (MetS) intervened with placebo or histidine for 12 weeks. Multivariable statistical analysis were conducted to define characteristic metabolites. In serum 1 H NMR metabolic profiles, increases in histidine, glutamine, aspartate, glycine, choline, and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) were observed; meanwhile, decreases in cholesterol, triglycerides, fatty acids and unsaturated lipids, acetone, and α/β-glucose were exhibited after histidine supplement. In urine 1 H NMR metabolic profiles, citrate, creatinine/creatine, methylguanidine, and betaine + TMAO were higher, while hippurate was lower in histidine supplement group. In serum AA profiles, 10 AAs changed after histidine supplementation, including increased histidine, glycine, alanine, lysine, asparagine, and tyrosine and decreased leucine, isoleucine, ornithine, and citrulline. The study showed a systemic metabolic response in serum and urine metabolomics and AA profiles to histidine supplementation, showing significantly changed metabolism in AAs, lipid, and glucose in obese women with MetS.

  4. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ying; Cameron, Iain T; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2017-09-01

    It is not uncommon for a woman to suffer from abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) or heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) at some point during her lifetime. Once pathology is excluded, in practice, management needs to be individualised, taking into account the improvement of the woman's symptoms and quality of life. Peer-reviewed journals, governmental and professional society publications. There is now agreement on a structured, universal approach to the diagnosis of AUB, with the aide memoirs PALM (polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyoma, malignancy) and COEIN (coagulopathies, ovulatory dysfunction, endometrial, iatrogenic, not otherwise classified). Once malignancy and significant pelvic pathology have been ruled out, medical treatment is an effective first-line therapeutic option, with surgery, including endometrial ablation and hysterectomy, offered when medical management has failed to resolve symptoms and fertility is no longer desired. There remains controversy around the management of the types and subtypes of adenomyosis and leiomyoma, and understanding their impact on clinical reproductive outcomes. Standardised assessment tools for measuring outcomes of AUB are being developed. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools should be developed to help stratify treatment for women with AUB, particularly relating to 'unclassified' and 'endometrial' causes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  6. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    PubMed

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  7. Parenting young children with and without Fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Audra; Barnum, Leah; Skinner, Debra; Warren, Steven F; Fleming, Kandace

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine maternal parenting styles across age-matched siblings using a within-family design, in which one child has Fragile X syndrome. Thirteen families participated; children were aged 16 to 71 months. Mothers completed several videotaped activities with each child separately as well as an interview. Mothers used a consistent, responsive style with both children, using the same degree of positive affect and warmth. Differences included using more behavior management strategies with the child with Fragile X and a conversational style of interaction with the sibling. Differences in approaches suggest the mothers adapted to the developmental differences between the children. The interview data supported these findings; mothers were aware of the changes made to accommodate the developmental differences.

  8. Human pluripotent stem cell models of Fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Anita; Zhao, Xinyu

    2016-06-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism. The causal mutation in FXS is a trinucleotide CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene that leads to human specific epigenetic silencing and loss of Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) expression. Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and particularly induced PSCs (iPSCs), offer a model system to reveal cellular and molecular events underlying human neuronal development and function in FXS. Human FXS PSCs have been established and have provided insight into the epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene as well as aspects of neuronal development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multifarious Functions of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jenna K; Broadie, Kendal

    2017-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), a heritable intellectual and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), results from the loss of Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). This neurodevelopmental disease state exhibits neural circuit hyperconnectivity and hyperexcitability. Canonically, FMRP functions as an mRNA-binding translation suppressor, but recent findings have enormously expanded its proposed roles. Although connections between burgeoning FMRP functions remain unknown, recent advances have extended understanding of its involvement in RNA, channel, and protein binding that modulate calcium signaling, activity-dependent critical period development, and the excitation-inhibition (E/I) neural circuitry balance. In this review, we contextualize 3 years of FXS model research. Future directions extrapolated from recent advances focus on discovering links between FMRP roles to determine whether FMRP has a multitude of unrelated functions or whether combinatorial mechanisms can explain its multifaceted existence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Of Men and Mice: Modeling the Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dahlhaus, Regina

    2018-01-01

    The Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is one of the most common forms of inherited intellectual disability in all human societies. Caused by the transcriptional silencing of a single gene, the fragile x mental retardation gene FMR1, FXS is characterized by a variety of symptoms, which range from mental disabilities to autism and epilepsy. More than 20 years ago, a first animal model was described, the Fmr1 knock-out mouse. Several other models have been developed since then, including conditional knock-out mice, knock-out rats, a zebrafish and a drosophila model. Using these model systems, various targets for potential pharmaceutical treatments have been identified and many treatments have been shown to be efficient in preclinical studies. However, all attempts to turn these findings into a therapy for patients have failed thus far. In this review, I will discuss underlying difficulties and address potential alternatives for our future research. PMID:29599705

  11. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Regulates the Levels of Scaffold Proteins and Glutamate Receptors in Postsynaptic Densities*

    PubMed Central

    Schütt, Janin; Falley, Katrin; Richter, Dietmar; Kreienkamp, Hans-Jürgen; Kindler, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Functional absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes the fragile X syndrome, a hereditary form of mental retardation characterized by a change in dendritic spine morphology. The RNA-binding protein FMRP has been implicated in regulating postsynaptic protein synthesis. Here we have analyzed whether the abundance of scaffold proteins and neurotransmitter receptor subunits in postsynaptic densities (PSDs) is altered in the neocortex and hippocampus of FMRP-deficient mice. Whereas the levels of several PSD components are unchanged, concentrations of Shank1 and SAPAP scaffold proteins and various glutamate receptor subunits are altered in both adult and juvenile knock-out mice. With the exception of slightly increased hippocampal SAPAP2 mRNA levels in adult animals, altered postsynaptic protein concentrations do not correlate with similar changes in total and synaptic levels of corresponding mRNAs. Thus, loss of FMRP in neurons appears to mainly affect the translation and not the abundance of particular brain transcripts. Semi-quantitative analysis of RNA levels in FMRP immunoprecipitates showed that in the mouse brain mRNAs encoding PSD components, such as Shank1, SAPAP1–3, PSD-95, and the glutamate receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B, are associated with FMRP. Luciferase reporter assays performed in primary cortical neurons from knock-out and wild-type mice indicate that FMRP silences translation of Shank1 mRNAs via their 3′-untranslated region. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors relieves translational suppression. As Shank1 controls dendritic spine morphology, our data suggest that dysregulation of Shank1 synthesis may significantly contribute to the abnormal spine development and function observed in brains of fragile X syndrome patients. PMID:19640847

  12. Inactivation of the maternal fragile X gene results in sensitization of GABAB receptor function in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Bojana; Toth, Miklos

    2008-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome is an X-linked disorder caused by the inactivation of the FMR1 gene, with symptoms ranging from impaired cognitive functions to seizures, anxiety, sensory abnormalities, and hyperactivity. Although fragile X syndrome is considered a typical Mendelian disorder, we have recently reported that the environment, specifically the fmr1(+/-) or fmr1(-/-) [H or knockout (KO)] maternal environment, elicits on its own a partial fragile X-like phenotype and can contribute to the overall phenotype of fmr1(-/0) (KO) male offspring. Genetically fmr1(+/0) (WT) males born to H females (H(maternal) > WT(offspring)), similar to KO male offspring born to H and KO mothers (H > KO and KO > KO), exhibit locomotor hyperactivity. These mice also showed reduced D(2) autoreceptor function, indicating a possible diminished feedback inhibition of dopamine (DA) release in the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic systems. The GABAergic system also regulates DA release, in part via presynaptic GABA(B) receptors (Rs) located on midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Here, we show that the locomotor inhibitory effect of the GABA(B)R agonist baclofen [4-amino-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-butanoic acid] is enhanced in all progeny of mutant mothers (H > WT, H > KO, and KO > KO) compared with WT > WT mice, irrespective of their own genotype. However, increased sensitivity to baclofen was selective and limited to the locomotor response because the muscle-relaxant and sedative effects of the drug were not altered by the maternal environment. These data show that GABA(B)R sensitization, traditionally induced pharmacologically, can also be elicited by the fmr1-deficient maternal environment.

  13. Cellular Basis for Learning Impairment in Fragile X Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    disability and autism in addition to the specific condition of fragile X syndrome. This knowledge will be necessary for the development of rational...circuit in Fmr1-KO mice. We hypothesize that absence of FMRP disrupts trafficking of NMDA receptors to synapses, resulting in impairments in NMDA ...impact on our understanding of mental retardation in general as well as learning disabilities in other autism spectrum disorders. This knowledge will

  14. Manipulation of a fragile object by elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Gorniak, Stacey L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2011-08-01

    We investigated strategies of healthy elderly participants (74-84 years old) during prehension and transport of an object with varying degrees of fragility. Fragility was specified as the maximal normal force that the object could withstand without collapsing. Specifically, kinetic and kinematic variables as well as and force covariation indices were quantified and compared to those shown by young healthy persons (19-28 years old). We tested three hypotheses related to age-related changes in two safety margins (slip safety margin and crush safety margin) and indices of force covariation. Compared to young controls, elderly individuals exhibited a decrease in object acceleration and an increase in movement time, an increase in grip force production, a decrease in the correlation between grip and load forces, an overall decrease in indices of multi-digit synergies, and lower safety margin indices computed with respect to both dropping and crushing the object. Elderly participants preferred to be at a relatively lower risk of crushing the object even if this led to a higher risk of dropping it. Both groups showed an increase in the index of synergy stabilizing total normal force produced by the four fingers with increased fragility of the object. Age-related changes are viewed as a direct result of physiological changes due to aging, not adaptation to object fragility. Such changes in overall characteristics of prehension likely reflect diminished synergic control by the central nervous system of finger forces with aging. The findings corroborate an earlier hypothesis on an age-related shift from synergic to element-based control.

  15. Seismic fragility assessment of low-rise stone masonry buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-El-Ezz, Ahmad; Nollet, Marie-José; Nastev, Miroslav

    2013-03-01

    Many historic buildings in old urban centers in Eastern Canada are made of stone masonry reputed to be highly vulnerable to seismic loads. Seismic risk assessment of stone masonry buildings is therefore the first step in the risk mitigation process to provide adequate planning for retrofit and preservation of historical urban centers. This paper focuses on development of analytical displacement-based fragility curves reflecting the characteristics of existing stone masonry buildings in Eastern Canada. The old historic center of Quebec City has been selected as a typical study area. The standard fragility analysis combines the inelastic spectral displacement, a structure-dependent earthquake intensity measure, and the building damage state correlated to the induced building displacement. The proposed procedure consists of a three-step development process: (1) mechanics-based capacity model, (2) displacement-based damage model and (3) seismic demand model. The damage estimation for a uniform hazard scenario of 2% in 50 years probability of exceedance indicates that slight to moderate damage is the most probable damage experienced by these stone masonry buildings. Comparison is also made with fragility curves implicit in the seismic risk assessment tools Hazus and ELER. Hazus shows the highest probability of the occurrence of no to slight damage, whereas the highest probability of extensive and complete damage is predicted with ELER. This comparison shows the importance of the development of fragility curves specific to the generic construction characteristics in the study area and emphasizes the need for critical use of regional risk assessment tools and generated results.

  16. Post-surgical rehabilitative approach to fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Gimigliano, F; Iolascon, G; Riccio, I; Frizzi, L; Gimigliano, R

    2013-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength predisposing to an increased risk of fracture. The most frequent sites of fragility fractures are the hip, the distal radius, the spine, the proximal humerus, and the ankle. In most cases, a surgical approach with subsequent rehabilitative treatment is required. The general aims of rehabilitation are to increase functioning and improve patients' activities, participation level, and quality of life.

  17. Treatment of Fragile X Syndrome with a Neuroactive Steroid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    common form of inherited intellectual disability and autism . The protein (FMRP) encoded by the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR1), is an RNA...FXS) is the most common inherited cause of mental retardation, and the most common single gene mutation associated with autism (Demark et al. 2003...profile of impairments, with the most interesting being comorbidity with autism . From the most recent studies, the prevalence of autism spectrum

  18. Selective Deletion of Astroglial FMRP Dysregulates Glutamate Transporter GLT1 and Contributes to Fragile X Syndrome Phenotypes In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Higashimori, Haruki; Schin, Christina S; Chiang, Ming Sum R; Morel, Lydie; Shoneye, Temitope A; Nelson, David L; Yang, Yongjie

    2016-07-06

    How the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) in different brain cell types, especially in non-neuron glial cells, induces fragile X syndrome (FXS) phenotypes has just begun to be understood. In the current study, we generated inducible astrocyte-specific Fmr1 conditional knock-out mice (i-astro-Fmr1-cKO) and restoration mice (i-astro-Fmr1-cON) to study the in vivo modulation of FXS synaptic phenotypes by astroglial FMRP. We found that functional expression of glutamate transporter GLT1 is 40% decreased in i-astro-Fmr1-cKO somatosensory cortical astrocytes in vivo, which can be fully rescued by the selective re-expression of FMRP in astrocytes in i-astro-Fmr1-cON mice. Although the selective loss of astroglial FMRP only modestly increases spine density and length in cortical pyramidal neurons, selective re-expression of FMRP in astrocytes significantly attenuates abnormal spine morphology in these neurons of i-astro-Fmr1-cON mice. Moreover, we found that basal protein synthesis levels and immunoreactivity of phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein (p-s6P) is significantly increased in i-astro-Fmr1-cKO mice, while the enhanced cortical protein synthesis observed in Fmr1 KO mice is mitigated in i-astro-Fmr1-cON mice. Furthermore, ceftriaxone-mediated upregulation of surface GLT1 expression restores functional glutamate uptake and attenuates enhanced neuronal excitability in Fmr1 KO mice. In particular, ceftriaxone significantly decreases the growth rate of abnormally accelerated body weight and completely corrects spine abnormality in Fmr1 KO mice. Together, these results show that the selective loss of astroglial FMRP contributes to cortical synaptic deficits in FXS, presumably through dysregulated astroglial glutamate transporter GLT1 and impaired glutamate uptake. These results suggest the involvement of astrocyte-mediated mechanisms in the pathogenesis of FXS. Previous studies to understand how the loss of function of fragile X mental retardation

  19. Is mammalian chromosomal evolution driven by regions of genome fragility?

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Castresana, Jose; Robinson, Terence J

    2006-01-01

    Background A fundamental question in comparative genomics concerns the identification of mechanisms that underpin chromosomal change. In an attempt to shed light on the dynamics of mammalian genome evolution, we analyzed the distribution of syntenic blocks, evolutionary breakpoint regions, and evolutionary breakpoints taken from public databases available for seven eutherian species (mouse, rat, cattle, dog, pig, cat, and horse) and the chicken, and examined these for correspondence with human fragile sites and tandem repeats. Results Our results confirm previous investigations that showed the presence of chromosomal regions in the human genome that have been repeatedly used as illustrated by a high breakpoint accumulation in certain chromosomes and chromosomal bands. We show, however, that there is a striking correspondence between fragile site location, the positions of evolutionary breakpoints, and the distribution of tandem repeats throughout the human genome, which similarly reflect a non-uniform pattern of occurrence. Conclusion These observations provide further evidence that certain chromosomal regions in the human genome have been repeatedly used in the evolutionary process. As a consequence, the genome is a composite of fragile regions prone to reorganization that have been conserved in different lineages, and genomic tracts that do not exhibit the same levels of evolutionary plasticity. PMID:17156441

  20. Content fragile watermarking for H.264/AVC video authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait Sadi, K.; Guessoum, A.; Bouridane, A.; Khelifi, F.

    2017-04-01

    Discrete cosine transform is exploited in this work to generate the authentication data that are treated as a fragile watermark. This watermark is embedded in the motion vectors. The advances in multimedia technologies and digital processing tools have brought with them new challenges for the source and content authentication. To ensure the integrity of the H.264/AVC video stream, we introduce an approach based on a content fragile video watermarking method using an independent authentication of each group of pictures (GOPs) within the video. This technique uses robust visual features extracted from the video pertaining to the set of selected macroblocs (MBs) which hold the best partition mode in a tree-structured motion compensation process. An additional security degree is offered by the proposed method through using a more secured keyed function HMAC-SHA-256 and randomly choosing candidates from already selected MBs. In here, the watermark detection and verification processes are blind, whereas the tampered frames detection is not since it needs the original frames within the tampered GOPs. The proposed scheme achieves an accurate authentication technique with a high fragility and fidelity whilst maintaining the original bitrate and the perceptual quality. Furthermore, its ability to detect the tampered frames in case of spatial, temporal and colour manipulations is confirmed.

  1. Image authentication by means of fragile CGH watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirripa Spagnolo, Giuseppe; Simonetti, Carla; Cozzella, Lorenzo

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we propose a fragile marking system based on Computer Generated Hologram coding techniques, which is able to detect malicious tampering while tolerating some incidental distortions. A fragile watermark is a mark that is readily altered or destroyed when the host image is modified through a linear or nonlinear transformation. A fragile watermark monitors the integrity of the content of the image but not its numerical representation. Therefore the watermark is designed so that the integrity is proven if the content of the image has not been tampered. Since digital images can be altered or manipulated with ease, the ability to detect changes to digital images is very important for many applications such as news reporting, medical archiving, or legal usages. The proposed technique could be applied to Color Images as well as to Gray Scale ones. Using Computer Generated Hologram watermarking, the embedded mark could be easily recovered by means of a Fourier Transform. Due to this fact host image can be tampered and watermarked with the same holographic pattern. To avoid this possibility we have introduced an encryption method using a asymmetric Cryptography. The proposed schema is based on the knowledge of original mark from the Authentication

  2. Robust-yet-fragile nature of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fei; Xia, Yongxiang; Wei, Zhi

    2015-05-01

    Interdependent networks have been shown to be extremely vulnerable based on the percolation model. Parshani et al. [Europhys. Lett. 92, 68002 (2010), 10.1209/0295-5075/92/68002] further indicated that the more intersimilar networks are, the more robust they are to random failures. When traffic load is considered, how do the coupling patterns impact cascading failures in interdependent networks? This question has been largely unexplored until now. In this paper, we address this question by investigating the robustness of interdependent Erdös-Rényi random graphs and Barabási-Albert scale-free networks under either random failures or intentional attacks. It is found that interdependent Erdös-Rényi random graphs are robust yet fragile under either random failures or intentional attacks. Interdependent Barabási-Albert scale-free networks, however, are only robust yet fragile under random failures but fragile under intentional attacks. We further analyze the interdependent communication network and power grid and achieve similar results. These results advance our understanding of how interdependency shapes network robustness.

  3. RTEL1 Inhibits Trinucleotide Repeat Expansions and Fragility

    PubMed Central

    Frizzell, Aisling; Nguyen, Jennifer H.G.; Petalcorin, Mark I.R.; Turner, Katherine D.; Boulton, Simon J.; Freudenreich, Catherine H.; Lahue, Robert S.

    2018-01-01

    SUMMARY Human RTEL1 is an essential, multifunctional helicase that maintains telomeres, regulates homologous recombination, and helps prevent bone marrow failure. Here, we show that RTEL1 also blocks trinucleotide repeat expansions, the causal mutation for 17 neurological diseases. Increased expansion frequencies of (CTG·CAG) repeats occurred in human cells following knockdown of RTEL1, but not the alternative helicase Fbh1, and purified RTEL1 efficiently unwound triplet repeat hairpins in vitro. The expansion-blocking activity of RTEL1 also required Rad18 and HLTF, homologs of yeast Rad18 and Rad5. These findings are reminiscent of budding yeast Srs2, which inhibits expansions, unwinds hairpins, and prevents triplet-repeat-induced chromosome fragility. Accordingly, we found expansions and fragility were suppressed in yeast srs2 mutants expressing RTEL1, but not Fbh1. We propose that RTEL1 serves as a human analog of Srs2 to inhibit (CTG·CAG) repeat expansions and fragility, likely by unwinding problematic hairpins. PMID:24561255

  4. RTEL1 inhibits trinucleotide repeat expansions and fragility.

    PubMed

    Frizzell, Aisling; Nguyen, Jennifer H G; Petalcorin, Mark I R; Turner, Katherine D; Boulton, Simon J; Freudenreich, Catherine H; Lahue, Robert S

    2014-03-13

    Human RTEL1 is an essential, multifunctional helicase that maintains telomeres, regulates homologous recombination, and helps prevent bone marrow failure. Here, we show that RTEL1 also blocks trinucleotide repeat expansions, the causal mutation for 17 neurological diseases. Increased expansion frequencies of (CTG⋅CAG) repeats occurred in human cells following knockdown of RTEL1, but not the alternative helicase Fbh1, and purified RTEL1 efficiently unwound triplet repeat hairpins in vitro. The expansion-blocking activity of RTEL1 also required Rad18 and HLTF, homologs of yeast Rad18 and Rad5. These findings are reminiscent of budding yeast Srs2, which inhibits expansions, unwinds hairpins, and prevents triplet-repeat-induced chromosome fragility. Accordingly, we found expansions and fragility were suppressed in yeast srs2 mutants expressing RTEL1, but not Fbh1. We propose that RTEL1 serves as a human analog of Srs2 to inhibit (CTG⋅CAG) repeat expansions and fragility, likely by unwinding problematic hairpins. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Do Individuals with Fragile X Syndrome Show Developmental Stuttering or Not? Comment on "Speech Fluency in Fragile X Syndrome" by Van Borsel, Dor and Rondal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Van Borsel, Dor, and Rondal (2007) examined the speech of seven boys and two young male adults with fragile X syndrome and considered whether their speech was comparable to that reported in the developmental stuttering literature. They listed five criteria which led them to conclude that the speech patterns of speakers with fragile X syndrome…

  6. Cresyl Saligenin Phosphate, an Organophosphorus Toxicant, Makes Covalent Adducts with Histidine, Lysine and Tyrosine Residues of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Liyasova, Mariya S.; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2012-01-01

    CBDP (2-(2-cresyl)-4H-1-3-2-benzodioxaphosphorin-2-oxide) is a toxic organophosphorus compound. It is generated in vivo from tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate (TOCP), a component of jet engine oil and hydraulic fluids. Exposure to TOCP was proven to occur on board aircraft by finding CBDP-derived phospho-butyrylcholinesterase in the blood of passengers. Adducts on BChE however do not explain the toxicity of CBDP. Critical target proteins of CBDP are yet to be identified. Our goal was to facilitate the search for the critical targets of CBDP by determining the range of amino acid residues capable of reacting with CBDP and characterizing the types of adducts formed. We used human albumin as a model protein. Mass spectral analysis of the tryptic digest of CBDP-treated human albumin revealed adducts on His-67, His-146, His-242, His-247, His-338, Tyr-138, Tyr-140, Lys-199, Lys-351, Lys-414, Lys-432, Lys-525. Adducts formed on tyrosine residues were different from those formed on histidines and lysines. Tyrosines were organophosphorylated by CBDP, while histidine and lysine residues were alkylated. This is the first report of an organophosphorus compound with both phosphorylating and alkylating properties. The hydroxybenzyl adduct on histidine is novel. The ability of CBDP to form stable adducts on histidine, tyrosine and lysine allows one to consider new mechanisms of toxicity from TOCP exposure. PMID:22793878

  7. Cresyl saligenin phosphate, an organophosphorus toxicant, makes covalent adducts with histidine, lysine, and tyrosine residues of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Liyasova, Mariya S; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Lockridge, Oksana

    2012-08-20

    CBDP [2-(2-cresyl)-4H-1-3-2-benzodioxaphosphorin-2-oxide] is a toxic organophosphorus compound. It is generated in vivo from tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate (TOCP), a component of jet engine oil and hydraulic fluids. Exposure to TOCP was proven to occur on board aircraft by finding CBDP-derived phospho-butyrylcholinesterase in the blood of passengers. Adducts on BChE, however, do not explain the toxicity of CBDP. Critical target proteins of CBDP are yet to be identified. Our goal was to facilitate the search for the critical targets of CBDP by determining the range of amino acid residues capable of reacting with CBDP and characterizing the types of adducts formed. We used human albumin as a model protein. Mass spectral analysis of the tryptic digest of CBDP-treated human albumin revealed adducts on His-67, His-146, His-242, His-247, His-338, Tyr-138, Tyr-140, Lys-199, Lys-351, Lys-414, Lys-432, and Lys-525. Adducts formed on tyrosine residues were different from those formed on histidines and lysines. Tyrosines were organophosphorylated by CBDP, while histidine and lysine residues were alkylated. This is the first report of an organophosphorus compound with both phosphorylating and alkylating properties. The o-hydroxybenzyl adduct on histidine is novel. The ability of CBDP to form stable adducts on histidine, tyrosine, and lysine allows one to consider new mechanisms of toxicity from TOCP exposure.

  8. Chromium III histidinate exposure modulates antioxidant gene expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While the toxicity of hexavalent chromium is well established, trivalent Cr (Cr(III)) is an essential nutrient involved in insulin and glucose homeostasis. Recently, antioxidant effects of chromium (III) histidinate (Cr(III)His) were reported in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress...

  9. Functions and ATP-binding responses of the twelve histidine residues in the TF1-ATPase beta subunit.

    PubMed

    Tozawa, K; Yagi, H; Hisamatsu, K; Ozawa, K; Yoshida, M; Akutsu, H

    2001-10-01

    The C2 proton signals of all (twelve) histidine residues of the TF1 beta subunit in the 1H-NMR spectrum have been identified and assigned by means of pH change experiments and site-directed substitution of histidines by glutamines. pH and ligand titration experiments were carried out for these signals. Furthermore, the ATPase activity of the reconstituted alpha3beta3gamma complex was examined for the twelve mutant beta subunits. Two of three conserved histidines, namely, His-119 and 324, were found to be important for expression of the ATPase activity. The former fixes the N-terminal domain to the central domain. His-324 is involved in the formation of the interface essential for the alpha3beta3gamma complex assembly. The other conserved residue, His-363, showed a very low pK(a), suggesting that it is involved in the tertiary structure formation. On the binding of a nucleotide, only the signals of His-173, 179, 200, and 324 shifted. These histidines are located in the hinge region, and its proximity, of the beta subunit. This observation provided further support for the conformational change of the beta monomer from the open to the closed form on the binding of a nucleotide proposed by us [Yagi et al. (1999) Biophys. J. 77, 2175-2183]. This conformational change should be one of the essential driving forces in the rotation of the alpha3beta3gamma complex.

  10. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  11. Dendritic spine instability and insensitivity to modulation by sensory experience in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Aldridge, Georgina M; Greenough, William T; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2010-10-12

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of mental retardation and is caused by transcriptional inactivation of the X-linked fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. FXS is associated with increased density and abnormal morphology of dendritic spines, the postsynaptic sites of the majority of excitatory synapses. To better understand how lack of the FMR1 gene function affects spine development and plasticity, we examined spine formation and elimination of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the whisker barrel cortex of Fmr1 KO mice with a transcranial two-photon imaging technique. We found that the rates of spine formation and elimination over days to weeks were significantly higher in both young and adult KO mice compared with littermate controls. The heightened spine turnover in KO mice was due to the existence of a larger pool of "short-lived" new spines in KO mice than in controls. Furthermore, we found that the formation of new spines and the elimination of existing ones were less sensitive to modulation by sensory experience in KO mice. These results indicate that the loss of Fmr1 gene function leads to ongoing overproduction of transient spines in the primary somatosensory cortex. The insensitivity of spine formation and elimination to sensory alterations in Fmr1 KO mice suggest that the developing synaptic circuits may not be properly tuned by sensory stimuli in FXS.

  12. Histidine-rich stabilized polyplexes for cMet-directed tumor-targeted gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Petra; Lächelt, Ulrich; Herrmann, Annika; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Döblinger, Markus; He, Dongsheng; Krhač Levačić, Ana; Morys, Stephan; Bräuchle, Christoph; Wagner, Ernst

    2015-03-01

    Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing terminal cysteines for redox-sensitive polyplex stabilization, were assembled by solid-phase supported syntheses. The resulting oligomers exhibited a greatly enhanced cellular uptake and gene transfer over non-targeted control sequences, confirming the efficacy and target-specificity of the formed polyplexes. Implementation of endosomal escape-promoting histidines in the cationic core was required for gene expression without additional endosomolytic agent. The histidine-enriched polyplexes demonstrated stability in serum as well as receptor-specific gene transfer in vivo upon intratumoral injection. The co-formulation with an analogous PEG-free cationic oligomer led to a further compaction of pDNA polyplexes with an obvious change of shape as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Such compaction was critically required for efficient intravenous gene delivery which resulted in greatly enhanced, cMBP2 ligand-dependent gene expression in the distant tumor.Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing

  13. Histidine-derived nontoxic nitrogen-doped carbon dots for sensing and bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Li, Chunguang; Zhu, Shoujun; Wang, Hailong; Chen, Cailing; Wang, Zhaorui; Bai, Tianyu; Shi, Zhan; Feng, Shouhua

    2014-11-18

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) were prepared by a one-pot microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment using histidine as the sole carbon source in the absence of acid, alkali, or metal ions. With a diameter of 2-5 nm, the synthesized CDs had apparent lattice fringes and exhibited an excitation-dependent photoluminescent behavior. The CDs were highly yielded, well-dispersed in aqueous solution, and showed high photostability in the solutions of a wide range of pH and salinity. They were used as probes to identify the presence of Fe(3+) ions with a detection limit of 10 nM. With confirmed nontoxicity, these CDs could enter the cancer cells, indicating a practical potential for cellular imaging and labeling.

  14. The catalytic effect of L- and D-histidine on alanine and lysine peptide formation.

    PubMed

    Fitz, Daniel; Jakschitz, Thomas; Rode, Bernd M

    2008-12-01

    A starting phase of chemical evolution on our ancient Earth around 4 billion years ago was the formation of amino acids and their combination to peptides and proteins. The salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction has been shown to be appropriate for this condensation reaction under moderate and plausible primitive Earth conditions, forming short peptides from amino acids in aqueous solution containing sodium chloride and Cu(II) ions. In this paper we report results about the formation of dialanine and dilysine from their monomers in this reaction. The catalytic influence of l- and d-histidine dramatically increases dialanine yields when starting from lower alanine concentrations, but also dilysine formation is markedly boosted by these catalysts. Attention is paid to measurable preferences for one enantiomeric form of alanine and lysine in the SIPF reaction. Alanine, especially, shows stereospecific behaviour, mostly in favour of the l-form.

  15. Quantum Chemical Mass Spectrometry: Verification and Extension of the Mobile Proton Model for Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cautereels, Julie; Blockhuys, Frank

    2017-06-01

    The quantum chemical mass spectrometry for materials science (QCMS2) method is used to verify the proposed mechanism for proton transfer - the Mobile Proton Model (MPM) - by histidine for ten XHS tripeptides, based on quantum chemical calculations at the DFT/B3LYP/6-311+G* level of theory. The fragmentations of the different intermediate structures in the MPM mechanism are studied within the QCMS2 framework, and the energetics of the proposed mechanism itself and those of the fragmentations of the intermediate structures are compared, leading to the computational confirmation of the MPM. In addition, the calculations suggest that the mechanism should be extended from considering only the formation of five-membered ring intermediates to include larger-ring intermediates. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. [Low-frequency vibrations of a Mg pyropheophorbide-histidine complex].

    PubMed

    Klevanic, A V; Shuvalov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The spectrum of vibrations and normal model for the Mg piropheophorbide-histidine complex was calculated using the MNDO-PM3 (MOPAC) semiempirical quantum chemical method. The delocalization index and the distribution function were introduced to describe the shape of normal vibrations. The greatest part (approximately 65%) of the low-frequency vibrations (1-400 cm-1) was shown to delocalize over both the His and Mg piropheophorbide molecules. Leu, Met, and Asp were also studied as the fifth ligand to the Mg piropheophorbide molecule. It is concluded that the fifth amino acid ligand to porphyrin molecules causes marked geometrical distortions in porphyrin, and induces a new, compared to four coordinated pigment, spectrum of normal modes.

  17. Autism and heritable bone fragility: A true association?

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Meena; Jones, Rebecca; Milne, Elizabeth; Marshall, Charlotte; Arundel, Paul; Smith, Kath; Bishop, Nicholas J

    2018-06-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous condition mainly characterised by bone fragility; intelligence is reported to be normal. However, a minority of children seen also show symptomology consistent with an 'Autism Spectrum Disorder'. A joint genetics and psychology research study was undertaken to identify these patients using 'Gold Standard' research tools: Autism Diagnostic Inventory Revised (ADI-R); Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and undertake genetic analyses in them. A cohort of n  = 7 children with autistic traits and severe/complex OI were recruited to the study. The study was set-up to explore whether there was a genetic link between bone fragility and autism in a sub-set of patients with bone fragility identified with autism traits in our complex/severe OI clinic. This was not set-up as a prevalence study but rather an exploration of genetics in association with ADI/ADOS confirmed ASD and bone fragility. Standardised tools were used to confirm autism diagnosis. ADI and ADOS were completed by the Clinical Psychologist; ADI comprises a 93 item semi-structured clinical review with a diagnostic algorithm diagnosing Autism; ADOS is a semi-structured assessment of socialisation, communication and play/imagination which also provides a diagnostic algorithm. In patients recruited, those that fulfilled research criteria for diagnosis of autism using above tools were recruited to trio whole exome sequencing (WES). one patient had compound heterozygous variants in NBAS ; one patient had a variant in NRX1 ; one patient had a maternally inherited PLS3 variant; all the other patients in this cohort had pathogenic variants in COL1A1/COL1A2 . Although, not set out as an objective, we were able to establish that identifying autism had important clinical and social benefits for patients and their families in ensuring access to services, appropriate schooling, increased understanding of behaviour and support. It is important for clinicians

  18. The Efficacy of Melatonin for Sleep Problems in Children with Autism, Fragile X Syndrome, or Autism and Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wirojanan, Juthamas; Jacquemont, Sebastien; Diaz, Rafael; Bacalman, Susan; Anders, Thomas F.; Hagerman, Randi J.; Goodlin-Jones, Beth L.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the efficacy of melatonin on sleep problems in children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and fragile X syndrome (FXS). Methods: A 4-week, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design was conducted following a 1-week baseline period. Either melatonin, 3 mg, or placebo was given to participants for 2 weeks and then alternated for another 2 weeks. Sleep variables, including sleep duration, sleep-onset time, sleep-onset latency time, and the number of night awakenings, were recorded using an Actiwatch and from sleep diaries completed by parents. All participants had been thoroughly assessed for ASD and also had DNA testing for the diagnosis of FXS. Results: Data were successfully obtained from the 12 of 18 subjects who completed the study (11 males, age range 2 to 15.25 years, mean 5.47, SD 3.6). Five participants met diagnostic criteria for ASD, 3 for FXS alone, 3 for FXS and ASD, and 1 for fragile X premutation. Eight out of 12 had melatonin first. The conclusions from a nonparametric repeated-measures technique indicate that mean night sleep duration was longer on melatonin than placebo by 21 minutes (p = .02), mean sleep-onset latency was shorter by 28 minutes (p = .0001), and mean sleep-onset time was earlier by 42 minutes (p = .02). Conclusion: The results of this study support the efficacy and tolerability of melatonin treatment for sleep problems in children with ASD and FXS. Citation: Wirojanan J; Jacquemont S; Diaz R; Bacalman S; Anders TF; Hagerman RJ; Goodlin-Jones BL. The Efficacy of Melatonin for Sleep Problems in Children with Autism, Fragile X Syndrome, or Autism and Fragile X Syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(2):145-150. PMID:19968048

  19. Mechanisms of High Temperature Resistance of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: An Impact of Histidine Kinase 34.

    PubMed

    Červený, Jan; Sinetova, Maria A; Zavřel, Tomáš; Los, Dmitry A

    2015-03-02

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a widely used model cyanobacterium for studying responses and acclimation to different abiotic stresses. Changes in transcriptome, proteome, lipidome, and photosynthesis in response to short term heat stress are well studied in this organism, and histidine kinase 34 (Hik34) is shown to play an important role in mediating such response. Corresponding data on long term responses, however, are fragmentary and vary depending on parameters of experiments and methods of data collection, and thus are hard to compare. In order to elucidate how the early stress responses help cells to sustain long-term heat stress, as well as the role of Hik34 in prolonged acclimation, we examined the resistance to long-term heat stress of wild-type and ΔHik34 mutant of Synechocystis. In this work, we were able to precisely control the long term experimental conditions by cultivating Synechocystis in automated photobioreactors, measuring selected physiological parameters within a time range of minutes. In addition, morphological and ultrastructural changes in cells were analyzed and western blotting of individual proteins was used to study the heat stress-affected protein expression. We have shown that the majority of wild type cell population was able to recover after 24 h of cultivation at 44 °C. In contrast, while ΔHik34 mutant cells were resistant to heat stress within its first hours, they could not recover after 24 h long high temperature treatment. We demonstrated that the early induction of HspA expression and maintenance of high amount of other HSPs throughout the heat incubation is critical for successful adaptation to long-term stress. In addition, it appears that histidine kinase Hik34 is an essential component for the long term high temperature resistance.

  20. Changes at the KinA PAS-A Dimerization Interface Influence Histidine Kinase Function

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, James; Tomchick, Diana R.; Brautigam, Chad A.

    2008-11-12

    The Bacillus subtilis KinA protein is a histidine protein kinase that controls the commitment of this organism to sporulate in response to nutrient deprivation and several other conditions. Prior studies indicated that the N-terminal Per-ARNT-Sim domain (PAS-A) plays a critical role in the catalytic activity of this enzyme, as demonstrated by the significant decrease of the autophosphorylation rate of a KinA protein lacking this domain. On the basis of the environmental sensing role played by PAS domains in a wide range of proteins, including other bacterial sensor kinases, it has been suggested that the PAS-A domain plays an important regulatorymore » role in KinA function. We have investigated this potential by using a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods to examine PAS-A structure and function, both in isolation and within the intact protein. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of the KinA PAS-A domain, showing that it crystallizes as a homodimer using {beta}-sheet/{beta}-sheet packing interactions as observed for several other PAS domain complexes. Notably, we observed two dimers with tertiary and quaternary structure differences in the crystalline lattice, indicating significant structural flexibility in these domains. To confirm that KinA PAS-A also forms dimers in solution, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy, gel filtration chromatography, and analytical ultracentrifugation, the results of which are all consistent with the crystallographic results. We experimentally tested the importance of several residues at the dimer interface using site-directed mutagenesis, finding changes in the PAS-A domain that significantly alter KinA enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo. These results support the importance of PAS domains within KinA and other histidine kinases and suggest possible routes for natural or artificial regulation of kinase activity.« less

  1. Histidine at Position 195 is Essential for Association of Heme- b in Lcp1VH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetermann, Sylvia; Vivod, Robin; Hiessl, Sebastian; Hogeback, Jens; Holtkamp, Michael; Karst, Uwe; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2018-05-01

    The latex clearing protein (Lcp) is the key enzyme of polyisoprene degradation in actinomycetes (Yikmis and Steinbüchel in Appl Environ Microbiol 78:4543-4551, https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00001-12 , 2012). In this study it was shown that Lcp from Gordonia polyisoprenivorans VH2 (Lcp1VH2) harbors a non-covalently bound heme b as cofactor, which was identified by pyridine hemochrome spectra and confirmed by LC/ESI-ToF-MS. It contains iron, most likely in the Fe3+ state. We focused on the characterization of the heme-cofactor, its accessibility with respect to the conformation of Lcp1VH2, and the identification of putative histidine residues involved in the coordination of heme. A change was detectable in UV/Vis-spectra of reduced Lcp1VH2 when imidazole was added, showing that Lcp1VH2 "as isolated" occurs in an open state, directly being accessible for external ligands. In addition, three highly conserved histidines (H195, H200 and H228), presumably acting as ligands coordinating the heme within the heme pocket, were replaced with alanines by site-directed mutagenesis. The effect of these changes on in vivo rubber-mineralization was investigated. The lcp- deletion mutant complemented with the H195A variant of lcp1 VH2 was unable to mineralize poly( cis-1,4-isoprene). In vitro analyses of purified, recombinant Lcp1VH2H195A confirmed the loss of enzyme activity, which could be ascribed to the loss of heme. Hence, H195 is essential for the association of heme- b in the central region of Lcp1VH2.

  2. Employment impact and financial burden for families of children with fragile X syndrome: findings from the National Fragile X Survey.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, L; Grosse, S; Raspa, M; Bailey, D

    2010-10-01

    The employment impact and financial burden experienced by families of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) has not been quantified in the USA. Using a national fragile X family survey, we analysed data on 1019 families with at least one child who had a full FXS mutation. Out-of-pocket expenditures related to fragile X were reported. We used logistic regression to examine the role of insurance, number of affected children, and number of total co-occurring conditions in predicting the financial burden and employment impact of FXS, while adjusting for race, education, marital status and other sociodemographic predictors. Almost half of families affected by FXS reported that they had experienced an increased financial burden and nearly 60% stated that they had had to change work hours or stop work because of FXS. Families with health insurance that met family needs were significantly less likely to report an excess financial burden. The type of insurance (private or public) was not associated with the reported financial burden. Affected children's mutation status, especially male children with the full mutation, was associated with employment impact. The total number of co-occurring conditions was associated with both financial burden and employment impact. Families affected by FXS experienced a significant employment impact and financial burden. Policies designed to help families with FXS need to take into consideration the dimension of co-occurring conditions. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Seismic Fragility Analysis of a Degraded Condensate Storage Tank

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.

    2011-05-16

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Brookhaven National Laboratory are conducting a collaborative research project to develop seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the goals of this collaboration endeavor is to develop seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The essential part of this collaboration is aimed at achieving a better understanding of the effects of aging on the performance of SSCs and ultimately on the safety of NPPs. A recent search of the degradation occurrences ofmore » structures and passive components (SPCs) showed that the rate of aging related degradation in NPPs was not significantly large but increasing, as the plants get older. The slow but increasing rate of degradation of SPCs can potentially affect the safety of the older plants and become an important factor in decision making in the current trend of extending the operating license period of the plants (e.g., in the U.S. from 40 years to 60 years, and even potentially to 80 years). The condition and performance of major aged NPP structures such as the containment contributes to the life span of a plant. A frequent misconception of such low degradation rate of SPCs is that such degradation may not pose significant risk to plant safety. However, under low probability high consequence initiating events, such as large earthquakes, SPCs that have slowly degraded over many years could potentially affect plant safety and these effects need to be better understood. As part of the KAERI-BNL collaboration, a condensate storage tank (CST) was analyzed to estimate its seismic fragility capacities under various postulated degradation scenarios. CSTs were shown to have a significant impact on the seismic core damage frequency of a nuclear power plant. The seismic fragility capacity of the CST was

  4. Mercury(II) binds to both of chymotrypsin's histidines, causing inhibition followed by irreversible denaturation/aggregation.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Amanda; Ericksen, Matthew; Harris, Travis V; Symmonds, Nick; Silverstein, Todd P

    2017-02-01

    The toxicity of mercury is often attributed to its tight binding to cysteine thiolate anions in vital enzymes. To test our hypothesis that Hg(II) binding to histidine could be a significant factor in mercury's toxic effects, we studied the enzyme chymotrypsin, which lacks free cysteine thiols; we found that chymotrypsin is not only inhibited, but also denatured by Hg(II). We followed the aggregation of denatured enzyme by the increase in visible absorbance due to light scattering. Hg(II)-induced chymotrypsin precipitation increased dramatically above pH 6.5, and free imidazole inhibited this precipitation, implicating histidine-Hg(II) binding in the process of chymotrypsin denaturation/aggregation. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) blocked chymotrypsin's two histidines (his 40 and his 57 ) quickly and completely, with an IC 50 of 35 ± 6 µM. DEPC at 350 µM reduced the hydrolytic activity of chymotrypsin by 90%, suggesting that low concentrations of DEPC react with his 57 at the active site catalytic triad; furthermore, DEPC below 400 µM enhanced the Hg(II)-induced precipitation of chymotrypsin. We conclude that his 57 reacts readily with DEPC, causing enzyme inhibition and enhancement of Hg(II)-induced aggregation. Above 500 µM, DEPC inhibited Hg(II)-induced precipitation, and [DEPC] >2.5 mM completely protected chymotrypsin against precipitation. This suggests that his 40 reacts less readily with DEPC, and that chymotrypsin denaturation is caused by Hg(II) binding specifically to the his 40 residue. Finally, we show that Hg(II)-histidine binding may trigger hemoglobin aggregation as well. Because of results with these two enzymes, we suggest that metal-histidine binding may be key to understanding all heavy metal-induced protein aggregation. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  5. Genetic Removal of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Rescues the Symptoms of Fragile X Syndrome in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Harpreet; Dansie, Lorraine E.; Hickmott, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Fmr1 knock-out (ko) mice display key features of fragile X syndrome (FXS), including delayed dendritic spine maturation and FXS-associated behaviors, such as poor socialization, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and hyperactivity. Here we provide conclusive evidence that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is necessary to the development of FXS-associated defects in Fmr1 ko mice. Genetic disruption of Mmp-9 rescued key aspects of Fmr1 deficiency, including dendritic spine abnormalities, abnormal mGluR5-dependent LTD, as well as aberrant behaviors in open field and social novelty tests. Remarkably, MMP-9 deficiency also corrected non-neural features of Fmr1 deficiency—specifically macroorchidism—indicating that MMP-9 dysregulation contributes to FXS-associated abnormalities outside the CNS. Further, MMP-9 deficiency suppressed elevations of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E phosphorylation seen in Fmr1 ko mice, which are also associated with other autistic spectrum disorders. These findings establish that MMP-9 is critical to the mechanisms responsible for neural and non-neural aspects of the FXS phenotype. PMID:25057190

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhapsmore » reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.« less

  7. Selective Disruption of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5-Homer Interactions Mimics Phenotypes of Fragile X Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weirui; Molinaro, Gemma; Collins, Katie A.; Hays, Seth A.; Paylor, Richard; Worley, Paul F.; Szumlinski, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    Altered function of the Gq-coupled, Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, specifically mGlu5, is implicated in multiple mouse models of autism and intellectual disability. mGlu5 dysfunction has been most well characterized in the fragile X syndrome mouse model, the Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mouse, where pharmacological and genetic reduction of mGlu5 reverses many phenotypes. mGlu5 is less associated with its scaffolding protein Homer in Fmr1 KO mice, and restoration of mGlu5-Homer interactions by genetic deletion of a short, dominant negative of Homer, H1a, rescues many phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice. These results suggested that disruption of mGlu5-Homer leads to phenotypes of FXS. To test this idea, we examined mice with a knockin mutation of mGlu5 (F1128R; mGlu5R/R) that abrogates binding to Homer. Although FMRP levels were normal, mGlu5R/R mice mimicked multiple phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice, including reduced mGlu5 association with the postsynaptic density, enhanced constitutive mGlu5 signaling to protein synthesis, deficits in agonist-induced translational control, protein synthesis-independent LTD, neocortical hyperexcitability, audiogenic seizures, and altered behaviors, including anxiety and sensorimotor gating. These results reveal new roles for the Homer scaffolds in regulation of mGlu5 function and implicate a specific molecular mechanism in a complex brain disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Abnormal function of the metabotropic, or Gq-coupled, glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including a genetic cause of intellectual disability and autism called fragile X syndrome. In brains of a mouse model of fragile X, mGlu5 is less associated with its binding partner Homer, a scaffolding protein that regulates mGlu5 localization to synapses and its ability to activate biochemical signaling pathways. Here we show that a mouse expressing a mutant mGlu5 that cannot bind to Homer is sufficient to mimic many of the biochemical

  8. Selective Disruption of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5-Homer Interactions Mimics Phenotypes of Fragile X Syndrome in Mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weirui; Molinaro, Gemma; Collins, Katie A; Hays, Seth A; Paylor, Richard; Worley, Paul F; Szumlinski, Karen K; Huber, Kimberly M

    2016-02-17

    Altered function of the Gq-coupled, Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, specifically mGlu5, is implicated in multiple mouse models of autism and intellectual disability. mGlu5 dysfunction has been most well characterized in the fragile X syndrome mouse model, the Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mouse, where pharmacological and genetic reduction of mGlu5 reverses many phenotypes. mGlu5 is less associated with its scaffolding protein Homer in Fmr1 KO mice, and restoration of mGlu5-Homer interactions by genetic deletion of a short, dominant negative of Homer, H1a, rescues many phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice. These results suggested that disruption of mGlu5-Homer leads to phenotypes of FXS. To test this idea, we examined mice with a knockin mutation of mGlu5 (F1128R; mGlu5(R/R)) that abrogates binding to Homer. Although FMRP levels were normal, mGlu5(R/R) mice mimicked multiple phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice, including reduced mGlu5 association with the postsynaptic density, enhanced constitutive mGlu5 signaling to protein synthesis, deficits in agonist-induced translational control, protein synthesis-independent LTD, neocortical hyperexcitability, audiogenic seizures, and altered behaviors, including anxiety and sensorimotor gating. These results reveal new roles for the Homer scaffolds in regulation of mGlu5 function and implicate a specific molecular mechanism in a complex brain disease. Abnormal function of the metabotropic, or Gq-coupled, glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including a genetic cause of intellectual disability and autism called fragile X syndrome. In brains of a mouse model of fragile X, mGlu5 is less associated with its binding partner Homer, a scaffolding protein that regulates mGlu5 localization to synapses and its ability to activate biochemical signaling pathways. Here we show that a mouse expressing a mutant mGlu5 that cannot bind to Homer is sufficient to mimic many of the biochemical, neurophysiological, and

  9. Visual-spatial learning impairments are associated with hippocampal PSD-95 protein dysregulation in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Réno M; Kogan, Cary S; Messier, Claude; Macleod, Lindsey S

    2014-03-05

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and is caused by the lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression. In-vitro findings in mice and post-mortem autopsies in humans are characterized by dendritic spine abnormalities in the absence of Fmrp/FMRP. Biochemical and electrophysiological studies have identified postsynaptic density protein (PSD)-95 as having an established role in dendritic morphology as well as a molecular target of Fmrp. How Fmrp affects the expression of PSD-95 following behavioral learning is unknown. In the current study, wild type controls and Fmr1 knockout mice were trained in a subset of the Hebb-Williams (H-W) mazes. Dorsal hippocampal PSD-95 protein levels relative to a stable cytoskeleton protein (β-tubulin) were measured. We report a significant upregulation of PSD-95 protein levels in wild type mice, whereas training-related protein increases were blunted in Fmr1 knockout mice. In addition, there was a significant negative correlation between mean total errors on the mazes and PSD-95 protein levels. The coefficient of determination indicated that the mean total errors on the H-W mazes accounted for 35% of the variance in PSD-95 protein levels. These novel findings suggest that reduced PSD-95-associated postsynaptic plasticity may contribute to the learning and memory deficits observed in human fragile X syndrome patients.

  10. Targeted Upregulation of FMRP Expression as an Approach to the Treatment of Fragile X Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    form of autism, and a relatively common cause of epilepsy . The syndrome is caused by partial or complete silencing of the fragile X (FMR1) gene when...potential to correct ALL of the clinical domains of fragile X syndrome, including epilepsy -like activity observed for both those with FXS and carriers of...the FMR1 gene. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fragile X, autism, FMR1, FXTAS, CGG repeat, epilepsy , seizures, FMRP, PTSD, premutation, iPSC, progenitor, calcium

  11. Beyond the Factor of Safety: Developing Fragility Curves to Characterize System Reliability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    increasingly common compo- nents of flood risk assessments. This report introduces the concept of the fragility curve and shows how fragility curves are...curves are identified in the literature on structures and risk assessment to identify what methods have been used to develop fragility curves in...and disadvantages of the various approaches are considered. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising

  12. Hemorheological abnormalities in lipoprotein lipase deficient mice with severe hypertriglyceridemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Tieqiang; Guo Jun; Li Hui

    2006-03-24

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a metabolic disturbance often seen in clinical practice. It is known to induce life-threatening acute pancreatitis, but its role in atherogenesis remains elusive. Hemorheological abnormality was thought to play an important role in pathogenesis of both pancreatitis and atherosclerosis. However, hemorheology in severe HTG was not well investigated. Recently, we established a severe HTG mouse model deficient in lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in which severe HTG was observed to cause a significant increase in plasma viscosity. Disturbances of erythrocytes were also documented, including decreased deformability, electrophoresis rate, and membrane fluidity, and increased osmotic fragility. Scanning electron microscopymore » demonstrated that most erythrocytes of LPL deficient mice deformed with protrusions, irregular appearances or indistinct concaves. Analysis of erythrocyte membrane lipids showed decreased cholesterol (Ch) and phospholipid (PL) contents but unaltered Ch/PL ratio. The changes of membrane lipids may be partially responsible for the hemorheological and morphologic abnormalities of erythrocytes. This study indicated that severe HTG could lead to significant impairment of hemorheology and this model may be useful in delineating the role of severe HTG in the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis and atherosclerosis.« less

  13. Osmotic fragility changes in preserved blood: measurements by coil planet centrifuge and parpart methods.

    PubMed

    Sasakawa, S; Tokunaga, E; Hasegawa, G; Nakagawa, S

    1977-09-01

    The coil planet centrifuge (CPC) can be used to measure the osmotic fragility of erythrocytes. Fragility measured by this method alters when different salts are used. The CPC and Parpart methods were used to measure the changes during storage in red cell osmotic fragility in ACD or CPD blood with or without adenine. More marked changes were detected by the CPC method, especially in old cells. The changes of fragility of erythrocytes during storage seem to occur mainly in old cells. Adenine is effective in preventing such changes.

  14. Improved Iris Recognition through Fusion of Hamming Distance and Fragile Bit Distance.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Karen P; Bowyer, Kevin W; Flynn, Patrick J

    2011-12-01

    The most common iris biometric algorithm represents the texture of an iris using a binary iris code. Not all bits in an iris code are equally consistent. A bit is deemed fragile if its value changes across iris codes created from different images of the same iris. Previous research has shown that iris recognition performance can be improved by masking these fragile bits. Rather than ignoring fragile bits completely, we consider what beneficial information can be obtained from the fragile bits. We find that the locations of fragile bits tend to be consistent across different iris codes of the same eye. We present a metric, called the fragile bit distance, which quantitatively measures the coincidence of the fragile bit patterns in two iris codes. We find that score fusion of fragile bit distance and Hamming distance works better for recognition than Hamming distance alone. To our knowledge, this is the first and only work to use the coincidence of fragile bit locations to improve the accuracy of matches.

  15. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003242.htm Abnormally dark or light skin To use the sharing features ... The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the degree of ...

  16. A simplified fragility analysis of fan type cable stayed bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, R. A.; Datta, T. K.; Ahmad, S.

    2005-06-01

    A simplified fragility analysis of fan type cable stayed bridges using Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) procedure is presented for determining their failure probability under random ground motion. Seismic input to the bridge support is considered to be a risk consistent response spectrum which is obtained from a separate analysis. For the response analysis, the bridge deck is modeles as a beam supported on spring at different points. The stiffnesses of the springs are determined by a separate 2D static analysis of cable-tower-deck system. The analysis provides a coupled stiffness matrix for the spring system. A continuum method of analysis using dynamic stiffness is used to determine the dynamic properties of the bridges. The response of the bridge deck is obtained by the response spectrum method of analysis as applied to multidegree of freedom system which duly takes into account the quasi-static component of bridge deck vibration. The fragility analysis includes uncertainties arising due to the variation in ground motion, material property, modeling, method of analysis, ductility factor and damage concentration effect. Probability of failure of the bridge deck is determined by the First Order Second Moment (FOSM) method of reliability. A three span double plane symmetrical fan type cable stayed bridge of total span 689 m, is used as an illustrative example. The fragility curves for the bridge deck failure are obtained under a number of parametric variations. Some of the important conclusions of the study indicate that (i) not only vertical component but also the horizontal component of ground motion has considerable effect on the probability of failure; (ii) ground motion with no time lag between support excitations provides a smaller probability of failure as compared to ground motion with very large time lag between support excitation; and (iii) probability of failure may considerably increase soft soil condition.

  17. Primary Retrograde Tibiotalocalcaneal Nailing For Fragility Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Benjamin C; Hansen, Dane C; Harrison, Ryan; Lucas, Douglas E; Degenova, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ankle fragility fractures are difficult to treat due to poor bone quality and soft tissues as well as the near ubiquitous presence of comorbidities including diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Conventional open reduction and internal fixation in this population has been shown to lead to a significant rate of complications. Given the high rate of complications with contemporary fixation methods, the present study aims to critically evaluate the use of acute hindfoot nailing as a percutaneous fixation technique for high-risk ankle fragility fractures. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated 31 patients treated with primary retrograde tibiotalocalcaneal nail without joint preparation for a mean of 13.6 months postoperatively from an urban Level I trauma center during the years 2006-2012. Overall, there were two superficial infections (6.5%) and three deep infections (9.7%) in the series. There were 28 (90.3%) patients that went on to radiographic union at a mean of 22.2 weeks with maintenance of foot and ankle alignment. There were three cases of asymptomatic screw breakage observed at a mean of 18.3 months postoperatively, which were all treated conservatively.. This study shows that retrograde hindfoot nailing is an acceptable treatment option for treatment of ankle fragility fractures. Hindfoot nailing allows early weightbearing, limited soft tissue injury, and a relatively low rate of complications, all of which are advantages to conventional open reduction internal fixation techniques. Given these findings, larger prospective randomized trials comparing this treatment with conventional open reduction internal fixation techniques are warranted.

  18. Synaptic vesicle dynamic changes in a model of fragile X.

    PubMed

    Broek, Jantine A C; Lin, Zhanmin; de Gruiter, H Martijn; van 't Spijker, Heleen; Haasdijk, Elize D; Cox, David; Ozcan, Sureyya; van Cappellen, Gert W A; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Willemsen, Rob; de Zeeuw, Chris I; Bahn, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a single-gene disorder that is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and the most frequent monogenic cause of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). FXS is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats in the promoter region of the fragile X mental retardation gene (Fmr1). This leads to a lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which regulates translation of a wide range of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The extent of expression level alterations of synaptic proteins affected by FMRP loss and their consequences on synaptic dynamics in FXS has not been fully investigated. Here, we used an Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying FXS by monitoring protein expression changes using shotgun label-free liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS(E)) in brain tissue and synaptosome fractions. FXS-associated candidate proteins were validated using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in synaptosome fractions for targeted protein quantification. Furthermore, functional alterations in synaptic release and dynamics were evaluated using live-cell imaging, and interpretation of synaptic dynamics differences was investigated using electron microscopy. Key findings relate to altered levels of proteins involved in GABA-signalling, especially in the cerebellum. Further exploration using microscopy studies found reduced synaptic vesicle unloading of hippocampal neurons and increased vesicle unloading in cerebellar neurons, which suggests a general decrease of synaptic transmission. Our findings suggest that FMRP is a regulator of synaptic vesicle dynamics, which supports the role of FMRP in presynaptic functions. Taken together, these studies provide novel insights into the molecular changes associated with FXS.

  19. Primary Retrograde Tibiotalocalcaneal Nailing For Fragility Ankle Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin C.; Hansen, Dane C.; Harrison, Ryan; Lucas, Douglas E; Degenova, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Ankle fragility fractures are difficult to treat due to poor bone quality and soft tissues as well as the near ubiquitous presence of comorbidities including diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Conventional open reduction and internal fixation in this population has been shown to lead to a significant rate of complications. Given the high rate of complications with contemporary fixation methods, the present study aims to critically evaluate the use of acute hindfoot nailing as a percutaneous fixation technique for high-risk ankle fragility fractures. Methods In this study, we retrospectively evaluated 31 patients treated with primary retrograde tibiotalocalcaneal nail without joint preparation for a mean of 13.6 months postoperatively from an urban Level I trauma center during the years 2006-2012. Results Overall, there were two superficial infections (6.5%) and three deep infections (9.7%) in the series. There were 28 (90.3%) patients that went on to radiographic union at a mean of 22.2 weeks with maintenance of foot and ankle alignment. There were three cases of asymptomatic screw breakage observed at a mean of 18.3 months postoperatively, which were all treated conservatively.. Conclusions This study shows that retrograde hindfoot nailing is an acceptable treatment option for treatment of ankle fragility fractures. Hindfoot nailing allows early weightbearing, limited soft tissue injury, and a relatively low rate of complications, all of which are advantages to conventional open reduction internal fixation techniques. Given these findings, larger prospective randomized trials comparing this treatment with conventional open reduction internal fixation techniques are warranted. PMID:27528840

  20. Deletion of Plasmodium falciparum Histidine-Rich Protein 2 (pfhrp2) and Histidine-Rich Protein 3 (pfhrp3) Genes in Colombian Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Murillo Solano, Claribel; Akinyi Okoth, Sheila; Abdallah, Joseph F.; Pava, Zuleima; Dorado, Erika; Incardona, Sandra; Huber, Curtis S.; Macedo de Oliveira, Alexandre; Bell, David; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Barnwell, John W.

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have analyzed the performance of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in Colombia with discrepancies in performance being attributed to a combination of factors such as parasite levels, interpretation of RDT results and/or the handling and storage of RDT kits. However, some of the inconsistencies observed with results from Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2)-based RDTs could also be explained by the deletion of the gene that encodes the protein, pfhrp2, and its structural homolog, pfhrp3, in some parasite isolates. Given that pfhrp2- and pfhrp3-negative P. falciparum isolates have been detected in the neighboring Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon regions, we hypothesized that parasites with deletions of pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 may also be present in Colombia. In this study we tested 100 historical samples collected between 1999 and 2009 from six Departments in Colombia for the presence of pfhrp2, pfhrp3 and their flanking genes. Seven neutral microsatellites were also used to determine the genetic background of these parasites. In total 18 of 100 parasite isolates were found to have deleted pfhrp2, a majority of which (14 of 18) were collected from Amazonas Department, which borders Peru and Brazil. pfhrp3 deletions were found in 52 of the100 samples collected from all regions of the country. pfhrp2 flanking genes PF3D7_0831900 and PF3D7_0831700 were deleted in 22 of 100 and in 1 of 100 samples, respectively. pfhrp3 flanking genes PF3D7_1372100 and PF3D7_1372400 were missing in 55 of 100 and in 57 of 100 samples. Structure analysis of microsatellite data indicated that Colombian samples tested in this study belonged to four clusters and they segregated mostly based on their geographic region. Most of the pfhrp2-deleted parasites were assigned to a single cluster and originated from Amazonas Department although a few pfhrp2-negative parasites originated from the other three clusters. The presence of a high proportion of pfhrp2-negative

  1. Deletion of Plasmodium falciparum Histidine-Rich Protein 2 (pfhrp2) and Histidine-Rich Protein 3 (pfhrp3) Genes in Colombian Parasites.

    PubMed

    Murillo Solano, Claribel; Akinyi Okoth, Sheila; Abdallah, Joseph F; Pava, Zuleima; Dorado, Erika; Incardona, Sandra; Huber, Curtis S; Macedo de Oliveira, Alexandre; Bell, David; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Barnwell, John W

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have analyzed the performance of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in Colombia with discrepancies in performance being attributed to a combination of factors such as parasite levels, interpretation of RDT results and/or the handling and storage of RDT kits. However, some of the inconsistencies observed with results from Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2)-based RDTs could also be explained by the deletion of the gene that encodes the protein, pfhrp2, and its structural homolog, pfhrp3, in some parasite isolates. Given that pfhrp2- and pfhrp3-negative P. falciparum isolates have been detected in the neighboring Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon regions, we hypothesized that parasites with deletions of pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 may also be present in Colombia. In this study we tested 100 historical samples collected between 1999 and 2009 from six Departments in Colombia for the presence of pfhrp2, pfhrp3 and their flanking genes. Seven neutral microsatellites were also used to determine the genetic background of these parasites. In total 18 of 100 parasite isolates were found to have deleted pfhrp2, a majority of which (14 of 18) were collected from Amazonas Department, which borders Peru and Brazil. pfhrp3 deletions were found in 52 of the 100 samples collected from all regions of the country. pfhrp2 flanking genes PF3D7_0831900 and PF3D7_0831700 were deleted in 22 of 100 and in 1 of 100 samples, respectively. pfhrp3 flanking genes PF3D7_1372100 and PF3D7_1372400 were missing in 55 of 100 and in 57 of 100 samples. Structure analysis of microsatellite data indicated that Colombian samples tested in this study belonged to four clusters and they segregated mostly based on their geographic region. Most of the pfhrp2-deleted parasites were assigned to a single cluster and originated from Amazonas Department although a few pfhrp2-negative parasites originated from the other three clusters. The presence of a high proportion of pfhrp2

  2. Biochemical abnormalities in neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Sood, Arvind; Grover, Neelam; Sharma, Roshan

    2003-03-01

    The presence of seizure does not constitute a diagnoses but it is a symptom of an underlying central nervous system disorder due to systemic or biochemical disturbances. Biochemical disturbances occur frequently in the neonatal seizures either as an underlying cause or as an associated abnormality. In their presence, it is difficult to control seizure and there is a risk of further brain damage. Early recognition and treatment of biochemical disturbances is essential for optimal management and satisfactory long term outcome. The present study was conducted in the department of pediatrics in IGMC Shimla on 59 neonates. Biochemical abnormalities were detected in 29 (49.15%) of cases. Primary metabolic abnormalities occurred in 10(16.94%) cases of neonatal seizures, most common being hypocalcaemia followed by hypoglycemia, other metabolic abnormalities include hypomagnesaemia and hyponateremia. Biochemical abnormalities were seen in 19(38.77%) cases of non metabolic seizure in neonates. Associated metabolic abnormalities were observed more often with Hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy (11 out of 19) cases and hypoglycemia was most common in this group. No infant had hyponateremia, hyperkelemia or low zinc level.

  3. Communication for Development Interventions in Fragile States: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Skuse, Andrew; Rodger, Dianne; Power, Gerry; Mbus, Domenic Friguglietti; Brimacombe, Tait

    2013-01-01

    Executive summary Background A wide range of contextual and programmatic factors frame, affect and constrain communication for development (C4D) interventions undertaken in fragile or conflict affected states. For the purposes of this review, contextual factors include culture, poverty, different stages of conflict (such as latent, open or post-conflict scenarios), policy, legislation and so on, while programmatic factors include the type of intervention, formative and summative evaluation, project design and management, human and financial resources and so on. Understanding the various factors that influence C4D interventions in fragile states is important to improving practice, implementation and evaluation, as well as to the future development of methodologies and frameworks that can be utilised in conflict or crisis situations. Objective The objective of this review is to assess the contextual and programmatic factors that influence communication for development interventions in fragile states. Types of participants Persons regardless of age, gender and ethnicity – living in fragile states. Phenomena of interest The contextual and programmatic factors that influence communication for development (C4D) interventions in fragile states. Types of studies Qualitative peer reviewed studies, expert opinion, discussion papers, project reports, policy papers, position papers and other text. Search strategy Searches were conducted for published and unpublished material (between January 2001 – September 2011), including grey literature, in the English language. Databases searched were: Academic Search Premier; African Women's Bibliographic Database; Anthropology Plus; Bibliography of Asian Studies; Educational Resources Information Centre; Ingenta Connect; JSTOR; Scopus; and Sociological Abstracts; Communication for Social Change Consortium; DevComm (World Bank); Eldis; Search for Common Ground; The Communication Initiative; United Nations Development Programme

  4. Social approach and emotion recognition in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tracey A; Porter, Melanie A; Langdon, Robyn

    2014-03-01

    Evidence is emerging that individuals with Fragile X syndrome (FXS) display emotion recognition deficits, which may contribute to their significant social difficulties. The current study investigated the emotion recognition abilities, and social approachability judgments, of FXS individuals when processing emotional stimuli. Relative to chronological age- (CA-) and mental age- (MA-) matched controls, the FXS group performed significantly more poorly on the emotion recognition tasks, and displayed a bias towards detecting negative emotions. Moreover, after controlling for emotion recognition deficits, the FXS group displayed significantly reduced ratings of social approachability. These findings suggest that a social anxiety pattern, rather than poor socioemotional processing, may best explain the social avoidance observed in FXS.

  5. Fragile X syndrome neurobiology translates into rational therapy.

    PubMed

    Braat, Sien; Kooy, R Frank

    2014-04-01

    Causal genetic defects have been identified for various neurodevelopmental disorders. A key example in this respect is fragile X syndrome, one of the most frequent genetic causes of intellectual disability and autism. Since the discovery of the causal gene, insights into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have increased exponentially. Over the past years, defects were discovered in pathways that are potentially amendable by pharmacological treatment. These findings have inspired the initiation of clinical trials in patients. The targeted pathways converge in part with those of related neurodevelopmental disorders raising hopes that the treatments developed for this specific disorder might be more broadly applicable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Christina; Stöllberger, Claudia; Hlavin, Anton; Finsterer, Josef; Hager, Isabella; Hermann, Peter

    2008-12-01

    To determine in a cross-sectional study the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in opiate addicts who were therapy-seeking and its association with demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters. In consecutive therapy-seeking opiate addicts, a 12-lead ECG was registered within 24 hours after admission and evaluated according to a pre-set protocol between October 2004 and August 2006. Additionally, demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters were recorded. Included were 511 opiate-addicts, 25% female, with a mean age of 29 years (range 17-59 years). One or more ECG abnormalities were found in 314 patients (61%). In the 511 patients we found most commonly ST abnormalities (19%), QTc prolongation (13%), tall R- and/or S-waves (11%) and missing R progression (10%). ECG abnormalities were more common in males than in females (64 versus 54%, P < 0.05), and in patients with positive than negative urine findings for cannabis (68 versus 57%, P < 0.05). Patients with ST abnormalities were more often males than females (21 versus 11%, P < 0.05), had a history of seizures less often (16 versus 27%, P < 0.05), had positive than negative urine findings for cannabis more often (26 versus 15%, P < 0.01) and had negative than positive urine findings for methadone more often (21 versus 11%, P < 0.05). QTc prolongation was more frequent in patients with high dosages of maintenance drugs than in patients with medium or low dosages (27 versus 12 versus 10%, P < 0.05) and in patients whose urine findings were positive than negative for methadone (23 versus 11%, P < 0.001) as well as for benzodiazepines (17 versus 9%, P < 0.05). Limitations of the data are that in most cases other risk factors for the cardiac abnormalities were not known. ECG abnormalities are frequent in opiate addicts. The most frequent ECG abnormalities are ST abnormalities, QTc prolongation and tall R- and/or S-waves. ST abnormalities are associated with cannabis, and QTc prolongation

  7. Discovery and characterization of a photo-oxidative histidine-histidine cross-link in IgG1 antibody utilizing ¹⁸O-labeling and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Zhongqi; Cheetham, Janet; Ren, Da; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2014-05-20

    A novel photo-oxidative cross-linking between two histidines (His-His) has been discovered and characterized in an IgG1 antibody via the workflow of XChem-Finder, (18)O labeling and mass spectrometry (Anal. Chem. 2013, 85, 5900-5908). Its structure was elucidated by peptide mapping with multiple proteases with various specificities (e.g., trypsin, Asp-N, and GluC combined with trypsin or Asp-N) and mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation modes (e.g., collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD)). Our data indicated that cross-linking occurred across two identical conserved histidine residues on two separate heavy chains in the hinge region, which is highly flexible and solvent accessible. On the basis of model studies with short peptides, it has been proposed that singlet oxygen reacts with the histidyl imidazole ring to form an endoperoxide and then converted to the 2-oxo-histidine (2-oxo-His) and His+32 intermediates, the latter is subject to a nucleophilic attack by the unmodified histidine; and finally, elimination of a water molecule leads to the final adduct with a net mass increase of 14 Da. Our findings are consistent with this mechanism. Successful discovery of cross-linked His-His again demonstrates the broad applicability and utility of our XChem-Finder approach in the discovery and elucidation of protein cross-linking, particularly without a priori knowledge of the chemical nature and site of cross-linking.

  8. Requirement of histidine 217 for ubiquinone reductase activity (Qi site) in the cytochrome bc1 complex.

    PubMed

    Gray, K A; Dutton, P L; Daldal, F

    1994-01-25

    Folding models suggest that the highly conserved histidine 217 of the cytochrome b subunit from the cytochrome bc1 complex is close to the quinone reductase (Qi) site. This histidine (bH217) in the cytochrome b polypeptide of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus has been replaced with three other residues, aspartate (D), arginine (R), and leucine (L). bH217D and bH217R are able to grow photoheterotrophically and contain active cytochrome bc1 complexes (60% of wild-type activity), whereas the bH217L mutant is photosynthetically incompetent and contains a cytochrome bc1 complex that has only 10% of the wild-type activity. Single-turnover flash-activated electron transfer experiments show that cytochrome bH is reduced via the Qo site with near native rates in the mutant strains but that electron transfer between cytochrome bH and quinone bound at the Qi site is greatly slowed. These results are consistent with redox midpoint potential (Em) measurements of the cytochrome b subunit hemes and the Qi site quinone. The Em values of cyt bL and bH are approximately the same in the mutants and wild type, although the mutant strains have a larger relative concentration of what may be the high-potential form of cytochrome bH, called cytochrome b150. However, the redox properties of the semiquinone at the Qi site are altered significantly. The Qi site semiquinone stability constant of bH217R is 10 times higher than in the wild type, while in the other two strains (bH217D and bH217L) the stability constant is much lower than in the wild type. Thus H217 appears to have major effects on the redox properties of the quinone bound at the Qi site. These data are incorporated into a suggestion that H217 forms part of the binding pocket of the Qi site in a manner reminiscent of the interaction between quinone bound at the Qb site and H190 of the L subunit of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

  9. Role of DNA secondary structures in fragile site breakage along human chromosome 10

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Laura W.; Pierce, Levi C. T.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    The formation of alternative DNA secondary structures can result in DNA breakage leading to cancer and other diseases. Chromosomal fragile sites, which are regions of the genome that exhibit chromosomal breakage under conditions of mild replication stress, are predicted to form stable DNA secondary structures. DNA breakage at fragile sites is associated with regions that are deleted, amplified or rearranged in cancer. Despite the correlation, unbiased examination of the ability to form secondary structures has not been evaluated in fragile sites. Here, using the Mfold program, we predict potential DNA secondary structure formation on the human chromosome 10 sequence, and utilize this analysis to compare fragile and non-fragile DNA. We found that aphidicolin (APH)-induced common fragile sites contain more sequence segments with potential high secondary structure-forming ability, and these segments clustered more densely than those in non-fragile DNA. Additionally, using a threshold of secondary structure-forming ability, we refined legitimate fragile sites within the cytogenetically defined boundaries, and identified potential fragile regions within non-fragile DNA. In vitro detection of alternative DNA structure formation and a DNA breakage cell assay were used to validate the computational predictions. Many of the regions identified by our analysis coincide with genes mutated in various diseases and regions of copy number alteration in cancer. This study supports the role of DNA secondary structures in common fragile site instability, provides a systematic method for their identification and suggests a mechanism by which DNA secondary structures can lead to human disease. PMID:23297364

  10. Mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-induced bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Nicola; Chandran, Manju; Pierroz, Dominique D; Abrahamsen, Bo; Schwartz, Ann V; Ferrari, Serge L

    2017-04-01

    The risk of fragility fractures is increased in patients with either type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although BMD is decreased in T1DM, BMD in T2DM is often normal or even slightly elevated compared with an age-matched control population. However, in both T1DM and T2DM, bone turnover is decreased and the bone material properties and microstructure of bone are altered; the latter particularly so when microvascular complications are present. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bone fragility in diabetes mellitus are complex, and include hyperglycaemia, oxidative stress and the accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts that compromise collagen properties, increase marrow adiposity, release inflammatory factors and adipokines from visceral fat, and potentially alter the function of osteocytes. Additional factors including treatment-induced hypoglycaemia, certain antidiabetic medications with a direct effect on bone and mineral metabolism (such as thiazolidinediones), as well as an increased propensity for falls, all contribute to the increased fracture risk in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  11. Radiology of Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Rickets and Other Bony Fragility States.

    PubMed

    Calder, Alistair D

    2015-01-01

    This section gives an overview of radiological findings in bony fragility states, with a special focus on osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and rickets. Conventional radiological assessment of bone density is inaccurate and imprecise and only reliably detects severe osteopaenia. However, other aspects of bone structure and morphology can be assessed, and it is possible to distinguish between osteopaenic and osteomalacic states. OI is a heterogeneous group of disorders of type 1 collagen formation and processing that are characterised by varying degrees of bony fragility, with presentations varying from perinatal lethality to asymptomatic. Radiological diagnosis of severe forms is usually straightforward, but that of milder disease may be challenging because specific features are often absent. However, a multidisciplinary approach is usually successful. Features of OI, including Wormian bones, skull base deformities, vertebral involvement and long bone fractures and deformities, are reviewed in this section. Rickets is best defined as a disorder of the growth plate characterised by the impaired apoptosis of hypertrophied chondrocytes. Vitamin D deficiency is a common cause of rickets. The patho-anatomical basis of radiological findings in rickets is reviewed and illustrated. Rickets is frequently accompanied by hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia. Rickets used to be classified as calciopaenic or phosphopaenic but is now referred to as parathyroid hormone or fibroblast growth factor 23 mediated, respectively [1]. The radiological features of the two forms are reviewed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Atomic and electronic structures of an extremely fragile liquid

    PubMed Central

    Kohara, Shinji; Akola, Jaakko; Patrikeev, Leonid; Ropo, Matti; Ohara, Koji; Itou, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yahiro, Jumpei; Okada, Junpei T.; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Masuno, Atsunobu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Usuki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The structure of high-temperature liquids is an important topic for understanding the fragility of liquids. Here we report the structure of a high-temperature non-glass-forming oxide liquid, ZrO2, at an atomistic and electronic level. The Bhatia–Thornton number–number structure factor of ZrO2 does not show a first sharp diffraction peak. The atomic structure comprises ZrO5, ZrO6 and ZrO7 polyhedra with a significant contribution of edge sharing of oxygen in addition to corner sharing. The variety of large oxygen coordination and polyhedral connections with short Zr–O bond lifetimes, induced by the relatively large ionic radius of zirconium, disturbs the evolution of intermediate-range ordering, which leads to a reduced electronic band gap and increased delocalization in the ionic Zr–O bonding. The details of the chemical bonding explain the extremely low viscosity of the liquid and the absence of a first sharp diffraction peak, and indicate that liquid ZrO2 is an extremely fragile liquid. PMID:25520236

  13. Fragile-to-strong transition in liquid silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geske, Julian; Drossel, Barbara; Vogel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We investigate anomalies in liquid silica with molecular dynamics simulations and present evidence for a fragile-to-strong transition at around 3100 K-3300 K. To this purpose, we studied the structure and dynamical properties of silica over a wide temperature range, finding four indicators of a fragile-to-strong transition. First, there is a density minimum at around 3000 K and a density maximum at 4700 K. The turning point is at 3400 K. Second, the local structure characterized by the tetrahedral order parameter changes dramatically around 3000 K from a higher-ordered, lower-density phase to a less ordered, higher-density phase. Third, the correlation time τ changes from an Arrhenius behavior below 3300 K to a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann behavior at higher temperatures. Fourth, the Stokes-Einstein relation holds for temperatures below 3000 K, but is replaced by a fractional relation above this temperature. Furthermore, our data indicate that dynamics become again simple above 5000 K, with Arrhenius behavior and a classical Stokes-Einstein relation.

  14. Finding FMR1 mosaicism in Fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Thaís Fernandez; dos Santos, Jussara Mendonça; Gonçalves, Andressa Pereira; Tassone, Flora; Mendoza-Morales, Guadalupe; Ribeiro, Márcia Gonçalves; Kahn, Evelyn; Boy, Raquel; Pimentel, Márcia Mattos Gonçalves; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia Barros

    2016-01-01

    OBJETIVE Almost all patients with Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) exhibit a CGG repeat expansion (full mutation) in the Fragile Mental Retardation 1 gene (FMR1). Here, we report five unrelated males with FXS harboring a somatic full mutation/deletion mosaicism. METHODS Mutational profiles were only elucidated by using a combination of molecular approaches (CGG-based PCR, Sanger sequencing, MS-MLPA, Southern blot and mPCR). RESULT Four patients exhibited small deletions encompassing the CGG repeats tract and flanking regions, whereas the remaining had a larger deletion comprising at least exon 1 and part of intron 1 of FMR1 gene. The presence of a 2–3 base pairs microhomology in proximal and distal non-recurrent breakpoints without scars supports the involvement of microhomology mediated induced repair (MMBIR) mechanism in three small deletions. CONCLUSION Our data highlights the importance of using different research methods to elucidate atypical FXS mutational profiles, which are clinically undistinguishable and may have been underestimated. PMID:26716517

  15. Thinking through health capacity development for Fragile States.

    PubMed

    Mark, Annabelle; Jones, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider capacity development for healthcare in Fragile States and its roles, for example, in securing civil and political stability, as well as improved health, within the various contexts prevailing in fragile settings across the world. As a precursor to this, however, it is important to understand how, in rapidly changing environments, the role and contribution of different donors will have an impact in different ways. This paper sets out to interpret these issues, and what becomes apparent is the need to develop an understanding of the value base of donors, which we demonstrate through the development of a value-based framework. This highlights the separate motivations and choices made by donors, but what is apparent is that all remain within the positivist perspective perhaps for reasons of accountability and transparency. However, the emergence of new interpretations drawing on systems thinking, and followed by complexity theory more recently, in understanding contexts, suggests that the favouring of any one of these perspective can be counterproductive, without a consideration of the contexts in which they occur. In seeking an explanation of these environmental contexts, which also address the perspectives in use, we suggest the use of wider multi-ontology sense-making framework such as Cynefin. Through this approach, analytical insights can be given into the interpretation, decision and intervention processes available in these different and often changing environments, thus enabling greater coherence between donor values and recipient contexts. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Modeling fragile X syndrome in the Fmr1 knockout mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M.; Leach, Prescott T.; Silverman, Jill L.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and one of the leading genetic causes for autism spectrum disorder. Clinical symptoms of FXS can include impaired cognition, anxiety, hyperactivity, social phobia, and repetitive behaviors. FXS is caused by a CGG repeat mutation which expands a region on the X chromosome containing the FMR1 gene. In FXS, a full mutation (> 200 repeats) leads to hypermethylation of FMR1, an epigenetic mechanism that effectively silences FMR1 gene expression and reduces levels of the FMR1 gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that is important for the regulation of protein expression. In an effort to further understand how loss of FMR1 and FMRP contribute to FXS symptomology, several FXS animal models have been created. The most well characterized rodent model is the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse, which lacks FMRP protein due to a disruption in its Fmr1 gene. Here, we review the behavioral phenotyping of the Fmr1 KO mouse to date, and discuss the clinical relevance of this mouse model to the human FXS condition. While much remains to be learned about FXS, the Fmr1 KO mouse is a valuable tool for understanding the repercussions of functional loss of FMRP and assessing the efficacy of pharmacological compounds in ameliorating the molecular and behavioral phenotypes relevant to FXS. PMID:25606362

  17. Drift-free MPEG-4 AVC semi-fragile watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnaoui, M.; Mitrea, M.

    2014-02-01

    While intra frame drifting is a concern for all types of MPEG-4 AVC compressed-domain video processing applications, it has a particular negative impact in watermarking. In order to avoid the drift drawbacks, two classes of solutions are currently considered in the literature. They try either to compensate the drift distortions at the expense of complex decoding/estimation algorithms or to restrict the insertion to the blocks which are not involved in the prediction, thus reducing the data payload. The present study follows a different approach. First, it algebraically models the drift distortion spread problem by considering the analytic expressions of the MPEG-4 AVC encoding operations. Secondly, it solves the underlying algebraic system under drift-free constraints. Finally, the advanced solution is adapted to take into account the watermarking peculiarities. The experiments consider an m-QIM semi-fragile watermarking method and a video surveillance corpus of 80 minutes. For prescribed data payload (100 bit/s), robustness (BER < 0.1 against transcoding at 50% in stream size), fragility (frame modification detection with accuracies of 1/81 from the frame size and 3s) and complexity constraints, the modified insertion results in gains in transparency of 2 dB in PSNR, of 0.4 in AAD, of 0.002 in IF, of 0.03 in SC, of 0.017 NCC and 22 in DVQ.

  18. Molecular/clinical correlations in females with fragile X

    SciTech Connect

    Sobesky, W.E.; Riddle, J.; Hagerman, R.J.

    1996-08-09

    Females who are affected by fragile X syndrome (FXS) can have significant physical, neuropsychological and emotional involvement. This study was designed to explore the relationships between these three domains and to learn how the degree of involvement in each of these phenotypic areas relates to molecular parameters including CGG repeat length and activation ratio (the proportion of normal FMR1 alleles on the active X chromosome). Three groups of females were studied: 35 women who grew up in a fragile X family but do not carry an FMR1 mutation, 92 women with a premutation, and 29 women with a full mutation.more » Correlations between neurocognitive, physical and emotional traits were calculated for each of the three groups. Within the full mutation group significant correlations were seen between schizotypal traits and full scale IQ. The Lie scale was significantly correlated with the physical findings index. The activation ratio correlated significantly with the measure of executive function (r = .50, P = .01). There was a trend toward correlations of activation ratio with the physical index score, outer ear prominence and IQ. CGG repeat number significantly correlated only with the physical index (r = .44, P = .0 1). Thus, activation ratio may be the more pertinent molecular parameter in full mutation women in determining the degree of cognitive and physical phenotypic involvement. 29 refs., 2 tabs.« less

  19. Atomic and electronic structures of an extremely fragile liquid.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Shinji; Akola, Jaakko; Patrikeev, Leonid; Ropo, Matti; Ohara, Koji; Itou, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yahiro, Jumpei; Okada, Junpei T; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Masuno, Atsunobu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Usuki, Takeshi

    2014-12-18

    The structure of high-temperature liquids is an important topic for understanding the fragility of liquids. Here we report the structure of a high-temperature non-glass-forming oxide liquid, ZrO2, at an atomistic and electronic level. The Bhatia-Thornton number-number structure factor of ZrO2 does not show a first sharp diffraction peak. The atomic structure comprises ZrO5, ZrO6 and ZrO7 polyhedra with a significant contribution of edge sharing of oxygen in addition to corner sharing. The variety of large oxygen coordination and polyhedral connections with short Zr-O bond lifetimes, induced by the relatively large ionic radius of zirconium, disturbs the evolution of intermediate-range ordering, which leads to a reduced electronic band gap and increased delocalization in the ionic Zr-O bonding. The details of the chemical bonding explain the extremely low viscosity of the liquid and the absence of a first sharp diffraction peak, and indicate that liquid ZrO2 is an extremely fragile liquid.

  20. Event-related potential alterations in fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Knoth, Inga S.; Lippé, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of X-linked intellectual disability (ID), associated with a wide range of cognitive and behavioral impairments. FXS is caused by a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene located on the X-chromosome. FMR1 is expected to prevent the expression of the “fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP)”, which results in altered structural and functional development of the synapse, including a loss of synaptic plasticity. This review aims to unveil the contribution of electrophysiological signal studies for the understanding of the information processing impairments in FXS patients. We discuss relevant event-related potential (ERP) studies conducted with full mutation FXS patients and clinical populations sharing symptoms with FXS in a developmental perspective. Specific deviances found in FXS ERP profiles are described. Alterations are reported in N1, P2, Mismatch Negativity (MMN), N2, and P3 components in FXS compared to healthy controls. Particularly, deviances in N1 and P2 amplitude seem to be specific to FXS. The presented results suggest a cascade of impaired information processes that are in line with symptoms and anatomical findings in FXS. PMID:23015788

  1. Nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy in a fragile plastic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michl, M.; Bauer, Th.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we provide a thorough examination of the nonlinear dielectric properties of a succinonitrile-glutaronitrile mixture, representing one of the rare examples of a plastic crystal with fragile glassy dynamics. The detected alteration of the complex dielectric permittivity under high fields can be explained considering the heterogeneous nature of glassy dynamics and a field-induced variation of entropy. While the first mechanism was also found in structural glass formers, the latter effect seems to be more pronounced in plastic crystals. Moreover, the third harmonic component of the dielectric susceptibility is reported, revealing a hump-like spectral shape as predicted, e.g., within a model considering cooperative molecular dynamics. If assuming the validity of this model, one can deduce the temperature dependence of the number of correlated molecules Ncorr from these data. In accord with the fragile nature of the glass transition in this plastic crystal, we obtain a relatively strong temperature dependence of Ncorr, in contrast to the much weaker temperature dependence in plastic-crystalline cyclo-octanol, whose glass transition is of strong nature.

  2. Delayed stabilization of dendritic spines in fragile X mice.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martín, Alberto; Crespo, Michelle; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos

    2010-06-09

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) causes mental impairment and autism through transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene, resulting in the loss of the RNA-binding protein fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Cortical pyramidal neurons in affected individuals and Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mice have an increased density of dendritic spines. The mutant mice also show defects in synaptic and experience-dependent circuit plasticity, which are known to be mediated in part by dendritic spine dynamics. We used in vivo time-lapse imaging with two-photon microscopy through cranial windows in male and female neonatal mice to test the hypothesis that dynamics of dendritic protrusions are altered in KO mice during early postnatal development. We find that layer 2/3 neurons from wild-type mice exhibit a rapid decrease in dendritic spine dynamics during the first 2 postnatal weeks, as immature filopodia are replaced by mushroom spines. In contrast, KO mice show a developmental delay in the downregulation of spine turnover and in the transition from immature to mature spine subtypes. Blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) signaling, which reverses some adult phenotypes of KO mice, accentuated this immature protrusion phenotype in KO mice. Thus, absence of FMRP delays spine stabilization and dysregulated mGluR signaling in FXS may partially normalize this early synaptic defect.

  3. Food insecurity and child behavior problems in fragile families.

    PubMed

    King, Christian

    2018-02-01

    Food insecurity remains a persistent problem in the United States. Several studies have shown that food insecurity is associated with child externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. However, some potential methodological limitations remain. For example, most studies use a household measure of food insecurity while there is evidence that children, especially younger ones, tend to be shielded by their parents from experiencing food insecurity. In addition, the mechanisms through which food insecurity affects children are not well understood. This study uses longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to address these limitations. Fixed-effects models show that the association is even larger using a measure of child food insecurity instead of a household one. Correlated-random effects models show a large difference in child behavior problems between food secure and food insecure children due to unobserved heterogeneity. In addition, the association between child food insecurity and child externalizing behaviors remains largely unexplained while food insecurity among adults explains almost all the variation in the association with child internalizing behaviors. Food insecure children and parents are at risk of micronutrient deficiencies, which may lead to behavior problems in young children. These findings underscore the need for greater focus on reducing the risk of food insecurity, especially for children in fragile families, in order to reduce behavior problems and improve their educational attainment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Rhizobium radiobacter Histidine Kinase Can Employ Both Boolean AND and OR Logic Gates to Initiate Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Lin, Yi-Han; Pierce, B Daniel; Lynn, David G

    2015-10-12

    The molecular logic gates that regulate gene circuits are necessarily intricate and highly regulated, particularly in the critical commitments necessary for pathogenesis. We now report simple AND and OR logic gates to be accessible within a single protein receptor. Pathogenesis by the bacterium Rhizobium radiobacter is mediated by a single histidine kinase, VirA, which processes multiple small molecule host signals (phenol and sugar). Mutagenesis analyses converged on a single signal integration node, and finer functional analyses revealed that a single residue could switch VirA from a functional AND logic gate to an OR gate where each of two signals activate independently. Host range preferences among natural strains of R. radiobacter correlate with these gate logic strategies. Although the precise mechanism for the signal integration node requires further analyses, long-range signal transmission through this histidine kinase can now be exploited for synthetic signaling circuits. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The possible influence of L-histidine on the origin of the first peptides on the primordial Earth.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Hannes; Plankensteiner, Kristof; Fitz, Daniel; Rode, Bernd Michael

    2006-06-01

    One of the most unsettled problems of prebiotic evolution and the origin of life is the explanation why one enantiomeric form of biomolecules prevailed. In the experiments presented in this paper, the influence of L-histidine on the peptide formation in the Salt-Induced Peptide Formation (SIPF) reaction of the enantiomeric forms of valine, proline, serine, lysine, and tryptophan, and the catalytic effects in this first step toward the first building blocks of proteins on the primordial earth were investigated. In the majority of the produced dipeptides, a remarkable increase of yields was shown, and the preference of the L-amino acids in the peptide formation in most cases cannot be denied. In summary, our data provide further experimental evidence for the plausibility of the SIPF reaction and point at a possible important role of L-histidine in the chemical evolution on the primordial Earth.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of histidine-functionalized single-crystalline gold nanoparticles and their pH-dependent UV absorption characteristic.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie; Meng, Ronghua; Guo, Songling; Xing, Zhimin; Tan, Shengnan

    2010-03-01

    L-Histidine capped single-crystalline gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by a hydrothermal process under a basic condition at temperature between 65 and 150 degrees C. The produced gold nanoparticles were spherical with average diameter of 11.5+/-2.9nm. The synthesized gold colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored at room temperature for more than 6 months. The color of the colloidal solution can change from wine red to mauve, purple and blue during the acidifying process. This color changing phenomenon is attributed to the aggregation of gold nanoparticles resulted from hydrogen bond formation between the histidines adsorbed on the gold nanoparticles surfaces. This hydrothermal synthetic method is expected to be used for synthesizing some other amino acid functionalized gold nanomaterials.

  7. Risk factors for fragility fracture in Seremban district, Malaysia: a comparison of patients with fragility fracture in the orthopedic ward versus those in the outpatient department.

    PubMed

    Keng Yin Loh; King Hock Shong; Soo Nie Lan; Lo, Wan-Yi; Shu Yuen Woon

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a silent disease and becomes clinically significant in the presence of fragility fracture. Identifying risk factors that are associated with osteoporosis in the community is important in reducing the incidence of fragility fracture. The aim of this study is to identify risk factors associated with fragility fracture in the Seremban District of Malaysia. This is a population comparison study between orthopedic ward patients and outpatients attending a community health clinic for 6 months. Epidemiological data and the possible risk factors for osteoporosis were collected by direct interview. This study demonstrates that advancing age, low body weight, smoking, lack of regular exercise, low consumption of calcium containing foods, and using bone depleting drugs (steroids, thyroid hormone, and frusemides) are major risk factors for fragility fracture. Most of these risk factors are modifiable through effective lifestyle intervention.

  8. Hemoglobin Hiroshima (β143 histidine → aspartic acid): a newly identified fast moving beta chain variant associated with increased oxygen affinity and compensatory erythremia

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Howard B.; Iuchi, Iwao; Miyaji, Takaoki; Shibata, Susumu

    1969-01-01

    During a survey for hemoglobinopathies in over 9000 residents of Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan, a fast moving hemoglobin was identified in eight members of three generations in a Japanese family. The abnormal hemoglobin, named Hb Hiroshima, constitutes about 50% of the total hemoglobin in hemolysates from the carriers who have a mild erythremia but are otherwise apparently clinically unaffected. All preparations of Hb Hiroshima have increased affinity for oxygen, by either tonometric or oxygen electrode determinations. At pH 7.0, the oxygen pressure, P50 required to half saturate an unfractionated hemolysate from a carrier was one-half that of Hb A, and the P50 of a purified sample containing no Hb A was one-fourth that of Hb A. The pH dependence of the oxygen equilibrium (Bohr effect) is below normal, as shown by the absolute value of the Bohr effect factor which is about half that of Hb A, in the pH range between 7.0 and 7.4. The Hill constant, n, for Hb Hiroshima between pH 7.0 and 7.4 is 2-2.4, compared to 2.8-3 for Hb A under the same conditions, indicating reduction of, but not complete abolition of heme-heme interaction. Urea dissociation and canine hybridization tests located the biochemical lesion in the beta chain. Fingerprints (Ingram), carboxypeptidase digestion, and amino acid analysis demonstrated that the substitution was at residue 143 in the beta chain, where histidine was replaced by aspartic acid. In contrast to other recently described high oxygen affinity mutants that show intact Bohr effects, all three of the major characteristics of the reversible combination of hemoglobin with oxygen (oxygen equilibrium, heme-heme interaction, and pH dependence) are affected in Hb Hiroshima. A tentative interpretation of these effects, relating structure to function, is offered in terms of recently developed models of normal hemoglobin. Images PMID:5773089

  9. Replacement of arginine 773 by cysteine or histidine in the human androgen receptor causes complete androgen insensitivity with different receptor phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Lynn; Bordet, Sylvie; Trifiro, Mark A.; Mhatre, Anand; Kaufman, Morris; Pinsky, Leonard; Wrogeman, Klaus; Belsham, Denise D.; Pereira, Fred; Greenberg, Cheryl; Trapman, Jan; Brinkman, Albert O.; Chang, Chawnshang; Liao, Shutsung

    1992-01-01

    We have discovered two different point mutations in a single codon of the X-linked androgen-receptor (AR) gene in two pairs of unrelated families who have complete androgen insensitivity (resistance) associated with different AR phenotypes in their genital skin fibroblasts. One mutation is a C-to-T transition at a CpG sequence near the 5' terminus of exon 6; it changes the sense of codon 773 from arginine to cysteine, ablates specific androgen-binding activity at 37°C, and eliminates a unique KpnI site at the intron-exon boundary. The other mutation is a G-to-A transition that changes amino acid 773 to histidine and eliminates an SphI site. This mutant AR has a normal androgen-binding capacity at 37°C but has a reduced affinity for androgens and is thermolabile in their presence. Transient transfection of COS cells with cDNA expression vectors yielded little androgen-binding activity at 37°C from Arg773Cys and abundant activity with abnormal properties from Arg773His, thereby proving the pathogenicity of both sequence alterations. This conclusion coincides with the following facts about evolutionary preservation of the position homologous to Arg773 in the AR: it is occupied by Arg or lysine in the progesterone, glucocorticoid, and mineralocorticoid receptors, and it is within a 14-amino-acid region of their steroid-binding domains that share ∼85% amino acid identity. ImagesFigure 7Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6Figure 8 PMID:1609793

  10. Effects of grain, fructose, and histidine on ruminal pH and fermentation products during an induced subacute acidosis protocol.

    PubMed

    Golder, H M; Celi, P; Rabiee, A R; Heuer, C; Bramley, E; Miller, D W; King, R; Lean, I J

    2012-04-01

    The effects of grain, fructose, and histidine on ruminal pH and fermentation products were studied in dairy cattle during an induced subacute acidosis protocol. Thirty Holstein heifers were randomly allocated to 5 treatment groups: (1) control (no grain); (2) grain [fed at a crushed triticale dry matter intake (DMI) of 1.2% of body weight (BW)]; (3) grain (0.8% of BW DMI)+fructose (0.4% of BW DMI); (4) grain (1.2% of BW DMI)+histidine (6 g/head); and (5) grain (0.8% of BW DMI)+fructose (0.4% of BW DMI)+histidine (6 g/head) in a partial factorial arrangement. Heifers were fed 1 kg of grain daily with ad libitum access to ryegrass silage and alfalfa hay for 10 d. Feed was withheld for 14 h before challenge day, on which heifers were fed 200 g of alfalfa hay and then the treatment diets immediately thereafter. Rumen samples were collected 5 min after diet ingestion, 60 min later, and at 3 subsequent 50-min intervals. Grain decreased ruminal pH and increased ammonia, total volatile fatty acid (VFA), acetate, butyrate, propionate, and valerate concentrations compared with controls. The addition of grain had no effect on ruminal D- and L-lactate concentrations. Fructose markedly decreased ruminal pH and markedly increased D- and L-lactate concentrations. Fructose increased total VFA and butyrate and decreased valerate concentrations. Although histidine did not have a marked effect on ruminal fermentation, increased concentrations of histamine were observed following feeding. This study demonstrates that the substitution of some grain for fructose can lower ruminal pH and increase VFA and lactate concentrations, warranting further investigation into the role of sugars on the risk of acidosis in dairy cattle. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Improved Acid Stress Survival of Lactococcus lactis Expressing the Histidine Decarboxylation Pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524*

    PubMed Central

    Trip, Hein; Mulder, Niels L.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2012-01-01

    Degradative amino acid decarboxylation pathways in bacteria generate secondary metabolic energy and provide resistance against acid stress. The histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524 was functionally expressed in the heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and the benefits of the newly acquired pathway for the host were analyzed. During growth in M17 medium in the pH range of 5–6.5, a small positive effect was observed on the biomass yield in batch culture, whereas no growth rate enhancement was evident. In contrast, a strong benefit for the engineered L. lactis strain was observed in acid stress survival. In the presence of histidine, the pathway enabled cells to survive at pH values as low as 3 for at least 2 h, conditions under which the host cells were rapidly dying. The flux through the histidine decarboxylation pathway in cells grown at physiological pH was under strict control of the electrochemical proton gradient (pmf) across the membrane. Ionophores that dissipated the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and/or the pH gradient (ΔpH) strongly increased the flux, whereas the presence of glucose almost completely inhibited the flux. Control of the pmf over the flux was exerted by both ΔΨ and ΔpH and was distributed over the transporter HdcP and the decarboxylase HdcA. The control allowed for a synergistic effect between the histidine decarboxylation and glycolytic pathways in acid stress survival. In a narrow pH range around 2.5 the synergism resulted in a 10-fold higher survival rate. PMID:22351775

  12. Tautomerism, acid-base equilibria, and H-bonding of the six histidines in subtilisin BPN′ by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Day, Regina M.; Thalhauser, Craig J.; Sudmeier, James L.; Vincent, Matthew P.; Torchilin, Ekaterina V.; Sanford, David G.; Bachovchin, Christopher W.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2003-01-01

    We have determined by 15N, 1H, and 13C NMR, the chemical behavior of the six histidines in subtilisin BPN′ and their PMSF and peptide boronic acid complexes in aqueous solution as a function of pH in the range of from 5 to 11, and have assigned every 15N, 1H, Cɛ1, and Cδ2 resonance of all His side chains in resting enzyme. Four of the six histidine residues (17, 39, 67, and 226) are neutrally charged and do not titrate. One histidine (238), located on the protein surface, titrates with pKa = 7.30 ± 0.03 at 25°C, having rapid proton exchange, but restricted mobility. The active site histidine (64) in mutant N155A titrates with a pKa value of 7.9 ± 0.3 and sluggish proton exchange behavior, as shown by two-site exchange computer lineshape simulation. His 64 in resting enzyme contains an extremely high Cɛ1-H proton chemical shift of 9.30 parts per million (ppm) owing to a conserved Cɛ1-H. . .O=C H-bond from the active site imidazole to a backbone carbonyl group, which is found in all known serine proteases representing all four superfamilies. Only His 226, and His 64 at high pH, exist as the rare Nδ1-H tautomer, exhibiting 13Cδ1 chemical shifts ~9 ppm higher than those for Nɛ2-H tautomers. His 64 in the PMSF complex, unlike that in the resting enzyme, is highly mobile in its low pH form, as shown by 15N-1H NOE effects, and titrates with rapid proton exchange kinetics linked to a pKa value of 7.47 ± 0.02. PMID:12649438

  13. Pinna abnormalities and low-set ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect - pinna; Congenital defect - pinna Images Ear abnormalities Pinna of the newborn ear References Haddad J, Keesecker S. Congenital malformations. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, ...

  14. Partial alanine scan of mast cell degranulating peptide (MCD): importance of the histidine- and arginine residues.

    PubMed

    Buku, Angeliki; Mendlowitz, Milton; Condie, Barry A; Price, Joseph A

    2004-06-01

    The influence of the two histidine and two arginine residues of mast cell degranulating peptide (MCD) in activity and binding was studied by replacing these amino acids in the MCD sequence with L-alanine. Their histamine releasing activity was determined on rat peritoneal mast cells. Their binding affinity to the FcepsilonRIalpha binding subunit of the human mast cell receptor protein, was carried out using fluorescence polarization. The histamine assay showed that replacement of His13 by Ala o ccurred without loss of activity compared with the activity of MCD. Alanine substitutions for Arg7 and His8 resulted in an approximately 40 fold increase, and for Arg16 in a 14-fold increase in histamine-releasing activity of MCD. The binding affinities of the analogs were tested by competitive displacement of bound fluorescent MCD peptide from the FcepsilonRIalpha binding protein of the mast cell receptor by the Ala analogs using fluorescence polarization. The analogs Ala8 (for His) and Ala16 (for Arg) showed the same binding affinities as MCD, whereas analog Ala7 (for Arg) and analog Ala13 (for His) showed slightly better binding affinity than the parent compound. This study showed that the introduction of alanine residues in these positions resulted in MCD agonists of diverse potency. These findings will be useful in further MCD structure-activity studies.

  15. Insight into the Evolution of the Histidine Triad Protein (HTP) Family in Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiu-Zhen; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2013-01-01

    The Histidine Triad Proteins (HTPs), also known as Pht proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae, constitute a family of surface-exposed proteins that exist in many pathogenic streptococcal species. Although many studies have revealed the importance of HTPs in streptococcal physiology and pathogenicity, little is known about their origin and evolution. In this study, after identifying all htp homologs from 105 streptococcal genomes representing 38 different species/subspecies, we analyzed their domain structures, positions in genome, and most importantly, their evolutionary histories. By further projecting this information onto the streptococcal phylogeny, we made several major findings. First, htp genes originated earlier than the Streptococcus genus and gene-loss events have occurred among three streptococcal groups, resulting in the absence of the htp gene in the Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups. Second, the copy number of htp genes in other groups of Streptococcus is variable, ranging from one to four functional copies. Third, both phylogenetic evidence and domain structure analyses support the division of two htp subfamilies, designated as htp I and htp II. Although present mainly in the pyogenic group and in Streptococcus suis, htp II members are distinct from htp I due to the presence of an additional leucine-rich-repeat domain at the C-terminus. Finally, htp genes exhibit a faster nucleotide substitution rate than do housekeeping genes. Specifically, the regions outside the HTP domains are under strong positive selection. This distinct evolutionary pattern likely helped Streptococcus to easily escape from recognition by host immunity. PMID:23527301

  16. Acetylcholine content and viability of cholinergic neurons are influenced by the activity of protein histidine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The first mammalian protein histidine phosphatase (PHP) was discovered in the late 90s of the last century. One of the known substrates of PHP is ATP-citrate lyase (ACL), which is responsible - amongst other functions - for providing acetyl-CoA for acetylcholine synthesis in neuronal tissues. It has been shown in previous studies that PHP downregulates the activity of ACL by dephosphorylation. According to this our present work focused on the influence of PHP activity on the acetylcholine level in cholinergic neurons. Results The amount of PHP in SN56 cholinergic neuroblastoma cells was increased after overexpression of PHP by using pIRES2-AcGFP1-PHP as a vector. We demonstrated that PHP overexpression reduced the acetylcholine level and induced cell death. The acetylcholine content of SN56 cells was measured by fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Overexpression of the inactive H53A-PHP mutant also induced cell damage, but in a significantly reduced manner. However, this overexpression of the inactive PHP mutant did not change the acetylcholine content of SN56 cells significantly. In contrast, PHP downregulation, performed by RNAi-technique, did not induce cell death, but significantly increased the acetylcholine content in SN56 cells. Conclusions We could show for the first time that PHP downregulation increased the acetylcholine level in SN56 cells. This might be a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases involving cholinergic deficits like Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22436051

  17. A histidine-rich protein 2-based malaria drug sensitivity assay for field use.

    PubMed

    Noedl, Harald; Attlmayr, Bernhard; Wernsdorfer, Walther H; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Miller, Robert S

    2004-12-01

    With the spread of antimalarial drug resistance, simple and reliable tools for the assessment of antimalarial drug resistance, particularly in endemic regions and under field conditions, have become more important than ever before. We therefore developed a histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2)-based drug sensitivity assay for testing of fresh isolates of Plasmodium falciparum in the field. In contrast to the HRP2 laboratory assay, the field assay uses a procedure that further simplifies the handling and culturing of malaria parasites by omitting centrifugation, washing, the use of serum, and dilution with uninfected red blood cells. A total of 40 fresh Plasmodium falciparum isolates were successfully tested for their susceptibility to dihydroartemisinin, mefloquine, quinine, and chloroquine (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 3.43, 61.89, 326.75, and 185.31 nM, respectively). Results very closely matched those obtained with a modified World Health Organization schizont maturation assay (R2 = 0.96, P < 0.001; mean log difference at IC50 = 0.054).

  18. A non-catalytic histidine residue influences the function of the metalloprotease of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Forster, Brian M; Bitar, Alan Pavinski; Marquis, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Mpl, a thermolysin-like metalloprotease, and PC-PLC, a phospholipase C, are synthesized as proenzymes by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. During intracellular growth, L. monocytogenes is temporarily confined in a membrane-bound vacuole whose acidification leads to Mpl autolysis and Mpl-mediated cleavage of the PC-PLC N-terminal propeptide. Mpl maturation also leads to the secretion of both Mpl and PC-PLC across the bacterial cell wall. Previously, we identified negatively charged and uncharged amino acid residues within the N terminus of the PC-PLC propeptide that influence the ability of Mpl to mediate the maturation of PC-PLC, suggesting that these residues promote the interaction of the PC-PLC propeptide with Mpl. In the present study, we identified a non-catalytic histidine residue (H226) that influences Mpl secretion across the cell wall and its ability to process PC-PLC. Our results suggest that a positive charge at position 226 is required for Mpl functions other than autolysis. Based on the charge requirement at this position, we hypothesize that this residue contributes to the interaction of Mpl with the PC-PLC propeptide.

  19. Enhanced Indirect Photochemical Transformation of Histidine and Histamine through Association with Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chiheng; Lundeen, Rachel A; Remucal, Christina K; Sander, Michael; McNeill, Kristopher

    2015-05-05

    Photochemical transformations greatly affect the stability and fate of amino acids (AAs) in sunlit aquatic ecosystems. Whereas the direct phototransformation of dissolved AAs is well investigated, their indirect photolysis in the presence of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is poorly understood. In aquatic systems, CDOM may act both as sorbent for AAs and as photosensitizer, creating microenvironments with high concentrations of photochemically produced reactive intermediates, such as singlet oxygen (1O2). This study provides a systematic investigation of the indirect photochemical transformation of histidine (His) and histamine by 1O2 in solutions containing CDOM as a function of solution pH. Both His and histamine showed pH-dependent enhanced phototransformation in the CDOM systems as compared to systems in which model, low-molecular-weight 1O2 sensitizers were used. Enhanced reactivity resulted from sorption of His and histamine to CDOM and thus exposure to elevated 1O2 concentrations in the CDOM microenvironment. The extent of reactivity enhancement depended on solution pH via its effects on the protonation state of His, histamine, and CDOM. Sorption-enhanced reactivity was independently supported by depressed rate enhancements in the presence of a cosorbate that competitively displaced His and histamine from CDOM. Incorporating sorption and photochemical transformation processes into a reaction rate prediction model improved the description of the abiotic photochemical transformation rates of His in the presence of CDOM.

  20. Major Threat to Malaria Control Programs by Plasmodium falciparum Lacking Histidine-Rich Protein 2, Eritrea

    PubMed Central

    Berhane, Araia; Anderson, Karen; Mihreteab, Selam; Gresty, Karryn; Rogier, Eric; Mohamed, Salih; Hagos, Filmon; Embaye, Ghirmay; Chinorumba, Anderson; Zehaie, Assefash; Dowd, Simone; Waters, Norman C.; Gatton, Michelle L.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Cunningham, Jane

    2018-01-01

    False-negative results for Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein (HRP) 2–based rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are increasing in Eritrea. We investigated HRP gene 2/3 (pfhrp2/pfhrp3) status in 50 infected patients at 2 hospitals. We showed that 80.8% (21/26) of patients at Ghindae Hospital and 41.7% (10/24) at Massawa Hospital were infected with pfhrp2-negative parasites and 92.3% (24/26) of patients at Ghindae Hospital and 70.8% (17/24) at Massawa Hospital were infected with pfhrp3-negative parasites. Parasite densities between pfhrp2-positive and pfhrp2-negative patients were comparable. All pfhrp2-negative samples had no detectable HRP2/3 antigen and showed negative results for HRP2-based RDTs. pfhrp2-negative parasites were genetically less diverse and formed 2 clusters with no close relationships to parasites from Peru. These parasites probably emerged independently by selection in Eritrea. High prevalence of pfhrp2-negative parasites caused a high rate of false-negative results for RDTs. Determining prevalence of pfhrp2-negative parasites is urgently needed in neighboring countries to assist case management policies. PMID:29460730