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Sample records for abnormal functional connectivity

  1. Abnormal Functional Connectivity in Autism Spectrum Disorders during Face Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinhans, Natalia M.; Richards, Todd; Sterling, Lindsey; Stegbauer, Keith C.; Mahurin, Roderick; Johnson, L. Clark; Greenson, Jessica; Dawson, Geraldine; Aylward, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Abnormalities in the interactions between functionally linked brain regions have been suggested to be associated with the clinical impairments observed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We investigated functional connectivity within the limbic system during face identification; a primary component of social cognition, in 19 high-functioning…

  2. Connectivity and functional profiling of abnormal brain structures in pedophilia.

    PubMed

    Poeppl, Timm B; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T; Laird, Angela R; Rupprecht, Rainer; Langguth, Berthold; Bzdok, Danilo

    2015-06-01

    Despite its 0.5-1% lifetime prevalence in men and its general societal relevance, neuroimaging investigations in pedophilia are scarce. Preliminary findings indicate abnormal brain structure and function. However, no study has yet linked structural alterations in pedophiles to both connectional and functional properties of the aberrant hotspots. The relationship between morphological alterations and brain function in pedophilia as well as their contribution to its psychopathology thus remain unclear. First, we assessed bimodal connectivity of structurally altered candidate regions using meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) and resting-state correlations employing openly accessible data. We compared the ensuing connectivity maps to the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) maps of a recent quantitative meta-analysis of brain activity during processing of sexual stimuli. Second, we functionally characterized the structurally altered regions employing meta-data of a large-scale neuroimaging database. Candidate regions were functionally connected to key areas for processing of sexual stimuli. Moreover, we found that the functional role of structurally altered brain regions in pedophilia relates to nonsexual emotional as well as neurocognitive and executive functions, previously reported to be impaired in pedophiles. Our results suggest that structural brain alterations affect neural networks for sexual processing by way of disrupted functional connectivity, which may entail abnormal sexual arousal patterns. The findings moreover indicate that structural alterations account for common affective and neurocognitive impairments in pedophilia. The present multimodal integration of brain structure and function analyses links sexual and nonsexual psychopathology in pedophilia.

  3. Functional brain networks and abnormal connectivity in the movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Poston, Kathleen L.; Eidelberg, David

    2012-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dystonia, arise from neurophysiological changes within the cortico-striato-pallidothalamocortical (CSPTC) and cerebello-thalamo-cortical (CbTC) circuits. Neuroimaging techniques that probe connectivity within these circuits can be used to understand how these disorders develop as well as identify potential targets for medical and surgical therapies. Indeed, network analysis of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has identified abnormal metabolic networks associated with the cardinal motor symptoms of PD, such as akinesia and tremor, as well as PD-related cognitive dysfunction. More recent task-based and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have reproduced several of the altered connectivity patterns identified in these abnormal PD-related networks. A similar network analysis approach in dystonia revealed abnormal disease related metabolic patterns in both manifesting and non-manifesting carriers of dystonia mutations. Other multimodal imaging approaches using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging in patients with primary genetic dystonia suggest abnormal connectivity within the CbTC circuits mediate the clinical manifestations of this inherited neurodevelopmental disorder. Ongoing developments in functional imaging and future studies in early patients are likely to enhance our understanding of these movement disorders and guide novel targets for future therapies. PMID:22206967

  4. Latent and Abnormal Functional Connectivity Circuits in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuo; Xing, Yishi; Kang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with disrupted brain networks. Neuroimaging techniques provide noninvasive methods of investigating abnormal connectivity patterns in ASD. In the present study, we compare functional connectivity networks in people with ASD with those in typical controls, using neuroimaging data from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE) project. Specifically, we focus on the characteristics of intrinsic functional connectivity based on data collected by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). Our aim was to identify disrupted brain connectivity patterns across all networks, instead of in individual edges, by using advanced statistical methods. Unlike many brain connectome studies, in which networks are prespecified before the edge connectivity in each network is compared between clinical groups, we detected the latent differentially expressed networks automatically. Our network-level analysis identified abnormal connectome networks that (i) included a high proportion of edges that were differentially expressed between people with ASD and typical controls; and (ii) showed highly-organized graph topology. These findings provide new insight into the study of the underlying neuropsychiatric mechanism of ASD. PMID:28377688

  5. Abnormal Functional Connectivity Density in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youxue; Xie, Bing; Chen, Heng; Li, Meiling; Liu, Feng; Chen, Huafu

    2016-05-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that occurs in individuals who have experienced life-threatening mental traumas. Previous neuroimaging studies have indicated that the pathology of PTSD may be associated with the abnormal functional integration among brain regions. In the current study, we used functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping, a novel voxel-wise data-driven approach based on graph theory, to explore aberrant FC through the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the PTSD. We calculated both short- and long-range FCD in PTSD patients and healthy controls (HCs). Compared with HCs, PTSD patients showed significantly increased long-range FCD in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), but no abnormal short-range FCD was found in PTSD. Furthermore, seed-based FC analysis of the left DLPFC showed increased connectivity in the left superior parietal lobe and visual cortex of PTSD patients. The results suggested that PTSD patients experienced a disruption of intrinsic long-range functional connections in the fronto-parietal network and visual cortex, which are associated with attention control and visual information processing.

  6. Abnormal Amygdala Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Kathryn R.; Westlund, Melinda; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Mueller, Bryon A.; Houri, Alaa; Eberly, Lynn E.; Lim, Kelvin O.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Major depressive disorder (MDD) frequently emerges during adolescence and can lead to persistent illness, disability and suicide. The maturational changes that take place in the brain during adolescence underscore the importance of examining neurobiological mechanisms during this time period of early illness. However, neural mechanisms of depression in adolescents have been understudied. Prior research has implicated the amygdala in emotion processing in mood disorders, and adult depression studies have suggested amygdala-frontal connectivity deficits. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) is an advanced tool that can be used to probe neural networks and identify brain-behavior relationships. Objective To examine amygdala resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) in adolescents with and without MDD using rsfMRI, and to examine how amygdala RSFC relates to a broad range of symptom dimensions. Design Cross-sectional rsfMRI study. Setting Depression research program at an academic medical center. Participants 41 girls and boys aged 12–19 years with MDD and 29 healthy adolescents (frequency matched on age and sex) with no psychiatric diagnoses. Main Outcome Measure Using a whole-brain functional connectivity approach, we examined correlation of spontaneous fluctuation of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal of each voxel in the whole brain with that of the amygdala. Results Adolescents with MDD showed lower positive RSFC between amygdala and hippocampus, parahippocampus and brain stem; this connectivity was inversely correlated with general depression, dysphoria, and lassitude, and positively correlated with well-being. Patients also showed greater (positive) amygdala-precuneus RSFC (in contrast to negative amygdala-precuneus RSFC in controls.) Conclusion Impaired amygdala-hippocampal/brainstem and amygdala-precuneus RSFC has not previously been highlighted in depression and may be unique to adolescent MDD. These circuits

  7. Abnormal functional connectivity during visuospatial processing is associated with disrupted organisation of white matter in autism

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Jane; Johnson, Katherine; O'Hanlon, Erik; Garavan, Hugh; Leemans, Alexander; Gallagher, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of structural and functional neural connectivity has been widely reported in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) but there is a striking lack of research attempting to integrate analysis of functional and structural connectivity in the same study population, an approach that may provide key insights into the specific neurobiological underpinnings of altered functional connectivity in autism. The aims of this study were (1) to determine whether functional connectivity abnormalities were associated with structural abnormalities of white matter (WM) in ASD and (2) to examine the relationships between aberrant neural connectivity and behavior in ASD. Twenty-two individuals with ASD and 22 age, IQ-matched controls completed a high-angular-resolution diffusion MRI scan. Structural connectivity was analysed using constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) based tractography. Regions for tractography were generated from the results of a previous study, in which 10 pairs of brain regions showed abnormal functional connectivity during visuospatial processing in ASD. WM tracts directly connected 5 of the 10 region pairs that showed abnormal functional connectivity; linking a region in the left occipital lobe (left BA19) and five paired regions: left caudate head, left caudate body, left uncus, left thalamus, and left cuneus. Measures of WM microstructural organization were extracted from these tracts. Fractional anisotropy (FA) reductions in the ASD group relative to controls were significant for WM connecting left BA19 to left caudate head and left BA19 to left thalamus. Using a multimodal imaging approach, this study has revealed aberrant WM microstructure in tracts that directly connect brain regions that are abnormally functionally connected in ASD. These results provide novel evidence to suggest that structural brain pathology may contribute (1) to abnormal functional connectivity and (2) to atypical visuospatial processing in ASD. PMID:24133425

  8. Multiple resting state network functional connectivity abnormalities in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael C; Lovejoy, David; Kim, Jinsuh; Oakes, Howard; Kureshi, Inam; Witt, Suzanne T

    2012-06-01

    Several reports show that traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in abnormalities in the coordinated activation among brain regions. Because most previous studies examined moderate/severe TBI, the extensiveness of functional connectivity abnormalities and their relationship to postconcussive complaints or white matter microstructural damage are unclear in mild TBI. This study characterized widespread injury effects on multiple integrated neural networks typically observed during a task-unconstrained "resting state" in mild TBI patients. Whole brain functional connectivity for twelve separate networks was identified using independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI data collected from thirty mild TBI patients mostly free of macroscopic intracerebral injury and thirty demographically-matched healthy control participants. Voxelwise group comparisons found abnormal mild TBI functional connectivity in every brain network identified by ICA, including visual processing, motor, limbic, and numerous circuits believed to underlie executive cognition. Abnormalities not only included functional connectivity deficits, but also enhancements possibly reflecting compensatory neural processes. Postconcussive symptom severity was linked to abnormal regional connectivity within nearly every brain network identified, particularly anterior cingulate. A recently developed multivariate technique that identifies links between whole brain profiles of functional and anatomical connectivity identified several novel mild TBI abnormalities, and represents a potentially important new tool in the study of the complex neurobiological sequelae of TBI.

  9. Abnormal whole-brain functional connectivity in patients with primary insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Dong, Mengshi; Yin, Yi; Hua, Kelei; Fu, Shishun; Jiang, Guihua

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of the mechanism of insomnia could provide the basis for improved understanding and treatment of insomnia. The aim of this study is to investigate the abnormal functional connectivity throughout the entire brain of insomnia patients, and analyze the global distribution of these abnormalities. Whole brains of 50 patients with insomnia and 40 healthy controls were divided into 116 regions and abnormal connectivities were identified by comparing the Pearson’s correlation coefficients of each pair using general linear model analyses with covariates of age, sex, and duration of education. In patients with insomnia, regions that relate to wakefulness, emotion, worry/rumination, saliency/attention, and sensory-motor showed increased positive connectivity with each other; however, regions that often restrain each other, such as regions in salience network with regions in default mode network, showed decreased positive connectivity. Correlation analysis indicated that some increased positive functional connectivity was associated with the Self-Rating Depression Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. According to our findings, increased and decreased positive connectivities suggest function strengthening and function disinhibition, respectively, which offers a parsimonious explanation for the hyperarousal hypothesis in the level of the whole-brain functional connectivity in patients with insomnia. PMID:28243094

  10. Abnormal whole-brain functional connectivity in patients with primary insomnia.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Dong, Mengshi; Yin, Yi; Hua, Kelei; Fu, Shishun; Jiang, Guihua

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of the mechanism of insomnia could provide the basis for improved understanding and treatment of insomnia. The aim of this study is to investigate the abnormal functional connectivity throughout the entire brain of insomnia patients, and analyze the global distribution of these abnormalities. Whole brains of 50 patients with insomnia and 40 healthy controls were divided into 116 regions and abnormal connectivities were identified by comparing the Pearson's correlation coefficients of each pair using general linear model analyses with covariates of age, sex, and duration of education. In patients with insomnia, regions that relate to wakefulness, emotion, worry/rumination, saliency/attention, and sensory-motor showed increased positive connectivity with each other; however, regions that often restrain each other, such as regions in salience network with regions in default mode network, showed decreased positive connectivity. Correlation analysis indicated that some increased positive functional connectivity was associated with the Self-Rating Depression Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. According to our findings, increased and decreased positive connectivities suggest function strengthening and function disinhibition, respectively, which offers a parsimonious explanation for the hyperarousal hypothesis in the level of the whole-brain functional connectivity in patients with insomnia.

  11. Somatosensory cortex functional connectivity abnormalities in autism show opposite trends, depending on direction and spatial scale

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sheraz; Michmizos, Konstantinos; Tommerdahl, Mark; Ganesan, Santosh; Kitzbichler, Manfred G.; Zetino, Manuel; Garel, Keri-Lee A.; Herbert, Martha R.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.

    2015-01-01

    Functional connectivity is abnormal in autism, but the nature of these abnormalities remains elusive. Different studies, mostly using functional magnetic resonance imaging, have found increased, decreased, or even mixed pattern functional connectivity abnormalities in autism, but no unifying framework has emerged to date. We measured functional connectivity in individuals with autism and in controls using magnetoencephalography, which allowed us to resolve both the directionality (feedforward versus feedback) and spatial scale (local or long-range) of functional connectivity. Specifically, we measured the cortical response and functional connectivity during a passive 25-Hz vibrotactile stimulation in the somatosensory cortex of 20 typically developing individuals and 15 individuals with autism, all males and right-handed, aged 8–18, and the mu-rhythm during resting state in a subset of these participants (12 per group, same age range). Two major significant group differences emerged in the response to the vibrotactile stimulus. First, the 50-Hz phase locking component of the cortical response, generated locally in the primary (S1) and secondary (S2) somatosensory cortex, was reduced in the autism group (P < 0.003, corrected). Second, feedforward functional connectivity between S1 and S2 was increased in the autism group (P < 0.004, corrected). During resting state, there was no group difference in the mu-α rhythm. In contrast, the mu-β rhythm, which has been associated with feedback connectivity, was significantly reduced in the autism group (P < 0.04, corrected). Furthermore, the strength of the mu-β was correlated to the relative strength of 50 Hz component of the response to the vibrotactile stimulus (r = 0.78, P < 0.00005), indicating a shared aetiology for these seemingly unrelated abnormalities. These magnetoencephalography-derived measures were correlated with two different behavioural sensory processing scores (P < 0.01 and P < 0.02 for the autism

  12. Abnormal Profiles of Local Functional Connectivity Proximal to Focal Cortical Dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Besseling, René M. H.; Jansen, Jacobus F. A.; de Louw, Anton J. A.; Vlooswijk, Mariëlle C. G.; Hoeberigs, M. Christianne; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Backes, Walter H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is a congenital malformation of cortical development that often leads to medically refractory epilepsy. Focal resection can be an effective treatment, but is challenging as the surgically relevant abnormality may exceed the MR-visible lesion. The aim of the current study is to develop methodology to characterize the profile of functional connectivity around FCDs using resting-state functional MRI and in the individual patient. The detection of aberrant connectivity may provide a means to more completely delineate the clinically relevant lesion. Materials and Methods Fifteen FCD patients (age, mean±SD: 31±11 years; 11 males) and 16 matched healthy controls (35±9 years; 7 males) underwent structural and functional imaging at 3 Tesla. The cortical surface was reconstructed from the T1-weighted scan and the registered functional MRI data was spatially normalized to a common anatomical standard space employing the gyral pattern. Seed-based functional connectivity was determined in all subjects for all dysplasia locations. A single patient was excluded based on an aberrant FCD seed time series. Functional connectivity as a function of geodesic distance (along the cortical surface) was compared between the individual patients and the homotopic normative connectivity profiles derived from the controls. Results In 12/14 patients, aberrant profiles of functional connectivity were found, which demonstrated both hyper- and hypoconnectivity as well as combinations. Abnormal functional connectivity was typically found (also) beyond the lesion visible on structural MRI, while functional connectivity profiles not related to a lesion appeared normal in patients. Conclusion This novel functional MRI technique has potential for delineating functionally aberrant from normal cortex beyond the structural lesion in FCD, which remains to be confirmed in future research. PMID:27861502

  13. Abnormal lateralization of functional connectivity between language and default mode regions in autism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateralization of brain structure and function occurs in typical development, and abnormal lateralization is present in various neuropsychiatric disorders. Autism is characterized by a lack of left lateralization in structure and function of regions involved in language, such as Broca and Wernicke areas. Methods Using functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging from a large publicly available sample (n = 964), we tested whether abnormal functional lateralization in autism exists preferentially in language regions or in a more diffuse pattern across networks of lateralized brain regions. Results The autism group exhibited significantly reduced left lateralization in a few connections involving language regions and regions from the default mode network, but results were not significant throughout left- and right-lateralized networks. There is a trend that suggests the lack of left lateralization in a connection involving Wernicke area and the posterior cingulate cortex associates with more severe autism. Conclusions Abnormal language lateralization in autism may be due to abnormal language development rather than to a deficit in hemispheric specialization of the entire brain. PMID:24502324

  14. Abnormal functional connectivity in focal hand dystonia: mutual information analysis in EEG.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Lin, Peter; Auh, Sungyoung; Hallett, Mark

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate functional connectivity in focal hand dystonia patients to understand the pathophysiology underlying their abnormality in movement. We recorded EEGs from 58 electrodes in 15 focal hand dystonia patients and 15 healthy volunteers during rest and a simple finger-tapping task that did not induce any dystonic symptoms. We investigated mutual information, which provides a quantitative measure of linear and nonlinear coupling, in the alpha, beta, and gamma bands. Mean mutual information of all 58 channels and mean of the channels of interest representative of regional functional connectivity over sensorimotor areas (C3, CP3, C4, CP4, FCz, and Cz) were evaluated. For both groups, we found enhanced mutual information during the task compared with the rest condition, specifically in the beta and gamma bands for mean mutual information of all channels, and in all bands for mean mutual information of channels of interest. Comparing the focal hand dystonia patients with the healthy volunteers for both rest and task, there was reduced mutual information in the beta band for both mean mutual information of all channels and mean mutual information of channels of interest. Regarding the properties of the connectivity in the beta band, we found that the majority of the mutual information differences were from linear connectivity. The abnormal beta-band functional connectivity in focal hand dystonia patients suggests deficient brain connectivity.

  15. A broken filter: Prefrontal functional connectivity abnormalities in schizophrenia during working memory interference

    PubMed Central

    Anticevic, Alan; Repovs, Grega; Krystal, John H.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing working memory (WM) abnormalities represents a fundamental challenge in schizophrenia research given the impact of cognitive deficits on life outcome in patients. In prior work we demonstrated that dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation was related to successful distracter resistance during WM in healthy controls, but not in schizophrenia. Although understanding the impact of regional functional deficits is critical, functional connectivity abnormalities among nodes within WM networks may constitute a final common pathway for WM impairment. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that schizophrenia is associated with functional connectivity abnormalities within DLPFC networks during distraction conditions in WM. 28 patients and 24 controls completed a delayed non-verbal WM task that included transient visual distraction during the WM maintenance phase. We computed DLPFC whole-brain task-based functional connectivity (tb-fcMRI) specifically during the maintenance phase in the presence or absence of distraction. Results revealed that patients failed to modulate tb-fcMRI during distracter presentation in both cortical and sub-cortical regions. Specifically, controls demonstrated reductions in tb-fcMRI between DLPFC and the extended amygdala when distraction was present. Conversely, patients failed to demonstrate a change in coupling with the amygdala, but showed greater connectivity with medio-dorsal thalamus. While controls showed more positive coupling between DLPFC and other prefrontal cortical regions during distracter presentation, patients failed to exhibit such a modulation. Taken together, these findings support the notion that observed distracter resistance deficit involves a breakdown in coupling between DLPFC and distributed regions, encompassing both subcortical (thalamic/limbic) and control region connectivity. PMID:22863548

  16. ABNORMAL STRIATAL RESTING-STATE FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY IN ADOLESCENTS WITH OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Gail A.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Schreiner, Melinda Westlund; Campbell, Sarah M.; Regan, Emily K.; Nelson, Peter M.; Houri, Alaa K.; Lee, Susanne S.; Zagoloff, Alexandra D.; Lim, Kelvin O.; Yacoub, Essa S.; Cullen, Kathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging research has implicated abnormalities in cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical (CSTC) circuitry in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In this study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) was used to investigate functional connectivity in the CSTC in adolescents with OCD. Imaging was obtained with the Human Connectome Project (HCP) scanner using newly developed pulse sequences which allow for higher spatial and temporal resolution. Fifteen adolescents with OCD and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (ages 12-19) underwent R-fMRI on the 3T HCP scanner. Twenty-four minutes of resting-state scans (two consecutive 12-minute scans) were acquired. We investigated functional connectivity of the striatum using a seed-based, whole brain approach with anatomically-defined seeds placed in the bilateral caudate, putamen, and nucleus accumbens. Adolescents with OCD compared with controls exhibited significantly lower functional connectivity between the left putamen and a single cluster of right-sided cortical areas including the orbitofrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and operculum. Preliminary findings suggest that impaired striatal connectivity in adolescents with OCD in part falls within the predicted CSTC network, and also involves impaired connections between a key CSTC network region (i.e., putamen) and key regions in the salience network (i.e., insula/operculum). The relevance of impaired putamen-insula/operculum connectivity in OCD is discussed. PMID:26674413

  17. Abnormal striatal resting-state functional connectivity in adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Gail A; Mueller, Bryon A; Schreiner, Melinda Westlund; Campbell, Sarah M; Regan, Emily K; Nelson, Peter M; Houri, Alaa K; Lee, Susanne S; Zagoloff, Alexandra D; Lim, Kelvin O; Yacoub, Essa S; Cullen, Kathryn R

    2016-01-30

    Neuroimaging research has implicated abnormalities in cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical (CSTC) circuitry in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In this study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) was used to investigate functional connectivity in the CSTC circuitry in adolescents with OCD. Imaging was obtained with the Human Connectome Project (HCP) scanner using newly developed pulse sequences which allow for higher spatial and temporal resolution. Fifteen adolescents with OCD and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (ages 12-19) underwent R-fMRI on the 3T HCP scanner. Twenty-four minutes of resting-state scans (two consecutive 12-min scans) were acquired. We investigated functional connectivity of the striatum using a seed-based, whole brain approach with anatomically-defined seeds placed in the bilateral caudate, putamen, and nucleus accumbens. Adolescents with OCD compared with controls exhibited significantly lower functional connectivity between the left putamen and a single cluster of right-sided cortical areas including parts of the orbitofrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and operculum. Preliminary findings suggest that impaired striatal connectivity in adolescents with OCD in part falls within the predicted CSTC network, and also involves impaired connections between a key CSTC network region (i.e., putamen) and key regions in the salience network (i.e., insula/operculum). The relevance of impaired putamen-insula/operculum connectivity in OCD is discussed.

  18. Resting state functional MRI reveals abnormal network connectivity in Neurofibromatosis 1

    PubMed Central

    Tomson, S.N.; Schreiner, M.; Narayan, M.; Rosser, Tena; Enrique, Nicole; Silva, Alcino J.; Allen, G.I.; Bookheimer, S.Y.; Bearden, C.E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the neurofibromin 1 gene at locus 17q11.2. Individuals with NF1 have an increased incidence of learning disabilities, attention deficits and autism spectrum disorders. As a single gene disorder, NF1 represents a valuable model for understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships. While mouse models have elucidated molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying learning deficits associated with this mutation, little is known about functional brain architecture in human subjects with NF1. To address this question, we used resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) to elucidate the intrinsic network structure of 30 NF1 participants compared with 30 healthy demographically matched controls during an eyes-open rs-fcMRI scan. Novel statistical methods were employed to quantify differences in local connectivity (edge strength) and modularity structure, in combination with traditional global graph theory applications. Our findings suggest that individuals with NF1 have reduced anterior-posterior connectivity, weaker bilateral edges, and altered modularity clustering relative to healthy controls. Further, edge strength and modular clustering indices were correlated with IQ and internalizing symptoms. These findings suggest that Ras signaling disruption may lead to abnormal functional brain connectivity; further investigation into the functional consequences of these alterations in both humans and in animal models is warranted. PMID:26304096

  19. Resting state functional MRI reveals abnormal network connectivity in neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Tomson, Steffie N; Schreiner, Matthew J; Narayan, Manjari; Rosser, Tena; Enrique, Nicole; Silva, Alcino J; Allen, Genevera I; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Bearden, Carrie E

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the neurofibromin 1 gene at locus 17q11.2. Individuals with NF1 have an increased incidence of learning disabilities, attention deficits, and autism spectrum disorders. As a single-gene disorder, NF1 represents a valuable model for understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships. While mouse models have elucidated molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying learning deficits associated with this mutation, little is known about functional brain architecture in human subjects with NF1. To address this question, we used resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fcMRI) to elucidate the intrinsic network structure of 30 NF1 participants compared with 30 healthy demographically matched controls during an eyes-open rs-fcMRI scan. Novel statistical methods were employed to quantify differences in local connectivity (edge strength) and modularity structure, in combination with traditional global graph theory applications. Our findings suggest that individuals with NF1 have reduced anterior-posterior connectivity, weaker bilateral edges, and altered modularity clustering relative to healthy controls. Further, edge strength and modular clustering indices were correlated with IQ and internalizing symptoms. These findings suggest that Ras signaling disruption may lead to abnormal functional brain connectivity; further investigation into the functional consequences of these alterations in both humans and in animal models is warranted.

  20. Abnormal Resting-State Connectivity at Functional MRI in Women with Premenstrual Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Li, Rui; Zhou, Renlai; Li, Juan; Gu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refers to a series of cycling and relapsing physical, emotion and behavior syndromes that occur in the luteal phase and resolve soon after the onset of menses. Although PMS is widely recognized, its neural mechanism is still unclear. Design To address this question, we measured brain activity for women with PMS and women without PMS (control group) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). In addition, the participants should complete the emotion scales (Beck Anxiety Inventory, BAI; Beck Depression Inventory, BDI, before the scanning) as well as the stress perception scale (Visual analog scale for stress, VAS, before and after the scanning). Results The results showed that compared with the control group, the PMS group had decreased connectivity in the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) and theparahippocampalgyrus (PHG), as well as increased connectivity in the left medial/superior temporal gyri (MTG/STG) and precentralgyrus within the default mode network (DMN); in addition, the PMS group had higher anxiety and depression scale scores, together with lower stress perception scores. Finally, there were significantly positive correlations between the stress perception scores and functional connectivity in the MFG and cuneus. The BDI scores in the PMS group were correlated negatively with the functional connectivity in the MFG and precuneus and correlated positively with the functional connectivity in the MTG. Conclusion These findings suggest that compared with normal women, women with PMS displayed abnormal stress sensitivity, which was reflected in the decreased and increased functional connectivity within the DMN, blunted stress perception and higher depression. PMID:26325510

  1. Abnormal dynamics of cortical resting state functional connectivity in chronic headache patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zewei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Li Min

    2017-02-01

    The goals of this study are to characterize the temporal dynamics of inter-regional connectivity of the brain in chronic headache (CH) patients versus their age/gender matched controls (CONCH, n=28 pairs), and to determine whether dynamic measures reveal additional features to static functional connectivity and correlate with psychometric scores. Cortical thickness and inter-regional resting state fMRI connectivity were quantified and compared between CH and CONCH groups. Six cortical regions of interest (ROI) pairs that exhibited correlated cortical thickness and static functional connectivity abnormalities were selected for temporal dynamic analysis. Two methods were used: temporal sliding-window (SW) and wavelet transformation coherence (WTC). SW analyses using three temporal windows of 30, 60, 120s revealed that all six ROI pairs of CH exhibited higher percentage of strong connectivity (high r values), and smaller fast Fourier transform (FFT) amplitudes at a very low frequency range (i.e., 0.002-0.01Hz), compared to those of CONCH. These features were particularly prevalent in the 120s window analysis. Less variable dynamic fluctuation (i.e., smaller standard deviation of r values) was identified in two out of six ROI pairs in CH. WTC analysis revealed that time-averaged coherence was generally greater in CH than CONCH between wavelet decomposition scales 20 to 55 (0.018-0.05Hz), and was statistically significant in three out of six ROI pairs. Together, the most robust and significant differences in temporal dynamics between CH and CONCH were detected in two ROI pairs: left medial-orbitofrontal-left posterior-cingulate and left medial-orbitofrontal-left inferior-temporal. The high degrees of sleep disturbance (high PSQI score), depression (high HRSD score) and fatigue (low SF-36 score) were associated with high degree of inter-regional temporal coherence in CH. In summary, these dynamic functional connectivity (dFC) measures uncovered a temporal "lock

  2. Major depressive disorder is associated with abnormal interoceptive activity and functional connectivity in the insula

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Jason; Drevets, Wayne C.; Moseman, Scott; Bodurka, Jerzy; Barcalow, Joel; Simmons, W. Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Background Somatic complaints and altered interoceptive awareness are common features in the clinical presentation of major depressive disorder (MDD). Recently, neurobiological evidence has accumulated demonstrating that the insula is one of the primary cortical structures underlying interoceptive awareness. Abnormal interoceptive representation within the insula may thus contribute to the pathophysiology and symptomatology of MDD. Methods We compared fMRI blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses between twenty unmedicated adults with MDD and twenty healthy control participants during a task requiring attention to visceral interoceptive sensations and also assessed the relationship of this BOLD response to depression severity, as rated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Additionally, we examined between-group differences in insula resting-state functional connectivity, and its relationship to HDRS ratings of depression severity. Results Relative to the healthy controls, unmedicated MDD subjects exhibited decreased activity bilaterally in the dorsal mid-insula cortex (dmIC) during interoception, as well as within a network of brain regions implicated previously in emotion and visceral control. Activity within the insula during the interoceptive attention task was negatively correlated with both depression severity and somatic symptom severity in depressed subjects. MDD also was associated with greater resting-state functional connectivity between the dmIC and limbic brain regions implicated previously in MDD, including the amygdala, subgenual prefrontal cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex. Moreover, functional connectivity between these regions and the dmIC was positively correlated with depression severity. Conclusions MDD and the somatic symptoms of depression are associated with abnormal interoceptive representation within the insula. PMID:24387823

  3. Abnormal functional global and local brain connectivity in female patients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Daniel; Borchardt, Viola; Lord, Anton R.; Boehm, Ilka; Ritschel, Franziska; Zwipp, Johannes; Clas, Sabine; King, Joseph A.; Wolff-Stephan, Silvia; Roessner, Veit; Walter, Martin; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous resting-state functional connectivity studies in patients with anorexia nervosa used independent component analysis or seed-based connectivity analysis to probe specific brain networks. Instead, modelling the entire brain as a complex network allows determination of graph-theoretical metrics, which describe global and local properties of how brain networks are organized and how they interact. Methods To determine differences in network properties between female patients with acute anorexia nervosa and pairwise matched healthy controls, we used resting-state fMRI and computed well-established global and local graph metrics across a range of network densities. Results Our analyses included 35 patients and 35 controls. We found that the global functional network structure in patients with anorexia nervosa is characterized by increases in both characteristic path length (longer average routes between nodes) and assortativity (more nodes with a similar connectedness link together). Accordingly, we found locally decreased connectivity strength and increased path length in the posterior insula and thalamus. Limitations The present results may be limited to the methods applied during preprocessing and network construction. Conclusion We demonstrated anorexia nervosa–related changes in the network configuration for, to our knowledge, the first time using resting-state fMRI and graph-theoretical measures. Our findings revealed an altered global brain network architecture accompanied by local degradations indicating wide-scale disturbance in information flow across brain networks in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Reduced local network efficiency in the thalamus and posterior insula may reflect a mechanism that helps explain the impaired integration of visuospatial and homeostatic signals in patients with this disorder, which is thought to be linked to abnormal representations of body size and hunger. PMID:26252451

  4. Functional Connectivity Abnormalities of Brain Regions with Structural Deficits in Young Adult Male Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Limei; Yu, Dahua; Su, Shaoping; Ma, Yao; von Deneen, Karen M.; Luo, Lin; Zhai, Jinquan; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Jiadong; Guan, Yanyan; Li, Yangding; Bi, Yanzhi; Xue, Ting; Lu, Xiaoqi; Yuan, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is one of the most prevalent dependence disorders. Previous studies have detected structural and functional deficits in smokers. However, few studies focused on the changes of resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the brain regions with structural deficits in young adult smokers. Twenty-six young adult smokers and 26 well-matched healthy non-smokers participated in our study. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and RSFC were employed to investigate the structural and functional changes in young adult smokers. Compared with healthy non-smokers, young smokers showed increased gray matter (GM) volume in the left putamen and decreased GM volume in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Moreover, GM volume in the left ACC has a negative correlation trend with pack-years and GM volume in the left putamen was positively correlated with pack-years. The left ACC and putamen with abnormal volumes were chosen as the regions of interest (ROIs) for the RSFC analysis. We found that smokers showed increased RSFC between the left ACC and right amygdala and between the left putamen and right anterior insula. We revealed structural and functional deficits within the frontostriatal circuits in young smokers, which may shed new insights into the neural mechanisms of smoking. PMID:27757078

  5. Abnormal resting-state functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens in multi-year abstinent heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Zou, Feng; Wu, Xinhuai; Zhai, Tianye; Lei, Yu; Shao, Yongcong; Jin, Xiao; Tan, Shuwen; Wu, Bing; Wang, Lubin; Yang, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that abnormal brain functional connectivity may be the neural underpinning of addiction to illicit drugs and of relapse after successful cessation therapy. Aberrant brain networks have been demonstrated in addicted patients and in newly abstinent addicts. However, it is not known whether abnormal brain connectivity patterns persist after prolonged abstinence. In this cross-sectional study, whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance images (8 min) were collected from 30 heroin-addicted individuals after a long period of abstinence (more than 3 years) and from 30 healthy controls. We first examined the group differences in the resting-state functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region implicated in relapse-related processes, including craving and reactivity to stress following acute and protracted withdrawal from heroin. We then examined the relation between the duration of abstinence and the altered NAc functional connectivity in the heroin group. We found that, compared with controls, heroin-dependent participants exhibited significantly greater functional connectivity between the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the NAc and weaker functional connectivity between the NAc and the left putamen, left precuneus, and supplementary motor area. However, with longer abstinence time, the strength of NAc functional connectivity with the left putamen increased. These results indicate that dysfunction of the NAc functional network is still present in long-term-abstinent heroin-dependent individuals.

  6. Abnormal brain functional connectivity leads to impaired mood and cognition in hyperthyroidism: a resting-state functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Zhi, Mengmeng; Hou, Zhenghua; Zhang, Yuqun; Yue, Yingying; Yuan, Yonggui

    2017-01-01

    Patients with hyperthyroidism frequently have neuropsychiatric complaints such as lack of concentration, poor memory, depression, anxiety, nervousness, and irritability, suggesting brain dysfunction. However, the underlying process of these symptoms remains unclear. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI), we depicted the altered graph theoretical metric degree centrality (DC) and seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (FC) in 33 hyperthyroid patients relative to 33 healthy controls. The peak points of significantly altered DC between the two groups were defined as the seed regions to calculate FC to the whole brain. Then, partial correlation analyses were performed between abnormal DC, FC and neuropsychological performances, as well as some clinical indexes. The decreased intrinsic functional connectivity in the posterior lobe of cerebellum (PLC) and medial frontal gyrus (MeFG), as well as the abnormal seed-based FC anchored in default mode network (DMN), attention network, visual network and cognitive network in this study, possibly constitutes the latent mechanism for emotional and cognitive changes in hyperthyroidism, including anxiety and impaired processing speed. PMID:28009983

  7. Gray Matter Abnormalities in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Relationships with Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Episodic Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Gaelle E.; He, Xiaosong; Sperling, Michael; Sharan, Ashwini; Tracy, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affects multiple brain regions through evidence from both structural (gray matter; GM) and functional connectivity (FC) studies. We tested whether these structural abnormalities were associated with FC abnormalities, and assessed the ability of these measures to explain episodic memory impairments in this population. A resting-state and T1 sequences were acquired on 94 (45 with mesial temporal pathology) TLE patients and 50 controls, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. A voxel-based morphometry analysis was computed to determine the GM volume differences between groups (right, left TLE, controls). Resting-state FC between the abnormal GM volume regions was computed, and compared between groups. Finally, we investigated the relation between EM, GM and FC findings. Patients with and without temporal pathology were analyzed separately. The results revealed reduced GM volume in multiple regions in the patients relative to the controls. Using FC, we found the abnormal GM regions did not display abnormal functional connectivity. Lastly, we found in left TLE patients, verbal episodic memory was associated with abnormal left posterior hippocampus volume, while in right TLE, non-verbal episodic memory was better predicted by resting-state FC measures. This study investigated TLE abnormalities using a multi-modal approach combining GM, FC and neurocognitive measures. We did not find that the GM abnormalities were functionally or abnormally connected during an inter-ictal resting state, which may reflect a weak sensitivity of functional connectivity to the epileptic network. We provided evidence that verbal and non-verbal episodic memory in left and right TLE patients may have distinct relationships with structural and functional measures. Lastly, we provide data suggesting that in the setting of occult, non-lesional right TLE pathology, a coupling of structural and functional abnormalities in extra-temporal/non-ictal regions is

  8. Abnormal Functional Connectivity in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Dardo; Volkow, Nora D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is typically characterized by symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, but there is increased recognition of a motivation deficit too. This neuropathology may reflect dysfunction of both attention and reward-motivation networks. Methods To test this hypothesis, we compared the functional connectivity density between 247 ADHD and 304 typically developing control children from a public magnetic resonance imaging database. We quantified short- and long-range functional connectivity density in the brain using an ultrafast data-driven approach. Results Children with ADHD had lower connectivity (short- and long-range) in regions of the dorsal attention (superior parietal cortex) and default-mode (precuneus) networks and in cerebellum and higher connectivity (short-range) in reward-motivation regions (ventral striatum and orbitofrontal cortex) than control subjects. In ADHD children, the orbitofrontal cortex (region involved in salience attribution) had higher connectivity with reward-motivation regions (striatum and anterior cingulate) and lower connectivity with superior parietal cortex (region involved in attention processing). Conclusions The enhanced connectivity within reward-motivation regions and their decreased connectivity with regions from the default-mode and dorsal attention networks suggest impaired interactions between control and reward pathways in ADHD that might underlie attention and motivation deficits in ADHD. PMID:22153589

  9. Abnormalities in Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Foryt, Paul; Ochs, Renee; Chung, Jae-Hoon; Wu, Ying; Parrish, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Limited information is available concerning changes that occur in the brain early in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This investigation evaluated resting-state functional connectivity, which is based on correlations of spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) oscillations between brain regions, in 15 subjects within the first year of HIV infection and in 15 age-matched controls. Resting-state fMRI data for each session were concatenated in time across subjects to create a single 4D dataset and decomposed into 36 independent component analysis (ICA) using Multivariate Exploratory Linear Optimized Decomposition into Independent Components. ICA components were back-reconstructed for each subject's 4D data to estimate subject-specific spatial maps using the dual-regression technique. Comparison of spatial maps between HIV and controls revealed significant differences in the lateral occipital cortex (LOC) network. Reduced coactivation in left inferior parietal cortex within the LOC network was identified in the HIV subjects. Connectivity strength within this region correlated with performance on tasks involving visual-motor coordination (Grooved Pegboard and Rey Figure Copy) in the HIV group. The findings indicate prominent changes in resting-state functional connectivity of visual networks early in HIV infection. This network may sustain injury in association with the intense viremia and brain viral invasion before immune defenses can contain viral replication. Resting-state functional connectivity may have utility as a noninvasive neuroimaging biomarker for central nervous system impairment in early HIV infection. PMID:22433049

  10. Resting state functional MRI reveals abnormal network connectivity in orthostatic tremor.

    PubMed

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D; Manzanedo, Eva; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Molina-Arjona, José Antonio; Matarazzo, Michele; Romero, Juan Pablo; Domínguez-González, Cristina; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Sánchez-Ferro, Álvaro

    2016-07-01

    Very little is known about the pathogenesis of orthostatic tremor (OT). We have observed that OT patients might have deficits in specific aspects of neuropsychological function, particularly those thought to rely on the integrity of the prefrontal cortex, which suggests a possible involvement of frontocerebellar circuits. We examined whether resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) might provide further insights into the pathogenesis on OT. Resting-state fMRI data in 13 OT patients (11 women and 2 men) and 13 matched healthy controls were analyzed using independent component analysis, in combination with a "dual-regression" technique, to identify group differences in several resting-state networks (RSNs). All participants also underwent neuropsychological testing during the same session. Relative to healthy controls, OT patients showed increased connectivity in RSNs involved in cognitive processes (default mode network [DMN] and frontoparietal networks), and decreased connectivity in the cerebellum and sensorimotor networks. Changes in network integrity were associated not only with duration (DMN and medial visual network), but also with cognitive function. Moreover, in at least 2 networks (DMN and medial visual network), increased connectivity was associated with worse performance on different cognitive domains (attention, executive function, visuospatial ability, visual memory, and language). In this exploratory study, we observed selective impairments of RSNs in OT patients. This and other future resting-state fMRI studies might provide a novel method to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of motor and nonmotor features of OT.

  11. Resting state functional MRI reveals abnormal network connectivity in orthostatic tremor

    PubMed Central

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D.; Manzanedo, Eva; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Molina-Arjona, José Antonio; Matarazzo, Michele; Romero, Juan Pablo; Domínguez-González, Cristina; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Sánchez-Ferro, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Very little is known about the pathogenesis of orthostatic tremor (OT). We have observed that OT patients might have deficits in specific aspects of neuropsychological function, particularly those thought to rely on the integrity of the prefrontal cortex, which suggests a possible involvement of frontocerebellar circuits. We examined whether resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) might provide further insights into the pathogenesis on OT. Resting-state fMRI data in 13 OT patients (11 women and 2 men) and 13 matched healthy controls were analyzed using independent component analysis, in combination with a “dual-regression” technique, to identify group differences in several resting-state networks (RSNs). All participants also underwent neuropsychological testing during the same session. Relative to healthy controls, OT patients showed increased connectivity in RSNs involved in cognitive processes (default mode network [DMN] and frontoparietal networks), and decreased connectivity in the cerebellum and sensorimotor networks. Changes in network integrity were associated not only with duration (DMN and medial visual network), but also with cognitive function. Moreover, in at least 2 networks (DMN and medial visual network), increased connectivity was associated with worse performance on different cognitive domains (attention, executive function, visuospatial ability, visual memory, and language). In this exploratory study, we observed selective impairments of RSNs in OT patients. This and other future resting-state fMRI studies might provide a novel method to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of motor and nonmotor features of OT. PMID:27442678

  12. Abnormal functional connectivity density in patients with ischemic white matter lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ju-Rong; Ding, Xin; Hua, Bo; Xiong, Xingzhong; Wang, Qingsong; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract White matter lesions (WMLs) are frequently detected in elderly people. Previous structural and functional studies have demonstrated that WMLs are associated with cognitive and motor decline. However, the underlying mechanism of how WMLs lead to cognitive decline and motor disturbance remains unclear. We used functional connectivity density mapping (FCDM) to investigate changes in brain functional connectivity in 16 patients with ischemic WMLs and 13 controls. Both short- and long-range FCD maps were computed, and group comparisons were performed between the 2 groups. A correlation analysis was further performed between regions with altered FCD and cognitive test scores (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] and Montreal Cognitive Assessment [MoCA]) in the patient group. We found that patients with ischemic WMLs showed reduced short-range FCD in the temporal cortex, primary motor cortex, and subcortical region, which may account for inadequate top-down attention, impaired motor, memory, and executive function associated with WMLs. The positive correlation between primary motor cortex and MoCA scores may provide evidence for the influences of cognitive function on behavioral performance. The inferior parietal cortex exhibited increased short-range FCD, reflecting a hyper bottom-up attention to compensate for the inadequate top-down attention for language comprehension and information retrieval in patients with WMLs. Moreover, the prefrontal and primary motor cortex showed increased long-range FCD and the former positively correlated with MoCA scores, which may suggest a strategy of cortical functional reorganization to compensate for motor and executive deficits. Our findings provide new insights into how WMLs cause cognitive and motor decline from cortical functional connectivity perspective. PMID:27603353

  13. Abnormal gray matter volume and resting-state functional connectivity in former heroin-dependent individuals abstinent for multiple years.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lubin; Zou, Feng; Zhai, Tianye; Lei, Yu; Tan, Shuwen; Jin, Xiao; Ye, Enmao; Shao, Yongcong; Yang, Yihong; Yang, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that heroin addiction is associated with structural and functional brain abnormalities. However, it is largely unknown whether these characteristics of brain abnormalities would be persistent or restored after long periods of abstinence. Considering the very high rates of relapse, we hypothesized that there may exist some latent neural vulnerabilities in abstinent heroin users. In this study, structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected from 30 former heroin-dependent (FHD) subjects who were drug free for more than 3 years and 30 non-addicted control (CN) volunteers. Voxel-based morphometry was used to identify possible gray matter volume differences between the FHD and CN groups. Alterations in resting-state functional connectivity in FHD were examined using brain areas with gray matter deficits as seed regions. Significantly reduced gray matter volume was observed in FHD in an area surrounding the parieto-occipital sulcus, which included the precuneus and cuneus. Functional connectivity analyses revealed that the FHD subjects showed reduced positive correlation within the default mode network and visual network and decreased negative correlation between the default mode network, visual network and task positive network. Moreover, the altered functional connectivity was correlated with self-reported impulsivity scores in the FHD subjects. Our findings suggest that disruption of large-scale brain systems is present in former heroin users even after multi-year abstinence, which could serve as system-level neural underpinnings for behavioral dysfunctions associated with addiction.

  14. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S.; De Jesus, Danilo R.; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Schutter, Dennis J.L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. Results We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. Limitations The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders. PMID:23937798

  15. Abnormal asymmetry of brain connectivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ribolsi, Michele; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown a significant reduction of leftward asymmetry in some key white-matter tracts in SCZ. In this paper, we review the studies that investigated both structural brain asymmetry and asymmetry of functional connectivity in healthy subjects and SCZ. From an analysis of the existing literature on this topic, we can hypothesize an overall generally attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in SCZ compared to healthy controls. Such attenuated asymmetry increases with the duration of the disease and correlates with psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that structural deficits across the corpus callosum may contribute to the abnormal asymmetry of intra-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia.

  16. Abnormal Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Results of Seed and Data-Driven Analyses.

    PubMed

    Gay, Charles W; Robinson, Michael E; Lai, Song; O'Shea, Andrew; Craggs, Jason G; Price, Donald D; Staud, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Although altered resting-state functional connectivity (FC) is a characteristic of many chronic pain conditions, it has not yet been evaluated in patients with chronic fatigue. Our objective was to investigate the association between fatigue and altered resting-state FC in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Thirty-six female subjects, 19 ME/CFS and 17 healthy controls, completed a fatigue inventory before undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two methods, (1) data driven and (2) model based, were used to estimate and compare the intraregional FC between both groups during the resting state (RS). The first approach using independent component analysis was applied to investigate five RS networks: the default mode network, salience network (SN), left frontoparietal networks (LFPN) and right frontoparietal networks, and the sensory motor network (SMN). The second approach used a priori selected seed regions demonstrating abnormal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in ME/CFS patients at rest. In ME/CFS patients, Method-1 identified decreased intrinsic connectivity among regions within the LFPN. Furthermore, the FC of the left anterior midcingulate with the SMN and the connectivity of the left posterior cingulate cortex with the SN were significantly decreased. For Method-2, five distinct clusters within the right parahippocampus and occipital lobes, demonstrating significant rCBF reductions in ME/CFS patients, were used as seeds. The parahippocampal seed and three occipital lobe seeds showed altered FC with other brain regions. The degree of abnormal connectivity correlated with the level of self-reported fatigue. Our results confirm altered RS FC in patients with ME/CFS, which was significantly correlated with the severity of their chronic fatigue.

  17. Abnormal Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Results of Seed and Data-Driven Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Charles W.; Robinson, Michael E.; Lai, Song; O'Shea, Andrew; Craggs, Jason G.; Price, Donald D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although altered resting-state functional connectivity (FC) is a characteristic of many chronic pain conditions, it has not yet been evaluated in patients with chronic fatigue. Our objective was to investigate the association between fatigue and altered resting-state FC in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Thirty-six female subjects, 19 ME/CFS and 17 healthy controls, completed a fatigue inventory before undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two methods, (1) data driven and (2) model based, were used to estimate and compare the intraregional FC between both groups during the resting state (RS). The first approach using independent component analysis was applied to investigate five RS networks: the default mode network, salience network (SN), left frontoparietal networks (LFPN) and right frontoparietal networks, and the sensory motor network (SMN). The second approach used a priori selected seed regions demonstrating abnormal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in ME/CFS patients at rest. In ME/CFS patients, Method-1 identified decreased intrinsic connectivity among regions within the LFPN. Furthermore, the FC of the left anterior midcingulate with the SMN and the connectivity of the left posterior cingulate cortex with the SN were significantly decreased. For Method-2, five distinct clusters within the right parahippocampus and occipital lobes, demonstrating significant rCBF reductions in ME/CFS patients, were used as seeds. The parahippocampal seed and three occipital lobe seeds showed altered FC with other brain regions. The degree of abnormal connectivity correlated with the level of self-reported fatigue. Our results confirm altered RS FC in patients with ME/CFS, which was significantly correlated with the severity of their chronic fatigue. PMID:26449441

  18. Cocaine addiction is associated with abnormal prefrontal function, increased striatal connectivity and sensitivity to monetary incentives, and decreased connectivity outside the human reward circuit.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Lucía; Cámara, Estela; Sampedro, Frederic; Pérez de Los Cobos, José; Batlle, Francesca; Fabregas, Josep Maria; Sales, Joan Artur; Cervantes, Mercè; Ferrer, Xavier; Lazcano, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Riba, Jordi

    2017-05-01

    Cocaine addiction has been associated with increased sensitivity of the human reward circuit to drug-related stimuli. However, the capacity of non-drug incentives to engage this network is poorly understood. Here, we characterized the functional sensitivity to monetary incentives and the structural integrity of the human reward circuit in abstinent cocaine-dependent (CD) patients and their matched controls. We assessed the BOLD response to monetary gains and losses in 30 CD patients and 30 healthy controls performing a lottery task in a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We measured brain gray matter volume (GMV) using voxel-based morphometry and white matter microstructure using voxel-based fractional anisotropy (FA). Functional data showed that, after monetary incentives, CD patients exhibited higher activation in the ventral striatum than controls. Furthermore, we observed an inverted BOLD response pattern in the prefrontal cortex, with activity being highest after unexpected high gains and lowest after losses. Patients showed increased GMV in the caudate and the orbitofrontal cortex, increased white matter FA in the orbito-striatal pathway but decreased FA in antero-posterior association bundles. Abnormal activation in the prefrontal cortex correlated with GMV and FA increases in the orbitofrontal cortex. While functional abnormalities in the ventral striatum were inversely correlated with abstinence duration, structural alterations were not. In conclusion, results suggest abnormal incentive processing in CD patients with high salience for rewards and punishments in subcortical structures but diminished prefrontal control after adverse outcomes. They further suggest that hypertrophy and hyper-connectivity within the reward circuit, to the expense of connectivity outside this network, characterize cocaine addiction.

  19. Cocaine addiction related reproducible brain regions of abnormal default-mode network functional connectivity: a group ICA study with different model orders.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyu; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2013-08-26

    Model order selection in group independent component analysis (ICA) has a significant effect on the obtained components. This study investigated the reproducible brain regions of abnormal default-mode network (DMN) functional connectivity related with cocaine addiction through different model order settings in group ICA. Resting-state fMRI data from 24 cocaine addicts and 24 healthy controls were temporally concatenated and processed by group ICA using model orders of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50, respectively. For each model order, the group ICA approach was repeated 100 times using the ICASSO toolbox and after clustering the obtained components, centrotype-based anterior and posterior DMN components were selected for further analysis. Individual DMN components were obtained through back-reconstruction and converted to z-score maps. A whole brain mixed effects factorial ANOVA was performed to explore the differences in resting-state DMN functional connectivity between cocaine addicts and healthy controls. The hippocampus, which showed decreased functional connectivity in cocaine addicts for all the tested model orders, might be considered as a reproducible abnormal region in DMN associated with cocaine addiction. This finding suggests that using group ICA to examine the functional connectivity of the hippocampus in the resting-state DMN may provide an additional insight potentially relevant for cocaine-related diagnoses and treatments.

  20. Whole-brain functional connectivity during emotional word classification in medication-free Major Depressive Disorder: Abnormal salience circuitry and relations to positive emotionality☆

    PubMed Central

    van Tol, Marie-José; Veer, Ilya M.; van der Wee, Nic J.A.; Aleman, André; van Buchem, Mark A.; Rombouts, Serge A.R.B.; Zitman, Frans G.; Veltman, Dick J.; Johnstone, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been associated with biased processing and abnormal regulation of negative and positive information, which may result from compromised coordinated activity of prefrontal and subcortical brain regions involved in evaluating emotional information. We tested whether patients with MDD show distributed changes in functional connectivity with a set of independently derived brain networks that have shown high correspondence with different task demands, including stimulus salience and emotional processing. We further explored if connectivity during emotional word processing related to the tendency to engage in positive or negative emotional states. In this study, 25 medication-free MDD patients without current or past comorbidity and matched controls (n = 25) performed an emotional word-evaluation task during functional MRI. Using a dual regression approach, individual spatial connectivity maps representing each subject's connectivity with each standard network were used to evaluate between-group differences and effects of positive and negative emotionality (extraversion and neuroticism, respectively, as measured with the NEO-FFI). Results showed decreased functional connectivity of the medial prefrontal cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and ventral striatum with the fronto-opercular salience network in MDD patients compared to controls. In patients, abnormal connectivity was related to extraversion, but not neuroticism. These results confirm the hypothesis of a relative (para)limbic–cortical decoupling that may explain dysregulated affect in MDD. As connectivity of these regions with the salience network was related to extraversion, but not to general depression severity or negative emotionality, dysfunction of this network may be responsible for the failure to sustain engagement in rewarding behavior. PMID:24179829

  1. Abnormal regional activity and functional connectivity in resting-state brain networks associated with etiology confirmed unilateral pulsatile tinnitus in the early stage of disease.

    PubMed

    Lv, Han; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Zhaohui; Li, Rui; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Peng; Yan, Fei; Liu, Liheng; Wang, Guopeng; Zeng, Rong; Li, Ting; Dong, Cheng; Gong, Shusheng; Wang, Zhenchang

    2017-03-01

    Abnormal neural activities can be revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) using analyses of the regional activity and functional connectivity (FC) of the networks in the brain. This study was designed to demonstrate the functional network alterations in the patients with pulsatile tinnitus (PT). In this study, we recruited 45 patients with unilateral PT in the early stage of disease (less than 48 months of disease duration) and 45 normal controls. We used regional homogeneity (ReHo) and seed-based FC computational methods to reveal resting-state brain activity features associated with pulsatile tinnitus. Compared with healthy controls, PT patients showed regional abnormalities mainly in the left middle occipital gyrus (MOG), posterior cingulate gyrus (PCC), precuneus and right anterior insula (AI). When these regions were defined as seeds, we demonstrated widespread modification of interaction between the auditory and non-auditory networks. The auditory network was positively connected with the cognitive control network (CCN), which may associate with tinnitus related distress. Both altered regional activity and changed FC were found in the visual network. The modification of interactions of higher order networks were mainly found in the DMN, CCN and limbic networks. Functional connectivity between the left MOG and left parahippocampal gyrus could also be an index to reflect the disease duration. This study helped us gain a better understanding of the characteristics of neural network modifications in patients with pulsatile tinnitus.

  2. Functionally reduced sensorimotor connections form with normal specificity despite abnormal muscle spindle development: the role of spindle-derived neurotrophin 3.

    PubMed

    Shneider, Neil A; Mentis, George Z; Schustak, Joshua; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2009-04-15

    The mechanisms controlling the formation of synaptic connections between muscle spindle afferents and spinal motor neurons are believed to be regulated by factors originating from muscle spindles. Here, we find that the connections form with appropriate specificity in mice with abnormal spindle development caused by the conditional elimination of the neuregulin 1 receptor ErbB2 from muscle precursors. However, despite a modest ( approximately 30%) decrease in the number of afferent terminals on motor neuron somata, the amplitude of afferent-evoked synaptic potentials recorded in motor neurons was reduced by approximately 80%, suggesting that many of the connections that form are functionally silent. The selective elimination of neurotrophin 3 (NT3) from muscle spindles had no effect on the amplitude of afferent-evoked ventral root potentials until the second postnatal week, revealing a late role for spindle-derived NT3 in the functional maintenance of the connections. These findings indicate that spindle-derived factors regulate the strength of the connections but not their initial formation or their specificity.

  3. Functionally reduced sensorimotor connections form with normal specificity despite abnormal muscle spindle development: the role of spindle-derived NT3

    PubMed Central

    Shneider, Neil A.; Mentis, George Z.; Schustak, Joshua; O’Donovan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms controlling the formation of synaptic connections between muscle spindle afferents and spinal motor neurons are believed to be regulated by factors originating from muscle spindles. Here, we find that the connections form with appropriate specificity in mice with abnormal spindle development caused by the conditional elimination of the neuregulin1 receptor ErbB2 from muscle precursors. However, despite a modest (~30%) decrease in the number of afferent terminals on motor neuron somata, the amplitude of afferent-evoked synaptic potentials recorded in motor neurons was reduced by ~80%, suggesting that many of the connections that form are functionally silent. The selective elimination of neurotrophin 3 (NT3) from muscle spindles had no effect on the amplitude of afferent-evoked ventral root potentials until the second postnatal week, revealing a late role for spindle-derived NT3 in the functional maintenance of the connections. These findings indicate that spindle-derived factors regulate the strength of the connections, but not their initial formation or their specificity. PMID:19369542

  4. Physiological consequences of abnormal connectivity in a developmental epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Mouhsin M.; Vernet, Marine; Klooster, Debby; Chu, Catherine J.; Boric, Katica; Barnard, Mollie E.; Romatoski, Kelsey; Westover, M. Brandon; Christodoulou, Joanna A.; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Chang, Bernard S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many forms of epilepsy are associated with aberrant neuronal connections, but the relationship between such pathological connectivity and the underlying physiological predisposition to seizures is unclear. We sought to characterize the cortical excitability profile of a developmental form of epilepsy known to have structural and functional connectivity abnormalities. Methods We employed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with simultaneous EEG recording in eight patients with epilepsy from periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) and matched healthy controls. We used connectivity imaging findings to guide TMS targeting and compared the evoked responses to single-pulse stimulation from different cortical regions. Results Heterotopia patients with active epilepsy demonstrated a relatively augmented late cortical response that was greater than that of matched controls. This abnormality was specific to cortical regions with connectivity to subcortical heterotopic gray matter. Topographic mapping of the late response differences showed distributed cortical networks that were not limited to the stimulation site, and source analysis in one subject revealed that the generator of abnormal TMS-evoked activity overlapped with the spike and seizure onset zone. Interpretation Our findings indicate that patients with epilepsy from gray matter heterotopia have altered cortical physiology consistent with hyperexcitability, and that this abnormality is specifically linked to the presence of aberrant connectivity. These results support the idea that TMS-EEG could be a useful biomarker in epilepsy in gray matter heterotopia, expand our understanding of circuit mechanisms of epileptogenesis, and have potential implications for therapeutic neuromodulation in similar epileptic conditions associated with deep lesions. PMID:25858773

  5. Abnormalities of localized connectivity in schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives: a meta-analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Jianbo; Meng, Tiantian; He, Yuqiong; Luo, Xuerong

    2017-01-01

    Objective The localized dysfunction of specialized brain regions in schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives has been identified in a large-scale brain network; however, evidence is inconsistent. We aimed to identify abnormalities in the localized connectivity in schizophrenia patients and their relatives by conducting a meta-analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) studies. Methods Fourteen studies on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, with 316 schizophrenia patients, 342 healthy controls, and 66 unaffected relatives, were included in the meta-analysis. This analysis was performed using anisotropic effect-size-based signed differential mapping software. Results Schizophrenia patients showed increased ReHo in right superior frontal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus, as well as decreased ReHo in left fusiform gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, left postcentral gyrus, and right precentral gyrus. Unaffected relatives showed decreased ReHo in right insula and right superior temporal gyrus. These results remained widely unchanged in both sensitivity and subgroup analyses. Conclusion Schizophrenia patients and their unaffected relatives had extensive abnormal localized connectivity in cerebrum, especially in superior temporal gyrus, which were the potential diagnostic markers and expounded the pathophysiological hypothesis for the disorder. PMID:28243099

  6. Abnormalities in Functional Connectivity in Collegiate Football Athletes with and without a Concussion History: Implications and Role of Neuroactive Kynurenine Pathway Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Meier, Timothy B; Lancaster, Melissa A; Mayer, Andrew R; Teague, T Kent; Savitz, Jonathan

    2017-02-15

    There is a great need to identify potential long-term consequences of contact sport exposure and to identify molecular pathways that may be associated with these changes. We tested the hypothesis that football players with (Ath-mTBI) (n = 25) and without a concussion history (Ath) (n = 24) have altered resting state functional connectivity in regions with previously documented structural changes relative to healthy controls without football or concussion history (HC) (n = 27). As a secondary aim, we tested the hypothesis that group differences in functional connectivity are moderated by the relative ratio of neuroprotective to neurotoxic metabolites of the kynurenine pathway. Ath-mTBI had significantly increased connectivity of motor cortex to the supplementary motor area relative to Ath and HC. In contrast, both Ath-mTBI and Ath had increased connectivity between the left orbital frontal cortex and the right lateral frontal cortex, and between the left cornu ammonis areas 2 and 3/dentate gyrus (CA2-3/DG) of the hippocampus and the middle and posterior cingulate cortices, relative to HC. The relationship between the ratio of plasma concentrations of kynurenic acid to quinolinic acid (KYNA/QUIN) and left pregenual anterior cingulate cortex connectivity to multiple regions as well as KYNA/QUIN and right CA2-3/DG connectivity to multiple regions differed significantly according to football and concussion history. The results suggest that football exposure with and without concussion history can have a significant effect on intrinsic brain connectivity and implicate the kynurenine metabolic pathway as one potential moderator of functional connectivity dependent on football exposure and concussion history.

  7. Normal and abnormal lid function.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Janet C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter on lid function is comprised of two primary sections, the first on normal eyelid anatomy, neurological innervation, and physiology, and the second on abnormal eyelid function in disease states. The eyelids serve several important ocular functions, the primary objectives of which are protection of the anterior globe from injury and maintenance of the ocular tear film. Typical eyelid behaviors to perform these functions include blinking (voluntary, spontaneous, or reflexive), voluntary eye closure (gentle or forced), partial lid lowering during squinting, normal lid retraction during emotional states such as surprise or fear (startle reflex), and coordination of lid movements with vertical eye movements for maximal eye protection. Detailed description of the neurological innervation patterns and neurophysiology of each of these lid behaviors is provided. Abnormal lid function is divided by conditions resulting in excessive lid closure (cerebral ptosis, apraxia of lid opening, blepharospasm, oculomotor palsy, Horner's syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and mechanical) and those resulting in excessive lid opening (midbrain lid retraction, facial nerve palsy, and lid retraction due to orbital disease).

  8. Abnormal structure and functional connectivity of the anterior insula at pain-free periovulation is associated with perceived pain during menstruation.

    PubMed

    Dun, Wang-Huan; Yang, Jing; Yang, Ling; Ding, Dun; Ma, Xue-Ying; Liang, Feng-Li; von Deneen, Karen M; Ma, Shao-Hui; Xu, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Jixin; Zhang, Ming

    2016-11-10

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated the critical role of the insula in pain pathways and its close relation with the perceived intensity of nociceptive stimuli. We aimed to identify the structural and functional characteristics of the insula during periovulatory phase in women with primary dysmenorrhea (PDM), and further investigate its association with the intensity of perceived pain during menstruation. Optimized voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity (FC) analyses were applied by using 3-dimensional T1-weighted and resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 36 patients at the peri-ovulation phase and 29 age-, education-, and gender-matched healthy controls (HC). A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to examine the intensity of the abdominal pain at periovulation and menstruation. In our results, PDM patients had significant higher VAS-rating during menstruaion than periovulation. Compared with the HC, PDM patients had lower gray matter density in the left anterior insula (aINS). Taken the left aINS as a seed region, we further found hypoconnectivity between aINS and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which showed negative relation with the VAS during menstruation. As the aINS is a key site of the salience network (SN) and the mPFC is a critical region in the default mode network (DMN), it's implicated a trait-related central-alteration that communications between pain attention and perception networks were disrupted without the ongoing menstrual pain. Moreover, result of correlation analysis, at least in part, suggested a possible role of altered FC (pain-free period) in predicting pain perception (menstruation).

  9. Abnormal connectivity in the sensorimotor network predicts attention deficits in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shumskaya, Elena; van Gerven, Marcel A J; Norris, David G; Vos, Pieter E; Kessels, Roy P C

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore modifications of functional connectivity in multiple resting-state networks (RSNs) after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and evaluate the relationship between functional connectivity patterns and cognitive abnormalities. Forty-three moderate/severe TBI patients and 34 healthy controls (HC) underwent resting-state fMRI. Group ICA was applied to identify RSNs. Between-subject analysis was performed using dual regression. Multiple linear regressions were used to investigate the relationship between abnormal connectivity strength and neuropsychological outcome. Forty (93%) TBI patients showed moderate disability, while 2 (5%) and 1 (2%) upper severe disability and low good recovery, respectively. TBI patients performed worse than HC on the domains attention and language. We found increased connectivity in sensorimotor, visual, default mode (DMN), executive, and cerebellar RSNs after TBI. We demonstrated an effect of connectivity in the sensorimotor RSN on attention (p < 10(-3)) and a trend towards a significant effect of the DMN connectivity on attention (p = 0.058). A group-by-network interaction on attention was found in the sensorimotor network (p = 0.002). In TBI, attention was positively related to abnormal connectivity within the sensorimotor RSN, while in HC this relation was negative. Our results show altered patterns of functional connectivity after TBI. Attention impairments in TBI were associated with increased connectivity in the sensorimotor network. Further research is needed to test whether attention in TBI patients is directly affected by changes in functional connectivity in the sensorimotor network or whether the effect is actually driven by changes in the DMN.

  10. Abnormal cortical thickness connectivity persists in childhood absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Curwood, Evan K; Pedersen, Mangor; Carney, Patrick W; Berg, Anne T; Abbott, David F; Jackson, Graeme D

    2015-01-01

    Objective Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is a childhood-onset generalized epilepsy. Recent fMRI studies have suggested that frontal cortex activity occurs before thalamic involvement in epileptic discharges suggesting that frontal cortex may play an important role in childhood absence seizures. Neurocognitive deficits can persist after resolution of the epilepsy. We investigate whether structural connectivity changes are present in the brains of CAE patients in young adulthood. Methods Cortical thickness measurements were obtained for 30 subjects with CAE (mean age 21 ± 2 years) and 56 healthy controls (mean age 24 ± 4) and regressed for age, sex, and total intracranial volume (TIV). Structural connectivity was evaluated by measuring the correlation between average cortical thicknesses in 915 regions over the brain. Maps of connectivity strength were then obtained for both groups. Results When compared to controls, the CAE group shows overall increased “connectivity” with focal increased connection strength in anterior regions including; the anterior cingulate and the insula and superior temporal gyrus bilaterally; the right orbito-frontal and supramarginal regions; and the left entorhinal cortex. Decreased connection strength in the CAE group was found in the left occipital lobe, with a similar trend in right occipital lobe. Interpretation Brains in young adults whose CAE was resolved had abnormal structural connectivity. Our findings suggest that frontal regions correlate most with cortical thickness throughout the brain in CAE patients, whereas occipital regions correlate most in well matched normal controls. We interpret this as evidence of a developmental difference in CAE that emphasizes these frontal lobe regions, perhaps driven by frontal lobe epileptiform activity. PMID:26000319

  11. Abnormalities of lung function in hay fever.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, E J; Hall, D R

    1976-01-01

    Twenty subjects with symptoms of hay fever were studied to see whether abnormalities could be detected in the function of small airways. The investigations included dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies, closing capacity, residual volume, transfer factor, and maximal expiratory flow-volume curves. The tests were repeated in the winter when symptoms had resolved. Frequency dependence of compliance was found in eight subjects with symptoms (40%), closing capacities being abnormal in only two instances. Conventional pulmonary function tests, including expiratory flow rates at mid vital capacity, were within the predicted range of all subjects. When tests were repeated in the winter, frequency dependence of compliance was no longer present in subjects whose symptoms had resolved. The study suggests that reversible small airway abnormalities are present in a significant proportion of subjects with symptoms of hay fever and that such abnormalities are best detected by the measurement of dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies. PMID:769243

  12. Intrinsic connective tissue abnormalities in the heart muscle of cardiomyopathic Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Gould, L.; Robinson, T. F.; Factor, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    Significant connective tissue abnormalities occurring in hearts of cardiomyopathic Syrian hamsters are reported. These abnormalities include a pronounced loss of the intrinsic connective tissue skeletal framework around foci of myocytolytic necrosis within the non-necrotic myocardium. These changes were demonstrated by a silver impregnation technique, and they were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Quantitation demonstrated more than a twofold increase in the area of ventricular wall affected by pathologic changes, when the connective tissue alterations were included with the myocardial necrosis. In addition, the authors also observed focal, thick "tethering" connective tissue fibers at the termini of necrotic lesions, seemingly connecting them to normal muscle. These connective tissue abnormalities may contribute to the progressive loss of ventricular function that occurs in this model of cardiomyopathy. They may permit greater wall thinning than would occur with focal necrosis alone, and they may increase focal mural stiffness in the tethered regions. Further investigation of the pathogenesis of these changes and their mechanical significance is indicated. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3578490

  13. Precentral gyrus functional connectivity signatures of autism

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Mary Beth; Eloyan, Ani; Barber, Anita D.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2014-01-01

    Motor impairments are prevalent in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and are perhaps the earliest symptoms to develop. In addition, motor skills relate to the communicative/social deficits at the core of ASD diagnosis, and these behavioral deficits may reflect abnormal connectivity within brain networks underlying motor control and learning. Despite the fact that motor abnormalities in ASD are well-characterized, there remains a fundamental disconnect between the complexity of the clinical presentation of ASD and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms. In this study, we examined connectivity within and between functional subregions of a key component of the motor control network, the precentral gyrus, using resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data collected from a large, heterogeneous sample of individuals with ASD as well as neurotypical controls. We found that the strength of connectivity within and between distinct functional subregions of the precentral gyrus was related to ASD diagnosis and to the severity of ASD traits. In particular, connectivity involving the dorsomedial (lower limb/trunk) subregion was abnormal in ASD individuals as predicted by models using a dichotomous variable coding for the presence of ASD, as well as models using symptom severity ratings. These findings provide further support for a link between motor and social/communicative abilities in ASD. PMID:24860442

  14. Functional connectivity hubs of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Liska, Adam; Galbusera, Alberto; Schwarz, Adam J; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2015-07-15

    Recent advances in functional connectivity methods have made it possible to identify brain hubs - a set of highly connected regions serving as integrators of distributed neuronal activity. The integrative role of hub nodes makes these areas points of high vulnerability to dysfunction in brain disorders, and abnormal hub connectivity profiles have been described for several neuropsychiatric disorders. The identification of analogous functional connectivity hubs in preclinical species like the mouse may provide critical insight into the elusive biological underpinnings of these connectional alterations. To spatially locate functional connectivity hubs in the mouse brain, here we applied a fully-weighted network analysis to map whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e., the functional connectome) at a high-resolution voxel-scale. Analysis of a large resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) dataset revealed the presence of six distinct functional modules related to known large-scale functional partitions of the brain, including a default-mode network (DMN). Consistent with human studies, highly-connected functional hubs were identified in several sub-regions of the DMN, including the anterior and posterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices, in the thalamus, and in small foci within well-known integrative cortical structures such as the insular and temporal association cortices. According to their integrative role, the identified hubs exhibited mutual preferential interconnections. These findings highlight the presence of evolutionarily-conserved, mutually-interconnected functional hubs in the mouse brain, and may guide future investigations of the biological foundations of aberrant rsfMRI hub connectivity associated with brain pathological states.

  15. Abnormal Brain Connectivity Patterns in Adults with ADHD: A Coherence Study

    PubMed Central

    Sato, João Ricardo; Hoexter, Marcelo Queiroz; Castellanos, Xavier Francisco; Rohde, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the resting state have shown decreased functional connectivity between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and regions of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in adult patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) relative to subjects with typical development (TD). Most studies used Pearson correlation coefficients among the BOLD signals from different brain regions to quantify functional connectivity. Since the Pearson correlation analysis only provides a limited description of functional connectivity, we investigated functional connectivity between the dACC and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in three groups (adult patients with ADHD, n = 21; TD age-matched subjects, n = 21; young TD subjects, n = 21) using a more comprehensive analytical approach – unsupervised machine learning using a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) that quantifies an abnormality index for each individual. The median abnormality index for patients with ADHD was greater than for TD age-matched subjects (p = 0.014); the ADHD and young TD indices did not differ significantly (p = 0.480); the median abnormality index of young TD was greater than that of TD age-matched subjects (p = 0.016). Low frequencies below 0.05 Hz and around 0.20 Hz were the most relevant for discriminating between ADHD patients and TD age-matched controls and between the older and younger TD subjects. In addition, we validated our approach using the fMRI data of children publicly released by the ADHD-200 Competition, obtaining similar results. Our findings suggest that the abnormal coherence patterns observed in patients with ADHD in this study resemble the patterns observed in young typically developing subjects, which reinforces the hypothesis that ADHD is associated with brain maturation deficits. PMID:23049834

  16. Grid Connected Functionality

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baker, Kyri; Jin, Xin; Vaidynathan, Deepthi; Jones, Wesley; Christensen, Dane; Sparn, Bethany; Woods, Jason; Sorensen, Harry; Lunacek, Monte

    2016-08-04

    Dataset demonstrating the potential benefits that residential buildings can provide for frequency regulation services in the electric power grid. In a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) implementation, simulated homes along with a physical laboratory home are coordinated via a grid aggregator, and it is shown that their aggregate response has the potential to follow the regulation signal on a timescale of seconds. Connected (communication-enabled), devices in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) received demand response (DR) requests from a grid aggregator, and the devices responded accordingly to meet the signal while satisfying user comfort bounds and physical hardware limitations.

  17. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  18. The developmental cognitive neuroscience of functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael C

    2009-06-01

    Developmental cognitive neuroscience is a rapidly growing field that examines the relationships between biological development and cognitive ability. In the past decade, there has been ongoing refinement of concepts and methodology related to the study of 'functional connectivity' among distributed brain regions believed to underlie cognition and behavioral control. Due to the recent availability of relatively easy-to-use tools for functional connectivity analysis, there has been a sharp upsurge of studies that seek to characterize normal and psychopathologically abnormal brain functional integration. However, relatively few studies have applied functional and effective connectivity analysis techniques to developmental cognitive neuroscience. Functional and effective connectivity analysis methods are ideally suited to advance our understanding of the neural substrates of cognitive development, particularly in understanding how and why changes in the functional 'wiring' of neural networks promotes optimal cognitive control throughout development. The purpose of this review is to summarize the central concepts, methods, and findings of functional integration neuroimaging research to discuss key questions in the field of developmental cognitive neuroscience. These ideas will be presented within a context that merges relevant concepts and proposals from different developmental theorists. The review will outline a few general predictions about likely relationships between typical 'executive' cognitive maturation and changes in brain network functional integration during adolescence. Although not exhaustive, this conceptual review also will showcase some of recent findings that have emerged to support these predictions.

  19. Altered Functional Connectivity in Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D.; Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Manzanedo, Eva; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix; Posada, Ignacio; Rocon, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Essential tremor (ET) has been associated with a spectrum of clinical features, with both motor and nonmotor elements, including cognitive deficits. We employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess whether brain networks that might be involved in the pathogenesis of nonmotor manifestations associated with ET are altered, and the relationship between abnormal connectivity and ET severity and neuropsychological function. Resting-state fMRI data in 23 ET patients (12 women and 11 men) and 22 healthy controls (HC) (12 women and 10 men) were analyzed using independent component analysis, in combination with a “dual-regression” technique, to identify the group differences of resting-state networks (RSNs) (default mode network [DMN] and executive, frontoparietal, sensorimotor, cerebellar, auditory/language, and visual networks). All participants underwent a neuropsychological and neuroimaging session, where resting-state data were collected. Relative to HC, ET patients showed increased connectivity in RSNs involved in cognitive processes (DMN and frontoparietal networks) and decreased connectivity in the cerebellum and visual networks. Changes in network integrity were associated not only with ET severity (DMN) and ET duration (DMN and left frontoparietal network), but also with cognitive ability. Moreover, in at least 3 networks (DMN and frontoparietal networks), increased connectivity was associated with worse performance on different cognitive domains (attention, executive function, visuospatial ability, verbal memory, visual memory, and language) and depressive symptoms. Further, in the visual network, decreased connectivity was associated with worse performance on visuospatial ability. ET was associated with abnormal brain connectivity in major RSNs that might be involved in both motor and nonmotor symptoms. Our findings underscore the importance of examining RSNs in this population as a biomarker of disease. PMID:26656325

  20. Dissociable cortico-striatal connectivity abnormalities in major depression in response to monetary gains and penalties

    PubMed Central

    Admon, Roee; Nickerson, Lisa D.; Dillon, Daniel G.; Holmes, Avram J.; Bogdan, Ryan; Kumar, Poornima; Dougherty, Darin D.; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Mischoulon, David; Fava, Maurizio; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) are characterized by maladaptive responses to both positive and negative outcomes, which have been linked to localized abnormal activations in cortical and striatal brain regions. However, the exact neural circuitry implicated in such abnormalities remains largely unexplored. Methods In this study 26 unmedicated adults with MDD and 29 matched healthy controls completed a monetary incentive delay task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analyses probed group differences in connectivity separately in response to positive and negative outcomes (i.e., monetary gains and penalties). Results Relative to controls, MDD subjects displayed decreased connectivity between the caudate and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) in response to monetary gains, yet increased connectivity between the caudate and a different, more rostral, dACC sub-region in response to monetary penalties. Moreover, exploratory analyses of 14 MDD patients who completed a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial after the baseline fMRI scans indicated that a more normative pattern of cortico-striatal connectivity pre-treatment was associated with more symptoms improvement 12 weeks later. Conclusions These results identify the caudate as a region with dissociable incentive-dependent dACC connectivity abnormalities in MDD, and provide initial evidence that cortico-striatal circuitry may play a role in MDD treatment response. Given the role of cortico-striatal circuitry in encoding action-outcome contingencies, such dysregulated connectivity may relate to the prominent disruptions in goal-directed behavior that characterize MDD. PMID:25055809

  1. MATLAB toolbox for functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongli; Thompson, Wesley K; Siegle, Greg

    2009-10-01

    The term "functional connectivity" is used to denote correlations in activation among spatially-distinct brain regions, either in a resting state or when processing external stimuli. Functional connectivity has been extensively evaluated with several functional neuroimaging methods, particularly PET and fMRI. Yet these relationships have been quantified using very different measures and the extent to which they index the same constructs is unclear. We have implemented a variety of these functional connectivity measures in a new freely available MATLAB toolbox. These measures are categorized into two groups: whole time-series and trial-based approaches. We evaluate these measures via simulations with different patterns of functional connectivity and provide recommendations for their use. We also apply these measures to a previously published fMRI data set (Siegle, G.J., Thompson, W., Carter, C.S., Steinhauer, S.R., Thase, M.E., 2007. Increased amygdala and decreased dorsolateral prefrontal BOLD responses in unipolar depression: related and independent features. Biol. Psychiatry 610 (2), 198-209) in which activity in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was evaluated in 32 control subjects during a digit sorting task. Though all implemented measures demonstrate functional connectivity between dACC and DLPFC activity during event-related tasks, different participants appeared to display qualitatively different relationships.

  2. Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classification of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; DuBray, Molly B.; Druzgal, T. Jason; Cariello, Annahir N.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2011-01-01

    Group differences in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity between individuals with autism and typically developing controls have been widely replicated for a small number of discrete brain regions, yet the whole-brain distribution of connectivity abnormalities in autism is not well characterized. It is also unclear…

  3. Dynamic functional connectivity reveals altered variability in functional connectivity among patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tornador, Cristian; Falcón, Carles; López‐Solà, Marina; Hernández‐Ribas, Rosa; Pujol, Jesús; Menchón, José M.; Ritter, Petra; Cardoner, Narcis; Soriano‐Mas, Carles; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Resting‐state fMRI (RS‐fMRI) has become a useful tool to investigate the connectivity structure of mental health disorders. In the case of major depressive disorder (MDD), recent studies regarding the RS‐fMRI have found abnormal connectivity in several regions of the brain, particularly in the default mode network (DMN). Thus, the relevance of the DMN to self‐referential thoughts and ruminations has made the use of the resting‐state approach particularly important for MDD. The majority of such research has relied on the grand averaged functional connectivity measures based on the temporal correlations between the BOLD time series of various brain regions. We, in our study, investigated the variations in the functional connectivity over time at global and local level using RS‐fMRI BOLD time series of 27 MDD patients and 27 healthy control subjects. We found that global synchronization and temporal stability were significantly increased in the MDD patients. Furthermore, the participants with MDD showed significantly increased overall average (static) functional connectivity (sFC) but decreased variability of functional connectivity (vFC) within specific networks. Static FC increased to predominance among the regions pertaining to the default mode network (DMN), while the decreased variability of FC was observed in the connections between the DMN and the frontoparietal network. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2918–2930, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27120982

  4. Dynamic functional connectivity reveals altered variability in functional connectivity among patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Demirtaş, Murat; Tornador, Cristian; Falcón, Carles; López-Solà, Marina; Hernández-Ribas, Rosa; Pujol, Jesús; Menchón, José M; Ritter, Petra; Cardoner, Narcis; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    Resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) has become a useful tool to investigate the connectivity structure of mental health disorders. In the case of major depressive disorder (MDD), recent studies regarding the RS-fMRI have found abnormal connectivity in several regions of the brain, particularly in the default mode network (DMN). Thus, the relevance of the DMN to self-referential thoughts and ruminations has made the use of the resting-state approach particularly important for MDD. The majority of such research has relied on the grand averaged functional connectivity measures based on the temporal correlations between the BOLD time series of various brain regions. We, in our study, investigated the variations in the functional connectivity over time at global and local level using RS-fMRI BOLD time series of 27 MDD patients and 27 healthy control subjects. We found that global synchronization and temporal stability were significantly increased in the MDD patients. Furthermore, the participants with MDD showed significantly increased overall average (static) functional connectivity (sFC) but decreased variability of functional connectivity (vFC) within specific networks. Static FC increased to predominance among the regions pertaining to the default mode network (DMN), while the decreased variability of FC was observed in the connections between the DMN and the frontoparietal network. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2918-2930, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Differential Effects of Brain Disorders on Structural and Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Pons, Sandro; Olivetti, Emanuele; Avesani, Paolo; Dodero, Luca; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Different measures of brain connectivity can be defined based on neuroimaging read-outs, including structural and functional connectivity. Neurological and psychiatric conditions are often associated with abnormal connectivity, but comparing the effects of the disease on different types of connectivity remains a challenge. In this paper, we address the problem of quantifying the relative effects of brain disease on structural and functional connectivity at a group level. Within the framework of a graph representation of connectivity, we introduce a kernel two-sample test as an effective method to assess the difference between the patients and control group. Moreover, we propose a common representation space for structural and functional connectivity networks, and a novel test statistics to quantitatively assess differential effects of the disease on different types of connectivity. We apply this approach to a dataset from BTBR mice, a murine model of Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum (ACC), a congenital disorder characterized by the absence of the main bundle of fibers connecting the two hemispheres. We used normo-callosal mice (B6) as a comparator. The application of the proposed methods to this data-set shows that the two types of connectivity can be successfully used to discriminate between BTBR and B6, meaning that both types of connectivity are affected by ACC. However, our novel test statistics shows that structural connectivity is significantly more affected than functional connectivity, consistent with the idea that functional connectivity has a robust topology that can tolerate substantial alterations in its structural connectivity substrate. PMID:28119556

  6. Differential Effects of Brain Disorders on Structural and Functional Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Vega-Pons, Sandro; Olivetti, Emanuele; Avesani, Paolo; Dodero, Luca; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Different measures of brain connectivity can be defined based on neuroimaging read-outs, including structural and functional connectivity. Neurological and psychiatric conditions are often associated with abnormal connectivity, but comparing the effects of the disease on different types of connectivity remains a challenge. In this paper, we address the problem of quantifying the relative effects of brain disease on structural and functional connectivity at a group level. Within the framework of a graph representation of connectivity, we introduce a kernel two-sample test as an effective method to assess the difference between the patients and control group. Moreover, we propose a common representation space for structural and functional connectivity networks, and a novel test statistics to quantitatively assess differential effects of the disease on different types of connectivity. We apply this approach to a dataset from BTBR mice, a murine model of Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum (ACC), a congenital disorder characterized by the absence of the main bundle of fibers connecting the two hemispheres. We used normo-callosal mice (B6) as a comparator. The application of the proposed methods to this data-set shows that the two types of connectivity can be successfully used to discriminate between BTBR and B6, meaning that both types of connectivity are affected by ACC. However, our novel test statistics shows that structural connectivity is significantly more affected than functional connectivity, consistent with the idea that functional connectivity has a robust topology that can tolerate substantial alterations in its structural connectivity substrate.

  7. Neuronal substrate and effective connectivity of abnormal movement sequencing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zemankova, Petra; Lungu, Ovidiu; Huttlova, Jitka; Kerkovsky, Milos; Zubor, Jozef; Lipova, Petra; Bares, Martin; Kasparek, Tomas

    2016-06-03

    Movement sequencing difficulties are part of the neurological soft signs (NSS), they have high clinical value because they are not always present in schizophrenia. We investigated the neuronal correlates of movement sequencing in 24 healthy controls and 24 schizophrenia patients, with (SZP SQ+) or without (SZP SQ-) sequencing difficulties. We characterized simultaneous and lagged functional connectivity between brain regions involved in movement sequencing using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) and the Granger causality modeling (GCM), respectively. Left premotor cortex (PMC) and superior parietal lobule (SPL) were specifically activated during sequential movements in all participants. Right PMC and precuneus, ipsilateral to the hand executing the task, activated during sequential movements only in healthy controls and SZP SQ-. SZP SQ+ showed hyperactivation in contralateral PMC, as compared to the other groups. PPI analysis revealed a deficit in inhibitory connections within this fronto-parietal network in SZP SQ+ during sequential task. GCM showed a significant lagged effective connectivity from right PMC to left SPL during task and rest periods in all groups and from right PMC to right precuneus in SZP SQ+ group only. Both SZP groups had a significant lagged connectivity from right to left PMC, during sequential task. Our results indicate that aberrant fronto-parietal network connectivity with cortical inhibition deficit and abnormal reliance on previous network activity are related to movement sequencing in SZP. The overactivation of motor cortex seems to be a good compensating strategy, the hyperactivation of parietal cortex is linked to motor deficit symptoms.

  8. Dorsal striatum and its limbic connectivity mediate abnormal anticipatory reward processing in obesity.

    PubMed

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Hirvonen, Jussi; Hannukainen, Jarna C; Immonen, Heidi; Lindroos, Markus M; Salminen, Paulina; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by an imbalance in the brain circuits promoting reward seeking and those governing cognitive control. Here we show that the dorsal caudate nucleus and its connections with amygdala, insula and prefrontal cortex contribute to abnormal reward processing in obesity. We measured regional brain glucose uptake in morbidly obese (n = 19) and normal weighted (n = 16) subjects with 2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([¹⁸F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia and with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while anticipatory food reward was induced by repeated presentations of appetizing and bland food pictures. First, we found that glucose uptake rate in the dorsal caudate nucleus was higher in obese than in normal-weight subjects. Second, obese subjects showed increased hemodynamic responses in the caudate nucleus while viewing appetizing versus bland foods in fMRI. The caudate also showed elevated task-related functional connectivity with amygdala and insula in the obese versus normal-weight subjects. Finally, obese subjects had smaller responses to appetizing versus bland foods in the dorsolateral and orbitofrontal cortices than did normal-weight subjects, and failure to activate the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was correlated with high glucose metabolism in the dorsal caudate nucleus. These findings suggest that enhanced sensitivity to external food cues in obesity may involve abnormal stimulus-response learning and incentive motivation subserved by the dorsal caudate nucleus, which in turn may be due to abnormally high input from the amygdala and insula and dysfunctional inhibitory control by the frontal cortical regions. These functional changes in the responsiveness and interconnectivity of the reward circuit could be a critical mechanism to explain overeating in obesity.

  9. Disturbed Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity Rather than Structural Connectivity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Rongfeng; Liu, Chang; Weng, Yifei; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Liya; Wang, Fangyu; Zhang, Long J.; Lu, Guang M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)—a relapsing functional bowel disorder—presents with disrupted brain connections. However, little is known about the alterations of interhemispheric functional connectivity and underlying structural connectivity in IBS. This study combined resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate changes in interhemispheric coordination in IBS patients. Resting-state functional and structural magnetic resonance images were acquired from 65 IBS patients and 67 healthy controls (HCs; matched for age, sex and educational level). Interhemispheric voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) was calculated and compared between groups. Homotopic regions showing abnormal VMHC in patients were targeted as regions of interest (ROIs) for analysis of DTI tractography. The fractional anisotropy (FA), fiber number and fiber length were compared between groups. Statistical analysis was also performed by including anxiety and depression as covariates to evaluate their effect. A Pearson correlation analysis between abnormal interhemispheric connectivity and clinical indices of IBS patients was performed. Compared to HCs, IBS patients had higher interhemispheric functional connectivity between bilateral thalami, cuneus, posterior cingulate cortices (PCC), lingual gyri and inferior occipital/cerebellum lobes, as well as lower interhemispheric functional connectivity between bilateral ventral anterior cingulate cortices (vACC) and inferior parietal lobules (IPL). The inclusion of anxiety and depression as covariates abolished VMHC difference in vACC. Microstructural features of white matter tracts connecting functionally abnormal regions did not reveal any differences between the groups. VMHC values in vACC negatively correlated with the quality of life (QOL) scores of patients. In conclusion, this study provides preliminary evidence of the disrupted

  10. Disturbed Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity Rather than Structural Connectivity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Qi, Rongfeng; Liu, Chang; Weng, Yifei; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Liya; Wang, Fangyu; Zhang, Long J; Lu, Guang M

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-a relapsing functional bowel disorder-presents with disrupted brain connections. However, little is known about the alterations of interhemispheric functional connectivity and underlying structural connectivity in IBS. This study combined resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate changes in interhemispheric coordination in IBS patients. Resting-state functional and structural magnetic resonance images were acquired from 65 IBS patients and 67 healthy controls (HCs; matched for age, sex and educational level). Interhemispheric voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) was calculated and compared between groups. Homotopic regions showing abnormal VMHC in patients were targeted as regions of interest (ROIs) for analysis of DTI tractography. The fractional anisotropy (FA), fiber number and fiber length were compared between groups. Statistical analysis was also performed by including anxiety and depression as covariates to evaluate their effect. A Pearson correlation analysis between abnormal interhemispheric connectivity and clinical indices of IBS patients was performed. Compared to HCs, IBS patients had higher interhemispheric functional connectivity between bilateral thalami, cuneus, posterior cingulate cortices (PCC), lingual gyri and inferior occipital/cerebellum lobes, as well as lower interhemispheric functional connectivity between bilateral ventral anterior cingulate cortices (vACC) and inferior parietal lobules (IPL). The inclusion of anxiety and depression as covariates abolished VMHC difference in vACC. Microstructural features of white matter tracts connecting functionally abnormal regions did not reveal any differences between the groups. VMHC values in vACC negatively correlated with the quality of life (QOL) scores of patients. In conclusion, this study provides preliminary evidence of the disrupted

  11. Determination of effective brain connectivity from functional connectivity with application to resting state connectivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Sarkar, S.; Pandejee, Grishma Mehta; Henderson, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Neural field theory insights are used to derive effective brain connectivity matrices from the functional connectivity matrix defined by activity covariances. The symmetric case is exactly solved for a resting state system driven by white noise, in which strengths of connections, often termed effective connectivities, are inferred from functional data; these include strengths of connections that are underestimated or not detected by anatomical imaging. Proximity to criticality is calculated and found to be consistent with estimates obtainable from other methods. Links between anatomical, effective, and functional connectivity and resting state activity are quantified, with applicability to other complex networks. Proof-of-principle results are illustrated using published experimental data on anatomical connectivity and resting state functional connectivity. In particular, it is shown that functional connection matrices can be used to uncover the existence and strength of connections that are missed from anatomical connection matrices, including interhemispheric connections that are difficult to track with techniques such as diffusion spectrum imaging.

  12. Abnormal Connectional Fingerprint in Schizophrenia: A Novel Network Analysis of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Edwin Thanarajah, Sharmili; Han, Cheol E.; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Singer, Wolf; Deichmann, Ralf; Maurer, Konrad; Kaiser, Marcus; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The graph theoretical analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has received a great deal of interest in recent years to characterize the organizational principles of brain networks and their alterations in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. However, the characterization of networks in clinical populations can be challenging, since the comparison of connectivity between groups is influenced by several factors, such as the overall number of connections and the structural abnormalities of the seed regions. To overcome these limitations, the current study employed the whole-brain analysis of connectional fingerprints in diffusion tensor imaging data obtained at 3 T of chronic schizophrenia patients (n = 16) and healthy, age-matched control participants (n = 17). Probabilistic tractography was performed to quantify the connectivity of 110 brain areas. The connectional fingerprint of a brain area represents the set of relative connection probabilities to all its target areas and is, hence, less affected by overall white and gray matter changes than absolute connectivity measures. After detecting brain regions with abnormal connectional fingerprints through similarity measures, we tested each of its relative connection probability between groups. We found altered connectional fingerprints in schizophrenia patients consistent with a dysconnectivity syndrome. While the medial frontal gyrus showed only reduced connectivity, the connectional fingerprints of the inferior frontal gyrus and the putamen mainly contained relatively increased connection probabilities to areas in the frontal, limbic, and subcortical areas. These findings are in line with previous studies that reported abnormalities in striatal–frontal circuits in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, highlighting the potential utility of connectional fingerprints for the analysis of anatomical networks in the disorder. PMID:27445870

  13. Abnormally Malicious Autonomous Systems and their Internet Connectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shue, Craig A; Kalafut, Prof. Andrew; Gupta, Prof. Minaxi

    2011-01-01

    While many attacks are distributed across botnets, investigators and network operators have recently targeted malicious networks through high profile autonomous system (AS) de-peerings and network shut-downs. In this paper, we explore whether some ASes indeed are safe havens for malicious activity. We look for ISPs and ASes that exhibit disproportionately high malicious behavior using ten popular blacklists, plus local spam data, and extensive DNS resolutions based on the contents of the blacklists. We find that some ASes have over 80% of their routable IP address space blacklisted. Yet others account for large fractions of blacklisted IP addresses. Several ASes regularly peer with ASes associated with significant malicious activity. We also find that malicious ASes as a whole differ from benign ones in other properties not obviously related to their malicious activities, such as more frequent connectivity changes with their BGP peers. Overall, we conclude that examining malicious activity at AS granularity can unearth networks with lax security or those that harbor cybercrime.

  14. Largely typical patterns of resting-state functional connectivity in high-functioning adults with autism.

    PubMed

    Tyszka, J Michael; Kennedy, Daniel P; Paul, Lynn K; Adolphs, Ralph

    2014-07-01

    A leading hypothesis for the neural basis of autism postulates globally abnormal brain connectivity, yet the majority of studies report effects that are either very weak, inconsistent across studies, or explain results incompletely. Here we apply multiple analytical approaches to resting-state BOLD-fMRI data at the whole-brain level. Neurotypical and high-functioning adults with autism displayed very similar patterns and strengths of resting-state connectivity. We found only limited evidence in autism for abnormal resting-state connectivity at the regional level and no evidence for altered connectivity at the whole-brain level. Regional abnormalities in functional connectivity in autism spectrum disorder were primarily in the frontal and temporal cortices. Within these regions, functional connectivity with other brain regions was almost exclusively lower in the autism group. Further examination showed that even small amounts of head motion during scanning have large effects on functional connectivity measures and must be controlled carefully. Consequently, we suggest caution in the interpretation of apparent positive findings until all possible confounding effects can be ruled out. Additionally, we do not rule out the possibility that abnormal connectivity in autism is evident at the microstructural synaptic level, which may not be reflected sensitively in hemodynamic changes measured with BOLD-fMRI.

  15. Connective tissue spectrum abnormalities associated with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Pariani, Mitchel; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Schievink, Wouter I

    2013-04-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of connective tissue abnormalities among patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in a prospective study using a large cohort of patients. We enrolled a consecutive group of 50 patients, referred for consultation because of CSF leak. All patients have been carefully examined for the presence of connective tissue abnormalities, and based on findings, patients underwent genetic testing. Ancillary diagnostic studies included echocardiography, eye exam, and histopathological examinations of skin and dura biopsies in selected patients. We identified nine patients with heritable connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and other unclassified forms. In seven patients, spontaneous CSF leak was the first noted manifestation of the genetic disorder. We conclude that spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with a spectrum of connective tissue abnormalities and may be the first noted clinical presentation of the genetic disorder. We propose that there is a clinical basis for considering spontaneous CSF leak as a clinical manifestation of heritable connective tissue disorders, and we suggest that patients with CSF leaks should be screened for connective tissue and vascular abnormalities.

  16. Altered default mode network functional connectivity in schizotypal personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Shen, Jing; Wu, Jianlin; Yu, Xiao; Lou, Wutao; Fan, Hongyu; Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng

    2014-12-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been identified to play a critical role in many mental disorders, but such abnormalities have not yet been determined in patients with schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). The purpose of this study was to analyze the alteration of the DMN functional connectivity in subjects with (SPD) and compared it to healthy control subjects. Eighteen DSM-IV diagnosed SPD subjects (all male, average age: 19.7±0.9) from a pool of 3000 first year college students, and eighteen age and gender matched healthy control subjects were recruited (all male, average age: 20.3±0.9). Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to analyze the DMN functional connectivity alteration. Compared to the healthy control group, SPD subjects had significantly decreased functional connectivity in the frontal areas, including the superior and medial frontal gyrus, and greater functional connectivity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus and sub-lobar regions, including the bilateral putamen and caudate. Compared to subjects with SPD, the healthy control group showed decreased functional connectivity in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus, but showed greater functional connectivity in the right transverse temporal gyrus and left middle temporal gyrus. The healthy control group also showed greater activation in the cerebellum compared to the SPD group. These findings suggest that DMN functional connectivity, particularly that involving cognitive or emotional regulation, is altered in SPD subjects, and thus may be helpful in studying schizophrenia.

  17. Dissociated functional connectivity profiles for motor and attention deficits in acute right-hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Antonello; Ramsey, Lenny; Rengachary, Jennifer; Zinn, Kristi; Siegel, Joshua S; Metcalf, Nicholas V; Strube, Michael J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Corbetta, Maurizio; Shulman, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Strokes often cause multiple behavioural deficits that are correlated at the population level. Here, we show that motor and attention deficits are selectively associated with abnormal patterns of resting state functional connectivity in the dorsal attention and motor networks. We measured attention and motor deficits in 44 right hemisphere-damaged patients with a first-time stroke at 1-2 weeks post-onset. The motor battery included tests that evaluated deficits in both upper and lower extremities. The attention battery assessed both spatial and non-spatial attention deficits. Summary measures for motor and attention deficits were identified through principal component analyses on the raw behavioural scores. Functional connectivity in structurally normal cortex was estimated based on the temporal correlation of blood oxygenation level-dependent signals measured at rest with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Any correlation between motor and attention deficits and between functional connectivity in the dorsal attention network and motor networks that might spuriously affect the relationship between each deficit and functional connectivity was statistically removed. We report a double dissociation between abnormal functional connectivity patterns and attention and motor deficits, respectively. Attention deficits were significantly more correlated with abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity within the dorsal attention network than motor networks, while motor deficits were significantly more correlated with abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity patterns within the motor networks than dorsal attention network. These findings indicate that functional connectivity patterns in structurally normal cortex following a stroke link abnormal physiology in brain networks to the corresponding behavioural deficits.

  18. Random geometric graphs with general connection functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, Carl P.; Georgiou, Orestis

    2016-03-01

    In the original (1961) Gilbert model of random geometric graphs, nodes are placed according to a Poisson point process, and links formed between those within a fixed range. Motivated by wireless ad hoc networks "soft" or "probabilistic" connection models have recently been introduced, involving a "connection function" H (r ) that gives the probability that two nodes at distance r are linked (directly connect). In many applications (not only wireless networks), it is desirable that the graph is connected; that is, every node is linked to every other node in a multihop fashion. Here the connection probability of a dense network in a convex domain in two or three dimensions is expressed in terms of contributions from boundary components for a very general class of connection functions. It turns out that only a few quantities such as moments of the connection function appear. Good agreement is found with special cases from previous studies and with numerical simulations.

  19. Cognition and Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sheffield, Julia M; Barch, Deanna M

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia consistently display deficits in a multitude of cognitive domains, but the neurobiological source of these cognitive impairments remains unclear. By analyzing the functional connectivity of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fcMRI) data in clinical populations like schizophrenia, research groups have begun elucidating abnormalities in the intrinsic communication between specific brain regions, and assessing relationships between these abnormalities and cognitive performance in schizophrenia. Here we review studies that have reported analysis of these brain-behavior relationships. Through this systematic review we found that patients with schizophrenia display abnormalities within and between regions comprising 1) the cortico-cerebellar-striatal-thalamic loop and 2) task-positive and task-negative cortical networks. Importantly, we did not observe unique relationships between specific functional connectivity abnormalities and distinct cognitive domains, suggesting that the observed functional systems may underlie mechanisms that are shared across cognitive abilities, the disturbance of which could contribute to the “generalized” cognitive deficit found in schizophrenia. We also note several areas of methodological change that we believe will strengthen this literature. PMID:26698018

  20. Abnormalities in fronto-striatal connectivity within language networks relate to differences in grey-matter heterogeneity in Asperger syndrome☆

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, Eugenia; Minati, Ludovico; Ganeshan, Balaji; Harrison, Neil A.; Gray, Marcus A.; Beacher, Felix D.C.C.; Chatwin, Chris; Young, Rupert C.D.; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2013-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) characterised by qualitative impairment in the development of emotional and social skills with relative preservation of general intellectual abilities, including verbal language. People with AS may nevertheless show atypical language, including rate and frequency of speech production. We previously observed that abnormalities in grey matter homogeneity (measured with texture analysis of structural MR images) in AS individuals when compared with controls are also correlated with the volume of caudate nucleus. Here, we tested a prediction that these distributed abnormalities in grey matter compromise the functional integrity of brain networks supporting verbal communication skills. We therefore measured the functional connectivity between caudate nucleus and cortex during a functional neuroimaging study of language generation (verbal fluency), applying psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) methods to test specifically for differences attributable to grey matter heterogeneity in AS participants. Furthermore, we used dynamic causal modelling (DCM) to characterise the causal directionality of these differences in interregional connectivity during word production. Our results revealed a diagnosis-dependent influence of grey matter heterogeneity on the functional connectivity of the caudate nuclei with right insula/inferior frontal gyrus and anterior cingulate, respectively with the left superior frontal gyrus and right precuneus. Moreover, causal modelling of interactions between inferior frontal gyri, caudate and precuneus, revealed a reliance on bottom-up (stimulus-driven) connections in AS participants that contrasted with a dominance of top-down (cognitive control) connections from prefrontal cortex observed in control participants. These results provide detailed support for previously hypothesised central disconnectivity in ASD and specify discrete brain network targets for diagnosis and therapy in ASD

  1. A small number of abnormal brain connections predicts adult autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yahata, Noriaki; Morimoto, Jun; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Lisi, Giuseppe; Shibata, Kazuhisa; Kawakubo, Yuki; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Kuroda, Miho; Yamada, Takashi; Megumi, Fukuda; Imamizu, Hiroshi; Náñez Sr, José E.; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Kasai, Kiyoto; Kato, Nobumasa; Sasaki, Yuka; Watanabe, Takeo; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a serious lifelong condition, its underlying neural mechanism remains unclear. Recently, neuroimaging-based classifiers for ASD and typically developed (TD) individuals were developed to identify the abnormality of functional connections (FCs). Due to over-fitting and interferential effects of varying measurement conditions and demographic distributions, no classifiers have been strictly validated for independent cohorts. Here we overcome these difficulties by developing a novel machine-learning algorithm that identifies a small number of FCs that separates ASD versus TD. The classifier achieves high accuracy for a Japanese discovery cohort and demonstrates a remarkable degree of generalization for two independent validation cohorts in the USA and Japan. The developed ASD classifier does not distinguish individuals with major depressive disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder from their controls but moderately distinguishes patients with schizophrenia from their controls. The results leave open the viable possibility of exploring neuroimaging-based dimensions quantifying the multiple-disorder spectrum. PMID:27075704

  2. Functional connectivity networks for preoperative brain mapping in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hart, Michael G; Price, Stephen J; Suckling, John

    2016-08-26

    OBJECTIVE Resection of focal brain lesions involves maximizing the resection while preserving brain function. Mapping brain function has entered a new era focusing on distributed connectivity networks at "rest," that is, in the absence of a specific task or stimulus, requiring minimal participant engagement. Central to this frame shift has been the development of methods for the rapid assessment of whole-brain connectivity with functional MRI (fMRI) involving blood oxygenation level-dependent imaging. The authors appraised the feasibility of fMRI-based mapping of a repertoire of functional connectivity networks in neurosurgical patients with focal lesions and the potential benefits of resting-state connectivity mapping for surgical planning. METHODS Resting-state fMRI sequences with a 3-T scanner and multiecho echo-planar imaging coupled to independent component analysis were acquired preoperatively from 5 study participants who had a right temporoparietooccipital glioblastoma. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis was performed with InstaCorr. Network identification focused on 7 major functional connectivity networks described in the literature and a putative language network centered on Broca's area. RESULTS All 8 functional connectivity networks were identified in each participant. Tumor-related topological changes to the default mode network were observed in all participants. In addition, each participant had at least 1 other abnormal network, and each network was abnormal in at least 1 participant. Individual patterns of network irregularities were identified with a qualitative approach and included local displacement due to mass effect, loss of a functional network component, and recruitment of new regions. CONCLUSIONS Resting-state fMRI can reliably and rapidly detect common functional connectivity networks in patients with glioblastoma and also has sufficient sensitivity for identifying patterns of network alterations. Mapping of functional

  3. Abnormalities in large scale functional networks in unmedicated patients with schizophrenia and effects of risperidone

    PubMed Central

    Kraguljac, Nina Vanessa; White, David Matthew; Hadley, Jennifer Ann; Visscher, Kristina; Knight, David; ver Hoef, Lawrence; Falola, Blessing; Lahti, Adrienne Carol

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe abnormalities in large scale functional networks in unmedicated patients with schizophrenia and to examine effects of risperidone on networks. Material and methods 34 unmedicated patients with schizophrenia and 34 matched healthy controls were enrolled in this longitudinal study. We collected resting state functional MRI data with a 3T scanner at baseline and six weeks after they were started on risperidone. In addition, a group of 19 healthy controls were scanned twice six weeks apart. Four large scale networks, the dorsal attention network, executive control network, salience network, and default mode network were identified with seed based functional connectivity analyses. Group differences in connectivity, as well as changes in connectivity over time, were assessed on the group's participant level functional connectivity maps. Results In unmedicated patients with schizophrenia we found resting state connectivity to be increased in the dorsal attention network, executive control network, and salience network relative to control participants, but not the default mode network. Dysconnectivity was attenuated after six weeks of treatment only in the dorsal attention network. Baseline connectivity in this network was also related to clinical response at six weeks of treatment with risperidone. Conclusions Our results demonstrate abnormalities in large scale functional networks in patients with schizophrenia that are modulated by risperidone only to a certain extent, underscoring the dire need for development of novel antipsychotic medications that have the ability to alleviate symptoms through attenuation of dysconnectivity. PMID:26793436

  4. A Preliminary Study of Functional Connectivity in Comorbid Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Kathryn R.; Gee, Dylan G.; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Gabbay, Vilma; Hulvershorn, Leslie; Mueller, Bryon A.; Camchong, Jazmin; Bell, Christopher J.; Houri, Alaa; Kumra, Sanjiv; Lim, Kelvin O.; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Milham, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) begins frequently in adolescence and is associated with severe outcomes, but the developmental neurobiology of MDD is not well understood. Research in adults has implicated fronto-limbic neural networks in the pathophysiology of MDD, particularly in relation to the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Developmental changes in brain networks during adolescence highlight the need to examine MDD-related circuitry in teens separately from adults. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), this study examined functional connectivity in adolescents with MDD (n=12) and healthy adolescents (n=14). Seed-based connectivity analysis revealed that adolescents with MDD have decreased functional connectivity in a subgenual ACC-based neural network that includes the supragenual ACC (BA 32), the right medial frontal cortex (BA 10), the left inferior (BA 47) and superior frontal cortex (BA 22), superior temporal gyrus (BA 22), and the insular cortex (BA 13). These preliminary data suggest that MDD in adolescence is associated with abnormal connectivity within neural circuits that mediate emotion processing. Future research in larger, un-medicated samples will be necessary to confirm this finding. We conclude that hypothesis-driven, seed-based analyses of resting state fMRI data hold promise for advancing our current understanding of abnormal development of neural circuitry in adolescents with MDD. PMID:19446602

  5. Corticostriatal connectivity fingerprints: Probability maps based on resting-state functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Ellen; Balsters, Joshua H; Kassraian Fard, Pegah; Mantini, Dante; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2017-03-01

    Over the last decade, structure-function relationships have begun to encompass networks of brain areas rather than individual structures. For example, corticostriatal circuits have been associated with sensorimotor, limbic, and cognitive information processing, and damage to these circuits has been shown to produce unique behavioral outcomes in Autism, Parkinson's Disease, Schizophrenia and healthy ageing. However, it remains an open question how abnormal or absent connectivity can be detected at the individual level. Here, we provide a method for clustering gross morphological structures into subregions with unique functional connectivity fingerprints, and generate network probability maps usable as a baseline to compare individual cases against. We used connectivity metrics derived from resting-state fMRI (N = 100), in conjunction with hierarchical clustering methods, to parcellate the striatum into functionally distinct clusters. We identified three highly reproducible striatal subregions, across both hemispheres and in an independent replication dataset (N = 100) (dice-similarity values 0.40-1.00). Each striatal seed region resulted in a highly reproducible distinct connectivity fingerprint: the putamen showed predominant connectivity with cortical and cerebellar sensorimotor and language processing areas; the ventromedial striatum cluster had a distinct limbic connectivity pattern; the caudate showed predominant connectivity with the thalamus, frontal and occipital areas, and the cerebellum. Our corticostriatal probability maps agree with existing connectivity data in humans and non-human primates, and showed a high degree of replication. We believe that these maps offer an efficient tool to further advance hypothesis driven research and provide important guidance when investigating deviant connectivity in neurological patient populations suffering from e.g., stroke or cerebral palsy. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1478-1491, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Distribution of Diseases Causing Liver Function Test Abnormality in Children and Natural Recovery Time of the Abnormal Liver Function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although liver function test abnormality is frequently noted in children, there is no report about the distribution of the etiology and natural recovery time of the abnormal liver function. From March 2005 to February 2014, clinical information was retrospectively collected from 559 children who had abnormal liver function and were hospitalized or visited the outpatient clinic at the Jeju National University Hospital. The etiology of abnormal liver function was classified into groups and the natural recovery time of abnormal liver function was analyzed. The etiological groups of 559 patients included ‘nonspecific hepatitis’ in 42 (7.5%), ‘infection’ in 323 (57.8%), ‘rheumatologic and autoimmune’ in 66 (11.8%), ‘nonalcoholic fatty liver disease’ in 57 (10.2%), ‘anatomic’ in 12 (2.1%), ‘toxic’ in 13 (2.1%), ‘metabolic’ in 8 (1.4%), ‘hematologic’ in 7 (1.3%), ‘hemodynamic’ in 4 (0.7%), and ‘others’ in 27 (4.8%). Among the ‘infection’ group (57.8%), the ‘viral infection in the respiratory tract’ subgroup, which had 111 patients (19.8%), was the most common. The natural recovery time of the abnormal liver function was 27 days (median) in ‘nonspecific hepatitis’, 13 days (median) in ‘viral respiratory tract disease’, 16 days (median) in ‘viral gastroenteritis’, 42 days (median) in ‘viral febrile illness”, and 7 days (median) in “Kawasaki disease”. The information on the natural recovery time of abnormal liver function may help the physician to perform good clinical consultation for patients and their parents. PMID:27709857

  7. Predicting individual brain functional connectivity using a Bayesian hierarchical model.

    PubMed

    Dai, Tian; Guo, Ying

    2017-02-15

    Network-oriented analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), especially resting-state fMRI, has revealed important association between abnormal connectivity and brain disorders such as schizophrenia, major depression and Alzheimer's disease. Imaging-based brain connectivity measures have become a useful tool for investigating the pathophysiology, progression and treatment response of psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Recent studies have started to explore the possibility of using functional neuroimaging to help predict disease progression and guide treatment selection for individual patients. These studies provide the impetus to develop statistical methodology that would help provide predictive information on disease progression-related or treatment-related changes in neural connectivity. To this end, we propose a prediction method based on Bayesian hierarchical model that uses individual's baseline fMRI scans, coupled with relevant subject characteristics, to predict the individual's future functional connectivity. A key advantage of the proposed method is that it can improve the accuracy of individualized prediction of connectivity by combining information from both group-level connectivity patterns that are common to subjects with similar characteristics as well as individual-level connectivity features that are particular to the specific subject. Furthermore, our method also offers statistical inference tools such as predictive intervals that help quantify the uncertainty or variability of the predicted outcomes. The proposed prediction method could be a useful approach to predict the changes in individual patient's brain connectivity with the progression of a disease. It can also be used to predict a patient's post-treatment brain connectivity after a specified treatment regimen. Another utility of the proposed method is that it can be applied to test-retest imaging data to develop a more reliable estimator for individual

  8. Development of hippocampal functional connectivity during childhood.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, Sarah L; Redcay, Elizabeth; Dougherty, Lea R; Riggins, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus is a medial temporal lobe structure involved in memory, spatial navigation, and regulation of stress responses, making it a structure critical to daily functioning. However, little is known about the functional development of the hippocampus during childhood due to methodological challenges of acquiring neuroimaging data in young participants. This is a critical gap given evidence that hippocampally-mediated behaviors (e.g., episodic memory) undergo rapid and important changes during childhood. To address this gap, the present investigation collected resting-state fMRI scans in 97, 4- to 10-year-old children. Whole brain seed-based analyses of anterior, posterior, and whole hippocampal connectivity were performed to identify regions demonstrating stable (i.e., age-controlled) connectivity profiles as well as age-related differences in connectivity. Results reveal that the hippocampus is a highly connected structure of the brain and that most of the major components of the adult network are evident during childhood, including both unique and overlapping connectivity between anterior and posterior regions. Despite widespread age-controlled connectivity, the strength of hippocampal connectivity with regions of lateral temporal lobes and the anterior cingulate increased throughout the studied age range. These findings have implications for future investigations of the development of hippocampally-mediated behaviors and methodological applications for the appropriateness of whole versus segmented hippocampal seeds in connectivity analyses. Hum Brain Mapp 38:182-201, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cannabinoid Modulation of Functional Connectivity within Regions Processing Attentional Salience

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Falkenberg, Irina; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Atakan, Zerrin; Crippa, Jose A; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Mick; McGuire, Philip

    2015-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence to support the hypothesis that psychotic symptoms are the result of abnormal salience attribution, and that the attribution of salience is largely mediated through the prefrontal cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus. Although these areas show differential activation under the influence of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), the two major derivatives of cannabis sativa, little is known about the effects of these cannabinoids on the functional connectivity between these regions. We investigated this in healthy occasional cannabis users by employing event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following oral administration of delta-9-THC, CBD, or a placebo capsule. Employing a seed cluster-based functional connectivity analysis that involved using the average time series from each seed cluster for a whole-brain correlational analysis, we investigated the effect of drug condition on functional connectivity between the seed clusters and the rest of the brain during an oddball salience processing task. Relative to the placebo condition, delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on the functional connectivity between the dorsal striatum, the prefrontal cortex, and the hippocampus. Delta-9-THC reduced fronto-striatal connectivity, which was related to its effect on task performance, whereas this connection was enhanced by CBD. Conversely, mediotemporal-prefrontal connectivity was enhanced by delta-9-THC and reduced by CBD. Our results suggest that the functional integration of brain regions involved in salience processing is differentially modulated by single doses of delta-9-THC and CBD and that this relates to the processing of salient stimuli. PMID:25249057

  10. Altered Immune Function Associated with Disordered Neural Connectivity and Executive Dysfunctions: A Neurophysiological Study on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Yvonne M. Y.; Chan, Agnes S.; Sze, Sophia L.; Cheung, Mei-Chun; Wong, Chun-kwok; Lam, Joseph M. K.; Poon, Priscilla M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have impaired executive function, disordered neural connectivity, and abnormal immunologic function. The present study examined whether these abnormalities were associated. Seventeen high-functioning (HFA) and 17 low-functioning (LFA) children with ASD, aged 8-17…

  11. Multimodal evaluation of the amygdala's functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kerestes, Rebecca; Chase, Henry W; Phillips, Mary L; Ladouceur, Cecile D; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2017-01-09

    The amygdala is one of the most extensively studied human brain regions and undisputedly plays a central role in many psychiatric disorders. However, an outstanding question is whether connectivity of amygdala subregions, specifically the centromedial (CM), laterobasal (LB) and superficial (SF) nuclei, are modulated by brain state (i.e., task vs. rest). Here, using a multimodal approach, we directly compared meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) and specific co-activation likelihood estimation (SCALE)-derived estimates of CM, LB and SF task-based co-activation to the functional connectivity of these nuclei as assessed by resting state fmri (rs-fmri). Finally, using a preexisting resting state functional connectivity-derived cortical parcellation, we examined both MACM and rs-fmri amygdala subregion connectivity with 17 large-scale networks, to explicitly address how the amygdala interacts with other large-scale neural networks. Analyses revealed strong differentiation of CM, LB and SF connectivity patterns with other brain regions, both in task-dependent and task-independent contexts. All three regions, however, showed convergent connectivity with the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) that was not driven by high base rate levels of activation. Similar patterns of connectivity across rs-fmri and MACM were observed for each subregion, suggesting a similar network architecture of amygdala connectivity with the rest of the brain across tasks and resting state for each subregion, that may be modified in the context of specific task demands. These findings support animal models that posit a parallel model of amygdala functioning, but importantly, also modify this position to suggest integrative processing in the amygdala.

  12. Multimodal Imaging of Dynamic Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Laufs, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The study of large-scale functional interactions in the human brain with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) extends almost to the first applications of this technology. Due to historical reasons and preconceptions about the limitations of this brain imaging method, most studies have focused on assessing connectivity over extended periods of time. It is now clear that fMRI can resolve the temporal dynamics of functional connectivity, like other faster imaging techniques such as electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography (albeit on a different temporal scale). However, the indirect nature of fMRI measurements can hinder the interpretability of the results. After briefly summarizing recent advances in the field, we discuss how the simultaneous combination of fMRI with electrophysiological activity measurements can contribute to a better understanding of dynamic functional connectivity in humans both during rest and task, wakefulness, and other brain states. PMID:25762977

  13. A systematic framework for functional connectivity measures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huifang E.; Bénar, Christian G.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Friston, Karl J.; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Bernard, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed to characterize the functional connectivity between nodes in a network measured with different modalities (electrophysiology, functional magnetic resonance imaging etc.). Since different measures of functional connectivity yield different results for the same dataset, it is important to assess when and how they can be used. In this work, we provide a systematic framework for evaluating the performance of a large range of functional connectivity measures—based upon a comprehensive portfolio of models generating measurable responses. Specifically, we benchmarked 42 methods using 10,000 simulated datasets from 5 different types of generative models with different connectivity structures. Since all functional connectivity methods require the setting of some parameters (window size and number, model order etc.), we first optimized these parameters using performance criteria based upon (threshold free) ROC analysis. We then evaluated the performance of the methods on data simulated with different types of models. Finally, we assessed the performance of the methods against different levels of signal-to-noise ratios and network configurations. A MATLAB toolbox is provided to perform such analyses using other methods and simulated datasets. PMID:25538556

  14. Disrupted resting-state insular subregions functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youxue; Xie, Bing; Chen, Heng; Li, Meiling; Guo, Xiaonan; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is suggested to be a structural and functional abnormality in the insula. The insula, which consists of distinct subregions with various patterns of connectivity, displays complex and diverse functions. However, whether these insular subregions have different patterns of connectivity in PTSD remains unclear. Investigating the abnormal functional connectivity of the insular subregions is crucial to reveal its potential effect on diseases specifically PTSD. This study uses a seed-based method to investigate the altered resting-state functional connectivity of insular subregions in PTSD. We found that patients with PTSD showed reduced functional connectivity compared with healthy controls (HCs) between the left ventral anterior insula and the anterior cingulate cortex. The patients with PTSD also exhibited decreased functional connectivity between the right posterior insula and left inferior parietal lobe, and the postcentral gyrus relative to HCs. These results suggest the involvement of altered functional connectivity of insular subregions in the abnormal regulation of emotion and processing of somatosensory information in patients with PTSD. Such impairments in functional connectivity patterns of the insular subregions may advance our understanding of the pathophysiological basis underlying PTSD. PMID:27399097

  15. Disrupted resting-state insular subregions functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youxue; Xie, Bing; Chen, Heng; Li, Meiling; Guo, Xiaonan; Chen, Huafu

    2016-07-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is suggested to be a structural and functional abnormality in the insula. The insula, which consists of distinct subregions with various patterns of connectivity, displays complex and diverse functions. However, whether these insular subregions have different patterns of connectivity in PTSD remains unclear. Investigating the abnormal functional connectivity of the insular subregions is crucial to reveal its potential effect on diseases specifically PTSD. This study uses a seed-based method to investigate the altered resting-state functional connectivity of insular subregions in PTSD. We found that patients with PTSD showed reduced functional connectivity compared with healthy controls (HCs) between the left ventral anterior insula and the anterior cingulate cortex. The patients with PTSD also exhibited decreased functional connectivity between the right posterior insula and left inferior parietal lobe, and the postcentral gyrus relative to HCs. These results suggest the involvement of altered functional connectivity of insular subregions in the abnormal regulation of emotion and processing of somatosensory information in patients with PTSD. Such impairments in functional connectivity patterns of the insular subregions may advance our understanding of the pathophysiological basis underlying PTSD.

  16. Abnormal megakaryocyte development and platelet function in Nbeal2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Kahr, Walter H A; Lo, Richard W; Li, Ling; Pluthero, Fred G; Christensen, Hilary; Ni, Ran; Vaezzadeh, Nima; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Weyrich, Andrew S; Di Paola, Jorge; Landolt-Marticorena, Carolina; Gross, Peter L

    2013-11-07

    Gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is an inherited bleeding disorder associated with macrothrombocytopenia and α-granule-deficient platelets. GPS has been linked to loss of function mutations in NEABL2 (neurobeachin-like 2), and we describe here a murine GPS model, the Nbeal2(-/-) mouse. As in GPS, Nbeal2(-/-) mice exhibit splenomegaly, macrothrombocytopenia, and a deficiency of platelet α-granules and their cargo, including von Willebrand factor (VWF), thrombospondin-1, and platelet factor 4. The platelet α-granule membrane protein P-selectin is expressed at 48% of wild-type levels and externalized upon platelet activation. The presence of P-selectin and normal levels of VPS33B and VPS16B in Nbeal2(-/-) platelets suggests that NBEAL2 acts independently of VPS33B/VPS16B at a later stage of α-granule biogenesis. Impaired Nbeal2(-/-) platelet function was shown by flow cytometry, platelet aggregometry, bleeding assays, and intravital imaging of laser-induced arterial thrombus formation. Microscopic analysis detected marked abnormalities in Nbeal2(-/-) bone marrow megakaryocytes, which when cultured showed delayed maturation, decreased survival, decreased ploidy, and developmental abnormalities, including abnormal extracellular distribution of VWF. Our results confirm that α-granule secretion plays a significant role in platelet function, and they also indicate that abnormal α-granule formation in Nbeal2(-/-) mice has deleterious effects on megakaryocyte survival, development, and platelet production.

  17. Abnormalities of hippocampal-cortical connectivity in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Wang, Chunheng; Li, Meng; Lv, Bin; Jin, Zhengyu

    2011-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common damage seen in the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, the hippocampal-cortical connectivity was defined as the correlation between the hippocampal volume and cortical thickness at each vertex throughout the whole brain. We aimed to investigate the differences of ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity between the unilateral TLE-HS patients and the normal controls. In our study, the bilateral hippocampal volumes were first measured in each subject, and we found that the ipsilateral hippocampal volume significantly decreased in the left TLE-HS patients. Then, group analysis showed significant thinner average cortical thickness of the whole brain in the left TLE-HS patients compared with the normal controls. We found significantly increased ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, the right cingulate gyrus and the left parahippocampal gyrus of the left TLE-HS patients, which indicated structural vulnerability related to the hippocampus atrophy in the patient group. However, for the right TLE-HS patients, no significant differences were found between the patients and the normal controls, regardless of the ipsilateral hippocampal volume, the average cortical thickness or the patterns of hippocampal-cortical connectivity, which might be related to less atrophies observed in the MRI scans. Our study provided more evidence for the structural abnormalities in the unilateral TLE-HS patients.

  18. Functional Connectivity Homogeneity Correlates with Duration of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Zulfi; Chiang, Sharon; Yeh, Hsiang J.; Engel, Jerome; Stern, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) often is associated with progressive changes to seizures, memory, and mood during its clinical course. However, the cerebral changes related to this progression are not well understood. Because the changes may be related to changes in brain networks, we used functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) to determine whether brain network parameters relate to the duration of TLE. Graph theory based analysis of the sites of reported regions of TLE abnormality, was performed on resting state fMRI data in 48 subjects: 24 controls, 13 patients with left TLE, and 11 patients with right TLE. Various network parameters were analyzed including betweenness centrality (BC), clustering coefficient (CC), path length (PL), small-world index (SWI), global efficiency (GE), connectivity strength (CS), and connectivity diversity (CD). These were compared for TLE as a group, compared to controls, and for left and right TLE separately. Association of changes in network parameters with epilepsy duration was also evaluated. We found that CC, CS and CD were decreased in TLE, compared to control subjects. Analyzed according to epilepsy duration, TLE showed a progressive reduction in CD. In conclusion, we found that several network parameters were decreased in TLE compared to controls, which suggested reduced connectivity in TLE. Reduction in CD associated with epilepsy duration suggests a homogenization of connections over time in TLE, indicating a reduction of the normal repertoire of stronger and weaker connections to other brain regions. PMID:25873437

  19. Interictal activity is an important contributor to abnormal intrinsic network connectivity in paediatric focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shamshiri, Elhum A; Tierney, Tim M; Centeno, Maria; St Pier, Kelly; Pressler, Ronit M; Sharp, David J; Perani, Suejen; Cross, J Helen; Carmichael, David W

    2017-01-01

    Patients with focal epilepsy have been shown to have reduced functional connectivity in intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs), which has been related to neurocognitive development and outcome. However, the relationship between interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) and changes in ICNs remains unclear, with evidence both for and against their influence. EEG-fMRI data was obtained in 27 children with focal epilepsy (mixed localisation and aetiologies) and 17 controls. A natural stimulus task (cartoon blocks verses blocks where the subject was told "please wait") was used to enhance the connectivity within networks corresponding to ICNs while reducing potential confounds of vigilance and motion. Our primary hypothesis was that the functional connectivity within visual and attention networks would be reduced in patients with epilepsy. We further hypothesized that controlling for the effects of IEDs would increase the connectivity in the patient group. The key findings were: (1) Patients with mixed epileptic foci showed a common connectivity reduction in lateral visual and attentional networks compared with controls. (2) Having controlled for the effects of IEDs there were no connectivity differences between patients and controls. (3) A comparison within patients revealed reduced connectivity between the attentional network and basal ganglia associated with interictal epileptiform discharges. We also found that the task activations were reduced in epilepsy patients but that this was unrelated to IED occurrence. Unexpectedly, connectivity changes in ICNs were strongly associated with the transient effects of interictal epileptiform discharges. Interictal epileptiform discharges were shown to have a pervasive transient influence on the brain's functional organisation. Hum Brain Mapp 38:221-236, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Functional Connectivity of the Posteromedial Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cauda, Franco; Geminiani, Giuliano; D'Agata, Federico; Sacco, Katiuscia; Duca, Sergio; Bagshaw, Andrew P.; Cavanna, Andrea E.

    2010-01-01

    As different areas within the PMC have different connectivity patterns with various cortical and subcortical regions, we hypothesized that distinct functional modules may be present within the PMC. Because the PMC appears to be the most active region during resting state, it has been postulated to play a fundamental role in the control of baseline brain functioning within the default mode network (DMN). Therefore one goal of this study was to explore which components of the PMC are specifically involved in the DMN. In a sample of seventeen healthy volunteers, we performed an unsupervised voxelwise ROI-based clustering based on resting state functional connectivity. Our results showed four clusters with different network connectivity. Each cluster showed positive and negative correlations with cortical regions involved in the DMN. Progressive shifts in PMC functional connectivity emerged from anterior to posterior and from dorsal to ventral ROIs. Ventral posterior portions of PMC were found to be part of a network implicated in the visuo-spatial guidance of movements, whereas dorsal anterior portions of PMC were interlinked with areas involved in attentional control. Ventral retrosplenial PMC selectively correlated with a network showing considerable overlap with the DMN, indicating that it makes essential contributions in self-referential processing, including autobiographical memory processing. Finally, ventral posterior PMC was shown to be functionally connected with a visual network. The paper represents the first attempt to provide a systematic, unsupervised, voxelwise clustering of the human posteromedial cortex (PMC), using resting-state functional connectivity data. Moreover, a ROI-based parcellation was used to confirm the results. PMID:20927345

  1. Abnormal White Matter Connections Between Medial Frontal Regions Predict Symptoms in Patients with First Episode Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Toshiyuki; Bouix, Sylvain; Lyall, Amanda E; Hosokawa, Taiga; Saito, Yukiko; Melonakos, Eric; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Seidman, Larry J.; Goldstein, Jill; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle; Petryshen, Tracey; Wojcik, Joanne; Kubicki, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and rostral part of anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) have been suggested to be involved in the neural network of salience and emotional processing, and associated with specific clinical symptoms in schizophrenia. Considering the schizophrenia dysconnectivity hypothesis, the connectivity abnormalities between mOFC and rACC might be associated with clinical characteristics in first episode schizophrenia patients (FESZ). Methods After parcellating mOFC into the anterior and posterior part, diffusion properties of the mOFC-rACC white matter connections for 21 patients with FESZ and 21 healthy controls (HCs) were examined using stochastic tractography, one of the most effective Diffusion Tensor Imaging methods for examining tracts between adjacent gray matter regions. Results Fractional anisotropy (FA) reductions were observed in bilateral posterior, but not anterior mOFC-rACC connections (left: p<0.0001; right: p<0.0001) in FESZ compared to HCs. In addition, reduced FA in the left posterior mOFC-rACC connection was associated with more severe anhedonia-asociality (rho=−0.633, p=0.006) and total score (rho=−0.520, p=0.032) in the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS); reduced FA in the right posterior mOFC-rACC connection was associated with more severe affective flattening (rho=−0.644, p=0.005), total score (rho=−0.535, p=0.027) in SANS, hallucinations (rho=−0.551, p=0.018), delusions (rho=−0.632, p=0.005) and total score (rho=−0.721, p=0.001) in the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS) in FESZ. Conclusions The observed white matter abnormalities within the connections between mOFC and rACC might be associated with the psychopathology of the early stage of schizophrenia. PMID:26277547

  2. Empirical validation of directed functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Mill, Ravi D; Bagic, Anto; Bostan, Andreea; Schneider, Walter; Cole, Michael W

    2017-02-01

    Mapping directions of influence in the human brain connectome represents the next phase in understanding its functional architecture. However, a host of methodological uncertainties have impeded the application of directed connectivity methods, which have primarily been validated via "ground truth" connectivity patterns embedded in simulated functional MRI (fMRI) and magneto-/electro-encephalography (MEG/EEG) datasets. Such simulations rely on many generative assumptions, and we hence utilized a different strategy involving empirical data in which a ground truth directed connectivity pattern could be anticipated with confidence. Specifically, we exploited the established "sensory reactivation" effect in episodic memory, in which retrieval of sensory information reactivates regions involved in perceiving that sensory modality. Subjects performed a paired associate task in separate fMRI and MEG sessions, in which a ground truth reversal in directed connectivity between auditory and visual sensory regions was instantiated across task conditions. This directed connectivity reversal was successfully recovered across different algorithms, including Granger causality and Bayes network (IMAGES) approaches, and across fMRI ("raw" and deconvolved) and source-modeled MEG. These results extend simulation studies of directed connectivity, and offer practical guidelines for the use of such methods in clarifying causal mechanisms of neural processing.

  3. Disruptions in Functional Network Connectivity during Alcohol Intoxicated Driving

    PubMed Central

    Rzepecki-Smith, Catherine I.; Meda, Shashwath A.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Stevens, Michael C.; Jafri, Madiha J.; Astur, Robert S.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Driving while under the influence of alcohol is a major public health problem whose neural basis is not well understood. In a recently published fMRI study (Meda et al, 2009), our group identified five, independent critical driving-associated brain circuits whose inter-regional connectivity was disrupted by alcohol intoxication. However, the functional connectivity between these circuits has not yet been explored in order to determine how these networks communicate with each other during sober and alcohol-intoxicated states. Methods: In the current study, we explored such differences in connections between the above brain circuits and driving behavior, under the influence of alcohol versus placebo. Forty social drinkers who drove regularly underwent fMRI scans during virtual reality driving simulations following two alcohol doses, placebo and an individualized dose producing blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) of 0.10%. Results: At the active dose, we found specific disruptions of functional network connectivity between the frontal-temporal-basal ganglia and the cerebellar circuits. The temporal connectivity between these two circuits was found to be less correlated (p <0.05) when driving under the influence of alcohol. This disconnection was also associated with an abnormal driving behavior (unstable motor vehicle steering). Conclusions: Connections between frontal-temporal-basal ganglia and cerebellum have recently been explored; these may be responsible in part for maintaining normal motor behavior by integrating their overlapping motor control functions. These connections appear to be disrupted by alcohol intoxication, in turn associated with an explicit type of impaired driving behavior. PMID:20028354

  4. Abnormal structural connectivity in the brain networks of children with hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Weihong; Holland, Scott K.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Altaye, Mekibib; Mangano, Francesco T.; Limbrick, David D.; Jones, Blaise V.; Nash, Tiffany; Rajagopal, Akila; Simpson, Sarah; Ragan, Dustin; McKinstry, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure and ventriculomegaly in children with hydrocephalus are known to have adverse effects on white matter structure. This study seeks to investigate the impact of hydrocephalus on topological features of brain networks in children. The goal was to investigate structural network connectivity, at both global and regional levels, in the brains in children with hydrocephalus using graph theory analysis and diffusion tensor tractography. Three groups of children were included in the study (29 normally developing controls, 9 preoperative hydrocephalus patients, and 17 postoperative hydrocephalus patients). Graph theory analysis was applied to calculate the global network measures including small-worldness, normalized clustering coefficients, normalized characteristic path length, global efficiency, and modularity. Abnormalities in regional network parameters, including nodal degree, local efficiency, clustering coefficient, and betweenness centrality, were also compared between the two patients groups (separately) and the controls using two tailed t-test at significance level of p < 0.05 (corrected for multiple comparison). Children with hydrocephalus in both the preoperative and postoperative groups were found to have significantly lower small-worldness and lower normalized clustering coefficient than controls. Children with hydrocephalus in the postoperative group were also found to have significantly lower normalized characteristic path length and lower modularity. At regional level, significant group differences (or differences at trend level) in regional network measures were found between hydrocephalus patients and the controls in a series of brain regions including the medial occipital gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, thalamus, cingulate gyrus, lingual gyrus, rectal gyrus, caudate, cuneus, and insular. Our data showed that structural connectivity analysis using graph theory and diffusion tensor tractography is sensitive to detect

  5. Abnormal structural connectivity in the brain networks of children with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Weihong; Holland, Scott K; Shimony, Joshua S; Altaye, Mekibib; Mangano, Francesco T; Limbrick, David D; Jones, Blaise V; Nash, Tiffany; Rajagopal, Akila; Simpson, Sarah; Ragan, Dustin; McKinstry, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure and ventriculomegaly in children with hydrocephalus are known to have adverse effects on white matter structure. This study seeks to investigate the impact of hydrocephalus on topological features of brain networks in children. The goal was to investigate structural network connectivity, at both global and regional levels, in the brains in children with hydrocephalus using graph theory analysis and diffusion tensor tractography. Three groups of children were included in the study (29 normally developing controls, 9 preoperative hydrocephalus patients, and 17 postoperative hydrocephalus patients). Graph theory analysis was applied to calculate the global network measures including small-worldness, normalized clustering coefficients, normalized characteristic path length, global efficiency, and modularity. Abnormalities in regional network parameters, including nodal degree, local efficiency, clustering coefficient, and betweenness centrality, were also compared between the two patients groups (separately) and the controls using two tailed t-test at significance level of p < 0.05 (corrected for multiple comparison). Children with hydrocephalus in both the preoperative and postoperative groups were found to have significantly lower small-worldness and lower normalized clustering coefficient than controls. Children with hydrocephalus in the postoperative group were also found to have significantly lower normalized characteristic path length and lower modularity. At regional level, significant group differences (or differences at trend level) in regional network measures were found between hydrocephalus patients and the controls in a series of brain regions including the medial occipital gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, thalamus, cingulate gyrus, lingual gyrus, rectal gyrus, caudate, cuneus, and insular. Our data showed that structural connectivity analysis using graph theory and diffusion tensor tractography is sensitive to detect

  6. Decreased coherence and functional connectivity of electroencephalograph in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruofan; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Wei, Xile; Yang, Chen; Deng, Bin

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the abnormalities of electroencephalograph (EEG) signals in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) by analyzing 16-scalp electrodes EEG signals and make a comparison with the normal controls. Coherence is introduced to measure the pair-wise normalized linear synchrony and functional correlations between two EEG signals in different frequency domains, and graph analysis is further used to investigate the influence of AD on the functional connectivity of human brain. Data analysis results show that, compared with the control group, the pair-wise coherence of AD group is significantly decreased, especially for the theta and alpha frequency bands in the frontal and parieto-occipital regions. Furthermore, functional connectivity among different brain regions is reconstructed based on EEG, which exhibit obvious small-world properties. Graph analysis demonstrates that the local functional connections between regions for AD decrease. In addition, it is found that small-world properties of AD networks are largely weakened, by calculating its average path lengths, clustering coefficients, global efficiency, local efficiency, and small-worldness. The obtained results show that both pair-wise coherence and functional network can be taken as effective measures to distinguish AD patients from the normal, which may benefit our understanding of the disease.

  7. The Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience of Functional Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental cognitive neuroscience is a rapidly growing field that examines the relationships between biological development and cognitive ability. In the past decade, there has been ongoing refinement of concepts and methodology related to the study of "functional connectivity" among distributed brain regions believed to underlie cognition and…

  8. Abnormal synchrony and effective connectivity in patients with schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia-Vaya, Maria; Escartí, Maria José; Molina-Mateo, Jose; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Gadea, Marien; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Aguilar García-Iturrospe, Eduardo J; Robles, Montserrat; Biswal, Bharat B; Sanjuan, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are the most frequent positive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Hallucinations have been related to emotional processing disturbances, altered functional connectivity and effective connectivity deficits. Previously, we observed that, compared to healthy controls, the limbic network responses of patients with auditory hallucinations differed when the subjects were listening to emotionally charged words. We aimed to compare the synchrony patterns and effective connectivity of task-related networks between schizophrenia patients with and without AH and healthy controls. Schizophrenia patients with AH (n = 27) and without AH (n = 14) were compared with healthy participants (n = 31). We examined functional connectivity by analyzing correlations and cross-correlations among previously detected independent component analysis time courses. Granger causality was used to infer the information flow direction in the brain regions. The results demonstrate that the patterns of cortico-cortical functional synchrony differentiated the patients with AH from the patients without AH and from the healthy participants. Additionally, Granger-causal relationships between the networks clearly differentiated the groups. In the patients with AH, the principal causal source was an occipital-cerebellar component, versus a temporal component in the patients without AH and the healthy controls. These data indicate that an anomalous process of neural connectivity exists when patients with AH process emotional auditory stimuli. Additionally, a central role is suggested for the cerebellum in processing emotional stimuli in patients with persistent AH.

  9. Abnormal synchrony and effective connectivity in patients with schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    de la Iglesia-Vaya, Maria; Escartí, Maria José; Molina-Mateo, Jose; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Gadea, Marien; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Aguilar García-Iturrospe, Eduardo J.; Robles, Montserrat; Biswal, Bharat B.; Sanjuan, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are the most frequent positive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Hallucinations have been related to emotional processing disturbances, altered functional connectivity and effective connectivity deficits. Previously, we observed that, compared to healthy controls, the limbic network responses of patients with auditory hallucinations differed when the subjects were listening to emotionally charged words. We aimed to compare the synchrony patterns and effective connectivity of task-related networks between schizophrenia patients with and without AH and healthy controls. Schizophrenia patients with AH (n = 27) and without AH (n = 14) were compared with healthy participants (n = 31). We examined functional connectivity by analyzing correlations and cross-correlations among previously detected independent component analysis time courses. Granger causality was used to infer the information flow direction in the brain regions. The results demonstrate that the patterns of cortico-cortical functional synchrony differentiated the patients with AH from the patients without AH and from the healthy participants. Additionally, Granger-causal relationships between the networks clearly differentiated the groups. In the patients with AH, the principal causal source was an occipital–cerebellar component, versus a temporal component in the patients without AH and the healthy controls. These data indicate that an anomalous process of neural connectivity exists when patients with AH process emotional auditory stimuli. Additionally, a central role is suggested for the cerebellum in processing emotional stimuli in patients with persistent AH. PMID:25379429

  10. The role of anxiety in stuttering: Evidence from functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jia, Fanlu; Siok, Wai Ting; Tan, Li Hai

    2017-03-27

    Persistent developmental stuttering is a neurologically based speech disorder associated with cognitive-linguistic, motor and emotional abnormalities. Previous studies investigating the relationship between anxiety and stuttering have yielded mixed results, but it has not yet been examined whether anxiety influences brain activity underlying stuttering. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the functional connectivity associated with state anxiety in a syllable repetition task, and trait anxiety during rest in adults who stutter (N=19) and fluent controls (N=19). During the speech task, people who stutter (PWS) showed increased functional connectivity of the right amygdala with the prefrontal gyrus (the left ventromedial frontal gyrus and right middle frontal gyrus) and the left insula compared to controls. During rest, PWS showed stronger functional connectivity between the right hippocampus and the left orbital frontal gyrus, and between the left hippocampus and left motor areas than controls. Taken together, our results suggest aberrant bottom-up and/or top-down interactions for anxiety regulation, which might be responsible for the higher level of state anxiety during speech and for the anxiety-prone trait in PWS. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the neural underpinnings of anxiety in PWS, thus yielding new insight into the causes of stuttering which might aid strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of stuttering.

  11. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-05-26

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose &gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  12. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-05-01

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose & gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  13. Morphological and functional abnormalities of salience network in the early-stage of paranoid schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pu, Weidan; Li, Li; Zhang, Huiran; Ouyang, Xuan; Liu, Haihong; Zhao, Jingping; Li, Lingjiang; Xue, Zhimin; Xu, Ke; Tang, Haibo; Shan, Baoci; Liu, Zhening; Wang, Fei

    2012-10-01

    A salience network (SN), mainly composed of the anterior insula (AI) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), has been suggested to play an important role in salience attribution which has been proposed as central to the pathology of paranoid schizophrenia. The role of this SN in the pathophysiology of paranoid schizophrenia, however, still remains unclear. In the present study, voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity analyses were combined to identify morphological and functional abnormalities in the proposed SN in the early-stage of paranoid schizophrenia (ESPS). Voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity analyses were applied to 90 ESPS patients and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Correlation analyses were performed to examine the relationships between various clinical variables and both gray matter morphology and functional connectivity within the SN in ESPS. Compared to the HC group, the ESPS group showed significantly reduced gray matter volume (GMV) in both bilateral AI and ACC. Moreover, significantly reduced functional connectivity within the SN sub-networks was identified in the ESPS group. These convergent morphological and functional deficits in SN were significantly associated with hallucinations. Additionally, illness duration correlated with reduced GMV in the left AI in ESPS. In conclusion, these findings provide convergent evidence for the morphological and functional abnormalities of the SN in ESPS. Moreover, the association of illness duration with the reduced GMV in the left AI suggests that the SN and the AI, in particular, may manifest progressive morphological changes that are especially important in the emergence of ESPS.

  14. Dynamic Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Roselinde H; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Dillon, Daniel G; Goer, Franziska; Beltzer, Miranda; Minkel, Jared; Smoski, Moria; Dichter, Gabriel; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2016-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by abnormal resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), especially in medial prefrontal cortical (MPFC) regions of the default network. However, prior research in MDD has not examined dynamic changes in functional connectivity as networks form, interact, and dissolve over time. We compared unmedicated individuals with MDD (n=100) to control participants (n=109) on dynamic RSFC (operationalized as SD in RSFC over a series of sliding windows) of an MPFC seed region during a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Among participants with MDD, we also investigated the relationship between symptom severity and RSFC. Secondary analyses probed the association between dynamic RSFC and rumination. Results showed that individuals with MDD were characterized by decreased dynamic (less variable) RSFC between MPFC and regions of parahippocampal gyrus within the default network, a pattern related to sustained positive connectivity between these regions across sliding windows. In contrast, the MDD group exhibited increased dynamic (more variable) RSFC between MPFC and regions of insula, and higher severity of depression was related to increased dynamic RSFC between MPFC and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These patterns of highly variable RSFC were related to greater frequency of strong positive and negative correlations in activity across sliding windows. Secondary analyses indicated that increased dynamic RSFC between MPFC and insula was related to higher levels of recent rumination. These findings provide initial evidence that depression, and ruminative thinking in depression, are related to abnormal patterns of fluctuating communication among brain systems involved in regulating attention and self-referential thinking.

  15. Abnormal climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synaptic connections in the essential tremor cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Ying; Louis, Elan D; Faust, Phyllis L; Koeppen, Arnulf H; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G; Kuo, Sheng-Han

    2014-12-01

    Structural changes in Purkinje cells have been identified in the essential tremor cerebellum, although the mechanisms that underlie these changes remain poorly understood. Climbing fibres provide one of the major excitatory inputs to Purkinje cells, and climbing fibre-Purkinje cell connections are essential for normal cerebellar-mediated motor control. The distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses on Purkinje cell dendrites is dynamically regulated and may be altered in disease states. The aim of the present study was to examine the density and distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses using post-mortem cerebellar tissue of essential tremor cases and controls. Using vesicular glutamate transporter type 2 immunohistochemistry, we labelled climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses of 12 essential tremor cases and 13 age-matched controls from the New York Brain Bank. Normally, climbing fibres form synapses mainly on the thick, proximal Purkinje cell dendrites in the inner portion of the molecular layer, whereas parallel fibres form synapses on the thin, distal Purkinje cell spiny branchlets. We observed that, compared with controls, essential tremor cases had decreased climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synaptic density, more climbing fibres extending to the outer portion of the molecular layer, and more climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses on the thin Purkinje cell spiny branchlets. Interestingly, in essential tremor, the increased distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses on the thin Purkinje cell branchlets was inversely associated with clinical tremor severity, indicating a close relationship between the altered distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell connections and tremor. These findings suggest that abnormal climbing fibre-Purkinje cell connections could be of importance in the pathogenesis of essential tremor.

  16. Abnormal insula functional network is associated with episodic memory decline in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunming; Bai, Feng; Yu, Hui; Shi, Yongmei; Yuan, Yonggui; Chen, Gang; Li, Wenjun; Chen, Guangyu; Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Shi-Jiang

    2012-10-15

    Abnormalities of functional connectivity in the default mode network (DMN) recently have been reported in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other psychiatric diseases. As such, these abnormalities may be epiphenomena instead of playing a causal role in AD progression. To date, few studies have investigated specific brain networks, which extend beyond the DMN involved in the early AD stages, especially in aMCI. The insula is one site affected by early pathological changes in AD and is a crucial hub of the human brain networks. Currently, we explored the contribution of the insula networks to cognitive performance in aMCI patients. Thirty aMCI and 26 cognitively normal (CN) subjects participated in this study. Intrinsic connectivity of the insula networks was measured, using the resting-state functional connectivity fMRI approach. We examined the differential connectivity of insula networks between groups, and the neural correlation between the altered insula networks connectivity and the cognitive performance in aMCI patients and CN subjects, respectively. Insula subregional volumes were also investigated. AMCI subjects, when compared to CN subjects, showed significantly reduced right posterior insula volumes, cognitive deficits and disrupted intrinsic connectivity of the insula networks. Specifically, decreased intrinsic connectivity was primarily located in the frontal-parietal network and the cingulo-opercular network, including the anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC), anterior cingulate cortex, operculum, inferior parietal cortex and precuneus. Increased intrinsic connectivity was primarily situated in the visual-auditory pathway, which included the posterior superior temporal gyrus and middle occipital gyrus. Conjunction analysis was performed; and significantly decreased intrinsic connectivity in the overlapping regions of the anterior and posterior insula networks, including the bilateral aPFC, left

  17. Modeling the Relationship among Gray Matter Atrophy, Abnormalities in Connecting White Matter, and Cognitive Performance in Early Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kuceyeski, A.F.; Vargas, W.; Dayan, M.; Monohan, E.; Blackwell, C.; Raj, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Gauthier, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Quantitative assessment of clinical and pathologic consequences of white matter abnormalities in multiple sclerosis is critical in understanding the pathways of disease. This study aimed to test whether gray matter atrophy was related to abnormalities in connecting white matter and to identify patterns of imaging biomarker abnormalities that were related to patient processing speed. Materials and Methods Image data and Symbol Digit Modalities Test scores were collected from a cohort of patients with early multiple sclerosis. The Network Modification Tool was used to estimate connectivity irregularities by projecting white matter abnormalities onto connecting gray matter regions. Partial least-squares regression quantified the relationship between imaging biomarkers and processing speed as measured by the Symbol Digit Modalities Test. Results Atrophy in deep gray matter structures of the thalami and putamen had moderate and significant correlations with abnormalities in connecting white matter (r = 0.39–0.41, P < .05 corrected). The 2 models of processing speed, 1 for each of the WM imaging biomarkers, had goodness-of-fit (R2) values of 0.42 and 0.30. A measure of the impact of white matter lesions on the connectivity of occipital and parietal areas had significant nonzero regression coefficients. Conclusions We concluded that deep gray matter regions may be susceptible to inflammation and/or demyelination in white matter, possibly having a higher sensitivity to remote degeneration, and that lesions affecting visual processing pathways were related to processing speed. The Network Modification Tool may be used to quantify the impact of early white matter abnormalities on both connecting gray matter structures and processing speed. PMID:25414004

  18. Functional Connectivity Modulation by Acupuncture in Patients with Bell's Palsy

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoxuan; Hu, Sheng; Li, Chuanfu; Xu, Chunsheng; Kan, Hongxing; Xue, Qiuju; Qiu, Bensheng

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy (BP), an acute unilateral facial paralysis, is frequently treated with acupuncture in many countries. However, the mechanism of treatment is not clear so far. In order to explore the potential mechanism, 22 healthy volunteers and 17 BP patients with different clinical duration were recruited. The resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were conducted before and after acupuncture at LI4 (Hegu), respectively. By comparing BP-induced functional connectivity (FC) changes with acupuncture-induced FC changes in the patients, the abnormal increased FC that could be reduced by acupuncture was selected. The FC strength of the selected FC at various stages was analyzed subsequently. Our results show that FC modulation of acupuncture is specific and consistent with the tendency of recovery. Therefore, we propose that FC modulation by acupuncture may be beneficial to recovery from the disease. PMID:27293461

  19. Left hemisphere structural connectivity abnormality in pediatric hydrocephalus patients following surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Weihong; Meller, Artur; Shimony, Joshua S; Nash, Tiffany; Jones, Blaise V; Holland, Scott K; Altaye, Mekibib; Barnard, Holly; Phillips, Jannel; Powell, Stephanie; McKinstry, Robert C; Limbrick, David D; Rajagopal, Akila; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-01-01

    -II)]. However, one global network measure (global efficiency) and two regional network measures in the insula (local efficiency and between centrality) tested at 3-month post-surgery were found to correlate with GAC score tested at 12-month post-surgery with statistical significance (all p < 0.05, corrected). Our data showed that the structural connectivity analysis based on DTI and graph theory was sensitive in detecting both global and regional network abnormality when the analysis was conducted in the left hemisphere only. This approach provides a new avenue enabling the application of advanced neuroimaging analysis methods in quantifying brain damage in children with hydrocephalus surgically treated with programmable shunts.

  20. Dynamic functional network connectivity using distance correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudas, Jorge; Guaje, Javier; Demertzi, Athena; Heine, Lizette; Tshibanda, Luaba; Soddu, Andrea; Laureys, Steven; Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Investigations about the intrinsic brain organization in resting-state are critical for the understanding of healthy, pathological and pharmacological cerebral states. Recent studies on fMRI suggest that resting state activity is organized on large scale networks of coordinated activity, in the so called, Resting State Networks (RSNs). The assessment of the interactions among these functional networks plays an important role for the understanding of different brain pathologies. Current methods to quantify these interactions commonly assume that the underlying coordination mechanisms are stationary and linear through the whole recording of the resting state phenomena. Nevertheless, recent evidence suggests that rather than stationary, these mechanisms may exhibit a rich set of time-varying repertoires. In addition, these approaches do not consider possible non-linear relationships maybe linked to feed-back communication mechanisms between RSNs. In this work, we introduce a novel approach for dynamical functional network connectivity for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting activity, which accounts for non-linear dynamic relationships between RSNs. The proposed method is based on a windowed distance correlations computed on resting state time-courses extracted at single subject level. We showed that this strategy is complementary to the current approaches for dynamic functional connectivity and will help to enhance the discrimination capacity of patients with disorder of consciousness.

  1. Abnormal Default System Functioning in Depression: Implications for Emotion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Irene; Bianco, Francesca; Cusinato, Maria; Calvo, Vincenzo; Sambin, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Depression is widely seen as the result of difficulties in regulating emotions. Based on neuroimaging studies on voluntary emotion regulation, neurobiological models have focused on the concept of cognitive control, considering emotion regulation as a shift toward involving controlled processes associated with activation of the prefrontal and parietal executive areas, instead of responding automatically to emotional stimuli. According to such models, the weaker executive area activation observed in depressed patients is attributable to a lack of cognitive control over negative emotions. Going beyond the concept of cognitive control, psychodynamic models describe the development of individuals’ capacity to regulate their emotional states in mother-infant interactions during childhood, through the construction of the representation of the self, others, and relationships. In this mini-review, we link these psychodynamic models with recent findings regarding the abnormal functioning of the default system in depression. Consistently with psychodynamic models, psychological functions associated with the default system include self-related processing, semantic processes, and implicit forms of emotion regulation. The abnormal activation of the default system observed in depression may explain the dysfunctional aspects of emotion regulation typical of the condition, such as an exaggerated negative self-focus and rumination on self-esteem issues. We also discuss the clinical implications of these findings with reference to the therapeutic relationship as a key tool for revisiting impaired or distorted representations of the self and relational objects. PMID:27375536

  2. Dynamic functional connectivity: Promise, issues, and interpretations

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, R. Matthew; Womelsdorf, Thilo; Allen, Elena A.; Bandettini, Peter A.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Corbetta, Maurizio; Penna, Stefania Della; Duyn, Jeff H.; Glover, Gary H.; Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Handwerker, Daniel A.; Keilholz, Shella; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Leopold, David A.; de Pasquale, Francesco; Sporns, Olaf; Walter, Martin; Chang, Catie

    2013-01-01

    The brain must dynamically integrate, coordinate, and respond to internal and external stimuli across multiple time scales. Non-invasive measurements of brain activity with fMRI have greatly advanced our understanding of the large-scale functional organization supporting these fundamental features of brain function. Conclusions from previous resting-state fMRI investigations were based upon static descriptions of functional connectivity (FC), and only recently studies have begun to capitalize on the wealth of information contained within the temporal features of spontaneous BOLD FC. Emerging evidence suggests that dynamic FC metrics may index changes in macroscopic neural activity patterns underlying critical aspects of cognition and behavior, though limitations with regard to analysis and interpretation remain. Here, we review recent findings, methodological considerations, neural and behavioral correlates, and future directions in the emerging field of dynamic FC investigations. PMID:23707587

  3. Clinical applications of resting state functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Fox, Michael D; Greicius, Michael

    2010-01-01

    During resting conditions the brain remains functionally and metabolically active. One manifestation of this activity that has become an important research tool is spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The identification of correlation patterns in these spontaneous fluctuations has been termed resting state functional connectivity (fcMRI) and has the potential to greatly increase the translation of fMRI into clinical care. In this article we review the advantages of the resting state signal for clinical applications including detailed discussion of signal to noise considerations. We include guidelines for performing resting state research on clinical populations, outline the different areas for clinical application, and identify important barriers to be addressed to facilitate the translation of resting state fcMRI into the clinical realm.

  4. Clinical Applications of Resting State Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael D.; Greicius, Michael

    2010-01-01

    During resting conditions the brain remains functionally and metabolically active. One manifestation of this activity that has become an important research tool is spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The identification of correlation patterns in these spontaneous fluctuations has been termed resting state functional connectivity (fcMRI) and has the potential to greatly increase the translation of fMRI into clinical care. In this article we review the advantages of the resting state signal for clinical applications including detailed discussion of signal to noise considerations. We include guidelines for performing resting state research on clinical populations, outline the different areas for clinical application, and identify important barriers to be addressed to facilitate the translation of resting state fcMRI into the clinical realm. PMID:20592951

  5. Autism spectrum disorder and early motor abnormalities: Connected or coincidental companions?

    PubMed

    Setoh, Peipei; Marschik, Peter B; Einspieler, Christa; Esposito, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Research in the past decade has produced a growing body of evidence showing that motor abnormalities in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are the rule rather than the exception. The paper by Chinello and colleagues furthers our understanding of the importance of studying motor functions in ASD by testing a non-clinical population of parents-infant triads. Chinello and colleagues' findings seem to suggest that subclinical motor impairments may exist in the typical population with inherited non-clinical ASD traits. Chinello and colleagues' discovery also urges us to ask why motor abnormalities exist in typically developing infants when their parents present some subclinical ASD traits. We believe that there are at least two possibilities. In the first possible scenario, motor impairments and ASD traits form a single cluster of symptoms unique to a subgroup of individuals with autism. A second possible scenario is that motor atypicalities are the first warning signs of vulnerability often associated with atypical development. In conclusion, Chinello et al.'s findings inform us that subclinical atypical phenotypes such as sociocommunicative anomalies may be related to subclinical motor performances in the next generation. This adds to our knowledge by shedding some light on the relation of vulnerability in one domain with vulnerability in another domain.

  6. Altered striatal intrinsic functional connectivity in pediatric anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, Julia; Benson, Brenda; Farber, Madeline; Pine, Daniel; Ernst, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders of adolescence. Behavioral and task-based imaging studies implicate altered reward system function, including striatal dysfunction, in adolescent anxiety. However, no study has yet examined alterations of the striatal intrinsic functional connectivity in adolescent anxiety disorders. The current study examines striatal intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC), using six bilateral striatal seeds, among 35 adolescents with anxiety disorders and 36 healthy comparisons. Anxiety is associated with abnormally low iFC within the striatum (e.g., between nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus), and between the striatum and prefrontal regions, including subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, posterior insula and supplementary motor area. The current findings extend prior behavioral and task-based imaging research, and provide novel data implicating decreased striatal iFC in adolescent anxiety. Alterations of striatal neurocircuitry identified in this study may contribute to the perturbations in the processing of motivational, emotional, interoceptive, and motor information seen in pediatric anxiety disorders. This pattern of the striatal iFC perturbations can guide future research on specific mechanisms underlying anxiety. PMID:27004799

  7. Auditory abnormalities in autism: toward functional distinctions among findings.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, Gabriella R; Fan, Jin; Gorman, Jack M

    2005-09-01

    Recently, findings on a wide range of auditory abnormalities among individuals with autism have been reported. To date, functional distinctions among these varied findings are poorly established. Such distinctions should be of interest to clinicians and researchers alike given their potential therapeutic and experimental applications. This review suggests three general trends among these findings as a starting point for future analyses. First, studies of auditory perception of linguistic and social auditory stimuli among individuals with autism generally have found impaired perception versus normal controls. Such findings may correlate with impaired language and communication skills and social isolation observed among individuals with autism. Second, studies of auditory perception of pitch and music among individuals with autism generally have found enhanced perception versus normal controls. These findings may correlate with the restrictive and highly focused behaviors observed among individuals with autism. Third, findings on the auditory perception of non-linguistic, non-musical stimuli among autism patients resist any generalized conclusions. Ultimately, as some researchers have already suggested, the distinction between impaired global processing and enhanced local processing may prove useful in making sense of apparently discordant findings on auditory abnormalities among individuals with autism.

  8. Assessing uncertainty in dynamic functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kudela, Maria; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Lindquist, Martin A

    2017-04-01

    Functional connectivity (FC) - the study of the statistical association between time series from anatomically distinct regions (Friston, 1994, 2011) - has become one of the primary areas of research in the field surrounding resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). Although for many years researchers have implicitly assumed that FC was stationary across time in rs-fMRI, it has recently become increasingly clear that this is not the case and the ability to assess dynamic changes in FC is critical for better understanding of the inner workings of the human brain (Hutchison et al., 2013; Chang and Glover, 2010). Currently, the most common strategy for estimating these dynamic changes is to use the sliding-window technique. However, its greatest shortcoming is the inherent variation present in the estimate, even for null data, which is easily confused with true time-varying changes in connectivity (Lindquist et al., 2014). This can have serious consequences as even spurious fluctuations caused by noise can easily be confused with an important signal. For these reasons, assessment of uncertainty in the sliding-window correlation estimates is of critical importance. Here we propose a new approach that combines the multivariate linear process bootstrap (MLPB) method and a sliding-window technique to assess the uncertainty in a dynamic FC estimate by providing its confidence bands. Both numerical results and an application to rs-fMRI study are presented, showing the efficacy of the proposed method.

  9. Global network influences on local functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Adam C.; Morais, Michael J.; Willis, Cory M.; Smith, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    A central neuroscientific pursuit is understanding neuronal interactions that support computations underlying cognition and behavior. Although neurons interact across disparate scales – from cortical columns to whole-brain networks – research has been restricted to one scale at a time. We measured local interactions through multi-neuronal recordings while accessing global networks using scalp EEG in rhesus macaques. We measured spike count correlation, an index of functional connectivity with computational relevance, and EEG oscillations, which have been linked to various cognitive functions. We found a surprising non-monotonic relationship between EEG oscillation amplitude and spike count correlation, contrary to the intuitive expectation of a direct relationship. With a widely-used network model we replicated these findings by incorporating a private signal targeting inhibitory neurons, a common mechanism proposed for gain modulation. Finally, we report that spike count correlation explains nonlinearities in the relationship between EEG oscillations and response time in a spatial selective attention task. PMID:25799040

  10. Abnormal Effective Connectivity in the Brain is Involved in Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Baojuan; Cui, Long-Biao; Xi, Yi-Bin; Friston, Karl J; Guo, Fan; Wang, Hua-Ning; Zhang, Lin-Chuan; Bai, Yuan-Han; Tan, Qing-Rong; Yin, Hong; Lu, Hongbing

    2017-02-21

    Information flow among auditory and language processing-related regions implicated in the pathophysiology of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) in schizophrenia (SZ) remains unclear. In this study, we used stochastic dynamic causal modeling (sDCM) to quantify connections among the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (inner speech monitoring), auditory cortex (auditory processing), hippocampus (memory retrieval), thalamus (information filtering), and Broca's area (language production) in 17 first-episode drug-naïve SZ patients with AVHs, 15 without AVHs, and 19 healthy controls using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, we performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and correlation analysis between image measures and symptoms. sDCM revealed an increased sensitivity of auditory cortex to its thalamic afferents and a decrease in hippocampal sensitivity to auditory inputs in SZ patients with AVHs. The area under the ROC curve showed the diagnostic value of these two connections to distinguish SZ patients with AVHs from those without AVHs. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between the strength of the connectivity from Broca's area to the auditory cortex and the severity of AVHs. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, augmented AVH-specific excitatory afferents from the thalamus to the auditory cortex in SZ patients, resulting in auditory perception without external auditory stimuli. Our results provide insights into the neural mechanisms underlying AVHs in SZ. This thalamic-auditory cortical-hippocampal dysconnectivity may also serve as a diagnostic biomarker of AVHs in SZ and a therapeutic target based on direct in vivo evidence.

  11. Improving Synchronization and Functional Connectivity in Autism Spectrum Disorders Through Plasticity-Induced Rehabilitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    suggests that these abnormal patterns may be reversed with the proper type of treatment. Indeed, neurofeedback (NF) training, an intervention based on...functional and structural connectivity. It is hypothesized that neurofeedback produces positive behavioral changes in ASD children by normalizing the aberrant...training holds promise to support current treatments for this complex disorder. The proposed hypothesis specifically states that neurofeedback -induced

  12. Brain functional connectivity in stimulant drug dependence and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Meunier, David; Ersche, Karen D; Craig, Kevin J; Fornito, Alex; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Fineberg, Naomi A; Shabbir, Shaila S; Robbins, Trevor W; Bullmore, Edward T

    2012-01-16

    There are reasons for thinking that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and drug dependence, although conventionally distinct diagnostic categories, might share important cognitive and neurobiological substrates. We tested this hypothesis directly by comparing brain functional connectivity measures between patients with OCD, stimulant dependent individuals (SDIs; many of whom were non-dependent users of other recreational drugs) and healthy volunteers. We measured functional connectivity between each possible pair of 506 brain regional functional MRI time series representing low frequency (0.03-0.06 Hz) spontaneous brain hemodynamics in healthy volunteers (N=18), patients with OCD (N=18) and SDIs (N=18). We used permutation tests to identify i) brain regions where strength of connectivity was significantly different in both patient groups compared to healthy volunteers; and ii) brain regions and connections which had significantly different functional connectivity between patient groups. We found that functional connectivity of right inferior and superior orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) was abnormally reduced in both disorders. Whether diagnosed as OCD or SDI, patients with higher scores on measures of compulsive symptom severity showed greater reductions of right orbitofrontal connectivity. Functional connections specifically between OFC and dorsal medial pre-motor and cingulate cortex were attenuated in both patient groups. However, patients with OCD demonstrated more severe and extensive reductions of functional connectivity compared to SDIs. OCD and stimulant dependence are not identical at the level of brain functional systems but they have some important abnormalities in common compared with healthy volunteers. Orbitofrontal connectivity may serve as a human brain systems biomarker for compulsivity across diagnostic categories.

  13. Dynamic functional connectivity analysis reveals transient states of dysconnectivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Damaraju, E; Allen, E A; Belger, A; Ford, J M; McEwen, S; Mathalon, D H; Mueller, B A; Pearlson, G D; Potkin, S G; Preda, A; Turner, J A; Vaidya, J G; van Erp, T G; Calhoun, V D

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychotic disorder characterized by functional dysconnectivity or abnormal integration between distant brain regions. Recent functional imaging studies have implicated large-scale thalamo-cortical connectivity as being disrupted in patients. However, observed connectivity differences in schizophrenia have been inconsistent between studies, with reports of hyperconnectivity and hypoconnectivity between the same brain regions. Using resting state eyes-closed functional imaging and independent component analysis on a multi-site data that included 151 schizophrenia patients and 163 age- and gender matched healthy controls, we decomposed the functional brain data into 100 components and identified 47 as functionally relevant intrinsic connectivity networks. We subsequently evaluated group differences in functional network connectivity, both in a static sense, computed as the pairwise Pearson correlations between the full network time courses (5.4 minutes in length), and a dynamic sense, computed using sliding windows (44 s in length) and k-means clustering to characterize five discrete functional connectivity states. Static connectivity analysis revealed that compared to healthy controls, patients show significantly stronger connectivity, i.e., hyperconnectivity, between the thalamus and sensory networks (auditory, motor and visual), as well as reduced connectivity (hypoconnectivity) between sensory networks from all modalities. Dynamic analysis suggests that (1), on average, schizophrenia patients spend much less time than healthy controls in states typified by strong, large-scale connectivity, and (2), that abnormal connectivity patterns are more pronounced during these connectivity states. In particular, states exhibiting cortical-subcortical antagonism (anti-correlations) and strong positive connectivity between sensory networks are those that show the group differences of thalamic hyperconnectivity and sensory hypoconnectivity. Group

  14. Resting state functional connectivity predicts neurofeedback response

    PubMed Central

    Scheinost, Dustin; Stoica, Teodora; Wasylink, Suzanne; Gruner, Patricia; Saksa, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Hampson, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Tailoring treatments to the specific needs and biology of individual patients—personalized medicine—requires delineation of reliable predictors of response. Unfortunately, these have been slow to emerge, especially in neuropsychiatric disorders. We have recently described a real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback protocol that can reduce contamination-related anxiety, a prominent symptom of many cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Individual response to this intervention is variable. Here we used patterns of brain functional connectivity, as measured by baseline resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), to predict improvements in contamination anxiety after neurofeedback training. Activity of a region of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and anterior prefrontal cortex, Brodmann area (BA) 10, associated with contamination anxiety in each subject was measured in real time and presented as a neurofeedback signal, permitting subjects to learn to modulate this target brain region. We have previously reported both enhanced OFC/BA 10 control and improved anxiety in a group of subclinically anxious subjects after neurofeedback. Five individuals with contamination-related OCD who underwent the same protocol also showed improved clinical symptomatology. In both groups, these behavioral improvements were strongly correlated with baseline whole-brain connectivity in the OFC/BA 10, computed from rs-fMRI collected several days prior to neurofeedback training. These pilot data suggest that rs-fMRI can be used to identify individuals likely to benefit from rt-fMRI neurofeedback training to control contamination anxiety. PMID:25309375

  15. A probabilistic framework to infer brain functional connectivity from anatomical connections.

    PubMed

    Deligianni, Fani; Varoquaux, Gael; Thirion, Bertrand; Robinson, Emma; Sharp, David J; Edwards, A David; Rueckert, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel probabilistic framework to learn across several subjects a mapping from brain anatomical connectivity to functional connectivity, i.e. the covariance structure of brain activity. This prediction problem must be formulated as a structured-output learning task, as the predicted parameters are strongly correlated. We introduce a model selection framework based on cross-validation with a parametrization-independent loss function suitable to the manifold of covariance matrices. Our model is based on constraining the conditional independence structure of functional activity by the anatomical connectivity. Subsequently, we learn a linear predictor of a stationary multivariate autoregressive model. This natural parameterization of functional connectivity also enforces the positive-definiteness of the predicted covariance and thus matches the structure of the output space. Our results show that functional connectivity can be explained by anatomical connectivity on a rigorous statistical basis, and that a proper model of functional connectivity is essential to assess this link.

  16. Resting-State Time-Varying Analysis Reveals Aberrant Variations of Functional Connectivity in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Xie, Yuanwei; Zheng, Fang; Liu, Guangyao; Chen, Xuejiao; Zheng, Weihao

    2016-01-01

    Recently, studies based on time-varying functional connectivity have unveiled brain states diversity in some neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. However, time-varying functional connectivity analysis of resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) have been rarely performed on the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Hence, we performed time-varying connectivity analysis on resting-state fMRI data to investigate brain states mutation in ASD children. ASD showed an imbalance of connectivity state and aberrant ratio of connectivity with different strengths in the whole brain network, and decreased connectivity associated precuneus/posterior cingulate gyrus with medial prefrontal gyrus in default mode network. As compared to typical development children, weak relevance condition (the strength of a large number of connectivities in the state was less than means minus standard deviation of all connection strength) was maintained for a longer time between brain areas of ASD children, and ratios of weak connectivity in brain states varied dramatically in the ASD. In the ASD, the abnormal brain state might be related to repetitive behaviors and stereotypical interests, and macroscopically reflect disruption of gamma-aminobutyric acid at the cellular level. The detection of brain states based on time-varying functional connectivity analysis of resting-state fMRI might be conducive for diagnosis and early intervention of ASD before obvious clinical symptoms. PMID:27695408

  17. Resting-State Time-Varying Analysis Reveals Aberrant Variations of Functional Connectivity in Autism.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Xie, Yuanwei; Zheng, Fang; Liu, Guangyao; Chen, Xuejiao; Zheng, Weihao

    2016-01-01

    Recently, studies based on time-varying functional connectivity have unveiled brain states diversity in some neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. However, time-varying functional connectivity analysis of resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) have been rarely performed on the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Hence, we performed time-varying connectivity analysis on resting-state fMRI data to investigate brain states mutation in ASD children. ASD showed an imbalance of connectivity state and aberrant ratio of connectivity with different strengths in the whole brain network, and decreased connectivity associated precuneus/posterior cingulate gyrus with medial prefrontal gyrus in default mode network. As compared to typical development children, weak relevance condition (the strength of a large number of connectivities in the state was less than means minus standard deviation of all connection strength) was maintained for a longer time between brain areas of ASD children, and ratios of weak connectivity in brain states varied dramatically in the ASD. In the ASD, the abnormal brain state might be related to repetitive behaviors and stereotypical interests, and macroscopically reflect disruption of gamma-aminobutyric acid at the cellular level. The detection of brain states based on time-varying functional connectivity analysis of resting-state fMRI might be conducive for diagnosis and early intervention of ASD before obvious clinical symptoms.

  18. Resting-State Network Disruption and APOE Genotype in Alzheimer's Disease: A lagged Functional Connectivity Study

    PubMed Central

    Canuet, Leonides; Tellado, Ivan; Couceiro, Veronica; Fraile, Carmen; Fernandez-Novoa, Lucia; Ishii, Ryouhei; Takeda, Masatoshi; Cacabelos, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Background The apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 (APOE-4) is associated with a genetic vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and with AD-related abnormalities in cortical rhythms. However, it is unclear whether APOE-4 is linked to a specific pattern of intrinsic functional disintegration of the brain after the development of the disease or during its different stages. This study aimed at identifying spatial patterns and effects of APOE genotype on resting-state oscillations and functional connectivity in patients with AD, using a physiological connectivity index called “lagged phase synchronization”. Methodology/Principal Findings Resting EEG was recorded during awake, eyes-closed state in 125 patients with AD and 60 elderly controls. Source current density and functional connectivity were determined using eLORETA. Patients with AD exhibited reduced parieto-occipital alpha oscillations compared with controls, and those carrying the APOE-4 allele had reduced alpha activity in the left inferior parietal and temporo-occipital cortex relative to noncarriers. There was a decreased alpha2 connectivity pattern in AD, involving the left temporal and bilateral parietal cortex. Several brain regions exhibited increased lagged phase synchronization in low frequencies, specifically in the theta band, across and within hemispheres, where temporal lobe connections were particularly compromised. Areas with abnormal theta connectivity correlated with cognitive scores. In patients with early AD, we found an APOE-4-related decrease in interhemispheric alpha connectivity in frontal and parieto-temporal regions. Conclusions/Significance In addition to regional cortical dysfunction, as indicated by abnormal alpha oscillations, there are patterns of functional network disruption affecting theta and alpha bands in AD that associate with the level of cognitive disturbance or with the APOE genotype. These functional patterns of nonlinear connectivity may potentially represent

  19. Strengthened Corticosubcortical Functional Connectivity during Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Yue, Guang H.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined functional connectivity (FC) between functional MRI (fMRI) signals of the primary motor cortex (M1) and each of the three subcortical neural structures, cerebellum (CB), basal ganglia (BG), and thalamus (TL), during muscle fatigue using the quantile regression technique. Understanding activation relation between the subcortical structures and the M1 during prolonged motor performance should help delineate how central motor control network modulates acute perturbations at peripheral sensorimotor system such as muscle fatigue. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study and completed a 20-minute intermittent handgrip motor task at 50% of their maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) level. Quantile regression analyses were carried out to compare the FC between the contralateral (left) M1 and CB, BG, and TL in the minimal (beginning 100 s) versus significant (ending 100 s) fatigue stages. Widespread, statistically significant increases in FC were found in bilateral BG, CB, and TL with the left M1 during significant versus minimal fatigue stages. Our results imply that these subcortical nuclei are critical components in the motor control network and actively involved in modulating voluntary muscle fatigue, possibly, by working together with the M1 to strengthen the descending central command to prolong the motor performance. PMID:27830093

  20. Functional and structural connectivity of frontostriatal circuitry in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Delmonte, Sonja; Gallagher, Louise; O'Hanlon, Erik; McGrath, Jane; Balsters, Joshua H.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormalities in frontostriatal circuitry potentially underlie the two core deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD); social interaction and communication difficulties and restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Whilst a few studies have examined connectivity within this circuitry in ASD, no previous study has examined both functional and structural connectivity within the same population. The present study provides the first exploration of both functional and structural frontostriatal connectivity in ASD. Twenty-eight right-handed Caucasian male ASD (17.28 ± 3.57 years) and 27 right-handed male, age and IQ matched controls (17.15 ± 3.64 years) took part in the study. Resting state functional connectivity was carried out on 21 ASD and control participants, and tractography was carried out on 22 ASD and 24 control participants, after excluding subjects for excessive motion and poor data quality. Functional connectivity analysis was carried out between the frontal cortex and striatum after which tractography was performed between regions that showed significant group differences in functional connectivity. The ASD group showed increased functional connectivity between regions in the frontal cortex [anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), paracingulate gyrus (Pcg) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC)], and striatum [nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and caudate]. Increased functional connectivity between ACC and caudate was associated with deactivation to social rewards in the caudate, as previously reported in the same participants. Greater connectivity between the right MFG and caudate was associated with higher restricted interests and repetitive behaviors and connectivity between the bilateral Pcg and NAcc, and the right OFC and NAcc, was negatively associated with social and communicative deficits. Although tracts were reliably constructed for each subject, there were no group differences in structural connectivity. Results are in keeping with

  1. Functioning of Circuits Connecting Thalamus and Cortex.

    PubMed

    Sherman, S Murray

    2017-03-16

    Glutamatergic pathways in thalamus and cortex are divided into two distinct classes: driver, which carries the main information between cells, and modulator, which modifies how driver inputs function. Identifying driver inputs helps to reveal functional computational circuits, and one set of such circuits identified by this approach are cortico-thalamo-cortical (or transthalamic corticocortical) circuits. This, in turn, leads to the conclusion that there are two types of thalamic relay: first order nuclei (such as the lateral geniculate nucleus) that relay driver input from a subcortical source (i.e., retina), and higher order nuclei (such as the pulvinar) which are involved in these transthalamic pathways by relaying driver input from layer 5 of one cortical area to another. This thalamic division is also seen in other sensory pathways and beyond these so that most of thalamus by volume consists of higher-order relays. Many, and perhaps all, direct driver connections between cortical areas are paralleled by an indirect cortico-thalamo-cortical (transthalamic) driver route involving higher order thalamic relays. Such thalamic relays represent a heretofore unappreciated role in cortical functioning, and this assessment challenges and extends conventional views regarding both the role of thalamus and mechanisms of corticocortical communication. Finally, many and perhaps the vast majority of driver inputs relayed through thalamus arrive via branching axons, with extrathalamic targets often being subcortical motor centers. This raises the possibility that inputs relayed by thalamus to cortex also serve as efference copies, and this may represent an important feature of information relayed up the cortical hierarchy via transthalamic circuits. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:713-739, 2017.

  2. Brain-Wide Analysis of Functional Connectivity in First-Episode and Chronic Stages of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Rolls, Edmund T; Yang, Wei; Palaniyappan, Lena; Zhang, Lu; Cheng, Wei; Yao, Ye; Liu, Zhaowen; Gong, Xiaohong; Luo, Qiang; Tang, Yanqing; Crow, Timothy J; Broome, Matthew R; Xu, Ke; Li, Chunbo; Wang, Jijun; Liu, Zhening; Lu, Guangming; Wang, Fei; Feng, Jianfeng

    2016-07-21

    Published reports of functional abnormalities in schizophrenia remain divergent due to lack of staging point-of-view and whole-brain analysis. To identify key functional-connectivity differences of first-episode (FE) and chronic patients from controls using resting-state functional MRI, and determine changes that are specifically associated with disease onset, a clinical staging model is adopted. We analyze functional-connectivity differences in prodromal, FE (mostly drug naïve), and chronic patients from their matched controls from 6 independent datasets involving a total of 789 participants (343 patients). Brain-wide functional-connectivity analysis was performed in different datasets and the results from the datasets of the same stage were then integrated by meta-analysis, with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Prodromal patients differed from controls in their pattern of functional-connectivity involving the inferior frontal gyri (Broca's area). In FE patients, 90% of the functional-connectivity changes involved the frontal lobes, mostly the inferior frontal gyrus including Broca's area, and these changes were correlated with delusions/blunted affect. For chronic patients, functional-connectivity differences extended to wider areas of the brain, including reduced thalamo-frontal connectivity, and increased thalamo-temporal and thalamo-sensorimoter connectivity that were correlated with the positive, negative, and general symptoms, respectively. Thalamic changes became prominent at the chronic stage. These results provide evidence for distinct patterns of functional-dysconnectivity across FE and chronic stages of schizophrenia. Importantly, abnormalities in the frontal language networks appear early, at the time of disease onset. The identification of stage-specific pathological processes may help to understand the disease course of schizophrenia and identify neurobiological markers crucial for early diagnosis.

  3. Functional connectivity of primary motor cortex is dependent on genetic burden in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Katherine A; Lowe, Mark J; Harrington, Deborah L; Lin, Jian; Durgerian, Sally; Mourany, Lyla; Paulsen, Jane S; Rao, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Subtle changes in motor function have been observed in individuals with prodromal Huntington disease (prHD), but the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood nor is the cumulative effect of the disease (disease burden) on functional connectivity. The present study examined the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) connectivity of the primary motor cortex (M1) in 16 gene-negative (NEG) controls and 48 gene-positive prHD participants with various levels of disease burden. The results showed that the strength of the left M1 connectivity with the ipsilateral M1 and somatosensory areas decreased as disease burden increased and correlated with motor symptoms. Weakened M1 connectivity within the motor areas was also associated with abnormalities in long-range connections that evolved with disease burden. In this study, M1 connectivity was decreased with visual centers (bilateral cuneus), but increased with a hub of the default mode network (DMN; posterior cingulate cortex). Changes in connectivity measures were associated with worse performance on measures of cognitive-motor functioning. Short- and long-range functional connectivity disturbances were also associated with volume loss in the basal ganglia, suggesting that weakened M1 connectivity is partly a manifestation of striatal atrophy. Altogether, the results indicate that the prodromal phase of HD is associated with abnormal interhemispheric interactions among motor areas and disturbances in the connectivity of M1 with visual centers and the DMN. These changes may, respectively, contribute to increased motor symptoms, visuomotor integration problems, and deficits in the executive control of movement as individuals approach a manifest diagnosis.

  4. Functional Connectivity of Primary Motor Cortex Is Dependent on Genetic Burden in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Katherine A.; Lowe, Mark J.; Harrington, Deborah L.; Lin, Jian; Durgerian, Sally; Mourany, Lyla; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Subtle changes in motor function have been observed in individuals with prodromal Huntington disease (prHD), but the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood nor is the cumulative effect of the disease (disease burden) on functional connectivity. The present study examined the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) connectivity of the primary motor cortex (M1) in 16 gene-negative (NEG) controls and 48 gene-positive prHD participants with various levels of disease burden. The results showed that the strength of the left M1 connectivity with the ipsilateral M1 and somatosensory areas decreased as disease burden increased and correlated with motor symptoms. Weakened M1 connectivity within the motor areas was also associated with abnormalities in long-range connections that evolved with disease burden. In this study, M1 connectivity was decreased with visual centers (bilateral cuneus), but increased with a hub of the default mode network (DMN; posterior cingulate cortex). Changes in connectivity measures were associated with worse performance on measures of cognitive–motor functioning. Short- and long-range functional connectivity disturbances were also associated with volume loss in the basal ganglia, suggesting that weakened M1 connectivity is partly a manifestation of striatal atrophy. Altogether, the results indicate that the prodromal phase of HD is associated with abnormal interhemispheric interactions among motor areas and disturbances in the connectivity of M1 with visual centers and the DMN. These changes may, respectively, contribute to increased motor symptoms, visuomotor integration problems, and deficits in the executive control of movement as individuals approach a manifest diagnosis. PMID:25072408

  5. Hydronephrosis in the Wnt5a-ablated kidney is caused by an abnormal ureter-bladder connection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Kangsun; Perantoni, Alan O

    The Wnt5a null mouse is a complex developmental model which, among its several posterior-localized axis defects, exhibits multiple kidney phenotypes, including duplex kidney and loss of the medullary zone. We previously reported that ablation of Wnt5a in nascent mesoderm causes duplex kidney formation as a result of aberrant development of the nephric duct and abnormal extension of intermediate mesoderm. However, these mice also display a loss of the medullary region late in gestation. We have now genetically isolated duplex kidney formation from the medullary defect by specifically targeting the progenitors for both the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme. The conditional mutants fail to form a normal renal medulla but no longer exhibit duplex kidney formation. Approximately 1/3 of the mutants develop hydronephrosis in the kidneys either uni- or bilaterally when using Dll1Cre. The abnormal kidney phenotype becomes prominent at E16.5, which approximates the time when urine production begins in the mouse embryonic kidney, and is associated with a dramatic increase in apoptosis only in mutant kidneys with hydronephrosis. Methylene blue dye injection and histologic examination reveal that aberrant cell death likely results from urine toxicity due to an abnormal ureter-bladder connection. This study shows that Wnt5a is not required for development of the renal medulla and that loss of the renal medullary region in the Wnt5a-deleted kidney is caused by an abnormal ureter-bladder connection.

  6. Alterations in functional connectivity for language in prematurely born adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Robin J; Lacadie, Cheryl; Vohr, Betty; Kesler, Shelli R; Katz, Karol H; Schneider, Karen C; Pugh, Kenneth R; Makuch, Robert W; Reiss, Allan L; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2009-03-01

    Recent data suggest recovery of language systems but persistent structural abnormalities in the prematurely born. We tested the hypothesis that subjects who were born prematurely develop alternative networks for processing language. Subjects who were born prematurely (n = 22; 600-1250 g birth weight), without neonatal brain injury on neonatal cranial ultrasound, and 26 term control subjects were examined with a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) semantic association task, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III (WISC-III) and the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals (CELF). In-magnet task accuracy and response times were calculated, and fMRI data were evaluated for the effect of group on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation, the correlation between task accuracy and activation and the functional connectivity between regions activating to task. Although there were differences in verbal IQ and CELF scores between the preterm (PT) and term control groups, there were no significant differences for either accuracy or response time for the in-magnet task. Both groups activated classic semantic processing areas including the left superior and middle temporal gyri and inferior frontal gyrus, and there was no significant difference in activation patterns between groups. Clear differences between the groups were observed in the correlation between task accuracy and activation to task at P < 0.01, corrected for multiple comparisons. Left inferior frontal gyrus correlated with accuracy only for term controls and left sensory motor areas correlated with accuracy only for PT subjects. Left middle temporal gyri correlated with task accuracy for both groups. Connectivity analyses at P < 0.001 revealed the importance of a circuit between left middle temporal gyri and inferior frontal gyrus for both groups. In addition, the PT subjects evidenced greater connectivity between traditional language areas and sensory motor areas but significantly

  7. Alterations in functional connectivity for language in prematurely born adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lacadie, Cheryl; Vohr, Betty; Kesler, Shelli R.; Katz, Karol H.; Schneider, Karen C.; Pugh, Kenneth R.; Makuch, Robert. W.; Reiss, Allan L.; Constable, R. Todd; Ment, Laura R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent data suggest recovery of language systems but persistent structural abnormalities in the prematurely born. We tested the hypothesis that subjects who were born prematurely develop alternative networks for processing language. Subjects who were born prematurely (n = 22; 600–1250 g birth weight), without neonatal brain injury on neonatal cranial ultrasound, and 26 term control subjects were examined with a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) semantic association task, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III (WISC-III) and the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals (CELF). In-magnet task accuracy and response times were calculated, and fMRI data were evaluated for the effect of group on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation, the correlation between task accuracy and activation and the functional connectivity between regions activating to task. Although there were differences in verbal IQ and CELF scores between the preterm (PT) and term control groups, there were no significant differences for either accuracy or response time for the in-magnet task. Both groups activated classic semantic processing areas including the left superior and middle temporal gyri and inferior frontal gyrus, and there was no significant difference in activation patterns between groups. Clear differences between the groups were observed in the correlation between task accuracy and activation to task at P < 0.01, corrected for multiple comparisons. Left inferior frontal gyrus correlated with accuracy only for term controls and left sensory motor areas correlated with accuracy only for PT subjects. Left middle temporal gyri correlated with task accuracy for both groups. Connectivity analyses at P < 0.001 revealed the importance of a circuit between left middle temporal gyri and inferior frontal gyrus for both groups. In addition, the PT subjects evidenced greater connectivity between traditional language areas and sensory motor areas but significantly

  8. Biochemical and functional abnormalities in hypercholesterolemic rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, K.B.; Ebbe, S.; Mazoyer, E.; Carpenter, D.; Yee, T. )

    1990-02-01

    This study was designed to elucidate changes in rabbit platelet lipids induced by a cholesterol rich diet and to explore the possible correlation of these lipid changes with platelet abnormalities. Pronounced biochemical alterations were observed when serum cholesterol levels of 700-1000 mg% were reached. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) platelets contained 37% more neutral lipids and 16% less phospholipids than the controls. Lysolecithin, cholesterol esters and phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels were increased in HC platelets, and the levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC) were decreased. The cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of lipidemic platelets increased from 0.55 +/- 0.011 to 0.89 +/- 0.016 (P less than 0.01) in eight weeks. HC platelets had 90% more arachidonic acid (AA) in the PI than normal platelets. No significant changes in AA of PC were observed. Platelet function was monitored by the uptake and release of (14C)serotonin in platelet rich plasma (PRP), using varying concentrations of collagen as an aggregating agent. The uptake of (14C)serotonin in HC and normal platelets ranged from 78-94%. The percent of (14C)serotonin released from normal and HC platelets was proportional to the concentration of collagen. However, lipidemic platelets were hyperreactive to low concentrations of collagen. Incorporation of 50 microM acetylsalicylic acid into the aggregating medium suppressed the release of (14C)serotonin in normal PRP by more than 90%, but had only a partial effect on lipidemic PRP.

  9. Abnormal regional brain function in Parkinson's disease: truth or fiction?

    PubMed

    Ma, Yilong; Tang, Chengke; Moeller, James R; Eidelberg, David

    2009-04-01

    Normalization of regional measurements by the global mean is commonly employed to minimize inter-subject variability in functional imaging studies. This practice is based on the assumption that global values do not substantially differ between patient and control groups. In this issue of NeuroImage, Borghammer and colleagues challenge the validity of this assumption. They focus on Parkinson's disease (PD) and use computer simulations to show that lower global values can produce spurious increases in subcortical brain regions. The authors speculate that the increased signal observed in these areas in PD is artefactual and unrelated to localized changes in brain function. In this commentary, we summarize what is currently known of the relationship between regional and global metabolic activity in PD and experimental parkinsonism. We found that early stage PD patients exhibit global values that are virtually identical to those of age-matched healthy subjects. SPM analysis revealed increased normalized metabolic activity in a discrete set of biologically relevant subcortical brain regions. Because of their higher variability, the corresponding absolute regional measures did not differ across the two groups. Longitudinal imaging studies in this population showed that the subcortical elevations in normalized metabolism appeared earlier and progressed faster than did focal cortical or global metabolic reductions. The observed increases in subcortical activity, but not the global changes, correlated with independent clinical measures of disease progression. Multivariate analysis with SSM/PCA further confirmed that the abnormal spatial covariance structure of early PD is dominated by these subcortical increases as opposed to network-related reductions in cortical metabolic activity or global changes. Thus, increased subcortical activity in PD cannot be regarded as a simple artefact of global normalization. Moreover, stability of the normalized measurements, particularly at

  10. Prefrontal dopaminergic receptor abnormalities and executive functions in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ji Hyun; Antonelli, Francesca; Monchi, Oury; Ray, Nicola; Rusjan, Pablo; Houle, Sylvain; Lang, Anthony E; Christopher, Leigh; Strafella, Antonio P

    2013-07-01

    The main pattern of cognitive impairments seen in early to moderate stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) includes deficits of executive functions. These nonmotor complications have a significant impact on the quality of life and day-to-day activities of PD patients and are not effectively managed by current therapies, a problem which is almost certainly due to the fact that the disease extends beyond the nigrostriatal system. To investigate the role of extrastriatal dopamine in executive function in PD, PD patients and a control group were studied with positron-emission-tomography using a high-affinity dopamine D2/D3 receptor tracer, [(11) C]FLB-457. All participants were scanned twice while performing an executive task and a control task. Patients were off medication for at least 12 h. The imaging analysis revealed that parkinsonian patients had lower [(11) C]FLB-457 binding than control group independently of task conditions across different brain regions. Cognitive assessment measures were positively correlated with [(11) C]FLB-457 binding in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex only in control group, but not in PD patients. Within the control group, during the executive task (as compared to control task), there was evidence of reduced [(11) C]FLB-457 binding (indicative of increased dopamine release) in the right orbitofrontal cortex. In contrast, PD patients did not show any reduction in binding during the executive task (as compared with control task). These findings suggest that PD patients present significant abnormalities in extrastriatal dopamine associated with executive processing. These observations provide important insights on the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction in PD.

  11. Functional Connectivity Anomalies in Adolescents with Psychotic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    O’Hanlon, Erik; Kraft, Dominik; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Clarke, Mary; Kelleher, Ian; Higgins, Niamh; Coughlan, Helen; Creegan, Daniel; Heneghan, Mark; Power, Emmet; Power, Lucy; Ryan, Jessica; Frodl, Thomas; Cannon, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research suggests that, prior to the onset of psychosis, high risk youths already exhibit brain abnormalities similar to those present in patients with schizophrenia. Objectives The goal of the present study was to describe the functional organization of endogenous activation in young adolescents who report auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in view of the “distributed network” hypothesis of psychosis. We recruited 20 young people aged 13–16 years who reported AVHs and 20 healthy controls matched for age, gender and handedness from local schools. Methods Each participant underwent a semi-structured clinical interview and a resting state (RS) neuroimaging protocol. We explored functional connectivity (FC) involving three different networks: 1) default mode network (DMN) 2) salience network (SN) and 3) central executive network (CEN). In line with previous findings on the role of the auditory cortex in AVHs as reported by young adolescents, we also investigated FC anomalies involving both the primary and secondary auditory cortices (A1 and A2, respectively). Further, we explored between-group inter-hemispheric FC differences (laterality) for both A1 and A2. Compared to the healthy control group, the AVH group exhibited FC differences in all three networks investigated. Moreover, FC anomalies were found in a neural network including both A1 and A2. The laterality analysis revealed no between-group, inter-hemispheric differences. Conclusions The present study suggests that young adolescents with subclinical psychotic symptoms exhibit functional connectivity anomalies directly and indirectly involving the DMN, SN, CEN and also a neural network including both primary and secondary auditory cortical regions. PMID:28125578

  12. Connecting Functions in Geometry and Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steketee, Scott; Scher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    One goal of a mathematics education is that students make significant connections among different branches of mathematics. Connections--such as those between arithmetic and algebra, between two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometry, between compass-and-straight-edge constructions and transformations, and between calculus and analytic…

  13. Naltrexone ameliorates functional network abnormalities in alcohol-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Morris, Laurel S; Baek, Kwangyeol; Tait, Roger; Elliott, Rebecca; Ersche, Karen D; Flechais, Remy; McGonigle, John; Murphy, Anna; Nestor, Liam J; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Paterson, Louise M; Rabiner, Ilan; Reed, Laurence; Smith, Dana; Suckling, John; Taylor, Eleanor M; Bullmore, Edward T; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Deakin, Bill; Nutt, David J; Sahakian, Barbara J; Robbins, Trevor W; Voon, Valerie

    2017-02-28

    Naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, is commonly used as a relapse prevention medication in alcohol and opiate addiction, but its efficacy and the mechanisms underpinning its clinical usefulness are not well characterized. In the current study, we examined the effects of 50-mg naltrexone compared with placebo on neural network changes associated with substance dependence in 21 alcohol and 36 poly-drug-dependent individuals compared with 36 healthy volunteers. Graph theoretic and network-based statistical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data revealed that alcohol-dependent subjects had reduced functional connectivity of a dispersed network compared with both poly-drug-dependent and healthy subjects. Higher local efficiency was observed in both patient groups, indicating clustered and segregated network topology and information processing. Naltrexone normalized heightened local efficiency of the neural network in alcohol-dependent individuals, to the same levels as healthy volunteers. Naltrexone failed to have an effect on the local efficiency in abstinent poly-substance-dependent individuals. Across groups, local efficiency was associated with substance, but no alcohol exposure implicating local efficiency as a potential premorbid risk factor in alcohol use disorders that can be ameliorated by naltrexone. These findings suggest one possible mechanism for the clinical effects of naltrexone, namely, the amelioration of disrupted network topology.

  14. Reorganization of functionally connected brain subnetworks in high-functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Glerean, Enrico; Pan, Raj K; Salmi, Juha; Kujala, Rainer; Lahnakoski, Juha M; Roine, Ulrika; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Leppämäki, Sami; Nieminen-von Wendt, Taina; Tani, Pekka; Saramäki, Jari; Sams, Mikko; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P

    2016-03-01

    Previous functional connectivity studies have found both hypo- and hyper-connectivity in brains of individuals having autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here we studied abnormalities in functional brain subnetworks in high-functioning individuals with ASD during free viewing of a movie containing social cues and interactions. Twenty-six subjects (13 with ASD) watched a 68-min movie during functional magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, we computed Pearson's correlation between haemodynamic time-courses of each pair of 6-mm isotropic voxels. From the whole-brain functional networks, we derived individual and group-level subnetworks using graph theory. Scaled inclusivity was then calculated between all subject pairs to estimate intersubject similarity of connectivity structure of each subnetwork. Additional 54 individuals (27 with ASD) from the ABIDE resting-state database were included to test the reproducibility of the results. Between-group differences were observed in the composition of default-mode and ventro-temporal-limbic (VTL) subnetworks. The VTL subnetwork included amygdala, striatum, thalamus, parahippocampal, fusiform, and inferior temporal gyri. Further, VTL subnetwork similarity between subject pairs correlated significantly with similarity of symptom gravity measured with autism quotient. This correlation was observed also within the controls, and in the reproducibility dataset with ADI-R and ADOS scores. Our results highlight how the reorganization of functional subnetworks in individuals with ASD clarifies the mixture of hypo- and hyper-connectivity findings. Importantly, only the functional organization of the VTL subnetwork emerges as a marker of inter-individual similarities that co-vary with behavioral measures across all participants. These findings suggest a pivotal role of ventro-temporal and limbic systems in autism.

  15. A new class of methods for functional connectivity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wutu

    Measuring functional connectivity from neural recordings is important in understanding processing in cortical networks. The covariance-based methods are the current golden standard for functional connectivity estimation. However, the link between the pair-wise correlations and the physiological connections inside the neural network is unclear. Therefore, the power of inferring physiological basis from functional connectivity estimation is limited. To build a stronger tie and better understand the relationship between functional connectivity and physiological neural network, we need (1) a realistic model to simulate different types of neural recordings with known ground truth for benchmarking; (2) a new functional connectivity method that produce estimations closely reflecting the physiological basis. In this thesis, (1) I tune a spiking neural network model to match with human sleep EEG data, (2) introduce a new class of methods for estimating connectivity from different kinds of neural signals and provide theory proof for its superiority, (3) apply it to simulated fMRI data as an application.

  16. The Role of Corpus Callosum Development in Functional Connectivity and Cognitive Processing

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Anne M.; Honma, Susanne; Jeremy, Rita J.; Strominger, Zoe; Bukshpun, Polina; Wakahiro, Mari; Brown, Warren S.; Paul, Lynn K.; Barkovich, A. James; Mukherjee, Pratik; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Sherr, Elliott H.

    2012-01-01

    The corpus callosum is hypothesized to play a fundamental role in integrating information and mediating complex behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that lack of normal callosal development can lead to deficits in functional connectivity that are related to impairments in specific cognitive domains. We examined resting-state functional connectivity in individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) and matched controls using magnetoencephalographic imaging (MEG-I) of coherence in the alpha (8–12 Hz), beta (12–30 Hz) and gamma (30–55 Hz) bands. Global connectivity (GC) was defined as synchronization between a region and the rest of the brain. In AgCC individuals, alpha band GC was significantly reduced in the dorsolateral pre-frontal (DLPFC), posterior parietal (PPC) and parieto-occipital cortices (PO). No significant differences in GC were seen in either the beta or gamma bands. We also explored the hypothesis that, in AgCC, this regional reduction in functional connectivity is explained primarily by a specific reduction in interhemispheric connectivity. However, our data suggest that reduced connectivity in these regions is driven by faulty coupling in both inter- and intrahemispheric connectivity. We also assessed whether the degree of connectivity correlated with behavioral performance, focusing on cognitive measures known to be impaired in AgCC individuals. Neuropsychological measures of verbal processing speed were significantly correlated with resting-state functional connectivity of the left medial and superior temporal lobe in AgCC participants. Connectivity of DLPFC correlated strongly with performance on the Tower of London in the AgCC cohort. These findings indicate that the abnormal callosal development produces salient but selective (alpha band only) resting-state functional connectivity disruptions that correlate with cognitive impairment. Understanding the relationship between impoverished functional connectivity and cognition is a key step

  17. Morphological and functional platelet abnormalities in Berkeley sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Shet, Arun S; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Jirouskova, Marketa; Janczak, Christin A; Stevens, Jacqueline R M; Adamson, Adewole; Mohandas, Narla; Manci, Elizabeth A; Cynober, Therese; Coller, Barry S

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley sickle cell mice are used as animal models of human sickle cell disease but there are no reports of platelet studies in this model. Since humans with sickle cell disease have platelet abnormalities, we studied platelet morphology and function in Berkeley mice (SS). We observed elevated mean platelet forward angle light scatter (FSC) values (an indirect measure of platelet volume) in SS compared to wild type (WT) (37+/-3.2 vs. 27+/-1.4, mean+/-SD; p<0.001), in association with moderate thrombocytopenia (505+/-49 x 10(3)/microl vs. 1151+/-162 x 10(3)/microl; p<0.001). Despite having marked splenomegaly, SS mice had elevated levels of Howell-Jolly bodies and "pocked" erythrocytes (p<0.001 for both) suggesting splenic dysfunction. SS mice also had elevated numbers of thiazole orange positive platelets (5+/-1% vs. 1+/-1%; p<0.001), normal to low plasma thrombopoietin levels, normal plasma glycocalicin levels, normal levels of platelet recovery, and near normal platelet life spans. Platelets from SS mice bound more fibrinogen and antibody to P-selectin following activation with a threshold concentration of a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide compared to WT mice. Enlarged platelets are associated with a predisposition to arterial thrombosis in humans and some humans with SCD have been reported to have large platelets. Thus, additional studies are needed to assess whether large platelets contribute either to pulmonary hypertension or the large vessel arterial occlusion that produces stroke in some children with sickle cell disease.

  18. Altered Activity and Functional Connectivity of Superior Temporal Gyri in Anxiety Disorders: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaohu; Xi, Qian; Li, Chunbo; He, Hongjian

    2014-01-01

    Objective The prior functional MRI studies have demonstrated significantly abnormal activity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG) of anxiety patients. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether the abnormal activity in these regions was related to a loss of functional connectivity between these regions. Materials and Methods Ten healthy controls and 10 anxiety patients underwent noninvasive fMRI while actively listening to emotionally neutral words alternated by silence (Task 1) or threat-related words (Task 2). The participants were instructed to silently make a judgment of each word's valence (i.e., unpleasant, pleasant, or neutral). A coherence analysis was applied to the functional MRI data to examine the functional connectivity between the left and the right STG, which was selected as the primary region of interest on the basis of our prior results. Results The data demonstrated that the anxiety patients exhibited significantly increased activation in the bilateral STG than the normal controls. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that the patient group showed significantly decreased degree of connectivity between the bilateral STG during processing Task 2 compared to Task 1 (t = 2.588, p = 0.029). In addition, a significantly decreased connectivity was also observed in the patient group compared to the control group during processing Task 2 (t = 2.810, p = 0.012). Conclusion Anxiety patients may exhibit increased activity of the STG but decreased functional connectivity between the left and right STG, which may reflect the underlying neural abnormality of anxiety disorder, and this will provide new insights into this disease. PMID:25053913

  19. Default mode network functional and structural connectivity after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sharp, David J; Beckmann, Christian F; Greenwood, Richard; Kinnunen, Kirsi M; Bonnelle, Valerie; De Boissezon, Xavier; Powell, Jane H; Counsell, Serena J; Patel, Maneesh C; Leech, Robert

    2011-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury often results in cognitive impairments that limit recovery. The underlying pathophysiology of these impairments is uncertain, which restricts clinical assessment and management. Here, we use magnetic resonance imaging to test the hypotheses that: (i) traumatic brain injury results in abnormalities of functional connectivity within key cognitive networks; (ii) these changes are correlated with cognitive performance; and (iii) functional connectivity within these networks is influenced by underlying changes in structural connectivity produced by diffuse axonal injury. We studied 20 patients in the chronic phase after traumatic brain injury compared with age-matched controls. Network function was investigated in detail using functional magnetic resonance imaging to analyse both regional brain activation, and the interaction of brain regions within a network (functional connectivity). We studied patients during performance of a simple choice-reaction task and at 'rest'. Since functional connectivity reflects underlying structural connectivity, diffusion tensor imaging was used to quantify axonal injury, and test whether structural damage correlated with functional change. The patient group showed typical impairments in information processing and attention, when compared with age-matched controls. Patients were able to perform the task accurately, but showed slow and variable responses. Brain regions activated by the task were similar between the groups, but patients showed greater deactivation within the default mode network, in keeping with an increased cognitive load. A multivariate analysis of 'resting' state functional magnetic resonance imaging was then used to investigate whether changes in network function were present in the absence of explicit task performance. Overall, default mode network functional connectivity was increased in the patient group. Patients with the highest functional connectivity had the least cognitive impairment. In

  20. Functional Connectivity of Left Heschl’s Gyrus in Vulnerability to Auditory Hallucinations in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Ann K.; Baker, Justin T.; Cohen, Bruce M.; Öngür, Dost

    2012-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous disorder that may consist of multiple etiologies and disease processes. Auditory hallucinations (AH), which are common and often disabling, represent a narrower and more basic dimension of psychosis than schizophrenia. Previous studies suggest that abnormal primary auditory cortex activity is associated with AH pathogenesis. We thus investigated functional connectivity, using a seed in primary auditory cortex, in schizophrenia patients with and without AH and healthy controls, to examine neural circuit abnormalities associated more specifically with AH than the myriad other symptoms that comprise schizophrenia. Methods Using resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI), we investigated functional connectivity of the primary auditory cortex, located on Heschl’s gyrus, in schizophrenia spectrum patients with AH. Participants were patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophreniform disorder with lifetime AH (n=27); patients with the same diagnoses but no lifetime AH (n=14); and healthy controls (n=28). Results Patients with AH vulnerability showed increased left Heschl’s gyrus functional connectivity with left frontoparietal regions and decreased functional connectivity with right hippocampal formation and mediodorsal thalamus compared to patients without lifetime AH. Furthermore, among AH patients, left Heschl’s gyrus functional connectivity covaried positively with AH severity in left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca’s area), left lateral STG, right pre- and postcentral gyri, cingulate cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex. There were no differences between patients with and without lifetime AH in right Heschl’s gyrus seeded functional connectivity. Conclusions Abnormal interactions between left Heschl’s gyrus and regions involved in speech/language, memory, and the monitoring of self-generated events may contribute to AH vulnerability. PMID:23287311

  1. Network topology and functional connectivity disturbances precede the onset of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Deborah L; Rubinov, Mikail; Durgerian, Sally; Mourany, Lyla; Reece, Christine; Koenig, Katherine; Bullmore, Ed; Long, Jeffrey D; Paulsen, Jane S; Rao, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Cognitive, motor and psychiatric changes in prodromal Huntington's disease have nurtured the emergent need for early interventions. Preventive clinical trials for Huntington's disease, however, are limited by a shortage of suitable measures that could serve as surrogate outcomes. Measures of intrinsic functional connectivity from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging are of keen interest. Yet recent studies suggest circumscribed abnormalities in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity in prodromal Huntington's disease, despite the spectrum of behavioural changes preceding a manifest diagnosis. The present study used two complementary analytical approaches to examine whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity in prodromal Huntington's disease. Network topology was studied using graph theory and simple functional connectivity amongst brain regions was explored using the network-based statistic. Participants consisted of gene-negative controls (n = 16) and prodromal Huntington's disease individuals (n = 48) with various stages of disease progression to examine the influence of disease burden on intrinsic connectivity. Graph theory analyses showed that global network interconnectivity approximated a random network topology as proximity to diagnosis neared and this was associated with decreased connectivity amongst highly-connected rich-club network hubs, which integrate processing from diverse brain regions. However, functional segregation within the global network (average clustering) was preserved. Functional segregation was also largely maintained at the local level, except for the notable decrease in the diversity of anterior insula intermodular-interconnections (participation coefficient), irrespective of disease burden. In contrast, network-based statistic analyses revealed patterns of weakened frontostriatal connections and strengthened frontal-posterior connections that evolved as disease

  2. Probabilistic diffusion tractography and graph theory analysis reveal abnormal white matter structural connectivity networks in drug-naive boys with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qingjiu; Shu, Ni; An, Li; Wang, Peng; Sun, Li; Xia, Ming-Rui; Wang, Jin-Hui; Gong, Gao-Lang; Zang, Yu-Feng; Wang, Yu-Feng; He, Yong

    2013-06-26

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which is characterized by core symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood. Neuroimaging studies have suggested that these behavioral disturbances are associated with abnormal functional connectivity among brain regions. However, the alterations in the structural connections that underlie these behavioral and functional deficits remain poorly understood. Here, we used diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and probabilistic tractography method to examine whole-brain white matter (WM) structural connectivity in 30 drug-naive boys with ADHD and 30 healthy controls. The WM networks of the human brain were constructed by estimating inter-regional connectivity probability. The topological properties of the resultant networks (e.g., small-world and network efficiency) were then analyzed using graph theoretical approaches. Nonparametric permutation tests were applied for between-group comparisons of these graphic metrics. We found that both the ADHD and control groups showed an efficient small-world organization in the whole-brain WM networks, suggesting a balance between structurally segregated and integrated connectivity patterns. However, relative to controls, patients with ADHD exhibited decreased global efficiency and increased shortest path length, with the most pronounced efficiency decreases in the left parietal, frontal, and occipital cortices. Intriguingly, the ADHD group showed decreased structural connectivity in the prefrontal-dominant circuitry and increased connectivity in the orbitofrontal-striatal circuitry, and these changes significantly correlated with the inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms, respectively. The present study shows disrupted topological organization of large-scale WM networks in ADHD, extending our understanding of how structural disruptions of neuronal circuits underlie behavioral disturbances in

  3. The functional logic of corticostriatal connections.

    PubMed

    Shipp, Stewart

    2017-03-01

    Unidirectional connections from the cortex to the matrix of the corpus striatum initiate the cortico-basal ganglia (BG)-thalamocortical loop, thought to be important in momentary action selection and in longer-term fine tuning of behavioural repertoire; a discrete set of striatal compartments, striosomes, has the complementary role of registering or anticipating reward that shapes corticostriatal plasticity. Re-entrant signals traversing the cortico-BG loop impact predominantly frontal cortices, conveyed through topographically ordered output channels; by contrast, striatal input signals originate from a far broader span of cortex, and are far more divergent in their termination. The term 'disclosed loop' is introduced to describe this organisation: a closed circuit that is open to outside influence at the initial stage of cortical input. The closed circuit component of corticostriatal afferents is newly dubbed 'operative', as it is proposed to establish the bid for action selection on the part of an incipient cortical action plan; the broader set of converging corticostriatal afferents is described as contextual. A corollary of this proposal is that every unit of the striatal volume, including the long, C-shaped tail of the caudate nucleus, should receive a mandatory component of operative input, and hence include at least one area of BG-recipient cortex amongst the sources of its corticostriatal afferents. Individual operative afferents contact twin classes of GABAergic striatal projection neuron (SPN), distinguished by their neurochemical character, and onward circuitry. This is the basis of the classic direct and indirect pathway model of the cortico-BG loop. Each pathway utilises a serial chain of inhibition, with two such links, or three, providing positive and negative feedback, respectively. Operative co-activation of direct and indirect SPNs is, therefore, pictured to simultaneously promote action, and to restrain it. The balance of this rival activity is

  4. The Therapeutic Function of the Instructor in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halgin, Richard P.

    1982-01-01

    Describes three main types of therapeutic problems which college instructors of abnormal psychology courses may encounter with their students. Students may seek the instructor's assistance in helping a relative or acquaintance or for self-help. Often a student may not seek help but may display pathological behavior. (AM)

  5. Deafferentation-induced plasticity of visual callosal connections: predicting critical periods and analyzing cortical abnormalities using diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Olavarria, Jaime F; Bock, Andrew S; Leigland, Lindsey A; Kroenke, Christopher D

    2012-01-01

    Callosal connections form elaborate patterns that bear close association with striate and extrastriate visual areas. Although it is known that retinal input is required for normal callosal development, there is little information regarding the period during which the retina is critically needed and whether this period correlates with the same developmental stage across species. Here we review the timing of this critical period, identified in rodents and ferrets by the effects that timed enucleations have on mature callosal connections, and compare it to other developmental milestones in these species. Subsequently, we compare these events to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements of water diffusion anisotropy within developing cerebral cortex. We observed that the relationship between the timing of the critical period and the DTI-characterized developmental trajectory is strikingly similar in rodents and ferrets, which opens the possibility of using cortical DTI trajectories for predicting the critical period in species, such as humans, in which this period likely occurs prenatally. Last, we discuss the potential of utilizing DTI to distinguish normal from abnormal cerebral cortical development, both within the context of aberrant connectivity induced by early retinal deafferentation, and more generally as a potential tool for detecting abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  6. Diagnostic classification of intrinsic functional connectivity highlights somatosensory, default mode, and visual regions in autism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Colleen P; Keown, Christopher L; Jahedi, Afrooz; Nair, Aarti; Pflieger, Mark E; Bailey, Barbara A; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2015-01-01

    Despite consensus on the neurological nature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), brain biomarkers remain unknown and diagnosis continues to be based on behavioral criteria. Growing evidence suggests that brain abnormalities in ASD occur at the level of interconnected networks; however, previous attempts using functional connectivity data for diagnostic classification have reached only moderate accuracy. We selected 252 low-motion resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) scans from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE) including typically developing (TD) and ASD participants (n = 126 each), matched for age, non-verbal IQ, and head motion. A matrix of functional connectivities between 220 functionally defined regions of interest was used for diagnostic classification, implementing several machine learning tools. While support vector machines in combination with particle swarm optimization and recursive feature elimination performed modestly (with accuracies for validation datasets <70%), diagnostic classification reached a high accuracy of 91% with random forest (RF), a nonparametric ensemble learning method. Among the 100 most informative features (connectivities), for which this peak accuracy was achieved, participation of somatosensory, default mode, visual, and subcortical regions stood out. Whereas some of these findings were expected, given previous findings of default mode abnormalities and atypical visual functioning in ASD, the prominent role of somatosensory regions was remarkable. The finding of peak accuracy for 100 interregional functional connectivities further suggests that brain biomarkers of ASD may be regionally complex and distributed, rather than localized.

  7. The trabecula septomarginalis (Leonardo’s cord) in abnormal ventriculo-arterial connections: anatomic and morphogenetic implications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The abnormal ventriculo-arterial connections in atrio-ventricular concordance and situs solitus with two well developed ventricles include the range from tetralogy of Fallot throughout the different forms of double outlet right ventricle to transposition of great arteries. The infundibular septum and the trabecula septomarginalis are the fundamental anatomical landmarks for the segmental analysis. In these abnormalities there is a pathological progressive counter-clockwise rotation of the infundibular septum which divorces from the antero-superior limb of the trabecula septomarginalis and achieves his identity. Is there any anatomical evidence of a simultaneous abnormal counter-clockwise rotation of the trabecula septomarginalis? Methods Malposition of great arteries is a generic term since all relationships have to be expected. We present specimens with anatomical evidence of a progressive counter-clockwise rotation from 0° to about 180°of the plane passing throughout the trabecula septomarginalis’s limbs. Results We can observe sequentially: 1. Malformations in which the posterior limb of the trabecula septomarginalis is committed to the ventriculo infundibular fold: (tetralogy of Fallot, double outlet right ventricle with sub-aortic ventricular septal defect, truncus arteriosus and doubly committed ventricular septal defect); 2. Malformations in which the posterior limb of the trabecula septomarginalis is committed to the infundibular septum (double outlet right ventricle with sub-pulmonary ventricular septal defect, transposition of great arteries). Conclusions 1. The sequential-segmental analysis identify all the morphologies. 2. The trabecula septomarginalis plane presents a progressive counter-clockwise twist on the long axis. 3. Since the trabeculated portions of the ventricles are the oldest developmental components, our observations support the hypothesis that the abnormal ventriculo-arterial connections could be in relation with a

  8. Changes in brain functional network connectivity after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Li, Yapeng; Zhu, Wenzhen; Chen, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that functional network connection models can be used to study brain network changes in patients with schizophrenia. In this study, we inferred that these models could also be used to explore functional network connectivity changes in stroke patients. We used independent component analysis to find the motor areas of stroke patients, which is a novel way to determine these areas. In this study, we collected functional magnetic resonance imaging datasets from healthy controls and right-handed stroke patients following their first ever stroke. Using independent component analysis, six spatially independent components highly correlated to the experimental paradigm were extracted. Then, the functional network connectivity of both patients and controls was established to observe the differences between them. The results showed that there were 11 connections in the model in the stroke patients, while there were only four connections in the healthy controls. Further analysis found that some damaged connections may be compensated for by new indirect connections or circuits produced after stroke. These connections may have a direct correlation with the degree of stroke rehabilitation. Our findings suggest that functional network connectivity in stroke patients is more complex than that in hea-lthy controls, and that there is a compensation loop in the functional network following stroke. This implies that functional network reorganization plays a very important role in the process of rehabilitation after stroke. PMID:25206743

  9. Joint Modeling of Anatomical and Functional Connectivity for Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Yogesh; Kubicki, Marek; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Golland, Polina

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel probabilistic framework to merge information from diffusion weighted imaging tractography and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging correlations to identify connectivity patterns in the brain. In particular, we model the interaction between latent anatomical and functional connectivity and present an intuitive extension to population studies. We employ the EM algorithm to estimate the model parameters by maximizing the data likelihood. The method simultaneously infers the templates of latent connectivity for each population and the differences in connectivity between the groups. We demonstrate our method on a schizophrenia study. Our model identifies significant increases in functional connectivity between the parietal/posterior cingulate region and the frontal lobe and reduced functional connectivity between the parietal/posterior cingulate region and the temporal lobe in schizophrenia. We further establish that our model learns predictive differences between the control and clinical populations, and that combining the two modalities yields better results than considering each one in isolation. PMID:21878411

  10. Resting-State EEG Source Localization and Functional Connectivity in Schizophrenia-Like Psychosis of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Canuet, Leonides; Ishii, Ryouhei; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D.; Iwase, Masao; Kurimoto, Ryu; Aoki, Yasunori; Ikeda, Shunichiro; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Nakahachi, Takayuki; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether, like in schizophrenia, psychosis-related disruption in connectivity between certain regions, as an index of intrinsic functional disintegration, occurs in schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy (SLPE). In this study, we sought to determine abnormal patterns of resting-state EEG oscillations and functional connectivity in patients with SLPE, compared with nonpsychotic epilepsy patients, and to assess correlations with psychopathological deficits. Methodology/Principal Findings Resting EEG was recorded in 21 patients with focal epilepsy and SLPE and in 21 clinically-matched non-psychotic epilepsy controls. Source current density and functional connectivity were determined using eLORETA software. For connectivity analysis, a novel nonlinear connectivity measure called “lagged phase synchronization” was used. We found increased theta oscillations in regions involved in the default mode network (DMN), namely the medial and lateral parietal cortex bilaterally in the psychotic patients relative to their nonpsychotic counterparts. In addition, patients with psychosis had increased beta temporo-prefrontal connectivity in the hemisphere with predominant seizure focus. This functional connectivity in temporo-prefrontal circuits correlated with positive symptoms. Additionally, there was increased interhemispheric phase synchronization between the auditory cortex of the affected temporal lobe and the Broca's area correlating with auditory hallucination scores. Conclusions/Significance In addition to dysfunction of parietal regions that are part of the DMN, resting-state disrupted connectivity of the medial temporal cortex with prefrontal areas that are either involved in the DMN or implicated in psychopathological dysfunction may be critical to schizophrenia-like psychosis, especially in individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy. This suggests that DMN deficits might be a core neurobiological feature of the disorder, and that abnormalities

  11. Age-Related Increases in Long-Range Connectivity in Fetal Functional Neural Connectivity Networks In Utero

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Moriah E.; Grove, Lauren E.; Lozon, Tim A.; Vila, Angela M.; Ye, Yongquan; Nye, Matthew J.; Manning, Janessa H.; Pappas, Athina; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Mody, Swati; Berman, Susan; Hassan, Sonia S.; Romero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Formation of operational neural networks is one of the most significant accomplishments of human fetal brain growth. Recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have made it possible to obtain information about brain function during fetal development. Specifically, resting-state fMRI and novel signal covariation approaches have opened up a new avenue for non-invasive assessment of neural functional connectivity (FC) before birth. Early studies in this area have unearthed new insights about principles of prenatal brain function. However, very little is known about the emergence and maturation of neural networks during fetal life. Here, we obtained cross-sectional rs-fMRI data from 39 fetuses between 24 and 38 weeks postconceptual age to examine patterns of connectivity across ten neural FC networks. We identified primitive forms of motor, visual, default mode, thalamic, and temporal networks in the human fetal brain. We discovered the first evidence of increased long-range, cerebral-cerebellar, cortical-subcortical, and intra-hemispheric FC with advancing fetal age. Continued aggregation of data about fundamental neural connectivity systems in utero is essential to establishing principles of connectomics at the beginning of human life. Normative data provides a vital context against which to compare instances of abnormal neurobiological development. PMID:25284273

  12. Age-related increases in long-range connectivity in fetal functional neural connectivity networks in utero.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Moriah E; Grove, Lauren E; Lozon, Tim A; Vila, Angela M; Ye, Yongquan; Nye, Matthew J; Manning, Janessa H; Pappas, Athina; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Mody, Swati; Berman, Susan; Hassan, Sonia S; Romero, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Formation of operational neural networks is one of the most significant accomplishments of human fetal brain growth. Recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have made it possible to obtain information about brain function during fetal development. Specifically, resting-state fMRI and novel signal covariation approaches have opened up a new avenue for non-invasive assessment of neural functional connectivity (FC) before birth. Early studies in this area have unearthed new insights about principles of prenatal brain function. However, very little is known about the emergence and maturation of neural networks during fetal life. Here, we obtained cross-sectional rs-fMRI data from 39 fetuses between 24 and 38 weeks postconceptual age to examine patterns of connectivity across ten neural FC networks. We identified primitive forms of motor, visual, default mode, thalamic, and temporal networks in the human fetal brain. We discovered the first evidence of increased long-range, cerebral-cerebellar, cortical-subcortical, and intra-hemispheric FC with advancing fetal age. Continued aggregation of data about fundamental neural connectivity systems in utero is essential to establishing principles of connectomics at the beginning of human life. Normative data provides a vital context against which to compare instances of abnormal neurobiological development.

  13. Interhemispheric functional disconnection because of abnormal corpus callosum integrity in bipolar disorder type II

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Takashi; Matsuoka, Kiwamu; Yamamoto, Akihide; Takahashi, Masato; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Iida, Hidehiro; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background A significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA) value has been shown in anterior parts of the corpus callosum in patients with bipolar disorder. Aims We investigated the association between abnormal corpus callosum integrity and interhemispheric functional connectivity (IFC) in patients with bipolar disorder. Methods We examined the association between FA values in the corpus callosum (CC-FA) and the IFC between homotopic regions in the anterior cortical structures of bipolar disorder (n=16) and major depressive disorder (n=22) patients with depressed or euthymic states. Results We found a positive correlation between the CC-FA and IFC values between homotopic regions of the ventral prefrontal cortex and insula cortex, and significantly lower IFC between these regions in bipolar disorder patients. Conclusions The abnormal corpus callosum integrity in bipolar disorder patients is relevant to the IFC between homotopic regions, possibly disturbing the exchange of emotional information between the cerebral hemispheres resulting in emotional dysregulation. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27847590

  14. The Psychoactive Designer Drug and Bath Salt Constituent MDPV Causes Widespread Disruption of Brain Functional Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Colon-Perez, Luis M; Tran, Kelvin; Thompson, Khalil; Pace, Michael C; Blum, Kenneth; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; Bruijnzeel, Adriaan W; Setlow, Barry; Febo, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    The abuse of 'bath salts' has raised concerns because of their adverse effects, which include delirium, violent behavior, and suicide ideation in severe cases. The bath salt constituent 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) has been closely linked to these and other adverse effects. The abnormal behavioral pattern produced by acute high-dose MDPV intake suggests possible disruptions of neural communication between brain regions. Therefore, we determined if MDPV exerts disruptive effects on brain functional connectivity, particularly in areas of the prefrontal cortex. Male rats were imaged following administration of a single dose of MDPV (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg) or saline. Resting state brain blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) images were acquired at 4.7 T. To determine the role of dopamine transmission in MDPV-induced changes in functional connectivity, a group of rats received the dopamine D1/D2 receptor antagonist cis-flupenthixol (0.5 mg/kg) 30 min before MDPV. MDPV dose-dependently reduced functional connectivity. Detailed analysis of its effects revealed that connectivity between frontal cortical and striatal areas was reduced. This included connectivity between the prelimbic prefrontal cortex and other areas of the frontal cortex and the insular cortex with hypothalamic, ventral, and dorsal striatal areas. Although the reduced connectivity appeared widespread, connectivity between these regions and somatosensory cortex was not as severely affected. Dopamine receptor blockade did not prevent the MDPV-induced decrease in functional connectivity. The results provide a novel signature of MDPV's in vivo mechanism of action. Reduced brain functional connectivity has been reported in patients suffering from psychosis and has been linked to cognitive dysfunction, audiovisual hallucinations, and negative affective states akin to those reported for MDPV-induced intoxication. The present results suggest that disruption of functional connectivity networks

  15. Alternations of functional connectivity in amblyopia patients: a resting-state fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieqiong; Hu, Ling; Li, Wenjing; Xian, Junfang; Ai, Likun; He, Huiguang

    2014-03-01

    Amblyopia is a common yet hard-to-cure disease in children and results in poor or blurred vision. Some efforts such as voxel-based analysis, cortical thickness analysis have been tried to reveal the pathogenesis of amblyopia. However, few studies focused on alterations of the functional connectivity (FC) in amblyopia. In this study, we analyzed the abnormalities of amblyopia patients by both the seed-based FC with the left/right primary visual cortex and the network constructed throughout the whole brain. Experiments showed the following results: (1)As for the seed-based FC analysis, FC between superior occipital gyrus and the primary visual cortex was found to significantly decrease in both sides. The abnormalities were also found in lingual gyrus. The results may reflect functional deficits both in dorsal stream and ventral stream. (2)Two increased functional connectivities and 64 decreased functional connectivities were found in the whole brain network analysis. The decreased functional connectivities most concentrate in the temporal cortex. The results suggest that amblyopia may be caused by the deficits in the visual information transmission.

  16. Diagnostic discontinuity in psychosis: a combined study of cortical gyrification and functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, Lena; Liddle, Peter F

    2014-05-01

    The point of rarity in brain structure and function that separates the 2 major psychotic disorders--schizophrenia and bipolar disorder--is presently unknown. The aim of this study is to combine surface anatomical and functional imaging modalities to quantify the integrity of cortical connectivity in pursuit of the neural basis of the Kraepelinian "line of divide." We tested the hypothesis that multimodal brain regions show overlapping abnormalities in both disorders, while schizophrenia-specific defects are likely to be localized to sensory processing regions. Cortical folding patterns (gyrification) and functional connectivity hub architecture (degree centrality) were studied in a sample of 39 subjects with established schizophrenia, 20 subjects with psychotic bipolar disorder, and 34 healthy controls. We observed a significant difference between the 2 groups in both gyrification and functional connectivity of the visual processing regions. Further, the aberrant functional connectivity of the visual processing regions predicted persistent symptom burden better than the diagnostic information. Using a spatial similarity analysis, we observed that the degree of overlap between the 2 disorders was small (25%) for changes in cortical gyrification and modest (51%) for changes in functional connectivity measured during a cognitive task (n-back). In conclusion, our results suggest that prominent unimodal sensory processing deficits are more likely to be present in schizophrenia than in bipolar disorder. Further, connectivity-based neuroimaging measures appear to be better indicators of diagnostic discontinuity than the symptom-based clinical information.

  17. Electrophysiological and functional connectivity of the human supplementary motor area.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Shalini; Laird, Angela R; Tandon, Nitin; Franklin, Crystal; Lancaster, Jack L; Fox, Peter T

    2012-08-01

    Neuro-imaging methods for detecting functional and structural inter-regional connectivity are in a rapid phase of development. While reports of regional connectivity patterns based on individual methods are becoming common, studies comparing the results of two or more connectivity-mapping methods remain rare. In this study, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation during PET imaging (TMS/PET), a stimulation-based method, and meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM), a task-based method to map the connectivity patterns of the supplementary motor area (SMA). Further, we drew upon the behavioral domain meta-data of the BrainMap® database to characterize the behavioral domain specificity of two maps. Both MACM and TMS/PET detected multi-synaptic connectivity patterns, with the MACM-detected connections being more extensive. Both MACM and TMS/PET detected connections belonging to multiple behavioral domains, including action, cognition and perception. Finally, we show that the two connectivity-mapping methods are complementary in that, the MACM informed on the functional nature of SMA connections, while TMS/PET identified brain areas electrophysiologically connected with the SMA. Thus, we demonstrate that integrating multimodal database and imaging techniques can derive comprehensive connectivity maps of brain areas.

  18. Alterations in Brain Structure and Functional Connectivity in Alcohol Dependent Patients and Possible Association with Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yue; Ma, Mengying; Ma, Yi; Dong, Yuru; Niu, Yajuan; Jiang, Yin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Zhiyan; Wu, Liuzhen; Sun, Hongqiang; Cui, Cailian

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have documented that heightened impulsivity likely contributes to the development and maintenance of alcohol use disorders. However, there is still a lack of studies that comprehensively detected the brain changes associated with abnormal impulsivity in alcohol addicts. This study was designed to investigate the alterations in brain structure and functional connectivity associated with abnormal impulsivity in alcohol dependent patients. Methods Brain structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging data as well as impulsive behavior data were collected from 20 alcohol dependent patients and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls respectively. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate the differences of grey matter volume, and tract-based spatial statistics was used to detect abnormal white matter regions between alcohol dependent patients and healthy controls. The alterations in resting-state functional connectivity in alcohol dependent patients were examined using selected brain areas with gray matter deficits as seed regions. Results Compared with healthy controls, alcohol dependent patients had significantly reduced gray matter volume in the mesocorticolimbic system including the dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the medial prefrontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex and the putamen, decreased fractional anisotropy in the regions connecting the damaged grey matter areas driven by higher radial diffusivity value in the same areas and decreased resting-state functional connectivity within the reward network. Moreover, the gray matter volume of the left medial prefrontal cortex exhibited negative correlations with various impulse indices. Conclusions These findings suggest that chronic alcohol dependence could cause a complex neural changes linked to abnormal impulsivity. PMID:27575491

  19. Abnormal ventilation scans in middle-aged smokers. Comparison with tests of overall lung function

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, S.J.; Cunningham, D.A.; Lavender, J.P.; Gibellino, F.; Connellan, S.J.; Pride, N.B.

    1985-07-01

    The uniformity of regional ventilation during tidal breathing has been assessed using continuous inhalation of krypton-81m in 43 male, lifelong nonsmokers and 46 male, current cigarette smokers (mean daily consumption 24.1 cigarettes/day) between 44 and 61 yr of age and with mild or no respiratory symptoms. All subjects had normal chest radiographs. The results of the ventilation scans were compared with tests of overall lung function (spirometry, maximal expiratory flow-volume curves, and single-breath N2 test). Diffuse abnormalities of the ventilation scan were found in 19 (41%) of the 46 smokers but in none of the nonsmokers. Focal abnormalities were found in 7 smokers and 3 nonsmokers. Smokers showed the expected abnormalities in overall lung function (reduced FEV1 and VC, increased single-breath N2 slope, and closing volume), but in individual smokers there was only a weak relation between the severity of abnormality of overall lung function and an abnormal ventilation scan. Abnormal scans could be found when overall lung function was normal and were not invariably found when significant abnormalities in FEV1/VC or N2 slope were present. There was no relation between the presence of chronic expectoration and an abnormal scan. The prognostic significance of an abnormal ventilation scan in such smokers remains to be established.

  20. BASCO: a toolbox for task-related functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Göttlich, Martin; Beyer, Frederike; Krämer, Ulrike M.

    2015-01-01

    BASCO (BetA Series COrrelation) is a user-friendly MATLAB toolbox with a graphical user interface (GUI) which allows investigating functional connectivity in event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Connectivity analyses extend and compliment univariate activation analyses since the actual interaction between brain regions involved in a task can be explored. BASCO supports seed-based functional connectivity as well as brain network analyses. Although there are a multitude of advanced toolboxes for investigating resting-state functional connectivity, BASCO is the first toolbox for evaluating task-related whole-brain functional connectivity employing a large number of network nodes. Thus, BASCO allows investigating task-specific rather than resting-state networks. Here, we summarize the main features of the toolbox and describe the methods and algorithms. PMID:26441558

  1. The contribution of sensory system functional connectivity reduction to clinical pain in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Jesus; Macià, Dídac; Garcia-Fontanals, Alba; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; López-Solà, Marina; Garcia-Blanco, Susana; Poca-Dias, Violant; Harrison, Ben J; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Monfort, Jordi; Garcia-Fructuoso, Ferran; Deus, Joan

    2014-08-01

    Fibromyalgia typically presents with spontaneous body pain with no apparent cause and is considered pathophysiologically to be a functional disorder of somatosensory processing. We have investigated potential associations between the degree of self-reported clinical pain and resting-state brain functional connectivity at different levels of putative somatosensory integration. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was obtained in 40 women with fibromyalgia and 36 control subjects. A combination of functional connectivity-based measurements were used to assess (1) the basic pain signal modulation system at the level of the periaqueductal gray (PAG); (2) the sensory cortex with an emphasis on the parietal operculum/secondary somatosensory cortex (SII); and (3) the connectivity of these regions with the self-referential "default mode" network. Compared with control subjects, a reduction of functional connectivity was identified across the 3 levels of neural processing, each showing a significant and complementary correlation with the degree of clinical pain. Specifically, self-reported pain in fibromyalgia patients correlated with (1) reduced connectivity between PAG and anterior insula; (2) reduced connectivity between SII and primary somatosensory, visual, and auditory cortices; and (3) increased connectivity between SII and the default mode network. The results confirm previous research demonstrating abnormal functional connectivity in fibromyalgia and show that alterations at different levels of sensory processing may contribute to account for clinical pain. Importantly, reduced functional connectivity extended beyond the somatosensory domain and implicated visual and auditory sensory modalities. Overall, this study suggests that a general weakening of sensory integration underlies clinical pain in fibromyalgia.

  2. Detecting Functional Connectivity During Audiovisual Integration with MEG: A Comparison of Connectivity Metrics.

    PubMed

    Ard, Tyler; Carver, Frederick W; Holroyd, Tom; Horwitz, Barry; Coppola, Richard

    2015-08-01

    In typical magnetoencephalography and/or electroencephalography functional connectivity analysis, researchers select one of several methods that measure a relationship between regions to determine connectivity, such as coherence, power correlations, and others. However, it is largely unknown if some are more suited than others for various types of investigations. In this study, the authors investigate seven connectivity metrics to evaluate which, if any, are sensitive to audiovisual integration by contrasting connectivity when tracking an audiovisual object versus connectivity when tracking a visual object uncorrelated with the auditory stimulus. The authors are able to assess the metrics' performances at detecting audiovisual integration by investigating connectivity between auditory and visual areas. Critically, the authors perform their investigation on a whole-cortex all-to-all mapping, avoiding confounds introduced in seed selection. The authors find that amplitude-based connectivity measures in the beta band detect strong connections between visual and auditory areas during audiovisual integration, specifically between V4/V5 and auditory cortices in the right hemisphere. Conversely, phase-based connectivity measures in the beta band as well as phase and power measures in alpha, gamma, and theta do not show connectivity between audiovisual areas. The authors postulate that while beta power correlations detect audiovisual integration in the current experimental context, it may not always be the best measure to detect connectivity. Instead, it is likely that the brain utilizes a variety of mechanisms in neuronal communication that may produce differential types of temporal relationships.

  3. EEG functional connectivity is partially predicted by underlying white matter connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chu, CJ; Tanaka, N; Diaz, J; Edlow, BL; Wu, O; Hämäläinen, M; Stufflebeam, S; Cash, SS; Kramer, MA.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, networks have become a leading model to illustrate both the anatomical relationships (structural networks) and the coupling of dynamic physiology (functional networks) linking separate brain regions. The relationship between these two levels of description remains incompletely understood and an area of intense research interest. In particular, it is unclear how cortical currents relate to underlying brain structural architecture. In addition, although theory suggests that brain communication is highly frequency dependent, how structural connections influence overlying functional connectivity in different frequency bands has not been previously explored. Here we relate functional networks inferred from statistical associations between source imaging of EEG activity and underlying cortico-cortical structural brain connectivity determined by probabilistic white matter tractography. We evaluate spontaneous fluctuating cortical brain activity over a long time scale (minutes) and relate inferred functional networks to underlying structural connectivity for broadband signals, as well as in seven distinct frequency bands. We find that cortical networks derived from source EEG estimates partially reflect both direct and indirect underlying white matter connectivity in all frequency bands evaluated. In addition, we find that when structural support is absent, functional connectivity is significantly reduced for high frequency bands compared to low frequency bands. The association between cortical currents and underlying white matter connectivity highlights the obligatory interdependence of functional and structural networks in the human brain. The increased dependence on structural support for the coupling of higher frequency brain rhythms provides new evidence for how underlying anatomy directly shapes emergent brain dynamics at fast time scales. PMID:25534110

  4. EEG functional connectivity is partially predicted by underlying white matter connectivity.

    PubMed

    Chu, C J; Tanaka, N; Diaz, J; Edlow, B L; Wu, O; Hämäläinen, M; Stufflebeam, S; Cash, S S; Kramer, M A

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, networks have become a leading model to illustrate both the anatomical relationships (structural networks) and the coupling of dynamic physiology (functional networks) linking separate brain regions. The relationship between these two levels of description remains incompletely understood and an area of intense research interest. In particular, it is unclear how cortical currents relate to underlying brain structural architecture. In addition, although theory suggests that brain communication is highly frequency dependent, how structural connections influence overlying functional connectivity in different frequency bands has not been previously explored. Here we relate functional networks inferred from statistical associations between source imaging of EEG activity and underlying cortico-cortical structural brain connectivity determined by probabilistic white matter tractography. We evaluate spontaneous fluctuating cortical brain activity over a long time scale (minutes) and relate inferred functional networks to underlying structural connectivity for broadband signals, as well as in seven distinct frequency bands. We find that cortical networks derived from source EEG estimates partially reflect both direct and indirect underlying white matter connectivity in all frequency bands evaluated. In addition, we find that when structural support is absent, functional connectivity is significantly reduced for high frequency bands compared to low frequency bands. The association between cortical currents and underlying white matter connectivity highlights the obligatory interdependence of functional and structural networks in the human brain. The increased dependence on structural support for the coupling of higher frequency brain rhythms provides new evidence for how underlying anatomy directly shapes emergent brain dynamics at fast time scales.

  5. Upregulation of cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity after motor learning.

    PubMed

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Breakspear, Michael; Hinder, Mark; Summers, Jeffery J

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between the cerebellum and primary motor cortex are crucial for the acquisition of new motor skills. Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning motor skills is associated with subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The neuronal processes underlying the motor-learning-induced plasticity are not well understood. Here, we investigate changes in functional connectivity in source-reconstructed electroencephalography (EEG) following the performance of a single session of a dynamic force task in twenty young adults. Source activity was reconstructed in 112 regions of interest (ROIs) and the functional connectivity between all ROIs was estimated using the imaginary part of coherence. Significant changes in resting-state connectivity were assessed using partial least squares (PLS). We found that subjects adapted their motor performance during the training session and showed improved accuracy but with slower movement times. A number of connections were significantly upregulated after motor training, principally involving connections within the cerebellum and between the cerebellum and motor cortex. Increased connectivity was confined to specific frequency ranges in the mu- and beta-bands. Post hoc analysis of the phase spectra of these cerebellar and cortico-cerebellar connections revealed an increased phase lag between motor cortical and cerebellar activity following motor practice. These findings show a reorganization of intrinsic cortico-cerebellar connectivity related to motor adaptation and demonstrate the potential of EEG connectivity analysis in source space to reveal the neuronal processes that underpin neural plasticity.

  6. Effects of corticosteroids on the proliferation of normal and abnormal human connective tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Priestley, G C; Brown, J C

    1980-01-01

    Four corticosteroids were tested in vitro for effect on the proliferation of four strains of fibroblasts from scleroderma skin, four strains from normal adult skin and four strains of rheumatoid synovial cells. Significant effects on fibroblasts occurred only at the highest steroid concentration tested (10 microgram/ml) where the inhibitory ranking of the steriods was clobetasol propionate greater than clobetasone butyrate greater than betamethasone valerate greater than hydrocortisone. Hydrocortisone and betamethasone valerate stimulated proliferation of two normal strains, had no certain effect on the scleroderma group, and inhibited growth of synovial cells. Clobetasone butyrate and clobetasol propionate inhibited growth of all cells. All four steroids substantially reduced acid mucopolysaccharide secretion by scleroderma fibroblasts. These results suggest that fibroblasts from normal and abnormal skin show only small differences in their responses to corticosteroids in vitro, but contrast sharply with the mouse L-929 fibroblasts previously used in some assays of topical corticosteroid potency.

  7. GPU accelerated dynamic functional connectivity analysis for functional MRI data.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Devrim; Sakoğlu, Ünal; Esquivel, Johnny; Adinoff, Bryon; Mete, Mutlu

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in multi-core processors and graphics card based computational technologies have paved the way for an improved and dynamic utilization of parallel computing techniques. Numerous applications have been implemented for the acceleration of computationally-intensive problems in various computational science fields including bioinformatics, in which big data problems are prevalent. In neuroimaging, dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) analysis is a computationally demanding method used to investigate dynamic functional interactions among different brain regions or networks identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. In this study, we implemented and analyzed a parallel DFC algorithm based on thread-based and block-based approaches. The thread-based approach was designed to parallelize DFC computations and was implemented in both Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP) and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming platforms. Another approach developed in this study to better utilize CUDA architecture is the block-based approach, where parallelization involves smaller parts of fMRI time-courses obtained by sliding-windows. Experimental results showed that the proposed parallel design solutions enabled by the GPUs significantly reduce the computation time for DFC analysis. Multicore implementation using OpenMP on 8-core processor provides up to 7.7× speed-up. GPU implementation using CUDA yielded substantial accelerations ranging from 18.5× to 157× speed-up once thread-based and block-based approaches were combined in the analysis. Proposed parallel programming solutions showed that multi-core processor and CUDA-supported GPU implementations accelerated the DFC analyses significantly. Developed algorithms make the DFC analyses more practical for multi-subject studies with more dynamic analyses.

  8. Resting-State Functional Connectivity Bias of Middle Temporal Gyrus and Caudate with Altered Gray Matter Volume in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chaoqiong; Ding, Jurong; Li, Jun; Guo, Wenbin; Long, Zhiliang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Qing; Zeng, Ling; Zhao, Jingping; Chen, Huafu

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have indicated that the structure deficits and resting-state functional connectivity (FC) imbalances in cortico-limbic circuitry might underline the pathophysiology of MDD. Using structure and functional MRI, our aim is to investigate gray matter abnormalities in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and treatment-responsive depression (TSD), and test whether the altered gray matter is associated with altered FC. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate the regions with gray matter abnormality and FC analysis was further conducted between each gray matter abnormal region and the remaining voxels in the brain. Using one-way analysis of variance, we found significant gray matter abnormalities in the right middle temporal cortex (MTG) and bilateral caudate among the TRD, TSD and healthy controls. For the FC of the right MTG, we found that both the patients with TRD and TSD showed altered connectivity mainly in the default-mode network (DMN). For the FC of the right caudate, both patient groups showed altered connectivity in the frontal regions. Our results revealed the gray matter reduction of right MTG and bilateral caudate, and disrupted functional connection to widely distributed circuitry in DMN and frontal regions, respectively. These results suggest that the abnormal DMN and reward circuit activity might be biomarkers of depression trait. PMID:23028892

  9. Attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in schizophrenia: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Mahdi; Meuli, Reto; Do, Kim Q; Hasler, Martin; Crow, Timothy J; Knyazeva, Maria G

    2010-07-01

    The interhemispheric asymmetries that originate from connectivity-related structuring of the cortex are compromised in schizophrenia (SZ). Under the assumption that such abnormalities affect functional connectivity, we analyzed its correlate-EEG synchronization-in SZ patients and matched controls. We applied multivariate synchronization measures based on Laplacian EEG and tuned to various spatial scales. Compared to the controls who had rightward asymmetry at a local level (EEG power), rightward anterior and leftward posterior asymmetries at an intraregional level (1st and 2nd order S-estimator), and rightward global asymmetry (hemispheric S-estimator), SZ patients showed generally attenuated asymmetry, the effect being strongest for intraregional synchronization in the alpha and beta bands. The abnormalities of asymmetry increased with the duration of the disease and correlated with the negative symptoms. We discuss the tentative links between these findings and gross anatomical asymmetries, including the cerebral torque and gyrification pattern, in normal subjects and SZ patients.

  10. Changed Hub and Corresponding Functional Connectivity of Subgenual Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huawang; Sun, Hui; Xu, Jinping; Wu, Yan; Wang, Chao; Xiao, Jing; She, Shenglin; Huang, Jianwei; Zou, Wenjin; Peng, Hongjun; Lu, Xiaobing; Huang, Guimao; Jiang, Tianzi; Ning, Yuping; Wang, Jiaojian

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most prevalent mental disorders. In the brain, the hubs of the brain network play a key role in integrating and transferring information between different functional modules. However, whether the changed pattern in functional network hubs contributes to the onset of MDD remains unclear. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and graph theory methods, we investigated whether alterations of hubs can be detected in MDD. First, we constructed the whole-brain voxel-wise functional networks and calculated a functional connectivity strength (FCS) map in each subject in 34 MDD patients and 34 gender-, age- and education level-matched healthy controls (HCs). Next, the two-sample t-test was applied to compare the FCS maps between HC and MDD patients and identified significant decrease of FCS in subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) in MDD patients. Subsequent functional connectivity analyses of sgACC showed disruptions in functional connectivity with posterior insula, middle and inferior temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus and cerebellum in MDD patients. Furthermore, the changed FCS of sgACC and functional connections to sgACC were significantly correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores in MDD patients. The results of the present study revealed the abnormal hub of sgACC and its corresponding disrupted frontal-limbic-visual cognitive-cerebellum functional networks in MDD. These findings may provide a new insight for the diagnosis and treatment of MDD. PMID:28018183

  11. Changed Hub and Corresponding Functional Connectivity of Subgenual Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huawang; Sun, Hui; Xu, Jinping; Wu, Yan; Wang, Chao; Xiao, Jing; She, Shenglin; Huang, Jianwei; Zou, Wenjin; Peng, Hongjun; Lu, Xiaobing; Huang, Guimao; Jiang, Tianzi; Ning, Yuping; Wang, Jiaojian

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most prevalent mental disorders. In the brain, the hubs of the brain network play a key role in integrating and transferring information between different functional modules. However, whether the changed pattern in functional network hubs contributes to the onset of MDD remains unclear. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and graph theory methods, we investigated whether alterations of hubs can be detected in MDD. First, we constructed the whole-brain voxel-wise functional networks and calculated a functional connectivity strength (FCS) map in each subject in 34 MDD patients and 34 gender-, age- and education level-matched healthy controls (HCs). Next, the two-sample t-test was applied to compare the FCS maps between HC and MDD patients and identified significant decrease of FCS in subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) in MDD patients. Subsequent functional connectivity analyses of sgACC showed disruptions in functional connectivity with posterior insula, middle and inferior temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus and cerebellum in MDD patients. Furthermore, the changed FCS of sgACC and functional connections to sgACC were significantly correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores in MDD patients. The results of the present study revealed the abnormal hub of sgACC and its corresponding disrupted frontal-limbic-visual cognitive-cerebellum functional networks in MDD. These findings may provide a new insight for the diagnosis and treatment of MDD.

  12. Functional connectivity changes resemble patterns of pTDP-43 pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schulthess, Ines; Gorges, Martin; Müller, Hans-Peter; Lulé, Dorothée; Del Tredici, Kelly; Ludolph, Albert C.; Kassubek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ‘Resting-state’ fMRI allows investigation of alterations in functional brain organization that are associated with an underlying pathological process. We determine whether abnormal connectivity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in a priori-defined intrinsic functional connectivity networks, according to a neuropathological staging scheme and its DTI-based tract correlates, permits recognition of a sequential involvement of functional networks. ‘Resting-state’ fMRI data from 135 ALS patients and 56 matched healthy controls were investigated for the motor network (corresponding to neuropathological stage 1), brainstem (stage 2), ventral attention (stage 3), default mode/hippocampal network (stage 4), and primary visual network (as the control network) in a cross-sectional analysis and longitudinally in a subgroup of 27 patients after 6 months. Group comparison from cross-sectional and longitudinal data revealed significantly increased functional connectivity (p < 0.05, corrected) in all four investigated networks (but not in the control network), presenting as a network expansion that was correlated with physical disability. Increased connectivity of functional networks, as investigated in a hypothesis-driven approach, is characterized by network expansions and resembled the pattern of pTDP-43 pathology in ALS. However, our data did not allow for the recognition of a sequential involvement of functional connectivity networks at the individual level. PMID:27929102

  13. Joint brain connectivity estimation from diffusion and functional MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shu-Hsien; Lenglet, Christophe; Parhi, Keshab K.

    2015-03-01

    Estimating brain wiring patterns is critical to better understand the brain organization and function. Anatomical brain connectivity models axonal pathways, while the functional brain connectivity characterizes the statistical dependencies and correlation between the activities of various brain regions. The synchronization of brain activity can be inferred through the variation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal from functional MRI (fMRI) and the neural connections can be estimated using tractography from diffusion MRI (dMRI). Functional connections between brain regions are supported by anatomical connections, and the synchronization of brain activities arises through sharing of information in the form of electro-chemical signals on axon pathways. Jointly modeling fMRI and dMRI data may improve the accuracy in constructing anatomical connectivity as well as functional connectivity. Such an approach may lead to novel multimodal biomarkers potentially able to better capture functional and anatomical connectivity variations. We present a novel brain network model which jointly models the dMRI and fMRI data to improve the anatomical connectivity estimation and extract the anatomical subnetworks associated with specific functional modes by constraining the anatomical connections as structural supports to the functional connections. The key idea is similar to a multi-commodity flow optimization problem that minimizes the cost or maximizes the efficiency for flow configuration and simultaneously fulfills the supply-demand constraint for each commodity. In the proposed network, the nodes represent the grey matter (GM) regions providing brain functionality, and the links represent white matter (WM) fiber bundles connecting those regions and delivering information. The commodities can be thought of as the information corresponding to brain activity patterns as obtained for instance by independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI data. The concept of information

  14. Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modeling Reveals Differential Functional Connectivity of the Medial and Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zald, David H.; McHugo, Maureen; Ray, Kimberly L.; Glahn, David C.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Laird, Angela R.

    2014-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is implicated in a broad range of behaviors and neuropsychiatric disorders. Anatomical tracing studies in nonhuman primates reveal differences in connectivity across subregions of the OFC, but data on the connectivity of the human OFC remain limited. We applied meta-analytic connectivity modeling in order to examine which brain regions are most frequently coactivated with the medial and lateral portions of the OFC in published functional neuroimaging studies. The analysis revealed a clear divergence in the pattern of connectivity for the medial OFC (mOFC) and lateral OFC (lOFC) regions. The lOFC showed coactivations with a network of prefrontal regions and areas involved in cognitive functions including language and memory. In contrast, the mOFC showed connectivity with default mode, autonomic, and limbic regions. Convergent patterns of coactivations were observed in the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus. A small number of regions showed connectivity specific to the anterior or posterior sectors of the OFC. Task domains involving memory, semantic processing, face processing, and reward were additionally analyzed in order to identify the different patterns of OFC functional connectivity associated with specific cognitive and affective processes. These data provide a framework for understanding the human OFC's position within widespread functional networks. PMID:23042731

  15. Multisite reliability of MR-based functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Noble, Stephanie; Scheinost, Dustin; Finn, Emily S; Shen, Xilin; Papademetris, Xenophon; McEwen, Sarah C; Bearden, Carrie E; Addington, Jean; Goodyear, Bradley; Cadenhead, Kristin S; Mirzakhanian, Heline; Cornblatt, Barbara A; Olvet, Doreen M; Mathalon, Daniel H; McGlashan, Thomas H; Perkins, Diana O; Belger, Aysenil; Seidman, Larry J; Thermenos, Heidi; Tsuang, Ming T; van Erp, Theo G M; Walker, Elaine F; Hamann, Stephan; Woods, Scott W; Cannon, Tyrone D; Constable, R Todd

    2017-02-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increasing number of multisite MRI functional connectivity (fcMRI) studies. While multisite studies provide an efficient way to accelerate data collection and increase sample sizes, especially for rare clinical populations, any effects of site or MRI scanner could ultimately limit power and weaken results. Little data exists on the stability of functional connectivity measurements across sites and sessions. In this study, we assess the influence of site and session on resting state functional connectivity measurements in a healthy cohort of traveling subjects (8 subjects scanned twice at each of 8 sites) scanned as part of the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS). Reliability was investigated in three types of connectivity analyses: (1) seed-based connectivity with posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), right motor cortex (RMC), and left thalamus (LT) as seeds; (2) the intrinsic connectivity distribution (ICD), a voxel-wise connectivity measure; and (3) matrix connectivity, a whole-brain, atlas-based approach to assessing connectivity between nodes. Contributions to variability in connectivity due to subject, site, and day-of-scan were quantified and used to assess between-session (test-retest) reliability in accordance with Generalizability Theory. Overall, no major site, scanner manufacturer, or day-of-scan effects were found for the univariate connectivity analyses; instead, subject effects dominated relative to the other measured factors. However, summaries of voxel-wise connectivity were found to be sensitive to site and scanner manufacturer effects. For all connectivity measures, although subject variance was three times the site variance, the residual represented 60-80% of the variance, indicating that connectivity differed greatly from scan to scan independent of any of the measured factors (i.e., subject, site, and day-of-scan). Thus, for a single 5min scan, reliability across connectivity measures was poor (ICC=0

  16. fMRI alignment based on local functional connectivity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Di; Du, Yuhui; Cheng, Hewei; Jiang, Tianzi; Fan, Yong

    2012-02-01

    In functional neuroimaging studies, the inter-subject alignment of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is a necessary precursor to improve functional consistency across subjects. Traditional structural MRI based registration methods cannot achieve accurate inter-subject functional consistency in that functional units are not necessarily consistently located relative to anatomical structures due to functional variability across subjects. Although spatial smoothing commonly used in fMRI data preprocessing can reduce the inter-subject functional variability, it may blur the functional signals and thus lose the fine-grained information. In this paper we propose a novel functional signal based fMRI image registration method which aligns local functional connectivity patterns of different subjects to improve the inter-subject functional consistency. Particularly, the functional connectivity is measured using Pearson correlation. For each voxel of an fMRI image, its functional connectivity to every voxel in its local spatial neighborhood, referred to as its local functional connectivity pattern, is characterized by a rotation and shift invariant representation. Based on this representation, the spatial registration of two fMRI images is achieved by minimizing the difference between their corresponding voxels' local functional connectivity patterns using a deformable image registration model. Experiment results based on simulated fMRI data have demonstrated that the proposed method is more robust and reliable than the existing fMRI image registration methods, including maximizing functional correlations and minimizing difference of global connectivity matrices across different subjects. Experiment results based on real resting-state fMRI data have further demonstrated that the proposed fMRI registration method can statistically significantly improve functional consistency across subjects.

  17. Disrupted Functional Connectivity with Dopaminergic Midbrain in Cocaine Abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, D.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.; Carrillo, J.; Maloney, T.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-06-01

    Chronic cocaine use is associated with disrupted dopaminergic neurotransmission but how this disruption affects overall brain function (other than reward/motivation) is yet to be fully investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that cocaine addicted subjects will have disrupted functional connectivity between the midbrain (where dopamine neurons are located) and cortical and subcortical brain regions during the performance of a sustained attention task. We measured brain activation and functional connectivity with fMRI in 20 cocaine abusers and 20 matched controls. When compared to controls, cocaine abusers had lower positive functional connectivity of midbrain with thalamus, cerebellum, and rostral cingulate, and this was associated with decreased activation in thalamus and cerebellum and enhanced deactivation in rostral cingulate. These findings suggest that decreased functional connectivity of the midbrain interferes with the activation and deactivation signals associated with sustained attention in cocaine addicts.

  18. Statistical technique for analysing functional connectivity of multiple spike trains.

    PubMed

    Masud, Mohammad Shahed; Borisyuk, Roman

    2011-03-15

    A new statistical technique, the Cox method, used for analysing functional connectivity of simultaneously recorded multiple spike trains is presented. This method is based on the theory of modulated renewal processes and it estimates a vector of influence strengths from multiple spike trains (called reference trains) to the selected (target) spike train. Selecting another target spike train and repeating the calculation of the influence strengths from the reference spike trains enables researchers to find all functional connections among multiple spike trains. In order to study functional connectivity an "influence function" is identified. This function recognises the specificity of neuronal interactions and reflects the dynamics of postsynaptic potential. In comparison to existing techniques, the Cox method has the following advantages: it does not use bins (binless method); it is applicable to cases where the sample size is small; it is sufficiently sensitive such that it estimates weak influences; it supports the simultaneous analysis of multiple influences; it is able to identify a correct connectivity scheme in difficult cases of "common source" or "indirect" connectivity. The Cox method has been thoroughly tested using multiple sets of data generated by the neural network model of the leaky integrate and fire neurons with a prescribed architecture of connections. The results suggest that this method is highly successful for analysing functional connectivity of simultaneously recorded multiple spike trains.

  19. Sustained deep-tissue pain alters functional brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L; Edwards, Robert R; Wasan, Ajay D; Gollub, Randy L; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-08-01

    Recent functional brain connectivity studies have contributed to our understanding of the neurocircuitry supporting pain perception. However, evoked-pain connectivity studies have employed cutaneous and/or brief stimuli, which induce sensations that differ appreciably from the clinical pain experience. Sustained myofascial pain evoked by pressure cuff affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate functional connectivity change to more clinically relevant sustained deep-tissue pain. Connectivity in specific networks known to be modulated by evoked pain (sensorimotor, salience, dorsal attention, frontoparietal control, and default mode networks: SMN, SLN, DAN, FCN, and DMN) was evaluated with functional-connectivity magnetic resonance imaging, both at rest and during a sustained (6-minute) pain state in healthy adults. We found that pain was stable, with no significant changes of subjects' pain ratings over the stimulation period. Sustained pain reduced connectivity between the SMN and the contralateral leg primary sensorimotor (S1/M1) representation. Such SMN-S1/M1 connectivity decreases were also accompanied by and correlated with increased SLN-S1/M1 connectivity, suggesting recruitment of activated S1/M1 from SMN to SLN. Sustained pain also increased DAN connectivity to pain processing regions such as mid-cingulate cortex, posterior insula, and putamen. Moreover, greater connectivity during pain between contralateral S1/M1 and posterior insula, thalamus, putamen, and amygdala was associated with lower cuff pressures needed to reach the targeted pain sensation. These results demonstrate that sustained pain disrupts resting S1/M1 connectivity by shifting it to a network known to process stimulus salience. Furthermore, increased connectivity between S1/M1 and both sensory and affective processing areas may be an important contribution to interindividual differences in pain sensitivity.

  20. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder: a perfusion MRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baojuan; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Hong-Bing; Yin, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The majority of studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) so far have focused on delineating patterns of activations during cognitive processes. Recently, more and more researches have started to investigate functional connectivity in PTSD subjects using BOLD-fMRI. Functional connectivity analysis has been demonstrated as a powerful approach to identify biomarkers of different brain diseases. This study aimed to detect resting-state functional connectivity abnormities in patients with PTSD using arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI. As a completely non-invasive technique, ASL allows quantitative estimates of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Compared with BOLD-fMRI, ASL fMRI has many advantages, including less low-frequency signal drifts, superior functional localization, etc. In the current study, ASL images were collected from 10 survivors in mining disaster with recent onset PTSD and 10 survivors without PTSD. Decreased regional CBF in the right middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and postcentral gyrus was detected in the PTSD patients. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis was performed using an area in the right middle temporal gyrus as region of interest. Compared with the non-PTSD group, the PTSD subjects demonstrated increased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus, the left middle temporal gyrus. Meanwhile, decreased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right postcentral gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule was also found in the PTSD patients. This is the first study which investigated resting-state functional connectivity in PTSD using ASL images. The results may provide new insight into the neural substrates of PTSD.

  1. Salience Network Functional Connectivity Predicts Placebo Effects in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Magdalena; Heffernan, Joseph; Avery, Erich T.; Mickey, Brian J.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Peciña, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) abnormalities among intrinsic brain networks in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD); however, their role as predictors of treatment response has not yet been explored. Here, we investigate whether network-based rsFC predicts antidepressant and placebo effects in MDD. Methods We performed a randomized controlled trial of two weeklong, identical placebos (described as having either “active” fast-acting, antidepressant effects or as “inactive”) followed by a ten-week open-label antidepressant medication treatment. Twenty-nine participants underwent a rsFC fMRI scan at the completion of each placebo condition. Networks were isolated from resting-state blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal fluctuations using independent component analysis. Baseline and placebo-induced changes in rsFC within the default-mode, salience, and executive networks were examined for associations with placebo and antidepressant treatment response. Results Increased baseline rsFC in the rostral anterior cingulate (rACC) within the salience network, a region classically implicated in the formation of placebo analgesia and the prediction of treatment response in MDD, was associated with greater response to one week of active placebo and ten weeks of antidepressant treatment. Machine learning further demonstrated that increased salience network rsFC, mainly within the rACC, significantly predicts individual responses to placebo administration. Conclusions These data demonstrate that baseline rsFC within the salience network is linked to clinical placebo responses. This information could be employed to identify patients who would benefit from lower doses of antidepressant medication or non-pharmacological approaches, or to develop biomarkers of placebo effects in clinical trials. PMID:26709390

  2. Perfusion deficits and functional connectivity alterations in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Baojuan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Linchuan; Li, Liang; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    To explore the alteration in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and functional connectivity between survivors with recent onset post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and without PTSD, survived from the same coal mine flood disaster. In this study, a processing pipeline using arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence was proposed. Considering low spatial resolution of ASL sequence, a linear regression method was firstly used to correct the partial volume (PV) effect for better CBF estimation. Then the alterations of CBF between two groups were analyzed using both uncorrected and PV-corrected CBF maps. Based on altered CBF regions detected from the CBF analysis as seed regions, the functional connectivity abnormities in PTSD patients was investigated. The CBF analysis using PV-corrected maps indicates CBF deficits in the bilateral frontal lobe, right superior frontal gyrus and right corpus callosum of PTSD patients, while only right corpus callosum was identified in uncorrected CBF analysis. Furthermore, the regional CBF of the right superior frontal gyrus exhibits significantly negative correlation with the symptom severity in PTSD patients. The resting-state functional connectivity indicates increased connectivity between left frontal lobe and right parietal lobe. These results indicate that PV-corrected CBF exhibits more subtle perfusion changes and may benefit further perfusion and connectivity analysis. The symptom-specific perfusion deficits and aberrant connectivity in above memory-related regions may be putative biomarkers for recent onset PTSD induced by a single prolonged trauma exposure and help predict the severity of PTSD.

  3. Assessing Thalamocortical Functional Connectivity with Granger Causality

    PubMed Central

    Israel, David; Thakor, Nitish V.; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of network connectivity across multiple brain regions is critical to understanding the mechanisms underlying various neurological disorders. Conventional methods for assessing dynamic interactions include cross-correlation and coherence analysis. However, these methods do not reveal the direction of information flow, which is important for studying the highly directional neurological system. Granger causality (GC) analysis can characterize the directional influences between two systems. We tested GC analysis for its capability to capture directional interactions within both simulated and in-vivo neural networks. The simulated networks consisted of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons; GC analysis was used to estimate the causal influences between two model networks. Our analysis successfully detected asymmetrical interactions between these networks (p<10−10, t-test). Next, we characterized the relationship between the “electrical synaptic strength” in the model networks and interactions estimated by GC analysis. We demonstrated the novel application of GC to monitor interactions between thalamic and cortical neurons following ischemia induced brain injury in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA). We observed that during the post-CA acute period the GC interactions from the thalamus to the cortex were consistently higher than those from the cortex to the thalamus (1.983±0.278 times higher, p=0.021). In addition, the dynamics of GC interactions between the thalamus and the cortex were frequency dependent. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of GC to monitor the dynamics of thalamocortical interactions after a global nervous system injury such as CA-induced ischemia, and offers preferred alternative applications in characterizing other inter-regional interactions in an injured brain. PMID:23864221

  4. Assessing thalamocortical functional connectivity with Granger causality.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Maybhate, Anil; Israel, David; Thakor, Nitish V; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2013-09-01

    Assessment of network connectivity across multiple brain regions is critical to understanding the mechanisms underlying various neurological disorders. Conventional methods for assessing dynamic interactions include cross-correlation and coherence analysis. However, these methods do not reveal the direction of information flow, which is important for studying the highly directional neurological system. Granger causality (GC) analysis can characterize the directional influences between two systems. We tested GC analysis for its capability to capture directional interactions within both simulated and in vivo neural networks. The simulated networks consisted of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons; GC analysis was used to estimate the causal influences between two model networks. Our analysis successfully detected asymmetrical interactions between these networks ( , t -test). Next, we characterized the relationship between the "electrical synaptic strength" in the model networks and interactions estimated by GC analysis. We demonstrated the novel application of GC to monitor interactions between thalamic and cortical neurons following ischemia induced brain injury in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA). We observed that during the post-CA acute period the GC interactions from the thalamus to the cortex were consistently higher than those from the cortex to the thalamus ( 1.983±0.278 times higher, p = 0.021). In addition, the dynamics of GC interactions between the thalamus and the cortex were frequency dependent. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of GC to monitor the dynamics of thalamocortical interactions after a global nervous system injury such as CA-induced ischemia, and offers preferred alternative applications in characterizing other inter-regional interactions in an injured brain.

  5. Prestimulus functional connectivity determines pain perception in humans.

    PubMed

    Ploner, Markus; Lee, Michael C; Wiech, Katja; Bingel, Ulrike; Tracey, Irene

    2010-01-05

    Pain is a highly subjective experience that can be substantially influenced by differences in individual susceptibility as well as personality. How susceptibility to pain and personality translate to brain activity is largely unknown. Here, we report that the functional connectivity of two key brain areas before a sensory event reflects the susceptibility to a subsequent noxious stimulus being perceived as painful. Specifically, the prestimulus connectivity among brain areas related to the subjective perception of the body and to the modulation of pain (anterior insular cortex and brainstem, respectively) determines whether a noxious event is perceived as painful. Further, these effects of prestimulus connectivity on pain perception covary with pain-relevant personality traits. More anxious and pain-attentive individuals display weaker descending connectivity to pain modulatory brain areas. We conclude that variations in functional connectivity underlie personality-related differences in individual susceptibility to pain.

  6. Bayesian Estimation of Conditional Independence Graphs Improves Functional Connectivity Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Hinne, Max; Janssen, Ronald J.; Heskes, Tom; van Gerven, Marcel A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Functional connectivity concerns the correlated activity between neuronal populations in spatially segregated regions of the brain, which may be studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This coupled activity is conveniently expressed using covariance, but this measure fails to distinguish between direct and indirect effects. A popular alternative that addresses this issue is partial correlation, which regresses out the signal of potentially confounding variables, resulting in a measure that reveals only direct connections. Importantly, provided the data are normally distributed, if two variables are conditionally independent given all other variables, their respective partial correlation is zero. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic generative model that allows us to estimate functional connectivity in terms of both partial correlations and a graph representing conditional independencies. Simulation results show that this methodology is able to outperform the graphical LASSO, which is the de facto standard for estimating partial correlations. Furthermore, we apply the model to estimate functional connectivity for twenty subjects using resting-state fMRI data. Results show that our model provides a richer representation of functional connectivity as compared to considering partial correlations alone. Finally, we demonstrate how our approach can be extended in several ways, for instance to achieve data fusion by informing the conditional independence graph with data from probabilistic tractography. As our Bayesian formulation of functional connectivity provides access to the posterior distribution instead of only to point estimates, we are able to quantify the uncertainty associated with our results. This reveals that while we are able to infer a clear backbone of connectivity in our empirical results, the data are not accurately described by simply looking at the mode of the distribution over connectivity. The implication of this is that

  7. EEG Signatures of Dynamic Functional Network Connectivity States.

    PubMed

    Allen, E A; Damaraju, E; Eichele, T; Wu, L; Calhoun, V D

    2017-02-22

    The human brain operates by dynamically modulating different neural populations to enable goal directed behavior. The synchrony or lack thereof between different brain regions is thought to correspond to observed functional connectivity dynamics in resting state brain imaging data. In a large sample of healthy human adult subjects and utilizing a sliding windowed correlation method on functional imaging data, earlier we demonstrated the presence of seven distinct functional connectivity states/patterns between different brain networks that reliably occur across time and subjects. Whether these connectivity states correspond to meaningful electrophysiological signatures was not clear. In this study, using a dataset with concurrent EEG and resting state functional imaging data acquired during eyes open and eyes closed states, we demonstrate the replicability of previous findings in an independent sample, and identify EEG spectral signatures associated with these functional network connectivity changes. Eyes open and eyes closed conditions show common and different connectivity patterns that are associated with distinct EEG spectral signatures. Certain connectivity states are more prevalent in the eyes open case and some occur only in eyes closed state. Both conditions exhibit a state of increased thalamocortical anticorrelation associated with reduced EEG spectral alpha power and increased delta and theta power possibly reflecting drowsiness. This state occurs more frequently in the eyes closed state. In summary, we find a link between dynamic connectivity in fMRI data and concurrently collected EEG data, including a large effect of vigilance on functional connectivity. As demonstrated with EEG and fMRI, the stationarity of connectivity cannot be assumed, even for relatively short periods.

  8. ToolConnect: A Functional Connectivity Toolbox for In vitro Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Vito Paolo; Poli, Daniele; Godjoski, Aleksandar; Martinoia, Sergio; Massobrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of in vitro reduced models of neuronal networks to investigate the interplay between structural-functional connectivity and the emerging collective dynamics is a widely accepted approach. In this respect, a relevant advance for this kind of studies has been given by the recent introduction of high-density large-scale Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) which have favored the mapping of functional connections and the recordings of the neuronal electrical activity. Although, several toolboxes have been implemented to characterize network dynamics and derive functional links, no specifically dedicated software for the management of huge amount of data and direct estimation of functional connectivity maps has been developed. toolconnect offers the implementation of up to date algorithms and a user-friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) to analyze recorded data from large scale networks. It has been specifically conceived as a computationally efficient open-source software tailored to infer functional connectivity by analyzing the spike trains acquired from in vitro networks coupled to MEAs. In the current version, toolconnect implements correlation- (cross-correlation, partial-correlation) and information theory (joint entropy, transfer entropy) based core algorithms, as well as useful and practical add-ons to visualize functional connectivity graphs and extract some topological features. In this work, we present the software, its main features and capabilities together with some demonstrative applications on hippocampal recordings. PMID:27065841

  9. ToolConnect: A Functional Connectivity Toolbox for In vitro Networks.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Vito Paolo; Poli, Daniele; Godjoski, Aleksandar; Martinoia, Sergio; Massobrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of in vitro reduced models of neuronal networks to investigate the interplay between structural-functional connectivity and the emerging collective dynamics is a widely accepted approach. In this respect, a relevant advance for this kind of studies has been given by the recent introduction of high-density large-scale Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) which have favored the mapping of functional connections and the recordings of the neuronal electrical activity. Although, several toolboxes have been implemented to characterize network dynamics and derive functional links, no specifically dedicated software for the management of huge amount of data and direct estimation of functional connectivity maps has been developed. toolconnect offers the implementation of up to date algorithms and a user-friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) to analyze recorded data from large scale networks. It has been specifically conceived as a computationally efficient open-source software tailored to infer functional connectivity by analyzing the spike trains acquired from in vitro networks coupled to MEAs. In the current version, toolconnect implements correlation- (cross-correlation, partial-correlation) and information theory (joint entropy, transfer entropy) based core algorithms, as well as useful and practical add-ons to visualize functional connectivity graphs and extract some topological features. In this work, we present the software, its main features and capabilities together with some demonstrative applications on hippocampal recordings.

  10. The structure of Airy's stress function in multiply connected regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grioli, Giusippe

    1951-01-01

    In solving two-dimensional problems using Airy's stress function for multiply connected regions, the form of the function depends on the dislocations and boundary forces present. The structure of Airy's function is shown to consist of a part expressible in terms of boundary forces and a part expressible in the manner of Poincare. Meanings of the constants occurring in Poincare's expression are discussed.

  11. Estimation of dynamic functional connectivity using Multiplication of Temporal Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shine, James M; Koyejo, Oluwasanmi; Bell, Peter T; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Gilat, Moran; Poldrack, Russell A

    2015-11-15

    Functional connectivity provides an informative and powerful framework for exploring brain organization. Despite this, few statistical methods are available for the accurate estimation of dynamic changes in functional network architecture. To date, the majority of existing statistical techniques have assumed that connectivity structure is stationary, which is in direct contrast to emerging data that suggests that the strength of connectivity between regions is variable over time. Therefore, the development of statistical methods that enable exploration of dynamic changes in functional connectivity is currently of great importance to the neuroscience community. In this paper, we introduce the 'Multiplication of Temporal Derivatives' (MTD) and then demonstrate the utility of this metric to: (i) detect dynamic changes in connectivity using data from a novel state-switching simulation; (ii) accurately estimate graph structure in a previously-described 'ground-truth' simulated dataset; and (iii) identify task-driven alterations in functional connectivity. We show that the MTD is more sensitive than existing sliding-window methods in detecting dynamic alterations in connectivity structure across a range of correlation strengths and window lengths in simulated data. In addition to the temporal precision offered by MTD, we demonstrate that the metric is also able to accurately estimate stationary network structure in both simulated and real task-based data, suggesting that the method may be used to identify dynamic changes in network structure as they evolve through time.

  12. Advanced Connectivity Analysis (ACA): a Large Scale Functional Connectivity Data Mining Environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Nixon, Erika; Herskovits, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to study functional connectivity is of great importance to understand normal development and function as well as a host of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Seed-based analysis is one of the most widely used rs-fMRI analysis methods. Here we describe a freely available large scale functional connectivity data mining software package called Advanced Connectivity Analysis (ACA). ACA enables large-scale seed-based analysis and brain-behavior analysis. It can seamlessly examine a large number of seed regions with minimal user input. ACA has a brain-behavior analysis component to delineate associations among imaging biomarkers and one or more behavioral variables. We demonstrate applications of ACA to rs-fMRI data sets from a study of autism.

  13. Clarifying the anatomy of hearts with concordant ventriculo-arterial connections but abnormally related arterial trunks.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Gulati, Gurpreet S; Henry, G William; Spicer, Diane E; Backer, Carl L; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Hearts in which the arterial trunks arise from the morphologically appropriate ventricles, but in a parallel manner, rather than the usual spiralling arrangement, have long fascinated anatomists. These rare entities, for quite some time, were considered embryological impossibilities, but ongoing experience has shown that they can be found in various segmental combinations. Problems still exist about how best to describe them, as the different variants are often described with esoteric terms, such as anatomically corrected malposition or isolated ventricular inversion. In this review, based on our combined clinical and morphological experience, we demonstrate that the essential feature of all hearts described in this manner is a parallel arrangement of the arterial trunks as they exit from the ventricular mass. We show that the relationship of the arterial roots needs to be described in terms of the underlying ventricular topology, rather than according to the arrangement of the atrial chambers. We then discuss the importance of determining atrial arrangement on the basis of the morphology of the appendages, following the precepts as set out in the so-called "morphological method" and distinguished according to the extent of the pectinate muscles relative to the atrioventricular junctions as opposed to basing diagnosis on the venoatrial connections. We show that, when approached in this manner, the various combinations can be readily diagnosed in the clinical setting and described in straightforward way.

  14. Altered Functional Connectivity in Essential Tremor: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D; Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Manzanedo, Eva; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix; Posada, Ignacio; Rocon, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Essential tremor (ET) has been associated with a spectrum of clinical features, with both motor and nonmotor elements, including cognitive deficits. We employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess whether brain networks that might be involved in the pathogenesis of nonmotor manifestations associated with ET are altered, and the relationship between abnormal connectivity and ET severity and neuropsychological function.Resting-state fMRI data in 23 ET patients (12 women and 11 men) and 22 healthy controls (HC) (12 women and 10 men) were analyzed using independent component analysis, in combination with a "dual-regression" technique, to identify the group differences of resting-state networks (RSNs) (default mode network [DMN] and executive, frontoparietal, sensorimotor, cerebellar, auditory/language, and visual networks). All participants underwent a neuropsychological and neuroimaging session, where resting-state data were collected.Relative to HC, ET patients showed increased connectivity in RSNs involved in cognitive processes (DMN and frontoparietal networks) and decreased connectivity in the cerebellum and visual networks. Changes in network integrity were associated not only with ET severity (DMN) and ET duration (DMN and left frontoparietal network), but also with cognitive ability. Moreover, in at least 3 networks (DMN and frontoparietal networks), increased connectivity was associated with worse performance on different cognitive domains (attention, executive function, visuospatial ability, verbal memory, visual memory, and language) and depressive symptoms. Further, in the visual network, decreased connectivity was associated with worse performance on visuospatial ability.ET was associated with abnormal brain connectivity in major RSNs that might be involved in both motor and nonmotor symptoms. Our findings underscore the importance of examining RSNs in this population as a biomarker of disease.

  15. Abnormal Amygdalar Activation and Connectivity in Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Jonathan; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Maia, Tiago V.; Mechling, Anna; Oh, Milim; Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Emotional reactivity is one of the most disabling symptoms associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We aimed to identify neural substrates associated with emotional reactivity and to assess the effects of stimulants on those substrates. Method: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess neural…

  16. Insulin Resistance-Associated Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity Alterations in T2DM: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenqing; Wang, Shaohua; Spaeth, Andrea M.; Rao, Hengyi; Wang, Pin; Yang, Yue; Huang, Rong; Cai, Rongrong; Sun, Haixia

    2015-01-01

    We aim to investigate whether decreased interhemispheric functional connectivity exists in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). In addition, we sought to determine whether interhemispheric functional connectivity deficits associated with cognition and insulin resistance (IR) among T2DM patients. We compared the interhemispheric resting state functional connectivity of 32 T2DM patients and 30 healthy controls using rs-fMRI. Partial correlation coefficients were used to detect the relationship between rs-fMRI information and cognitive or clinical data. Compared with healthy controls, T2DM patients showed bidirectional alteration of functional connectivity in several brain regions. Functional connectivity values in the middle temporal gyrus (MTG) and in the superior frontal gyrus were inversely correlated with Trail Making Test-B score of patients. Notably, insulin resistance (log homeostasis model assessment-IR) negatively correlated with functional connectivity in the MTG of patients. In conclusion, T2DM patients exhibit abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity in several default mode network regions, particularly in the MTG, and such alteration is associated with IR. Alterations in interhemispheric functional connectivity might contribute to cognitive dysfunction in T2DM patients. PMID:26064945

  17. Linking Functional Connectivity and Structural Connectivity Quantitatively: A Comparison of Methods.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiqing; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-03-01

    Structural connectivity in the brain is the basis of functional connectivity. Quantitatively linking the two, however, remains a challenge. For a pair of regions of interest (ROIs), anatomical connections derived from diffusion-weighted imaging are often quantified by fractional anisotropy (FA) or edge weight, whereas functional connections, derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, can be characterized by non-time-series measures such as zero-lag cross correlation and partial correlation, as well as by time-series measures such as coherence and Granger causality. In this study, we addressed the question of linking structural connectivity and functional connectivity quantitatively by considering two pairs of ROIs, one from the default mode network (DMN) and the other from the central executive network (CEN), using two different data sets. Selecting (1) posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex of the DMN as the first pair of ROIs and (2) left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex and left inferior parietal lobule of the CEN as the second pair of ROIs, we show that (1) zero-lag cross correlation, partial correlation, and pairwise Granger causality were not significantly correlated with either mean FA or edge weight and (2) conditional Granger causality (CGC) was significantly correlated with edge weight but not with mean FA. These results suggest that (1) edge weight may be a more appropriate measure to quantify the strength of the anatomical connection between ROIs and (2) CGC, which statistically removes common input and the indirect influences between a given ROI pair, may be a more appropriate measure to quantify the strength of the functional interaction enabled by the fibers linking the two ROIs.

  18. Microstructural and functional connectivity in the developing preterm brain.

    PubMed

    Lubsen, Julia; Vohr, Betty; Myers, Eliza; Hampson, Michelle; Lacadie, Cheryl; Schneider, Karen C; Katz, Karol H; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2011-02-01

    Prematurely born children are at increased risk for cognitive deficits, but the neurobiological basis of these findings remains poorly understood. Because variations in neural circuitry may influence performance on cognitive tasks, recent investigations have explored the impact of preterm birth on connectivity in the developing brain. Diffusion tensor imaging studies demonstrate widespread alterations in fractional anisotropy, a measure of axonal integrity and microstructural connectivity, throughout the developing preterm brain. Functional connectivity studies report that preterm neonates, children and adolescents exhibit alterations in both resting state and task-based connectivity when compared with term control subjects. Taken together, these data suggest that neurodevelopmental impairment following preterm birth may represent a disease of neural connectivity.

  19. Hyper-connectivity of functional networks for brain disease diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Biao; Wee, Chong-Yaw

    2017-01-01

    Exploring structural and functional interactions among various brain regions enables better understanding of pathological underpinnings of neurological disorders. Brain connectivity network, as a simplified representation of those structural and functional interactions, has been widely used for diagnosis and classification of neurodegenerative diseases, especially for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and its early stage - mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the conventional functional connectivity network is usually constructed based on the pairwise correlation among different brain regions and thus ignores their higher-order relationships. Such loss of high-order information could be important for disease diagnosis, since neurologically a brain region predominantly interacts with more than one other brain regions. Accordingly, in this paper, we propose a novel framework for estimating the hyper-connectivity network of brain functions and then use this hyper-network for brain disease diagnosis. Here, the functional connectivity hyper-network denotes a network where each of its edges representing the interactions among multiple brain regions (i.e., an edge can connect with more than two brain regions), which can be naturally represented by a hyper-graph. Specifically, we first construct connectivity hyper-networks from the resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) time series by using sparse representation. Then, we extract three sets of brain-region specific features from the connectivity hyper-networks, and further exploit a manifold regularized multi-task feature selection method to jointly select the most discriminative features. Finally, we use multi-kernel support vector machine (SVM) for classification. The experimental results on both MCI dataset and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) dataset demonstrate that, compared with the conventional connectivity network-based methods, the proposed method can not only improve the classification performance, but also

  20. Abnormal structural connectivity between the basal ganglia, thalamus, and frontal cortex in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ling; Xie, Qiuyou; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Ruibin; Ma, Qing; Wang, Junjing; Jiang, Wenjie; He, Yanbin; Chen, Yan; Li, Changhong; Ni, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Qin; Yu, Ronghao; Huang, Ruiwang

    2017-03-10

    Consciousness loss in patients with severe brain injuries is associated with reduced functional connectivity of the default mode network (DMN), fronto-parietal network, and thalamo-cortical network. However, it is still unclear if the brain white matter connectivity between the above mentioned networks is changed in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). In this study, we collected diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from 13 patients and 17 healthy controls, constructed whole-brain white matter (WM) structural networks with probabilistic tractography. Afterward, we estimated and compared topological properties, and revealed an altered structural organization in the patients. We found a disturbance in the normal balance between segregation and integration in brain structural networks and detected significantly decreased nodal centralities primarily in the basal ganglia and thalamus in the patients. A network-based statistical analysis detected a subnetwork with uniformly significantly decreased structural connections between the basal ganglia, thalamus, and frontal cortex in the patients. Further analysis indicated that along the WM fiber tracts linking the basal ganglia, thalamus, and frontal cortex, the fractional anisotropy was decreased and the radial diffusivity was increased in the patients compared to the controls. Finally, using the receiver operating characteristic method, we found that the structural connections within the NBS-derived component that showed differences between the groups demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity (>90%). Our results suggested that major consciousness deficits in DOC patients may be related to the altered WM connections between the basal ganglia, thalamus, and frontal cortex.

  1. Functional connectivity of paired default mode network subregions in primary insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xiao; Shao, Yi; Liu, Si-yu; Li, Hai-jun; Wan, Ai-lan; Nie, Si; Peng, De-chang; Dai, Xi-jian

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to explore the resting-state functional connectivity (FC) differences between the paired default mode network (DMN) subregions in patients with primary insomnia (PIs). Methods Forty-two PIs and forty-two age- and sex-matched good sleepers (GSs) were recruited. All subjects underwent the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The seed-based region-to-region FC method was used to evaluate the abnormal connectivity within the DMN subregions between the PIs and the GSs. Pearson correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationships between the abnormal FC strength within the paired DMN subregions and the clinical features in PIs. Results Compared with the GSs, the PIs showed higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale score, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score, Self-Rating Depression Scale score, Self Rating Anxiety Scale score, Self-Rating Scale of Sleep score, and Profile of Mood States score (P<0.001). Compared with the GSs, the PIs showed significant decreased region-to-region FC between the medial prefrontal cortex and the right medial temporal lobe (t=−2.275, P=0.026), and between the left medial temporal lobe and the left inferior parietal cortices (t=−3.32, P=0.001). The abnormal FC strengths between the DMN subregions did not correlate with the clinical features. Conclusion PIs showed disrupted FC within the DMN subregions. PMID:26719693

  2. Online detection of low-frequency functional connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, Scott J.; LaConte, Stephen M.; Hu, Xiaoping

    2004-04-01

    Synchronized oscillations in resting state timecourses have been detected in recent fMRI studies. These oscillations are low frequency in nature (<0.08 Hz), and seem to be a property of symmetric cortices. These fluctuations are important as a pontential signal of interest, which could indicate connectivity between functionally related areas of the brain. It has also been shown that the synchronized oscillations decrease in some spontaneous pathological states (such as cocaine injection). Thus, detection of these functional connectivity patterns may help to serve as a guage of normal brain activity. Currently, functional connectivity detection is applied only in offline post-processing analysis. Online detection methods have been applied to detect task activation in functional MRI. This allows real-time analysis of fMRI results, and could be important in detecting short-term changes in functional states. In this work, we develop an outline algorithm to detect low frequency resting state functional connectivity in real time. This will extend connectivity analysis to allow online detection of changes in "resting state" brain networks.

  3. Functional Connectivity of the Dorsal Striatum in Female Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shoji; Kirino, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal striatum (caudate/putamen) is a node of the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical (CSPTC) motor circuit, which plays a central role in skilled motor learning, a critical feature of musical performance. The dorsal striatum receives input from a large part of the cerebral cortex, forming a hub in the cortical-subcortical network. This study sought to examine how the functional network of the dorsal striatum differs between musicians and nonmusicians. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired from female university students majoring in music and nonmusic disciplines. The data were subjected to functional connectivity analysis and graph theoretical analysis. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that compared with nonmusicians, musicians had significantly decreased connectivity between the left putamen and bilateral frontal operculum (FO) and between the left caudate nucleus and cerebellum. The graph theoretical analysis of the entire brain revealed that the degrees, which represent the numbers of connections, of the bilateral putamen were significantly lower in musicians than in nonmusicians. In conclusion, compared with nonmusicians, female musicians have a smaller functional network of the dorsal striatum with decreased connectivity. These data are consistent with previous anatomical studies reporting a reduced volume of the dorsal striatum in musicians and ballet dancers, suggesting that long-term musical training reshapes the functional network of the dorsal striatum to be less extensive or selective. PMID:27148025

  4. Etiologic factors in long-term respiratory function abnormalities following esophageal atresia repair.

    PubMed

    LeSouëf, P N; Myers, N A; Landau, L I

    1987-10-01

    Recurrent respiratory illnesses are frequent in infants following repair of esophageal atresia and functional abnormalities of respiratory and esophageal function are often seen in older children. Recurrent aspiration is a potential cause of these respiratory abnormalities, but a relationship between abnormalities of gastrointestinal and respiratory mechanics has not been adequately investigated. We sought an association between lower esophageal sphincter (LES) incompetence, gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and respiratory function abnormalities in 18 subjects (age 12 to 21 years) following repair of esophageal atresia (Vogt type 111B). In each subject, measurements were made of spirometry, lung volumes assessed by plethysmography, esophageal manometry recorded using a constantly infused fluid-filled trilumen catheter to assess LES pressure and esophageal motility, and esophageal pH monitoring to detect GER. Subjects were grouped according to the presence or absence of a radiologically supported diagnosis of pneumonia in the first 4 years of life. Lung volumes were mildly but significantly decreased in the "pneumonia" group compared with the "nonpneumonia" group. There was no association between abnormalities of respiratory function and abnormal LES pressure or the presence of GER. These data suggest that pneumonia in esophageal atresia infants is associated with mild long-term lung damage. LES dysfunction and GER do not appear to play a major role in this process.

  5. Measuring functional connectivity using MEG: Methodology and comparison with fcMRI

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Matthew J.; Hale, Joanne R.; Zumer, Johanna M.; Stevenson, Claire M.; Francis, Susan T.; Barnes, Gareth R.; Owen, Julia P.; Morris, Peter G.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2011-01-01

    Functional connectivity (FC) between brain regions is thought to be central to the way in which the brain processes information. Abnormal connectivity is thought to be implicated in a number of diseases. The ability to study FC is therefore a key goal for neuroimaging. Functional connectivity (fc) MRI has become a popular tool to make connectivity measurements but the technique is limited by its indirect nature. A multimodal approach is therefore an attractive means to investigate the electrodynamic mechanisms underlying hemodynamic connectivity. In this paper, we investigate resting state FC using fcMRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG). In fcMRI, we exploit the advantages afforded by ultra high magnetic field. In MEG we apply envelope correlation and coherence techniques to source space projected MEG signals. We show that beamforming provides an excellent means to measure FC in source space using MEG data. However, care must be taken when interpreting these measurements since cross talk between voxels in source space can potentially lead to spurious connectivity and this must be taken into account in all studies of this type. We show good spatial agreement between FC measured independently using MEG and fcMRI; FC between sensorimotor cortices was observed using both modalities, with the best spatial agreement when MEG data are filtered into the β band. This finding helps to reduce the potential confounds associated with each modality alone: while it helps reduce the uncertainties in spatial patterns generated by MEG (brought about by the ill posed inverse problem), addition of electrodynamic metric confirms the neural basis of fcMRI measurements. Finally, we show that multiple MEG based FC metrics allow the potential to move beyond what is possible using fcMRI, and investigate the nature of electrodynamic connectivity. Our results extend those from previous studies and add weight to the argument that neural oscillations are intimately related to functional

  6. Small-world topology of functional connectivity in randomly connected dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Hlinka, J; Hartman, D; Paluš, M

    2012-09-01

    Characterization of real-world complex systems increasingly involves the study of their topological structure using graph theory. Among global network properties, small-world property, consisting in existence of relatively short paths together with high clustering of the network, is one of the most discussed and studied. When dealing with coupled dynamical systems, links among units of the system are commonly quantified by a measure of pairwise statistical dependence of observed time series (functional connectivity). We argue that the functional connectivity approach leads to upwardly biased estimates of small-world characteristics (with respect to commonly used random graph models) due to partial transitivity of the accepted functional connectivity measures such as the correlation coefficient. In particular, this may lead to observation of small-world characteristics in connectivity graphs estimated from generic randomly connected dynamical systems. The ubiquity and robustness of the phenomenon are documented by an extensive parameter study of its manifestation in a multivariate linear autoregressive process, with discussion of the potential relevance for nonlinear processes and measures.

  7. Prenatal stress alters amygdala functional connectivity in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Lacadie, Cheryl; Sze, Gordon; Sinha, Rajita; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal and early-life stress results in alterations in neural connectivity and an increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. In particular, alterations in amygdala connectivity have emerged as a common effect across several recent studies. However, the impact of prenatal stress exposure on the functional organization of the amygdala has yet to be explored in the prematurely-born, a population at high risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. We test the hypothesis that preterm birth and prenatal exposure to maternal stress alter functional connectivity of the amygdala using two independent cohorts. The first cohort is used to establish the effects of preterm birth and consists of 12 very preterm neonates and 25 term controls, all without prenatal stress exposure. The second is analyzed to establish the effects of prenatal stress exposure and consists of 16 extremely preterm neonates with prenatal stress exposure and 10 extremely preterm neonates with no known prenatal stress exposure. Standard resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and seed connectivity methods are used. When compared to term controls, very preterm neonates show significantly reduced connectivity between the amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the brainstem, and the insula (p < 0.05). Similarly, when compared to extremely preterm neonates without exposure to prenatal stress, extremely preterm neonates with exposure to prenatal stress show significantly less connectivity between the left amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, and the peristriate cortex (p < 0.05). Exploratory analysis of the combined cohorts suggests additive effects of prenatal stress on alterations in amygdala connectivity associated with preterm birth. Functional connectivity from the amygdala to other subcortical regions is decreased in preterm neonates compared to term controls. In addition, these data, for the first time, suggest that prenatal stress exposure amplifies these

  8. BOLD signal and functional connectivity associated with loving kindness meditation.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2014-05-01

    Loving kindness is a form of meditation involving directed well-wishing, typically supported by the silent repetition of phrases such as "may all beings be happy," to foster a feeling of selfless love. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the neural substrate of loving kindness meditation in experienced meditators and novices. We first assessed group differences in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal during loving kindness meditation. We next used a relatively novel approach, the intrinsic connectivity distribution of functional connectivity, to identify regions that differ in intrinsic connectivity between groups, and then used a data-driven approach to seed-based connectivity analysis to identify which connections differ between groups. Our findings suggest group differences in brain regions involved in self-related processing and mind wandering, emotional processing, inner speech, and memory. Meditators showed overall reduced BOLD signal and intrinsic connectivity during loving kindness as compared to novices, more specifically in the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCu), a finding that is consistent with our prior work and other recent neuroimaging studies of meditation. Furthermore, meditators showed greater functional connectivity during loving kindness between the PCC/PCu and the left inferior frontal gyrus, whereas novices showed greater functional connectivity during loving kindness between the PCC/PCu and other cortical midline regions of the default mode network, the bilateral posterior insula lobe, and the bilateral parahippocampus/hippocampus. These novel findings suggest that loving kindness meditation involves a present-centered, selfless focus for meditators as compared to novices.

  9. Changes in functional connectivity support conscious object recognition.

    PubMed

    Imamoglu, Fatma; Kahnt, Thorsten; Koch, Christof; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2012-12-01

    What are the brain mechanisms that mediate conscious object recognition? To investigate this question, it is essential to distinguish between brain processes that cause conscious recognition of a stimulus from other correlates of its sensory processing. Previous fMRI studies have identified large-scale brain activity ranging from striate to high-level sensory and prefrontal regions associated with conscious visual perception or recognition. However, the possible role of changes in connectivity during conscious perception between these regions has only rarely been studied. Here, we used fMRI and connectivity analyses, together with 120 custom-generated, two-tone, Mooney images to directly assess whether conscious recognition of an object is accompanied by a dynamical change in the functional coupling between extrastriate cortex and prefrontal areas. We compared recognizing an object versus not recognizing it in 19 naïve subjects using two different response modalities. We find that connectivity between the extrastriate cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) increases when objects are consciously recognized. This interaction was independent of the response modality used to report conscious recognition. Furthermore, computing the difference in Granger causality between recognized and not recognized conditions reveals stronger feedforward connectivity than feedback connectivity when subjects recognized the objects. We suggest that frontal and visual brain regions are part of a functional network that supports conscious object recognition by changes in functional connectivity.

  10. Abnormal GABAergic function and negative affect in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephan F; Demeter, Elise; Phan, K Luan; Tso, Ivy F; Welsh, Robert C

    2014-03-01

    Deficits in the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system have been reported in postmortem studies of schizophrenia, and therapeutic interventions in schizophrenia often involve potentiation of GABA receptors (GABAR) to augment antipsychotic therapy and treat negative affect such as anxiety. To map GABAergic mechanisms associated with processing affect, we used a benzodiazepine challenge while subjects viewed salient visual stimuli. Fourteen stable, medicated schizophrenia/schizoaffective patients and 13 healthy comparison subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging using the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) technique while they viewed salient emotional images. Subjects received intravenous lorazepam (LRZ; 0.01 mg/kg) or saline in a single-blinded, cross-over design (two sessions separated by 1-3 weeks). A predicted group by drug interaction was noted in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) as well as right superior frontal gyrus and left and right occipital regions, such that psychosis patients showed an increased BOLD signal to LRZ challenge, rather than the decreased signal exhibited by the comparison group. A main effect of reduced BOLD signal in bilateral occipital areas was noted across groups. Consistent with the role of the dmPFC in processing emotion, state negative affect positively correlated with the response to the LRZ challenge in the dmPFC for the patients and comparison subjects. The altered response to LRZ challenge is consistent with altered inhibition predicted by postmortem findings of altered GABAR in schizophrenia. These results also suggest that negative affect in schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder is associated-directly or indirectly-with GABAergic function on a continuum with normal behavior.

  11. Functional Connectivity Density and Balance in Young Patients with Traumatic Axonal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Siugzdaite, Roma; Drijkoningen, David; Marinazzo, Daniele; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our previous study provided some evidence for the relationship between abnormal structural connectivity and poor balance performance in young traumatic axonal injury (TAI) patients. An enhanced understanding of the functional connectivity following TAI may allow targeted treatments geared toward improving brain function and postural control. Twelve patients with TAI and 28 normally developing children (aged 9–19 years) performed the sensory organization test (SOT) protocol of the EquiTest (Neurocom). All participants were scanned using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging series along with anatomical scans. We applied “functional connectivity density mapping” (FCDM), a voxel-wise data-driven method that calculates individual functional connectivity maps to obtain both short-range and long-range FCD. Findings revealed that the TAI group scored generally lower than the control group on the SOT, especially when proprioceptive feedback was compromised. Between-group maps noted significantly decreased long-range FCD in the TAI group in frontal and subcortical regions and significantly increased short-range FCD in frontal regions, left inferior parietal, and cerebellar lobules. Moreover, lower balance levels in TAI patients were associated with a lower long-range FCD in left putamen and cerebellar vermis. These findings suggest that long-range connections may be more vulnerable to TAI than short-range connections. Moreover, higher values of short-range FCD may suggest adaptive mechanisms in the TAI group. Finally, this study supports the view that FCDM is a valuable tool for selectively predicting functional motor deficits in TAI patients. PMID:25327385

  12. Mapping Functional Connectivity in Patients with Brain Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Guggisberg, Adrian G.; Honma, Susanne M.; Findlay, Anne M.; Dalal, Sarang S.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although electrophysiological measures of functional connectivity between brain areas are widely used, the spatial distribution of functional interactions as well as the disturbance introduced by focal brain lesions remains poorly understood. Based on the rationale that damaged brain tissue can be expected to be disconnected from the physiological interactions among healthy areas, this study aimed to map the functionality of brain areas according to their connectivity with other areas. METHODS Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of spontaneous cortical activity during resting state were obtained from 15 consecutive patients with focal brain lesions and from 14 healthy controls. Neural activity at each volume element (voxel) in the brain was estimated using an adaptive spatial filtering technique. For each brain voxel, the mean imaginary coherence of all its connections with other brain voxels was then caluculated as an index of functional connectivity, and the results compared across brain regions and between subjects. RESULTS The magnitude of the mean imaginary coherence of all voxels and subjects was greatest in the alpha frequency range corresponding to the human cortical idling rhythm. In healthy subjects, functionally critical brain areas such as the somatosensory and language cortices had the highest alpha coherence. When compared to healthy controls, all lesion patients had diffuse or scattered brain areas with decreased coherence. Patients with lesion-induced neurological deficits displayed decreased connectivity estimates in the corresponding brain area compared to intact contralateral regions. In tumor patients without preoperative neurological deficits, brain areas showing decreased coherence could be surgically resected without the occurrence of post-surgical deficits. CONCLUSION Resting state coherence measured with MEG is capable of mapping the functional connectivity of the brain, and can therefore offer valuable information for use in

  13. Network topology and functional connectivity disturbances precede the onset of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Deborah L.; Rubinov, Mikail; Durgerian, Sally; Mourany, Lyla; Reece, Christine; Koenig, Katherine; Bullmore, Ed; Long, Jeffrey D.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive, motor and psychiatric changes in prodromal Huntington’s disease have nurtured the emergent need for early interventions. Preventive clinical trials for Huntington’s disease, however, are limited by a shortage of suitable measures that could serve as surrogate outcomes. Measures of intrinsic functional connectivity from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging are of keen interest. Yet recent studies suggest circumscribed abnormalities in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity in prodromal Huntington’s disease, despite the spectrum of behavioural changes preceding a manifest diagnosis. The present study used two complementary analytical approaches to examine whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity in prodromal Huntington’s disease. Network topology was studied using graph theory and simple functional connectivity amongst brain regions was explored using the network-based statistic. Participants consisted of gene-negative controls (n = 16) and prodromal Huntington’s disease individuals (n = 48) with various stages of disease progression to examine the influence of disease burden on intrinsic connectivity. Graph theory analyses showed that global network interconnectivity approximated a random network topology as proximity to diagnosis neared and this was associated with decreased connectivity amongst highly-connected rich-club network hubs, which integrate processing from diverse brain regions. However, functional segregation within the global network (average clustering) was preserved. Functional segregation was also largely maintained at the local level, except for the notable decrease in the diversity of anterior insula intermodular-interconnections (participation coefficient), irrespective of disease burden. In contrast, network-based statistic analyses revealed patterns of weakened frontostriatal connections and strengthened frontal-posterior connections that evolved

  14. Abnormalities of thyroid function tests in hospital inpatients.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, M. C.; Ramsden, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Results of thyroid function tests were analysed in 199 clinically euthyroid inpatients with normal serum thyroid stimulating hormone values. Serum total triiodothyronine was less than 1.25 nmol/l in 61.8% of samples, free triiodothyronine less than 3.9 pmol/l in 57.8%, total thyroxine less than 63 nmol/l in 21.1% and free thyroxine less than 9.5 pmol/l in 17.6%. In contrast, thyroxine binding globulin ratio was below normal (less than 5) in only 5 samples. A significant positive correlation (P less than 0.001) of serum free thyroxine with total thyroxine, thyroxine/thyroxine binding globulin ratio and free triiodothyronine was present as well as a significant negative correlation (P less than 0.001) with serum thyroid stimulating hormone. There was no correlation of free thyroxine measurements with serum albumin or non-esterified fatty acid concentrations. Although serum free thyroxine is low in a number of patients with non-thyroidal illnesses, this does not appear to be due to a rise in non-esterified fatty acids or a fall in albumin as has been proposed. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone measurements are essential to confirm the diagnosis of hypothyroidism in such subjects. PMID:4070117

  15. Globus Pallidus Interna in Tourette Syndrome: Decreased Local Activity and Disrupted Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Gong-Jun; Liao, Wei; Yu, Yang; Miao, Huan-Huan; Feng, Yi-Xuan; Wang, Kai; Feng, Jian-Hua; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Globus pallidus interna (GPi) is an effective deep brain stimulation site for the treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS), and plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of TS. To investigate the functional network feature of GPi in TS patients, we retrospectively studied 24 boys with ‘pure’ TS and 32 age-/education-matched healthy boys by resting state functional magnetic resonance images. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and functional connectivity were used to estimate the local activity in GPi and its functional coordinate with the whole brain regions, respectively. We found decreased ALFF in patients’ bilateral GPi, which was also negatively correlated with clinical symptoms. Functional connectivity analysis indicated abnormal regions within motor and motor-control networks in patients (inferior part of sensorimotor area, cerebellum, prefrontal cortex, cingulate gyrus, caudate nucleus, and brain stem). Transcranial magnetic stimulation sites defined by previous studies (“hand knob” area, premotor area, and supplementary motor area) did not show significantly different functional connectivity with GPi between groups. In summary, this study characterized the disrupted functional network of GPi and provided potential regions-of-interest for further basic and clinical studies on TS. PMID:27799898

  16. Cortical brain connectivity evaluated by graph theory in dementia: a correlation study between functional and structural data.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Curcio, Giuseppe; Altavilla, Riccardo; Scrascia, Federica; Giambattistelli, Federica; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Bramanti, Placido; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2015-01-01

    A relatively new approach to brain function in neuroscience is the "functional connectivity", namely the synchrony in time of activity in anatomically-distinct but functionally-collaborating brain regions. On the other hand, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a recently developed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique with the capability to detect brain structural connection with fractional anisotropy (FA) identification. FA decrease has been observed in the corpus callosum of subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI, an AD prodromal stage). Corpus callosum splenium DTI abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas. This study aimed to investigate possible correlations between structural damage, measured by MRI-DTI, and functional abnormalities of brain integration, measured by characteristic path length detected in resting state EEG source activity (40 participants: 9 healthy controls, 10 MCI, 10 mild AD, 11 moderate AD). For each subject, undirected and weighted brain network was built to evaluate graph core measures. eLORETA lagged linear connectivity values were used as weight of the edges of the network. Results showed that callosal FA reduction is associated to a loss of brain interhemispheric functional connectivity characterized by increased delta and decreased alpha path length. These findings suggest that "global" (average network shortest path length representing an index of how efficient is the information transfer between two parts of the network) functional measure can reflect the reduction of fiber connecting the two hemispheres as revealed by DTI analysis and also anticipate in time this structural loss.

  17. Functional Connectivity Disruption in Neonates with Prenatal Marijuana Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Grewen, Karen; Salzwedel, Andrew P.; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal marijuana exposure (PME) is linked to neurobehavioral and cognitive impairments; however, findings in childhood and adolescence are inconsistent. Type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) modulate fetal neurodevelopment, mediating PME effects on growth of functional circuitry sub-serving behaviors critical for academic and social success. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of prenatal marijuana on development of early brain functional circuitry prior to prolonged postnatal environmental influences. We measured resting state functional connectivity during unsedated sleep in infants at 2–6 weeks (+MJ: 20 with PME in combination with nicotine, alcohol, opiates, and/or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors; −MJ: 23 exposed to the same other drugs without marijuana, CTR: 20 drug-free controls). Connectivity of subcortical seed regions with high fetal CB1R expression was examined. Marijuana-specific differences were observed in insula and three striatal connections: anterior insula–cerebellum, right caudate–cerebellum, right caudate–right fusiform gyrus/inferior occipital, left caudate–cerebellum. +MJ neonates had hypo-connectivity in all clusters compared with −MJ and CTR groups. Altered striatal connectivity to areas involved in visual spatial and motor learning, attention, and in fine-tuning of motor outputs involved in movement and language production may contribute to neurobehavioral deficits reported in this at-risk group. Disrupted anterior insula connectivity may contribute to altered integration of interoceptive signals with salience estimates, motivation, decision-making, and later drug use. Compared with CTRs, both +MJ and −MJ groups demonstrated hyper-connectivity of left amygdala seed with orbital frontal cortex and hypo-connectivity of posterior thalamus seed with hippocampus, suggesting vulnerability to multiple drugs in these circuits. PMID:26582983

  18. Altered brain functional connectivity in relation to perception of scrutiny in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Mónica; Pujol, Jesús; Ortiz, Hector; Soriano-Mas, Carles; López-Solà, Marina; Farré, Magí; Deus, Joan; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Martín-Santos, Rocio

    2012-06-30

    Although the fear of being scrutinized by others in a social context is a key symptom in social anxiety disorder (SAD), the neural processes underlying the perception of scrutiny have not previously been studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We used fMRI to map brain activation during a perception-of-scrutiny task in 20 SAD patients and 20 controls. A multi-dimensional analytic approach was used. Scrutiny perception was mediated by activation of the medial frontal cortex, insula-operculum region and cerebellum, and the additional recruitment of visual areas and the thalamus in patients. Between-group comparison demonstrated significantly enhanced brain activation in patients in the primary visual cortex and cerebellum. Functional connectivity mapping demonstrated an abnormal connectivity between regions underlying general arousal and attention. SAD patients showed significantly greater task-induced functional connectivity in the thalamo-cortical and the fronto-striatal circuits. A statistically significant increase in task-induced functional connectivity between the anterior cingulate cortex and scrutiny-perception-related regions was observed in the SAD patients, suggesting the existence of enhanced behavior-inhibitory control. The presented data indicate that scrutiny perception in SAD enhances brain activity in arousal-attention systems, suggesting that fMRI may be a useful tool to explore such a behavioral dimension.

  19. Functional connectivity changes in second language vocabulary learning.

    PubMed

    Ghazi Saidi, Ladan; Perlbarg, Vincent; Marrelec, Guillaume; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélani; Benali, Habib; Ansaldo, Ana-Inés

    2013-01-01

    Functional connectivity changes in the language network (Price, 2010), and in a control network involved in second language (L2) processing (Abutalebi & Green, 2007) were examined in a group of Persian (L1) speakers learning French (L2) words. Measures of network integration that characterize the global integrative state of a network (Marrelec, Bellec et al., 2008) were gathered, in the shallow and consolidation phases of L2 vocabulary learning. Functional connectivity remained unchanged across learning phases for L1, whereas total, between- and within-network integration levels decreased as proficiency for L2 increased. The results of this study provide the first functional connectivity evidence regarding the dynamic role of the language processing and cognitive control networks in L2 learning (Abutalebi, Cappa, & Perani, 2005; Altarriba & Heredia, 2008; Leonard et al., 2011; Parker-Jones et al., 2011). Thus, increased proficiency results in a higher degree of automaticity and lower cognitive effort (Segalowitz & Hulstijn, 2005).

  20. Multi-neuronal activity and functional connectivity in cell assemblies.

    PubMed

    Roudi, Yasser; Dunn, Benjamin; Hertz, John

    2015-06-01

    Our ability to collect large amounts of data from many cells has been paralleled by the development of powerful statistical models for extracting information from this data. Here we discuss how the activity of cell assemblies can be analyzed using these models, focusing on the generalized linear models and the maximum entropy models and describing a number of recent studies that employ these tools for analyzing multi-neuronal activity. We show results from simulations comparing inferred functional connectivity, pairwise correlations and the real synaptic connections in simulated networks demonstrating the power of statistical models in inferring functional connectivity. Further development of network reconstruction techniques based on statistical models should lead to more powerful methods of understanding functional anatomy of cell assemblies.

  1. Amygdala Functional Connectivity is Reduced After the Cold Pressor Task

    PubMed Central

    Clewett, David; Schoeke, Andrej; Mather, Mara

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala forms a crucial link between central pain and stress systems. There is much evidence that psychological stress affects amygdala activity, but it is less clear how painful stressors influence subsequent amygdala functional connectivity. In the present study, we used pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) to investigate differences in healthy male adults’ resting-state amygdala functional connectivity following a cold pressor versus control task, with the stressor and control conditions conducted on different days. During the period of peak cortisol response to acute stress (approximately fifteen to thirty minutes after stressor onset), participants were asked to rest for six minutes with their eyes closed during a PASL scanning sequence. The cold pressor task led to reduced resting-state functional connectivity between the amygdalae and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC), which occurred irrespective of cortisol release. The stressor also induced greater inverse connectivity between the left amygdala and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), a brain region implicated in the down-regulation of amygdala responsivity. Furthermore, the degree of post-stressor left amygdala decoupling with the lateral OFC varied according to self-reported pain intensity during the cold pressor task. These findings indicate that the cold pressor task alters amygdala interactions with prefrontal and ACC regions 15–30 minutes after the stressor, and that these altered functional connectivity patterns are related to pain perception rather than cortisol feedback. PMID:23645370

  2. Amygdala functional connectivity is reduced after the cold pressor task.

    PubMed

    Clewett, David; Schoeke, Andrej; Mather, Mara

    2013-09-01

    The amygdala forms a crucial link between central pain and stress systems. Previous research indicates that psychological stress affects amygdala activity, but it is less clear how painful stressors influence subsequent amygdala functional connectivity. In the present study, we used pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) to investigate differences in healthy male adults' resting-state amygdala functional connectivity following a cold pressor versus a control task, with the stressor and control conditions being conducted on different days. During the period of peak cortisol response to acute stress (approximately 15-30 min after stressor onset), participants were asked to rest for 6 min with their eyes closed during a PASL scanning sequence. The cold pressor task led to reduced resting-state functional connectivity between the amygdalae and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and this occurred irrespective of cortisol release. The stressor also induced greater inverse connectivity between the left amygdala and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a brain region implicated in the down-regulation of amygdala responsivity. Furthermore, the degree of poststressor left amygdala decoupling with the lateral OFC varied according to self-reported pain intensity during the cold pressor task. These findings indicate that the cold pressor task alters amygdala interactions with prefrontal and ACC regions 15-30 min after the stressor, and that these altered functional connectivity patterns are related to pain perception rather than cortisol feedback.

  3. The functional logic of cortico-pulvinar connections.

    PubMed

    Shipp, S

    2003-10-29

    The pulvinar is an 'associative' thalamic nucleus, meaning that most of its input and output relationships are formed with the cerebral cortex. The function of this circuitry is little understood and its anatomy, though much investigated, is notably recondite. This is because pulvinar connection patterns disrespect the architectural subunits (anterior, medial, lateral and inferior pulvinar nuclei) that have been the traditional reference system. This article presents a simplified, global model of the organization of cortico-pulvinar connections so as to pursue their structure-function relationships. Connections between the cortex and pulvinar are topographically organized, and as a result the pulvinar contains a 'map' of the cortical sheet. However, the topography is very blurred. Hence the pulvinar connection zones of nearby cortical areas overlap, allowing indirect transcortical communication via the pulvinar. A general observation is that indirect cortico-pulvino-cortical circuits tend to mimic direct cortico-cortical pathways: this is termed 'the replication principle'. It is equally apt for certain pairs (or groups) of nearby cortical areas that happen not to connect with each other. The 'replication' of this non-connection is achieved by discontinuities and dislocations of the cortical topography within the pulvinar, such that the associated pair of connection zones do not overlap. Certain of these deformations can be used to divide the global cortical topography into specific sub-domains, which form the natural units of a connectional subdivision of the pulvinar. A substantial part of the pulvinar also expresses visual topography, reflecting visual maps in occipital cortex. There are just two well-ordered visual maps in the pulvinar, that both receive projections from area V1, and several other occipital areas; the resulting duplication of cortical topography means that each visual map also acts as a separate connection domain. In summary, the model

  4. Network-based analysis reveals stronger local diffusion-based connectivity and different correlations with oral language skills in brains of children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai; Xue, Zhong; Ellmore, Timothy M; Frye, Richard E; Wong, Stephen T C

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimaging has uncovered both long-range and short-range connectivity abnormalities in the brains of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the precise connectivity abnormalities and the relationship between these abnormalities and cognition and ASD symptoms have been inconsistent across studies. Indeed, studies find both increases and decreases in connectivity, suggesting that connectivity changes in the ASD brain are not merely due to abnormalities in specific connections, but rather, due to changes in the structure of the network in which the brain areas interact (i.e., network topology). In this study, we examined the differences in the network topology between high-functioning ASD patients and age and gender matched typically developing (TD) controls. After quantitatively characterizing the whole-brain connectivity network using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data, we searched for brain regions with different connectivity between ASD and TD. A measure of oral language ability was then correlated with the connectivity changes to determine the functional significance of such changes. Whole-brain connectivity measures demonstrated greater local connectivity and shorter path length in ASD as compared to TD. Stronger local connectivity was found in ASD, especially in regions such as the left superior parietal lobule, the precuneus and angular gyrus, and the right supramarginal gyrus. The relationship between oral language ability and local connectivity within these regions was significantly different between ASD and TD. Stronger local connectivity was associated with better performance in ASD and poorer performance in TD. This study supports the notion that increased local connectivity is compensatory for supporting cognitive function in ASD.

  5. Functional connectivity when detecting rare visual targets in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Amy M; Lee, Junghee; Green, Michael F; Wynn, Jonathan K

    2017-03-30

    Individuals with schizophrenia demonstrate difficulties in attending to important stimuli (e.g., targets) and ignoring distractors (e.g., non-targets). We used a visual oddball task during fMRI to examine functional connectivity within and between the ventral and dorsal attention networks to determine the relative contribution of each network to detection of rare visual targets in schizophrenia. The sample comprised 25 schizophrenia patients and 27 healthy controls. Psychophysiological interaction analysis was used to examine whole-brain functional connectivity in response to targets. We used the right temporo parietal junction (TPJ) as the seed region for the ventral network and the right medial intraparietal sulcus (IPS) as the seed region for the dorsal network. We found that connectivity between right IPS and right anterior insula (AI; a component of the ventral network) was significantly greater in controls than patients. Expected patterns of within- and between-network connectivity for right TPJ were observed in controls, and not significantly different in patients. These findings indicate functional connectivity deficits between the dorsal and ventral attention networks in schizophrenia that may create problems in processing relevant versus irrelevant stimuli. Understanding the nature of network disruptions underlying cognitive deficits of schizophrenia may help shed light on the pathophysiology of this disorder.

  6. Bayesian network models in brain functional connectivity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2013-01-01

    Much effort has been made to better understand the complex integration of distinct parts of the human brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Altered functional connectivity between brain regions is associated with many neurological and mental illnesses, such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, addiction, and depression. In computational science, Bayesian networks (BN) have been used in a broad range of studies to model complex data set in the presence of uncertainty and when expert prior knowledge is needed. However, little is done to explore the use of BN in connectivity analysis of fMRI data. In this paper, we present an up-to-date literature review and methodological details of connectivity analyses using BN, while highlighting caveats in a real-world application. We present a BN model of fMRI dataset obtained from sixty healthy subjects performing the stop-signal task (SST), a paradigm widely used to investigate response inhibition. Connectivity results are validated with the extant literature including our previous studies. By exploring the link strength of the learned BN’s and correlating them to behavioral performance measures, this novel use of BN in connectivity analysis provides new insights to the functional neural pathways underlying response inhibition. PMID:24319317

  7. Abnormal platelet von Willebrand factor (vWF) as a marker of abnormal function in megakaryocytic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    de Cataldo, F; Baudo, F; Redaelli, R; Corno, A R

    1995-03-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are neoplastic disorders of the hemopoietic system; multilineage involvement is also evidenced by specific cellular dysfunctions. The von Willebrand factor (vWF), synthesized and processed in the megakaryocytes (MK), is stored in the alpha granules of the platelets. The platelet vWF multimeric pattern was studied in 18 patients with MDS, and in 4 with pernicious anemia (PA), to investigate whether the processing of vWF is abnormal in the megakaryocytic dysplasia. An abnormal multimeric pattern was observed in 10/18 MDS and 4/4 PA patients. The abnormality of this specific protein is the discrete expression of the basic disorder, and is reversible when hemopoiesis is normalized. Although the data do not allow any conclusion, abnormal synthesis is the likely explantation of the abnormality.

  8. Reduced Hippocampal Functional Connectivity During Episodic Memory Retrieval in Autism.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Rose A; Richter, Franziska R; Bays, Paul M; Plaisted-Grant, Kate C; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Simons, Jon S

    2017-02-01

    Increasing recent research has sought to understand the recollection impairments experienced by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here, we tested whether these memory deficits reflect a reduction in the probability of retrieval success or in the precision of memory representations. We also used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the neural mechanisms underlying memory encoding and retrieval in ASD, focusing particularly on the functional connectivity of core episodic memory networks. Adults with ASD and typical control participants completed a memory task that involved studying visual displays and subsequently using a continuous dial to recreate their appearance. The ASD group exhibited reduced retrieval success, but there was no evidence of a difference in retrieval precision. fMRI data revealed similar patterns of brain activity and functional connectivity during memory encoding in the 2 groups, though encoding-related lateral frontal activity predicted subsequent retrieval success only in the control group. During memory retrieval, the ASD group exhibited attenuated lateral frontal activity and substantially reduced hippocampal connectivity, particularly between hippocampus and regions of the fronto-parietal control network. These findings demonstrate notable differences in brain function during episodic memory retrieval in ASD and highlight the importance of functional connectivity to understanding recollection-related retrieval deficits in this population.

  9. A Multivariate Granger Causality Concept towards Full Brain Functional Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christoph; Pester, Britta; Schmid-Hertel, Nicole; Witte, Herbert; Wismüller, Axel; Leistritz, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Detecting changes of spatially high-resolution functional connectivity patterns in the brain is crucial for improving the fundamental understanding of brain function in both health and disease, yet still poses one of the biggest challenges in computational neuroscience. Currently, classical multivariate Granger Causality analyses of directed interactions between single process components in coupled systems are commonly restricted to spatially low- dimensional data, which requires a pre-selection or aggregation of time series as a preprocessing step. In this paper we propose a new fully multivariate Granger Causality approach with embedded dimension reduction that makes it possible to obtain a representation of functional connectivity for spatially high-dimensional data. The resulting functional connectivity networks may consist of several thousand vertices and thus contain more detailed information compared to connectivity networks obtained from approaches based on particular regions of interest. Our large scale Granger Causality approach is applied to synthetic and resting state fMRI data with a focus on how well network community structure, which represents a functional segmentation of the network, is preserved. It is demonstrated that a number of different community detection algorithms, which utilize a variety of algorithmic strategies and exploit topological features differently, reveal meaningful information on the underlying network module structure.

  10. Altered resting-state functional connectivity of the insula in young adults with Internet gaming disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Tao; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Zang, Yu-Feng; Shen, Zi-Jiao; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ling-Jiao; Liu, Ben; Fang, Xiao-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The insula has been implicated in salience processing, craving, and interoception, all of which are critical to the clinical manifestations of drug and behavioral addiction. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we examined resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the insula and its association with Internet gaming characteristics in 74 young adults with Internet gaming disorder (IGD) and 41 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects (HCs). In comparison with HCs, IGD subjects (IGDs) exhibited enhanced rsFC between the anterior insula and a network of regions including anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), putamen, angular gyrus, and precuneous, which are involved in salience, craving, self-monitoring, and attention. IGDs also demonstrated significantly stronger rsFC between the posterior insula and postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplemental motor area, and superior temporal gyrus (STG), which are involved in interoception, movement control, and auditory processing. Furthermore, IGD severity was positively associated with connectivity between the anterior insula and angular gyrus, and STG, and with connectivity between the posterior insula and STG. Duration of Internet gaming was positively associated with connectivity between the anterior insula and ACC. These findings highlight a key role of the insula in manifestation of the core symptoms of IGD and the importance to examine functional abnormalities of the anterior and posterior insula separately in IGDs.

  11. Alterations of functional connectivity and intrinsic activity within the cingulate cortex of suicidal ideators.

    PubMed

    Chase, Henry W; Segreti, Anna Maria; Keller, Timothy A; Cherkassky, Vladimir L; Just, Marcel A; Pan, Lisa A; Brent, David A

    2017-04-01

    The 'default mode network' (DMN), a collection of brain regions including the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), shows reliable inter-regional functional connectivity at rest. It has been implicated in rumination and other negative affective states, but its role in suicidal ideation is not well understood. We employed seed based functional connectivity methods to analyze resting state fMRI data in 34 suicidal ideators and 40 healthy control participants. Whole-brain connectivity with dorsal PCC or ventral PCC was broadly intact between the two groups, but while the control participants showed greater coupling between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and dorsal PCC, compared to the dACC and ventral PCC, this difference was reversed in the ideators. Furthermore, ongoing low frequency BOLD signal in these three regions (dorsal, ventral PCC, dACC) was reduced in the ideators. The structural integrity of the cingulum bundle, as measured using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), also explained variation in the functional connectivity measures but did not abolish the group differences. Together, these findings provide evidence of abnormalities in the DMN underlying the tendency towards suicidal ideation.

  12. Methylphenidate Modulates Functional Network Connectivity to Enhance Attention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Hsu, Wei-Ting; Scheinost, Dustin; Finn, Emily S.; Shen, Xilin; Constable, R. Todd; Li, Chiang-Shan R.; Chun, Marvin M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that human whole-brain functional connectivity patterns measured with fMRI contain information about cognitive abilities, including sustained attention. To derive behavioral predictions from connectivity patterns, our group developed a connectome-based predictive modeling (CPM) approach (Finn et al., 2015; Rosenberg et al., 2016). Previously using CPM, we defined a high-attention network, comprising connections positively correlated with performance on a sustained attention task, and a low-attention network, comprising connections negatively correlated with performance. Validating the networks as generalizable biomarkers of attention, models based on network strength at rest predicted attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in an independent group of individuals (Rosenberg et al., 2016). To investigate whether these networks play a causal role in attention, here we examined their strength in healthy adults given methylphenidate (Ritalin), a common ADHD treatment, compared with unmedicated controls. As predicted, individuals given methylphenidate showed patterns of connectivity associated with better sustained attention: higher high-attention and lower low-attention network strength than controls. There was significant overlap between the high-attention network and a network with greater strength in the methylphenidate group, and between the low-attention network and a network with greater strength in the control group. Network strength also predicted behavior on a stop-signal task, such that participants with higher go response rates showed higher high-attention and lower low-attention network strength. These results suggest that methylphenidate acts by modulating functional brain networks related to sustained attention, and that changing whole-brain connectivity patterns may help improve attention. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Recent work identified a promising neuromarker of sustained attention based on whole

  13. Aberrant regional neural fluctuations and functional connectivity in generalized anxiety disorder revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Hou, Jingming; Qian, Shaowen; Liu, Kai; Li, Bo; Li, Min; Peng, Zhaohui; Xin, Kuolin; Sun, Gang

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the neural activity and functional connectivity in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) during resting state, and how these alterations correlate to patients' symptoms. Twenty-eight GAD patients and 28 matched healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) scans. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) were computed to explore regional activity and functional integration, and were compared between the two groups using the voxel-based two-sample t test. Pearson's correlation analyses were performed to examine the neural relationships with demographics and clinical symptoms scores. Compared to controls, GAD patients showed functional abnormalities: higher ALFF in the bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex; lower connectivity in prefrontal gyrus; lower in prefrontal-limbic and cingulate RSFC and higher prefrontal-hippocampus RSFC were correlated with clinical symptoms severity, but these associations were unable to withstand correction for multiple testing. These findings may help facilitate further understanding of the potential neural substrate of GAD.

  14. Adult Age Differences in Functional Connectivity during Executive Control

    PubMed Central

    Madden, David J.; Costello, Matthew C.; Dennis, Nancy A.; Davis, Simon W.; Shepler, Anne M.; Spaniol, Julia; Bucur, Barbara; Cabeza, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Task switching requires executive control processes that undergo age-related decline. Previous neuroimaging studies have identified age-related differences in brain activation associated with global switching effects (dual-task blocks vs. single-task blocks), but age-related differences in activation during local switching effects (switch trials vs. repeat trials, within blocks) have not been investigated. This experiment used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to examine adult age differences in task switching across adjacent trials (i.e., local task switching). During fMRI scanning, participants performed a cued, word categorization task. From interspersed cue-only trials, switch-related processing associated with the cue was estimated separately from the target. Activation associated with task switching, within a distributed frontoparietal network, differed for cue- and target-related processing. The magnitude of event-related activation for task switching was similar for younger adults (n = 20; 18-27 years) and older adults (n = 20; 60-85 years), although activation sustained throughout the on-tasks periods exhibited some age-related decline. Critically, the functional connectivity of switch-related regions, during cue processing, was higher for younger adults than for older adults, whereas functional connectivity during target processing was comparable across the age groups. Further, individual differences in cue-related functional connectivity shared a substantial portion of the age-related variability in the efficiency of target categorization response (drift rate). This age-related difference in functional connectivity, however, was independent of white matter integrity within task-relevant regions. These findings highlight the functional connectivity of frontoparietal activation as a potential source of age-related decline in executive control. PMID:20434565

  15. The contribution of electrophysiology to functional connectivity mapping

    PubMed Central

    Schölvinck, Marieke L; Leopold, David A; Brookes, Matthew J; Khader, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    A powerful way to probe brain function is to assess the relationship between simultaneous changes in activity across different parts of the brain. In recent years, the temporal activity correlation between brain areas has frequently been taken as a measure of their functional connections. Evaluating ‘functional connectivity’ in this way is particularly popular in the fMRI community, but has also drawn interest among electrophysiologists. Like hemodynamic fluctuations observed with fMRI, electrophysiological signals display significant temporal fluctuations, even in the absence of a stimulus. These neural fluctuations exhibit correlational structure over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Initial evidence suggests that certain aspects of this correlational structure bear a high correspondence to so-called functional networks defined using fMRI. The growing family of methods to study activity covariation, combined with the diverse neural mechanisms that contribute to the spontaneous fluctuations, have somewhat blurred the operational concept of functional connectivity. What is clear is that spontaneous activity is a conspicuous, energy-consuming feature of the brain. Given its prominence and its practical applications for the functional connectivity mapping of brain networks, it is of increasing importance that we understand its neural origins as well as its contribution to normal brain function. PMID:23587686

  16. Functional connectivity changes in multiple sclerosis patients: a graph analytical study of MEG resting state data.

    PubMed

    Schoonheim, Menno M; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Landi, Doriana; Douw, Linda; van der Meer, Marieke L; Vrenken, Hugo; Polman, Chris H; Barkhof, Frederik; Stam, Cornelis J

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by extensive damage in the central nervous system. Within this field, there is a strong need for more advanced, functional imaging measures, as abnormalities measured with structural imaging insufficiently explain clinicocognitive decline in MS. In this study we investigated functional connectivity changes in MS using resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG). Data from 34 MS patients and 28 age and gender-matched controls was assessed using synchronization likelihood (SL) as a measure of functional interaction strength between brain regions, and graph analysis to characterize topological patterns of connectivity changes. Cognition was assessed using extensive neuropsychological evaluation. Structural measures included brain and lesion volumes, using MRI. Results show SL increases in MS patients in theta, lower alpha and beta bands, with decreases in the upper alpha band. Graph analysis revealed a more regular topology in the lower alpha band in patients, indicated by an increased path length (λ) and clustering coefficient (γ). Attention and working memory domains were impaired, with decreased brain volumes. A stepwise linear regression model using clinical, MRI and MEG parameters as predictors revealed that only increases in lower alpha band γ predicted impaired cognition. Cognitive impairments and related altered connectivity patterns were found to be especially predominant in male patients. These results show specific functional changes in MS as measured with MEG. Only changes in network topology were related to poorer cognitive outcome. This indicates the value of graph analysis beyond traditional structural and functional measures, with possible implications for diagnostic and/or prognostic purposes in MS.

  17. Functional Connectivity Changes in Second Language Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saidi, Ladan Ghazi; Perlbarg, Vincent; Marrelec, Guillaume; Pelegrini-Issac, Melani; Benali, Habib; Ansaldo, Ana-Ines

    2013-01-01

    Functional connectivity changes in the language network (Price, 2010), and in a control network involved in second language (L2) processing (Abutalebi & Green, 2007) were examined in a group of Persian (L1) speakers learning French (L2) words. Measures of network integration that characterize the global integrative state of a network (Marrelec,…

  18. Dynamic functional connectivity shapes individual differences in associative learning.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Zainab; Kovacevic, Natasha; Misic, Bratislav; McIntosh, Anthony Randal

    2016-11-01

    Current neuroscientific research has shown that the brain reconfigures its functional interactions at multiple timescales. Here, we sought to link transient changes in functional brain networks to individual differences in behavioral and cognitive performance by using an active learning paradigm. Participants learned associations between pairs of unrelated visual stimuli by using feedback. Interindividual behavioral variability was quantified with a learning rate measure. By using a multivariate statistical framework (partial least squares), we identified patterns of network organization across multiple temporal scales (within a trial, millisecond; across a learning session, minute) and linked these to the rate of change in behavioral performance (fast and slow). Results indicated that posterior network connectivity was present early in the trial for fast, and later in the trial for slow performers. In contrast, connectivity in an associative memory network (frontal, striatal, and medial temporal regions) occurred later in the trial for fast, and earlier for slow performers. Time-dependent changes in the posterior network were correlated with visual/spatial scores obtained from independent neuropsychological assessments, with fast learners performing better on visual/spatial subtests. No relationship was found between functional connectivity dynamics in the memory network and visual/spatial test scores indicative of cognitive skill. By using a comprehensive set of measures (behavioral, cognitive, and neurophysiological), we report that individual variations in learning-related performance change are supported by differences in cognitive ability and time-sensitive connectivity in functional neural networks. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3911-3928, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Real-time estimation of dynamic functional connectivity networks.

    PubMed

    Monti, Ricardo Pio; Lorenz, Romy; Braga, Rodrigo M; Anagnostopoulos, Christoforos; Leech, Robert; Montana, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Two novel and exciting avenues of neuroscientific research involve the study of task-driven dynamic reconfigurations of functional connectivity networks and the study of functional connectivity in real-time. While the former is a well-established field within neuroscience and has received considerable attention in recent years, the latter remains in its infancy. To date, the vast majority of real-time fMRI studies have focused on a single brain region at a time. This is due in part to the many challenges faced when estimating dynamic functional connectivity networks in real-time. In this work, we propose a novel methodology with which to accurately track changes in time-varying functional connectivity networks in real-time. The proposed method is shown to perform competitively when compared to state-of-the-art offline algorithms using both synthetic as well as real-time fMRI data. The proposed method is applied to motor task data from the Human Connectome Project as well as to data obtained from a visuospatial attention task. We demonstrate that the algorithm is able to accurately estimate task-related changes in network structure in real-time. Hum Brain Mapp 38:202-220, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The study of brain functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin-Lin; Wu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder primarily affecting the aging population. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying parkinsonian symptoms remain unclear. PD affects extensive neural networks and a more thorough understanding of network disruption will help bridge the gap between known pathological changes and observed clinical presentations in PD. Development of neuroimaging techniques, especially functional magnetic resonance imaging, allows for detection of the functional connectivity of neural networks in patients with PD. This review aims to provide an overview of current research involving functional network disruption in PD relating to motor and non-motor symptoms. Investigations into functional network connectivity will further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of clinical interventions, such as levodopa and deep brain stimulation treatment. In addition, identification of PD-specific neural network patterns has the potential to aid in the development of a definitive diagnosis of PD.

  1. Quantification of neural functional connectivity during an active avoidance task.

    PubMed

    Silva, Catia S; Hazrati, Mehrnaz K; Keil, Andreas; Principe, Jose C; Silva, Catia S; Hazrati, Mehrnaz K; Keil, Andreas; Principe, Jose C; Keil, Andreas; Principe, Jose C; Hazrati, Mehrnaz K; Silva, Catia S

    2016-08-01

    Many behavioral and cognitive processes are associated with spatiotemporal dynamic communication between brain areas. Thus, the quantification of functional connectivity with high temporal resolution is highly desirable for capturing in vivo brain function. However, brain functional network quantification from EEG recordings has been commonly used in a qualitative manner. In this paper, we consider pairwise dependence measures as random variables and estimate the pdf for each electrode of the arrangement. A metric imposed by the quadratic Cauchy-Schwartz Mutual Information quantifies these pdfs. We present the results by brain regions simplifying the analysis and visualization drastically. The proposed metric of functional connectivity quantification is addressed for temporal dependencies of the brain network that can be related to the task.

  2. Functional connectivity during rested wakefulness predicts vulnerability to sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Yeo, B T Thomas; Tandi, Jesisca; Chee, Michael W L

    2015-05-01

    Significant inter-individual differences in vigilance decline following sleep deprivation exist. We characterized functional connectivity in 68 healthy young adult participants in rested wakefulness and following a night of total sleep deprivation. After whole brain signal regression, functionally connected cortical networks during the well-rested state exhibited reduced correlation following sleep deprivation, suggesting that highly integrated brain regions become less integrated during sleep deprivation. In contrast, anti-correlations in the well-rested state became less so following sleep deprivation, suggesting that highly segregated networks become less segregated during sleep deprivation. Subjects more resilient to vigilance decline following sleep deprivation showed stronger anti-correlations among several networks. The weaker anti-correlations overlapped with connectivity alterations following sleep deprivation. Resilient individuals thus evidence clearer separation of highly segregated cortical networks in the well-rested state. In contrast to corticocortical connectivity, subcortical-cortical connectivity was comparable across resilient and vulnerable groups despite prominent state-related changes in both groups. Because sleep deprivation results in a significant elevation of whole brain signal amplitude, the aforesaid signal changes and group contrasts may be masked in analyses omitting their regression, suggesting possible value in regressing whole brain signal in certain experimental contexts.

  3. Functional Connectivity Hubs and Networks in the Awake Marmoset Brain

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Annabelle M.; Yen, Cecil Chern-Chyi; Notardonato, Lucia; Ross, Thomas J.; Volkow, Nora D.; Yang, Yihong; Stein, Elliot A.; Silva, Afonso C.; Tomasi, Dardo

    2016-01-01

    In combination with advances in analytical methods, resting-state fMRI is allowing unprecedented access to a better understanding of the network organization of the brain. Increasing evidence suggests that this architecture may incorporate highly functionally connected nodes, or “hubs”, and we have recently proposed local functional connectivity density (lFCD) mapping to identify highly-connected nodes in the human brain. Here, we imaged awake nonhuman primates to test whether, like the human brain, the marmoset brain contains FC hubs. Ten adult common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were acclimated to mild, comfortable restraint using individualized helmets. Following restraint training, resting BOLD data were acquired during eight consecutive 10 min scans for each subject. lFCD revealed prominent cortical and subcortical hubs of connectivity across the marmoset brain; specifically, in primary and secondary visual cortices (V1/V2), higher-order visual association areas (A19M/V6[DM]), posterior parietal and posterior cingulate areas (PGM and A23b/A31), thalamus, dorsal and ventral striatal areas (caudate, putamen, lateral septal nucleus, and anterior cingulate cortex (A24a). lFCD hubs were highly connected to widespread areas of the brain, and further revealed significant network-network interactions. These data provide a baseline platform for future investigations in a nonhuman primate model of the brain’s network topology. PMID:26973476

  4. Detection of Cardiac Function Abnormality from MRI Images Using Normalized Wall Thickness Temporal Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wael, Mai; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a method for identifying abnormal myocardial function based on studying the normalized wall motion pattern during the cardiac cycle. Methods. The temporal pattern of the normalized myocardial wall thickness is used as a feature vector to assess the cardiac wall motion abnormality. Principal component analysis is used to reduce the feature dimensionality and the maximum likelihood method is used to differentiate between normal and abnormal features. The proposed method was applied on a dataset of 27 cases from normal subjects and patients. Results. The developed method achieved 81.5%, 85%, and 88.5% accuracy for identifying abnormal contractility in the basal, midventricular, and apical slices, respectively. Conclusions. A novel feature vector, namely, the normalized wall thickness, has been introduced for detecting myocardial regional wall motion abnormality. The proposed method provides assessment of the regional myocardial contractility for each cardiac segment and slice; therefore, it could be a valuable tool for automatic and fast determination of regional wall motion abnormality from conventional cine MRI images.

  5. Reversible cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, E.L.; Firestein, G.S.; Weiss, J.L.; Heuser, R.R.; Leitl, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Brinker, J.A.; Ciuffo, A.A.; Becker, L.C.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of peripheral cold exposure on myocardial perfusion and function were studied in 13 patients with scleroderma without clinically evident myocardial disease. Ten patients had at least one transient, cold-induced, myocardial perfusion defect visualized by thallium-201 scintigraphy, and 12 had reversible, cold-induced, segmental left ventricular hypokinesis by two-dimensional echocardiography. The 10 patients with transient perfusion defects all had anatomically corresponding ventricular wall motion abnormalities. No one in either of two control groups (9 normal volunteers and 7 patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms) had cold-induced abnormalities. This study is the first to show the simultaneous occurrence of cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in patients with scleroderma. The results suggest that cold exposure in such patients may elicit transient reflex coronary vasoconstriction resulting in reversible myocardial ischemia and dysfunction. Chronic recurrent episodes of coronary spasm may lead to focal myocardial fibrosis.

  6. The effect of forced-exercise therapy for Parkinson's disease on motor cortex functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Beall, Erik B; Lowe, Mark J; Alberts, Jay L; Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Thota, Anil K; Shah, Chintan; Phillips, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurologic disorder primarily characterized by an altered motor function. Lower extremity forced exercise (FE) has been shown to reduce motor symptoms in patients with PD. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that FE and medication produce similar changes in brain activation patterns. Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) affords the ability to look at how strongly nodes of the motor circuit communicate with each other and can provide insight into the complementary effects of various therapies. Past work has demonstrated an abnormal motor connectivity in patients with PD compared to controls and subsequent normalization after treatment. Here we compare the effects of FE and medication using both resting and continuous visuomotor task fcMRI. Ten patients with mild to moderate PD completed three fMRI and fcMRI scanning sessions randomized under the following conditions: on PD medication, off PD medication, and FE+off medication. Blinded clinical ratings of motor function (a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Motor Scale-III exam) indicated that FE and medication resulted in 51% and 33% improvement in clinical ratings, respectively. In most nodes of the motor circuit, the observed changes in the functional connectivity produced by FE and medication were strongly positively correlated. These findings suggest that medication and FE likely use the same pathways to produce symptomatic relief in patients with PD. However, the connectivity changes, while consistent across therapy, were inconsistent in polarity for each patient. This finding may explain some past inconsistencies in connectivity changes after medication therapy.

  7. The Effect of Forced-Exercise Therapy for Parkinson's Disease on Motor Cortex Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Mark J.; Alberts, Jay L.; Frankemolle, Anneke M.M.; Thota, Anil K.; Shah, Chintan; Phillips, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurologic disorder primarily characterized by an altered motor function. Lower extremity forced exercise (FE) has been shown to reduce motor symptoms in patients with PD. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that FE and medication produce similar changes in brain activation patterns. Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) affords the ability to look at how strongly nodes of the motor circuit communicate with each other and can provide insight into the complementary effects of various therapies. Past work has demonstrated an abnormal motor connectivity in patients with PD compared to controls and subsequent normalization after treatment. Here we compare the effects of FE and medication using both resting and continuous visuomotor task fcMRI. Ten patients with mild to moderate PD completed three fMRI and fcMRI scanning sessions randomized under the following conditions: on PD medication, off PD medication, and FE+off medication. Blinded clinical ratings of motor function (a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Motor Scale-III exam) indicated that FE and medication resulted in 51% and 33% improvement in clinical ratings, respectively. In most nodes of the motor circuit, the observed changes in the functional connectivity produced by FE and medication were strongly positively correlated. These findings suggest that medication and FE likely use the same pathways to produce symptomatic relief in patients with PD. However, the connectivity changes, while consistent across therapy, were inconsistent in polarity for each patient. This finding may explain some past inconsistencies in connectivity changes after medication therapy. PMID:23316956

  8. Functional connectivity of the rodent brain using optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Codina, Edgar

    The aim of this thesis is to apply functional connectivity in a variety of animal models, using several optical imaging modalities. Even at rest, the brain shows high metabolic activity: the correlation in slow spontaneous fluctuations identifies remotely connected areas of the brain; hence the term "functional connectivity". Ongoing changes in spontaneous activity may provide insight into the neural processing that takes most of the brain metabolic activity, and so may provide a vast source of disease related changes. Brain hemodynamics may be modified during disease and affect resting-state activity. The thesis aims to better understand these changes in functional connectivity due to disease, using functional optical imaging. The optical imaging techniques explored in the first two contributions of this thesis are Optical Imaging of Intrinsic Signals and Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, together they can estimate the metabolic rate of oxygen consumption, that closely parallels neural activity. They both have adequate spatial and temporal resolution and are well adapted to image the convexity of the mouse cortex. In the last article, a depth-sensitive modality called photoacoustic tomography was used in the newborn rat. Optical coherence tomography and laminar optical tomography were also part of the array of imaging techniques developed and applied in other collaborations. The first article of this work shows the changes in functional connectivity in an acute murine model of epileptiform activity. Homologous correlations are both increased and decreased with a small dependence on seizure duration. These changes suggest a potential decoupling between the hemodynamic parameters in resting-state networks, underlining the importance to investigate epileptic networks with several independent hemodynamic measures. The second study examines a novel murine model of arterial stiffness: the unilateral calcification of the right carotid. Seed-based connectivity analysis

  9. Altered functional and effective connectivity in anticorrelated intrinsic networks in children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Cheng; Yang, Fei; Deng, Jiayan; Zhang, Yaodan; Hou, Changyue; Huang, Yue; Cao, Weifang; Wang, Jianjun; Xiao, Ruhui; Zeng, Nanlin; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There are 2 intrinsic networks in the human brain: the task positive network (TPN) and task negative network (alternately termed the default mode network, DMN) in which inverse correlations have been observed during resting state and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The antagonism between the 2 networks might indicate a dynamic interaction in the brain that is associated with development. To evaluate the alterations in the relations of the 2 networks in children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), resting state fMRI was performed in 17 patients with BECTS and 17 healthy controls. The functional and effective connectivities of 29 nodes in the TPN and DMN were analyzed. Positive functional connectivity (FC) within the networks and negative FC between the 2 networks were observed in both groups. The patients exhibited increased FC within both networks, particularly in the frontoparietal nodes such as the left superior frontal cortex, and enhanced antagonism between the 2 networks, suggesting abnormal functional integration of the nodes of the 2 networks in the patients. Granger causality analysis revealed a significant difference in the degree of outflow to inflow in the left superior frontal cortex and the left ventral occipital lobe. The alterations observed in the combined functional and effective connectivity analyses might indicate an association of an abnormal ability to integrate information between the DMN and TPN and the epileptic neuropathology of BECTS and provide preliminary evidence supporting the occurrence of abnormal development in children with BECTS. PMID:27310959

  10. Altered functional and effective connectivity in anticorrelated intrinsic networks in children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cheng; Yang, Fei; Deng, Jiayan; Zhang, Yaodan; Hou, Changyue; Huang, Yue; Cao, Weifang; Wang, Jianjun; Xiao, Ruhui; Zeng, Nanlin; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-06-01

    There are 2 intrinsic networks in the human brain: the task positive network (TPN) and task negative network (alternately termed the default mode network, DMN) in which inverse correlations have been observed during resting state and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The antagonism between the 2 networks might indicate a dynamic interaction in the brain that is associated with development.To evaluate the alterations in the relations of the 2 networks in children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), resting state fMRI was performed in 17 patients with BECTS and 17 healthy controls. The functional and effective connectivities of 29 nodes in the TPN and DMN were analyzed. Positive functional connectivity (FC) within the networks and negative FC between the 2 networks were observed in both groups.The patients exhibited increased FC within both networks, particularly in the frontoparietal nodes such as the left superior frontal cortex, and enhanced antagonism between the 2 networks, suggesting abnormal functional integration of the nodes of the 2 networks in the patients. Granger causality analysis revealed a significant difference in the degree of outflow to inflow in the left superior frontal cortex and the left ventral occipital lobe.The alterations observed in the combined functional and effective connectivity analyses might indicate an association of an abnormal ability to integrate information between the DMN and TPN and the epileptic neuropathology of BECTS and provide preliminary evidence supporting the occurrence of abnormal development in children with BECTS.

  11. The effects of hemodynamic lag on functional connectivity and behavior after stroke.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Joshua S; Snyder, Abraham Z; Ramsey, Lenny; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Stroke disrupts the brain's vascular supply, not only within but also outside areas of infarction. We investigated temporal delays (lag) in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in 130 stroke patients scanned two weeks, three months and 12 months post stroke onset. Thirty controls were scanned twice at an interval of three months. Hemodynamic lag was determined using cross-correlation with the global gray matter signal. Behavioral performance in multiple domains was assessed in all patients. Regional cerebral blood flow and carotid patency were assessed in subsets of the cohort using arterial spin labeling and carotid Doppler ultrasonography. Significant hemodynamic lag was observed in 30% of stroke patients sub-acutely. Approximately 10% of patients showed lag at one-year post-stroke. Hemodynamic lag corresponded to gross aberrancy in functional connectivity measures, performance deficits in multiple domains and local and global perfusion deficits. Correcting for lag partially normalized abnormalities in measured functional connectivity. Yet post-stroke FC-behavior relationships in the motor and attention systems persisted even after hemodynamic delays were corrected. Resting state fMRI can reliably identify areas of hemodynamic delay following stroke. Our data reveal that hemodynamic delay is common sub-acutely, alters functional connectivity, and may be of clinical importance.

  12. Functional connectivity changes with concentration of sevoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Scott J; Kerssens, Chantal; Hamann, Stephan B; Sebel, Peter S; Byas-Smith, Michael; Hu, Xiaoping

    2005-02-28

    Low-frequency oscillations (<0.08 Hz) have been detected in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, and appear to be synchronized between functionally related areas. The effect of anesthetic agents on cortical activity is not completely characterized. This study assessed the effect of anesthesia on the temporal relations in activity in the motor cortices. Resting-state magnetic resonance data were acquired on six volunteers under different anesthetic states (using 0.0%, 2.0% and 1.0% stable end-tidal sevoflurane). Across all volunteers, the number of significant voxels (p<2.5 x 10) in the functional connectivity maps was reduced by 78% for light anesthesia and by 98% for deep anesthesia, compared with the awake state. Additionally, significant correlations in the connectivity maps were bilateral in the awake state but unilateral in the light anesthesia state.

  13. Default Mode Functional Connectivity Is Associated With Social Functioning in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jaclyn M; Abram, Samantha V; Reilly, James L; Eack, Shaun; Goldman, Morris B; Csernansky, John G; Wang, Lei; Smith, Matthew J

    2017-03-30

    Individuals with schizophrenia display notable deficits in social functioning. Research indicates that neural connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) is related to social cognition and social functioning in healthy and clinical populations. However, the association between DMN connectivity, social cognition, and social functioning has not been studied in schizophrenia. For the present study, the authors used resting-state neuroimaging data to evaluate connectivity between the main DMN hubs (i.e., the medial prefrontal cortex [mPFC] and the posterior cingulate cortex-anterior precuneus [PPC]) in individuals with schizophrenia (n = 28) and controls (n = 32). The authors also examined whether DMN connectivity was associated with social functioning via social attainment (measured by the Specific Levels of Functioning Scale) and social competence (measured by the Social Skills Performance Assessment), and if social cognition mediates the association between DMN connectivity and these measures of social functioning. Results revealed that DMN connectivity did not differ between individuals with schizophrenia and controls. However, connectivity between the mPFC and PCC hubs was significantly associated with social competence and social attainment in individuals with schizophrenia but not in controls as reflected by a significant group-by-connectivity interaction. Social cognition did not mediate the association between DMN connectivity and social functioning in individuals with schizophrenia. The findings suggest that fronto-parietal DMN connectivity in particular may be differentially associated with social functioning in schizophrenia and controls. As a result, DMN connectivity may be used as a neuroimaging marker to monitor treatment response or as a potential target for interventions that aim to enhance social functioning in schizophrenia. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Functional Brain Network Abnormalities during Verbal Working Memory Performance in Adolescents and Young Adults with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Robert Christian; Sambataro, Fabio; Lohr, Christina; Steinbrink, Claudia; Martin, Claudia; Vasic, Nenad

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral and functional neuroimaging studies indicate deficits in verbal working memory (WM) and frontoparietal dysfunction in individuals with dyslexia. Additionally, structural brain abnormalities in dyslexics suggest a dysconnectivity of brain regions associated with phonological processing. However, little is known about the functional…

  15. Cortical functional connectivity under different auditory attentional efforts.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiangfei; Tong, Shanbao

    2012-01-01

    Auditory attentional effort (AAE) could be tuned to different levels in a top-down manner, while its neural correlates are still poorly understood. In this paper, we investigate the cortical connectivity under different levels of AAE. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded from nine subjects (male/female=6=3) in an auditory discrimination task under low or high AAE. Behavioral results showed that subjects paid more attention under high AAE and detected the probe stimuli better than low AAE. Partial directed coherence (PDC) was used to study the cortical functional connectivity within the first 300 ms post-stimulus period which includes the N100 and P200 components in the event-related potential (ERP). Majority of the cortical connections were strengthened with the increase of AAE. The right hemispheric dominance of connectivity in maintaining auditory attention was found under low AAE, which disappeared when the AAE was increased, indicating that the right hemispheric dominance previously reported might be due to a relatively lower AAE. Besides, most cortical connections under high AAE were found to be from the parietal cortex to the prefrontal cortex, which suggested the initiative role of parietal cortex in maintaining a high AAE.

  16. Altered functional connectivity related to white matter changes inside the working memory network at the very early stage of MS.

    PubMed

    Au Duong, My-Van; Audoin, Bertrand; Boulanouar, Kader; Ibarrola, Daniella; Malikova, Irina; Confort-Gouny, Sylrane; Celsis, Pierre; Pelletier, Jean; Cozzone, Patrick J; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe

    2005-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using paced auditory serial addition test (PASAT) as paradigm was used to study the functional connectivity in 18 patients at the very early stage of multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with 18 controls, to determine the existence of circuitry disturbance inside the working memory network and its relationship with white matter abnormalities assessed by conventional MRI and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging. The left BA 45/46 was selected as the seed region to compute correlation maps with other brain regions. After obtaining the correlation map for each subject, between-group comparisons were performed using random effect procedure. Compared with controls, patients did not show any greater functional connectivity between left BA 45/46 and other regions during PASAT. In contrast, decrease in functional connectivity was observed in patients between left BA 45/46 and left BA 9, right BA 3, and the anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24). In patients, no correlations were found between altered functional connectivity and clinical data. However, functional connectivity observed between left BA 45/46 and BA 24 in patients was correlated with the MTR of normal appearing white matter, and with brain T(2) lesion load. Altered functional connectivity is present inside the working memory network of patients at the very early stage of MS and is related to the extent of diffuse white matter changes.

  17. Resting Functional Connectivity of Language Networks: Characterization and Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Dardo; Volkow, Nora D.

    2011-01-01

    The neural basis of language comprehension and production has been associated with superior temporal (Wernicke’s) and inferior frontal (Broca’s) cortical areas respectively. However, recent resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) and lesion studies implicate a more extended network in language processing. Using a large RSFC dataset from 970 healthy subjects and seed regions in Broca’s and Wernicke’s we recapitulate this extended network that includes adjoining prefrontal, temporal and parietal regions but also bilateral caudate and left putamen/globus pallidus and subthalamic nucleus. We also show that the language network has predominance of short-range functional connectivity (except posterior Wernicke’s area that exhibited predominant long-range connectivity), which is consistent with reliance on local processing. Predominantly, the long-range connectivity was left lateralized (except anterior Wernicke’s area that exhibited rightward lateralization). The language network also exhibited anticorrelated activity with auditory (only for Wernickes’s area) and visual cortices that suggests integrated sequential activity with regions involved with listening or reading words. Assessment of the intra subject’s reproducibility of this network and its characterization in individuals with language dysfunction is needed to determine its potential as a biomarker for language disorders. PMID:22212597

  18. EEG functional connectivity, axon delays and white matter disease

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Paul L.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Fields, R. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Both structural and functional brain connectivities are closely linked to white matter disease. We discuss several such links of potential interest to neurologists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, and non-clinical neuroscientists. Methods Treatment of brains as genuine complex systems suggests major emphasis on the multi-scale nature of brain connectivity and dynamic behavior. Cross-scale interactions of local, regional, and global networks are apparently responsible for much of EEG's oscillatory behaviors. Finite axon propagation speed, often assumed to be infinite in local network models, is central to our conceptual framework. Results Myelin controls axon speed, and the synchrony of impulse traffic between distant cortical regions appears to be critical for optimal mental performance and learning. Results Several experiments suggest that axon conduction speed is plastic, thereby altering the regional and global white matter connections that facilitate binding of remote local networks. Conclusions Combined EEG and high resolution EEG can provide distinct multi-scale estimates of functional connectivity in both healthy and diseased brains with measures like frequency and phase spectra, covariance, and coherence. Significance White matter disease may profoundly disrupt normal EEG coherence patterns, but currently these kinds of studies are rare in scientific labs and essentially missing from clinical environments. PMID:24815984

  19. Multiple sclerosis impairs regional functional connectivity in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Kasper Winther; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne; Blinkenberg, Morten; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2014-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has been used to study changes in long-range functional brain connectivity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet little is known about how MS affects functional brain connectivity at the local level. Here we studied 42 patients with MS and 30 matched healthy controls with whole-brain rs-fMRI at 3 T to examine local functional connectivity. Using the Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance, regional homogeneity of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD)-signal fluctuations was calculated for each voxel and used as a measure of local connectivity. Patients with MS showed a decrease in regional homogeneity in the upper left cerebellar hemisphere in lobules V and VI relative to healthy controls. Similar trend changes in regional homogeneity were present in the right cerebellar hemisphere. The results indicate a disintegration of regional processing in the cerebellum in MS. This might be caused by a functional disruption of cortico-ponto-cerebellar and spino-cerebellar inputs, since patients with higher lesion load in the left cerebellar peduncles showed a stronger reduction in cerebellar homogeneity. In patients, two clusters in the left posterior cerebellum expressed a reduction in regional homogeneity with increasing global disability as reflected by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score or higher ataxia scores. The two clusters were mainly located in Crus I and extended into Crus II and the dentate nucleus but with little spatial overlap. These findings suggest a link between impaired regional integration in the cerebellum and general disability and ataxia.

  20. Variability in Cumulative Habitual Sleep Duration Predicts Waking Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Khalsa, Sakh; Mayhew, Stephen D.; Przezdzik, Izabela; Wilson, Rebecca; Hale, Joanne; Goldstone, Aimee; Bagary, Manny; Bagshaw, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: We examined whether interindividual differences in habitual sleep patterns, quantified as the cumulative habitual total sleep time (cTST) over a 2-w period, were reflected in waking measurements of intranetwork and internetwork functional connectivity (FC) between major nodes of three intrinsically connected networks (ICNs): default mode network (DMN), salience network (SN), and central executive network (CEN). Methods: Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using seed-based FC analysis combined with 14-d wrist actigraphy, sleep diaries, and subjective questionnaires (N = 33 healthy adults, mean age 34.3, standard deviation ± 11.6 y). Data were statistically analyzed using multiple linear regression. Fourteen consecutive days of wrist actigraphy in participant's home environment and fMRI scanning on day 14 at the Birmingham University Imaging Centre. Seed-based FC analysis on ICNs from resting-state fMRI data and multiple linear regression analysis performed for each ICN seed and target. cTST was used to predict FC (controlling for age). Results: cTST was specific predictor of intranetwork FC when the mesial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) region of the DMN was used as a seed for FC, with a positive correlation between FC and cTST observed. No significant relationship between FC and cTST was seen for any pair of nodes not including the MPFC. Internetwork FC between the DMN (MPFC) and SN (right anterior insula) was also predicted by cTST, with a negative correlation observed between FC and cTST. Conclusions: This study improves understanding of the relationship between intranetwork and internetwork functional connectivity of intrinsically connected networks (ICNs) in relation to habitual sleep quality and duration. The cumulative amount of sleep that participants achieved over a 14-d period was significantly predictive of intranetwork and inter-network functional connectivity of ICNs, an observation that may underlie the link

  1. Partially restored resting-state functional connectivity in women recovered from anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Ilka; Geisler, Daniel; Tam, Friederike; King, Joseph A.; Ritschel, Franziska; Seidel, Maria; Bernardoni, Fabio; Murr, Julia; Goschke, Thomas; Calhoun, Vince D.; Roessner, Veit; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background We have previously shown increased resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in the frontoparietal network (FPN) and the default mode network (DMN) in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Based on these findings we investigated within-network rsFC in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa to examine whether these abnormalities are a state or trait marker of the disease. To extend the understanding of functional connectivity in patients with anorexia nervosa, we also estimated rsFC between large-scale networks. Methods Girls and women recovered from anorexia nervosa and pair-wise, age- and sex-matched healthy controls underwent a resting-state fMRI scan. Using independent component analyses (ICA), we isolated the FPN, DMN and salience network. We used standard comparisons as well as a hypothesis-based approach to test the findings of our previous rsFC study in this recovered cohort. Temporal correlations between network time-course pairs were computed to investigate functional network connectivity (FNC). Results Thirty-one patients recovered from anorexia nervosa and 31 controls participated in our study. Standard group comparisons revealed reduced rsFC between the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and the FPN in the recovered group. Using a hypothesis-based approach we extended the previous finding of increased rsFC between the angular gyrus and the FPN in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa. No group differences in FNC were revealed. Limitations The study design did not allow us to conclude that the difference found in rsFC constitutes a scar effect of the disease. Conclusion This study suggests that some abnormal rsFC patterns found in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa normalize after long-term weight restoration, while distorted rsFC in the FPN, a network that has been associated with cognitive control, may constitute a trait marker of the disorder. PMID:27045551

  2. A spectroscopic approach toward depression diagnosis: local metabolism meets functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Demenescu, Liliana Ramona; Colic, Lejla; Li, Meng; Safron, Adam; Biswal, B; Metzger, Coraline Danielle; Li, Shijia; Walter, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Abnormal anterior insula (AI) response and functional connectivity (FC) is associated with depression. In addition to clinical features, such as severity, AI FC and its metabolism further predicted therapeutic response. Abnormal FC between anterior cingulate and AI covaried with reduced glutamate level within cingulate cortex. Recently, deficient glial glutamate conversion was found in AI in major depression disorder (MDD). We therefore postulate a local glutamatergic mechanism in insula cortex of depressive patients, which is correlated with symptoms severity and itself influences AI's network connectivity in MDD. Twenty-five MDD patients and 25 healthy controls (HC) matched on age and sex underwent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans. To determine the role of local glutamate-glutamine complex (Glx) ratio on whole brain AI FC, we conducted regression analysis with Glx relative to creatine (Cr) ratio as factor of interest and age, sex, and voxel tissue composition as nuisance factors. We found that in MDD, but not in HC, AI Glx/Cr ratio correlated positively with AI FC to right supramarginal gyrus and negatively with AI FC toward left occipital cortex (p < 0.05 family wise error). AI Glx/Cr level was negatively correlated with HAMD score (p < 0.05) in MDD patients. We showed that the local AI ratio of glutamatergic-creatine metabolism is an underlying candidate subserving functional network disintegration of insula toward low level and supramodal integration areas, in MDD. While causality cannot directly be inferred from such correlation, our finding helps to define a multilevel network of response-predicting regions based on local metabolism and connectivity strength.

  3. Disrupted functional connectivity of the periaqueductal gray in chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjun; Gollub, Randy L; Spaeth, Rosa; Napadow, Vitaly; Wasan, Ajay; Kong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common neurological disorder. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) plays a key role in the descending modulation of pain. In this study, we investigated brain resting state PAG functional connectivity (FC) differences between patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) in low pain or high pain condition and matched healthy controls (HCs). PAG seed based functional connectivity (FC) analysis of the functional MR imaging data was performed to investigate the difference among the connectivity maps in the cLBP in the low or high pain condition and HC groups as well as within the cLBP at differing endogenous back pain intensities. Results showed that FC between the PAG and the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC)/rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) increased in cLBP patients compared to matched controls. In addition, we also found significant negative correlations between pain ratings and PAG-vmPFC/rACC FC in cLBP patients after pain-inducing maneuver. The duration of cLBP was negatively correlated with PAG-insula and PAG-amygdala FC before pain-inducing maneuver in the patient group. These findings are in line with the impairments of the descending pain modulation reported in patients with cLBP. Our results provide evidence showing that cLBP patients have abnormal FC in PAG centered pain modulation network during rest.

  4. Disrupted functional connectivity of the periaqueductal gray in chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rongjun; Gollub, Randy L.; Spaeth, Rosa; Napadow, Vitaly; Wasan, Ajay; Kong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common neurological disorder. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) plays a key role in the descending modulation of pain. In this study, we investigated brain resting state PAG functional connectivity (FC) differences between patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) in low pain or high pain condition and matched healthy controls (HCs). PAG seed based functional connectivity (FC) analysis of the functional MR imaging data was performed to investigate the difference among the connectivity maps in the cLBP in the low or high pain condition and HC groups as well as within the cLBP at differing endogenous back pain intensities. Results showed that FC between the PAG and the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC)/rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) increased in cLBP patients compared to matched controls. In addition, we also found significant negative correlations between pain ratings and PAG–vmPFC/rACC FC in cLBP patients after pain-inducing maneuver. The duration of cLBP was negatively correlated with PAG–insula and PAG–amygdala FC before pain-inducing maneuver in the patient group. These findings are in line with the impairments of the descending pain modulation reported in patients with cLBP. Our results provide evidence showing that cLBP patients have abnormal FC in PAG centered pain modulation network during rest. PMID:25379421

  5. Continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation affects brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Dan Cao; Yingjie Li; Ling Wei; Yingying Tang

    2016-08-01

    Prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays an important role in the emotional processing as well as in the functional brain network. Hyperactivity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) would be found in anxious participants. However, it is still unclear what the role of PFC played in a resting functional network. Continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (cTBS) is an effective tool to create virtual lesions on brain regions. In this paper, we applied cTBS over right prefrontal area, and investigated the effects of cTBS on the brain activity for functional connectivity by the method of graph theory. We recorded 64-channels EEG on thirteen healthy participants in the resting condition and emotional tasks before and after 40 s of cTBS. This work focused on the effect of cTBS on cortical activities in the resting condition by calculating the coherence between EEG channels and building functional networks before and after cTBS in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands. Results revealed that 1) The functional connectivity after cTBS was significantly increased compared with that before cTBS in delta, theta, alpha and beta bands in the resting condition; 2) The efficiency-cost reached the maximum before and after cTBS both with the cost about 0.3 in the bands above, which meant that the information transmission of functional brain network with this cost was highly efficient; 3) the clustering coefficient and path length after cTBS was significantly increased in delta, theta and beta bands. In conclusion, cTBS over PFC indeed enhanced the functional connectivity in the resting condition. In addition, the information transmission in the resting brain network was highly efficient with the cost about 0.3.

  6. Changed crossmodal functional connectivity in older adults with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Thiel, Christiane M

    2017-01-01

    Previous work compellingly demonstrates a crossmodal plastic reorganization of auditory cortex in deaf individuals, leading to increased neural responses to non-auditory sensory input. Recent data indicate that crossmodal adaptive plasticity is not restricted to severe hearing impairments, but may also occur as a result of high-frequency hearing loss in older adults and affect audiovisual processing in these subjects. We here used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the effect of hearing loss in older adults on auditory cortex response patterns as well as on functional connectivity between auditory and visual cortex during audiovisual processing. Older participants with a varying degree of high frequency hearing loss performed an auditory stimulus categorization task, in which they had to categorize frequency-modulated (FM) tones presented alone or in the context of matching or non-matching visual motion. A motion only condition served as control for a visual take-over of auditory cortex. While the individual hearing status did not affect auditory cortex responses to auditory, visual, or audiovisual stimuli, we observed a significant hearing loss-related increase in functional connectivity between auditory cortex and the right motion-sensitive visual area MT+ when processing matching audiovisual input. Hearing loss also modulated resting state connectivity between right area MT+ and parts of the left auditory cortex, suggesting the existence of permanent, task-independent changes in coupling between visual and auditory sensory areas with an increasing degree of hearing loss. Our data thus indicate that hearing loss impacts on functional connectivity between sensory cortices in older adults.

  7. Cross-hemispheric functional connectivity in the human fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Moriah E; Dassanayake, Maya T; Shen, Stephen; Katkuri, Yashwanth; Alexis, Mitchell; Anderson, Amy L; Yeo, Lami; Mody, Swati; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Hassan, Sonia S; Studholme, Colin; Jeong, Jeong-Won; Romero, Roberto

    2013-02-20

    Compelling evidence indicates that psychiatric and developmental disorders are generally caused by disruptions in the functional connectivity (FC) of brain networks. Events occurring during development, and in particular during fetal life, have been implicated in the genesis of such disorders. However, the developmental timetable for the emergence of neural FC during human fetal life is unknown. We present the results of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging performed in 25 healthy human fetuses in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy (24 to 38 weeks of gestation). We report the presence of bilateral fetal brain FC and regional and age-related variation in FC. Significant bilateral connectivity was evident in half of the 42 areas tested, and the strength of FC between homologous cortical brain regions increased with advancing gestational age. We also observed medial to lateral gradients in fetal functional brain connectivity. These findings improve understanding of human fetal central nervous system development and provide a basis for examining the role of insults during fetal life in the subsequent development of disorders in neural FC.

  8. Cross-hemispheric functional connectivity in the human fetal brain

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, ME; Dassanayake, MT; Shen, S; Katkuri, Y; Alexis, M; Anderson, AL; Yeo, L; Mody, S; Hernandez-Andrade, E; Hassan, SS; Studholme, C; Jeong, JW; Romero, R

    2013-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that psychiatric and developmental disorders are generally caused by disruptions in the functional connectivity (FC) of brain networks. Events occurring during development, and in particular during fetal life, have been implicated in the genesis of such disorders. However, the developmental timetable for the emergence of neural FC during human fetal life is unknown. We present the results of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging performed in 25 healthy human fetuses in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy (24 to 38 weeks of gestation). We report the presence of bilateral fetal brain FC and regional and age-related variation in FC. Significant bilateral connectivity was evident in half of the 42 areas tested, and the strength of FC between homologous cortical brain regions increased with advancing gestational age. We also observed medial to lateral gradients in fetal functional brain connectivity. These findings improve understanding of human fetal central nervous system development and provide a basis for examining the role of insults during fetal life in the subsequent development of disorders in neural FC. PMID:23427244

  9. Functional and structural connectivity within a recently burned drainage basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wester, Thad; Wasklewicz, Thad; Staley, Dennis

    2014-02-01

    Studies examining post-wildfire sediment transport have often focused on changes to individual landscape compartments (planar slopes, rills, gullies, channels, or alluvial fans) or have captured coarse-scale hydrologic and sediment transport events at the drainage basin scale. We advance the understanding of functional and structural connectivity by quantifying changes of the morphodynamics of and sediment transport along seven rill-gully threads (RGTs) after two low intensity rainstorms in a burned basin from the 2008 Gap fire near Goleta, CA, USA. TLS surveys conducted within two months of the initial fire and three days after the rainfall events provide point clouds for high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs). DTM differencing techniques and morphological sediment budgets from the RGTs showed discontinuous sediment transport along the extent of these two landscape compartments immediately after the rainfall. Surface runoff was unable to remove dry ravel deposits within the RGTs and implied a high degree of structural disconnectivity there. Dry ravel and runoff erosion from the contributing areas to the RGTs indicated functional and structural connectivity at this scale of analysis. The results provide clear evidence that small amounts of rainfall and gravity-induced erosion are interacting at different scales within the recently burned watershed to produce structural and functional disconnectivity along the RGTs. While the current system was transport-limited during the analyzed event, higher magnitude rainstorms may produce enhanced connectivity, resulting in the ability of surface runoff to remove the stored sediments and perhaps produce debris flows.

  10. Decreased functional connectivity density in pain-related brain regions of female migraine patients without aura.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qing; Xu, Fei; Jiang, Cui; Chen, Zhifeng; Chen, Huafu; Liao, Huaqiang; Zhao, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Migraine is one of the most prevalent neurological disorders which is suggested to be associated with dysfunctions of the central nervous system. The purpose of the present study was to detect the altered functional connectivity architecture in the large-scale network of the whole brain in migraine without aura (MWoA). Meanwhile, the brain functional hubs which are targeted by MWoA could be identified. A new voxel-based method named functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping was applied to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 55 female MWoA patients and 44 age-matched female healthy controls (HC). Comparing to HC, MWoA patients showed abnormal short-range FCD values in bilateral hippocampus, bilateral insula, right amygdale, right anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral putamen, bilateral caudate nucleus and the prefrontal cortex. The results suggested decreased intraregional connectivity of these pain-related brain regions in female MWoA. In addition, short-range FCD values in left prefrontal cortex, putamen and caudate nucleus were significantly negatively correlated with duration of disease in MWoA group, implying the repeated migraine attacks over time may consistently affect the resting-state functional connectivity architecture of these brain hubs. Our findings revealed the dysfunction of brain hubs in female MWoA, and suggested the left prefrontal cortex, putamen and caudate nucleus served as sensitive neuroimaging markers for reflecting the disease duration of female MWoA. This may provide us new insights into the changes in the organization of the large-scale brain network in MWoA.

  11. Functional connectivity of parietal cortex during temporal selective attention.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Sarah C; Dasgupta, Samhita; Agosta, Sara; Battelli, Lorella; Grossman, Emily D

    2015-04-01

    Perception of natural experiences requires allocation of attention towards features, objects, and events that are moving and changing over time. This allocation of attention is controlled by large-scale brain networks that, when damaged, cause widespread cognitive deficits. In particular, damage to ventral parietal cortex (right lateralized TPJ, STS, supramarginal and angular gyri) is associated with failures to selectively attend to and isolate features embedded within rapidly changing visual sequences (Battelli, Pascual-Leone, & Cavanagh, 2007; Husain, Shapiro, Martin, & Kennard, 1997). In this study, we used fMRI to investigate the neural activity and functional connectivity of intact parietal cortex while typical subjects judged the relative onsets and offsets of rapidly flickering tokens (a phase discrimination task in which right parietal patients are impaired). We found two regions in parietal cortex correlated with task performance: a bilateral posterior TPJ (pTPJ) and an anterior right-lateralized TPJ (R aTPJ). Both regions were deactivated when subjects engaged in the task but showed different patterns of functional connectivity. The bilateral pTPJ was strongly connected to nodes within the default mode network (DMN) and the R aTPJ was connected to the attention network. Accurate phase discriminations were associated with increased functional correlations between sensory cortex (hMT+) and the bilateral pTPJ, whereas accuracy on a control task was associated with yoked activity in the hMT+ and the R aTPJ. We conclude that temporal selective attention is particularly sensitive for revealing information pathways between sensory and core cognitive control networks that, when damaged, can lead to nonspatial attention impairments in right parietal stroke patients.

  12. Interoceptive awareness changes the posterior insula functional connectivity profile.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Esther; Mueller, Karsten; Lohmann, Gabriele; Schuetz-Bosbach, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Interoceptive awareness describes the ability to consciously perceive inner bodily signals, such as one's own heartbeat. The right anterior insula is assumed to mediate this ability. The role of the posterior insula, particularly posterior-to-anterior insula signal flows is less clear in this respect. We scanned 27 healthy people with either high or low interoceptive awareness using 3T fMRI, while they either monitored their own heartbeats, or external tones, respectively. We used a combination of network centrality and bivariate connectivity analyses to characterize changes in cortical signal flows between the posterior insula and the anterior insula during interoceptive awareness or exteroceptive awareness, respectively. We show that heartbeat monitoring was accompanied by reduced network centrality of the right posterior insula, and decreased functional connectivity strengths between the right posterior insula and the right mid and anterior insula. In addition, decreased signal flows between the right posterior insula and the bilateral anterior cingulate cortices, and the bilateral orbitofrontal cortices were observed during interoceptive awareness. Functional connectivity changes were only shown by people with high interoceptive awareness, and occurred specifically within the low-frequency range (i.e., <0.1 Hz). Both groups did not differ in their functional connectivity profiles during rest. Our results show for the first time that interoceptive awareness changes intra-insula signal flows in the low-frequency range. We speculate that the selective inhibition of slow signal progression along the posterior-to-anterior insula pathway during interoceptive awareness allows the salient and noiseless detection of one's own heartbeat.

  13. Functional Connectivity of EEG Signals Under Laser Stimulation in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    de Tommaso, Marina; Trotta, Gabriele; Vecchio, Eleonora; Ricci, Katia; Van de Steen, Frederik; Montemurno, Anna; Lorenzo, Marta; Marinazzo, Daniele; Bellotti, Roberto; Stramaglia, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies, migraine patients showed abnormalities in pain-related evoked responses, as reduced habituation to repetitive stimulation. In this study, we aimed to apply a novel analysis of EEG bands synchronization and directed dynamical influences under painful stimuli in migraine patients compared to non-migraine healthy volunteers. Thirty-one migraine without aura outpatients (MIGR) were evaluated and compared to 19 controls (CONT). The right hand was stimulated by means of 30 consecutive CO2 laser stimuli. EEG signal was examined by means of Morlet wavelet, synchronization entropy (SE), and Granger causality (GC), and the statistically validated results were mapped on the corresponding scalp locations. The vertex complex of averaged laser-evoked responses (LEPs) showed reduced habituation compared to CONT. In the prestimulus phase, enhanced SE in the 0, 5–30 Hz range was present in MIGR and CONT between the bilateral temporal–parietal and the frontal regions around the midline. Migraine patients showed an anticipation of EEG changes preceding the painful stimulation compared to CONT. In the poststimulus phase, the same cortical areas were more connected in MIGR vs CONT. In both groups of patients and CONT, the habituation index was negatively correlated with the GC scores. A different pattern of cortical activation after painful stimulation was present in migraine. The increase in cortical connections during repetitive painful stimulation may subtend the phenomenon of LEPs reduced habituation. Brain network analysis may give an aid in understanding subtle changes of pain processing under laser stimuli in migraine patients. PMID:26635589

  14. Resting-State Functional Connectivity Differences in Premature Children

    PubMed Central

    Damaraju, Eswar; Phillips, John R.; Lowe, Jean R.; Ohls, Robin; Calhoun, Vince D.; Caprihan, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    We examine the coherence in the spontaneous brain activity of sleeping children as measured by the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals. The results are described in terms of resting-state networks (RSN) and their properties. More specifically, in this study we examine the effect of severe prematurity on the spatial location of the visual, temporal, motor, basal ganglia, and the default mode networks, the temporal response properties of each of these networks, and the functional connectivity between them. Our results suggest that the anatomical locations of the RSNs are well developed by 18 months of age and their spatial locations are not distinguishable between premature and term born infants at 18 months or at 36 months, with the exception of small spatial differences noted in the basal ganglia area and the visual cortex. The two major differences between term and pre-term children were present at 36 but not 18 months and include: (1) increased spectral energy in the low frequency range (0.01–0.06 Hz) for pre-term children in the basal ganglia component, and (2) stronger connectivity between RSNs in term children. We speculate that children born very prematurely are vulnerable to injury resulting in weaker connectivity between resting-state networks by 36 months of age. Further work is required to determine whether this could be a clinically useful tool to identify children at risk of developmental delay related to premature birth. PMID:20725534

  15. Impact of language on functional connectivity for audiovisual speech integration

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Jun; Hiroe, Nobuo; Sato, Masa-aki; Nagamine, Takashi; Sekiyama, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Visual information about lip and facial movements plays a role in audiovisual (AV) speech perception. Although this has been widely confirmed, previous behavioural studies have shown interlanguage differences, that is, native Japanese speakers do not integrate auditory and visual speech as closely as native English speakers. To elucidate the neural basis of such interlanguage differences, 22 native English speakers and 24 native Japanese speakers were examined in behavioural or functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) experiments while mono-syllabic speech was presented under AV, auditory-only, or visual-only conditions for speech identification. Behavioural results indicated that the English speakers identified visual speech more quickly than the Japanese speakers, and that the temporal facilitation effect of congruent visual speech was significant in the English speakers but not in the Japanese speakers. Using fMRI data, we examined the functional connectivity among brain regions important for auditory-visual interplay. The results indicated that the English speakers had significantly stronger connectivity between the visual motion area MT and the Heschl’s gyrus compared with the Japanese speakers, which may subserve lower-level visual influences on speech perception in English speakers in a multisensory environment. These results suggested that linguistic experience strongly affects neural connectivity involved in AV speech integration. PMID:27510407

  16. Early functional impairment of sensory-motor connectivity in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mentis, George Z.; Blivis, Dvir; Liu, Wenfang; Drobac, Estelle; Crowder, Melissa E.; Kong, Lingling; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Sumner, Charlotte J.; O'Donovan, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY To define alterations of neuronal connectivity that occur during motor neuron degeneration, we characterized the function and structure of spinal circuitry in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) model mice. SMA motor neurons show reduced proprioceptive reflexes that correlate with decreased number and function of synapses on motor neuron somata and proximal dendrites. These abnormalities occur at an early stage of disease in motor neurons innervating proximal hindlimb muscles and medial motor neurons innervating axial muscles, but only at end-stage disease in motor neurons innervating distal hindlimb muscles. Motor neuron loss follows afferent synapse loss with the same temporal and topographical pattern. Trichostatin A, which improves motor behavior and survival of SMA mice, partially restores spinal reflexes illustrating the reversibility of these synaptic defects. De-afferentation of motor neurons is an early event in SMA and may be a primary cause of motor dysfunction that is amenable to therapeutic intervention. PMID:21315257

  17. Early functional impairment of sensory-motor connectivity in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mentis, George Z; Blivis, Dvir; Liu, Wenfang; Drobac, Estelle; Crowder, Melissa E; Kong, Lingling; Alvarez, Francisco J; Sumner, Charlotte J; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2011-02-10

    To define alterations of neuronal connectivity that occur during motor neuron degeneration, we characterized the function and structure of spinal circuitry in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) model mice. SMA motor neurons show reduced proprioceptive reflexes that correlate with decreased number and function of synapses on motor neuron somata and proximal dendrites. These abnormalities occur at an early stage of disease in motor neurons innervating proximal hindlimb muscles and medial motor neurons innervating axial muscles, but only at end-stage disease in motor neurons innervating distal hindlimb muscles. Motor neuron loss follows afferent synapse loss with the same temporal and topographical pattern. Trichostatin A, which improves motor behavior and survival of SMA mice, partially restores spinal reflexes, illustrating the reversibility of these synaptic defects. Deafferentation of motor neurons is an early event in SMA and may be a primary cause of motor dysfunction that is amenable to therapeutic intervention.

  18. Structural and Functional Small Fiber Abnormalities in the Neuropathic Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H.; Bonyhay, Istvan; Benson, Adam; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define the neuropathology, clinical phenotype, autonomic physiology and differentiating features in individuals with neuropathic and non-neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Methods Twenty-four subjects with POTS and 10 healthy control subjects had skin biopsy analysis of intra-epidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD), quantitative sensory testing (QST) and autonomic testing. Subjects completed quality of life, fatigue and disability questionnaires. Subjects were divided into neuropathic and non-neuropathic POTS, defined by abnormal IENFD and abnormal small fiber and sudomotor function. Results Nine of 24 subjects had neuropathic POTS and had significantly lower resting and tilted heart rates; reduced parasympathetic function; and lower phase 4 valsalva maneuver overshoot compared with those with non-neuropathic POTS (P<0.05). Neuropathic POTS subjects also had less anxiety and depression and greater overall self-perceived health-related quality of life scores than non-neuropathic POTS subjects. A sub-group of POTS patients (cholinergic POTS) had abnormal proximal sudomotor function and symptoms that suggest gastrointestinal and genitourinary parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Conclusions and Relevance POTS subtypes may be distinguished using small fiber and autonomic structural and functional criteria. Patients with non-neuropathic POTS have greater anxiety, greater depression and lower health-related quality of life scores compared to those with neuropathic POTS. These findings suggest different pathophysiological processes underlie the postural tachycardia in neuropathic and non-neuropathic POTS patients. The findings have implications for the therapeutic interventions to treat this disorder. PMID:24386408

  19. Evidence for intact local connectivity but disrupted regional function in the occipital lobe in children and adolescents with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    White, Tonya; Moeller, Steen; Schmidt, Marcus; Pardo, Jose V; Olman, Cheryl

    2012-08-01

    It has long been known that specific visual frequencies result in greater blood flow to the striate cortex. These peaks are thought to reflect synchrony of local neuronal firing that is reflective of local cortical networks. Since disrupted neural connectivity is a possible etiology for schizophrenia, our goal was to investigate whether localized connectivity, as measured by aberrant synchrony, is abnormal in children and adolescents with schizophrenia. Subjects included 25 children and adolescents with schizophrenia and 39 controls matched for age and gender. Subjects were scanned on a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio scanner while observing flashing checkerboard presented at either 1, 4, 8, or 12 Hz. Image processing included both a standard GLM model and a Fourier transform analysis. Patients had significantly smaller volume of activation in the occipital lobe compared to controls. There were no differences in the integral or percent signal change of the hemodynamic response function for each of the four frequencies. Occipital activation was stable during development between childhood and late adolescence. Finally, both patients and controls demonstrated an increased response between 4 and 8 Hz consistent with synchrony or entrainment in the neuronal response. Children and adolescents with schizophrenia had a significantly lower volume of activation in the occipital lobe in response to the flashing checkerboard task. However, features of intact local connectivity in patients, such as the hemodynamic response function and maximal response at 8 Hz, were normal. These results are consistent with abnormalities in regional connectivity with preserved local connectivity in early-onset schizophrenia.

  20. Cluster pair correlation function of simple fluids: energetic connectivity criteria.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Zarragoicoechea, Guillermo J; Vericat, Fernando

    2006-11-21

    We consider the clustering of Lennard-Jones particles by using an energetic connectivity criterion proposed long ago by Hill [J. Chem. Phys. 32, 617 (1955)] for the bond between pairs of particles. The criterion establishes that two particles are bonded (directly connected) if their relative kinetic energy is less than minus their relative potential energy. Thus, in general, it depends on the direction as well as on the magnitude of the velocities and positions of the particles. An integral equation for the pair connectedness function, proposed by two of the authors [Phys. Rev. E 61, R6067 (2000)], is solved for this criterion and the results are compared with those obtained from molecular dynamics simulations and from a connectedness Percus-Yevick-type integral equation for a velocity-averaged version of Hill's energetic criterion.

  1. Increased resting state functional connectivity in the fronto-parietal and default mode network in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Ilka; Geisler, Daniel; King, Joseph A.; Ritschel, Franziska; Seidel, Maria; Deza Araujo, Yacila; Petermann, Juliane; Lohmeier, Heidi; Weiss, Jessika; Walter, Martin; Roessner, Veit; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of anorexia nervosa (AN) is poorly understood. Results from functional brain imaging studies investigating the neural profile of AN using cognitive and emotional task paradigms are difficult to reconcile. Task-related imaging studies often require a high level of compliance and can only partially explore the distributed nature and complexity of brain function. In this study, resting state functional connectivity imaging was used to investigate well-characterized brain networks potentially relevant to understand the neural mechanisms underlying the symptomatology and etiology of AN. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data was obtained from 35 unmedicated female acute AN patients and 35 closely matched healthy controls female participants (HC) and decomposed using spatial group independent component analyses (ICA). Using validated templates, we identified components covering the fronto-parietal “control” network, the default mode network (DMN), the salience network, the visual and the sensory-motor network. Group comparison revealed an increased functional connectivity between the angular gyrus and the other parts of the fronto-parietal network in patients with AN in comparison to HC. Connectivity of the angular gyrus was positively associated with self-reported persistence in HC. In the DMN, AN patients also showed an increased functional connectivity strength in the anterior insula in comparison to HC. Anterior insula connectivity was associated with self-reported problems with interoceptive awareness. This study, with one of the largest sample to date, shows that acute AN is associated with abnormal brain connectivity in two major resting state networks (RSN). The finding of an increased functional connectivity in the fronto-parietal network adds novel support for the notion of AN as a disorder of excessive cognitive control, whereas the elevated functional connectivity of the anterior insula with the DMN may reflect the high

  2. The Fault Lies on the Other Side: Altered Brain Functional Connectivity in Psychiatric Disorders is Mainly Caused by Counterpart Regions in the Opposite Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Kendrick, Keith M; Lu, Guangming; Feng, Jianfeng

    2015-10-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are associated with abnormal resting-state functional connectivity between pairs of brain regions, although it remains unclear whether the fault resides within the pair of regions themselves or other regions connected to them. Identifying the source of dysfunction is crucial for understanding the etiology of different disorders. Using pathway- and network-based techniques to analyze resting-state functional magnetic imaging data from a large population of patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (239 patients, 251 controls), major depression (39 patients, 37 controls), and schizophrenia (69 patients, 62 controls), we show for the first time that only network-based cross-correlation identifies significant functional connectivity changes in all 3 disorders which survive correction. This demonstrates that the primary source of dysfunction resides not in the regional pairs themselves but in their external connections. Combining pathway and network-based functional-connectivity analysis, we established that, in all 3 disorders, the counterparts of pairs of regions in the opposite hemisphere contribute 60-76% to altered functional connectivity, compared with only 17-21% from the regions themselves. Thus, a transdiagnostic feature is of abnormal functional connectivity between brain regions produced via their contralateral counterparts. Our results demonstrate an important role for contralateral counterpart regions in contributing to altered regional connectivity in psychiatric disorders.

  3. Connecting Teratogen-Induced Congenital Heart Defects to Neural Crest Cells and Their Effect on Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga H.; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest is in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies. PMID:25220155

  4. Connecting teratogen-induced congenital heart defects to neural crest cells and their effect on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga H; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M; Jenkins, Michael W; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies.

  5. Abnormal functional brain asymmetry in depression: evidence of biologic commonality between major depression and dysthymia.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Gerard E; Stewart, Jonathan W; Hellerstein, David; Alvarenga, Jorge E; Alschuler, Daniel; McGrath, Patrick J

    2012-04-30

    Prior studies have found abnormalities of functional brain asymmetry in patients having a major depressive disorder (MDD). This study aimed to replicate findings of reduced right hemisphere advantage for perceiving dichotic complex tones in depressed patients, and to determine whether patients having "pure" dysthymia show the same abnormality of perceptual asymmetry as MDD. It also examined gender differences in lateralization, and the extent to which abnormalities of perceptual asymmetry in depressed patients are dependent on gender. Unmedicated patients having either a MDD (n=96) or "pure" dysthymic disorder (n=42) and healthy controls (n=114) were tested on dichotic fused-words and complex-tone tests. Patient and control groups differed in right hemisphere advantage for complex tones, but not left hemisphere advantage for words. Reduced right hemisphere advantage for tones was equally present in MDD and dysthymia, but was more evident among depressed men than depressed women. Also, healthy men had greater hemispheric asymmetry than healthy women for both words and tones, whereas this gender difference was not seen for depressed patients. Dysthymia and MDD share a common abnormality of hemispheric asymmetry for dichotic listening.

  6. Prenatal Drug Exposure Affects Neonatal Brain Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Salzwedel, Andrew P.; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala–frontal, insula–frontal, and insula–sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala–frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention. PMID:25855194

  7. Defining Integrals Over Connections in the Discretized Gravitational Functional Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatsymovsky, V. M.

    Integration over connection type variables in the path integral for the discrete form of the first-order formulation of general relativity theory is studied. The result (a generalized function of the rest of variables of the type of tetrad or elementary areas) can be defined through its moments, i.e. integrals of it with the area tensor monomials. In our previous paper these moments have been defined by deforming integration contours in the complex plane as if we had passed to a Euclidean-like region. In this paper we define and evaluate the moments in the genuine Minkowski region. The distribution of interest resulting from these moments in this non-positively defined region contains the divergences. We prove that the latter contribute only to the singular (δ-function like) part of this distribution with support in the non-physical region of the complex plane of area tensors while in the physical region this distribution (usual function) confirms that defined in our previous paper which decays exponentially at large areas. Besides that, we evaluate the basic integrals over which the integral over connections in the general path integral can be expanded.

  8. Methylene blue modulates functional connectivity in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Pavel; Singh, Amar P; Malloy, Kristen E; Zhou, Wei; Barrett, Douglas W; Franklin, Crystal G; Altmeyer, Wilson B; Gutierrez, Juan E; Li, Jinqi; Heyl, Betty L; Lancaster, Jack L; Gonzalez-Lima, F; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-03-10

    Methylene blue USP (MB) is a FDA-grandfathered drug used in clinics to treat methemoglobinemia, carbon monoxide poisoning and cyanide poisoning that has been shown to increase fMRI evoked blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in rodents. Low dose MB also has memory enhancing effect in rodents and humans. However, the neural correlates of the effects of MB in the human brain are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that a single low oral dose of MB modulates the functional connectivity of neural networks in healthy adults. Task-based and task-free fMRI were performed before and one hour after MB or placebo administration utilizing a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled design. MB administration was associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow in a task-related network during a visuomotor task, and with stronger resting-state functional connectivity in multiple regions linking perception and memory functions. These findings demonstrate for the first time that low-dose MB can modulate task-related and resting-state neural networks in the human brain. These neuroimaging findings support further investigations in healthy and disease populations.

  9. Enhanced functional connectivity involving the ventromedial hypothalamus following methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Zuloaga, Damian G; Iancu, Ovidiu D; Weber, Sydney; Etzel, Desiree; Marzulla, Tessa; Stewart, Blair; Allen, Charles N; Raber, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) consumption causes disruption of many biological rhythms including the sleep-wake cycle. This circadian effect is seen shortly following MA exposure and later in life following developmental MA exposure. MA phase shifts, entrains the circadian clock and can also alter the entraining effect of light by currently unknown mechanisms. We analyzed and compared immunoreactivity of the immediate early gene c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activity, to assess neuronal activation 2 h following MA exposure in the light and dark phases. We used network analyses of correlation patterns derived from global brain immunoreactivity patterns of c-Fos, to infer functional connectivity between brain regions. There were five distinct patterns of neuronal activation. In several brain areas, neuronal activation following exposure to MA was stronger in the light than the dark phase, highlighting the importance of considering circadian periods of increased effects of MA in defining experimental conditions and understanding the mechanisms underlying detrimental effects of MA exposure to brain function. Functional connectivity between the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and other brain areas, including the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and basolateral and medial amygdala, was enhanced following MA exposure, suggesting a role for the VMH in the effects of MA on the brain.

  10. Cortical network functional connectivity in the descent to sleep.

    PubMed

    Larson-Prior, Linda J; Zempel, John M; Nolan, Tracy S; Prior, Fred W; Snyder, Abraham Z; Raichle, Marcus E

    2009-03-17

    Descent into sleep is accompanied by disengagement of the conscious brain from the external world. It follows that this process should be associated with reduced neural activity in regions of the brain known to mediate interaction with the environment. We examined blood oxygen dependent (BOLD) signal functional connectivity using conventional seed-based analyses in 3 primary sensory and 3 association networks as normal young adults transitioned from wakefulness to light sleep while lying immobile in the bore of a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Functional connectivity was maintained in each network throughout all examined states of arousal. Indeed, correlations within the dorsal attention network modestly but significantly increased during light sleep compared to wakefulness. Moreover, our data suggest that neuronally mediated BOLD signal variance generally increases in light sleep. These results do not support the view that ongoing BOLD fluctuations primarily reflect unconstrained cognition. Rather, accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations reflect processes that maintain the integrity of functional systems in the brain.

  11. Applications of random field theory to functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Worsley, K J; Cao, J; Paus, T; Petrides, M; Evans, A C

    1998-01-01

    Functional connectivity between two voxels or regions of voxels can be measured by the correlation between voxel measurements from either PET CBF or BOLD fMRI images in 3D. We propose to look at the entire 6D matrix of correlations between all voxels and search for 6D local maxima. The main result is a new theoretical formula based on random field theory for the p-value of these local maxima, which distinguishes true correlations from background noise. This can be applied to crosscorrelations between two different sets of images--such as activations under two different tasks, as well as autocorrelations within the same set of images.

  12. Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III: effect of single amino acid substitutions and relationship with functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, V; Leone, G; Mastrangelo, S; Lane, D A; Girolami, A; de Moerloose, P; Sas, G; Abildgaard, U; Blajchman, M; Rodeghiero, F

    1994-02-01

    Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III (AT-III) was investigated by crossed immunoelectrofocusing (CIEF) on eleven molecular variants. A normal pattern was found in five variants while two different abnormal CIEF patterns were found in the other four and two variants, respectively. Point mutations causing a major pI change (exceeding 4.0) of the amino acid substituted lead to alterations in the overall microheterogeneity. The variants thus substituted share a first type of abnormal CIEF pattern with alterations throughout the pH range, regardless of the location of the mutation (reactive site and adjacent regions or heparin binding region). Minor amino acid pI changes in these regions do not alter the AT-III overall microheterogeneity, whatever the resulting functional defect. However, if the mutation is placed in the region around positions 404 or 429, then even minor changes of the amino acid pI seem able to alter the overall charge, leading to a second type of abnormal CIEF pattern with the main alteration at pH 4.8-4.6. Neuraminidase treatment leads to disappearance of microheterogeneity except for the variants with the Arg393 to Cys substitution. Addition of thrombin induces CIEF modifications specifically related to the functional defect. A normal formation of thrombin-antithrombin complexes induces a shift towards the more acid pH range, whereas in the variants substituted at the reactive site the CIEF pattern is substantially unaffected by thrombin; variants substituted at positions 382-384 show a maximal thrombin-induced increase of the isoforms at pI 4.8-4.6. Therefore mutant antithrombins with different functional abnormalities but sharing a common CIEF pattern were well distinguished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Graph theoretical analysis of resting magnetoencephalographic functional connectivity networks

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, Lindsay; Nadar, Sreenivasan R.; Holroyd, Tom; Carver, Frederick W.; Apud, Jose; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Coppola, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Complex networks have been observed to comprise small-world properties, believed to represent an optimal organization of local specialization and global integration of information processing at reduced wiring cost. Here, we applied magnitude squared coherence to resting magnetoencephalographic time series in reconstructed source space, acquired from controls and patients with schizophrenia, and generated frequency-dependent adjacency matrices modeling functional connectivity between virtual channels. After configuring undirected binary and weighted graphs, we found that all human networks demonstrated highly localized clustering and short characteristic path lengths. The most conservatively thresholded networks showed efficient wiring, with topographical distance between connected vertices amounting to one-third as observed in surrogate randomized topologies. Nodal degrees of the human networks conformed to a heavy-tailed exponentially truncated power-law, compatible with the existence of hubs, which included theta and alpha bilateral cerebellar tonsil, beta and gamma bilateral posterior cingulate, and bilateral thalamus across all frequencies. We conclude that all networks showed small-worldness, minimal physical connection distance, and skewed degree distributions characteristic of physically-embedded networks, and that these calculations derived from graph theoretical mathematics did not quantifiably distinguish between subject populations, independent of bandwidth. However, post-hoc measurements of edge computations at the scale of the individual vertex revealed trends of reduced gamma connectivity across the posterior medial parietal cortex in patients, an observation consistent with our prior resting activation study that found significant reduction of synthetic aperture magnetometry gamma power across similar regions. The basis of these small differences remains unclear. PMID:23874288

  14. Subclinical Cardiac Abnormalities and Kidney Function Decline: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shlipak, Michael G.; Katz, Ronit; Agarwal, Subhashish; Ix, Joachim H.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Peralta, Carmen A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Clinical heart failure (HF) is associated with CKD and faster rates of kidney function decline. Whether subclinical abnormalities of cardiac structure are associated with faster kidney function decline is not known. The association between cardiac concentricity and kidney function decline was evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This is a longitudinal study of 3866 individuals from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2000–2007) who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease, with an estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at baseline and 5 years of follow-up. Concentricity, a measurement of abnormal cardiac size, was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and evaluated as a continuous measurement and in quartiles. GFR was estimated by creatinine (eGFRcr) and cystatin C (eGFRcys). The association of concentricity with annual eGFR decline, incident CKD, and rapid kidney function decline (>5% per year) was investigated using linear mixed models as well as Poisson and logistic regression, respectively. Analyses adjusted for demographics, BP, diabetes, and inflammatory markers. Results Median decline was −0.8 (interquartile range, −3.1, −0.5) by eGFRcr. Compared with the lowest quartile of concentricity, persons in the highest quartile had an additional 21% (9%–32%) decline in mean eGFRcr in fully adjusted models. Concentricity was also associated with incident CKD and with rapid kidney function decline after adjustment. Conclusions Subclinical abnormalities in cardiac structure are associated with longitudinal kidney function decline independent of diabetes and hypertension. Future studies should examine mechanisms to explain these associations. PMID:22580783

  15. The functional connectivity of the human caudate: an application of meta-analytic connectivity modeling with behavioral filtering.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer L; Laird, Angela R; Glahn, David C; Blangero, John; Sanghera, Manjit K; Pessoa, Luiz; Fox, P Mickle; Uecker, Angela; Friehs, Gerhard; Young, Keith A; Griffin, Jennifer L; Lovallo, William R; Fox, Peter T

    2012-03-01

    Meta-analysis based techniques are emerging as powerful, robust tools for developing models of connectivity in functional neuroimaging. Here, we apply meta-analytic connectivity modeling to the human caudate to 1) develop a model of functional connectivity, 2) determine if meta-analytic methods are sufficiently sensitive to detect behavioral domain specificity within region-specific functional connectivity networks, and 3) compare meta-analytic driven segmentation to structural connectivity parcellation using diffusion tensor imaging. Results demonstrate strong coherence between meta-analytic and data-driven methods. Specifically, we found that behavioral filtering resulted in cognition and emotion related structures and networks primarily localized to the head of the caudate nucleus, while perceptual and action specific regions localized to the body of the caudate, consistent with early models of nonhuman primate histological studies and postmortem studies in humans. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) revealed support for meta-analytic connectivity modeling's (MACM) utility in identifying both direct and indirect connectivity. Our results provide further validation of meta-analytic connectivity modeling, while also highlighting an additional potential, namely the extraction of behavioral domain specific functional connectivity.

  16. Impaired functional but preserved structural connectivity in limbic white matter tracts in youth with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder plus psychopathic traits.

    PubMed

    Finger, Elizabeth Carrie; Marsh, Abigail; Blair, Karina Simone; Majestic, Catherine; Evangelou, Iordanis; Gupta, Karan; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Sims, Courtney; Pope, Kayla; Fowler, Katherine; Sinclair, Stephen; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Pine, Daniel; Blair, Robert James

    2012-06-30

    Youths with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder and psychopathic traits (CD/ODD+PT) are at high risk of adult antisocial behavior and psychopathy. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate functional abnormalities in orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala in both youths and adults with psychopathic traits. Diffusion tensor imaging in psychopathic adults demonstrates disrupted structural connectivity between these regions (uncinate fasiculus). The current study examined whether functional neural abnormalities present in youths with CD/ODD+PT are associated with similar white matter abnormalities. Youths with CD/ODD+PT and comparison participants completed 3.0 T diffusion tensor scans and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Diffusion tensor imaging did not reveal disruption in structural connections within the uncinate fasiculus or other white matter tracts in youths with CD/ODD+PT, despite the demonstration of disrupted amygdala-prefrontal functional connectivity in these youths. These results suggest that disrupted amygdala-frontal white matter connectivity as measured by fractional anisotropy is less sensitive than imaging measurements of functional perturbations in youths with psychopathic traits. If white matter tracts are intact in youths with this disorder, childhood may provide a critical window for intervention and treatment, before significant structural brain abnormalities solidify.

  17. Impaired functional but preserved structural connectivity in limbic white matter tracts in youth with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder plus psychopathic traits

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Elizabeth Carrie; Marsh, Abigail; Blair, Karina Simone; Majestic, Catherine; Evangelou, Iordanis; Gupta, Karan; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Sims, Courtney; Pope, Kayla; Fowler, Katherine; Sinclair, Stephen; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Pine, Daniel; Blair, Robert James

    2012-01-01

    Youths with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder and psychopathic traits (CD/ODD+PT) are at high risk of adult anti-social behaviour and psychopathy. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate functional abnormalities in orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala in both youths and adults with psychopathic traits. Diffusion tensor imaging in psychopathic adults demonstrates disrupted structural connectivity between these regions (uncinate fasiculus). The current study examined whether functional neural abnormalities present in youths with CD/ODD+PT are associated with similar white matter abnormalities. Youths with CD/ODD+PT and comparison participants completed 3.0 T diffusion tensor scans and functional MRI scans. Diffusion tensor imaging did not reveal disruption in structural connections within the uncinate fasiculus or other white matter tracts in youths with CD/ODD+PT, despite the demonstration of disrupted amygdala-prefrontal functional connectivity in these youths. These results suggest that disrupted amygdala-frontal white matter connectivity as measured by fractional anisotropy is less sensitive than imaging measurements of functional perturbations in youths with psychopathic traits. If white matter tracts are intact in youths with this disorder, childhood may provide a critical window for intervention and treatment, before significant structural brain abnormalities solidify. PMID:22819939

  18. Abnormalities in personal space and parietal–frontal function in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Daphne J.; Boeke, Emily A.; Coombs, Garth; DeCross, Stephanie N.; Cassidy, Brittany S.; Stufflebeam, Steven; Rauch, Scott L.; Tootell, Roger B.H.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with subtle abnormalities in day-to-day social behaviors, including a tendency in some patients to “keep their distance” from others in physical space. The neural basis of this abnormality, and related changes in social functioning, is unknown. Here we examined, in schizophrenic patients and healthy control subjects, the functioning of a parietal–frontal network involved in monitoring the space immediately surrounding the body (“personal space”). Using fMRI, we found that one region of this network, the dorsal intraparietal sulcus (DIPS), was hyper-responsive in schizophrenic patients to face stimuli appearing to move towards the subjects, intruding into personal space. This hyper-responsivity was predicted both by the size of personal space (which was abnormally elevated in the schizophrenia group) and the severity of negative symptoms. In contrast, in a second study, the activity of two lower-level visual areas that send information to DIPS (the fusiform face area and middle temporal area) was normal in schizophrenia. Together, these findings suggest that changes in parietal–frontal networks that support the sensory-guided initiation of behavior, including actions occurring in the space surrounding the body, contribute to social dysfunction and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:26484048

  19. Abnormalities in personal space and parietal-frontal function in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Holt, Daphne J; Boeke, Emily A; Coombs, Garth; DeCross, Stephanie N; Cassidy, Brittany S; Stufflebeam, Steven; Rauch, Scott L; Tootell, Roger B H

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with subtle abnormalities in day-to-day social behaviors, including a tendency in some patients to "keep their distance" from others in physical space. The neural basis of this abnormality, and related changes in social functioning, is unknown. Here we examined, in schizophrenic patients and healthy control subjects, the functioning of a parietal-frontal network involved in monitoring the space immediately surrounding the body ("personal space"). Using fMRI, we found that one region of this network, the dorsal intraparietal sulcus (DIPS), was hyper-responsive in schizophrenic patients to face stimuli appearing to move towards the subjects, intruding into personal space. This hyper-responsivity was predicted both by the size of personal space (which was abnormally elevated in the schizophrenia group) and the severity of negative symptoms. In contrast, in a second study, the activity of two lower-level visual areas that send information to DIPS (the fusiform face area and middle temporal area) was normal in schizophrenia. Together, these findings suggest that changes in parietal-frontal networks that support the sensory-guided initiation of behavior, including actions occurring in the space surrounding the body, contribute to social dysfunction and negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

  20. Functional abnormalities of the default network during self- and other-reflection in autism

    PubMed Central

    Courchesne, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies of autism have identified functional abnormalities of the default network during a passive resting state. Since the default network is also typically engaged during social, emotional and introspective processing, dysfunction of this network may underlie some of the difficulties individuals with autism exhibit in these broad domains. In the present experiment, we attempted to further delineate the nature of default network abnormality in autism using experimentally constrained social and introspective tasks. Thirteen autism and 12 control participants were scanned while making true/false judgments for various statements about themselves (SELF condition) or a close other person (OTHER), and pertaining to either psychological personality traits (INTERNAL) or observable characteristics and behaviors (EXTERNAL). In the ventral medial prefrontal cortex/ventral anterior cingulate cortex, activity was reduced in the autism group across all judgment conditions and also during a resting condition, suggestive of task-independent dysfunction of this region. In other default network regions, overall levels of activity were not different between groups. Furthermore, in several of these regions, we found group by condition interactions only for INTERNAL/EXTERNAL judgments, and not SELF/OTHER judgments, suggestive of task-specific dysfunction. Overall, these results provide a more detailed view of default network functionality and abnormality in autism. PMID:19015108

  1. Integration Over Connections in the Discretized Gravitational Functional Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatsymovsky, V. M.

    The result of performing integrations over connection type variables in the path integral for the discrete field theory may be poorly defined in the case of non-compact gauge group with the Haar measure exponentially growing in some directions. This point is studied in the case of the discrete form of the first-order formulation of the Einstein gravity theory. Here the result of interest can be defined as generalized function (of the rest of variables of the type of tetrad or elementary areas), i.e. a functional on a set of probe functions. To define this functional, we calculate its values on the products of components of the area tensors, the so-called moments. The resulting distribution (in fact, probability distribution) has singular (δ-function-like) part with support in the nonphysical region of the complex plane of area tensors and regular part (usual function) which decays exponentially at large areas. As we discuss, this also provides suppression of large edge lengths which is important for internal consistency, if one asks whether gravity on short distances can be discrete. Some other features of the obtained probability distribution including occurrence of the local maxima at a number of the approximately equidistant values of area are also considered.

  2. Characterizing dynamic local functional connectivity in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lifu; Sun, Junfeng; Cheng, Lin; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    Functional connectivity (FC), obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), brings insights into the functional organization of the brain. Recently, rich and complex behaviour of brain has been revealed by the dynamic fluctuation of FC, which had previously been regarded as confounding ‘noise’. While the dynamics of long-distance, inter-regional FC has been extensively studied, the dynamics of local FC within a few millimetres in space remains largely unexplored. In this study, the local FC was depicted by regional homogeneity (ReHo), and the dynamics of local FC was obtained using sliding windows method. We observed a robust positive correlation between ReHo and its temporal variability, which was shown to be an intrinsic feature of the brain rather than a pure stochastic effect. Furthermore, fluctuation of ReHo was associated with global functional organization: (i) brain regions with higher centrality of inter-regional FC tended to possess higher ReHo variability; (ii) coherence of ReHo fluctuation was higher within brain’s functional modules. Finally, we observed alteration of ReHo variability during a motor task compared with resting-state. Our findings associated the temporal fluctuation of ReHo with brain function, opening up the possibility of dynamic local FC study in the future. PMID:27231194

  3. Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grush, Mary, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Connectivity has dramatically changed the landscape of higher education IT. From "on-demand" services for net-gen students and advanced eLearning systems for faculty, to high-performance computing grid resources for researchers, IT now provides more networked services than ever to connect campus constituents to each other and to the world.…

  4. Altered resting-state EEG source functional connectivity in schizophrenia: the effect of illness duration

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Daverio, Andrea; Ferrentino, Fabiola; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Ciabattini, Fabio; Monaco, Leonardo; Lisi, Giulia; Barone, Ylenia; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Niolu, Cinzia; Seri, Stefano; Siracusano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing body of evidence supporting the hypothesis of schizophrenia as a disconnection syndrome, studies of resting-state EEG Source Functional Connectivity (EEG-SFC) in people affected by schizophrenia are sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate resting-state EEG-SFC in 77 stable, medicated patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) compared to 78 healthy volunteers (HV). In order to study the effect of illness duration, SCZ were divided in those with a short duration of disease (SDD; n = 25) and those with a long duration of disease (LDD; n = 52). Resting-state EEG recordings in eyes closed condition were analyzed and lagged phase synchronization (LPS) indices were calculated for each ROI pair in the source-space EEG data. In delta and theta bands, SCZ had greater EEG-SFC than HV; a higher theta band connectivity in frontal regions was observed in LDD compared with SDD. In the alpha band, SCZ showed lower frontal EEG-SFC compared with HV whereas no differences were found between LDD and SDD. In the beta1 band, SCZ had greater EEG-SFC compared with HVs and in the beta2 band, LDD presented lower frontal and parieto-temporal EEG-SFC compared with HV. In the gamma band, SDD had greater connectivity values compared with LDD and HV. This study suggests that resting state brain network connectivity is abnormally organized in schizophrenia, with different patterns for the different EEG frequency components and that EEG can be a powerful tool to further elucidate the complexity of such disordered connectivity. PMID:25999835

  5. Condition-dependent functional connectivity: syntax networks in bilinguals

    PubMed Central

    Dodel, Silke; Golestani, Narly; Pallier, Christophe; ElKouby, Vincent; Le Bihan, Denis; Poline, Jean-Baptiste

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a method to study the variation of brain functional connectivity networks with respect to experimental conditions in fMRI data. It is related to the psychophysiological interaction technique introduced by Friston et al. and extends to networks of correlation modulation (CM networks). Extended networks containing several dozens of nodes are determined in which the links correspond to consistent correlation modulation across subjects. In addition, we assess inter-subject variability and determine networks in which the condition-dependent functional interactions can be explained by a subject-dependent variable. We applied the technique to data from a study on syntactical production in bilinguals and analysed functional interactions differentially across tasks (word reading or sentence production) and across languages. We find an extended network of consistent functional interaction modulation across tasks, whereas the network comparing languages shows fewer links. Interestingly, there is evidence for a specific network in which the differences in functional interaction across subjects can be explained by differences in the subjects' syntactical proficiency. Specifically, we find that regions, including ones that have previously been shown to be involved in syntax and in language production, such as the left inferior frontal gyrus, putamen, insula, precentral gyrus, as well as the supplementary motor area, are more functionally linked during sentence production in the second, compared with the first, language in syntactically more proficient bilinguals than in syntactically less proficient ones. Our approach extends conventional activation analyses to the notion of networks, emphasizing functional interactions between regions independently of whether or not they are activated. On the one hand, it gives rise to testable hypotheses and allows an interpretation of the results in terms of the previous literature, and on the other hand, it provides a

  6. Network Analysis of Intrinsic Functional Brain Connectivity in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Supekar, Kaustubh; Menon, Vinod; Rubin, Daniel; Musen, Mark; Greicius, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Functional brain networks detected in task-free (“resting-state”) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have a small-world architecture that reflects a robust functional organization of the brain. Here, we examined whether this functional organization is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Task-free fMRI data from 21 AD subjects and 18 age-matched controls were obtained. Wavelet analysis was applied to the fMRI data to compute frequency-dependent correlation matrices. Correlation matrices were thresholded to create 90-node undirected-graphs of functional brain networks. Small-world metrics (characteristic path length and clustering coefficient) were computed using graph analytical methods. In the low frequency interval 0.01 to 0.05 Hz, functional brain networks in controls showed small-world organization of brain activity, characterized by a high clustering coefficient and a low characteristic path length. In contrast, functional brain networks in AD showed loss of small-world properties, characterized by a significantly lower clustering coefficient (p<0.01), indicative of disrupted local connectivity. Clustering coefficients for the left and right hippocampus were significantly lower (p<0.01) in the AD group compared to the control group. Furthermore, the clustering coefficient distinguished AD participants from the controls with a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 78%. Our study provides new evidence that there is disrupted organization of functional brain networks in AD. Small-world metrics can characterize the functional organization of the brain in AD, and our findings further suggest that these network measures may be useful as an imaging-based biomarker to distinguish AD from healthy aging. PMID:18584043

  7. Neuroimaging markers of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems in drug addiction: relationships to resting-state functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Scott J.; London, Edythe D.; Northoff, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by widespread abnormalities in brain function and neurochemistry, including drug-associated effects on concentrations of the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively. In healthy individuals, these neurotransmitters drive the resting state, a default condition of brain function also disrupted in addiction. Here, our primary goal was to review in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography studies that examined markers of glutamate and GABA abnormalities in human drug addiction. Addicted individuals tended to show decreases in these markers compared with healthy controls, but findings also varied by individual characteristics (e.g., abstinence length). Interestingly, select corticolimbic brain regions showing glutamatergic and/or GABAergic abnormalities have been similarly implicated in resting-state functional connectivity deficits in drug addiction. Thus, our secondary goals were to provide a brief review of this resting-state literature, and an initial rationale for the hypothesis that abnormalities in glutamatergic and/or GABAergic neurotransmission may underlie resting-state functional deficits in drug addiction. In doing so, we suggest future research directions and possible treatment implications. PMID:26657968

  8. Neuroimaging markers of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems in drug addiction: Relationships to resting-state functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Scott J; London, Edythe D; Northoff, Georg

    2016-02-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by widespread abnormalities in brain function and neurochemistry, including drug-associated effects on concentrations of the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively. In healthy individuals, these neurotransmitters drive the resting state, a default condition of brain function also disrupted in addiction. Here, our primary goal was to review in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography studies that examined markers of glutamate and GABA abnormalities in human drug addiction. Addicted individuals tended to show decreases in these markers compared with healthy controls, but findings also varied by individual characteristics (e.g., abstinence length). Interestingly, select corticolimbic brain regions showing glutamatergic and/or GABAergic abnormalities have been similarly implicated in resting-state functional connectivity deficits in drug addiction. Thus, our secondary goals were to provide a brief review of this resting-state literature, and an initial rationale for the hypothesis that abnormalities in glutamatergic and/or GABAergic neurotransmission may underlie resting-state functional deficits in drug addiction. In doing so, we suggest future research directions and possible treatment implications.

  9. Characteristics of Brains in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Structure, Function and Connectivity across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sungji; Sohn, In-Jung; Kim, Namwook; Sim, Hyeon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a highly prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social communication and restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs). Over the past decade, neuroimaging studies have provided considerable insights underlying neurobiological mechanisms of ASD. In this review, we introduce recent findings from brain imaging studies to characterize the brains of ASD across the human lifespan. Results of structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies dealing with total brain volume, regional brain structure and cortical area are summarized. Using task-based functional MRI (fMRI), many studies have shown dysfunctional activation in critical areas of social communication and RRBs. We also describe several data to show abnormal connectivity in the ASD brains. Finally, we suggest the possible strategies to study ASD brains in the future. PMID:26713076

  10. Clinical symptoms and alpha band resting-state functional connectivity imaging in patients with schizophrenia: implications for novel approaches to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hinkley, Leighton B.N.; Vinogradov, Sophia; Guggisberg, Adrian G.; Fisher, Melissa; Findlay, Anne M.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is associated with functional decoupling between cortical regions, but we do not know whether and where this occurs in low-frequency electromagnetic oscillations. The goal of this study was to use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to identify brain regions that exhibit abnormal resting-state connectivity in the alpha frequency range in patients with schizophrenia and investigate associations between functional connectivity and clinical symptoms in stable outpatient participants. Method Thirty patients with schizophrenia and fifteen healthy comparison participants were scanned in resting-state MEG (eyes closed). Functional connectivity MEGI (fcMEGI) data were reconstructed globally in the alpha range, quantified by the mean imaginary coherence between a voxel and the rest of the brain. Results In patients, decreased connectivity was observed in left pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and right superior temporal cortex while increased connectivity was observed in left extrastriate cortex and the right inferior PFC. Functional connectivity of left inferior parietal cortex was negatively related to positive symptoms. Low left PFC connectivity was associated with negative symptoms. Functional connectivity of midline PFC was negatively correlated with depressed symptoms. Functional connectivity of right PFC was associated with other (cognitive) symptoms. Conclusions This study demonstrates direct functional disconnection in schizophrenia between specific cortical fields within low-frequency resting-state oscillations. Impaired alpha coupling in frontal, parietal, and temporal regions is associated with clinical symptoms in these stable outpatients. Our findings indicate that this level of functional disconnection between cortical regions is an important treatment target in schizophrenia. PMID:21861988

  11. Functional connectivity and graph theory in preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Brier, Matthew R; Thomas, Jewell B; Fagan, Anne M; Hassenstab, Jason; Holtzman, David M; Benzinger, Tammie L; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau M

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a long preclinical phase in which amyloid and tau cerebral pathology accumulate without producing cognitive symptoms. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated that brain networks degrade during symptomatic AD. It is unclear to what extent these degradations exist before symptomatic onset. In this study, we investigated graph theory metrics of functional integration (path length), functional segregation (clustering coefficient), and functional distinctness (modularity) as a function of disease severity. Further, we assessed whether these graph metrics were affected in cognitively normal participants with cerebrospinal fluid evidence of preclinical AD. Clustering coefficient and modularity, but not path length, were reduced in AD. Cognitively normal participants who harbored AD biomarker pathology also showed reduced values in these graph measures, demonstrating brain changes similar to, but smaller than, symptomatic AD. Only modularity was significantly affected by age. We also demonstrate that AD has a particular effect on hub-like regions in the brain. We conclude that AD causes large-scale disconnection that is present before onset of symptoms.

  12. Altered functional connectivity within the central reward network in overweight and obese women

    PubMed Central

    Coveleskie, K; Gupta, A; Kilpatrick, L A; Mayer, E D; Ashe-McNalley, C; Stains, J; Labus, J S; Mayer, E A

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects have identified abnormal activation of key regions of central reward circuits, including the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), in response to food-related stimuli. We aimed to examine whether women with elevated body mass index (BMI) show structural and resting state (RS) functional connectivity alterations within regions of the reward network. Subjects/Methods: Fifty healthy, premenopausal women, 19 overweight and obese (high BMI=26–38 kg m−2) and 31 lean (BMI=19–25 kg m−2) were selected from the University of California Los Angeles' Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress database. Structural and RS functional scans were collected. Group differences in grey matter volume (GMV) of the NAcc, oscillation dynamics of intrinsic brain activity and functional connectivity of the NAcc to regions within the reward network were examined. Results: GMV of the left NAcc was significantly greater in the high BMI group than in the lean group (P=0.031). Altered frequency distributions were observed in women with high BMI compared with lean group in the left NAcc (P=0.009) in a medium-frequency (MF) band, and in bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) (P=0.014, <0.001) and ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) (P=0.034, <0.001) in a high-frequency band. Subjects with high BMI had greater connectivity of the left NAcc with bilateral ACC (P=0.024) and right vmPFC (P=0.032) in a MF band and with the left ACC (P=0.03) in a high frequency band. Conclusions: Overweight and obese women in the absence of food-related stimuli show significant structural and functional alterations within regions of reward-related brain networks, which may have a role in altered ingestive behaviors. PMID:25599560

  13. Altered Default Network Resting State Functional Connectivity in Patients with a First Episode of Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Solís, Anna; Corripio, Iluminada; de Castro-Manglano, Pilar; Duran-Sindreu, Santiago; Garcia-Garcia, Manuel; Proal, Erika; Nuñez-Marín, Fidel; Soutullo, Cesar; Alvarez, Enric; Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Kelly, Clare; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Background Default network (DN) abnormalities have been identified in patients with chronic schizophrenia using “resting state” functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI). Here, we examined the integrity of the DN in patients experiencing their first episode of psychosis (FEP) compared with sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Methods We collected R-fMRI data from 19 FEP patients (mean age 24.9±4.8 yrs, 14 males) and 19 healthy controls (26.1±4.8 yrs, 14 males) at 3 Tesla. Following standard preprocessing, we examined the functional connectivity (FC) of two DN subsystems and the two DN hubs (P<0.0045, corrected). Results Patients with FEP exhibited abnormal FC that appeared largely restricted to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC) DN subsystem. Relative to controls, FEP patients exhibited weaker positive FC between dMPFC and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus, extending laterally through the parietal lobe to the posterior angular gyrus. Patients with FEP exhibited weaker negative FC between the lateral temporal cortex and the intracalcarine cortex, bilaterally. The PCC and temporo-parietal junction also exhibited weaker negative FC with the right fusiform gyrus extending to the lingual gyrus and lateral occipital cortex, in FEP patients, compared to controls. By contrast, patients with FEP showed stronger negative FC between the temporal pole and medial motor cortex, anterior precuneus and posterior mid-cingulate cortex. Conclusions Abnormalities in the dMPFC DN subsystem in patients with a FEP suggest that FC patterns are altered even in the early stages of psychosis. PMID:22633527

  14. Abnormal functional MRI BOLD contrast in the vegetative state after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Heelmann, Volker; Lippert-Grüner, Marcela; Rommel, Thomas; Wedekind, Christoph

    2010-06-01

    For the rehabilitation process, the treatment of patients surviving brain injury in a vegetative state is still a serious challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate patients exhibiting severely disturbed consciousness using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Five cases of posttraumatic vegetative state and one with minimal consciousness close to the vegetative state were studied clinically, electrophysiologically, and by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Visual, sensory, and acoustic paradigms were used for stimulation. In three patients examined less than 2 months after trauma, a consistent decrease in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal ('negative activation') was observed for visual stimulation; one case even showed a decrease in BOLD activation for all three activation paradigms. In the remaining three cases examined more than 6 months after trauma, visual stimulation yielded positive BOLD contrast or no activation. In all cases, sensory stimulation was followed by a decrease in BOLD signal or no activation, whereas auditory stimulation failed to elicit any activation with the exception of one case. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in the vegetative state indicates retained yet abnormal brain function; this abnormality can be attributed to the impairment of cerebral vascular autoregulation or an increase in the energy consumption of activated neocortex in severe traumatic brain injury.

  15. Quetiapine modulates functional connectivity in brain aggression networks.

    PubMed

    Klasen, Martin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Schwenzer, Michael; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Sarkheil, Pegah; Weber, René; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-07-15

    Aggressive behavior is associated with dysfunctions in an affective regulation network encompassing amygdala and prefrontal areas such as orbitofrontal (OFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In particular, prefrontal regions have been postulated to control amygdala activity by inhibitory projections, and this process may be disrupted in aggressive individuals. The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine successfully attenuates aggressive behavior in various disorders; the underlying neural processes, however, are unknown. A strengthened functional coupling in the prefrontal-amygdala system may account for these anti-aggressive effects. An inhibition of this network has been reported for virtual aggression in violent video games as well. However, there have been so far no in-vivo observations of pharmacological influences on corticolimbic projections during human aggressive behavior. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, quetiapine and placebo were administered for three successive days prior to an fMRI experiment. In this experiment, functional brain connectivity was assessed during virtual aggressive behavior in a violent video game and an aggression-free control task in a non-violent modification. Quetiapine increased the functional connectivity of ACC and DLPFC with the amygdala during virtual aggression, whereas OFC-amygdala coupling was attenuated. These effects were observed neither for placebo nor for the non-violent control. These results demonstrate for the first time a pharmacological modification of aggression-related human brain networks in a naturalistic setting. The violence-specific modulation of prefrontal-amygdala networks appears to control aggressive behavior and provides a neurobiological model for the anti-aggressive effects of quetiapine.

  16. Electrophysiological consequences of KATP Gain-of-function in the heart: Conduction abnormalities in Cantu Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Mark D.; Zhang, Haixia; Uchida, Keita; Grange, Dorothy K.; Singh, Gautam K.; Nichols, Colin G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in the KATP channel subunits Kir6.1 and SUR2 cause Cantu syndrome (CS), a disease characterized by multiple cardiovascular abnormalities. Objective To better understand the electrophysiological consequences of such GOF mutations in the heart. Methods We generated transgenic mice (Kir6.1-GOF) expressing ATP-insensitive Kir6.1[G343D] subunits under α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) promoter control, to target gene expression specifically in cardiomyocytes, and carried out patch-clamp experiments on isolated ventricular myocytes, invasive electrophysiology on anesthetized mice. Results In Kir6.1-GOF ventricular myocytes, KATP channels show decreased ATP sensitivity, but there is no significant change in current density. Ambulatory ECG recordings on Kir6.1-GOF mice reveal AV nodal conduction abnormalities and junctional rhythm. Invasive electrophysiological analyses reveal slowing of conduction and conduction failure through the AV node, but no increase in susceptibility to atrial or ventricular ectopic activity. Surface electrocardiograms recorded from CS patients also demonstrate first degree AV block, and fascicular block. Conclusions The primary electrophysiological consequence of cardiac KATP GOF is on the conduction system, particularly the AV node, resulting in conduction abnormalities in CS patients, who carry KATP GOF mutations. PMID:26142302

  17. Dynamic resting state functional connectivity in awake and anesthetized rodents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhifeng; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Nanyin

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) has been a powerful tool for investigating functional neural networks in both normal and pathological conditions. When measuring resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), most rsfMRI approaches do not consider its temporal variations and thus only provide the averaged RSFC over the scan time. Recently, there has been a surge of interest to investigate the dynamic characteristics of RSFC in humans, and promising results have been yielded. However, our knowledge regarding the dynamic RSFC in animals remains sparse. In the present study we utilized the single-volume co-activation method to systematically study the dynamic properties of RSFC within the networks of infralimbic cortex (IL) and primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in both awake and anesthetized rats. Our data showed that both IL and S1 networks could be decomposed into several spatially reproducible but temporally changing co-activation patterns (CAPs), suggesting that dynamic RSFC was indeed a characteristic feature in rodents. In addition, we demonstrated that anesthesia profoundly impacted the dynamic RSFC of neural circuits subserving cognitive and emotional functions but had less effects on sensorimotor systems. Finally, we examined the temporal characteristics of each CAP, and found that individual CAPs exhibited consistent temporal evolution patterns. Together, these results suggest that dynamic RSFC might be a general phenomenon in vertebrate animals. In addition, this study has paved the way for further understanding the alterations of dynamic RSFC in animal models of brain disorders.

  18. Abnormal function of the corpus luteum in some ewes with phyto-oestrogenic infertility.

    PubMed

    Adams, N R; Hearnshaw, H; Oldham, C M

    1981-01-01

    Ewes with permanent phyto-estrogenic infertility show oestrus less regularly than normal ewes, and the present study examines the extent to which this results from abnormal ovarian function. Forty-nine affected ewes and 53 controls were run with rams fitted with marking crayons and harnesses, and crayon marks were recorded and laparoscopy performed at weekly intervals for 3 weeks. Fewer affected ewes showed oestrus accompanied by ovulation (28 v. 49, P less than 0.001), and four of these affected ewes had a second ovulation during the experiment. More of the ovulations observed in affected ewes were unaccompanied by behavioural oestrus than in controls (8 out of 38 v. 2 out of 50; P less than 0.05). Six affected ewes had no corpus luteum or oestrus, and five of these had adhesions over the genitalia. Hydrops uteri in five other affected ewes was accompanied by prolonged maintenance of the corpus luteum. Some other abnormalities were also observed. In a second study, plasma progesterone concentrations were measured twice daily in 12 affected ewes which were run with rams. Five ewes had oestrous cycles of abnormal duration (two of more than 23 days, two of 21 days, and one of 11 days), and these were accompanied by plasma progesterone patterns different from those of the ewes with an oestrous cycle duration of 16-18 days. It is concluded that the irregular oestrous cycles in affected ewes are due mainly to abnormal life span and progesterone secretion by the corpus luteum, which in turn largely result from changes in the uterus.

  19. Brain functional connectivity and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulos, E

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade there is extensive evidence to suggest that cognitive functions depending on coordination of distributed neuronal responses are associated with synchronized oscillatory activity in various frequency ranges suggesting a functional mechanism of neural oscillations in cortical networks. In addition to their role in normal brain functioning, there is increasing evidence that altered oscillatory activity may be associated with certain neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. Consequently, disturbances in neural synchronization may represent the functional relationship of disordered connectivity of cortical networks underlying the characteristic fragmentation of mind and behavior in schizophrenia. In recent studies the synchronization of oscillatory activity in the experience of characteristic symptoms such as auditory verbal hallucinations and thought blocks have been studied in patients with schizophrenia. Studies involving analysis of EEG activity obtained from individuals in resting state (in cage Faraday, isolated from external influences and with eyes closed). In patients with schizophrenia and persistent auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) observed a temporary increase in the synchronization phase of α and high θ oscillations of the electroencephalogram (EEG) compared with those of healthy controls and patients without AVHs . This functional hyper-connection manifested in time windows corresponding to experience AVHs, as noted by the patients during the recording of EEG and observed in speech related cortical areas. In another study an interaction of theta and gamma oscillations engages in the production and experience of AVHs. The results showed increased phase coupling between theta and gamma EEG rhythms in the left temporal cortex during AVHs experiences. A more recent study, approaches the thought blocking experience in terms of functional brain connectivity. Thought blocks (TBs) are characterized by regular interruptions of

  20. Estimating Fast Neural Input Using Anatomical and Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, David

    2016-01-01

    In the last 20 years there has been an increased interest in estimating signals that are sent between neurons and brain areas. During this time many new methods have appeared for measuring those signals. Here we review a wide range of methods for which connected neurons can be identified anatomically, by tracing axons that run between the cells, or functionally, by detecting if the activity of two neurons are correlated with a short lag. The signals that are sent between the neurons are represented by the activity in the neurons that are connected to the target population or by the activity at the corresponding synapses. The different methods not only differ in the accuracy of the signal measurement but they also differ in the type of signal being measured. For example, unselective recording of all neurons in the source population encompasses more indirect pathways to the target population than if one selectively record from the neurons that project to the target population. Infact, this degree of selectivity is similar to that of optogenetic perturbations; one can perturb selectively or unselectively. Thus it becomes possible to match a given signal measurement method with a signal perturbation method, something that allows for an exact input control to any neuronal population. PMID:28066189

  1. Preliminary differences in resting state MEG functional connectivity pre- and post-ketamine in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Allison C; Robinson, Stephen E; Coppola, Richard; Zarate, Carlos A

    2016-08-30

    Functional neuroimaging techniques including magnetoencephalography (MEG) have demonstrated that the brain is organized into networks displaying correlated activity. Group connectivity differences between healthy controls and participants with major depressive disorder (MDD) can be detected using temporal independent components analysis (ICA) on beta-bandpass filtered Hilbert envelope MEG data. However, the response of these networks to treatment is unknown. Ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, exerts rapid antidepressant effects. We obtained MEG recordings before and after open-label infusion of 0.5mg/kg ketamine in MDD subjects (N=13) and examined networks previously shown to differ between healthy individuals and those with MDD. Connectivity between the amygdala and an insulo-temporal component decreased post-ketamine in MDD subjects towards that observed in control subjects at baseline. Decreased baseline connectivity of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) with a bilateral precentral network had previously been observed in MDD compared to healthy controls, and the change in connectivity post-ketamine was proportional to the change in sgACC glucose metabolism in a subset (N=8) of subjects receiving [11F]FDG-PET imaging. Ketamine appeared to reduce connectivity, regardless of whether connectivity was abnormally high or low compared to controls at baseline. These preliminary findings suggest that sgACC connectivity may be directly related to glutamate levels.

  2. Brain structures and functional connectivity associated with individual differences in Internet tendency in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Li, Yadan; Yang, Wenjing; Zhang, Qinglin; Wei, Dongtao; Li, Wenfu; Hitchman, Glenn; Qiu, Jiang

    2015-04-01

    Internet addiction (IA) incurs significant social and financial costs in the form of physical side-effects, academic and occupational impairment, and serious relationship problems. The majority of previous studies on Internet addiction disorders (IAD) have focused on structural and functional abnormalities, while few studies have simultaneously investigated the structural and functional brain alterations underlying individual differences in IA tendencies measured by questionnaires in a healthy sample. Here we combined structural (regional gray matter volume, rGMV) and functional (resting-state functional connectivity, rsFC) information to explore the neural mechanisms underlying IAT in a large sample of 260 healthy young adults. The results showed that IAT scores were significantly and positively correlated with rGMV in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, one key node of the cognitive control network, CCN), which might reflect reduced functioning of inhibitory control. More interestingly, decreased anticorrelations between the right DLPFC and the medial prefrontal cortex/rostral anterior cingulate cortex (mPFC/rACC, one key node of the default mode network, DMN) were associated with higher IAT scores, which might be associated with reduced efficiency of the CCN and DMN (e.g., diminished cognitive control and self-monitoring). Furthermore, the Stroop interference effect was positively associated with the volume of the DLPFC and with the IA scores, as well as with the connectivity between DLPFC and mPFC, which further indicated that rGMV variations in the DLPFC and decreased anticonnections between the DLPFC and mPFC may reflect addiction-related reduced inhibitory control and cognitive efficiency. These findings suggest the combination of structural and functional information can provide a valuable basis for further understanding of the mechanisms and pathogenesis of IA.

  3. Abnormal GABAergic function and face processing in schizophrenia: A pharmacologic-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Tso, Ivy F; Fang, Yu; Phan, K Luan; Welsh, Robert C; Taylor, Stephan F

    2015-10-01

    The involvement of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system in schizophrenia is suggested by postmortem studies and the common use of GABA receptor-potentiating agents in treatment. In a recent study, we used a benzodiazepine challenge to demonstrate abnormal GABAergic function during processing of negative visual stimuli in schizophrenia. This study extended this investigation by mapping GABAergic mechanisms associated with face processing and social appraisal in schizophrenia using a benzodiazepine challenge. Fourteen stable, medicated schizophrenia/schizoaffective patients (SZ) and 13 healthy controls (HC) underwent functional MRI using the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) technique while they performed the Socio-emotional Preference Task (SePT) on emotional face stimuli ("Do you like this face?"). Participants received single-blinded intravenous saline and lorazepam (LRZ) in two separate sessions separated by 1-3weeks. Both SZ and HC recruited medial prefrontal cortex/anterior cingulate during the SePT, relative to gender identification. A significant drug by group interaction was observed in the medial occipital cortex, such that SZ showed increased BOLD signal to LRZ challenge, while HC showed an expected decrease of signal; the interaction did not vary by task. The altered BOLD response to LRZ challenge in SZ was significantly correlated with increased negative affect across multiple measures. The altered response to LRZ challenge suggests that abnormal face processing and negative affect in SZ are associated with altered GABAergic function in the visual cortex, underscoring the role of impaired visual processing in socio-emotional deficits in schizophrenia.

  4. Link prediction boosted psychiatry disorder classification for functional connectivity network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiwei; Mei, Xue; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Jiashuang

    2017-02-01

    Functional connectivity network (FCN) is an effective tool in psychiatry disorders classification, and represents cross-correlation of the regional blood oxygenation level dependent signal. However, FCN is often incomplete for suffering from missing and spurious edges. To accurate classify psychiatry disorders and health control with the incomplete FCN, we first `repair' the FCN with link prediction, and then exact the clustering coefficients as features to build a weak classifier for every FCN. Finally, we apply a boosting algorithm to combine these weak classifiers for improving classification accuracy. Our method tested by three datasets of psychiatry disorder, including Alzheimer's Disease, Schizophrenia and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. The experimental results show our method not only significantly improves the classification accuracy, but also efficiently reconstructs the incomplete FCN.

  5. [Functional characteristics of the basic internal system of hippocampal connections].

    PubMed

    Kichigina, V F; Bragin, A G

    1976-01-01

    Functional characteristics of two main intrahippocampal connections (dentate fascia-field CA3 and field CA3-field CA1) were studied in unanesthetized rabbits. Electrical stimulation of FD or CA3 was used during extracellular recording of the CA3 or CA1 neuronal activity, respectively. The system CA3-CA1 is a highly effective, with a very narrow threshold zone and wide range of active frequencies. The process of recruitment during continuous rhythmic stimulation is weak, any signs of prolonged potentiation are absent. The system FD-CA3 is characterized by low effeciency, a wide threshold zone, narrow range of active frequencies. It is able of gradual building up and prolonged preservation of potentiated state. The morphological reasons of these differences and possible role of these systems in the hippocampal activity are discussed.

  6. Altered functional brain connectivity in a non-clinical sample of young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Cocchi, Luca; Bramati, Ivanei E; Zalesky, Andrew; Furukawa, Emi; Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Moll, Jorge; Tripp, Gail; Mattos, Paulo

    2012-12-05

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity that often persist in adulthood. There is a growing consensus that ADHD is associated with abnormal function of diffuse brain networks, but such alterations remain poorly characterized. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we characterized multivariate (complex network measures), bivariate (network-based statistic), and univariate (regional homogeneity) properties of brain networks in a non-clinical, drug-naive sample of high-functioning young men and women with ADHD (nine males, seven females) and a group of matched healthy controls. Data from our sample allowed the isolation of intrinsic functional connectivity alterations specific to ADHD diagnosis and symptoms that are not related to developmental delays, general cognitive dysfunction, or history of medication use. Multivariate results suggested that frontal, temporal, and occipital cortices were abnormally connected locally as well as with the rest of the brain in individuals with ADHD. Results from the network-based statistic support and extend multivariate results by isolating two brain networks comprising regions between which inter-regional connectivity was significantly altered in the ADHD group; namely, a frontal amygdala-occipital network and a frontal temporal-occipital network. Brain behavior correlations further highlighted the key role of altered orbitofrontal-temporal and frontal-amygdala connectivity for symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. All univariate properties were similar between groups. Taken together, results from this study show that the diagnosis and the two main symptom dimensions of ADHD are related to altered intrinsic connectivity in orbitofrontal-temporal-occipital and fronto-amygdala-occipital networks. Accordingly, our findings highlight the importance of extending the conceptualization of ADHD beyond segregated fronto

  7. Neurolinguistics: Structure, Function, and Connectivity in the Bilingual Brain.

    PubMed

    Wong, Becky; Yin, Bin; O'Brien, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging techniques and analytic methods have led to a proliferation of studies investigating the impact of bilingualism on the cognitive and brain systems in humans. Lately, these findings have attracted much interest and debate in the field, leading to a number of recent commentaries and reviews. Here, we contribute to the ongoing discussion by compiling and interpreting the plethora of findings that relate to the structural, functional, and connective changes in the brain that ensue from bilingualism. In doing so, we integrate theoretical models and empirical findings from linguistics, cognitive/developmental psychology, and neuroscience to examine the following issues: (1) whether the language neural network is different for first (dominant) versus second (nondominant) language processing; (2) the effects of bilinguals' executive functioning on the structure and function of the "universal" language neural network; (3) the differential effects of bilingualism on phonological, lexical-semantic, and syntactic aspects of language processing on the brain; and (4) the effects of age of acquisition and proficiency of the user's second language in the bilingual brain, and how these have implications for future research in neurolinguistics.

  8. Functional connectivity of the striatum in experts of stenography

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takehito; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stenography, or shorthand, is a unique set of skills that involves intensive training which is nearly life-long and orchestrating various brain functional modules, including auditory, linguistic, cognitive, mnemonic, and motor. Stenography provides cognitive neuroscientists with a unique opportunity to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the neural plasticity that enables such a high degree of expertise. However, shorthand is quickly being replaced with voice recognition technology. We took this nearly final opportunity to scan the brains of the last alive shorthand experts of the Japanese language. Methods Thirteen right-handed stenographers and fourteen right-handed controls participated in the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Results The fMRI data revealed plastic reorganization of the neural circuits around the putamen. The acquisition of expert skills was accompanied by structural and functional changes in the area. The posterior putamen is known as the execution center of acquired sensorimotor skills. Compared to nonexperts, the posterior putamen in stenographers had high covariation with the cerebellum and midbrain.The stenographers' brain developed different neural circuits from those of the nonexpert brain. Conclusions The current data illustrate the vigorous plasticity in the putamen and in its connectivity to other relevant areas in the expert brain. This is a case of vigorous neural plastic reorganization in response to massive overtraining, which is rare especially considering that it occurred in adulthood. PMID:25874166

  9. Neurolinguistics: Structure, Function, and Connectivity in the Bilingual Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Becky; Yin, Bin; O'Brien, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging techniques and analytic methods have led to a proliferation of studies investigating the impact of bilingualism on the cognitive and brain systems in humans. Lately, these findings have attracted much interest and debate in the field, leading to a number of recent commentaries and reviews. Here, we contribute to the ongoing discussion by compiling and interpreting the plethora of findings that relate to the structural, functional, and connective changes in the brain that ensue from bilingualism. In doing so, we integrate theoretical models and empirical findings from linguistics, cognitive/developmental psychology, and neuroscience to examine the following issues: (1) whether the language neural network is different for first (dominant) versus second (nondominant) language processing; (2) the effects of bilinguals' executive functioning on the structure and function of the “universal” language neural network; (3) the differential effects of bilingualism on phonological, lexical-semantic, and syntactic aspects of language processing on the brain; and (4) the effects of age of acquisition and proficiency of the user's second language in the bilingual brain, and how these have implications for future research in neurolinguistics. PMID:26881224

  10. Topographical functional connectivity patterns exist in the congenitally, prelingually deaf

    PubMed Central

    Striem-Amit, Ella; Almeida, Jorge; Belledonne, Mario; Chen, Quanjing; Fang, Yuxing; Han, Zaizhu; Caramazza, Alfonso; Bi, Yanchao

    2016-01-01

    Congenital deafness causes large changes in the auditory cortex structure and function, such that without early childhood cochlear-implant, profoundly deaf children do not develop intact, high-level, auditory functions. But how is auditory cortex organization affected by congenital, prelingual, and long standing deafness? Does the large-scale topographical organization of the auditory cortex develop in people deaf from birth? And is it retained despite cross-modal plasticity? We identified, using fMRI, topographic tonotopy-based functional connectivity (FC) structure in humans in the core auditory cortex, its extending tonotopic gradients in the belt and even beyond that. These regions show similar FC structure in the congenitally deaf throughout the auditory cortex, including in the language areas. The topographic FC pattern can be identified reliably in the vast majority of the deaf, at the single subject level, despite the absence of hearing-aid use and poor oral language skills. These findings suggest that large-scale tonotopic-based FC does not require sensory experience to develop, and is retained despite life-long auditory deprivation and cross-modal plasticity. Furthermore, as the topographic FC is retained to varying degrees among the deaf subjects, it may serve to predict the potential for auditory rehabilitation using cochlear implants in individual subjects. PMID:27427158

  11. Graph theoretical analysis of EEG functional connectivity during music perception.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjie; Zhang, Junsong; Liu, Chu; Liu, Dongwei; Ding, Xiaojun; Zhou, Changle

    2012-11-05

    The present study evaluated the effect of music on large-scale structure of functional brain networks using graph theoretical concepts. While most studies on music perception used Western music as an acoustic stimulus, Guqin music, representative of Eastern music, was selected for this experiment to increase our knowledge of music perception. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from non-musician volunteers in three conditions: Guqin music, noise and silence backgrounds. Phase coherence was calculated in the alpha band and between all pairs of EEG channels to construct correlation matrices. Each resulting matrix was converted into a weighted graph using a threshold, and two network measures: the clustering coefficient and characteristic path length were calculated. Music perception was found to display a higher level mean phase coherence. Over the whole range of thresholds, the clustering coefficient was larger while listening to music, whereas the path length was smaller. Networks in music background still had a shorter characteristic path length even after the correction for differences in mean synchronization level among background conditions. This topological change indicated a more optimal structure under music perception. Thus, prominent small-world properties are confirmed in functional brain networks. Furthermore, music perception shows an increase of functional connectivity and an enhancement of small-world network organizations.

  12. Increased Functional Connectivity Between Subcortical and Cortical Resting-State Networks in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cerliani, Leonardo; Mennes, Maarten; Thomas, Rajat M.; Di Martino, Adriana; Thioux, Marc; Keysers, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Importance Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit severe difficulties in social interaction, motor coordination, behavioral flexibility, and atypical sensory processing, with considerable interindividual variability. This heterogeneous set of symptoms recently led to investigating the presence of abnormalities in the interaction across large-scale brain networks. To date, studies have focused either on constrained sets of brain regions or whole-brain analysis, rather than focusing on the interaction between brain networks. Objectives To compare the intrinsic functional connectivity between brain networks in a large sample of individuals with ASD and typically developing control subjects and to estimate to what extent group differences would predict autistic traits and reflect different developmental trajectories. Design, Setting, and Participants We studied 166 male individuals (mean age, 17.6 years; age range, 7-50 years) diagnosed as having DSM-IV-TR autism or Asperger syndrome and 193 typical developing male individuals (mean age, 16.9 years; age range, 6.5-39.4 years) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants were matched for age, IQ, head motion, and eye status (open or closed) in the MRI scanner. We analyzed data from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE), an aggregated MRI data set from 17 centers, made public in August 2012. Main Outcomes and Measures We estimated correlations between time courses of brain networks extracted using a data-driven method (independent component analysis). Subsequently, we associated estimates of interaction strength between networks with age and autistic traits indexed by the Social Responsiveness Scale. Results Relative to typically developing control participants, individuals with ASD showed increased functional connectivity between primary sensory networks and subcortical networks (thalamus and basal ganglia) (all t ≥ 3.13, P < .001 corrected). The strength of

  13. Mutual connectivity analysis (MCA) using generalized radial basis function neural networks for nonlinear functional connectivity network recovery in resting-state functional MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Zainul; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the applicability of a computational framework, called mutual connectivity analysis (MCA), for directed functional connectivity analysis in both synthetic and resting-state functional MRI data. This framework comprises of first evaluating non-linear cross-predictability between every pair of time series prior to recovering the underlying network structure using community detection algorithms. We obtain the non-linear cross-prediction score between time series using Generalized Radial Basis Functions (GRBF) neural networks. These cross-prediction scores characterize the underlying functionally connected networks within the resting brain, which can be extracted using non-metric clustering approaches, such as the Louvain method. We first test our approach on synthetic models with known directional influence and network structure. Our method is able to capture the directional relationships between time series (with an area under the ROC curve = 0.92 +/- 0.037) as well as the underlying network structure (Rand index = 0.87 +/- 0.063) with high accuracy. Furthermore, we test this method for network recovery on resting-state fMRI data, where results are compared to the motor cortex network recovered from a motor stimulation sequence, resulting in a strong agreement between the two (Dice coefficient = 0.45). We conclude that our MCA approach is effective in analyzing non-linear directed functional connectivity and in revealing underlying functional network structure in complex systems.

  14. Structural and functional brain abnormalities place phenocopy frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in the FTD spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Steketee, Rebecca M.E.; Meijboom, Rozanna; Bron, Esther E.; Osse, Robert Jan; de Koning, Inge; Jiskoot, Lize C.; Klein, Stefan; de Jong, Frank Jan; van der Lugt, Aad; van Swieten, John C.; Smits, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Purpose ‘Phenocopy’ frontotemporal dementia (phFTD) patients may clinically mimic the behavioral variant of FTD (bvFTD), but do not show functional decline or abnormalities upon visual inspection of routine neuroimaging. We aimed to identify abnormalities in gray matter (GM) volume and perfusion in phFTD and to assess whether phFTD belongs to the FTD spectrum. We compared phFTD patients with both healthy controls and bvFTD patients. Materials & methods Seven phFTD and 11 bvFTD patients, and 20 age-matched controls underwent structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) at 3T. Normalized GM (nGM) volumes and perfusion, corrected for partial volume effects, were quantified regionally as well as in the entire supratentorial cortex, and compared between groups taking into account potential confounding effects of gender and scanner. Results PhFTD patients showed cortical atrophy, most prominently in the right temporal lobe. Apart from this regional atrophy, GM volume was generally not different from either controls or from bvFTD. BvFTD however showed extensive frontotemporal atrophy. Perfusion was increased in the left prefrontal cortex compared to bvFTD and to a lesser extent to controls. Conclusion PhFTD and bvFTD show overlapping cortical structural abnormalities indicating a continuum of changes especially in the frontotemporal regions. Together with functional changes suggestive of a compensatory response to incipient pathology in the left prefrontal regions, these findings are the first to support a possible neuropathological etiology of phFTD and suggest that phFTD may be a neurodegenerative disease on the FTD spectrum. PMID:27222795

  15. Abnormalities of mitochondrial functioning can partly explain the metabolic disorders encountered in sarcopenic gastrocnemius.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caroline; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Mosoni, Laurent; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Oudot, Alexandra; Fontaine, Eric; Vergely, Catherine; Keriel, Christiane; Rochette, Luc; Leverve, Xavier; Demaison, Luc

    2007-04-01

    Aging triggers several abnormalities in muscle glycolytic fibers including increased proteolysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis. Since the mitochondria are the main site of substrate oxidation, ROS production and programmed cell death, we tried to know whether the cellular disorders encountered in sarcopenia are due to abnormal mitochondrial functioning. Gastrocnemius mitochondria were extracted from adult (6 months) and aged (21 months) male Wistar rats. Respiration parameters, opening of the permeability transition pore and ROS production, with either glutamate (amino acid metabolism) or pyruvate (glucose metabolism) as a respiration substrate, were evaluated at different matrix calcium concentrations. Pyruvate dehydrogenase and respiratory complex activities as well as their contents measured by Western blotting analysis were determined. Furthermore, the fatty acid profile of mitochondrial phospholipids was also measured. At physiological calcium concentration, state III respiration rate was lowered by aging in pyruvate conditions (-22%), but not with glutamate. The reduction of pyruvate oxidation resulted from a calcium-dependent inactivation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase system and could provide for the well-known proteolysis encountered during sarcopenia. Matrix calcium loading and aging increased ROS production. They also reduced the oxidative phosphorylation. This was associated with lower calcium retention capacities, suggesting that sarcopenic fibers are more prone to programmed cell death. Aging was also associated with a reduced mitochondrial superoxide dismutase activity, which does not intervene in toxic ROS overproduction but could explain the lower calcium retention capacities. Despite a lower content, cytochrome c oxidase displayed an increased activity associated with an increased n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio of mitochondrial phospholipids. In conclusion, we propose that mitochondria obtained from aged muscle

  16. Functional evaluation of an inherited abnormal fibrinogen: fibrinogen “Baltimore”

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Eugene A.; Shainoff, John R.; Vogel, Alfred; Jackson, Dudley P.

    1971-01-01

    The rate of clotting and the rate of development and degree of turbidity after addition of thrombin to plasma or purified fibrinogen from a patient with fibrinogen Baltimore was delayed when compared with normal, especially in the presence of low concentrations of thrombin. Optimal coagulation and development of translucent, rather than opaque, clots occurred at a lower pH with the abnormal fibrinogen than with normal. Development of turbidity during clotting of the abnormal plasma or fibrinogen was less than normal at each pH tested, but was maximal in both at approximately pH 6.4. The physical quality of clots formed from fibrinogen Baltimore was abnormal, as demonstrated by a decreased amplitude on thromboelastography. The morphologic appearance of fibrin strands formed from fibrinogen Baltimore by thrombin at pH 7.4 was abnormal when examined by phase contrast or electron microscopy, but those formed by thrombin at pH 6.4 or by thrombin and calcium chloride were similar to, though less compact, than normal fibrin. The periodicity of fibrin formed from fibrinogen Baltimore was similar to normal and was 231-233 Å. A study of the release of the fibrinopeptides from the patient's fibrinogen and its chromatographic subfractions verified the existence of both a normally behaving and a defective form of fibrinogen in the patient's plasma. The defective form differed from normal in three functionally different ways: (a) the rate of release of fibrinopeptides A and AP was slower than normal; (b) no visible clot formation accompanied either partial or complete release of the fibrinopeptides from the defective form in 0.3 M NaCl at pH 7.4; and (c) the defective component possessed a high proportion of phosphorylated, relative to nonphosphorylated, fibrinopeptide A, while the coagulable component contained very little of the phosphorylated peptide (AP). The high phosphate content of the defective component did not appear to be the cause of the abnormality, but may be the

  17. Exercise tolerance, lung function abnormalities, anemia, and cardiothoracic ratio in sickle cell patients.

    PubMed

    van Beers, Eduard J; van der Plas, Mart N; Nur, Erfan; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; van Steenwijk, Reindert P; Biemond, Bart J; Bresser, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Many patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have a reduced exercise capacity and abnormal lung function. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) can identify causes of exercise limitation. Forty-four consecutive SCD patients (27 HbSS, 11 HbSC, and 6 HbS-beta thalassemia) with a median age (interquartile range) of 26 (21-41) years underwent pulmonary function tests, CPET, chest x-ray, and echocardiography to further characterize exercise limitation in SCD. Peak oxygen uptake (V'O2 -peak), expressing maximum exercise capacity, was decreased in 83% of the studied patients. V'O2 -peak correlated with hemoglobin levels (R = 0.440, P = 0.005), forced vital capacity (FVC) (R = 0.717, P < 0.0001). Cardiothoracic ratio on chest x-ray inversely correlated with FVC (R = -0.637, P < 0.001). According to criteria for exercise limitation, the patients were limited in exercise capacity due to anemia (n = 17), cardiovascular dysfunction (n = 2), musculoskeletal function (n = 10), pulmonary ventilatory abnormalities (n = 1), pulmonary vascular exercise limitation (n = 1), and poor effort (n = 3). In the present study we demonstrate that anemia is the most important determinant of reduced exercise tolerance observed in SCD patients without signs of pulmonary hypertension. We found a strong correlation between various parameters of lung volume and cardiothoracic ratio and we hypothesize that cardiomegaly and relative small chest size may be important causes of the impairment in pulmonary function, that is, reduced long volumes and diffusion capacity, in SCD. Taking into account anthropomorphic differences between SCD patients and controls could help to interpret lung function studies in SCD better.

  18. Presynaptic Inhibitory Terminals Are Functionally Abnormal in a Rat Model of Posttraumatic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Leonardo C.

    2010-01-01

    Partially isolated “undercut” neocortex with intact pial circulation is a well-established model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. Results of previous experiments showed a decreased frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in layer V pyramidal (Pyr) neurons of undercuts. We further examined possible functional abnormalities in GABAergic inhibition in rat epileptogenic neocortical slices in vitro by recording whole cell monosynaptic IPSCs in layer V Pyr cells and fast-spiking (FS) GABAergic interneurons using a paired pulse paradigm. Compared with controls, IPSCs in Pyr neurons of injured slices showed increased threshold and decreased peak amplitude at threshold, decreased input/output slopes, increased failure rates, and a shift from paired pulse depression toward paired pulse facilitation (increased paired pulse ratio or PPR). Increasing [Ca2+]o from 2 to 4 mM partially reversed these abnormalities in Pyr cells of the epileptogenic tissue. IPSCs onto FS cells also had an increased PPR and failures. Blockade of GABAB receptors did not affect the paired results. These findings suggest that there are functional alterations in GABAergic presynaptic terminals onto both Pyr and FS cells in this model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. PMID:20484536

  19. Abnormalities in itch sensation and skin barrier function in atopic NC/Tnd mice.

    PubMed

    Amagai, Yosuke; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by dryness and itchy skin. Genetic factors as well as other factors, including abnormality in skin barrier function, hypersensitivity of itch sensory nerves, and dysfunction of the immune system, strongly affect the onset and exacerbation of AD. Recently, it has become clear that itch sensation is closely related to pain sensation. By using NC/Tnd mice, a unique spontaneous animal model for human AD, we found abnormalities in sensitivity against external stimuli as compared to two standard strains, BALB/c and B6 mice. Particularly, in conventional NC/Tnd mice with AD, stimulation against transient receptor potential (TRP) V1 reduced the scratching behavior, suggesting the possibility of a TRPV1 modulator in the treatment of atopic itch. The review outlines observations regarding itch sensation and skin barrier function in NC/Tnd mice by using a novel itch quantification system for the laboratory animals, which may bring great progress in the future study of itch.

  20. The Association between Resting Functional Connectivity and Visual Creativity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenfu; Yang, Junyi; Zhang, Qinglin; Li, Gongying; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), the temporal correlation of intrinsic activation between different brain regions, has become one of the most fascinating field in the functional imaging studies. To better understand the association between RSFC and individual creativity, we used RSFC and the figure Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT-F) to investigate the relationship between creativity measured by TTCT and RSFC within two different brain networks, default mode network and the cognitive control network, in a large healthy sample (304). We took the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFC) to be the seed regions and investigated the association across subjects between the score of TTCT-F and the strength of RSFC between these seed regions and other voxels in the whole brain. Results revealed that the strength of RSFC with the MPFC was significantly and negatively correlated with the score of TTCT-F in the precuneus. Meanwhile, we also found that the strength of RSFC with the left DLPFC was significantly and positively correlated with the score of TTCT-F in the right DLPFC. It suggests that the decreased RSFC within DMN and the increased RSFC within CCN presents a potential interaction mechanism between different region for higher creativity. PMID:27138732

  1. The Vitamin D Connection to Pediatric Infections and Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Valencia P; Modlin, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, a resurgence in vitamin D deficiency and nutritional rickets has been reported throughout the world, including the United States. Inadequate serum vitamin D concentrations have also been associated with complications from other health problems, including tuberculosis, cancer (prostate, breast and colon), multiple sclerosis and diabetes. These findings support the concept of vitamin D possessing important pleiotropic actions outside of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. In children, an association between nutritional rickets with respiratory compromise has long been recognized. Recent epidemiological studies clearly demonstrate the link between vitamin D deficiency and the increased incidence of respiratory infections. Further research has also elucidated the contribution of vitamin D in the host defense response to infection. However, the mechanism(s) by which vitamin D levels contribute to pediatric infections and immune function has yet to be determined. This knowledge is particularly relevant and timely, because infants and children appear more susceptible to viral rather than bacterial infections in the face of vitamin D deficiency. The connection between vitamin D, infections and immune function in the pediatric population indicates a possible role for vitamin D supplementation in potential interventions and adjuvant therapies. PMID:19190532

  2. The association between resting functional connectivity and creativity.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Nagase, Tomomi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2012-12-01

    The analysis of functional connectivity at rest (rFC) enables us to know how brain regions within and between networks interact. In this study, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and a creativity test of divergent thinking (DT) to investigate the relationship between creativity measured by DT and rFC. We took the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) to be the seed region and investigated correlations across subjects between the score of the DT test and the strength of rFC between the mPFC and other brain regions. Our results showed that the strength of rFC with the mPFC significantly and positively correlated with creativity as measured by the DT test in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). These results showed that higher creativity measured by DT is associated with rFC between the mPFC and the PCC, the key nodes of the default mode network (DMN). Increased rFC between these regions is completely opposite from that is generally expected from the association between higher creativity and reduced deactivation in DMN during an externally directed attention-demanding task shown in our previous study but is similar to the pattern seen in relatives of schizophrenia. These findings are comparable to the previously reported psychological associations between schizotypy and creativity.

  3. Reliability correction for functional connectivity: Theory and implementation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sophia; Wang, Danhong; Fox, Michael D; Pan, Ruiqi; Lu, Jie; Li, Kuncheng; Sun, Wei; Buckner, Randy L; Liu, Hesheng

    2015-11-01

    Network properties can be estimated using functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI). However, regional variation of the fMRI signal causes systematic biases in network estimates including correlation attenuation in regions of low measurement reliability. Here we computed the spatial distribution of fcMRI reliability using longitudinal fcMRI datasets and demonstrated how pre-estimated reliability maps can correct for correlation attenuation. As a test case of reliability-based attenuation correction we estimated properties of the default network, where reliability was significantly lower than average in the medial temporal lobe and higher in the posterior medial cortex, heterogeneity that impacts estimation of the network. Accounting for this bias using attenuation correction revealed that the medial temporal lobe's contribution to the default network is typically underestimated. To render this approach useful to a greater number of datasets, we demonstrate that test-retest reliability maps derived from repeated runs within a single scanning session can be used as a surrogate for multi-session reliability mapping. Using data segments with different scan lengths between 1 and 30 min, we found that test-retest reliability of connectivity estimates increases with scan length while the spatial distribution of reliability is relatively stable even at short scan lengths. Finally, analyses of tertiary data revealed that reliability distribution is influenced by age, neuropsychiatric status and scanner type, suggesting that reliability correction may be especially important when studying between-group differences. Collectively, these results illustrate that reliability-based attenuation correction is an easily implemented strategy that mitigates certain features of fMRI signal nonuniformity.

  4. Abnormal Functional Activation and Connectivity in the Working Memory Network in Early-Onset Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyriakopoulos, Marinos; Dima, Danai; Roiser, Jonathan P.; Corrigall, Richard; Barker, Gareth J.; Frangou, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Disruption within the working memory (WM) neural network is considered an integral feature of schizophrenia. The WM network, and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in particular, undergo significant remodeling in late adolescence. Potential interactions between developmental changes in the WM network and disease-related…

  5. Abnormalities of sodium excretion and other disorders of renal function in fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, S P; Arroyo, V A; Moodie, H; Blendis, L M; Williams, R

    1976-01-01

    Renal function was evaluated in 40 patients with fulminant hepatic failure, They were divided into two groups on the basis of glomerular filtration rates greater than 40 ml/min or less than 25 ml/min. A number of patients in group 1 had markedly abnormal renal retention of sodium together with a reduced free water clearance and low potassium excretion which could be explained by increased proximal tubular reabsorption of sodium. The patients in group 2 had evidence that renal tubular integrity was maintained when the glomerular filtration rate was greater than or equal ml/min (functional renal failure), but evidence of tubular damage was present when this was less than 3 ml/min (acute tubular necrosis). PMID:964682

  6. Is the ADHD brain wired differently? A review on structural and functional connectivity in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Kerstin; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, a change in perspective in etiological models of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has occurred in concordance with emerging concepts in other neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. These models shift the focus of the assumed pathology from regional brain abnormalities to dysfunction in distributed network organization. In the current contribution, we report findings from functional connectivity studies during resting and task states, as well as from studies on structural connectivity using diffusion tensor imaging, in subjects with ADHD. Although major methodological limitations in analyzing connectivity measures derived from noninvasive in vivo neuroimaging still exist, there is convergent evidence for white matter pathology and disrupted anatomical connectivity in ADHD. In addition, dysfunctional connectivity during rest and during cognitive tasks has been demonstrated. However, the causality between disturbed white matter architecture and cortical dysfunction remains to be evaluated. Both genetic and environmental factors might contribute to disruptions in interactions between different brain regions. Stimulant medication not only modulates regionally specific activation strength but also normalizes dysfunctional connectivity, pointing to a predominant network dysfunction in ADHD. By combining a longitudinal approach with a systems perspective in ADHD in the future, it might be possible to identify at which stage during development disruptions in neural networks emerge and to delineate possible new endophenotypes of ADHD.

  7. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that "there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies" to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only

  8. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that “there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies” to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not

  9. Temporal lobe abnormalities in semantic processing by criminal psychopaths as revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kiehl, Kent A; Smith, Andra M; Mendrek, Adrianna; Forster, Bruce B; Hare, Robert D; Liddle, Peter F

    2004-04-30

    We tested the hypothesis that psychopathy is associated with abnormalities in semantic processing of linguistic information. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to elucidate and characterize the neural architecture underlying lexico-semantic processes in criminal psychopathic individuals and in a group of matched control participants. Participants performed a lexical decision task in which blocks of linguistic stimuli alternated with a resting baseline condition. In each lexical decision block, the stimuli were either concrete words and pseudowords or abstract words and pseudowords. Consistent with our hypothesis, psychopathic individuals, relative to controls, showed poorer behavioral performance for processing abstract words. Analysis of the fMRI data for both groups indicated that processing of word stimuli, compared with the resting baseline condition, was associated with neural activation in bilateral fusiform gyrus, anterior cingulate, left middle temporal gyrus, right posterior superior temporal gyrus, and left and right inferior frontal gyrus. Analyses confirmed our prediction that psychopathic individuals would fail to show the appropriate neural differentiation between abstract and concrete stimuli in the right anterior temporal gyrus and surrounding cortex. The results are consistent with other studies of semantic processing in psychopathy and support the theory that psychopathy is associated with right hemisphere abnormalities for processing conceptually abstract material.

  10. Temporal lobe abnormalities in semantic processing by criminal psychopaths as revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kiehl, Kent A; Smith, Andra M; Mendrek, Adrianna; Forster, Bruce B; Hare, Robert D; Liddle, Peter F

    2004-01-15

    We tested the hypothesis that psychopathy is associated with abnormalities in semantic processing of linguistic information. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to elucidate and characterize the neural architecture underlying lexico-semantic processes in criminal psychopathic individuals and in a group of matched control participants. Participants performed a lexical decision task in which blocks of linguistic stimuli alternated with a resting baseline condition. In each lexical decision block, the stimuli were either concrete words and pseudowords or abstract words and pseudowords. Consistent with our hypothesis, psychopathic individuals, relative to controls, showed poorer behavioral performance for processing abstract words. Analysis of the fMRI data for both groups indicated that processing of word stimuli, compared with the resting baseline condition, was associated with neural activation in bilateral fusiform gyrus, anterior cingulate, left middle temporal gyrus, right posterior superior temporal gyrus, and left and right inferior frontal gyrus. Analyses confirmed our prediction that psychopathic individuals would fail to show the appropriate neural differentiation between abstract and concrete stimuli in the right anterior temporal gyrus and surrounding cortex. The results are consistent with other studies of semantic processing in psychopathy and support the theory that psychopathy is associated with right hemisphere abnormalities for processing conceptually abstract material.

  11. Neurological Gait Abnormalities Moderate the Functional Brain Signature of the Posture First Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Joe; Allali, Gilles; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Wang, Cuiling; Mahoney, Jeannette R.

    2015-01-01

    The posture first hypothesis suggests that under dual-task walking conditions older adults prioritize gait over cognitive task performance. Functional neural confirmation of this hypothesis, however, is lacking. Herein, we determined the functional neural correlates of the posture first hypothesis and hypothesized that the presence of neurological gait abnormalities (NGA) would moderate associations between brain activations, gait and cognitive performance. Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy we assessed changes in oxygenated hemoglobin levels in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) during normal walk and walk while talk (WWT) conditions in a large cohort of non-demented older adults (n = 236; age = 75.5 ± 6.49 years; female = 51.7 %). NGA were defined as central (due to brain diseases) or peripheral (neuropathic gait) following a standardized neurological examination protocol. Double dissociations between brain activations and behavior emerged as a function of NGA. Higher oxygenation levels during WWT were related to better cognitive performance (estimate = 0.145; p < 0.001) but slower gait velocity (estimate = −6.336, p <0.05) among normals. In contrast, higher oxygenation levels during WWT among individuals with peripheral NGA were associated with worse cognitive performance (estimate = −0.355; p <0.001) but faster gait velocity (estimate = 14.855; p <0.05). Increased activation in the PFC during locomotion may have a compensatory function that is designed to support gait among individuals with peripheral NGA. PMID:26613725

  12. Positron Emission Tomography Reveals Abnormal Topological Organization in Functional Brain Network in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangzhe; Zhang, Yanjun; Feng, Hongbo; Jiang, Donglang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated alterations in the topological organization of structural brain networks in diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the DM-related changes in the topological properties in functional brain networks are unexplored so far. We therefore used fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data to construct functional brain networks of 73 DM patients and 91 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NCs), followed by a graph theoretical analysis. We found that both DM patients and NCs had a small-world topology in functional brain network. In comparison to the NC group, the DM group was found to have significantly lower small-world index, lower normalized clustering coefficients and higher normalized characteristic path length. Moreover, for diabetic patients, the nodal centrality was significantly reduced in the right rectus, the right cuneus, the left middle occipital gyrus, and the left postcentral gyrus, and it was significantly increased in the orbitofrontal region of the left middle frontal gyrus, the left olfactory region, and the right paracentral lobule. Our results demonstrated that the diabetic brain was associated with disrupted topological organization in the functional PET network, thus providing functional evidence for the abnormalities of brain networks in DM. PMID:27303259

  13. Prokaryotic Chaperonins as Experimental Models for Elucidating Structure-Function Abnormalities of Human Pathogenic Mutant Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Conway de Macario, Everly; Robb, Frank T.; Macario, Alberto J. L.

    2017-01-01

    All archaea have a chaperonin of Group II (thermosome) in their cytoplasm and some have also a chaperonin of Group I (GroEL; Cpn60; Hsp60). Conversely, all bacteria have GroEL, some in various copies, but only a few have, in addition, a chaperonin (tentatively designated Group III chaperonin) very similar to that occurring in all archaea, i.e., the thermosome subunit, and in the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, named CCT. Thus, nature offers a range of prokaryotic organisms that are potentially useful as experimental models to study the human CCT and its abnormalities. This is important because many diseases, the chaperonopathies, have been identified in which abnormal chaperones, including mutant CCT, are determinant etiologic-pathogenic factors and, therefore, research is needed to elucidate their pathologic features at the molecular level. Such research should lead to the clarification of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathologic lesions observed in the tissues and organs of patients with chaperonopathies. Information on these key issues is necessary to make progress in diagnosis and treatment. Some of the archaeal organisms as well as some of the bacterial models suitable for studying molecular aspects pertinent to human mutant chaperones are discussed here, focusing on CCT. Results obtained with the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus model to investigate the impact of a pathogenic CCT5 mutation on molecular properties and chaperoning functions are reviewed. The pathogenic mutation examined weakens the ability of the chaperonin subunit to form stable hexadecamers and as a consequence, the chaperoning functions of the complex are impaired. The future prospect is to find means for stabilizing the hexadecamer, which should lead to a recovering of chaperone function and the improving of lesions and clinical condition. PMID:28119916

  14. Kinesin family 17 (osmotic avoidance abnormal-3) is dispensable for photoreceptor morphology and function

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Tam, Beatrice M.; Ying, Guoxing; Wu, Sen; Hauswirth, William W.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Moritz, Orson L.; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, homodimeric [kinesin family (KIF) 17, osmotic avoidance abnormal-3 (OSM-3)] and heterotrimeric (KIF3) kinesin-2 motors are required to establish sensory cilia by intraflagellar transport (IFT) where KIF3 and KIF17 cooperate to build the axoneme core and KIF17 builds the distal segments. However, the function of KIF17 in vertebrates is unresolved. We expressed full-length and motorless KIF17 constructs in mouse rod photoreceptors using adeno-associated virus in Xenopus laevis rod photoreceptors using a transgene and in ciliated IMCD3 cells. We found that tagged KIF17 localized along the rod outer segment axoneme when expressed in mouse and X. laevis photoreceptors, whereas KIF3A was restricted to the proximal axoneme. Motorless KIF3A and KIF17 mutants caused photoreceptor degeneration, likely through dominant negative effects on IFT. KIF17 mutant lacking the motor domain translocated to nuclei after exposure of a C-terminal nuclear localization signal. Germ-line deletion of Kif17 in mouse did not affect photoreceptor function. A rod-specific Kif3/Kif17 double knockout mouse demonstrated that KIF17 and KIF3 do not act synergistically and did not prevent rhodopsin trafficking to rod outer segments. In summary, the nematode model of KIF3/KIF17 cooperation apparently does not apply to mouse photoreceptors in which the photosensory cilium is built exclusively by KIF3.—Jiang, L., Tam, B. M., Ying, G., Wu, S., Hauswirth, W. W., Frederick, J. M., Moritz, O. L., Baehr, W. Kinesin family 17 (osmotic avoidance abnormal-3) is dispensable for photoreceptor morphology and function. PMID:26229057

  15. Distinct Functional Connectivities Predict Clinical Response with Emotion Regulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fresco, David M.; Roy, Amy K.; Adelsberg, Samantha; Seeley, Saren; García-Lesy, Emmanuel; Liston, Conor; Mennin, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success of available medical and psychosocial treatments, a sizable subgroup of individuals with commonly co-occurring disorders, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), fail to make sufficient treatment gains thereby prolonging their deficits in life functioning and satisfaction. Clinically, these patients often display temperamental features reflecting heightened sensitivity to underlying motivational systems related to threat/safety and reward/loss (e.g., somatic anxiety) as well as inordinate negative self-referential processing (e.g., worry, rumination). This profile may reflect disruption in two important neural networks associated with emotional/motivational salience (e.g., salience network) and self-referentiality (e.g., default network, DN). Emotion Regulation Therapy (ERT) was developed to target this hypothesized profile and its neurobehavioral markers. In the present study, 22 GAD patients (with and without MDD) completed resting state MRI scans before receiving 16 sessions of ERT. To test study these hypotheses, we examined the associations between baseline patterns of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of the insula and of hubs within the DN (anterior and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex [MPFC] and posterior cingulate cortex [PCC]) and treatment-related changes in worry, somatic anxiety symptoms and decentering. Results suggest that greater treatment linked reductions in worry were associated with iFC clusters in both the insular and parietal cortices. Greater treatment linked gains in decentering, a metacognitive process that involves the capacity to observe items that arise in the mind with healthy psychological distance that is targeted by ERT, was associated with iFC clusters in the anterior and posterior DN. The current study adds to the growing body of research implicating disruptions in the default and salience networks as promising targets of treatment for GAD with and without co-occurring MDD

  16. Distinct Functional Connectivities Predict Clinical Response with Emotion Regulation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fresco, David M; Roy, Amy K; Adelsberg, Samantha; Seeley, Saren; García-Lesy, Emmanuel; Liston, Conor; Mennin, Douglas S

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success of available medical and psychosocial treatments, a sizable subgroup of individuals with commonly co-occurring disorders, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), fail to make sufficient treatment gains thereby prolonging their deficits in life functioning and satisfaction. Clinically, these patients often display temperamental features reflecting heightened sensitivity to underlying motivational systems related to threat/safety and reward/loss (e.g., somatic anxiety) as well as inordinate negative self-referential processing (e.g., worry, rumination). This profile may reflect disruption in two important neural networks associated with emotional/motivational salience (e.g., salience network) and self-referentiality (e.g., default network, DN). Emotion Regulation Therapy (ERT) was developed to target this hypothesized profile and its neurobehavioral markers. In the present study, 22 GAD patients (with and without MDD) completed resting state MRI scans before receiving 16 sessions of ERT. To test study these hypotheses, we examined the associations between baseline patterns of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of the insula and of hubs within the DN (anterior and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex [MPFC] and posterior cingulate cortex [PCC]) and treatment-related changes in worry, somatic anxiety symptoms and decentering. Results suggest that greater treatment linked reductions in worry were associated with iFC clusters in both the insular and parietal cortices. Greater treatment linked gains in decentering, a metacognitive process that involves the capacity to observe items that arise in the mind with healthy psychological distance that is targeted by ERT, was associated with iFC clusters in the anterior and posterior DN. The current study adds to the growing body of research implicating disruptions in the default and salience networks as promising targets of treatment for GAD with and without co-occurring MDD.

  17. Sex and Age Effects of Functional Connectivity in Early Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Cahill, Nathan D; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R; White, Tonya; Baum, Stefi A; Michael, Andrew M

    2016-11-01

    Functional connectivity (FC) in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) is widely used to find coactivating regions in the human brain. Despite its widespread use, the effects of sex and age on resting FC are not well characterized, especially during early adulthood. Here we apply regression and graph theoretical analyses to explore the effects of sex and age on FC between the 116 AAL atlas parcellations (a total of 6670 FC measures). rs-fMRI data of 494 healthy subjects (203 males and 291 females; age range: 22-36 years) from the Human Connectome Project were analyzed. We report the following findings. (1) Males exhibited greater FC than females in 1352 FC measures (1025 survived Bonferroni correction; [Formula: see text]). In 641 FC measures, females exhibited greater FC than males but none survived Bonferroni correction. Significant FC differences were mainly present in frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes. Although the average FC values for males and females were significantly different, FC values of males and females exhibited large overlap. (2) Age effects were present only in 29 FC measures and all significant age effects showed higher FC in younger subjects. Age and sex differences of FC remained significant after controlling for cognitive measures. (3) Although sex [Formula: see text] age interaction did not survive multiple comparison correction, FC in females exhibited a faster cross-sectional decline with age. (4) Male brains were more locally clustered in all lobes but the cerebellum; female brains had a higher clustering coefficient at the whole-brain level. Our results indicate that although both male and female brains show small-world network characteristics, male brains were more segregated and female brains were more integrated. Findings of this study further our understanding of FC in early adulthood and provide evidence to support that age and sex should be controlled for in FC studies of young adults.

  18. Guiding functional connectivity estimation by structural connectivity in MEG: an application to discrimination of conditions of mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Pardo, José Angel; Bruña, Ricardo; Woolrich, Mark; Marcos, Alberto; Nobre, Anna C.; Maestú, Fernando; Vidaurre, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Whole brain resting state connectivity is a promising biomarker that might help to obtain an early diagnosis in many neurological diseases, such as dementia. Inferring resting-state connectivity is often based on correlations, which are sensitive to indirect connections, leading to an inaccurate representation of the real backbone of the network. The precision matrix is a better representation for whole brain connectivity, as it considers only direct connections. The network structure can be estimated using the graphical lasso (GL), which achieves sparsity through l1-regularization on the precision matrix. In this paper, we propose a structural connectivity adaptive version of the GL, where weaker anatomical connections are represented as stronger penalties on the corresponding functional connections. We applied beamformer source reconstruction to the resting state MEG recordings of 81 subjects, where 29 were healthy controls, 22 were single-domain amnestic Mild Cognitive Impaired (MCI), and 30 were multiple-domain amnestic MCI. An atlas-based anatomical parcellation of 66 regions was obtained for each subject, and time series were assigned to each of the regions. The fiber densities between the regions, obtained with deterministic tractography from diffusion-weighted MRI, were used to define the anatomical connectivity. Precision matrices were obtained with the region specific time series in five different frequency bands. We compared our method with the traditional GL and a functional adaptive version of the GL, in terms of log-likelihood and classification accuracies between the three groups. We conclude that introducing an anatomical prior improves the expressivity of the model and, in most cases, leads to a better classification between groups. PMID:25111472

  19. Efficient Computation of Functional Brain Networks: toward Real-Time Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    García-Prieto, Juan; Bajo, Ricardo; Pereda, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Functional Connectivity has demonstrated to be a key concept for unraveling how the brain balances functional segregation and integration properties while processing information. This work presents a set of open-source tools that significantly increase computational efficiency of some well-known connectivity indices and Graph-Theory measures. PLV, PLI, ImC, and wPLI as Phase Synchronization measures, Mutual Information as an information theory based measure, and Generalized Synchronization indices are computed much more efficiently than prior open-source available implementations. Furthermore, network theory related measures like Strength, Shortest Path Length, Clustering Coefficient, and Betweenness Centrality are also implemented showing computational times up to thousands of times faster than most well-known implementations. Altogether, this work significantly expands what can be computed in feasible times, even enabling whole-head real-time network analysis of brain function. PMID:28220071

  20. Efficient Computation of Functional Brain Networks: toward Real-Time Functional Connectivity.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, Juan; Bajo, Ricardo; Pereda, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Functional Connectivity has demonstrated to be a key concept for unraveling how the brain balances functional segregation and integration properties while processing information. This work presents a set of open-source tools that significantly increase computational efficiency of some well-known connectivity indices and Graph-Theory measures. PLV, PLI, ImC, and wPLI as Phase Synchronization measures, Mutual Information as an information theory based measure, and Generalized Synchronization indices are computed much more efficiently than prior open-source available implementations. Furthermore, network theory related measures like Strength, Shortest Path Length, Clustering Coefficient, and Betweenness Centrality are also implemented showing computational times up to thousands of times faster than most well-known implementations. Altogether, this work significantly expands what can be computed in feasible times, even enabling whole-head real-time network analysis of brain function.

  1. Estimation of Directed Effective Connectivity from fMRI Functional Connectivity Hints at Asymmetries of Cortical Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, Matthieu; Moreno-Bote, Ruben; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Ritter, Petra; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The brain exhibits complex spatio-temporal patterns of activity. This phenomenon is governed by an interplay between the internal neural dynamics of cortical areas and their connectivity. Uncovering this complex relationship has raised much interest, both for theory and the interpretation of experimental data (e.g., fMRI recordings) using dynamical models. Here we focus on the so-called inverse problem: the inference of network parameters in a cortical model to reproduce empirically observed activity. Although it has received a lot of interest, recovering directed connectivity for large networks has been rather unsuccessful so far. The present study specifically addresses this point for a noise-diffusion network model. We develop a Lyapunov optimization that iteratively tunes the network connectivity in order to reproduce second-order moments of the node activity, or functional connectivity. We show theoretically and numerically that the use of covariances with both zero and non-zero time shifts is the key to infer directed connectivity. The first main theoretical finding is that an accurate estimation of the underlying network connectivity requires that the time shift for covariances is matched with the time constant of the dynamical system. In addition to the network connectivity, we also adjust the intrinsic noise received by each network node. The framework is applied to experimental fMRI data recorded for subjects at rest. Diffusion-weighted MRI data provide an estimate of anatomical connections, which is incorporated to constrain the cortical model. The empirical covariance structure is reproduced faithfully, especially its temporal component (i.e., time-shifted covariances) in addition to the spatial component that is usually the focus of studies. We find that the cortical interactions, referred to as effective connectivity, in the tuned model are not reciprocal. In particular, hubs are either receptors or feeders: they do not exhibit both strong incoming

  2. Abnormalities in Parentally Rated Executive Function in Methamphetamine/Polysubstance Exposed Children

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Brian J.; Acevedo, Summer F.; Kolchugina, Galena K.; Butler, Robert W.; Corbett, Selena M.; Honeycutt, Elizabeth B.; Craytor, Michael J.; Raber, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine/polysubstance abuse in women of childbearing age is a major concern because of the potential long-term detrimental effects on the brain function of the fetus following in utero exposure. A battery of established tests, including the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Conners’ Continuous Performance Test II, Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function, the CMS Family Pictures and Dot Location tests, the Spatial Span test from the WISC-IV-Integrated, and a recently developed spatial learning and memory measure (Memory Island), was used to assess the effects of prenatal drug exposure on neurobehavioral performance. Participants were 7 to 9 year old children from similar socioeconomic backgrounds who either had (N = 31) or had not (N = 35) been exposed to methamphetamine/polysubstance during pregnancy. Compared to unexposed children, exposed children showed pronounced elevations (i.e. more problems) in parental ratings of executive function, including behavioral regulation and metacognition. Exposed children also exhibited subtle reductions in spatial performance in the Memory Island test. In contrast, IQ, Spatial Span, Family Pictures, Dot Location, and vigilance performance was unaffected by prenatal drug exposure history. Thus, children of women who reported using methamphetamine and other recreational drugs during pregnancy showed a selective profile of abnormalities in parentally rated executive function. PMID:21334365

  3. Bilateral paramedian thalamic syndrome: abnormal circadian wake-sleep and autonomic functions

    PubMed Central

    Montagna, P; Provini, F; Plazzi, G; Vetrugno, R; Gallassi, R; Pierangeli, G; Ragno, M; Cortelli, P; Perani, D

    2002-01-01

    Methods: Patients underwent (18F)FDG PET scans and 24 hour polygraphic recordings of wake-sleep and t°. Results: PET showed bilateral thalamic hypometabolism in both patients with additional basal ganglia or mesiolateral frontal and cingular hypometabolism. Wake-sleep studies showed abnormal sleep organisation and in the case with frontal and limbic PET hypometabolism, pre-sleep behaviour associated with "subwakefulness" EEG activities, lack of EEG spindles and K complexes, and features of status dissociatus. The t° rhythms showed increased mesor in both (37.4°C and 37.75°C) and inverted rhythm in one patient. Conclusions: Paramedian thalamic structures and interconnected, especially frontal and cingular, areas play a part in the organisation of the wake-sleep cycle and attendant autonomic functions. PMID:12438490

  4. Functional brain abnormalities in psychiatric disorders: neural mechanisms to detect and resolve cognitive conflict and interference.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Tobias; Falkai, Peter; Gruber, Oliver

    2008-11-01

    In the present article, we review functional neuroimaging studies on interference processing and performance monitoring in three groups of psychiatric disorders, (1) mood disorders, (2) schizophrenia, and (3) obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Ad (1) Behavioral performance measures suggest an impaired interference resolution capability in symptomatic bipolar disorder patients. A series of neuroimaging analyses found alterations in the ACC-DLPFC system in mood disorder (unipolar depressed and bipolar) patients, putatively reflective of an abnormal interplay of monitoring and executive neurocognitive functions. Other studies of euthymic bipolar patients showed relatively decreased interference-related activation in rostroventral PFC which conceivably underlies defective inhibitory control. Ad (2) Behavioral Stroop studies revealed a specific performance pattern of schizophrenia patients (normal RT interference but increased error interference and RT facilitation) suggestive of a deficit in ignoring irrelevant (word) information. Moreover, reduced/absent behavioral post-error and post-conflict adaptation effects suggest alterations in performance monitoring and/or adjustment capability in these patients. Neuroimaging findings converge to suggest a disorder-related abnormal neurophysiology in ACC which consistently showed conflict- and error-related hypoactivation that, however, appeared to be modulated by different factors. Moreover, studies suggest a specific deficit in context processing in schizophrenia, evidently related to activation reduction in DLPFC. Ad (3) Behavioral findings provide evidence for impaired interference resolution in OCD. Neuroimaging results consistently showed conflict- and error-related ACC hyperactivation which--conforming OCD pathogenesis models--can be conclusively interpreted as reflecting overactive performance monitoring. Taken together, interference resolution and performance monitoring appeared to be fruitful concepts in the

  5. Abnormalities of Dorsolateral Prefrontal Function in Women With Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder: A Multimodal Neuroimaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Baller, Erica B.; Wei, Shau-Ming; Kohn, Philip D.; Rubinow, David R.; Alarcón, Gabriela; Schmidt, Peter J.; Berman, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the neural substrate of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), the authors used [15O]H2O positron emission tomography (PET) regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) signal measurements during working memory in conjunction with a 6-month hormone manipulation protocol. Method PET and fMRI scans were obtained from women with prospectively confirmed PMDD and asymptomatic comparison subjects while they completed the n-back task during three hormone conditions: ovarian suppression induced by the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist leuprolide acetate, leuprolide plus estradiol, and leuprolide plus progesterone. Fifteen patients and 15 matched comparison subjects underwent PET imaging. Fourteen patients and 14 comparison subjects underwent fMRI. For each hormone condition, rCBF was measured with [15O]H2O PET, and BOLD signal was measured with fMRI, both during an n-back working memory paradigm. Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) scores and clinical characteristics were obtained for each patient before hormone manipulation, and symptoms were measured before and during the protocol. Results In both the PET and fMRI studies, a main effect of diagnosis was observed, with PMDD patients showing greater prefrontal activation than comparison subjects. In the patient group, the degree to which dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation was abnormally increased correlated with several dimensions of disease: disability as indicated by GAF scores, age at symptom onset, duration of PMDD, and differences in pre- and postmenses PMDD symptoms. Conclusions Abnormal working memory activation in PMDD, specifically in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, is related to PMDD severity, symptoms, age at onset, and disease burden. These results support the clinical relevance of the findings and the proposal that dorsolateral prefrontal cortex dysfunction represents a substrate of risk for PMDD. The

  6. Ventilatory defect in coal workers with simple pneumoconiosis: early detection of functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lin, L C; Yang, S C; Lu, K W

    2001-05-01

    Airway obstruction is a prominent feature in coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). However, many patients with CWP have even demonstrated a normal forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ventilatory defect by spirometry and search for parameters, other than FVC and FEV1, suitable for early detection of pulmonary impairment in CWP. A sample of 227 coal miners was selected from the medical clinics of two teaching hospitals. Maximal expiratory flow volume measurement and determination of functional residual capacity (FRC) and residual volume (RV) were carried out with an automated plethysmograph. The prevalence of airway obstruction (FEV1/FVC < 70%) in this sample of miners was 52.9% (120/227). There was a progression of functional impairment with the transition from category 0 to categories 2 and 3, no matter what the miners smoking habits. All of the 107 non-obstructed miners had a normal FVC and FEV1. However, the mean values for FEF25-75% (mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of FVC) and Vmax50 (maximal expiratory flow rate at 50% FVC) were abnormally low, and RV was already elevated, in those non-obstructed subjects with category 1 simple pneumoconiosis. A borderline abnormally elevated FRC in the miners with radiological category 3 of CWP was also noted. We conclude that the Vmax50, FEF25-75%, and RV appeared to be the discriminative indices for detecting early ventilatory defect in non-obstructed patients with simple CWP. Further studies is still needed to clarify the cause of small airway dysfunction.

  7. Long-Term Functional Outcomes and Correlation with Regional Brain Connectivity by MRI Diffusion Tractography Metrics in a Near-Term Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Illa, Miriam; Eixarch, Elisenda; Batalle, Dafnis; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Figueras, Francesc; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) affects 5–10% of all newborns and is associated with increased risk of memory, attention and anxiety problems in late childhood and adolescence. The neurostructural correlates of long-term abnormal neurodevelopment associated with IUGR are unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the long-term functional and neurostructural correlates of abnormal neurodevelopment associated with IUGR in a near-term rabbit model (delivered at 30 days of gestation) and evaluate the development of quantitative imaging biomarkers of abnormal neurodevelopment based on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters and connectivity. Methodology At +70 postnatal days, 10 cases and 11 controls were functionally evaluated with the Open Field Behavioral Test which evaluates anxiety and attention and the Object Recognition Task that evaluates short-term memory and attention. Subsequently, brains were collected, fixed and a high resolution MRI was performed. Differences in diffusion parameters were analyzed by means of voxel-based and connectivity analysis measuring the number of fibers reconstructed within anxiety, attention and short-term memory networks over the total fibers. Principal Findings The results of the neurobehavioral and cognitive assessment showed a significant higher degree of anxiety, attention and memory problems in cases compared to controls in most of the variables explored. Voxel-based analysis (VBA) revealed significant differences between groups in multiple brain regions mainly in grey matter structures, whereas connectivity analysis demonstrated lower ratios of fibers within the networks in cases, reaching the statistical significance only in the left hemisphere for both networks. Finally, VBA and connectivity results were also correlated with functional outcome. Conclusions The rabbit model used reproduced long-term functional impairments and their neurostructural

  8. Alterations in Functional Connectivity for Language in Prematurely Born Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Robin J.; Lacadie, Cheryl; Vohr, Betty; Kesler, Shelli R.; Katz, Karol H.; Schneider, Karen C.; Pugh, Kenneth R.; Makuch, Robert W.; Reiss, Allan L.; Constable, R. Todd; Ment, Laura R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent data suggest recovery of language systems but persistent structural abnormalities in the prematurely born. We tested the hypothesis that subjects who were born prematurely develop alternative networks for processing language. Subjects who were born prematurely (n = 22; 600-1250 g birth weight), without neonatal brain injury on neonatal…

  9. Dynamic modulation of rTMS on functional connectivity and functional network connectivity to children with cerebral palsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiwei; Xing, Guoqiang; He, Bin; Chen, Huaping; Ou, Jun; McClure, Morgan A; Liu, Hua; Wang, Yunfeng; Mu, Qiwen

    2016-03-02

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive treatment tool for the recovery of cerebral palsy (CP). This report describes the modulation effect of rTMS to functional connectivity, functional network connectivity, motor, and cognitive ability following treatment in a child with mild ataxia CP. After receiving 8 months of 0.5 Hz rTMS treatment over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the child showed a gradual improvement in motor and cognitive-related functional connectivity and functional network connectivity following treatment as well as improved motor, cognitive functions. These pilot results provide the first evidence of the efficiency of 0.5 Hz of rTMS on a child with CP. Further large sample studies are needed to verify and expand the present findings.

  10. Resting-state functional connectivity alterations in the default network of schizophrenia patients with persistent auditory verbal hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Solís, Anna; Vives-Gilabert, Yolanda; Grasa, Eva; Portella, Maria J; Rabella, Mireia; Sauras, Rosa Blanca; Roldán, Alexandra; Núñez-Marín, Fidel; Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Pérez, Víctor; Alvarez, Enric; Corripio, Iluminada

    2015-02-01

    To understand the neural mechanism that underlies treatment resistant auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH), is still an important issue in psychiatric research. Alterations in functional connectivity during rest have been frequently reported in patients with schizophrenia. Though the default mode network (DN) appears to be abnormal in schizophrenia patients, little is known about its role in resistant AVH. We collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) data with a 3T scanner from 19 schizophrenia patients with chronic AVH resistant to pharmacological treatment, 14 schizophrenia patients without AVH and 20 healthy controls. Using seed-based correlation analysis, we created spherical seed regions of interest (ROI) to examine functional connectivity of the two DN hub regions (posterior cingulate cortex and anteromedial prefrontal cortex) and the two DN subsystems: dorsomedial prefrontal cortex subsystem and medial temporal lobe subsystem (p<0.0045 corrected). Patients with hallucinations exhibited higher FC between dMPFC ROI and bilateral central opercular cortex, bilateral insular cortex and bilateral precentral gyrus compared to non hallucinating patients and healthy controls. Additionally, patients with hallucinations also exhibited lower FC between vMPFC ROI and bilateral paracingulate and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. As the anterior cingulate cortex and the insula are two hubs of the salience network, our results suggest cross-network abnormalities between DN and salience system in patients with persistent hallucinations.

  11. Network analysis of functional brain connectivity in borderline personality disorder using resting-state fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Cullen, Kathryn R.; Mueller, Bryon; Schreiner, Mindy W.; Lim, Kelvin O.; Schulz, S. Charles; Parhi, Keshab K.

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is associated with symptoms such as affect dysregulation, impaired sense of self, and self-harm behaviors. Neuroimaging research on BPD has revealed structural and functional abnormalities in specific brain regions and connections. However, little is known about the topological organizations of brain networks in BPD. We collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 20 patients with BPD and 10 healthy controls, and constructed frequency-specific functional brain networks by correlating wavelet-filtered fMRI signals from 82 cortical and subcortical regions. We employed graph-theory based complex network analysis to investigate the topological properties of the brain networks, and employed network-based statistic to identify functional dysconnections in patients. In the 0.03–0.06 Hz frequency band, compared to controls, patients with BPD showed significantly larger measures of global network topology, including the size of largest connected graph component, clustering coefficient, small-worldness, and local efficiency, indicating increased local cliquishness of the functional brain network. Compared to controls, patients showed lower nodal centrality at several hub nodes but greater centrality at several non-hub nodes in the network. Furthermore, an interconnected subnetwork in 0.03–0.06 Hz frequency band was identified that showed significantly lower connectivity in patients. The links in the subnetwork were mainly long-distance connections between regions located at different lobes; and the mean connectivity of this subnetwork was negatively correlated with the increased global topology measures. Lastly, the key network measures showed high correlations with several clinical symptom scores, and classified BPD patients against healthy controls with high accuracy based on linear discriminant analysis. The abnormal topological properties and connectivity found in this study may add new

  12. Functional and structural abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract in severely malnourished children - A hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Misbah; Moorani, Khemchand N; Sameen, Ifra; Mustufa, Muhammad Ayaz; Kulsoom, Shazia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The association of malnutrition and systemic diseases like chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. Various urinary tract abnormalities may be associated with malnutrition. So objective of current study was to determine the frequency of functional and structural urinary tract abnormalities in severely malnourished children admitted in Nutritional Rehabilitation Unit (NRU) of a tertiary care facility, Karachi. Methods: This descriptive cases series of 78 children was conducted in NRU from October 2014 - March 2015. All newly admitted children aged 2-60 months, diagnosed as Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) were studied and children with known kidney and urinary tract disorders were excluded. Detailed history, examination and investigations like serum creatinine, ultrasound kidney and urinary tract in addition to routine tests for SAM, were done. A proforma was used to collect demographic data, clinical history, physical findings, and radio-imaging and biochemical investigations. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated using Schwartz equation. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Among 78 children, male to female ratio was equal. Mean age was 18±15.53 months and majority (79.48%) of children were below 24 months. Majority (82%) of children with SAM had marasmus whereas 18% had edematous malnutrition. Out of 78, 57 (73%) children had either functional (80.7%) and or structural (19.3%) abnormalities whereas 21(36.84%) had normal functional and structural status. Most common functional abnormality was subnormal GFR (<90ml/min/1.73 m2) found in all 46 children. Functional abnormities were more common in children below 24 months. Other functional disorders were Bartter syndrome, renal tubular acidosis and urinary tract infection (UTI) found in two cases each. Common structural abnormalities were echogenic kidneys (n=4, 36%), hydronephrosis (n=3, 27%), hypoplastic kidneys (n=3, 27%) and calculi (n=1, 9%). Subnormal GFR was also

  13. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Brain Functional Connectivity and Sensorimotor Functioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, K.; Koppelmans, V.; De Dios, Y.; Stepanyan, V.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S.; Reuter-Lorenz, P.; Castenada, R. Riascos; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight has been associated with detrimental alterations in human sensorimotor functioning. Prolonged exposure to a head-down tilt (HDT) position during long duration bed rest can resemble several effects of the microgravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The question of whether microgravity affects other central nervous system functions such as brain functional connectivity and its relationship with behavior is largely unknown, but of importance to the health and performance of astronauts both during and post-flight. In the present study, we investigate the effects of prolonged exposure to HDT bed rest on resting state brain functional connectivity and its association with behavioral changes in 17 male participants. To validate that our findings were not due to confounding factors such as time or task practice, we also acquired resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and behavioral measurements from 14 normative control participants at four time points. Bed rest participants remained in bed with their heads tilted down six degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Rs-fMRI and behavioral data were obtained at seven time points averaging around: 12 and 8 days prior to bed rest; 7, 50, and 70 days during bed rest; and 8 and 12 days after bed rest. 70 days of HDT bed rest resulted in significant increases in functional connectivity during bed rest followed by a reversal of changes in the post bed rest recovery period between motor cortical and somatosensory areas of the brain. In contrast, decreases in connectivity were observed between temporoparietal regions. Furthermore, post-hoc correlation analyses revealed a significant relationship between motor-somatosensory network connectivity and standing balance performance changes; participants that exhibited the greatest increases in connectivity strength showed the least deterioration in postural

  14. The effects of hippocampal lesions on MRI measures of structural and functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Henson, Richard N; Greve, Andrea; Cooper, Elisa; Gregori, Mariella; Simons, Jon S; Geerligs, Linda; Erzinçlioğlu, Sharon; Kapur, Narinder; Browne, Georgina

    2016-11-01

    Focal lesions can affect connectivity between distal brain regions (connectional diaschisis) and impact the graph-theoretic properties of major brain networks (connectomic diaschisis). Given its unique anatomy and diverse range of functions, the hippocampus has been claimed to be a critical "hub" in brain networks. We investigated the effects of hippocampal lesions on structural and functional connectivity in six patients with amnesia, using a range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analyses. Neuropsychological assessment revealed marked episodic memory impairment and generally intact performance across other cognitive domains. The hippocampus was the only brain structure exhibiting reduced grey-matter volume that was consistent across patients, and the fornix was the only major white-matter tract to show altered structural connectivity according to both diffusion metrics. Nonetheless, functional MRI revealed both increases and decreases in functional connectivity. Analysis at the level of regions within the default-mode network revealed reduced functional connectivity, including between nonhippocampal regions (connectional diaschisis). Analysis at the level of functional networks revealed reduced connectivity between thalamic and precuneus networks, but increased connectivity between the default-mode network and frontal executive network. The overall functional connectome showed evidence of increased functional segregation in patients (connectomic diaschisis). Together, these results point to dynamic reorganization following hippocampal lesions, with both decreased and increased functional connectivity involving limbic-diencephalic structures and larger-scale networks. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The effects of hippocampal lesions on MRI measures of structural and functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Andrea; Cooper, Elisa; Gregori, Mariella; Simons, Jon S.; Geerligs, Linda; Erzinçlioğlu, Sharon; Kapur, Narinder; Browne, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Focal lesions can affect connectivity between distal brain regions (connectional diaschisis) and impact the graph‐theoretic properties of major brain networks (connectomic diaschisis). Given its unique anatomy and diverse range of functions, the hippocampus has been claimed to be a critical “hub” in brain networks. We investigated the effects of hippocampal lesions on structural and functional connectivity in six patients with amnesia, using a range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analyses. Neuropsychological assessment revealed marked episodic memory impairment and generally intact performance across other cognitive domains. The hippocampus was the only brain structure exhibiting reduced grey‐matter volume that was consistent across patients, and the fornix was the only major white‐matter tract to show altered structural connectivity according to both diffusion metrics. Nonetheless, functional MRI revealed both increases and decreases in functional connectivity. Analysis at the level of regions within the default‐mode network revealed reduced functional connectivity, including between nonhippocampal regions (connectional diaschisis). Analysis at the level of functional networks revealed reduced connectivity between thalamic and precuneus networks, but increased connectivity between the default‐mode network and frontal executive network. The overall functional connectome showed evidence of increased functional segregation in patients (connectomic diaschisis). Together, these results point to dynamic reorganization following hippocampal lesions, with both decreased and increased functional connectivity involving limbic‐diencephalic structures and larger‐scale networks. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27479794

  16. Structural and Functional Cortical Connectivity Mediating Cross Education of Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Cross-education (CE) is the process whereby training with one limb leads to subsequent improvement in performance by the opposite untrained limb. We used multimodal neuroimaging in humans to investigate the mediating neural mechanisms by relating quantitative estimates of functional and structural cortical connectivity to individual levels of interlimb transfer. Resting-state (rs)-fMRI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) scans were undertaken before unilateral ballistic wrist flexion training. The rs-fMRI sequence was repeated immediately afterward. The increase in performance of the untrained limb was 83.6% of that observed for the trained limb and significantly greater than that of a control group who undertook no training. Functional connectivity in the resting motor network between right and left supplementary motor areas (SMA) was elevated after training. These changes were not, however, correlated with individual levels of transfer. Analysis of the DWI data using constrained spherical deconvolution-based tractography indicated that fractional anisotropy and apparent fiber density in tracts connecting bilateral SMA were negatively correlated with and predictive of transfer. The findings suggest that interhemispheric interactions between bilateral SMA play an instrumental role in CE and that the structural integrity of the connecting white matter pathways influences the level of transfer. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Strength or skill training with one limb also brings about improvements in the performance of the opposite, untrained limb. This phenomenon, termed cross-education (CE), has obvious potential for the rehabilitation of functional capacity that has been lost through brain insult or musculoskeletal injury. The neural mechanisms that give rise to CE are, however, poorly understood. We used a combination of neuroimaging methods to investigate the pathways in the human brain that mediate CE. We determined that the supplementary motor area (SMA) plays an

  17. Dynamic functional connectivity revealed by resting-state functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Liu, Hanli; Liao, Xuhong; Xu, Jingping; Liu, Wenli; Tian, Fenghua; He, Yong; Niu, Haijing

    2015-01-01

    The brain is a complex network with time-varying functional connectivity (FC) and network organization. However, it remains largely unknown whether resting-state fNIRS measurements can be used to characterize dynamic characteristics of intrinsic brain organization. In this study, for the first time, we used the whole-cortical fNIRS time series and a sliding-window correlation approach to demonstrate that fNIRS measurement can be ultimately used to quantify the dynamic characteristics of resting-state brain connectivity. Our results reveal that the fNIRS-derived FC is time-varying, and the variability strength (Q) is correlated negatively with the time-averaged, static FC. Furthermore, the Q values also show significant differences in connectivity between different spatial locations (e.g., intrahemispheric and homotopic connections). The findings are reproducible across both sliding-window lengths and different brain scanning sessions, suggesting that the dynamic characteristics in fNIRS-derived cerebral functional correlation results from true cerebral fluctuation. PMID:26203365

  18. Multiple-region directed functional connectivity based on phase delays.