Science.gov

Sample records for abnormal gait patterns

  1. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  2. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trong-Nguyen; Huynh, Huu-Hung; Meunier, Jean

    2016-10-26

    Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton) in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%.

  3. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trong-Nguyen; Huynh, Huu-Hung; Meunier, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton) in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%. PMID:27792181

  4. A gait paradigm reveals different patterns of abnormal cerebellar motor learning in primary focal dystonias.

    PubMed

    Hoffland, B S; Veugen, L C; Janssen, M M H P; Pasman, J W; Weerdesteyn, V; van de Warrenburg, B P

    2014-12-01

    Accumulating evidence points to a role of the cerebellum in the pathophysiology of primary dystonia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the abnormalities of cerebellar motor learning in primary dystonia are solely detectable in more pure forms of cerebellum-dependent associative motor learning paradigms, or whether these are also present in other motor learning paradigms that rely heavily on the cerebellum but in addition require a more widespread sensorimotor network. Twenty-six patients with various forms of focal dystonia and 10 age-matched healthy controls participated in a motor learning paradigm on a split-belt treadmill. By using reflective markers, three-dimensional kinematics were recorded using a 6-camera motion analysis system. Adaptation walking parameters were analyzed offline, comparing the different dystonia groups and healthy controls. Patients with blepharospasm and writer's cramp were significantly impaired on various adaptation walking parameters. Whereas results of cervical dystonia patients did not differ from healthy controls in terms of adaptation walking parameters, differences in parameters of normal gait were found. We have here demonstrated abnormal sensorimotor adaptation with the split-belt paradigm in patients with blepharospasm and writer's cramp. This reinforces the current concept of cerebellar dysfunction in primary dystonia, and that this extends beyond more pure forms of cerebellum-dependent associative motor learning paradigms. However, the finding of normal adaptation in cervical dystonia patients indicates that the pattern of cerebellar dysfunction may be slightly different for the various forms of primary focal dystonia, suggesting that actual cerebellar pathology may not be a primary driving force in dystonia.

  5. Detection of abnormalities in a human gait using smart shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Bae, Joonbum; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2008-03-01

    Health monitoring systems require a means for detecting and quantifying abnormalities from measured signals. In this paper, a new method for detecting abnormalities in a human gait is proposed for an improved gait monitoring system for patients with walking problems. In the previous work, we introduced a fuzzy logic algorithm for detecting phases in a human gait based on four foot pressure sensors for each of the right and left foot. The fuzzy logic algorithm detects the gait phases smoothly and continuously, and retains all information obtained from sensors. In this paper, a higher level algorithm for detecting abnormalities in the gait phases obtained from the fuzzy logic is discussed. In the proposed algorithm, two major abnormalities are detected 1) when the sensors measure improper foot pressure patterns, and 2) when the human does not follow a natural sequence of gait phases. For mathematical realization of the algorithm, the gait phases are dealt with by a vector analysis method. The proposed detection algorithm is verified by experiments on abnormal gaits as well as normal gaits. The experiment makes use of the Smart Shoes that embeds four bladders filled with air, the pressure changes in which are detected by pressure transducers.

  6. Neurologic Correlates of Gait Abnormalities in Cerebral Palsy: Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Joanne; Butler, Erin E.; Rose, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common movement disorder in children. A diagnosis of CP is often made based on abnormal muscle tone or posture, a delay in reaching motor milestones, or the presence of gait abnormalities in young children. Neuroimaging of high-risk neonates and of children diagnosed with CP have identified patterns of neurologic injury associated with CP, however, the neural underpinnings of common gait abnormalities remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we review the nature of the brain injury in CP, as well as the neuromuscular deficits and subsequent gait abnormalities common among children with CP. We first discuss brain injury in terms of mechanism, pattern, and time of injury during the prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal period in preterm and term-born children. Second, we outline neuromuscular deficits of CP with a focus on spastic CP, characterized by muscle weakness, shortened muscle-tendon unit, spasticity, and impaired selective motor control, on both a microscopic and functional level. Third, we examine the influence of neuromuscular deficits on gait abnormalities in CP, while considering emerging information on neural correlates of gait abnormalities and the implications for strategic treatment. This review of the neural basis of gait abnormalities in CP discusses what is known about links between the location and extent of brain injury and the type and severity of CP, in relation to the associated neuromuscular deficits, and subsequent gait abnormalities. Targeted treatment opportunities are identified that may improve functional outcomes for children with CP. By providing this context on the neural basis of gait abnormalities in CP, we hope to highlight areas of further research that can reduce the long-term, debilitating effects of CP. PMID:28367118

  7. Perception of gait patterns that deviate from normal and symmetric biped locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Handžić, Ismet; Reed, Kyle B.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the range of gait patterns that are perceived as healthy and human-like with the goal of understanding how much asymmetry is allowable in a gait pattern before other people start to notice a gait impairment. Specifically, this study explores if certain abnormal walking patterns can be dismissed as unimpaired or not uncanny. Altering gait biomechanics is generally done in the fields of prosthetics and rehabilitation, however the perception of gait is often neglected. Although a certain gait can be functional, it may not be considered as normal by observers. On the other hand, an abnormally perceived gait may be more practical or necessary in some situations, such as limping after an injury or stroke and when wearing a prosthesis. This research will help to find the balance between the form and function of gait. Gait patterns are synthetically created using a passive dynamic walker (PDW) model that allows gait patterns to be systematically changed without the confounding influence from human sensorimotor feedback during walking. This standardized method allows the perception of specific changes in gait to be studied. The PDW model was used to produce walking patterns that showed a degree of abnormality in gait cadence, knee height, step length, and swing time created by changing the foot roll-over-shape, knee damping, knee location, and leg masses. The gait patterns were shown to participants who rated them according to separate scales of impairment and uncanniness. The results indicate that some pathological and asymmetric gait patterns are perceived as unimpaired and normal. Step time and step length asymmetries less than 5%, small knee location differences, and gait cadence changes of 25% do not result in a change in perception. The results also show that the parameters of a pathologically or uncanny perceived gait can be beneficially altered by increasing other independent parameters, in some sense masking the initial pathology. PMID:25774144

  8. Perception of gait patterns that deviate from normal and symmetric biped locomotion.

    PubMed

    Handžić, Ismet; Reed, Kyle B

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the range of gait patterns that are perceived as healthy and human-like with the goal of understanding how much asymmetry is allowable in a gait pattern before other people start to notice a gait impairment. Specifically, this study explores if certain abnormal walking patterns can be dismissed as unimpaired or not uncanny. Altering gait biomechanics is generally done in the fields of prosthetics and rehabilitation, however the perception of gait is often neglected. Although a certain gait can be functional, it may not be considered as normal by observers. On the other hand, an abnormally perceived gait may be more practical or necessary in some situations, such as limping after an injury or stroke and when wearing a prosthesis. This research will help to find the balance between the form and function of gait. Gait patterns are synthetically created using a passive dynamic walker (PDW) model that allows gait patterns to be systematically changed without the confounding influence from human sensorimotor feedback during walking. This standardized method allows the perception of specific changes in gait to be studied. The PDW model was used to produce walking patterns that showed a degree of abnormality in gait cadence, knee height, step length, and swing time created by changing the foot roll-over-shape, knee damping, knee location, and leg masses. The gait patterns were shown to participants who rated them according to separate scales of impairment and uncanniness. The results indicate that some pathological and asymmetric gait patterns are perceived as unimpaired and normal. Step time and step length asymmetries less than 5%, small knee location differences, and gait cadence changes of 25% do not result in a change in perception. The results also show that the parameters of a pathologically or uncanny perceived gait can be beneficially altered by increasing other independent parameters, in some sense masking the initial pathology.

  9. Gait Pattern Differences between Children with Mild Scoliosis and Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Szopa, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of asymmetrical body posture alone, i.e., the effects seen in children with mild scoliosis, vs. the effects of body posture control impairment, i.e., those seen in children with unilateral cerebral palsy on gait patterns. Three-dimensional instrumented gait analysis (3DGA) was conducted in 45 children with hemiplegia and 51 children with mild scoliosis. All the children were able to walk without assistance devices. A set of 35 selected spatiotemporal gait and kinematics parameters were evaluated when subjects walked on a treadmill. A cluster analysis revealed 3 different gait patterns: a scoliotic gait pattern and 2 different hemiplegic gait patterns. The results showed that the discrepancy in gait patterns was not simply a lower limb kinematic deviation in the sagittal plane, as expected. Additional altered kinematics, such as pelvic misorientation in the coronal plane in both the stance and swing phases and inadequate stance phase hip ad/abduction, which resulted from postural pattern features, were distinguished between the 3 gait patterns. Our study provides evidence for a strong correlation between postural and gait patterns in children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Information on differences in gait patterns may be used to improve the guidelines for early therapy for children with hemiplegia before abnormal gait patterns are fully established. The gait pathology characteristic of scoliotic children is a potential new direction for treating scoliosis that complements the standard posture and walking control therapy exercises with the use of biofeedback. PMID:25089908

  10. Kinematic Analysis Quantifies Gait Abnormalities Associated with Lameness in Broiler Chickens and Identifies Evolutionary Gait Differences

    PubMed Central

    Caplen, Gina; Hothersall, Becky; Murrell, Joanna C.; Nicol, Christine J.; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E.; Weeks, Claire A.; Colborne, G. Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat) chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n = 10) would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n = 12) and jungle fowl (n = 10, tested at two ages: immature and adult). Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy) and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers) presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity) presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated with

  11. Predisability And Gait Patterns In Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Joe; Xue, Xiaonan

    2010-01-01

    Presence of performance inconsistency during repeated assessments of gait may reflect underlying subclinical disease, and help shed light on the earliest stages of disablement. We studied inter-session fluctuations on three selected gait measures (velocity, stride length, and stride length variability) during normal pace walking as well as during a cognitively demanding ‘walking while talking’ condition using a repeated measurement burst design (six sessions within a 2-week period) in 71 nondisabled and nondemented community residing older adults, 40 with predisability (does activities of daily living unassisted but with difficulty). Subjects with predisability had slower gait velocity and shorter stride length on both the normal and walking while talking conditions at baseline compared to nondisabled subjects. However, there was no significant pattern of fluctuations across the six sessions on the three selected gait variables comparing the two groups during normal walking as well as on the walking while talking conditions. Our findings support consistency of gait measurements during the earliest stages of disability. PMID:21050762

  12. On the imitation of CP gait patterns by healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Taysir; Megrot, Fabrice; Fradet, Laetitia; Marin, Frédéric

    2013-09-01

    The comparison of gait imitated by healthy subjects with real pathological CP gaits is expected to contribute to a better distinction between primary deviations directly induced by neurological troubles and secondary compensatory deviations in relation with the biomechanics of the pathological gait. However, the ability of healthy subjects for imitating typical CP gaits such as "jump" or "crouch" gaits still remains to be determined. The present study proposes to investigate healthy subjects imitating these typical CP gait patterns. 10 healthy adult subjects performed three types of gait: one "normal" and two imitated "jump" and "crouch" gaits. Kinematics and kinetics of the hip, knee and ankle were computed in the sagittal plane. Rectified normalized EMG was also analysed. Our data were compared with reference data. For the statistical analysis, the coefficient of multicorrelation has been used. It has been demonstrated that healthy subjects were able to voluntarily modify their gait pattern with a high level of intra-session and inter-subject reproducibility as quantified by a CMC values higher than 0.76 for all parameters. The comparison with literature reference data showed that healthy subjects not could perfectly reproduce a CP gait, however could only simulate the main characteristics of "crouch" and "jump" gaits pattern. As a perspective, pathological gaits imitated by healthy subjects could be used as valuable additional material to analyse the relationship between a voluntarily modified posture and the altered muscle activation to explore a new paradigm on pathological gait pattern analysis and musculoskeletal modelling.

  13. Gait patterns for crime fighting: statistical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulovská, Kateřina; Bělašková, Silvie; Adámek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The criminality is omnipresent during the human history. Modern technology brings novel opportunities for identification of a perpetrator. One of these opportunities is an analysis of video recordings, which may be taken during the crime itself or before/after the crime. The video analysis can be classed as identification analyses, respectively identification of a person via externals. The bipedal locomotion focuses on human movement on the basis of their anatomical-physiological features. Nowadays, the human gait is tested by many laboratories to learn whether the identification via bipedal locomotion is possible or not. The aim of our study is to use 2D components out of 3D data from the VICON Mocap system for deep statistical analyses. This paper introduces recent results of a fundamental study focused on various gait patterns during different conditions. The study contains data from 12 participants. Curves obtained from these measurements were sorted, averaged and statistically tested to estimate the stability and distinctiveness of this biometrics. Results show satisfactory distinctness of some chosen points, while some do not embody significant difference. However, results presented in this paper are of initial phase of further deeper and more exacting analyses of gait patterns under different conditions.

  14. New evidence for gait abnormalities among Parkinson's disease patients who suffer from freezing of gait: insights using a body-fixed sensor worn for 3 days.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Aner; Herman, Talia; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies conducted in laboratory settings suggest that the gait pattern in between freezing of gait (FOG) episodes is abnormal among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who suffer from FOG (i.e., "freezers"), compared to those who do not (i.e., "non-freezers"). We evaluated whether long-term recordings also reveal gait alterations in freezers and if these features were related to freezing severity and its impact on daily function. 72 patients with PD wore a 3-D accelerometer for 3 days. Acceleration-derived gait features included quantity (e.g., the amount of walking) and quality measures (e.g., gait variability). The New FOG-Questionnaire evaluated the subject's perceptions of FOG severity and its impact. Age, gender, and disease duration were similar (p > 0.19) in the 28 freezers and 44 non-freezers. Walking quantity was similar in the two groups, while freezers walked with higher gait variability (i.e., larger anterior-posterior power spectral density width; p = 0.003) and lower gait consistency (i.e., lower vertical stride regularity; p = 0.007). Group differences were observed when comparing the typical (i.e., median), best, and worst performance among the multiple walking bouts measured. Vertical and medio-lateral gait consistency were associated with the impact of FOG on daily living (r < -0.39, p < 0.044). The present findings demonstrate that freezers have altered gait variability and consistency during spontaneous community ambulation, even during optimal performance, and that these measures are associated with the impact of FOG on daily function. Long-term recordings may provide new insights into PD and augment the monitoring of FOG and its response to therapy.

  15. Gait pattern in myotonic dystrophy (Steinert disease): a kinematic, kinetic and EMG evaluation using 3D gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Crugnola, Veronica; Priano, Lorenzo; Menegoni, Francesco; Trotti, Claudio; Milano, Eva; Mauro, Alessandro

    2012-03-15

    We investigated the gait pattern of 10 patients with myotonic dystrophy (Steinert disease; 4 females, 6 males; age: 41.5+7.6 years), compared to 20 healthy controls, through manual muscle test and gait analysis, in terms of kinematic, kinetic and EMG data. In most of patients (80%) distal muscle groups were weaker than proximal ones. Weakness at lower limbs was in general moderate to severe and MRC values evidenced a significant correlation between tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis (R=0.91). An overall observation of gait pattern in patients when compared to controls showed that most spatio-temporal parameters (velocity, step length and cadence) were significantly different. As concerns kinematics, patients' pelvic tilt was globally in a higher position than control group, with reduced hip extension ability in stance phase and limited range of motion; 60% of the limbs revealed knee hyperextension during midstance and ankle joints showed a quite physiological position at initial contact and higher dorsiflexion during stance phase if compared to healthy individuals. Kinetic plots evidenced higher hip power during loading response and lower ankle power generation in terminal stance. The main EMG abnormalities were seen in tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis muscles. In this study gait analysis gives objective and quantitative information about the gait pattern and the deviations due to the muscular situation of these patients; these results are important from a clinical point of view and suggest that rehabilitation programs for them should take these findings into account.

  16. Intra-individual gait pattern variability in specific situations: Implications for forensic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Oliver; Dillinger, Steffen; Marschall, Franz

    2016-07-01

    In this study, inter- and intra-individual gait pattern differences are examined in various gait situations by means of phase diagrams of the extremity angles (cyclograms). 8 test subjects walked along a walking distance of 6m under different conditions three times each: barefoot, wearing sneakers, wearing combat boots, after muscular fatigue, and wearing a full-face motorcycle helmet restricting vision. The joint angles of foot, knee, and hip were recorded in the sagittal plane. The coupling of movements was represented by time-adjusted cyclograms, and the inter- and intra-individual differences were captured by calculating the similarity between different gait patterns. Gait pattern variability was often greater between the defined test situations than between the individual test subjects. The results have been interpreted considering neurophysiological regulation mechanisms. Footwear, masking, and fatigue were interpreted as disturbance parameters, each being a cause for gait pattern variability and complicating the inference of identity of persons in video recordings.

  17. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  18. Hindlimb lameness and gait abnormalities in bitches with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Klainbart, S; Ranen, E; Glikman, G; Kelmer, E; Bdolah-Abram, T; Aroch, I

    2014-07-12

    The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of gait abnormalities and lameness (GAL) in bitches with pyometra, and their association with clinical and laboratory findings. The study included 79 bitches diagnosed with pyometra and 35 negative control intact bitches presented with other soft tissue surgical disorders. Dogs with a history of chronic lameness due to orthopaedic or neurological origin were excluded. A history of GAL was more frequent in the pyometra group (47 per cent) compared with the control group (20 per cent) (P=0.007). In the pyometra group, bitches presenting GAL had (P<0.04) higher frequencies of closed-cervix pyometra, anorexia and vomiting, as well as higher serum creatinine concentration and muscle enzymes activity, compared with those in without GAL. GAL signs resolved postovariohysterectomy in all but one bitch. The results suggest that GAL signs occur frequently in bitches with pyometra, especially in closed-cervix disease. Therefore, pyometra should be considered among the differential diagnoses when GAL occurs, especially when the clinical signs are non-specific and the reproductive history is unclear.

  19. Evaluation of patients with gait abnormalities in physical and rehabilitation medicine settings.

    PubMed

    Bensoussan, Laurent; Viton, Jean-Michel; Barotsis, Nikos; Delarque, Alain

    2008-07-01

    The first step in the assessment of patients with gait abnormalities in physical and rehabilitation medicine settings is a clinical examination based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disabilities and Health. Body structure, activities and participation, and environmental factors (physical and human factors) must all be assessed. Qualitative and quantified assessments of gait are part of the activity and participation evaluation. Scales are also used to assess gait activities. Gait assessment tools can be used in laboratory environments for kinematic, kinetic, electromyographic and energy consumption analysis and other tools, such as videotape and walkways, can be used in clinical practice, while ambulatory assessment tools can be used to analyse patients' usual everyday activities. The aims of instrumental gait assessment are: to understand the underlying mechanisms and the aetiology of the disorders, to obtain quantified gait parameters, to define suitable therapeutic methods, and to follow the course of the disease.

  20. Muscle strength and kinetic gait pattern in children with bilateral spastic CP.

    PubMed

    Eek, Meta Nyström; Tranberg, Roy; Beckung, Eva

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral palsy is often associated with an abnormal gait pattern. This study put focus on relation between muscle strength and kinetic gait pattern in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy and compares them with a reference group. In total 20 children with CP and 20 typically developing children participated. They were all assessed with measurement of muscle strength in eight muscle groups in the legs and a 3-dimensional gait analysis including force data. It was found that children with CP were not only significantly weaker in all muscle groups but also walked with slower velocity and shorter stride length when compared with the reference group. Gait moments differed at the ankle level with significantly lower moments in children with CP. Gait moments were closer to the maximal muscle strength in the group of children with CP. Furthermore a correlation between plantarflexing gait moment and muscle strength was observed in six of the eight muscle groups in children with CP, a relation not found in the reference group. A similar pattern was seen between muscle strength and generating ankle power with a rho=0.582-0.766. The results of this study state the importance of the relationship of the overall muscle strength pattern in the lower extremity, not only the plantarflexors.

  1. Gait patterns associated with thyroid function: The Rotterdam Study

    PubMed Central

    Bano, Arjola; Chaker, Layal; Darweesh, Sirwan K. L.; Korevaar, Tim I. M.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Dehghan, Abbas; Franco, Oscar H.; van der Geest, Jos N.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Peeters, Robin P.

    2016-01-01

    Gait is an important health indicator and poor gait is strongly associated with disability and risk of falls. Thyroid dysfunction is suggested as a potential determinant of gait deterioration, but this has not been explored in a population-based study. We therefore investigated the association of thyroid function with gait patterns in 2645 participants from the Rotterdam Study with data available on TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone), FT4 (free thyroxine) and gait, without known thyroid disease or dementia. The primary outcome was Global gait (standardized Z-score), while secondary outcomes included gait domains (Rhythm, Variability, Phases, Pace, Base of support, Tandem, Turning) and velocity. Gait was assessed by electronic walkway. Multivariable regression models revealed an inverted U-shaped association of TSH (p < 0.001), but no association of FT4 concentrations with Global gait (p = 0.2). TSH levels were positively associated with Base of support (p = 0.01) and followed an inverted U-shaped curve with Tandem (p = 0.002) and velocity (p = 0.02). Clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism were associated with worse Global gait than euthyroidism (β = −0.61; CI = −1.03, −0.18; p = 0.004 and β = −0.13; CI = −0.26, −0.00; p = 0.04, respectively). In euthyroid participants, higher thyroid function was associated with worse gait patterns. In conclusion, both low and high thyroid function are associated with alterations in Global gait, Tandem, Base of support and velocity. PMID:27966590

  2. Individuals Poststroke Do Not Perceive Their Spatiotemporal Gait Asymmetries as Abnormal

    PubMed Central

    Wutzke, Clinton J.; Faldowski, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Following stroke, spatiotemporal gait asymmetries persist into the chronic phases, despite the neuromuscular capacity to produce symmetric walking patterns. This persistence of gait asymmetry may be due to deficits in perception, as the newly established asymmetric gait pattern is perceived as normal. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of usual overground gait asymmetry on the ability to consciously and unconsciously perceive the presence of gait asymmetry in people poststroke. Design An observational study was conducted. Methods Thirty people poststroke walked overground and on a split-belt treadmill with the belts moving at different speeds (0%–70% difference) to impose varied step length and stance time asymmetries. Conscious awareness and subconscious detection of imposed gait patterns were determined for each participant, and the asymmetry magnitudes at those points were compared with overground gait. Results For both spatial and temporal asymmetry variables, the asymmetry magnitude at the threshold of awareness was significantly greater than the asymmetry present at the threshold of detection or during overground gait. Participants appeared to identify belt speed differences using the type of gait asymmetry they typically exhibited (ie, step length or stance time asymmetries during overground gait). Limitations Very few individuals with severe spatiotemporal asymmetry were tested, and participants were instructed to identify asymmetric belt speeds rather than interlimb movements. Conclusions The data suggest that asymmetry magnitudes need to exceed usual overground levels to reach conscious awareness. Therefore, it is proposed that the spatiotemporal asymmetry that is specific to each participant may need to be augmented beyond what he or she usually has during walking in order to promote awareness of asymmetric gait patterns for long-term correction and learning. PMID:25838335

  3. Implementing gait pattern control and transition for legged locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhijun; Rocha, Marlon V.; Lima, Priscila M. V.; Karamanoglu, Mehmet; França, Felipe M. G.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, a generalised central pattern generator (CPG) model is formulated to generate a full range of gait patterns for a hexapod insect. To this end, a recurrent neuronal network module, as the building block for rhythmic patterns, is proposed to extend the concept of oscillatory building blocks (OBB) for constructing a CPG model. The model is able to make transitions between different gait patterns by simply adjusting one model parameter. Simulation results are further presented to show the effectiveness and performance of the CPG network.

  4. Quantifying gait abnormalities in persons with multiple sclerosis with minimal disability.

    PubMed

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Sandroff, Brian M; Motl, Robert W

    2012-05-01

    Abnormalities in gait kinematics in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) who have mild disability have been noted using motion capture systems. However, it is not clear if these abnormalities can be detected with clinically feasible technology. This investigation examined if the spatiotemporal markers of gait including variability metrics can distinguish between PwMS with minimal disability and controls with clinically feasible technology. 43 PwMS with minimal disability and 43 healthy controls completed four walking trials along a 26 foot long pressure sensitive pathway (GAITRite). Spatiotemporal markers of gait including variability metrics were determined. Statistical analysis revealed that PwMS walked slower, with fewer, shorter, wider steps and spent a greater percentage of a gait cycle in double support than controls. Additionally, PwMS had greater variability in the time between steps, single support percent and step width than controls. Collectively, the results highlight that PwMS, in the absence of clinical gait impairment, have subtle but detectable differences in gait and that these alterations can be detected with clinically feasible technology. The current results raise the possibility of targeting walking deviations earlier in disability progression in PwMS.

  5. Neurological Gait Abnormalities Moderate the Functional Brain Signature of the Posture First Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Joe; Allali, Gilles; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Wang, Cuiling; Mahoney, Jeannette R.

    2015-01-01

    The posture first hypothesis suggests that under dual-task walking conditions older adults prioritize gait over cognitive task performance. Functional neural confirmation of this hypothesis, however, is lacking. Herein, we determined the functional neural correlates of the posture first hypothesis and hypothesized that the presence of neurological gait abnormalities (NGA) would moderate associations between brain activations, gait and cognitive performance. Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy we assessed changes in oxygenated hemoglobin levels in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) during normal walk and walk while talk (WWT) conditions in a large cohort of non-demented older adults (n = 236; age = 75.5 ± 6.49 years; female = 51.7 %). NGA were defined as central (due to brain diseases) or peripheral (neuropathic gait) following a standardized neurological examination protocol. Double dissociations between brain activations and behavior emerged as a function of NGA. Higher oxygenation levels during WWT were related to better cognitive performance (estimate = 0.145; p < 0.001) but slower gait velocity (estimate = −6.336, p <0.05) among normals. In contrast, higher oxygenation levels during WWT among individuals with peripheral NGA were associated with worse cognitive performance (estimate = −0.355; p <0.001) but faster gait velocity (estimate = 14.855; p <0.05). Increased activation in the PFC during locomotion may have a compensatory function that is designed to support gait among individuals with peripheral NGA. PMID:26613725

  6. Gait Patterns in Patients with Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis

    PubMed Central

    Ranavolo, Alberto; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Martino, Giovanni; Leonardi, Luca; Conte, Carmela; Varrecchia, Tiwana; Draicchio, Francesco; Coppola, Gianluca; Casali, Carlo; Pierelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background Spastic gait is a key feature in patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis, but the gait characterization and the relationship between the gait impairment and clinical characteristics have not been investigated. Objectives To describe the gait patterns in hereditary spastic paraparesis and to identify subgroups of patients according to specific kinematic features of walking. Methods We evaluated fifty patients by computerized gait analysis and compared them to healthy participants. We computed time-distance parameters of walking and the range of angular motion at hip, knee, and ankle joints, and at the trunk and pelvis. Lower limb joint moments and muscle co-activation values were also evaluated. Results We identified three distinct subgroups of patients based on the range of motion values. Subgroup one was characterized by reduced hip, knee, and ankle joint range of motion. These patients were the most severely affected from a clinical standpoint, had the highest spasticity, and walked at the slowest speed. Subgroup three was characterized by an increased hip joint range of motion, but knee and ankle joint range of motion values close to control values. These patients were the most mildly affected and had the highest walking speed. Finally, subgroup two showed reduced knee and ankle joint range of motion, and hip range of motion values close to control values. Disease severity and gait speed in subgroup two were between those of subgroups one and three. Conclusions We identified three distinctive gait patterns in patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis that correlated robustly with clinical data. Distinguishing specific features in the gait patterns of these patients may help tailor pharmacological and rehabilitative treatments and may help evaluate therapeutic effects over time. PMID:27732632

  7. Automated Gait Analysis Through Hues and Areas (AGATHA): A Method to Characterize the Spatiotemporal Pattern of Rat Gait.

    PubMed

    Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Pettengill, Travis R; Turner, Sara M F; Streeter, Kristi A; Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Fuller, David D; Allen, Kyle D

    2017-03-01

    While rodent gait analysis can quantify the behavioral consequences of disease, significant methodological differences exist between analysis platforms and little validation has been performed to understand or mitigate these sources of variance. By providing the algorithms used to quantify gait, open-source gait analysis software can be validated and used to explore methodological differences. Our group is introducing, for the first time, a fully-automated, open-source method for the characterization of rodent spatiotemporal gait patterns, termed Automated Gait Analysis Through Hues and Areas (AGATHA). This study describes how AGATHA identifies gait events, validates AGATHA relative to manual digitization methods, and utilizes AGATHA to detect gait compensations in orthopaedic and spinal cord injury models. To validate AGATHA against manual digitization, results from videos of rodent gait, recorded at 1000 frames per second (fps), were compared. To assess one common source of variance (the effects of video frame rate), these 1000 fps videos were re-sampled to mimic several lower fps and compared again. While spatial variables were indistinguishable between AGATHA and manual digitization, low video frame rates resulted in temporal errors for both methods. At frame rates over 125 fps, AGATHA achieved a comparable accuracy and precision to manual digitization for all gait variables. Moreover, AGATHA detected unique gait changes in each injury model. These data demonstrate AGATHA is an accurate and precise platform for the analysis of rodent spatiotemporal gait patterns.

  8. Gait Patterns in Twins with Cerebral Palsy: Similarities and Development over Time after Multilevel Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Wolf, Sebastian I.

    2013-01-01

    To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event…

  9. Gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Chester, Victoria L; Biden, Edmund N; Tingley, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    Gait analysis, or the study of locomotion, has changed dramatically over the last few decades. Advances in computer technology and data analysis techniques have contributed greatly to the progress of this field. Gait analysis has become a valuable tool in the clinical setting. The ability to objectively quantify motion is essential to our understanding of normal and abnormal movement patterns and the evaluation of treatment effectiveness. This paper will discuss the various experimental and analytical techniques currently used for performing clinical gait analyses at the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.

  10. Effect of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation on Hemiplegic Gait Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Chong, Hyun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on both kinematic and temporospatial gait patterns in patients with hemiplegia. Materials and Methods Eighteen hemiplegic patients diagnosed with either cerebral palsy or stroke participated in this study. All participants underwent the 4-week gait training with RAS. The treatment was performed for 30 minutes per each session, three sessions per week. RAS was provided with rhythmic beats using a chord progression on a keyboard. Kinematic and temporospatial data were collected and analyzed using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Results Gait training with RAS significantly improved both proximal and distal joint kinematic patterns in hip adduction, knee flexion, and ankle plantar flexion, enhancing the gait deviation index (GDI) as well as ameliorating temporal asymmetry of the stance and swing phases in patients with hemiplegia. Stroke patients with previous walking experience demonstrated significant kinematic improvement in knee flexion in mid-swing and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance. Among stroke patients, subacute patients showed a significantly increased GDI score compared with chronic patients. In addition, household ambulators showed a significant effect on reducing anterior tilt of the pelvis with an enhanced GDI score, while community ambulators significantly increased knee flexion in mid-swing phase and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance phase. Conclusion Gait training with RAS has beneficial effects on both kinematic and temporospatial patterns in patients with hemiplegia, providing not only clinical implications of locomotor rehabilitation with goal-oriented external feedback using RAS but also differential effects according to ambulatory function. PMID:26446657

  11. Age-dependent gait abnormalities in mice lacking the Rnf170 gene linked to human autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Kook Hwan; Chae, Sujin; Kim, Chanki; Kim, Jeongjin; Shin, Hee-Sup; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kim, Daesoo

    2015-12-20

    Really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 170 (RNF170) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase known to mediate ubiquitination-dependent degradation of type-I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (ITPR1). It has recently been demonstrated that a point mutation of RNF170 gene is linked with autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), which is characterized by an age-dependent increase of walking abnormalities, a rare genetic disorder reported in only two families. Although this mutant allele is known to be dominant, the functional identity thereof has not been clearly established. Here, we generated mice lacking Rnf170 (Rnf170(-/-)) to evaluate the effect of its loss of function in vivo. Remarkably, Rnf170(-/-) mice began to develop gait abnormalities in old age (12 months) in the form of asynchronous stepping between diagonal limb pairs with a fixed step sequence during locomotion, while age-matched wild-type mice showed stable gait patterns using several step sequence repertoires. As reported in ADSA patients, they also showed a reduced sensitivity for proprioception and thermal nociception. Protein blot analysis revealed that the amount of Itpr1 protein was significantly elevated in the cerebellum and spinal cord but intact in the cerebral cortex in Rnf170(-/-) mice. These results suggest that the loss of Rnf170 gene function mediates ADSA-associated phenotypes and this gives insights on the cure of patients with ADSA and other age-dependent walking abnormalities.

  12. Brain flexibility and balance and gait performances mark morphological and metabolic abnormalities in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Douraied; Walker, Paul M; Aho, Serge; Tavernier, Béatrice; Giroud, Maurice; Tzourio, Christophe; Ricolfi, Frédéric; Brunotte, François

    2008-12-01

    Although previous studies have found that cerebral white matter hyperintensities are associated with balance-gait disorders, no proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy data at the plane of the basal ganglia have been published. We investigated a possible relationship between balance performance and brain metabolite ratios or structural MRI measurements. We also included neuropsychological tests to determine whether such tests are related to structural or metabolic findings. All 80 participants were taken from the cohort of the Three-City study (Dijon-Bordeaux-Montpellier, France). The ratios of N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr) and choline to creatine (Cho/Cr) were calculated in the basal ganglia, thalami and insular cortex. We used univariate regression to identify which variables predicted changes in NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr, and completed the analysis with a multiple linear or logistic regression. After the multivariate analysis including hypertension, age, balance-gait, sex, white matter lesions, brain atrophy and body mass index, only balance-gait performance remained statistically significant for NAA/Cr (p=0.01) and for deep white-matter lesions (p=0.02). The Trail-Making Test is independently associated with brain atrophy and periventricular white-matter hyperintensities. Neuronal and axonal integrity at the plane of the basal ganglia is associated with balance and gait in the elderly, whereas brain flexibility is associated with structural MRI brain abnormalities.

  13. Evolution of gait abnormalities in SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Renzo; Oliván, Sara; Osta, Rosario; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-08-11

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of upper and lower motoneurons. Clinically, it is manifested by weakness, muscle atrophy and progressive paralysis and ends up with patients' death 2-5 years after diagnosis. Although these symptoms lead in many cases to gait deficits in patients, an exhaustive locomotor profile of animal models mimicking the disease has not been assessed yet. In this work we evaluated the locomotor performance of the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of ALS using computerized treadmill gait analysis. SOD1(G93A) mice presented early (8 weeks of age) gait abnormalities, evidenced by an increase in the time of the propulsion phase of hindlimb stance. The alterations progressed during the disease until a complete disturbance of normal gait. This finding is meaningful to the field because the identification of a significant difference in a functional endpoint as early as 8 weeks might be a step forward resolving the debate about treatment of mice prior to the symptomatic phase in efficacy studies. These results also point out that digitizing analysis of treadmill locomotion may be useful to evaluate whether new therapeutic approaches are improving functional outcome of the animals.

  14. Gait patterns in twins with cerebral palsy: similarities and development over time after multilevel surgery.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W W; Wolf, Sebastian I

    2013-05-01

    To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event multilevel surgery. A standardized clinical exam and a three-dimensional gait analysis were performed. Gait patterns were classified according to Sutherland and Davids, and the Gillette Gait Index was calculated as a global measure of the gait impairment. Next to subject characteristics at time of first measurement, and at time of birth, birth conditions were collected. Gait patterns were determined as crouch gait in 13 legs, as stiff gait in 6 legs and as jump gait in 8 legs. One leg showed a normal gait pattern. The knee flexion-extension angle correlated most constant with the knee flexion-extension angle of the contralateral leg (range 0.91-0.99). Correlations with the legs of the sibling showed variable correlations (range 0.44-0.99); with all other legs medium to high correlations of 0.73-0.91 were found. The Gillette Gait Index was found to initially decrease after surgical intervention. Similar correlations were found between twins or between legs for the gait pattern expressed by the knee flexion-extension angle, and the Gillette Gait Index improved after surgery. It seems that gait quality in twins with cerebral palsy is characterized predominantly by the traumatic disorder: genetic dispositions and personal characteristics only play a negligible role.

  15. Quantifying Parkinson's disease progression by simulating gait patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, Luisa; Martínez, Fabio; Atehortúa, Angélica; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Modern rehabilitation protocols of most neurodegenerative diseases, in particular the Parkinson Disease, rely on a clinical analysis of gait patterns. Currently, such analysis is highly dependent on both the examiner expertise and the type of evaluation. Development of evaluation methods with objective measures is then crucial. Physical models arise as a powerful alternative to quantify movement patterns and to emulate the progression and performance of specific treatments. This work introduces a novel quantification of the Parkinson disease progression using a physical model that accurately represents the main gait biomarker, the body Center of Gravity (CoG). The model tracks the whole gait cycle by a coupled double inverted pendulum that emulates the leg swinging for the single support phase and by a damper-spring System (SDP) that recreates both legs in contact with the ground for the double phase. The patterns generated by the proposed model are compared with actual ones learned from 24 subjects in stages 2,3, and 4. The evaluation performed demonstrates a better performance of the proposed model when compared with a baseline model(SP) composed of a coupled double pendulum and a mass-spring system. The Frechet distance measured differences between model estimations and real trajectories, showing for stages 2, 3 and 4 distances of 0.137, 0.155, 0.38 for the baseline and 0.07, 0.09, 0.29 for the proposed method.

  16. Gait Patterns of Quadrupeds and Natural Vibration Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Yutaka; Matsumura, Yuichi; Kanda, Shinichi; Kinugasa, Hironao

    Quadruped animals switch gait patterns with speed for energy-effective movement. This is similar to the phenomenon that excited natural vibration modes switch with vibration frequency in a multi-degree-of-freedom system. Therefore, in this paper, it is assumed that quadruped animals move by using the natural vibration of their own musculoskeletal systems. In the simplest rigid-body-link model consisting of one body and four legs, there are natural vibration modes similar to the gait patterns (trot, pace, and gallop) of quadruped animals. However, all the natural frequencies in the model exist near the natural frequency of the free leg and are accordingly different from the walking frequencies of actual quadruped animals. When a scapula and a pelvis are added to the rigid-body-link model on the basis of observations of quadruped motion, the natural frequency of the gallop mode used at high speed increases greatly and approaches the walking frequency. If the body characteristics of a horse are applied to the rigid-body-link model with leg joints, the natural vibration modes of the model are close to the gait patterns of the horse.

  17. Variations In Gait Patterns Of Runners: Relationship To Anthropometric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelsberg, S.; Tauber, C.; Au, J.; Pugh, J.

    1983-07-01

    High-speed computerized motion analysis was used to assess the running parameters of a group of runners. Anthropometric measurements were taken on the group of runners in an effort to provide possible correlations between running style, speed, and anthropometry. The most consistent correlation was between speed and stride length. Femur length and stride length was only highly correlated for the runners at the fastest speeds. The faster runners also had a gait pattern characterized by significantly lower ground contact time than that of the slower runners. Of prime importance in running is behavior of the body during float phase, and mediated by anthropometry and the biomechanical characteristics of the stance phase.

  18. Models of central pattern generators for quadruped locomotion. II. Secondary gaits.

    PubMed

    Buono, P L

    2001-04-01

    We continue the analysis of the network of symmetrically coupled cells modeling central pattern generators (CPG) for quadruped locomotion proposed by Golubitsky, Stewart, Buono and Collins by studying secondary gaits. Secondary gaits are modeled by output signals from the CPG where each cell emits one of two different output signals along with exact phase shifts. Examples of secondary gaits are transverse gallop, rotary gallop, and canter. We classify secondary gaits that bifurcate when the Poincaré map of a primary gait has a real eigenvalue crossing the unit circle. In particular, we show that periodic solutions modeling transverse gallop and rotary gallop bifurcate from primary gaits. Moreover, we find gaits from period-doubling bifurcations and analyze plausible footfall patterns. Numerical simulations are performed using the Morris-Lecar equations as cell dynamics.

  19. Asymmetric gait nail unit syndrome: the most common worldwide toenail abnormality and onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Zaias, Nardo; Rebell, Gerbert; Escovar, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric gait nail unit syndrome (AGNUS) is the result of asymmetric shoe pressure on the toes and foot caused by ubiquitous uneven flat feet that affect the gait. The pressure produces clinical changes in the toenails, which are identical to all clinical types of dermatophyte and opportunistic onychomycosis, yet they are dermatophytes-free. AGNUS produces additional signs that make it easy to identify. Its coexistence with fungal disease has resulted in reports describing new clinical types of onychomycosis, identifying signs of drug resistance, assessing severity index, and defining complete clinical cure when taking a systemic or topical antifungal, as well as "retronychia." These signs are typically seen in the toenails of patients with AGNUS. AGNUS has a mechanical etiology and can coexist with dermatophytosis, which is a hereditary disease. AGNUS can coexist with any other disease affecting the toenails and results in greater clinical severity than each condition individually. AGNUS is and has been the most common worldwide toenail abnormality in shoe-wearing societies.

  20. Expressing hNF-LE397K results in abnormal gaiting in a transgenic model of CMT2E

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Jeffrey M.; Villalon, Eric; Shannon, Stephen G.; Barry, Devin M.; Markey, Rachel M.; Garcia, Virginia B.; Garcia, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT disease signs include distal limb neuropathy, abnormal gaiting, exacerbation of neuropathy, sensory defects, and deafness. We generated a novel line of CMT2E mice expressing a hNF-LE397K transgene, which displayed muscle atrophy of the lower limbs without denervation, proximal reduction in large caliber axons, and decreased nerve conduction velocity. In this study, we demonstrated that hNF-LE397K mice developed abnormal gait of the hind limbs. The identification of severe gaiting defects in combination with previously observed muscle atrophy, reduced axon caliber, and decreased nerve conduction velocity suggests that hNF-LE397K mice recapitulate many of clinical signs associated with CMT2E. Therefore, hNF-LE397K mice provide a context for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:22288874

  1. Gait abnormalities before and after total hip arthroplasty differ in men and women.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C

    2016-10-03

    This study tested the hypothesis that men and women have different preoperative and postoperative gait impairment relative to sex-matched healthy controls, and that the extent of gait improvement after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is different between men and women. A group of 124 THA subjects was identified from a motion analysis data repository; age and BMI-matched male and female control groups were then identified from the same repository. Dynamic sagittal plane hip range of motion (HROM) and peak 3D external moments at subjects' normal walking speeds were analyzed. Each hypotheses was tested using linear regression models, to adjust for potential confounding effects of walking speed. Preoperatively, the THA vs. control group differences in the HROM and peak adduction moments were larger in women than they were in men (p=0.007). The THA group vs. control group difference in the peak external rotation moment was larger in men (p=0.004). After surgery, HROM increased more in women than in men (p=0.020). However, peak adduction moment decreased in men but increased in women (-0.11±0.93 vs. 0.28±1.3%BWH, p=0.045). Accordingly, postoperatively the THA group vs. control group differences in the peak external rotation moment remained larger in men than in women (p=0.016). There were no other sex-specific differences (p=0.072-0.876). This study suggests that men and women have slightly different patterns of gait recovery after THA and may benefit from sex-specific rehabilitation strategies. These differences also underscore the importance of accounting for sex in biomechanical studies.

  2. Lack of Tryptophan Hydroxylase-1 in Mice Results in Gait Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, Georgette L.; Vanderhorst, Veronique; Hampton, Thomas G.; Wong, Siu Ling; Voorhees, Jaymie R.; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2013-01-01

    The role of peripheral serotonin in nervous system development is poorly understood. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1) is expressed by non-neuronal cells including enterochromaffin cells of the gut, mast cells and the pineal gland and is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of peripheral serotonin. Serotonin released into circulation is taken up by platelets via the serotonin transporter and stored in dense granules. It has been previously reported that mouse embryos removed from Tph1-deficient mothers present abnormal nervous system morphology. The goal of this study was to assess whether Tph1-deficiency results in behavioral abnormalities. We did not find any differences between Tph1-deficient and wild-type mice in general motor behavior as tested by rotarod, grip-strength test, open field and beam walk. However, here we report that Tph1 (−/−) mice display altered gait dynamics and deficits in rearing behavior compared to wild-type (WT) suggesting that tryptophan hydroxylase-1 expression has an impact on the nervous system. PMID:23516593

  3. EFFECTS OF LEVODOPA ON FORWARD AND BACKWARD GAIT PATTERNS IN PERSONS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, MS; Rintala, DH; Hou, JG; Lai, EC; Protas, EJ

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Backward walking is difficult for persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is unknown how levodopa influences backward gait patterns, especially when compared to forward gait patterns. Purpose Investigate the effects of levodopa on forward and backward gait patterns in individuals with PD. Design A repeated measures design was used. Methods The sample consisted of 21 individuals with PD (15 males, 6 females). Their mean age was 70.24 ± 8.69 yr. The average time since diagnosis was 11.81 ± 5.49 years. The median of the Hoehn and Yahr stage while ‘ON’ medication was 2.57. Gait patterns during forward and backward walking at a self-selected comfortable speed were recorded before and after taking levodopa on the same day. Results Levodopa significantly increased gait speed and stride length and decreased the percent of the gait cycle (%GC) spent in double support. Gait speed and stride length were greater and the %GC spent in double support was less during forward walking compared with backward walking. Cadence was not changed by levodopa or walking direction. Conclusions Levodopa improved gait characteristics during backward walking in a manner similar to that during forward walking in persons with PD. PMID:22142758

  4. Effects of gyrokinesis exercise on the gait pattern of female patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kook-Eun; Park, Tae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to use kinematic variables to identify the effects of 8/weeks’ performance of a gyrokinesis exercise on the gait pattern of females with chronic low back pain. [Subjects] The subjects of the present study were females in their late 20s to mid 30s who were chronic back pain patients. [Methods] A 3-D motion analysis system was used to measure the changes in their gait patterns between pre and post-gyrokintic exercise. The SPSS 21.0 statistics program was used to perform the paired t-test, to compare the gait patterns of pre-post-gyrokinesis exercise. [Results] In the gait analysis, pre-post-gyrokinesis exercise gait patterns showed statistically significant differences in right and left step length, stride length, right-left step widths, and stride speed. [Conclusion] Gait pattern analysis revealed increases in step length, stride length, and stride speed along with a decrease in step width after 8 weeks of gyrokinesis exercise, demonstrating it improved gait pattern. PMID:27065537

  5. Effects of gyrokinesis exercise on the gait pattern of female patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kook-Eun; Park, Tae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to use kinematic variables to identify the effects of 8/weeks' performance of a gyrokinesis exercise on the gait pattern of females with chronic low back pain. [Subjects] The subjects of the present study were females in their late 20s to mid 30s who were chronic back pain patients. [Methods] A 3-D motion analysis system was used to measure the changes in their gait patterns between pre and post-gyrokintic exercise. The SPSS 21.0 statistics program was used to perform the paired t-test, to compare the gait patterns of pre-post-gyrokinesis exercise. [Results] In the gait analysis, pre-post-gyrokinesis exercise gait patterns showed statistically significant differences in right and left step length, stride length, right-left step widths, and stride speed. [Conclusion] Gait pattern analysis revealed increases in step length, stride length, and stride speed along with a decrease in step width after 8 weeks of gyrokinesis exercise, demonstrating it improved gait pattern.

  6. Abnormal Breathing Patterns Predict Extubation Failure in Neurocritically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Punj, Pragya; Nattanmai, Premkumar; George, Pravin

    2017-01-01

    In neurologically injured patients, predictors for extubation success are not well defined. Abnormal breathing patterns may result from the underlying neurological injury. We present three patients with abnormal breathing patterns highlighting failure of successful extubation as a result of these neurologically driven breathing patterns. Recognizing abnormal breathing patterns may be predictive of extubation failure and thus need to be considered as part of extubation readiness. PMID:28348899

  7. Patient-specific walking pattern simulation in a gait trajectory guiding device.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Muhammad Kamrul; Park, Jang-Ho; Park, Seung-Hun; Hwang, Sun-Hee; Khang, Gon

    2009-01-01

    Repetitive training is of much importance for restoring full-fledged gait ability. At present, task-specific repetitive approach has been proved to be the most effective motor learning concept. In this regard, a gait trajectory guiding device with partial body weight support system can be a solution for gait rehabilitation. This paper presents a complete gait study with an objective to implement the motion of a natural walking pattern in the automated foot-boards of a gait trajectory guiding device. In our developed motion algorithm of foot-boards we have concentrated on adaptation of patient-specific true walking trajectory, determination of variable velocity pattern along different degrees of freedom and time-division for simulating different phases of a complete gait cycle. Gait database, collected from disparate sources and previous gait-studies have been used for kinetic and kinematic analysis of human walking. We have modeled those data based on the previous researches done in this area and adopt them for our motion algorithm. A precise velocity pattern and time-division have been described along different axes so that patient's biofeedback and postural stability in different walking phases can be recorded accordingly and motion-correction of the foot-boards can be done in consecutive cycles through iterative learning control algorithm with the help of motion sensors.

  8. An ambulatory method of identifying anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed gait patterns.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Matthew R; Delahunt, Eamonn; Sweeney, Kevin T; Caulfield, Brian

    2014-01-07

    The use of inertial sensors to characterize pathological gait has traditionally been based on the calculation of temporal and spatial gait variables from inertial sensor data. This approach has proved successful in the identification of gait deviations in populations where substantial differences from normal gait patterns exist; such as in Parkinsonian gait. However, it is not currently clear if this approach could identify more subtle gait deviations, such as those associated with musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates whether additional analysis of inertial sensor data, based on quantification of gyroscope features of interest, would provide further discriminant capability in this regard. The tested cohort consisted of a group of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) females and a group of non-injured female controls, each performed ten walking trials. Gait performance was measured simultaneously using inertial sensors and an optoelectronic marker based system. The ACL-R group displayed kinematic and kinetic deviations from the control group, but no temporal or spatial deviations. This study demonstrates that quantification of gyroscope features can successfully identify changes associated with ACL-R gait, which was not possible using spatial or temporal variables. This finding may also have a role in other clinical applications where small gait deviations exist.

  9. The modified gait abnormality rating scale in patients with a conversion disorder: a reliability and responsiveness study.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Justin M; George, Deanna R; O'Leary, Andrea J; Olson, Lindsay C; Strassburg, Kaitlyn R; Hollman, John H

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with conversion disorder have neurologic symptoms that are not identified by an underlying organic cause. Often the symptoms manifest as gait disturbances. The modified gait abnormality rating scale (GARS-M) may be useful for quantifying gait abnormalities in these individuals. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability, responsiveness and concurrent validity of GARS-M scores in individuals with conversion disorder. Data from 27 individuals who completed a rehabilitation program were included in this study. Pre- and post-intervention videos were obtained and walking speed was measured. Five examiners independently evaluated gait performance according to the GARS-M criteria. Inter- and intrarater reliability of GARS-M scores were estimated with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Responsiveness was estimated with the minimum detectable change (MDC). Pre- to post-treatment changes in GARS-M scores were analyzed with a dependent t-test. The correlation between GARS-M scores and walking speed was analyzed to assess concurrent validity. GARS-M scores were quantified with good-to-excellent inter- (ICC = 0.878) and intrarater reliability (ICC = 0.989). The MDC was 2 points. Mean GARS-M scores decreased from 7 ± 5 at baseline to 1 ± 2 at discharge (t26 = 7.411, p < 0.001) and 85% of patients improved beyond the MDC. Furthermore, GARS-M scores and walking speed measurements were moderately correlated (r = -0.582, p = 0.004), indicating that the GARS-M has acceptable concurrent validity. Our findings provide evidence that the GARS-M scores are reliable, valid and responsive for quantifying gait abnormalities in patients with conversion disorder. GARS-M scores provide objective measures upon which treatment effects can be assessed.

  10. Dynamic Contact Stress Patterns on the Tibial Plateaus during Simulated Gait: A Novel Application of Normalized Cross Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongsheng; Chen, Tony; Torzilli, Peter; Warren, Russell; Maher, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution and pattern of local contact stresses within the knee joint during activities of daily living have not been fully investigated. The objective of this study was to determine if common contact stress patterns exist on the tibial plateaus of human knees during simulated gait. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel normalized cross-correlation (NCC) algorithm and applied it to the contact stresses on the tibial plateaus of twelve human cadaveric knees subjected to multi-directional loads mimicking gait. The contact stress profiles at different locations on the tibial plateaus were compared, where regions with similar contact stress patterns were identified across specimens. Three consistent regional patterns were found, among them two most prominent contact stress patterns were shared by 9 to 12 of all the knees and the third pattern was shared by 6 to 8 knees. The first pattern was located at the posterior aspect of the medial tibial plateau and had a single peak stress that occurred during the early stance phase. The second pattern was located at the central-posterior aspects of the lateral plateau and consisted of two peak stresses coincident with the timing of peak axial force at early and late stance. The third pattern was found on the anterior aspect of cartilage-to-cartilage contact region on the medial plateau consisted of double peak stresses. The differences in the location and profile of the contact stress patterns suggest that the medial and lateral menisci function to carry load at different points in the gait cycle: with the posterior aspect of the medial meniscus consistently distributing load only during the early phase of stance, and the posterior aspect of the lateral meniscus consistently distributing load during both the early and late phases of stance. This novel approach can help identify abnormalities in knee contact mechanics and provide a better understanding of the mechanical pathways leading to post

  11. Fractal gait patterns are retained after entrainment to a fractal stimulus.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kiefer, Adam W; Wittstein, Matthew W; Leonard, Kelsey B; MacPherson, Ryan P; Wright, W Geoffrey; Haran, F Jay

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that fractal patterns in gait can be altered by entraining to a fractal stimulus. However, little is understood about how long those patterns are retained or which factors may influence stronger entrainment or retention. In experiment one, participants walked on a treadmill for 45 continuous minutes, which was separated into three phases. The first 15 minutes (pre-synchronization phase) consisted of walking without a fractal stimulus, the second 15 minutes consisted of walking while entraining to a fractal visual stimulus (synchronization phase), and the last 15 minutes (post-synchronization phase) consisted of walking without the stimulus to determine if the patterns adopted from the stimulus were retained. Fractal gait patterns were strengthened during the synchronization phase and were retained in the post-synchronization phase. In experiment two, similar methods were used to compare a continuous fractal stimulus to a discrete fractal stimulus to determine which stimulus type led to more persistent fractal gait patterns in the synchronization and post-synchronization (i.e., retention) phases. Both stimulus types led to equally persistent patterns in the synchronization phase, but only the discrete fractal stimulus led to retention of the patterns. The results add to the growing body of literature showing that fractal gait patterns can be manipulated in a predictable manner. Further, our results add to the literature by showing that the newly adopted gait patterns are retained for up to 15 minutes after entrainment and showed that a discrete visual stimulus is a better method to influence retention.

  12. Walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithms using gait phase information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jeen-Shing; Lin, Che-Wei; Yang, Ya-Ting C; Ho, Yu-Jen

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a walking pattern classification and a walking distance estimation algorithm using gait phase information. A gait phase information retrieval algorithm was developed to analyze the duration of the phases in a gait cycle (i.e., stance, push-off, swing, and heel-strike phases). Based on the gait phase information, a decision tree based on the relations between gait phases was constructed for classifying three different walking patterns (level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs). Gait phase information was also used for developing a walking distance estimation algorithm. The walking distance estimation algorithm consists of the processes of step count and step length estimation. The proposed walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithm have been validated by a series of experiments. The accuracy of the proposed walking pattern classification was 98.87%, 95.45%, and 95.00% for level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed walking distance estimation algorithm was 96.42% over a walking distance.

  13. A computational model of altered gait patterns in parkinson's disease patients negotiating narrow doorways.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Vignesh; Balasubramani, Pragathi P; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa; Lewis, Simon J G; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    We present a computational model of altered gait velocity patterns in Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients. PD gait is characterized by short shuffling steps, reduced walking speed, increased double support time and sometimes increased cadence. The most debilitating symptom of PD gait is the context dependent cessation in gait known as freezing of gait (FOG). Cowie et al. (2010) and Almeida and Lebold (2010) investigated FOG as the changes in velocity profiles of PD gait, as patients walked through a doorway with variable width. The former reported a sharp dip in velocity, a short distance from the doorway that was greater for narrower doorways. They compared the gait performance in PD freezers at ON and OFF dopaminergic medication. In keeping with this finding, the latter also reported the same for ON medicated PD freezers and non-freezers. In the current study, we sought to simulate these gait changes using a computational model of Basal Ganglia based on Reinforcement Learning, coupled with a spinal rhythm mimicking central pattern generator (CPG) model. In the model, a simulated agent was trained to learn a value profile over a corridor leading to the doorway by repeatedly attempting to pass through the doorway. Temporal difference error in value, associated with dopamine signal, was appropriately constrained in order to reflect the dopamine-deficient conditions of PD. Simulated gait under PD conditions exhibited a sharp dip in velocity close to the doorway, with PD OFF freezers showing the largest decrease in velocity compared to PD ON freezers and controls. PD ON and PD OFF freezers both showed sensitivity to the doorway width, with narrow door producing the least velocity/ stride length. Step length variations were also captured with PD freezers producing smaller steps and larger step-variability than PD non-freezers and controls. In addition this model is the first to explain the non-dopamine dependence for FOG giving rise to several other possibilities for its

  14. Micro-Doppler characteristics of elderly gait patterns with walking aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Moeness G.; Ahmad, Fauzia; Zhang, Yimin D.; Boashash, Boualem

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the micro-Doppler signatures of elderly gait patterns in the presence of walking aids using radars. The signatures are based on real data experiments conducted in a laboratory environment using human subjects walking with a walking cane and a walker. Short-time Fourier transform is used to provide the local signal behavior over frequency and to detail the changes in the micro-Doppler signatures over time. Intrinsic differences in the Doppler and micro-Doppler signatures of the elderly gait observed with and without the use of a walking aid are highlighted. Features that capture these differences can be effective in discriminating gait with walking aids from normal human gait.

  15. Models of central pattern generators for quadruped locomotion. I. Primary gaits.

    PubMed

    Buono, P L; Golubitsky, M

    2001-04-01

    In this paper we continue the analysis of a network of symmetrically coupled cells modeling central pattern generators for quadruped locomotion proposed by Golubitsky, Stewart, Buono, and Collins. By a cell we mean a system of ordinary differential equations and by a coupled cell system we mean a network of identical cells with coupling terms. We have three main results in this paper. First, we show that the proposed network is the simplest one modeling the common quadruped gaits of walk, trot, and pace. In doing so we prove a general theorem classifying spatio-temporal symmetries of periodic solutions to equivariant systems of differential equations. We also specialize this theorem to coupled cell systems. Second, this paper focuses on primary gaits; that is, gaits that are modeled by output signals from the central pattern generator where each cell emits the same waveform along with exact phase shifts between cells. Our previous work showed that the network is capable of producing six primary gaits. Here, we show that under mild assumptions on the cells and the coupling of the network, primary gaits can be produced from Hopf bifurcation by varying only coupling strengths of the network. Third, we discuss the stability of primary gaits and exhibit these solutions by performing numerical simulations using the dimensionless Morris-Lecar equations for the cell dynamics.

  16. Statistical Parametric Mapping to Identify Differences between Consensus-Based Joint Patterns during Gait in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Eirini; Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; De Laet, Tinne

    2017-01-01

    Experts recently identified 49 joint motion patterns in children with cerebral palsy during a Delphi consensus study. Pattern definitions were therefore the result of subjective expert opinion. The present study aims to provide objective, quantitative data supporting the identification of these consensus-based patterns. To do so, statistical parametric mapping was used to compare the mean kinematic waveforms of 154 trials of typically developing children (n = 56) to the mean kinematic waveforms of 1719 trials of children with cerebral palsy (n = 356), which were classified following the classification rules of the Delphi study. Three hypotheses stated that: (a) joint motion patterns with ‘no or minor gait deviations’ (n = 11 patterns) do not differ significantly from the gait pattern of typically developing children; (b) all other pathological joint motion patterns (n = 38 patterns) differ from typically developing gait and the locations of difference within the gait cycle, highlighted by statistical parametric mapping, concur with the consensus-based classification rules. (c) all joint motion patterns at the level of each joint (n = 49 patterns) differ from each other during at least one phase of the gait cycle. Results showed that: (a) ten patterns with ‘no or minor gait deviations’ differed somewhat unexpectedly from typically developing gait, but these differences were generally small (≤3°); (b) all other joint motion patterns (n = 38) differed from typically developing gait and the significant locations within the gait cycle that were indicated by the statistical analyses, coincided well with the classification rules; (c) joint motion patterns at the level of each joint significantly differed from each other, apart from two sagittal plane pelvic patterns. In addition to these results, for several joints, statistical analyses indicated other significant areas during the gait cycle that were not included in the pattern definitions of the consensus

  17. Feature reduction and multi-classification of different assistive devices according to the gait pattern.

    PubMed

    Martins, Maria; Santos, Cristina; Costa, Lino; Frizera, Anselmo

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a surgical procedure used in patients with Osteoarthritis to improve their state. An understanding about how gait patterns differ from patient to patient and are influenced by the assistive device (AD) that is prescribed is still missing. This article focuses on such purpose. Standard walker, crutches and rollator were tested. Symmetric indexes of spatiotemporal and postural control features were calculated. In order to select the important features which can discriminate the differences among the ADs, different techniques for feature selection are investigated. Classification is handled by Multi-class Support Vector Machine. Results showed that rollator provides a more symmetrical gait and crutches demonstrated to be the worst. Relatively to postural control parameters, standard walker is the most stable and crutches are the worst AD. This means that, depending on the patient's problem and the recovery goal, different ADs should be used. After selecting a set of 16 important features, through correlation, it was demonstrated that they provide important quantitative information about the functional capacity, which is not represented by velocity, cadence and clinical scales. Also, they were capable of distinguishing the gait patterns influenced by each AD, showing that each patient has different needs during recovery. Implications of Rehabilitation An understanding about how gait patterns of post-surgical patients differ from person to person and how they are influenced by the type of device that is prescribed during their recovery might help in physical therapy. Research specifically addressing these issues is still missing. Inter-limb asymmetry and postural control features can be evaluated in an outpatient setting, supplying important additional information about individual gait pattern, which is not represented by gait velocity, cadence and scales usually used. The features calculated in this study are able to provide

  18. Complex muscle vibration patterns to induce gait-like lower-limb movements: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Duclos, Cyril; Kemlin, Claire; Lazert, David; Gagnon, Dany; Dyer, Joseph-Omer; Forget, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Muscle vibrations can induce motor responses and illusions of complex movements. However, inducing gait-like cyclical movements and illusions requires the application of multiple fast alternating vibrations to lower-limb muscles. The objectives were (1) to test the feasibility of delivering complex vibrations in a time-organized manner and (2) to illustrate the possibility of inducing alternate gait-in-place-like movements using these vibrations. Patterns of vibration, produced by 12 vibrators applied bilaterally on the flexor and extensor muscle groups of the lower limbs, were based on normal gait kinematics. We tested 1 s and 2 s cycle patterns of vibration. Vibrator responses were assessed using auto- and crosscorrelations and frequency analyses based on accelerometry measurements, and compared between patterns. High auto- (>0.8) and crosscorrelation (>0.6) coefficients demonstrated a good response by the vibrators to the control signal. Vibrations induced cyclical, low-amplitude stepping-in-place movements that mimicked alternate walking movements with both legs, with 1 s and 2 s cycle durations, in one nondisabled participant and one participant with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale B spinal cord injury standing, relaxed, with body-weight support. Electromechanical vibrators can deliver complex cyclical vibrations and trigger gait-like lower-limb movements. These results warrant the application of these vibration patterns on individuals with sensorimotor impairments to test their potential in gait rehabilitation.

  19. Ambiguity domain-based identification of altered gait pattern in ALS disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugavaneswaran, L.; Umapathy, K.; Krishnan, S.

    2012-08-01

    The onset of a neurological disorder, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is so subtle that the symptoms are often overlooked, thereby ruling out the option of early detection of the abnormality. In the case of ALS, over 75% of the affected individuals often experience awkwardness when using their limbs, which alters their gait, i.e. stride and swing intervals. The aim of this work is to suitably represent the non-stationary characteristics of gait (fluctuations in stride and swing intervals) in order to facilitate discrimination between normal and ALS subjects. We define a simple-yet-representative feature vector space by exploiting the ambiguity domain (AD) to achieve efficient classification between healthy and pathological gait stride interval. The stride-to-stride fluctuations and the swing intervals of 16 healthy control and 13 ALS-affected subjects were analyzed. Three features that are representative of the gait signal characteristics were extracted from the AD-space and are fed to linear discriminant analysis and neural network classifiers, respectively. Overall, maximum accuracies of 89.2% (LDA) and 100% (NN) were obtained in classifying the ALS gait.

  20. Ambiguity domain-based identification of altered gait pattern in ALS disorder.

    PubMed

    Sugavaneswaran, L; Umapathy, K; Krishnan, S

    2012-08-01

    The onset of a neurological disorder, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is so subtle that the symptoms are often overlooked, thereby ruling out the option of early detection of the abnormality. In the case of ALS, over 75% of the affected individuals often experience awkwardness when using their limbs, which alters their gait, i.e. stride and swing intervals. The aim of this work is to suitably represent the non-stationary characteristics of gait (fluctuations in stride and swing intervals) in order to facilitate discrimination between normal and ALS subjects. We define a simple-yet-representative feature vector space by exploiting the ambiguity domain (AD) to achieve efficient classification between healthy and pathological gait stride interval. The stride-to-stride fluctuations and the swing intervals of 16 healthy control and 13 ALS-affected subjects were analyzed. Three features that are representative of the gait signal characteristics were extracted from the AD-space and are fed to linear discriminant analysis and neural network classifiers, respectively. Overall, maximum accuracies of 89.2% (LDA) and 100% (NN) were obtained in classifying the ALS gait.

  1. Simulation of Parkinsonian gait by fusing trunk learned patterns and a lower limb first order model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, Luisa; Martínez, Fabio; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that progressively affects the movement. Gait analysis is therefore crucial to determine a disease degree as well as to orient the diagnosis. However, gait examination is completely subjective and therefore prone to errors or misinterpretations, even with a great expertise. In addition, the conventional evaluation follows up general gait variables, which amounts to ignore subtle changes that definitely can modify the history of the treatment. This work presents a functional gait model that simulates the center of gravity trajectory (CoG) for different Parkinson disease stages. This model mimics the gait trajectory by coupling two models: a double pendulum (single stance phase) and a spring-mass model (double stance). Realistic simulations for different Parkinson disease stages are then obtained by integrating to the model a set of trunk bending patterns, learned from real patients. The proposed model was compared with the CoG of real Parkinson gaits in stages 2, 3, 4 achieving a correlation coefficient of 0.88, 0.92 and 0.86, respectively.

  2. Automatic characterization of the Parkinson disease by classifying the ipsilateral coordination and spatiotemporal gait patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, Fernanda; Martínez, Fabio; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, the Parkinson disease is diagnosed and followed up by conventional clinical tests that are fully dependent on the expert experience. The diffuse boundary between normal and early Parkinson stages and the high variability of gait patterns difficult any objective characterization of this disease. An automatic characterization of the disease is herein proposed by mixing up different measures of the ipsilateral coordination and spatiotemporal gait patterns which are then classified with a classical support vector machine. The strategy was evaluated in a population with Parkinson and healthy control subjects, obtaining an average accuracy of 87% for the task of classification.

  3. Fractal Gait Patterns Are Retained after Entrainment to a Fractal Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Rhea, Christopher K.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Wittstein, Matthew W.; Leonard, Kelsey B.; MacPherson, Ryan P.; Wright, W. Geoffrey; Haran, F. Jay

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that fractal patterns in gait can be altered by entraining to a fractal stimulus. However, little is understood about how long those patterns are retained or which factors may influence stronger entrainment or retention. In experiment one, participants walked on a treadmill for 45 continuous minutes, which was separated into three phases. The first 15 minutes (pre-synchronization phase) consisted of walking without a fractal stimulus, the second 15 minutes consisted of walking while entraining to a fractal visual stimulus (synchronization phase), and the last 15 minutes (post-synchronization phase) consisted of walking without the stimulus to determine if the patterns adopted from the stimulus were retained. Fractal gait patterns were strengthened during the synchronization phase and were retained in the post-synchronization phase. In experiment two, similar methods were used to compare a continuous fractal stimulus to a discrete fractal stimulus to determine which stimulus type led to more persistent fractal gait patterns in the synchronization and post-synchronization (i.e., retention) phases. Both stimulus types led to equally persistent patterns in the synchronization phase, but only the discrete fractal stimulus led to retention of the patterns. The results add to the growing body of literature showing that fractal gait patterns can be manipulated in a predictable manner. Further, our results add to the literature by showing that the newly adopted gait patterns are retained for up to 15 minutes after entrainment and showed that a discrete visual stimulus is a better method to influence retention. PMID:25221981

  4. A machine learning approach for automated recognition of movement patterns using basic, kinetic and kinematic gait data.

    PubMed

    Begg, R; Kamruzzaman, J

    2005-03-01

    This paper investigated application of a machine learning approach (Support vector machine, SVM) for the automatic recognition of gait changes due to ageing using three types of gait measures: basic temporal/spatial, kinetic and kinematic. The gaits of 12 young and 12 elderly participants were recorded and analysed using a synchronized PEAK motion analysis system and a force platform during normal walking. Altogether, 24 gait features describing the three types of gait characteristics were extracted for developing gait recognition models and later testing of generalization performance. Test results indicated an overall accuracy of 91.7% by the SVM in its capacity to distinguish the two gait patterns. The classification ability of the SVM was found to be unaffected across six kernel functions (linear, polynomial, radial basis, exponential radial basis, multi-layer perceptron and spline). Gait recognition rate improved when features were selected from different gait data type. A feature selection algorithm demonstrated that as little as three gait features, one selected from each data type, could effectively distinguish the age groups with 100% accuracy. These results demonstrate considerable potential in applying SVMs in gait classification for many applications.

  5. Learning new gait patterns: Exploratory muscle activity during motor learning is not predicted by motor modules.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Rajiv; Krishnan, Chandramouli; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Rymer, William Z

    2016-03-21

    The motor module hypothesis in motor control proposes that the nervous system can simplify the problem of controlling a large number of muscles in human movement by grouping muscles into a smaller number of modules. Here, we tested one prediction of the modular organization hypothesis by examining whether there is preferential exploration along these motor modules during the learning of a new gait pattern. Healthy college-aged participants learned a new gait pattern which required increased hip and knee flexion during the swing phase while walking in a lower-extremity robot (Lokomat). The new gait pattern was displayed as a foot trajectory in the sagittal plane and participants attempted to match their foot trajectory to this template. We recorded EMG from 8 lower-extremity muscles and we extracted motor modules during both baseline walking and target-tracking using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Results showed increased trajectory variability in the first block of learning, indicating that participants were engaged in exploratory behavior. Critically, when we examined the muscle activity during this exploratory phase, we found that the composition of motor modules changed significantly within the first few strides of attempting the new gait pattern. The lack of persistence of the motor modules under even short time scales suggests that motor modules extracted during locomotion may be more indicative of correlated muscle activity induced by the task constraints of walking, rather than reflecting a modular control strategy.

  6. Gait patterns comparison of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy to those of control subjects considering the effect of gait velocity.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Gravel, Denis; Nadeau, Sylvie; Houde, Sylvie; Gagnon, Denis

    2010-07-01

    3D analysis of the gait of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was the topic of only a few studies and none of these considered the effect of gait velocity on the gait parameters of children with DMD. Gait parameters of 11 children with DMD were compared to those of 14 control children while considering the effect of gait velocity using 3D biomechanical analysis. Kinematic and kinetic gait parameters were measured using an Optotrak motion analysis system and AMTI force plates embedded in the floor. The data profiles of children with DMD walking at natural gait velocity were compared to those of the control children who walked at both natural and slow gait velocities. When both groups walked at similar velocity, children with DMD had higher cadence and shorter step length. They demonstrated a lower hip extension moment as well as a minimal or absent knee extension moment. At the ankle, a dorsiflexion moment was absent at heel strike due to the anterior location of the center of pressure. The magnitude of the medio-lateral ground reaction force was higher in children with DMD. Despite this increase, the hip abductor moment was lower. Hip power generation was also observed at the mid-stance in DMD children. These results suggest that most of the modifications observed are strategies used by children with DMD to cope with possible muscle weakness in order to provide support, propulsion and balance of the body during gait.

  7. Smooth changes in the EMG patterns during gait transitions under body weight unloading.

    PubMed

    Labini, Francesca Sylos; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Cappellini, Germana; Gravano, Silvio; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-09-01

    During gradual speed changes, humans exhibit a sudden discontinuous switch from walking to running at a specific speed, and it has been suggested that different gaits may be associated with different functioning of neuronal networks. In this study we recorded the EMG activity of leg muscles at slow increments and decrements in treadmill belt speed and at different levels of body weight unloading. In contrast to normal walking at 1 g, at lower levels of simulated gravity (<0.4 g) the transition between walking and running was generally gradual, without systematic abrupt changes in either intensity or timing of EMG patterns. This phenomenon depended to a limited extent on the gravity simulation technique, although the exact level of the appearance of smooth transitions (0.4-0.6 g) tended to be lower for the vertical than for the tilted body weight support system. Furthermore, simulations performed with a half-center oscillator neuromechanical model showed that the abruptness of motor patterns at gait transitions at 1 g could be predicted from the distinct parameters anchored already in the normal range of walking and running speeds, whereas at low gravity levels the parameters of the model were similar for the two human gaits. A lack of discontinuous changes in the pattern of speed-dependent locomotor characteristics in a hypogravity environment is consistent with the idea of a continuous shift in the state of a given set of central pattern generators, rather than the activation of a separate set of central pattern generators for each distinct gait.

  8. A new training algorithm using artificial neural networks to classify gender-specific dynamic gait patterns.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Andre; Costa, Marcelo; Paolucci, Leopoldo; Braga, Antônio; Pires, Flavio; Ugrinowitsch, Herbert; Menzel, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a new training algorithm using artificial neural networks called multi-objective least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (MOBJ-LASSO) applied to the classification of dynamic gait patterns. The movement pattern is identified by 20 characteristics from the three components of the ground reaction force which are used as input information for the neural networks in gender-specific gait classification. The classification performance between MOBJ-LASSO (97.4%) and multi-objective algorithm (MOBJ) (97.1%) is similar, but the MOBJ-LASSO algorithm achieved more improved results than the MOBJ because it is able to eliminate the inputs and automatically select the parameters of the neural network. Thus, it is an effective tool for data mining using neural networks. From 20 inputs used for training, MOBJ-LASSO selected the first and second peaks of the vertical force and the force peak in the antero-posterior direction as the variables that classify the gait patterns of the different genders.

  9. Magnitude and pattern of 3D kinematic and kinetic gait profiles in persons with stroke: relationship to walking speed.

    PubMed

    Kim, C Maria; Eng, Janice J

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify 3D kinematic and kinetic gait profiles in individuals with chronic stroke and to determine whether the magnitude or pattern (shape and direction of curve) of these profiles relate to gait performance (as measured by self-selected gait speed). More than one type of kinematic and kinetic pattern was identified in all three planes in 20 individuals with stroke (age: 61.2+/-8.4 years). Persons in the "fast" speed group did not necessarily exhibit the gait patterns closest to the ones reported for healthy adults. For example, in the frontal plane, a variation from the typical pattern (i.e., a hip abductor pattern in swing) was more common among the "fast" group. Correlations revealed that in addition to the sagittal profiles, the magnitudes of the frontal and transverse profiles are also related to speed, particularly the frontal hip powers. The results support the importance of hip abductors, in addition to the sagittal plane muscle groups, for both the paretic and non-paretic limbs. Furthermore, profiles which resemble gait patterns of neurologically healthy adults do not necessarily result in the faster gait speeds for individuals with chronic stroke.

  10. Expressing gait-line symmetry in able-bodied gait

    PubMed Central

    Jeleń, Piotr; Wit, Andrzej; Dudziński, Krzysztof; Nolan, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Background Gait-lines, or the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the vertical ground reaction force, are a commonly reported parameter in most in-sole measuring systems. However, little is known about what is considered a "normal" or "abnormal" gait-line pattern or level of asymmetry. Furthermore, no reference databases on healthy young populations are available for this parameter. Thus the aim of this study is to provide such reference data in order to allow this tool to be better used in gait analysis. Methods Vertical ground reaction force data during several continuous gait cycles were collected using a Computer Dyno Graphy in-sole system® for 77 healthy young able-bodied subjects. A curve (termed gait-line) was obtained from the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the force. An Asymmetry Coefficient Curve (AsC) was calculated between the mean gait-lines for the left and right foot for each subject. AsC limits of ± 1.96 and 3 standard deviations (SD) from the mean were then calculated. Gait-line data from 5 individual subjects displaying pathological gait due to disorders relating to the discopathy of the lumbar spine (three with considerable plantarflexor weakness, two with considerable dorsiflexor weakness) were compared to the AsC results from the able-bodied group. Results The ± 1.96 SD limit suggested that non-pathological gait falls within 12–16% asymmetry for gait-lines. Those exhibiting pathological gait fell outside both the ± 1.96 and ± 3SD limits at several points during stance. The subjects exhibiting considerable plantarflexor weakness all fell outside the ± 1.96SD limit from 30–50% of foot length to toe-off while those exhibiting considerable dorsiflexor weakness fell outside the ± 1.96SD limit between initial contact to 25–40% of foot length, and then surpassed the ± 3SD limit after 55–80% of foot length. Conclusion This analysis of gait-line asymmetry provides a reference

  11. Relationship between Physical Impairments and Movement Patterns During Gait in Patients With End-stage Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zeni, Joseph; Pozzi, Federico; Abujaber, Sumayah; Miller, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Patients with hip osteoarthritis demonstrate limited range of motion, muscle weakness and altered biomechanics; however, few studies have evaluated the relationships between physical impairments and movement asymmetries. The purpose of this study was to identify the physical impairments related to movement abnormalities in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty. We hypothesized that muscle weakness and pain would be related to greater movement asymmetries. Fifty-six subjects who were awaiting total hip arthroplasty were enrolled. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 scale, range of motion was assessed with the Harris Hip Score and isometric hip abductor strength was tested using a hand-held dynamometer. Trunk, pelvis and hip angles and moments in the frontal and sagittal planes were measured during walking using three dimensional motion analysis. During gait, subjects had 3.49 degrees less peak hip flexion and 8.82 degrees less extension angles (p<0.001) and had 0.03 Nm/k*m less hip abduction moment on the affected side (p=0.043). Weaker hip muscles were related to greater pelvis (r=−0.291) and trunk (r=−0.332) rotations in the frontal plane. These findings suggest that hip weakness drives abnormal movement patterns at the pelvis and trunk in patients with hip osteoarthritis to a greater degree than hip pain. PMID:25492583

  12. Accuracy of a custom physical activity and knee angle measurement sensor system for patients with neuromuscular disorders and gait abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Feldhege, Frank; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Lindner, Tobias; Hein, Albert; Markschies, Andreas; Zettl, Uwe Klaus; Bader, Rainer

    2015-05-06

    Long-term assessment of ambulatory behavior and joint motion are valuable tools for the evaluation of therapy effectiveness in patients with neuromuscular disorders and gait abnormalities. Even though there are several tools available to quantify ambulatory behavior in a home environment, reliable measurement of joint motion is still limited to laboratory tests. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel inertial sensor system for ambulatory behavior and joint motion measurement in the everyday environment. An algorithm for behavior classification, step detection, and knee angle calculation was developed. The validation protocol consisted of simulated daily activities in a laboratory environment. The tests were performed with ten healthy subjects and eleven patients with multiple sclerosis. Activity classification showed comparable performance to commercially available activPAL sensors. Step detection with our sensor system was more accurate. The calculated flexion-extension angle of the knee joint showed a root mean square error of less than 5° compared with results obtained using an electro-mechanical goniometer. This new system combines ambulatory behavior assessment and knee angle measurement for long-term measurement periods in a home environment. The wearable sensor system demonstrated high validity for behavior classification and knee joint angle measurement in a laboratory setting.

  13. Accuracy of a Custom Physical Activity and Knee Angle Measurement Sensor System for Patients with Neuromuscular Disorders and Gait Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Feldhege, Frank; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Lindner, Tobias; Hein, Albert; Markschies, Andreas; Zettl, Uwe Klaus; Bader, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Long-term assessment of ambulatory behavior and joint motion are valuable tools for the evaluation of therapy effectiveness in patients with neuromuscular disorders and gait abnormalities. Even though there are several tools available to quantify ambulatory behavior in a home environment, reliable measurement of joint motion is still limited to laboratory tests. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel inertial sensor system for ambulatory behavior and joint motion measurement in the everyday environment. An algorithm for behavior classification, step detection, and knee angle calculation was developed. The validation protocol consisted of simulated daily activities in a laboratory environment. The tests were performed with ten healthy subjects and eleven patients with multiple sclerosis. Activity classification showed comparable performance to commercially available activPAL sensors. Step detection with our sensor system was more accurate. The calculated flexion-extension angle of the knee joint showed a root mean square error of less than 5° compared with results obtained using an electro-mechanical goniometer. This new system combines ambulatory behavior assessment and knee angle measurement for long-term measurement periods in a home environment. The wearable sensor system demonstrated high validity for behavior classification and knee joint angle measurement in a laboratory setting. PMID:25954954

  14. Changing pattern of epithelial cell abnormalities using revised Bethesda system

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Altaf, Fadwa J

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): In developing countries and worldwide cervical cancer is an important cause of female mortality. Reports describing the frequency and pattern of abnormal Pap smears in Saudi Arabia, using the revised Bethesda system (RBS) are very few. The current study was conducted to explore the changing pattern of epithelial cell abnormalities (ECA) detected in Pap smears (PS) in females of the Western region of Saudi Arabia at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah using the RBS. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was designed to review all the PSs from the archives of Cytopathology Department at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, starting from January 2000 to October 2012 using RBS. Cytological aspects of PSs were reviewed with age distribution. Results: Of the 15805 PS, 84 (0.53%) unsatisfactory smears were excluded. There were 2295 cases (14.52%) with ECA. In the abnormal squamous cell category the distribution of lesions was as follows: Atypical squamous cells of indeterminate significance (ASC-US) were 7.1%; atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude high squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H) were 1.08%; low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) including human papillomavirus was 2.2%, high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) was 0.8% and high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion with suspicious invasion was 0.06% smears. The mean age (MA) incidence was 39,43,45,46 and 45 years respectively. Conclusion: The percentage of abnormal PS is increasing (14.52%) over the last decade. This increase is evident by different studies conducted across Saudi Arabia. Under present circumstances the need for mass screening. PMID:25729547

  15. Gait Patterns in Hemiplegic Children with Cerebral Palsy: Comparison of Right and Left Hemiplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are to compare quantitatively the gait strategy of the right and left hemiplegic children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) using gait analysis. The gait strategy of 28 right hemiparetic CP (RHG) and 23 left hemiparetic CP (LHG) was compared using gait analysis (spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters) and considering the hemiplegic…

  16. Gait recognition: highly unique dynamic plantar pressure patterns among 104 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Todd C.; Mu, Tingting; Bosch, Kerstin; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Goulermas, John Y.

    2012-01-01

    Everyone's walking style is unique, and it has been shown that both humans and computers are very good at recognizing known gait patterns. It is therefore unsurprising that dynamic foot pressure patterns, which indirectly reflect the accelerations of all body parts, are also unique, and that previous studies have achieved moderate-to-high classification rates (CRs) using foot pressure variables. However, these studies are limited by small sample sizes (n < 30), moderate CRs (CR ≃ 90%), or both. Here we show, using relatively simple image processing and feature extraction, that dynamic foot pressures can be used to identify n = 104 subjects with a CR of 99.6 per cent. Our key innovation was improved and automated spatial alignment which, by itself, improved CR to over 98 per cent, a finding that pointedly emphasizes inter-subject pressure pattern uniqueness. We also found that automated dimensionality reduction invariably improved CRs. As dynamic pressure data are immediately usable, with little or no pre-processing required, and as they may be collected discreetly during uninterrupted gait using in-floor systems, foot pressure-based identification appears to have wide potential for both the security and health industries. PMID:21900318

  17. A connectionist central pattern generator for the aquatic and terrestrial gaits of a simulated salamander.

    PubMed

    Ijspeert, A J

    2001-05-01

    This article investigates the neural mechanisms underlying salamander locomotion, and develops a biologically plausible connectionist model of a central pattern generator capable of producing the typical aquatic and terrestrial gaits of the salamander. It investigates, in particular, what type of neural circuitry can produce and modulate the two locomotor programs identified within the salamander's spinal cord; namely, a traveling wave of neural activity for swimming and a standing wave for trotting. A two-dimensional biomechanical simulation of the salamander's body is developed whose muscle contraction is determined by the locomotion controller simulated as a leaky-integrator neural network. While the connectivity of the neural circuitry underlying locomotion in the salamander has not been decoded for the moment, this article presents the design of a neural circuit that has a general organization corresponding to that hypothesized by neurobiologists. In particular, the locomotion controller is based on a body central pattern generator (CPG) corresponding to a lamprey-like swimming controller, and is extended with a limb CPG for controlling the salamander's limbs. The complete controller is developed in three stages: first the development of segmental oscillators, second the development of intersegmental coupling for the making of a lamprey-like swimming CPG, and finally the development of the limb CPG and its coupling to the body CPG. A genetic algorithm is used to determine the parameters of the neural circuit for the different stages, given a high-level description of the desired state space trajectories of the different subnetworks. A controller is thus developed that can produce neural activities and locomotion gaits very similar to those observed in the real salamander. By varying the tonic (i.e. non-oscillating) excitation applied to the network, the speed, direction and type of gait can be varied.

  18. Exercise Alters Gait Pattern but Not Knee Load in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Chao-Chin; Chou, You-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Six female patients with bilateral medial knee OA and 6 healthy controls were recruited. Patients with knee OA received a 6-week physiotherapist-supervised and home-based exercise program. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey as well as objective biomechanical indices were obtained at baseline and follow-up. After treatment, no significant difference was observed in the knee abductor moment (KAM), lever arm, and ground reaction force. We, however, observed significantly improved pain and physical function as well as altered gait patterns, including a higher hip flexor moment and hip extension angle with a faster walking speed. Although KAM was unchanged, patients with bilateral knee OA showed an improved walking speed and altered the gait pattern after 6 weeks of supervised exercise. This finding suggests that the exercise intervention improves proximal joint mechanics during walking and can be considered for patients with bilateral knee OA. Non-weight-bearing strengthening without external resistance combined with stretching exercise may be an option to improve pain and function in individuals with OA who cannot perform high resistance exercises owing to pain or other reasons. PMID:27725941

  19. Older adults adopted more cautious gait patterns when walking in socks than barefoot.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Ju; Lin, Sang-I

    2013-01-01

    Walking barefoot or in socks is common for ambulating indoors and has been reported to be associated with increased risk of falls and related injuries in the elderly. This study sought to determine if gait patterns differed between these two conditions for young and older adults. A motion analysis system was used to record and calculate the stride characteristics and motion of the body's center of mass (COM) of 21 young and 20 older adults. For the walking tasks, the participants walked on a smooth floor surface at their preferred speed either barefoot or in socks in a random order. The socks were commercially available and commonly used. The results demonstrated that while walking in socks, compared with walking barefoot, older adults adopted a more cautious gait pattern including decreased walking speed and shortened stride length as well as reduced COM minimal velocity during the single limb support phase. Young adults, however, did not demonstrate significant changes. These findings suggest that walking with socks might present a greater balance threat for older adults. Clinically, safety precautions about walking in socks should be considered to be given to older adults, especially those with balance deficits.

  20. Foot loading patterns can be changed by deliberately walking with in-toeing or out-toeing gait modifications.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2013-09-01

    The present study shows how foot loading patterns may be deliberately altered by either in-toeing or out-toeing gait during barefoot walking. The results indicate that in-toeing increasingly loads the lateral aspects of the midfoot and forefoot by as much as 61% and 49%, respectively, whereas out-toeing intensifies the load on the medial aspect, i.e. predominantly the medial midfoot and medial forefoot by as much as 72% and 52%. These findings are being discussed with respect to the potential benefits of consciously altering the gait pattern in order to off-load certain plantar regions.

  1. Intelligent Process Abnormal Patterns Recognition and Diagnosis Based on Fuzzy Logic.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shi-Wang; Feng, Shunxiao; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Locating the assignable causes by use of the abnormal patterns of control chart is a widely used technology for manufacturing quality control. If there are uncertainties about the occurrence degree of abnormal patterns, the diagnosis process is impossible to be carried out. Considering four common abnormal control chart patterns, this paper proposed a characteristic numbers based recognition method point by point to quantify the occurrence degree of abnormal patterns under uncertain conditions and a fuzzy inference system based on fuzzy logic to calculate the contribution degree of assignable causes with fuzzy abnormal patterns. Application case results show that the proposed approach can give a ranked causes list under fuzzy control chart abnormal patterns and support the abnormity eliminating.

  2. Intelligent Process Abnormal Patterns Recognition and Diagnosis Based on Fuzzy Logic

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shunxiao; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Locating the assignable causes by use of the abnormal patterns of control chart is a widely used technology for manufacturing quality control. If there are uncertainties about the occurrence degree of abnormal patterns, the diagnosis process is impossible to be carried out. Considering four common abnormal control chart patterns, this paper proposed a characteristic numbers based recognition method point by point to quantify the occurrence degree of abnormal patterns under uncertain conditions and a fuzzy inference system based on fuzzy logic to calculate the contribution degree of assignable causes with fuzzy abnormal patterns. Application case results show that the proposed approach can give a ranked causes list under fuzzy control chart abnormal patterns and support the abnormity eliminating. PMID:28058046

  3. Exploring effects of different treadmill interventions on walking onset and gait patterns in infants with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianhua; Looper, Julia; Ulrich, Beverly D; Ulrich, Dale A; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa M

    2007-11-01

    Two cohorts of participants were included to investigate the effects of different treadmill interventions on walking onset and gait patterns in infants with Down syndrome (DS). The first cohort included 30 infants with DS (17 males, 13 females; mean age 10 mo [SD 1.9 mo]) who were randomly assigned to either a lower-intensity-generalized (LG) training group, or a higher-intensity-individualized (HI) training group. A control (C) group from another study, who did not receive treadmill training, served as the control (eight males, seven females; mean age 10.4 mo [SD 2.2 mo]). Mean age at walking onset was 19.2, 21.4, and 23.9 months for the HI, LG, and C groups respectively. At walking onset the HI group was significantly younger than the C group (p=0.011). At the gait follow-up that was conducted between 1 and 3 months after walking onset, three groups significantly different in overall gait patterns (p=0.037) were examined by six basic gait parameters including average velocity, stride length, step width, stride time, stance time, and dynamic base. Post-hoc analyses demonstrated that stride length was the gait parameter largely contributing to this overall group difference (p=0.033), and the HI group produced a significantly longer stride length than the C group (p=0.030). In conclusion, the HI treadmill intervention significantly promoted earlier walking onset and elicited more advanced gait patterns (particularly in stride length) in infants with DS.

  4. Gait Pattern in Two Rare Genetic Conditions Characterized by Muscular Hypotonia: Ehlers-Danlos and Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela; Vismara, Luca; Grugni, Graziano; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Rigoldi, Chiara; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify and compare the gait pattern in Ehlers-Danlos (EDS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) patients to provide data for developing evidence-based rehabilitation strategies. Twenty EDS and 19 PWS adult patients were evaluated with an optoelectronic system and force platforms for measuring kinematic and kinetic parameters…

  5. Human walking along a curved path. II. Gait features and EMG patterns.

    PubMed

    Courtine, Grégoire; Schieppati, Marco

    2003-07-01

    We recorded basic gait features and associated patterns of leg muscle activity, occurring during continuous body progression when humans walked along a curved trajectory, in order to gain insight into the nervous mechanisms underlying the control of the asymmetric movements of the two legs. The same rhythm was propagated to both legs, in spite of inner and outer strides diverging in length (P < 0.001). There was a phase lag in limb displacement between the inner and outer leg of 7% of the total cycle duration (P = 0.0001). Swing velocity was greater for outer than inner foot (P < 0.001). The duration of the stance phase diminished and increased in the outer and inner leg (P < 0.01), respectively, and was associated with trunk leaning toward the inside of the path. Muscle activity was not dramatically altered during curved walking. The amplitude of soleus burst during stance increased in the outer (P < 0.05) and decreased in the inner leg (P < 0.05), without changes in timing. Tibialis anterior activity increased in both legs during the swing phase (P < 0.05); it was advanced on the outer and delayed on the inner side (P < 0.01; 2% of the cycle). The peroneus longus burst decreased in both legs, but more in the inner than the outer leg, and lasted longer in the inner leg at the onset of swing. Closing the eyes did not affect the gait pattern and muscle activity during turning. The command to walk along a curved path may exploit the basic mechanisms of the spinal locomotor generator, thereby limiting the computational cost of turning.

  6. Energy consumption and gait analysis in children with myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Galli, M; Crivellini, M; Fazzi, E; Motta, F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, in children with different levels of myelomeningocele (MMC), the gait pattern and energy cost of walking with and without ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs). We found that each MMC level was characterised by recognisable gait patterns and that the abnormalities closely reflected the muscle deficits present. Furthermore, the study also introduces new indices for evaluating the energy cost of locomotion and demonstrates that the energy required for walking is increased in children with MMC compared with non disabled children. With respect to barefoot conditions, the use of AFOs leads to an improvement in gait and reduced energy consumption.

  7. The Effects of Vibration on the Gait Pattern and Vibration Perception Threshold of Children With Idiopathic Toe Walking.

    PubMed

    Fanchiang, Hsinchen Daniel; Geil, Mark; Wu, Jianhua; Chen, Yu-Ping; Wang, Yong Tai

    2015-07-01

    The effectiveness of idiopathic toe walking treatments is not conclusive. The study investigated the use of vibration as a therapeutic/treatment method for children with idiopathic toe walking. Fifteen children with idiopathic toe walking and 15 typically developing children, aged 4 to 10 years, completed the study. The study included a barefoot gait examination and a vibration perception threshold test before and after standing on a whole body vibration machine for 60 seconds. Temporal-spatial parameters were recorded along with HR32, a calculation designed to distinguish on aspects of the toe-walking pattern. No significant gait pattern differences were found between children with idiopathic toe walking and typically developing children after one bout of vibration intervention. HR32 was found to be a means to identify the toe-walking pattern (P < .001). Hypersensitivity to vibration of children with idiopathic toe walking was not found in the current study (P = .921).

  8. The mental representation of the human gait in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Stöckel, Tino; Jacksteit, Robert; Behrens, Martin; Skripitz, Ralf; Bader, Rainer; Mau-Moeller, Anett

    2015-01-01

    The link between mental representation (MREP) structures and motor performance has been evidenced for a great variety of movement skills, but not for the human gait. Therefore the present study sought to investigate the cognitive memory structures underlying the human gait in young and older adults. In a first experiment, gait parameters at comfortable gait speed (OptoGait) were compared with gait-specific MREPs (structural dimensional analysis of MREP; SDA-M) in 36 young adults. Participants were divided into a slow- and fast-walking group. The proven relationship between gait speed and executive functions such as working memory led to the hypothesis that gait pattern and MREP differ between slow- and fast-walking adults. In a second experiment, gait performance and MREPs were compared between 24 young (27.9 years) and 24 elderly (60.1 years) participants. As age-related declines in gait performance occur from the seventh decade of life onward, we hypothesized that gait parameters would not be affected until the age of 60 years accompanied by unchanged MREP. Data of experiment one revealed that gait parameters and MREPs differed significantly between slow and fast walkers. Notably, eleven previously incurred musculoskeletal injuries were documented for the slow walkers but only two injuries and one disorder for fast walkers. Experiment two revealed no age-related differences in gait parameters or MREPs between healthy young and older adults. In conclusion, the differences in gait parameters associated with lower comfortable gait speeds are reflected by differences in MREPs, whereby SDA-M data indicate that the single limb support phase may serve as a critical functional period. These differences probably resulted from previously incurred musculoskeletal injuries. Our data further indicate that the human gait and its MREP are stable until the age of 60. SDA-M may be considered as a valuable clinical tool for diagnosis of gait abnormalities and monitoring of

  9. Computational intelligent gait-phase detection system to identify pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Chathuri M; Senanayake, S M N Arosha

    2010-09-01

    An intelligent gait-phase detection algorithm based on kinematic and kinetic parameters is presented in this paper. The gait parameters do not vary distinctly for each gait phase; therefore, it is complex to differentiate gait phases with respect to a threshold value. To overcome this intricacy, the concept of fuzzy logic was applied to detect gait phases with respect to fuzzy membership values. A real-time data-acquisition system was developed consisting of four force-sensitive resistors and two inertial sensors to obtain foot-pressure patterns and knee flexion/extension angle, respectively. The detected gait phases could be further analyzed to identify abnormality occurrences, and hence, is applicable to determine accurate timing for feedback. The large amount of data required for quality gait analysis necessitates the utilization of information technology to store, manage, and extract required information. Therefore, a software application was developed for real-time acquisition of sensor data, data processing, database management, and a user-friendly graphical-user interface as a tool to simplify the task of clinicians. The experiments carried out to validate the proposed system are presented along with the results analysis for normal and pathological walking patterns.

  10. Effects of unilateral pedunculopontine stimulation on electromyographic activation patterns during gait in individual patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Caliandro, Pietro; Insola, A; Scarnati, E; Padua, L; Russo, G; Granieri, E; Mazzone, P

    2011-10-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), the effects of deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPTg-DBS) on gait has been object of international debate. Some evidence demonstrated that, in the late swing-early stance phase of gait cycle, a reduced surface electromyographic activation (sEMG) of tibialis anterior (TA) is linked to the striatal dopamine deficiency in PD patients. In the present study we report preliminary results on the effect of PPTg-DBS on electromyographic patterns during gait in individual PD patients. To evaluate the sEMG amplitude of TA, the root mean square (RMS) of the TA burst in late swing-early stance phase (RMS-A) was normalized as a percent of the RMS of the TA burst in late stance-early swing (RMS-B). We studied three male patients in the following conditions: on PPTg-DBS/on L: -dopa, on PPTg-DBS/off L: -dopa, off PPTg-DBS/on L: -dopa, off PPTg-DBS/off L: -dopa. For each assessment the UPDRS III was filled in. We observed no difference between on PPTg-DBS/off L: -dopa and off PPTg-DBS/off L: -dopa in UPDRS III scores. In off PPTg-DBS/off L: -dopa, patient A (right implant) showed absence of the right and left RMSA, respectively, in 80% and 83% of gait cycles. Patient B (right implant) showed absence of the right RMS-A in 86% of cycles. RMS-A of the patient C (left implant) was bilaterally normal. In on PPTg- DBS/off L: -dopa, no patient showed reduced RMS-A. Although the very low number of subjects we evaluated, our observations suggest that PPTg plays a role in modulating TA activation pattern during the steady state of gait.

  11. Effect of coordination movement using the PNF pattern underwater on the balance and gait of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Jung, Sang-In

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of coordination movement using the Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation pattern underwater on the balance and gait of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group that performed coordination movement using the Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation pattern underwater and a control group (n =10 each). Both the groups underwent neurodevelopmental treatment, and the experimental group performed coordination movement using the Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation pattern underwater. Balance was measured using the Berg Balance Scale and Functional Reach Test, and gait was measured using the 10-Meter Walk Test and Timed Up and Go Test. To compare in-group data before and after the intervention, paired t-test was used. Independent t-test was used to compare differences in the results of the Berg Balance Scale, Functional Reach Test, 10-Meter Walk Test, and Timed Up and Go Test before and after the intervention between the groups. [Results] Comparison within the groups showed significant differences in the results of the Berg Balance Scale, Functional Reach Test, 10-Meter Walk Test, and Timed Up and Go Test before and after the experimental intervention. On comparison between the groups, there were greater improvements in the scores of the Berg Balance Scale, Functional Reach Test, 10-Meter Walk Test, and Timed Up and Go Test in the experimental group. [Conclusion] The findings demonstrate that coordination movement using the Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation pattern under water has a significant effect on the balance and gait of stroke patients.

  12. Trendelenburg-Like Gait, Instability and Altered Step Patterns in a Mouse Model for Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2i

    PubMed Central

    Maricelli, Joseph W.; Lu, Qi L.; Lin, David C.; Rodgers, Buel D.

    2016-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2i (LGMD2i) affects thousands of lives with shortened life expectancy mainly due to cardiac and respiratory problems and difficulty with ambulation significantly compromising quality of life. Limited studies have noted impaired gait in patients and animal models of different muscular dystrophies, but not in animal models of LGMD2i. Our goal, therefore, was to quantify gait metrics in the fukutin-related protein P448L mutant (P448L) mouse, a recently developed model for LGMD2i. The Noldus CatWalk XT motion capture system was used to identify multiple gait impairments. An average galloping body speed of 35 cm/s for both P448L and C57BL/6 wild-type mice was maintained to ensure differences in gait were due only to strain physiology. Compared to wild-type mice, P448L mice reach maximum contact 10% faster and have 40% more paw surface area during stance. Additionally, force intensity at the time of maximum paw contact is roughly 2-fold higher in P448L mice. Paw swing time is reduced in P448L mice without changes in stride length as a faster swing speed compensates. Gait instability in P448L mice is indicated by 50% higher instances of 3 and 4 paw stance support and conversely, 2-fold fewer instances of single paw stance support and no instance of zero paw support. This leads to lower variation of normal step patterns used and a higher use of uncommon step patterns. Similar anomalies have also been noted in muscular dystrophy patients due to weakness in the hip abductor muscles, producing a Trendelenburg gait characterized by “waddling” and more pronounced shifts to the stance leg. Thus, gait of P448L mice replicates anomalies commonly seen in LGMD2i patients, which is not only potentially valuable for assessing drug efficacy in restoring movement biomechanics, but also for better understanding them. PMID:27627455

  13. Analysis and Classification of Stride Patterns Associated with Children Development Using Gait Signal Dynamics Parameters and Ensemble Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meihong; Liao, Lifang; Luo, Xin; Ye, Xiaoquan; Yao, Yuchen; Chen, Pinnan; Shi, Lei; Huang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Measuring stride variability and dynamics in children is useful for the quantitative study of gait maturation and neuromotor development in childhood and adolescence. In this paper, we computed the sample entropy (SampEn) and average stride interval (ASI) parameters to quantify the stride series of 50 gender-matched children participants in three age groups. We also normalized the SampEn and ASI values by leg length and body mass for each participant, respectively. Results show that the original and normalized SampEn values consistently decrease over the significance level of the Mann-Whitney U test (p < 0.01) in children of 3–14 years old, which indicates the stride irregularity has been significantly ameliorated with the body growth. The original and normalized ASI values are also significantly changing when comparing between any two groups of young (aged 3–5 years), middle (aged 6–8 years), and elder (aged 10–14 years) children. Such results suggest that healthy children may better modulate their gait cadence rhythm with the development of their musculoskeletal and neurological systems. In addition, the AdaBoost.M2 and Bagging algorithms were used to effectively distinguish the children's gait patterns. These ensemble learning algorithms both provided excellent gait classification results in terms of overall accuracy (≥90%), recall (≥0.8), and precision (≥0.8077). PMID:27034952

  14. Gait Patterns Differ Between ACL-Reconstructed Athletes Who Pass Return-to-Sport Criteria and Those Who Fail

    PubMed Central

    Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Logerstedt, David; Gardinier, Emily S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Background The current standard of practice for an athlete to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is varied. Attempt to return to activity is typically advised 6 months after surgery, but functional performance deficits and gait abnormalities are often still evident and may have important implications on future function. Hypothesis When comparing the involved and uninvolved limbs, patients who failed return-to-sport (RTS) criteria would demonstrate (1) smaller peak knee angles, extensor moments, and peak power absorption at the knee of the involved limb and (2) larger peak hip angles, extensor moments, and peak power generation of the involved limb. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods A total of 42 patients completed functional and biomechanical gait assessment 6 months after ACL reconstruction. Functional testing involved an isometric quadriceps strength test, 4 single-legged hop tests, and 2 self-report questionnaires. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to measure sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics of the hip and knee. A mixed-model analysis of variance and post hoc t tests were used to compare the limb symmetry of those who passed and those who did not pass RTS criteria. Minimal clinically important differences were calculated from healthy gait data and used to further define meaningful limb asymmetries. Results Twenty of the 42 (48%) patients passed RTS criteria 6 months after ACL reconstruction. Patients who did not pass the criteria demonstrated statistically significant differences between limbs on all kinematic and kinetic variables at the knee (P ≤ .027). Clinically meaningful asymmetries at the hip were also identified in this group. Only kinetic asymmetries at the knee were identified in the patients who passed RTS criteria. Conclusion Athletes who demonstrate superior functional performance 6 months after ACL reconstruction may have fewer abnormal and asymmetrical gait behaviors than their

  15. Correlation between the knee adduction torque and medial contact force for a variety of gait patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong; Banks, Scott A; Mitchell, Kim H; D'Lima, Darryl D; Colwell, Clifford W; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2007-06-01

    The external knee adduction torque has been proposed as a surrogate measure for medial compartment load during gait. However, a direct link between these two quantities has not been demonstrated using in vivo measurement of medial compartment load. This study uses in vivo data collected from a single subject with an instrumented knee implant to evaluate this link. The subject performed five different overground gait motions (normal, fast, slow, wide, and toe-out) with simultaneous collection of instrumented implant, video motion, and ground reaction data. For each trial, the knee adduction torque was measured externally while the total axial force applied to the tibial insert was measured internally. Based on data collected from the same subject performing treadmill gait under fluoroscopic motion analysis, a regression equation was developed to calculate medial contact force from the implant load cell measurements. Correlation analyses were performed for the stance phase and entire gait cycle to quantify the relationship between the knee adduction torque and both the medial contact force and the medial to total contact force ratio. When the entire gait cycle was analyzed, R(2) for medial contact force was 0.77 when all gait trials were analyzed together and between 0.69 and 0.93 when each gait trial was analyzed separately (p < 0.001 in all cases). For medial to total force ratio, R(2) was 0.69 for all trials together and between 0.54 and 0.90 for each trial separately (p < 0.001 in all cases). When only the stance phase was analyzed, R(2) values were slightly lower. These results support the hypothesis that the knee adduction torque is highly correlated with medial compartment contact force and medial to total force ratio during gait.

  16. The pattern of sensory processing abnormalities in autism.

    PubMed

    Kern, Janet K; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Garver, Carolyn R; Grannemann, Bruce D; Andrews, Alonzo A; Savla, Jayshree S; Johnson, Danny G; Mehta, Jyutika A; Schroeder, Jennifer L

    2006-09-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the nature of sensory dysfunction in persons with autism. The cross-sectional study examined auditory, visual, oral, and touch sensory processing, as measured by the Sensory Profile, in 104 persons with a diagnosis of autism, 3-56 years of age, gender-and age-matched to community controls. Persons with autism had abnormal auditory, visual, touch, and oral sensory processing that was significantly different from controls. This finding was also apparent when the high and low thresholds of these modalities were examined separately. At later ages for the group with autism, lower levels of abnormal sensory processing were found, except for low threshold touch, which did not improve significantly. There was a significant interaction in low threshold auditory and low threshold visual, suggesting that the two groups change differently over time on these variables. These results suggest that sensory abnormalities in autism are global in nature (involving several modalities) but have the potential to improve with age.

  17. Effect of a nonsurgical treatment program on the gait pattern of idiopathic toe walking: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Szopa, Andrzej; Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Gallert-Kopyto, Weronika; Kiebzak, Wojciech; Plinta, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have reported many possibilities for the treatment of idiopathic toe walking (ITW); however, none of them have been sufficiently documented. The purpose of this case study was to document the evolution of the gait pattern of a child with severe ITW using the Gillette Gait Index before and after the third and sixth weeks, a nonsurgical treatment program and then every 3 months to 1 year from the start of the treatment. This is significant because the case study shows that a nonsurgical treatment program can be an alternative treatment method for children with severe ITW. Case description The case study involved a 5-year-old boy diagnosed with severe ITW. An orthopedist recommended a surgical treatment, but his parents refused to provide consent. Intervention The subject participated in a 12-week nonsurgical treatment program that used tone-inhibiting casts (TICs) combined with physiotherapy based on neurodevelopmental treatment principles. The treatment protocol included the following: 1) precast preparation; 2) TICs with treatment; and 3) post-cast treatment to improve the gait pattern. Outcomes After treatment with TICs, the range of motion of ankle dorsiflexion during stance had increased, resulting in an almost normalized gait. The patient stopped toe walking for at least 1 year. Discussion This study demonstrates that nonsurgical treatment should be considered first, with surgical options reserved for resistant cases; however, further research is required given the current lack of knowledge about treatment outcomes using TICs and the wide use of this treatment modality in children with ITW. PMID:26937193

  18. EMG patterns in abnormal involuntary movements induced by neuroleptics.

    PubMed

    Bathien, N; Koutlidis, R M; Rondot, P

    1984-09-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) activity of abnormal involuntary movements and their modifications after Piribedil, a dopaminergic agonist, were analysed in patients presenting with tremor or tardive dyskinesia induced by treatment with neuroleptics. Quantitative analysis of EMG bursts and of their phase relationships with bursts of antagonist muscles revealed differences between tremor and tardive dyskinesia; three separate EMG types of the latter were found. In tremor, EMG activity was coordinated between agonists and antagonists. Length and frequency of bursts are characteristic. In tardive dyskinesia, phase histograms of antagonist muscle bursts showed an absence of reciprocal organisation of EMG activity. This activity was made up of either rhythmical bursts (type I and II according to the frequency) or irregular discharges (type III). Piribedil decreased tremor but facilitated EMG activity in tardive dyskinesia. These results give an objective measurement or classification of tremor and tardive dyskinesia induced by neuroleptics.

  19. EMG patterns in abnormal involuntary movements induced by neuroleptics.

    PubMed Central

    Bathien, N; Koutlidis, R M; Rondot, P

    1984-01-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) activity of abnormal involuntary movements and their modifications after Piribedil, a dopaminergic agonist, were analysed in patients presenting with tremor or tardive dyskinesia induced by treatment with neuroleptics. Quantitative analysis of EMG bursts and of their phase relationships with bursts of antagonist muscles revealed differences between tremor and tardive dyskinesia; three separate EMG types of the latter were found. In tremor, EMG activity was coordinated between agonists and antagonists. Length and frequency of bursts are characteristic. In tardive dyskinesia, phase histograms of antagonist muscle bursts showed an absence of reciprocal organisation of EMG activity. This activity was made up of either rhythmical bursts (type I and II according to the frequency) or irregular discharges (type III). Piribedil decreased tremor but facilitated EMG activity in tardive dyskinesia. These results give an objective measurement or classification of tremor and tardive dyskinesia induced by neuroleptics. PMID:6148381

  20. [Effects of aquatic physical exercise on the kinematic gait pattern in patients with Parkinson's disease: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Paula; Cancela, José M; Ayan, Carlos; do Nascimento, Carla; Seijo-Martínez, Manuel

    2013-03-16

    AIM. To determine the effects of an aquatic-based physical exercise program on gait parameters of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). PATIENTS AND METHODS. A total of nine patients diagnosed with idiopathic PD (stages I-III according to the Hoehn and Yahr scale) carried out an aquatic physical exercise program which lasted for five months, with one session per week. A three-dimensional biomechanical analysis was used to determine the effects of the program on several kinematic variables (walking speed, cadence, stride length, step time, single and double support time, angles of the hip, knee and ankle joints) which were assessed by a treadmill-walking test. RESULTS. At the end of the program, significant improvement in walking speed, stride length and on the relationship between single and double support time (p < 0,05). Although improvements in all tested ranges of motion were obtained, these did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS. Aquatic-based physical exercise seems to have positive effects in some aspects of the gait kinematics parameters present in the typical gait pattern of patients with PD.

  1. Gait Pattern Alterations during Walking, Texting and Walking and Texting during Cognitively Distractive Tasks while Negotiating Common Pedestrian Obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Licence, Sammy; Smith, Robynne; McGuigan, Miranda P.; Earnest, Conrad P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Mobile phone texting is a common daily occurrence with a paucity of research examining corresponding gait characteristics. To date, most studies have participants walk in a straight line vs. overcoming barriers and obstacles that occur during regular walking. The aim of our study is to examine the effect of mobile phone texting during periods of cognitive distraction while walking and negotiating barriers synonymous with pedestrian traffic. Methods Thirty participants (18-50y) completed three randomized, counter-balanced walking tasks over a course during: (1) normal walking (control), (2) texting and walking, and (3) texting and walking whilst being cognitively distraction via a standard mathematical test performed while negotiating the obstacle course. We analyzed gait characteristics during course negotiation using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system and a general linear model and Dunnet-Hsu post-hoc procedure the normal walking condition to assess gait characteristic differences. Primary outcomes included the overall time to complete the course time and barrier contact. Secondary outcomes included obstacle clearance height, step frequency, step time, double support phase and lateral deviation. Results Participants took significantly longer (mean ± SD) to complete the course while texting (24.96±4.20 sec) and during cognitive distraction COG (24.09±3.36 sec) vs. normal walking (19.32±2.28 sec; all, P<0.001). No significant differences were noted for barrier contacts (P = 0.28). Step frequency, step time, double support phase and lateral deviation all increased in duration during the texting and cognitive distraction trial. Texting and being cognitively distracted also increased obstacle clearance versus the walking condition (all, P<0.02). Conclusions Texting while walking and/or being cognitively distracted significantly affect gait characteristics concordant to mobile phone usage resulting in a more cautious gate pattern. Future research

  2. A quantitative analysis of gait patterns in vestibular neuritis patients using gyroscope sensor and a continuous walking protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Locomotion involves an integration of vision, proprioception, and vestibular information. The parieto-insular vestibular cortex is known to affect the supra-spinal rhythm generators, and the vestibular system regulates anti-gravity muscle tone of the lower leg in the same side to maintain an upright posture through the extra-pyramidal track. To demonstrate the relationship between locomotion and vestibular function, we evaluated the differences in gait patterns between vestibular neuritis (VN) patients and normal subjects using a gyroscope sensor and long-way walking protocol. Methods Gyroscope sensors were attached to both shanks of healthy controls (n=10) and age-matched VN patients (n = 10). We then asked the participants to walk 88.8 m along a corridor. Through the summation of gait cycle data, we measured gait frequency (Hz), normalized angular velocity (NAV) of each axis for legs, maximum and minimum NAV, up-slope and down-slope of NAV in swing phase, stride-swing-stance time (s), and stance to stride ratio (%). Results The most dominant walking frequency in the VN group was not different compared to normal control. The NAVs of z-axis (pitch motion) were significantly larger than the others (x-, y-axis) and the values in VN patients tended to decrease in both legs and the difference of NAV between both group was significant in the ipsi-lesion side in the VN group only (p=0.03). Additionally, the gait velocity of these individuals was decreased relatively to controls (1.11 ± 0.120 and 0.84 ± 0.061 m/s in control and VN group respectively, p<0.01), which seems to be related to the significantly increased stance and stride time of the ipsi-lesion side. Moreover, in the VN group, the maximum NAV of the lesion side was less, and the minimum one was higher than control group. Furthermore, the down-slope and up-slope of NAV decreased on the impaired side. Conclusion The walking pattern of VN patients was highly phase-dependent, and NAV of pitch motion

  3. Synergistic combination of clinical and imaging features predicts abnormal imaging patterns of pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Jaster-Miller, Kirsten; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Yao, Jianhua; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We designed and tested a novel hybrid statistical model that accepts radiologic image features and clinical variables, and integrates this information in order to automatically predict abnormalities in chest computed-tomography (CT) scans and identify potentially important infectious disease biomarkers. In 200 patients, 160 with various pulmonary infections and 40 healthy controls, we extracted 34 clinical variables from laboratory tests and 25 textural features from CT images. From the CT scans, pleural effusion (PE), linear opacity (or thickening) (LT), tree-in-bud (TIB), pulmonary nodules, ground glass opacity (GGO), and consolidation abnormality patterns were analyzed and predicted through clinical, textural (imaging), or combined attributes. The presence and severity of each abnormality pattern was validated by visual analysis of the CT scans. The proposed biomarker identification system included two important steps: (i) a coarse identification of an abnormal imaging pattern by adaptively selected features (AmRMR), and (ii) a fine selection of the most important features from the previous step, and assigning them as biomarkers, depending on the prediction accuracy. Selected biomarkers were used to classify normal and abnormal patterns by using a boosted decision tree (BDT) classifier. For all abnormal imaging patterns, an average prediction accuracy of 76.15% was obtained. Experimental results demonstrated that our proposed biomarker identification approach is promising and may advance the data processing in clinical pulmonary infection research and diagnostic techniques. PMID:23930819

  4. Advantages of EEG phase patterns for the detection of gait intention in healthy and stroke subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioana Sburlea, Andreea; Montesano, Luis; Minguez, Javier

    2017-06-01

    Objective. One use of EEG-based brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) in rehabilitation is the detection of movement intention. In this paper we investigate for the first time the instantaneous phase of movement related cortical potential (MRCP) and its application to the detection of gait intention. Approach. We demonstrate the utility of MRCP phase in two independent datasets, in which 10 healthy subjects and 9 chronic stroke patients executed a self-initiated gait task in three sessions. Phase features were compared to more conventional amplitude and power features. Main results. The neurophysiology analysis showed that phase features have higher signal-to-noise ratio than the other features. Also, BCI detectors of gait intention based on phase, amplitude, and their combination were evaluated under three conditions: session-specific calibration, intersession transfer, and intersubject transfer. Results show that the phase based detector is the most accurate for session-specific calibration (movement intention was correctly detected in 66.5% of trials in healthy subjects, and in 63.3% in stroke patients). However, in intersession and intersubject transfer, the detector that combines amplitude and phase features is the most accurate one and the only that retains its accuracy (62.5% in healthy subjects and 59% in stroke patients) w.r.t. session-specific calibration. Significance. MRCP phase features improve the detection of gait intention and could be used in practice to remove time-consuming BCI recalibration.

  5. Selection of clinical features for pattern recognition applied to gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Altilio, Rosa; Paoloni, Marco; Panella, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    This paper deals with the opportunity of extracting useful information from medical data retrieved directly from a stereophotogrammetric system applied to gait analysis. A feature selection method to exhaustively evaluate all the possible combinations of the gait parameters is presented, in order to find the best subset able to classify among diseased and healthy subjects. This procedure will be used for estimating the performance of widely used classification algorithms, whose performance has been ascertained in many real-world problems with respect to well-known classification benchmarks, both in terms of number of selected features and classification accuracy. Precisely, support vector machine, Naive Bayes and K nearest neighbor classifiers can obtain the lowest classification error, with an accuracy greater than 97 %. For the considered classification problem, the whole set of features will be proved to be redundant and it can be significantly pruned. Namely, groups of 3 or 5 features only are able to preserve high accuracy when the aim is to check the anomaly of a gait. The step length and the swing speed are the most informative features for the gait analysis, but also cadence and stride may add useful information for the movement evaluation.

  6. Design of Spiking Central Pattern Generators for Multiple Locomotion Gaits in Hexapod Robots by Christiansen Grammar Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Espinal, Andres; Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Carpio, Martin; Guerra-Hernandez, Erick I.; Ornelas-Rodriguez, Manuel; Sotelo-Figueroa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to design Spiking Central Pattern Generators (SCPGs) to achieve locomotion at different frequencies on legged robots. It is validated through embedding its designs into a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and implemented on a real hexapod robot. The SCPGs are automatically designed by means of a Christiansen Grammar Evolution (CGE)-based methodology. The CGE performs a solution for the configuration (synaptic weights and connections) for each neuron in the SCPG. This is carried out through the indirect representation of candidate solutions that evolve to replicate a specific spike train according to a locomotion pattern (gait) by measuring the similarity between the spike trains and the SPIKE distance to lead the search to a correct configuration. By using this evolutionary approach, several SCPG design specifications can be explicitly added into the SPIKE distance-based fitness function, such as looking for Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs) with minimal connectivity or a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) able to generate different locomotion gaits only by changing the initial input stimuli. The SCPG designs have been successfully implemented on a Spartan 6 FPGA board and a real time validation on a 12 Degrees Of Freedom (DOFs) hexapod robot is presented. PMID:27516737

  7. Design of Spiking Central Pattern Generators for Multiple Locomotion Gaits in Hexapod Robots by Christiansen Grammar Evolution.

    PubMed

    Espinal, Andres; Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Carpio, Martin; Guerra-Hernandez, Erick I; Ornelas-Rodriguez, Manuel; Sotelo-Figueroa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to design Spiking Central Pattern Generators (SCPGs) to achieve locomotion at different frequencies on legged robots. It is validated through embedding its designs into a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and implemented on a real hexapod robot. The SCPGs are automatically designed by means of a Christiansen Grammar Evolution (CGE)-based methodology. The CGE performs a solution for the configuration (synaptic weights and connections) for each neuron in the SCPG. This is carried out through the indirect representation of candidate solutions that evolve to replicate a specific spike train according to a locomotion pattern (gait) by measuring the similarity between the spike trains and the SPIKE distance to lead the search to a correct configuration. By using this evolutionary approach, several SCPG design specifications can be explicitly added into the SPIKE distance-based fitness function, such as looking for Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs) with minimal connectivity or a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) able to generate different locomotion gaits only by changing the initial input stimuli. The SCPG designs have been successfully implemented on a Spartan 6 FPGA board and a real time validation on a 12 Degrees Of Freedom (DOFs) hexapod robot is presented.

  8. Spatial pattern of nerve fiber abnormality indicative of pathologic mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Dyck, P. J.; Karnes, J.; O'Brien, P.; Nukada, H.; Lais, A.; Low, P.

    1984-01-01

    Estimates of the number, density, and size distribution of myelinated fibers at selected levels of roots, spinal tracts, and sampled levels of peripheral nerves may be used in the detection and characterization of alterations of motor, sensory, and autonomic neurons and their axons with development, aging and disease. Use of imaging techniques, now available, increases the reliability, versatility, and speed of such analysis. In this study, the authors evaluated the spatial pattern of fibers in sampled frames and contour areas of transverse sections of nerve fascicles, utilizing, the coefficient of variation and index of dispersion (ID), the latter extensively employed by plant ecologists. The ID was used for recognization of increased, normal, or decreased variability of density within fascicles, between fascicles, and between nerves in health and in various experimental neuropathies. In addition, various morphometric measurements were made in transverse sections at defined levels along the hind limb nerves of rats in acute and chronic ischemia, after rhizotomy and in galactose neuropathy. These stereomorphometric studies, emphasizing the number, size, shape, and spatial pattern of fibers, revealed differences among experimental neuropathies and may be found to be helpful in the characterization and prediction of pathologic mechanisms in neuropathies of unknown cause. Specifically, these approaches could be used for study of whether fiber loss in human diabetic neuropathy is multifocal and determination of the levels of such losses. PMID:6333825

  9. Gait deviations in children with autism spectrum disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Kindregan, Deirdre; Gallagher, Louise; Gormley, John

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have difficulty with gross motor function and coordination, factors which influence gait. Knowledge of gait abnormalities may be useful for assessment and treatment planning. This paper reviews the literature assessing gait deviations in children with ASD. Five online databases were searched using keywords "gait" and "autism," and 11 studies were found which examined gait in childhood ASD. Children with ASD tend to augment their walking stability with a reduced stride length, increased step width and therefore wider base of support, and increased time in the stance phase. Children with ASD have reduced range of motion at the ankle and knee during gait, with increased hip flexion. Decreased peak hip flexor and ankle plantar flexor moments in children with ASD may imply weakness around these joints, which is further exhibited by a reduction in ground reaction forces at toe-off in children with ASD. Children with ASD have altered gait patterns to healthy controls, widened base of support, and reduced range of motion. Several studies refer to cerebellar and basal ganglia involvement as the patterns described suggest alterations in those areas of the brain. Further research should compare children with ASD to other clinical groups to improve assessment and treatment planning.

  10. Pattern recognition of abnormal left ventricle wall motion in cardiac MR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingli; Radau, Perry; Connelly, Kim; Dick, Alexander; Wright, Graham

    2009-01-01

    There are four main problems that limit application of pattern recognition techniques for recognition of abnormal cardiac left ventricle (LV) wall motion: (1) Normalization of the LV's size, shape, intensity level and position; (2) defining a spatial correspondence between phases and subjects; (3) extracting features; (4) and discriminating abnormal from normal wall motion. Solving these four problems is required for application of pattern recognition techniques to classify the normal and abnormal LV wall motion. In this work, we introduce a normalization scheme to solve the first and second problems. With this scheme, LVs are normalized to the same position, size, and intensity level. Using the normalized images, we proposed an intra-segment classification criterion based on a correlation measure to solve the third and fourth problems. Application of the method to recognition of abnormal cardiac MR LV wall motion showed promising results.

  11. Gait patterns during different walking conditions in older adults with and without knee osteoarthritis--results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seung-uk; Ling, Shari M; Schreiber, Catherine; Nesbitt, Mark; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2011-02-01

    Biomechanical analysis of lower extremity activities while walking at different speeds and in challenging conditions may help to identify specific gait patterns associated with knee osteoarthritis (knee-OA). We hypothesized that individuals with asymptomatic knee-OA have lower ankle activity, while individuals with symptomatic knee-OA have similar or higher ankle activity compared to individuals without knee-OA, and that such differences are enhanced during challenging gait tasks. We tested this hypothesis by examining gait characteristics in multiple gait tasks using data from 153 Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) participants (112 without knee-OA, 41 with knee-OA; 53-87 years, 52% women). All participants who could walk unassisted were evaluated in the BLSA gait lab while walking at self-selected speed (usual-walking), at maximum speed (fast-walking) and again at self-selected speed after 30-min of walking activities (usual-walking-after-30 min). Knee range of motion was lower for knee-OA participants in the fast-walking and usual-walking-after-30 min tasks (p<0.030). Ankle range of motion for symptomatic knee-OA was greater compared to asymptomatic knee-OA for all walking tasks (p<0.050). Symptomatic knee-OA had greater generative MWE of the ankle compared to asymptomatic knee-OA (p=0.034), while keeping similar absorptive MWE of the knee when compared to no-OA controls (p=0.151). Symptomatic knee-OA individuals seem to adapt an ankle kinematic gait pattern aimed at avoiding knee pain, by enhancing forward propulsion so to minimize knee joint load. Whether these conditions represent subsequent steps in the causal pathway from knee-OA to changes in gait is still not clear.

  12. Detection of Cardiac Function Abnormality from MRI Images Using Normalized Wall Thickness Temporal Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wael, Mai; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a method for identifying abnormal myocardial function based on studying the normalized wall motion pattern during the cardiac cycle. Methods. The temporal pattern of the normalized myocardial wall thickness is used as a feature vector to assess the cardiac wall motion abnormality. Principal component analysis is used to reduce the feature dimensionality and the maximum likelihood method is used to differentiate between normal and abnormal features. The proposed method was applied on a dataset of 27 cases from normal subjects and patients. Results. The developed method achieved 81.5%, 85%, and 88.5% accuracy for identifying abnormal contractility in the basal, midventricular, and apical slices, respectively. Conclusions. A novel feature vector, namely, the normalized wall thickness, has been introduced for detecting myocardial regional wall motion abnormality. The proposed method provides assessment of the regional myocardial contractility for each cardiac segment and slice; therefore, it could be a valuable tool for automatic and fast determination of regional wall motion abnormality from conventional cine MRI images.

  13. Patients with knee osteoarthritis demonstrate improved gait pattern and reduced pain following a non-invasive biomechanical therapy: a prospective multi-centre study on Singaporean population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the effect of a unique therapy with a non-invasive biomechanical foot-worn device (AposTherapy) on Caucasian western population suffering from knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of this therapy on the level of symptoms and gait patterns in a multi-ethnic Singaporean population suffering from knee osteoarthritis. Methods Fifty-eight patients with bilateral medial compartment knee osteoarthritis participated in the study. All patients underwent a computerized gait test and completed two self-assessment questionnaires (WOMAC and SF-36). The biomechanical device was calibrated to each patient, and therapy commenced. Changes in gait patterns and self-assessment questionnaires were reassessed after 3 and 6 months of therapy. Results A significant improvement was seen in all of the gait parameters following 6 months of therapy. Specifically, gait velocity increased by 15.9%, step length increased by 10.3%, stance phase decreased by 5.9% and single limb support phase increased by 2.7%. In addition, pain, stiffness and functional limitation significantly decreased by 68.3%, 66.7% and 75.6%, respectively. SF-36 physical score and mental score also increased significantly following 6 months of therapy (46.1% and 22.4%, respectively) (P < 0.05 for all parameters). Conclusions Singaporean population with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis demonstrated improved gait patterns, reported alleviation in symptoms and improved function and quality of life following 6 months of therapy with a unique biomechanical device. Trial registration Registration number NCT01562652. PMID:24383821

  14. Animal Gaits and Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Many gaits of four-legged animals are described by symmetry. For example, when a horse paces it moves both left legs in unison and then both right legs and so on. The motion is described by two symmetries: Interchange front and back legs, and swap left and right legs with a half-period phase shift. Biologists postulate the existence of a central pattern generator (CPG) in the neuronal system that sends periodic signals to the legs. CPGs can be thought of as electrical circuits that produce periodic signals and can be modeled by systems with symmetry. In this lecture we discuss animal gaits; use gait symmetries to construct a simplest CPG architecture that naturally produces quadrupedal gait rhythms; and make several testable predictions about gaits.

  15. Gait Deviations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kindregan, Deirdre; Gallagher, Louise; Gormley, John

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have difficulty with gross motor function and coordination, factors which influence gait. Knowledge of gait abnormalities may be useful for assessment and treatment planning. This paper reviews the literature assessing gait deviations in children with ASD. Five online databases were searched using keywords “gait” and “autism,” and 11 studies were found which examined gait in childhood ASD. Children with ASD tend to augment their walking stability with a reduced stride length, increased step width and therefore wider base of support, and increased time in the stance phase. Children with ASD have reduced range of motion at the ankle and knee during gait, with increased hip flexion. Decreased peak hip flexor and ankle plantar flexor moments in children with ASD may imply weakness around these joints, which is further exhibited by a reduction in ground reaction forces at toe-off in children with ASD. Children with ASD have altered gait patterns to healthy controls, widened base of support, and reduced range of motion. Several studies refer to cerebellar and basal ganglia involvement as the patterns described suggest alterations in those areas of the brain. Further research should compare children with ASD to other clinical groups to improve assessment and treatment planning. PMID:25922766

  16. Abnormal Image Detection in Endoscopy Videos Using a Filter Bank and Local Binary Patterns.

    PubMed

    Nawarathna, Ruwan; Oh, JungHwan; Muthukudage, Jayantha; Tavanapong, Wallapak; Wong, Johnny; de Groen, Piet C; Tang, Shou Jiang

    2014-11-20

    Finding mucosal abnormalities (e.g., erythema, blood, ulcer, erosion, and polyp) is one of the most essential tasks during endoscopy video review. Since these abnormalities typically appear in a small number of frames (around 5% of the total frame number), automated detection of frames with an abnormality can save physician's time significantly. In this paper, we propose a new multi-texture analysis method that effectively discerns images showing mucosal abnormalities from the ones without any abnormality since most abnormalities in endoscopy images have textures that are clearly distinguishable from normal textures using an advanced image texture analysis method. The method uses a "texton histogram" of an image block as features. The histogram captures the distribution of different "textons" representing various textures in an endoscopy image. The textons are representative response vectors of an application of a combination of Leung and Malik (LM) filter bank (i.e., a set of image filters) and a set of Local Binary Patterns on the image. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed method achieves 92% recall and 91.8% specificity on wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) images and 91% recall and 90.8% specificity on colonoscopy images.

  17. Differential Neural Activation Patterns in Patients with Parkinson's Disease and Freezing of Gait in Response to Concurrent Cognitive and Motor Load

    PubMed Central

    Shine, James M.; Matar, Elie; Ward, Philip B.; Bolitho, Samuel J.; Pearson, Mark; Naismith, Sharon L.; Lewis, Simon J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing of gait is a devastating symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) that is exacerbated by the processing of cognitive information whilst walking. To date, no studies have explored the neural correlates associated with increases in cognitive load whilst performing a motor task in patients with freezing. In this experiment, 14 PD patients with and 15 PD patients without freezing of gait underwent 3T fMRI while performing a virtual reality gait task. Directions to walk and stop were presented on the viewing screen as either direct cues or as more cognitively indirect pre-learned cues. Both groups showed a consistent pattern of BOLD response within the Cognitive Control Network during performance of the paradigm. However, a between group comparison revealed that those PD patients with freezing of gait were less able to recruit the bilateral anterior insula, ventral striatum and the pre-supplementary motor area, as well as the left subthalamic nucleus when responding to indirect cognitive cues whilst maintaining a motor output. These results suggest that PD patients with freezing of gait are unable to properly recruit specific cortical and subcortical regions within the Cognitive Control Network during the performance of simultaneous motor and cognitive functions. PMID:23382821

  18. Autosomal recessive micrencephaly with simplified gyral pattern, abnormal myelination and arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Sztriha, L; Al-Gazali, L I; Várady, E; Goebel, H H; Nork, M

    1999-06-01

    The clinical courses, neuroimaging and muscle biopsy findings of two infants born to an inbred Arab family are described. They had a syndrome of micrencephaly with simplified gyral pattern, abnormal myelin formation and arthrogryposis. Increased variation of fiber size was seen in the muscle biopsy, creatine kinase, however was normal. Large areas of muscle were replaced by adipofibrous tissue. The infants had dysmorphic features consistent with the fetal akinesia/hypokinesia sequence. The abnormalities were suggestive of microlissencephaly probably associated with a dysgenetic process in the muscles. The syndrome showed an autosomal recessive inheritance.

  19. A mouse model of conduction system patterning abnormalities in heterotaxy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Czosek, Richard J; Haaning, Allison; Ware, Stephanie M

    2010-10-01

    Duplication or absence of parts of the specialized cardiac conduction system in patients with heterotaxy syndrome causes significant clinical disease, but the mechanistic basis by which embryonic disruption of left-right patterning alters conduction system patterning in these patients is not well understood. We sought to determine whether a mouse model of X-linked human heterotaxy recapitulates conduction system abnormalities identified in patients with heterotaxy. Cardiac structure and conduction system patterning were evaluated in Zic3 null embryos from e9.5 to e16.5 using genetic and molecular methods. Severe structural abnormalities involving atrial, ventricular, and conotruncal development were associated with a spectrum of disorganized and ambiguous arrangements throughout the conduction system, including the appearance of duplicated structures. The severity and location of conduction system abnormalities correlated with the severity and location of associated structural heart disease and were identifiable at the earliest stages examined. The Zic3 mouse model provides a novel tool to dissect the mechanistic underpinnings of conduction system patterning and dysfunction and its relationship to cardiovascular malformations, making it a promising model to improve understanding and risk assessment in the clinical arena.

  20. Unsupervised Pattern Classifier for Abnormality-Scaling of Vibration Features for Helicopter Gearbox Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jammu, Vinay B.; Danai, Kourosh; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    A new unsupervised pattern classifier is introduced for on-line detection of abnormality in features of vibration that are used for fault diagnosis of helicopter gearboxes. This classifier compares vibration features with their respective normal values and assigns them a value in (0, 1) to reflect their degree of abnormality. Therefore, the salient feature of this classifier is that it does not require feature values associated with faulty cases to identify abnormality. In order to cope with noise and changes in the operating conditions, an adaptation algorithm is incorporated that continually updates the normal values of the features. The proposed classifier is tested using experimental vibration features obtained from an OH-58A main rotor gearbox. The overall performance of this classifier is then evaluated by integrating the abnormality-scaled features for detection of faults. The fault detection results indicate that the performance of this classifier is comparable to the leading unsupervised neural networks: Kohonen's Feature Mapping and Adaptive Resonance Theory (AR72). This is significant considering that the independence of this classifier from fault-related features makes it uniquely suited to abnormality-scaling of vibration features for fault diagnosis.

  1. Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Experience Difficulties Adjusting Their Gait Pattern to Weight Added to the Waist, While Typically Developing Children Do Not

    PubMed Central

    Meyns, Pieter; Van Gestel, Leen; Bar-On, Lynn; Goudriaan, Marije; Wambacq, Hans; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Bruyninckx, Herman; Molenaers, Guy; De Cock, Paul; Ortibus, Els; Desloovere, Kaat

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity is increasing in the last decades, also in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). Even though it has been established that an increase in weight can have important negative effects on gait in healthy adults and children, it has not been investigated what the effect is of an increase in body weight on the characteristics of gait in children with CP. In CP, pre and post three-dimensional gait analyses are performed to assess the effectiveness of an intervention. As a considerable amount of time can elapse between these measurements, and the effect of an alteration in the body weight is not taken into consideration, this effect of increased body weight is of specific importance. Thirty children with the predominantly spastic type of CP and 15 typically developing (TD) children were enrolled (age 3–15 years). All children underwent three-dimensional gait analysis with weight-free (baseline) and weighted (10% of the body weight added around their waist) trials. Numerous gait parameters showed a different response to the added weight for TD and CP children. TD children increased walking velocity, step- and stride length, and decreased double support duration with a slightly earlier timing of foot-off, while the opposite was found in CP. Similarly, increased ranges of motion at the pelvis (coronal plane) and hip (all planes), higher joint angular velocities at the hip and ankle, as well as increased moments and powers at the hip, knee and ankle were observed for TD children, while CP children did not change or even showed decreases in the respective measures in response to walking with added weight. Further, while TD children increased their gastrocnemius EMG amplitude during weighted walking, CP children slightly decreased their gastrocnemius EMG amplitude. As such, an increase in weight has a significant effect on the gait pattern in CP children. Clinical gait analysts should therefore take into account the negative

  2. Changes of gait pattern in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: a 18 months follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In a previous study we identified 3 different gait patterns in a group of children with CMT1A disease: Normal-like (NL), Foot-drop (FD), Foot-drop and Push-off Deficit (FD&POD). Goal of the present study was to perform a follow-up evaluation of the same group of patients to analyze possible changes of gait features in relation to disease progression or specific therapy. Methods Nineteen children with CMT1A were evaluated clinically (CMT-Examination Score and Overall Neuropathy Limitation Scale) and through gait analysis 18.2±1.5 months after a baseline evaluation. Meanwhile, 3 of them had foot surgery. Results Fifteen out of the 16 non-operated patients significantly changed at least one of the two parameters associated to primary signs (FD and/or POD). Eleven participants worsened at least one parameter and 9 improved one parameter. CMTES significantly worsened for the group of non-operated patients. However, there was no change in CMTES score in 4 patients and in ONLS score in 11. At subgroup level, participants originally belonging to NL group showed a trend towards a foot-drop deficit (−15%, ns); FD and FD&POD subgroups did not change their primary signs, although significant changes were identified individually. All 3 patients operated have improved push-off and proximal joint patterns during walking. Clinical scores did not change within any sub-group. Conclusions Subtle changes occurring in 1.5 year in gait features of CMT1A children can be instrumentally identified. Such changes show a large inter-subject variability, with some patients even improving their walking pattern. There is anecdotal evidence that foot surgery may improve the push-off phase of gait. PMID:23819439

  3. Novel characterization of gait impairments in people with multiple sclerosis by means of the gait profile score.

    PubMed

    Pau, Massimiliano; Coghe, Giancarlo; Atzeni, Claudia; Corona, Federica; Pilloni, Giuseppina; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Cocco, Eleonora; Galli, Manuela

    2014-10-15

    The assessment of gait abnormalities in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) represents a key factor in evaluating the effectiveness of rehabilitation treatments. Despite the availability of sophisticated equipment to objectively evaluate the kinematic aspects of gait, there are still some difficulties in processing the large and complex amount of data they produce in the daily clinical routine. On the basis of the above-mentioned considerations we propose a novel characterization of gait kinematics in individuals with MS, based on a single measure (gait profile score, GPS) obtained from a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of gait performed using an opto-electronic system. We also investigated the correlation between GPS and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) values. Thirty-four patients suffering from relapsing-remitting MS (13 female, 21 male, mean age 46.7 years) with an EDSS score of ≤6 underwent a gait analysis from which the GPS index was calculated. Their results were compared with those of a control group of healthy age- and gender-matched subjects. The GPS of individuals with MS was found significantly higher with respect to controls (9.12° vs. 5.67°, p<0.001) as the result of kinematic differences in gait patterns referring to pelvic tilt and rotation, hip flexion-extension and rotation, knee flexion-extension and ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexion. A moderate correlation was also found between the EDSS score of the participants and their GPS values (r = 0.63, p < 0.001). The GPS index thus appears suitable to represent gait deviations from physiological patterns in individuals affected by MS and potentially useful in assessing the outcomes related both to rehabilitation programs and pharmacologic/physical therapies.

  4. The Change in Knee Angle during the Gait by Applying Elastic Tape to the Skin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to verify how the application of elastic tape to the anterior surface of the thigh changes the knee angle pattern during gait. [Subjects] The subjects were 10 people who showed an abnormal knee angle change pattern during usual walking. They did not show the so-called double knee action. [Methods] Subjects were asked to walk as usual, and then to walk with elastic tape attached to the anterior surface of the thigh. The knee angle was measured during gait with an electronic goniometer. We graphed the temporal changes of the knee angle and compared them with the normal gait pattern. [Results] The knee angle gait pattern of six of the 10 subjects improved after application of the tape and became like a normal gait pattern. The changes in the knee angle resulted from a stimulus via the skin, rather than voluntary muscular adjustment, suggesting that the changes may have originated due to differences in reflexive tensile strength. [Conclusion] In normal speed gait, it is suggested that the knee angle was altered such that it exhibited a normal pattern by applying elastic tape to the anterior surface of the thigh. We suspect that application of the elastic tape may change the muscle tonus.

  5. The Change in Knee Angle during the Gait by Applying Elastic Tape to the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to verify how the application of elastic tape to the anterior surface of the thigh changes the knee angle pattern during gait. [Subjects] The subjects were 10 people who showed an abnormal knee angle change pattern during usual walking. They did not show the so-called double knee action. [Methods] Subjects were asked to walk as usual, and then to walk with elastic tape attached to the anterior surface of the thigh. The knee angle was measured during gait with an electronic goniometer. We graphed the temporal changes of the knee angle and compared them with the normal gait pattern. [Results] The knee angle gait pattern of six of the 10 subjects improved after application of the tape and became like a normal gait pattern. The changes in the knee angle resulted from a stimulus via the skin, rather than voluntary muscular adjustment, suggesting that the changes may have originated due to differences in reflexive tensile strength. [Conclusion] In normal speed gait, it is suggested that the knee angle was altered such that it exhibited a normal pattern by applying elastic tape to the anterior surface of the thigh. We suspect that application of the elastic tape may change the muscle tonus. PMID:25140100

  6. Does Expectation of Abnormality Affect the Search Pattern of Radiologists When Looking for Pulmonary Nodules?

    PubMed

    Littlefair, Stephen; Brennan, Patrick; Reed, Warren; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    This experiment investigated whether there might be an effect on the visual search strategy of radiologists during image interpretation of the same adult chest radiographs when given different clinical information. Each of 17 experienced radiologists was asked to interpret a set of 57 (10 abnormal) posteroanterior chest images to identify the presence of pulmonary lesions using differing clinical information (leading to unknown, low and high expectations of prevalence). Eye position metrics (search time, dwell time and time to first fixation) were compared for normal and abnormal images, as well as between conditions. For all images, there was a significantly longer search time at high prevalence expectation compared to low prevalence expectation (W = 75.19, P = <0.0001). Mann-Whitney analysis of the abnormal images demonstrated that the dwell time on correctly identified lesions was significantly shorter at low prevalence expectation compared to both unknown (U = 364.5, P = 0.02) and high prevalence expectation (U = 397.0, P = 0.0002). Visual search patterns of radiologists appear to be affected by changing a priori information where such information fosters an expectation of abnormality.

  7. A Forward Genetic Screen in Mice Identifies Mutants with Abnormal Cortical Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seungshin; Stottmann, Rolf W.; Furley, Andrew J.; Beier, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of a 6-layered cortical plate and axon tract patterning are key features of cerebral cortex development. Abnormalities of these processes may be the underlying cause for a range of functional disabilities seen in human neurodevelopmental disorders. To identify mouse mutants with defects in cortical lamination or corticofugal axon guidance, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis was performed using mice expressing LacZ reporter genes in layers II/III and V of the cortex (Rgs4-lacZ) or in corticofugal axons (TAG1-tau-lacZ). Four lines with abnormal cortical lamination have been identified. One of these was a splice site mutation in reelin (Reln) that results in a premature stop codon and the truncation of the C-terminal region (CTR) domain of reelin. Interestingly, this novel allele of Reln did not display cerebellar malformation or ataxia, and this is the first report of a Reln mutant without a cerebellar defect. Four lines with abnormal cortical axon development were also identified, one of which was found by whole-genome resequencing to carry a mutation in Lrp2. These findings demonstrated that the application of ENU mutagenesis to mice carrying transgenic reporters marking cortical anatomy is a sensitive and specific method to identify mutations that disrupt patterning of the developing brain. PMID:23968836

  8. A forward genetic screen in mice identifies mutants with abnormal cortical patterning.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seungshin; Stottmann, Rolf W; Furley, Andrew J; Beier, David R

    2015-01-01

    Formation of a 6-layered cortical plate and axon tract patterning are key features of cerebral cortex development. Abnormalities of these processes may be the underlying cause for a range of functional disabilities seen in human neurodevelopmental disorders. To identify mouse mutants with defects in cortical lamination or corticofugal axon guidance, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis was performed using mice expressing LacZ reporter genes in layers II/III and V of the cortex (Rgs4-lacZ) or in corticofugal axons (TAG1-tau-lacZ). Four lines with abnormal cortical lamination have been identified. One of these was a splice site mutation in reelin (Reln) that results in a premature stop codon and the truncation of the C-terminal region (CTR) domain of reelin. Interestingly, this novel allele of Reln did not display cerebellar malformation or ataxia, and this is the first report of a Reln mutant without a cerebellar defect. Four lines with abnormal cortical axon development were also identified, one of which was found by whole-genome resequencing to carry a mutation in Lrp2. These findings demonstrated that the application of ENU mutagenesis to mice carrying transgenic reporters marking cortical anatomy is a sensitive and specific method to identify mutations that disrupt patterning of the developing brain.

  9. Quantitative measurement of Parkinsonian gait from walking in monocular image sequences using a centroid tracking algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng-Huang; Chen, Shih-Wei; Lo, Yu-Chun; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Chich-Haung; Chen, Shin-Yuan; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Chen, Chin-Hsing; Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chen, You-Yin; Tsang, Siny; Liao, Lun-De

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system that results from the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Abnormal gait begins in the early stage and becomes severe as the disease progresses; therefore, the assessment of gait becomes an important issue in evaluating the progression of PD and the effectiveness of treatment. To provide a clinically useful gait assessment in environments with budget and space limitations, such as a small clinic or home, we propose and develop a portable method utilizing the monocular image sequences of walking to track and analyze a Parkinsonian gait pattern. In addition, a centroid tracking algorithm is developed and used here to enhance the method of quantifying kinematic gait parameters of PD in different states. Twelve healthy subjects and twelve mild patients with PD participate in this study. This method requires one digital video camera and subjects with two joint markers attached on the fibula head and the lateral malleolus of the leg. All subjects walk with a natural pace in front of a video camera during the trials. Results of our study demonstrate the stride length and walking velocity significantly decrease in PD without drug compared to PD with drug in both proposed method and simultaneous gait assessment performed by GAITRite(®) system. In gait initiation, step length and swing velocity also decrease in PD without drug compared to both PD with drug and controls. Our results showed high correlation in gait parameters between the two methods and prove the reliability of the proposed method. With the proposed method, quantitative measurement and analysis of Parkinsonian gait could be inexpensive to implement, portable within a small clinic or home, easy to administer, and simple to interpret. Although this study is assessed Parkinsonian gait, the proposed method has the potential to help clinicians and researchers assess the gait of patients with other

  10. Abnormal Brain Connectivity Patterns in Adults with ADHD: A Coherence Study

    PubMed Central

    Sato, João Ricardo; Hoexter, Marcelo Queiroz; Castellanos, Xavier Francisco; Rohde, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the resting state have shown decreased functional connectivity between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and regions of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in adult patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) relative to subjects with typical development (TD). Most studies used Pearson correlation coefficients among the BOLD signals from different brain regions to quantify functional connectivity. Since the Pearson correlation analysis only provides a limited description of functional connectivity, we investigated functional connectivity between the dACC and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in three groups (adult patients with ADHD, n = 21; TD age-matched subjects, n = 21; young TD subjects, n = 21) using a more comprehensive analytical approach – unsupervised machine learning using a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) that quantifies an abnormality index for each individual. The median abnormality index for patients with ADHD was greater than for TD age-matched subjects (p = 0.014); the ADHD and young TD indices did not differ significantly (p = 0.480); the median abnormality index of young TD was greater than that of TD age-matched subjects (p = 0.016). Low frequencies below 0.05 Hz and around 0.20 Hz were the most relevant for discriminating between ADHD patients and TD age-matched controls and between the older and younger TD subjects. In addition, we validated our approach using the fMRI data of children publicly released by the ADHD-200 Competition, obtaining similar results. Our findings suggest that the abnormal coherence patterns observed in patients with ADHD in this study resemble the patterns observed in young typically developing subjects, which reinforces the hypothesis that ADHD is associated with brain maturation deficits. PMID:23049834

  11. Development and pilot clinical evaluation of a haptic-based perception-empathy biofeedback device for gait rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Saichi, Kenta; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Kitaji, Yu; Kaibuki, Naomi; Iwata, Hiroyasu

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that haptic feedback on the body, either at or away from the desired gait parameter to be changed, can improve gait performance. Here we introduced a haptic-based biofeedback device to supplement the foot pressure information of a paretic foot with a wearable vibrotactile biofeedback device attached to the back. This system provides information regarding a patient's foot pressure pattern to the patient and physical therapist. Therefore, the biofeedback system can share information regarding abnormal gait patterns between patients and therapists. This pilot study showed that the device immediately improved the stride length during walking, but not walking speed. Furthermore, subjective reports indicated that synchronizing foot pressure pattern information between the patient and therapist induced higher patient motivation for gait rehabilitation.

  12. Muscle-skeletal model of the thigh: a tool for understanding the biomechanics of gait in patients with cerebral palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Catalfamo Formento, Paola Andrea; José Crespo, Marcos; Andrés Braidot, Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Cerebral Palsy represents the most common cause of physical disability in modern world and within the pediatrics orthopedics units. The gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait disorders in CP. Giving a more comprehensive treatment plan, including or excluding surgical procedures that can potentially decrease the number of surgical interventions in the life of these patients. Recommendations for orthopedic surgery may be based on a quantitative description of how to alter the properties probably muscle force generation, and how this affects the action of the muscle to determine how these muscles, impaired by disease or surgery, contributing to the movement of the segments of the limb during crouch gait. So the causes and appropriate treatment of gait abnormalities are difficult to determine because the movements generated by the muscular forces of these patients are not clearly understood. A correct determination of the etiology of abnormal patterns of the knee is the key to select the appropriate therapy, presenting a major challenge at present since there is no theoretical basis to determine the biomechanical causes of abnormal gait of these patients. The potential and necessity of using correct biomechanical models that consistently study the abnormalities becomes clear. Reinforcing and correcting a simple gait analysis and eliminating the unknowns when selecting the appropriate treatment is crucial in clinical settings. In this paper a computer muscle-skeletal model is proposed. The model represents a person's thigh simulating the six most representative muscles and joints of the hip and knee. In this way you can have a better understanding of gait abnormalities present in these patients. So the quality of these estimates of individual muscle dynamics facilitate better understanding of the biomechanics of gait pathologies helping to reach better diagnosis prior to surgery and rehabilitation treatments.

  13. Neural code alterations and abnormal time patterns in Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Daniela Sabrina; Cerquetti, Daniel; Merello, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The neural code used by the basal ganglia is a current question in neuroscience, relevant for the understanding of the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease. While a rate code is known to participate in the communication between the basal ganglia and the motor thalamus/cortex, different lines of evidence have also favored the presence of complex time patterns in the discharge of the basal ganglia. To gain insight into the way the basal ganglia code information, we studied the activity of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), an output node of the circuit. Approach. We implemented the 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinsonism in Sprague-Dawley rats, and recorded the spontaneous discharge of single GPi neurons, in head-restrained conditions at full alertness. Analyzing the temporal structure function, we looked for characteristic scales in the neuronal discharge of the GPi. Main results. At a low-scale, we observed the presence of dynamic processes, which allow the transmission of time patterns. Conversely, at a middle-scale, stochastic processes force the use of a rate code. Regarding the time patterns transmitted, we measured the word length and found that it is increased in Parkinson’s disease. Furthermore, it showed a positive correlation with the frequency of discharge, indicating that an exacerbation of this abnormal time pattern length can be expected, as the dopamine depletion progresses. Significance. We conclude that a rate code and a time pattern code can co-exist in the basal ganglia at different temporal scales. However, their normal balance is progressively altered and replaced by pathological time patterns in Parkinson’s disease.

  14. Relation between abnormal patterns of muscle activation and response to common peroneal nerve stimulation in hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Burridge, J; McLellan, D

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the relation between response to common peroneal nerve stimulation, timed to the swing phase of walking, and abnormal ankle movement and muscle activation patterns.
METHOD—Eighteen patients who took part had a drop foot and had had a stroke at least 6 months before the study Twelve age matched normal subjects were also studied. Response to stimulation was measured by changes in the speed and effort of walking when the stimulator was used. Speed was measured over 10 m and effort by the physiological cost index. Abnormal ankle movement and muscle activation were measured in a rig by ability to follow a tracking signal moving sinusoidally at either 1 or 2 Hz, resistance to passive movement, and EMG activity during both passive and active movements. Indices were derived to define EMG response to passive stretch, coactivation, and ability to activate muscles appropriately during active movement
RESULTS—Different mechanisms underlying the drop foot were seen. Results showed that patients who had poor control of ankle movement and spasticity, demonstrated by stretch reflex and coactivation, were more likely to respond well to stimulation. Those with mechanical resistance to passive movement and with normal muscle activation responded less well.
CONCLUSIONS—The results support the hypothesis that stimulation of the common peroneal nerve to elicit a contraction of the anterior tibial muscles also inhibits the antagonist calf muscles. The technique used may be useful in directing physiotherapy by indicating the underlying cause of the drop foot.

 PMID:10945810

  15. Abnormal methylation pattern in constitutive and facultative heterochromatin of ICF patients

    SciTech Connect

    Miniou, P.; Blanquet, V.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.

    1994-09-01

    ICF syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by variable immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial abnormalities. Stretchings and frequent associations of centromeric or juxtacentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 1 and 16 principally, and to a lesser degree, chromosome 9 mimic chromosome features of normal PHA-stimulated lymphocytes treated with 5-azacytidine, an inducer of demethylation. In fact, in these patients we have detected by DNA digestion with methyl-sensitive enzymes a hypomethylation of classical satellites 2 and 3, located in heterochromatin. To assess the role of other satellite DNA in the heterochromatin modifications and chromosome rearrangements, in situ fluorescent method using 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) monoclonal antibody on chromosomes and nuclei were performed in parallel with Southern blot analysis of other satellite sequences located in heterochromatin. 5-MeC reveals that constitutive and facultative heterochromatin (X inactive chromosome) are hypomethylated. Alpha satellite sequences corresponding to centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 9, 16, 18 and X are mostly methylated in patients G and R, and are undermethylated in patient S. Both molecular and cytogenetic analysis are in agreement. By in situ hybridization, breakpoints of rearranged chromosomes were located in stretched and hypomethylated classical satellites. In euchromatin, 5-MeC antibodies reveal an R-like banding pattern indicating an unequal distribution of DNA methylation, disclosing another aspect of chromosome organization. The underlying hypomethylation, associated with an abnormal chromatin structure, may predispose to chromosome instability.

  16. Abnormal changes of multidimensional surface features using multivariate pattern classification in amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuyu; Yuan, Xiankun; Pu, Fang; Li, Deyu; Fan, Yubo; Wu, Liyong; Chao, Wang; Chen, Nan; He, Yong; Han, Ying

    2014-08-06

    Previous studies have suggested that amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is associated with changes in cortical morphological features, such as cortical thickness, sulcal depth, surface area, gray matter volume, metric distortion, and mean curvature. These features have been proven to have specific neuropathological and genetic underpinnings. However, most studies primarily focused on mass-univariate methods, and cortical features were generally explored in isolation. Here, we used a multivariate method to characterize the complex and subtle structural changing pattern of cortical anatomy in 24 aMCI human participants and 26 normal human controls. Six cortical features were extracted for each participant, and the spatial patterns of brain abnormities in aMCI were identified by high classification weights using a support vector machine method. The classification accuracy in discriminating the two groups was 76% in the left hemisphere and 80% in the right hemisphere when all six cortical features were used. Regions showing high weights were subtle, spatially complex, and predominately located in the left medial temporal lobe and the supramarginal and right inferior parietal lobes. In addition, we also found that the six morphological features had different contributions in discriminating the two groups even for the same region. Our results indicated that the neuroanatomical patterns that discriminated individuals with aMCI from controls were truly multidimensional and had different effects on the morphological features. Furthermore, the regions identified by our method could potentially be useful for clinical diagnosis.

  17. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  18. Exhaled Aerosol Pattern Discloses Lung Structural Abnormality: A Sensitivity Study Using Computational Modeling and Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua A.; Kim, JongWon; Mckee, Edward; Lin, En-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Background Exhaled aerosol patterns, also called aerosol fingerprints, provide clues to the health of the lung and can be used to detect disease-modified airway structures. The key is how to decode the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and retrieve the lung structural information for a non-invasive identification of respiratory diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, a CFD-fractal analysis method was developed to quantify exhaled aerosol fingerprints and applied it to one benign and three malign conditions: a tracheal carina tumor, a bronchial tumor, and asthma. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 30 L/min were simulated, with exhaled distributions recorded at the mouth. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to simulate respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Aerosol morphometric measures such as concentration disparity, spatial distributions, and fractal analysis were applied to distinguish various exhaled aerosol patterns. Findings Utilizing physiology-based modeling, we demonstrated substantial differences in exhaled aerosol distributions among normal and pathological airways, which were suggestive of the disease location and extent. With fractal analysis, we also demonstrated that exhaled aerosol patterns exhibited fractal behavior in both the entire image and selected regions of interest. Each exhaled aerosol fingerprint exhibited distinct pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, lacunarity, and multifractal spectrum. Furthermore, a correlation of the diseased location and exhaled aerosol spatial distribution was established for asthma. Conclusion Aerosol-fingerprint-based breath tests disclose clues about the site and severity of lung diseases and appear to be sensitive enough to be a practical tool for diagnosis and prognosis of respiratory diseases with structural abnormalities. PMID:25105680

  19. Development and consistency of gait in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Clarke, K A; Still, J

    2001-05-01

    Mouse models of human disease may display developmental abnormalities or adult onset of the condition. Since many diseases are accompanied by gait disturbances, knowledge of normal gait development in the mouse and its adult characteristics might be valuable as standards against which to appraise disease progression and the efficacy of putative therapies. Assessment of the gait of mice from postnatal day (pnd) 13 to postnatal week (pnw) 80 was undertaken utilising video techniques to examine velocity, stride, stance and swing times and between pnw 29 and 80 using load cells for analysis of the vertical reaction force (P(z)) associated with limb placements. Some adult features are apparent by pnd 13, but in the hindlimb (HL) particularly, the adult pattern of relationships between stride, stance and swing are not established. Adult characteristics of forelimb (FL) deployment develop earlier than those of HL while the systems controlling HL stance develop earlier than those regulating its swing. All the features measured, however, such as the shorter stance and longer swing of FL compared to HL, are established in their adult form by pnd 24 and maintained throughout adult life. In healthy mice at pnw 80, there was no deviation from the adult pattern of gait in which P(z) transmitted via FL exceeds that via HL by around 5%. We did not detect any significant change in any other variable or in their relationships.

  20. Understanding the significance, reasons and patterns of abnormal vital signs after gastric bypass for morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Bellorin, Omar; Abdemur, Abraham; Sucandy, Iswanto; Szomstein, Samuel; Rosenthal, Raul J

    2011-06-01

    Anastomotic leaks and bleeding are the two most feared major complications in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass (LRYGB). This study was designed to evaluate if there is a clinical correlation between abnormal vital signs and postoperative leaks and bleeding. After IRB approval and adherence to HIPAA guidelines, a retrospective review of medical records was performed on 518 patients who underwent LRYGB between October 2002 and October 2006. Vital signs from each patient were monitored hourly. Eight patients out of 518 (1.54%) were discovered to have anastomotic leak. A marked increase in heart rate up to 120 bpm at 20 h after surgery occurred in five of eight patients (62.5%). Of the eight patients who had a leak, seven (87.5%) experienced sustained tachycardia above 120 bpm. On the other hand, 20 patients out of 518 (3.86%) were discovered to have postoperative bleeding. A gradual rather than a dramatic increase in heart rate was recorded in 17 of 20 patients (85%) starting 8 h after surgery. Five patients (25%) had unsustained tachycardia above 120 bpm. Twelve patients in this group (60%) were seen to have cyclical tachycardia that never exceeded 120 bpm at any point during hospitalization. Marginal hypotension was found in seven patients (35%) in this group. Sustained tachycardia with a heart rate exceeding 120 bpm appears to be an indicator of anastomotic leak. Tachycardia less than 120 bpm that has occurred in a cyclical pattern strongly pointed toward postoperative bleeding. Anastomotic leaks and bleeding are the two most feared major complications in patients undergoing LRYGB. This study was designed to evaluate if there is a clinical correlation between abnormal vital signs and postoperative leaks and bleeding.

  1. Effects of acceleration on gait measures in three horse gaits.

    PubMed

    Nauwelaerts, Sandra; Zarski, Lila; Aerts, Peter; Clayton, Hilary

    2015-05-01

    Animals switch gaits according to locomotor speed. In terrestrial locomotion, gaits have been defined according to footfall patterns or differences in center of mass (COM) motion, which characterizes mechanisms that are more general and more predictive than footfall patterns. This has generated different variables designed primarily to evaluate steady-speed locomotion, which is easier to standardize in laboratory conditions. However, in the ecology of an animal, steady-state conditions are rare and the ability to accelerate, decelerate and turn is essential. Currently, there are no data available that have tested whether COM variables can be used in accelerative or decelerative conditions. This study used a data set of kinematics and kinetics of horses using three gaits (walk, trot, canter) to evaluate the effects of acceleration (both positive and negative) on commonly used gait descriptors. The goal was to identify variables that distinguish between gaits both at steady state and during acceleration/deceleration. These variables will either be unaffected by acceleration or affected by it in a predictable way. Congruity, phase shift and COM velocity angle did not distinguish between gaits when the dataset included trials in unsteady conditions. Work (positive and negative) and energy recovery distinguished between gaits and showed a clear relationship with acceleration. Hodographs are interesting graphical representations to study COM mechanics, but they are descriptive rather than quantitative. Force angle, collision angle and collision fraction showed a U-shaped relationship with acceleration and seem promising tools for future research in unsteady conditions.

  2. Gait patterns after intraarticular treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the Knee - Hyaluronan versus triamcinolone: a prospective, randomized, doubleblind, monocentric study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of gait performance and muscle activity patterns as well as clinical efficacy and safety after single intraarticular injection with hyaluronan compared with triamcinolone in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods This trial evaluated the influence of a single injection of hyaluronan or triamcinolone on gait pattern and muscle activity. For clinical evaluation a visual analogue scale for pain, Lequesne index, and Knee Society Score were used. Quality of life was assessed with the SF-36. Results The complete analysis was performed in 50 of 60 patients. 26 patients were treated with triamcinolone and 24 with hyaluronan. Hyaluronan treatment led to significant improvement of range of motion at hip and knee. Significant improvement could be either demonstrated for the pain scale, Lequesne and Knee Society score in both groups. Quality of life showed greater improvement in the triamcinolone group. Conclusion Single application of high-viscosity hyaluronan shows superior range of motion and pain reduction as well as improvement in clinical results. Even if there was a lack of significant differences compared to triamcinolone, this therapy classified as safe and effective in the short follow up. PMID:19380288

  3. GaitKeeper: A System for Measuring Canine Gait.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Cassim; O'Sullivan, Jack; Belshaw, Zoe; Asher, Lucy

    2017-02-08

    It is understood gait has the potential to be used as a window into neurodegenerative disorders, identify markers of subclinical pathology, inform diagnostic algorithms of disease progression and measure the efficacy of interventions. Dogs' gaits are frequently assessed in a veterinary setting to detect signs of lameness. Despite this, a reliable, affordable and objective method to assess lameness in dogs is lacking. Most described canine lameness assessments are subjective, unvalidated and at high risk of bias. This means reliable, early detection of canine gait abnormalities is challenging, which may have detrimental implications for dogs' welfare. In this paper, we draw from approaches and technologies used in human movement science and describe a system for objectively measuring temporal gait characteristics in dogs (step-time, swing-time, stance-time). Asymmetries and variabilities in these characteristics are of known clinical significance when assessing lameness but presently may only be assessed on coarse scales or under highly instrumented environments. The system consists an inertial measurement unit, containing a 3-axis accelerometer and gyroscope coupled with a standardized walking course. The measurement unit is attached to each leg of the dog under assessment before it is walked around the course. The data by the measurement unit is then processed to identify steps and subsequently, micro-gait characteristics. This method has been tested on a cohort of 19 healthy dogs of various breeds ranging in height from 34.2 cm to 84.9 cm. We report the system as capable of making precise step delineations with detections of initial and final contact times of foot-to-floor to a mean precision of 0.011 s and 0.048 s, respectively. Results are based on analysis of 12,678 foot falls and we report a sensitivity, positive predictive value and F-score of 0.81, 0.83 and 0.82 respectively. To investigate the effect of gait on system performance, the approach was tested

  4. Towards autonomous locomotion: CPG-based control of smooth 3D slithering gait transition of a snake-like robot.

    PubMed

    Bing, Zhenshan; Cheng, Long; Chen, Guang; Röhrbein, Florian; Huang, Kai; Knoll, Alois

    2017-04-04

    Snake-like robots with 3D locomotion ability have significant advantages of adaptive travelling in diverse complex terrain over traditional legged or wheeled mobile robots. Despite numerous developed gaits, these snake-like robots suffer from unsmooth gait transitions by changing the locomotion speed, direction, and body shape, which would potentially cause undesired movement and abnormal torque. Hence, there exists a knowledge gap for snake-like robots to achieve autonomous locomotion. To address this problem, this paper presents the smooth slithering gait transition control based on a lightweight central pattern generator (CPG) model for snake-like robots. First, based on the convergence behavior of the gradient system, a lightweight CPG model with fast computing time was designed and compared with other widely adopted CPG models. Then, by reshaping the body into a more stable geometry, the slithering gait was modified, and studied based on the proposed CPG model, including the gait transition of locomotion speed, moving direction, and body shape. In contrast to sinusoid-based method, extensive simulations and prototype experiments finally demonstrated that smooth slithering gait transition can be effectively achieved using the proposed CPG-based control method without generating undesired locomotion and abnormal torque.

  5. Gait in SWEDDs patients: comparison with Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Mian, Omar S; Schneider, Susanne A; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Bhatia, Kailash P; Day, Brian L

    2011-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease on clinical grounds who subsequently turn out to have normal dopamine transporter imaging have been referred to as SWEDDs (scans without evidence of dopaminergic deficits). Despite having clinical features similar to those of Parkinson's disease, these patients seem to have different pathophysiology, prognosis, and treatment requirements. In this study we determined the similarities and differences in the gaits of SWEDDs and Parkinson's disease patients to investigate whether walking patterns can distinguish these entities. We used 3-D motion capture to analyze the gaits of 11 SWEDDs patients (who had unilateral or asymmetric upper limb tremor with a rest component), 12 tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease patients, and 13 healthy control participants. In common with Parkinson's disease patients, SWEDDs patients had a slow gait mainly because of a small stride length, as well as a reduced arm swing. However, several abnormal features of posture and gait in Parkinson's disease were normal in SWEDDs. Thus, SWEDDs patients had normal trunk and elbow posture, normal stride length variability, and normal bilateral step-phase coordination, all of which were abnormal in Parkinson's disease patients. We also searched for signs of ataxic movements during normal and tandem walking, but found no evidence that ataxic gait was a general feature in SWEDDs. These findings could aid the clinician in identification of potential tremulous SWEDDs cases. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  6. Accelerometry reveals differences in gait variability between patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Huisinga, Jessie M.; Mancini, Martina; St. George, Rebecca; Horak, Fay

    2014-01-01

    Variability of movement reflects important information for the maintenance of the health of the system. For pathological populations, changes in variability during gait signal the presence of abnormal motor control strategies. For persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), extensive gait problems have been reported including changes in gait variability. While previous studies have focused on footfall variability, the present study used accelerometers on the trunk to measure variability during walking. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the variability of the acceleration pattern of the upper and lower trunk in PwMS compared to healthy controls. We extracted linear and nonlinear measures of gait variability from 30s of steady state walking for 15 PwMS and 15 age-matched healthy controls. PwMS had altered variability compared to controls with greater Lyapunov exponent in the ML (p < 0.001) and AP (p < 0.001) directions, and greater frequency dispersion in the ML direction (p = 0.034). PwMS also demonstrated greater mean velocity in the ML direction (p = 0.045) and lower root mean square of acceleration in the AP direction (p = 0.040). These findings indicate that PwMS have altered structure of variability of the trunk during gait compared to healthy controls and agree with previous findings related to changes in gait variability in PwMS. PMID:23161166

  7. Abnormal Brain Areas Common to the Focal Epilepsies: Multivariate Pattern Analysis of fMRI.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mangor; Curwood, Evan K; Vaughan, David N; Omidvarnia, Amir H; Jackson, Graeme D

    2016-04-01

    Individuals with focal epilepsy have heterogeneous sites of seizure origin. However, there may be brain regions that are common to most cases of intractable focal epilepsy. In this study, we aim to identify these using multivariate analysis of task-free functional MRI. Fourteen subjects with extratemporal focal epilepsy and 14 healthy controls were included in the study. Task-free functional MRI data were used to calculate voxel-wise regional connectivity with regional homogeneity (ReHo) and weighted degree centrality (DCw), in addition to regional activity using fraction of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF). Multivariate pattern analysis was applied to each of these metrics to discriminate brain areas that differed between focal epilepsy subjects and healthy controls. ReHo and DCw classified focal epilepsy subjects from healthy controls with high accuracy (89.3% and 75%, respectively). However, fALFF did not significantly classify patients from controls. Increased regional network activity in epilepsy subjects was seen in the ipsilateral piriform cortex, insula, and thalamus, in addition to the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and lateral frontal cortices. Decreased regional connectivity was observed in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, as well as lateral temporal cortices. Patients with extratemporal focal epilepsy have common areas of abnormality (ReHo and DCw measures), including the ipsilateral piriform cortex, temporal neocortex, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. ReHo shows additional increase in the "salience network" that includes anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex. DCw showed additional effects in the ipsilateral thalamus and striatum. These brain areas may represent key regional network properties underlying focal epilepsy.

  8. An ENSO-oriented mining algorithm for marine abnormal association patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, C.; DONG, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Spatiotemporal variation of marine environmental parameters and their relationship with ENSO is a complicated system. The relationships among them are mutually responding and driving, and they have attracted much more attention in the context of global change. With great challenges of traditional spatiotemporal analysis to deal with their relationships, we propose a novel algorithm for exploring marine association patterns before / when / after ENSO occurrence using the remote sensing images at large scale. The main works are as follows. Firstly, monthly anomalies are defined and used to represent marine abnormal changes, and their quantitative levels are calculated with a continuous interval to represent intensity of variations. Secondly, this paper designs a recursive mining algorithm to find frequent items within the context of ENSO occurrence. The key implementations are as follows. Step 1: Scan the database one time, for each item, i.e. marine parameter, and each variation type, i.e. -2, -1, 0, 1 and 2, calculate its probability, denoted as, and conditional probability when ENSO occurrence, denoted as, respectively, where, i is one of marine parameters, K is one of variation types of marine parameters, L is one of variation types of ENSO events. And find the frequent 1-items if and only if is not less than. Step 2: Generate candidate 2-items according to the Apriori's linking algorithm, and for each candidate 2-item scan the database, calculate its probability and conditional probability when ENSO occurrence, and generate frequent 2-items. Step 3: Generate frequent (m+1)-items from m-items using a recursive algorithm with "Linking-Pruning-Generating", where m is not less than 2. In Linking phase, Apriori's linking algorithm is done to generate the candidate (m+1)-items, Pruning phase is to remove the (m+1)-items whose sub items are not frequent on the property of non- monotonicity, while Generation phase is to generate the frequent (m+1)-items by checking its

  9. Modeling and simulation of normal and hemiparetic gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengas, Lely A.; Camargo, Esperanza; Sanchez, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Gait is the collective term for the two types of bipedal locomotion, walking and running. This paper is focused on walking. The analysis of human gait is of interest to many different disciplines, including biomechanics, human-movement science, rehabilitation and medicine in general. Here we present a new model that is capable of reproducing the properties of walking, normal and pathological. The aim of this paper is to establish the biomechanical principles that underlie human walking by using Lagrange method. The constraint forces of Rayleigh dissipation function, through which to consider the effect on the tissues in the gait, are included. Depending on the value of the factor present in the Rayleigh dissipation function, both normal and pathological gait can be simulated. First of all, we apply it in the normal gait and then in the permanent hemiparetic gait. Anthropometric data of adult person are used by simulation, and it is possible to use anthropometric data for children but is necessary to consider existing table of anthropometric data. Validation of these models includes simulations of passive dynamic gait that walk on level ground. The dynamic walking approach provides a new perspective of gait analysis, focusing on the kinematics and kinetics of gait. There have been studies and simulations to show normal human gait, but few of them have focused on abnormal, especially hemiparetic gait. Quantitative comparisons of the model predictions with gait measurements show that the model can reproduce the significant characteristics of normal gait.

  10. Gait pattern in 9-11-year-old children with generalized joint hypermobility compared with controls; a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To study differences in gait patterns in 10-year-old children with Generalized Joint Hypermobility (GJH) and with no GJH (NGJH). Methods A total of 37 children participated (19 GJH, 18 NGJH, mean age 10.2 (SD 0.5) years). Inclusion criteria for GJH were a Beighton score of ≥5, with at least one hypermobile knee joint; for NGJH a Beighton score of ≤4, and no hypermobile knees and for both groups no knee pain during the previous week. All children were recorded by five video cameras, while they walked across three force platforms. Net joint moments were calculated in 3D by inverse dynamics and peak values provided input to statistical analyses. Results In the frontal plane, children with GJH had a significantly lower peak knee abductor moment and peak hip abductor moment. In the sagittal plane, the peak knee flexor moment and the peak hip extensor moment were significantly lower in the GJH group although the absolute difference was small. Conclusions The walking pattern was the same for children with GJH and for healthy children, as there were no differences in kinematics, but it was, however, performed with different kinetics. Children with GJH walked with lower ankle, knee and hip joint moments compared to children with NGJH. However, the clinical importance of these differences during normal gait is unknown. To obtain this knowledge, children with GJH must be followed longitudinally. Trial registration The study was approved by the Committee on Biomedical Research Ethics for Copenhagen and Frederiksberg, Denmark (jnr. KF01-2006-178). PMID:24308706

  11. Parkinson's disease classification using gait analysis via deterministic learning.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Liu, Fenglin; Wang, Qinghui; Wang, Ying; Ma, Limin; Zhang, Yu

    2016-10-28

    Gait analysis plays an important role in maintaining the well-being of human mobility and health care, and is a valuable tool for obtaining quantitative information on motor deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this paper, we propose a method to classify (diagnose) patients with PD and healthy control subjects using gait analysis via deterministic learning theory. The classification approach consists of two phases: a training phase and a classification phase. In the training phase, gait characteristics represented by the gait dynamics are derived from the vertical ground reaction forces under the usual and self-selected paces of the subjects. The gait dynamics underlying gait patterns of healthy controls and PD patients are locally accurately approximated by radial basis function (RBF) neural networks. The obtained knowledge of approximated gait dynamics is stored in constant RBF networks. The gait patterns of healthy controls and PD patients constitute a training set. In the classification phase, a bank of dynamical estimators is constructed for all the training gait patterns. Prior knowledge of gait dynamics represented by the constant RBF networks is embedded in the estimators. By comparing the set of estimators with a test gait pattern of a certain PD patient to be classified (diagnosed), a set of classification errors are generated. The average L1 norms of the errors are taken as the classification measure between the dynamics of the training gait patterns and the dynamics of the test PD gait pattern according to the smallest error principle. When the gait patterns of 93 PD patients and 73 healthy controls are classified with five-fold cross-validation method, the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the results are 96.39%, 96.77% and 95.89%, respectively. Based on the results, it may be claimed that the features and the classifiers used in the present study could effectively separate the gait patterns between the groups of PD patients and healthy

  12. Frequency and patterns of abnormality detected by iodine-123 amine emission CT after cerebral infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Brott, T.G.; Gelfand, M.J.; Williams, C.C.; Spilker, J.A.; Hertzberg, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 31 patients with cerebral infarction and 13 who had had transient ischemic attacks, using iodine-123-labeled N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxyl-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propanediamin e (I-123-HIPDM) as the radiopharmaceutical. SPECT scans were compared with computed tomographic (CT) scans. SPECT was as sensitive as CT in detecting cerebral infarction (94% vs. 84%). The abnormalities were larger on the SPECT scans than on the CT scans in 19 cases, equal in seven, and smaller in five (SPECT abnormalities greater than or equal to CT abnormalities in 86% of cases). Fifteen of 30 patients with hemispheric infarction had decreased perfusion (decreased uptake of I-123-HIPDM) to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the cerebral hemisphere involved by the infarction (crossed cerebellar diaschisis). Nine of these 15 patients had major motor deficits, while only one of the 15 without crossed cerebellar diaschisis had a major motor deficit.

  13. Gait disturbances in dystrophic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Thomas G; Kale, Ajit; Amende, Ivo; Tang, Wenlong; McCue, Scott; Bhagavan, Hemmi N; VanDongen, Case G

    2011-01-01

    The delta-sarcoglycan-deficient hamster is an excellent model to study muscular dystrophy. Gait disturbances, important clinically, have not been described in this animal model. We applied ventral plane videography (DigiGait) to analyze gait in BIO TO-2 dystrophic and BIO F1B control hamsters walking on a transparent treadmill belt. Stride length was ∼13% shorter (P < .05) in TO-2 hamsters at 9 months of age compared to F1B hamsters. Hindlimb propulsion duration, an indicator of muscle strength, was shorter in 9-month-old TO-2 (247 ± 8 ms) compared to F1B hamsters (272 ± 11 ms; P < .05). Braking duration, reflecting generation of ground reaction forces, was delayed in 9-month-old TO-2 (147 ± 6 ms) compared to F1B hamsters (126 ± 8 ms; P < .05). Hindpaw eversion, evidence of muscle weakness, was greater in 9-month-old TO-2 than in F1B hamsters (17.7 ± 1.2° versus 8.7 ± 1.6°; P < .05). Incline and decline walking aggravated gait disturbances in TO-2 hamsters at 3 months of age. Several gait deficits were apparent in TO-2 hamsters at 1 month of age. Quantitative gait analysis demonstrates that dystrophic TO-2 hamsters recapitulate functional aspects of human muscular dystrophy. Early detection of gait abnormalities in a convenient animal model may accelerate the development of therapies for muscular dystrophy.

  14. The asymmetric gait toenail unit sign.

    PubMed

    Zaias, Nardo; Rebell, Gerbert; Casal, German; Appel, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to resolve a diagnostic problem and report toenail unit changes attributable to shoe friction that resemble onychomycosis, but that are fungus-negative, and identify common skeletal causes in patients with an asymmetric walking gait. X-ray and clinical feet inspections were performed to evaluate skeletal components that change normal foot biodynamics. Forty-nine patients, all dermatophyte-negative, were reviewed. All patients were those seen in our private practice who demonstrated skeletal and toenail unit abnormalities such as onycholysis, nail bed keratosis resembling distal subungual onychomycosis, nail plate surface abnormalities, distal toe skin keratosis, a diagnostic nail plate shape, as well as several skeletal abnormalities. The clinical abnormalities of the asymmetric gait syndrome include onycholysis, nail bed keratosis, nail plate surface abnormalities, and a diagnostic nail plate shape. By the patient's history, the skeletal findings that were present worsened with age and, in many patients, they were familial. Onychomycosis does not lead to an asymmetric gait nail problem, asymmetric gait toenail does not favor dermatophyte infection, and not all nail dystrophies are the result of an asymmetric walking gait.

  15. Spreading Photoparoxysmal EEG Response is Associated with an Abnormal Cortical Excitability Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groppa, Sergey; Jerosch, Bettina; Muhle, Hiltrud; Kurth, Christoph; Shepherd, Alex J.; Siebner, Hartwig; Stephani, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Photosensitivity or photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is a highly heritable electroencephalographic trait characterized by an abnormal cortical response to intermittent photic stimulation (IPS). In PPR-positive individuals, IPS induces spikes, spike-waves or intermittent slow waves. The PPR may be restricted to posterior visual areas (i.e. local PPR…

  16. Altered segregation pattern and numerical chromosome abnormalities interrelate in spermatozoa from Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Godo, Anna; Blanco, Joan; Vidal, Francesca; Sandalinas, Mireia; Garcia-Guixé, Elena; Anton, Ester

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether there is a relationship between numerical chromosome abnormalities and certain segregation modes in spermatozoa from Robertsonian translocation carriers. A sequential fluorescence in-situ hybridization protocol based on two successive hybridization rounds was performed on sperm samples from one t(13;22) and ten t(13;14) carriers. Patient inclusion criteria included the presence of a positive interchromosomal effect (ICE). In the first round, numerical abnormalities for chromosomes 15/22, 18, 21, X and Y were analysed. In the second round, the segregation outcome of the rearranged chromosomes was evaluated in the numerically abnormal spermatozoa detected in the first round, as well as in randomly assessed spermatozoa. Aneuploid spermatozoa showed statistical differences in all segregation modes when compared with randomly assessed spermatozoa: alternate (50.7% versus 84.3%), adjacent (36.6% versus 14.6%) and 3:0 (10.2% versus 1%). Diploid/multiple disomic spermatozoa showed differences in alternate (3.7% versus 84.3%) and 3:0 (67.6% versus 1%). We concluded that in Robertsonian translocation carriers that exhibit ICE, numerically abnormal spermatozoa preferentially contain unbalanced segregation products. This might be explained by heterosynapsis acting as a rescue mechanism that would lead to aberrant recombination, which is a predisposing factor for non-disjunction events.

  17. Identification of abnormal motor cortex activation patterns in children with cerebral palsy by functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Behbehani, Khosrow; Romero, Mario I.; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Reid, Dahlia; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a tool for physicians to study cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Motor cortex activation patterns were studied in five healthy children and five children with CP (8.4±2.3years old in both groups) performing a finger-tapping protocol. Spatial (distance from center and area difference) and temporal (duration and time-to-peak) image metrics are proposed as potential biomarkers for differentiating abnormal cortical activation in children with CP from healthy pediatric controls. In addition, a similarity image-analysis concept is presented that unveils areas that have similar activation patterns as that of the maximum activation area, but are not discernible by visual inspection of standard activation images. Metrics derived from the images presenting areas of similarity are shown to be sensitive identifiers of abnormal activation patterns in children with CP. Importantly, the proposed similarity concept and related metrics may be applicable to other studies for the identification of cortical activation patterns by fNIRS. PMID:20615010

  18. Identification of abnormal motor cortex activation patterns in children with cerebral palsy by functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Behbehani, Khosrow; Romero, Mario I.; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Reid, Dahlia; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the utility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a tool for physicians to study cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Motor cortex activation patterns were studied in five healthy children and five children with CP (8.4+/-2.3 years old in both groups) performing a finger-tapping protocol. Spatial (distance from center and area difference) and temporal (duration and time-to-peak) image metrics are proposed as potential biomarkers for differentiating abnormal cortical activation in children with CP from healthy pediatric controls. In addition, a similarity image-analysis concept is presented that unveils areas that have similar activation patterns as that of the maximum activation area, but are not discernible by visual inspection of standard activation images. Metrics derived from the images presenting areas of similarity are shown to be sensitive identifiers of abnormal activation patterns in children with CP. Importantly, the proposed similarity concept and related metrics may be applicable to other studies for the identification of cortical activation patterns by fNIRS.

  19. Improved gait recognition by gait dynamics normalization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongyi; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2006-06-01

    Potential sources for gait biometrics can be seen to derive from two aspects: gait shape and gait dynamics. We show that improved gait recognition can be achieved after normalization of dynamics and focusing on the shape information. We normalize for gait dynamics using a generic walking model, as captured by a population Hidden Markov Model (pHMM) defined for a set of individuals. The states of this pHMM represent gait stances over one gait cycle and the observations are the silhouettes of the corresponding gait stances. For each sequence, we first use Viterbi decoding of the gait dynamics to arrive at one dynamics-normalized, averaged, gait cycle of fixed length. The distance between two sequences is the distance between the two corresponding dynamics-normalized gait cycles, which we quantify by the sum of the distances between the corresponding gait stances. Distances between two silhouettes from the same generic gait stance are computed in the linear discriminant analysis space so as to maximize the discrimination between persons, while minimizing the variations of the same subject under different conditions. The distance computation is constructed so that it is invariant to dilations and erosions of the silhouettes. This helps us handle variations in silhouette shape that can occur with changing imaging conditions. We present results on three different, publicly available, data sets. First, we consider the HumanlD Gait Challenge data set, which is the largest gait benchmarking data set that is available (122 subjects), exercising five different factors, i.e., viewpoint, shoe, surface, carrying condition, and time. We significantly improve the performance across the hard experiments involving surface change and briefcase carrying conditions. Second, we also show improved performance on the UMD gait data set that exercises time variations for 55 subjects. Third, on the CMU Mobo data set, we show results for matching across different walking speeds. It is worth

  20. Knee kinetic pattern during gait and anterior knee pain before and after rehabilitation in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Claudon, B; Poussel, M; Billon-Grumillier, C; Beyaert, C; Paysant, J

    2012-05-01

    Patellofemoral pain is likely due to compressive force acting on the patella related in turn to knee extension moment. The latter variable was assumed to be (i) reduced during short-distance free walking in case of patellofemoral pain syndrome and (ii) increased after therapeutic pain reduction. Peak knee extension moment at beginning of stance phase was recorded by three-dimensional gait analysis in 22 controls and in 23 patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome before and after rehabilitation of knee extensors and flexors to reduce the pain. Pain would occur mainly in stressful activities such as stair negotiation or squatting and was quantified by the anterior knee pain scale. Peak knee extension moment was significantly reduced in all the patients before treatment (n=23) compared to controls, although no one had pain during free walking. In the 17 patients who experienced significant post-rehabilitation pain reduction in their stressful activities, the peak knee extension moment was significantly reduced before treatment compared to controls and significantly increased after treatment, reaching values similar to control values. The peak knee extension moment during free walking appears to be a good kinetic variable related to a compensatory mechanism limiting or avoiding anterior knee pain and may be of interest in assessing knee dynamics alteration in patients with PFPS.

  1. Probabilistic Gait Classification in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Bayesian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gestel, Leen; De Laet, Tinne; Di Lello, Enrico; Bruyninckx, Herman; Molenaers, Guy; Van Campenhout, Anja; Aertbelien, Erwin; Schwartz, Mike; Wambacq, Hans; De Cock, Paul; Desloovere, Kaat

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) generates a wealth of highly variable data. Gait classifications help to reduce, simplify and interpret this vast amount of 3DGA data and thereby assist and facilitate clinical decision making in the treatment of CP. CP gait is often a mix of several clinically accepted distinct gait patterns. Therefore,…

  2. Gait analysis methods for rodent models of arthritic disorders: reviews and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lakes, E H; Allen, K D

    2016-11-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool to understand behavioral changes in preclinical arthritis models. While observational scoring and spatiotemporal gait parameters are the most widely performed gait analyses in rodents, commercially available systems can now provide quantitative assessments of spatiotemporal patterns. However, inconsistencies remain between testing platforms, and laboratories often select different gait pattern descriptors to report in the literature. Rodent gait can also be described through kinetic and kinematic analyses, but systems to analyze rodent kinetics and kinematics are typically custom made and often require sensitive, custom equipment. While the use of rodent gait analysis rapidly expands, it is important to remember that, while rodent gait analysis is a relatively modern behavioral assay, the study of quadrupedal gait is not new. Nearly all gait parameters are correlated, and a collection of gait parameters is needed to understand a compensatory gait pattern used by the animal. As such, a change in a single gait parameter is unlikely to tell the full biomechanical story; and to effectively use gait analysis, one must consider how multiple different parameters contribute to an altered gait pattern. The goal of this article is to review rodent gait analysis techniques and provide recommendations on how to use these technologies in rodent arthritis models, including discussions on the strengths and limitations of observational scoring, spatiotemporal, kinetic, and kinematic measures. Recognizing rodent gait analysis is an evolving tool, we also provide technical recommendations we hope will improve the utility of these analyses in the future.

  3. The comparison of two physiotherapeutic approaches for gait improvement in sub-acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Maciej; Szczerbik, Ewa; Syczewska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The functional gait problems encountered by stroke patients include impaired balance, abnormal gait pattern with marked asymmetry, pathological trunk and spinal motion. Many different methods of physiotherapy are used to improve functional ability (especially gait) in stroke patients, but their efficacy and outcome are often not objectively assessed. The goal of this paper is to compare two therapeutic programs: one that is traditionally used in our rehabilitation facilities (exercises in lying position, "open chain" exercises, isolated movements of extremities with trunk stabilization) and the new one (exercises in vertical position, sitting or standing, "closed chain" exercises involving whole paretic side of the body). Fifty one stroke patients, aged 34 to 79 years, participated in the study. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the two groups. Patients underwent clinical assessment (Fugl-Meyer, Rivermead Motor Assessment, Berg Balance Scale) and instrumented gait analysis (using six-camera VICON 460 system) simultaneously three times: prior to the beginning of the rehabilitation program, after 6 weeks of the program, and after another 6 weeks of physiotherapy, at the end of rehabilitation program. Results demonstrated that both rehabilitation programs improved the gait function and clinical status in patients suffering from stroke. Despite the differences between the two programs the progress achieved by the patients in locomotor function is similar. Two equivalent physiotherapy programs could be applied during rehabilitation process depending on the patient's individual preferences and needs, as the amount of functional improvement provided by them is comparable.

  4. Gait analysis in forensic medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Peter K.; Simonsen, Erik B.; Lynnerup, Niels

    2007-01-01

    We have combined the basic human ability to recognize other individuals with functional anatomical and biomechanical knowledge, in order to analyze the gait of perpetrators as recorded on surveillance video. The perpetrators are then compared with similar analyses of suspects. At present we give a statement to the police as to whether the perpetrator has a characteristic gait pattern compared to normal gait, and if a suspect has a comparable gait pattern. We have found agreements such as: limping, varus instability in the knee at heel strike, larger lateral flexion of the spinal column to one side than the other, inverted ankle during stance, pronounced sagittal head-movements, and marked head-shoulder posture. Based on these characteristic features, we state whether suspect and perpetrator could have the same identity but it is not possible to positively identify the perpetrator. Nevertheless, we have been involved in several cases where the court has found that this type of gait analysis, especially combined with photogrammetry, was a valuable tool. The primary requisites are surveillance cameras recording with sufficient frequency, ideally about 15 Hz, which are positioned in frontal and preferably also in profile view.

  5. Identification of Abnormal System Noise Temperature Patterns in Deep Space Network Antennas Using Neural Network Trained Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Thomas; Pham, Timothy; Liao, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a fuzzy logic function trained by an artificial neural network to classify the system noise temperature (SNT) of antennas in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). The SNT data were classified into normal, marginal, and abnormal classes. The irregular SNT pattern was further correlated with link margin and weather data. A reasonably good correlation is detected among high SNT, low link margin and the effect of bad weather; however we also saw some unexpected non-correlations which merit further study in the future.

  6. The Electrophoretic Pattern of Hemoglobin in Newborn Babies, and Abnormalities of Hemoglobin F Synthesis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Vella, F.; Cunningham, T. A.

    1967-01-01

    On routine electrophoretic analyses on filter paper and starch gel in an alkaline or neutral medium, no abnormal hemoglobin fractions were found in the blood of 600 newborn infants or their mothers. Trace amounts of hemoglobin Barts were noted in many of the blood samples from newborns when the starch gels (phosphate buffer pH 7.0) were stained with a benzidine/H2O2 reagent. In one infant, precocious cessation of synthesis of hemoglobin F was postulated to account for the small amounts of this hemoglobin found in a cord-blood specimen. Analysis of 15,000 blood samples from adults revealed two instances in which the hemoglobin F level was 20 and 35%, respectively. The former was attributed to a hereditary persistence of hemoglobin F, while the latter was associated with acute leukemia. In an addendum, the finding of an infant with an abnormal hemoglobin variant, resembling in many of its properties hemoglobin F Texas, is reported. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:6019054

  7. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Källstrand, Johan; Olsson, Olle; Nehlstedt, Sara Fristedt; Sköld, Mia Ling; Nielzén, Sören

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by forward masking in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (AS). Sixteen AS subjects were included in the forward masking experiment and compared to three control groups consisting of healthy individuals (n = 16), schizophrenic patients (n = 16) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients (n = 16), respectively, of matching age and gender. The results showed that the AS subjects exhibited abnormally low activity in the early part of their ABRs that distinctly separated them from the three control groups. Specifically, wave III amplitudes were significantly lower in the AS group than for all the control groups in the forward masking condition (P < 0.005), which was not the case in the baseline condition. Thus, electrophysiological measurements of ABRs to complex sound stimuli (eg, forward masking) may lead to a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiology of AS. Future studies may further point to specific ABR characteristics in AS individuals that separate them from individuals diagnosed with other neurodevelopmental diseases. PMID:20628629

  8. Apparent diffusion coefficient in normal and abnormal pattern of intervertebral lumbar discs: initial experience☆

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Yu, Xuewen; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Shaojuan; Guo, Youmin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the relationship of morphologically defined non-bulging/herniated, bulging and herniated intervertebral lumbar discs with quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Thirty-two healthy volunteers and 28 patients with back pain or sciatica were examined by MRI. All intervertebral lumbar discs from L1 to S1 were classified according to morphological abnormality and degenerated grades. The ADC values of nucleus pulposus (NP) were measured and recorded. The significant differences about mean ADC values of NP were found between non-bulging/herniated discs and bulging discs as well as herniated discs (P < 0.05), whereas there were no significant differences in ADC values between bulging and herniated discs (P > 0.05). Moreover, statistically significant relationship was found in the mean ADC values of NP between “non-bulging/herniated and non-degenerated discs” and “non-bulging/herniated degenerated discs” as well as herniated discs (P < 0.05). Linear regression analysis between ADC value and disc level revealed an inverse correlation (r = -0.18). The ADC map of the NP is a potentially useful tool for the quantitative assessment of componential and molecular alterations accompanied with lumbar disc abnormalities. PMID:23554690

  9. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Schizophrenia Based on an International Mega-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Cota Navin; Calhoun, Vince D; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Chen, Jiayu; Patel, Veena; Liu, Jingyu; Segall, Judith; Franke, Barbara; Zwiers, Marcel P; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan; Fisher, Simon E; Fernandez, Guillen; van Erp, Theo G M; Potkin, Steven; Ford, Judith; Mathalon, Daniel; McEwen, Sarah; Lee, Hyo Jong; Mueller, Bryon A; Greve, Douglas N; Andreassen, Ole; Agartz, Ingrid; Gollub, Randy L; Sponheim, Scott R; Ehrlich, Stefan; Wang, Lei; Pearlson, Godfrey; Glahn, David C; Sprooten, Emma; Mayer, Andrew R; Stephen, Julia; Jung, Rex E; Canive, Jose; Bustillo, Juan; Turner, Jessica A

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of gray matter concentration (GMC) deficits in patients with schizophrenia (Sz) have identified robust changes throughout the cortex. We assessed the relationships between diagnosis, overall symptom severity, and patterns of gray matter in the largest aggregated structural imaging dataset to date. We performed both source-based morphometry (SBM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses on GMC images from 784 Sz and 936 controls (Ct) across 23 scanning sites in Europe and the United States. After correcting for age, gender, site, and diagnosis by site interactions, SBM analyses showed 9 patterns of diagnostic differences. They comprised separate cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. Seven patterns showed greater GMC in Ct than Sz, while 2 (brainstem and cerebellum) showed greater GMC for Sz. The greatest GMC deficit was in a single pattern comprising regions in the superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal cortex, which replicated over analyses of data subsets. VBM analyses identified overall cortical GMC loss and one small cluster of increased GMC in Sz, which overlapped with the SBM brainstem component. We found no significant association between the component loadings and symptom severity in either analysis. This mega-analysis confirms that the commonly found GMC loss in Sz in the anterior temporal lobe, insula, and medial frontal lobe form a single, consistent spatial pattern even in such a diverse dataset. The separation of GMC loss into robust, repeatable spatial patterns across multiple datasets paves the way for the application of these methods to identify subtle genetic and clinical cohort effects.

  10. Estimates of gastrocnemius muscle length during simulated pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Rao, Smita; Dietz, Fred; Yack, H John

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare estimates of gastrocnemius muscle length (GML) obtained using a segmented versus straight-line model in children. Kinematic data were acquired on eleven typically developing children as they walked under the following conditions: normal gait, crouch gait, equinus gait, and crouch with equinus gait. Maximum and minimum GML, and GML change were calculated using two models: straight-line and segmented. A two-way RMANOVA was used to compare GML characteristics. Results indicated that maximum GML and GML change during simulated pathological gait patterns were influenced by model used to calculate gastrocnemius muscle length (interaction: P = .004 and P = .026). Maximum GML was lower in the simulated gait patterns compared with normal gait (P < .001). Maximum GML was higher with the segmented model compared with the straight-line model (P = .030). Using either model, GML change in equinus gait and crouch with equinus gait was lower compared with normal gait (P < .001). Overall, minimum GML estimated with the segmented model was higher compared with the straight-line model (P < .01). The key findings of our study indicate that GML is significantly affected by both gait pattern and method of estimation. The GML estimates tended to be lower with the straight-line model versus the segmented model.

  11. Gait disorder as a predictor of spatial learning and memory impairment in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing M.; Meng, Zhaoxiang; Yin, Zhenglu

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether gait dysfunction is a predictor of severe spatial learning and memory impairment in aged mice. Methods A total of 100 12-month-old male mice that had no obvious abnormal motor ability and whose Morris water maze performances were not significantly different from those of two-month-old male mice were selected for the study. The selected aged mice were then divided into abnormal or normal gait groups according to the results from the quantitative gait assessment. Gaits of aged mice were defined as abnormal when the values of quantitative gait parameters were two standard deviations (SD) lower or higher than those of 2-month-old male mice. Gait parameters included stride length, variability of stride length, base of support, cadence, and average speed. After nine months, mice exhibiting severe spatial learning and memory impairment were separated from mice with mild or no cognitive dysfunction. The rate of severe spatial learning and memory impairment in the abnormal and normal gait groups was tested by a chi-square test and the correlation between gait dysfunction and decline in cognitive function was tested using a diagnostic test. Results The 12-month-old aged mice were divided into a normal gait group (n = 75) and an abnormal gait group (n = 25). Nine months later, three mice in the normal gait group and two mice in the abnormal gait group had died. The remaining mice were subjected to the Morris water maze again, and 17 out of 23 mice in the abnormal gait group had developed severe spatial learning and memory impairment, including six with stride length deficits, 15 with coefficient of variation (CV) in stride length, two with base of support (BOS) deficits, five with cadence dysfunction, and six with average speed deficits. In contrast, only 15 out of 72 mice in the normal gait group developed severe spatial learning and memory impairment. The rate of severe spatial learning and memory impairment was significantly higher in

  12. GaitKeeper: A System for Measuring Canine Gait

    PubMed Central

    Ladha, Cassim; O’Sullivan, Jack; Belshaw, Zoe; Asher, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    It is understood gait has the potential to be used as a window into neurodegenerative disorders, identify markers of subclinical pathology, inform diagnostic algorithms of disease progression and measure the efficacy of interventions. Dogs’ gaits are frequently assessed in a veterinary setting to detect signs of lameness. Despite this, a reliable, affordable and objective method to assess lameness in dogs is lacking. Most described canine lameness assessments are subjective, unvalidated and at high risk of bias. This means reliable, early detection of canine gait abnormalities is challenging, which may have detrimental implications for dogs’ welfare. In this paper, we draw from approaches and technologies used in human movement science and describe a system for objectively measuring temporal gait characteristics in dogs (step-time, swing-time, stance-time). Asymmetries and variabilities in these characteristics are of known clinical significance when assessing lameness but presently may only be assessed on coarse scales or under highly instrumented environments. The system consists an inertial measurement unit, containing a 3-axis accelerometer and gyroscope coupled with a standardized walking course. The measurement unit is attached to each leg of the dog under assessment before it is walked around the course. The data by the measurement unit is then processed to identify steps and subsequently, micro-gait characteristics. This method has been tested on a cohort of 19 healthy dogs of various breeds ranging in height from 34.2 cm to 84.9 cm. We report the system as capable of making precise step delineations with detections of initial and final contact times of foot-to-floor to a mean precision of 0.011 s and 0.048 s, respectively. Results are based on analysis of 12,678 foot falls and we report a sensitivity, positive predictive value and F-score of 0.81, 0.83 and 0.82 respectively. To investigate the effect of gait on system performance, the approach was

  13. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Schizophrenia Based on an International Mega-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Cota Navin; Calhoun, Vince D.; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Chen, Jiayu; Patel, Veena; Liu, Jingyu; Segall, Judith; Franke, Barbara; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan; Fisher, Simon E.; Fernandez, Guillen; van Erp, Theo G. M.; Potkin, Steven; Ford, Judith; Mathalon, Daniel; McEwen, Sarah; Lee, Hyo Jong; Mueller, Bryon A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Andreassen, Ole; Agartz, Ingrid; Gollub, Randy L.; Sponheim, Scott R.; Ehrlich, Stefan; Wang, Lei; Pearlson, Godfrey; Glahn, David C.; Sprooten, Emma; Mayer, Andrew R.; Stephen, Julia; Jung, Rex E.; Canive, Jose; Bustillo, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of gray matter concentration (GMC) deficits in patients with schizophrenia (Sz) have identified robust changes throughout the cortex. We assessed the relationships between diagnosis, overall symptom severity, and patterns of gray matter in the largest aggregated structural imaging dataset to date. We performed both source-based morphometry (SBM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses on GMC images from 784 Sz and 936 controls (Ct) across 23 scanning sites in Europe and the United States. After correcting for age, gender, site, and diagnosis by site interactions, SBM analyses showed 9 patterns of diagnostic differences. They comprised separate cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. Seven patterns showed greater GMC in Ct than Sz, while 2 (brainstem and cerebellum) showed greater GMC for Sz. The greatest GMC deficit was in a single pattern comprising regions in the superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal cortex, which replicated over analyses of data subsets. VBM analyses identified overall cortical GMC loss and one small cluster of increased GMC in Sz, which overlapped with the SBM brainstem component. We found no significant association between the component loadings and symptom severity in either analysis. This mega-analysis confirms that the commonly found GMC loss in Sz in the anterior temporal lobe, insula, and medial frontal lobe form a single, consistent spatial pattern even in such a diverse dataset. The separation of GMC loss into robust, repeatable spatial patterns across multiple datasets paves the way for the application of these methods to identify subtle genetic and clinical cohort effects. PMID:25548384

  14. Comparative gait analysis between children with autism and age-matched controls: analysis with temporal-spatial and foot pressure variables.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bee-Oh; O'Sullivan, David; Choi, Bum-Gwon; Kim, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the gait pattern of children with autism by using a gait analysis system. [Subjects] Thirty children were selected for this study: 15 with autism (age, 11.2 ± 2.8 years; weight, 48.1 ± 14.1 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.11 m) and 15 healthy age-matched controls (age, 11.0 ± 2.9 years; weight, 43.6 ± 10 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.011 m). [Methods] All participants walked three times on the GAITRite(®) system while their plantar pressure was being recorded. [Results] The results showed a reduction in cadence, gait velocity, and step length, and an increase in step width in children with autism. Plantar pressure variables highlight the differences between the active pressure areas, especially in the hindfoot of children with autism. [Conclusion] The results suggest that children with autism have an abnormal gait compared with that of age-matched controls, and thus they need extra attention to correct these abnormal gait patterns.

  15. Pendulum test measure correlates with gait parameters in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lotfian, M; Mirbagheri, M M; Kharazi, M R; Dadashi, F; Nourian, R; Irani, A; Mirbagheri, A

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) usually suffer from different impairments including gait impairment and spasticity. Spastic hypertonia is a defining feature of spasticity and manifests as a mechanical abnormality. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between spastic hypertonia and gait impairments in spastic children with CP, addressing an important controversial issue. Spastic hypertonia was quantified using the pendulum test. The gait impairments were evaluated using the motion capture system in a gait laboratory. Our results showed significant correlations among gait parameters; i.e. walking speed, step length, and the pendulum test measures. This indicates that neuromuscular abnormalities are associated with spasticity and may contribute to gait impairments. The clinical implication is that the impaired gait in children with CP may be improved with the treatment of neuromuscular abnormalities.

  16. Modification of spastic gait through mechanical damping.

    PubMed

    Maki, B E; Rosen, M J; Simon, S R

    1985-01-01

    The effect of dissipative mechanical loads on spastic gait has been studied, to evaluate the feasibility of using mechanically damped orthoses to effect functional improvements in the gait of spastic patients. This concept is based on a hypothesis citing uninhibited, velocity-dependent stretch reflexes as a possible causal factor in spastic gait abnormalities, such as equinus and back-kneeing. In order to screen potential experimental subjects and to quantify velocity-dependent reflex behaviour, ankle rotation experiments and filmed gait analysis were performed. The results supported the existence of a velocity threshold. Orthosis simulation experiments were performed with one spastic subject, using a wearable, computer-controlled, electromechanical, below-knee orthosis simulator to apply a variety of damping loads to the ankle as the subject walked. Results indicated that appropriate damping can improve local joint kinematics. The damping causes a reduction in muscle stretch velocity which apparently results in reduced spastic reflex activity.

  17. Abnormal fMRI Activation Pattern during Story Listening in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds Losin, Elizabeth A.; Rivera, Susan M.; O'Hare, Elizabeth D.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.; Pinter, Joseph D.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is characterized by disproportionately severe impairments of speech and language, yet little is known about the neural underpinnings of these deficits. We compared fMRI activation patterns during passive story listening in 9 young adults with Down syndrome and 9 approximately age-matched, typically developing controls. The typically…

  18. Identity Recognition Algorithm Using Improved Gabor Feature Selection of Gait Energy Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, LIANG; Ling-yao, JIA; Dong-cheng, SHI

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an effective gait recognition approach based on Gabor features of gait energy image. In this paper, the kernel Fisher analysis combined with kernel matrix is proposed to select dominant features. The nearest neighbor classifier based on whitened cosine distance is used to discriminate different gait patterns. The approach proposed is tested on the CASIA and USF gait databases. The results show that our approach outperforms other state of gait recognition approaches in terms of recognition accuracy and robustness.

  19. Abnormal serum IgG subclass pattern in children with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Annerén, G; Magnusson, C G; Lilja, G; Nordvall, S L

    1992-01-01

    Susceptibility to infections is a well known feature of Down's syndrome. The possible relation between this predisposition and the serum concentrations of the IgG subclasses was studied in 38 children with Down's syndrome aged 1-12 years. An age matched group of 50 healthy children served as controls. The serum concentrations of IgG1 and IgG3 were significantly raised among children with Down's syndrome in all three age groups studied (that is 1-2.5, 4-8, and 9-12 years). The serum concentrations of IgG2 were normal in the first two groups but significantly reduced in the third age group. In contrast, the concentrations of IgG4 among children with Down's syndrome were significantly reduced in all three age groups. Moreover, among the children with Down's syndrome aged 4-12 years 68% (15/22) had IgG4 concentrations below 2 SDs of the geometrical mean of the controls. The results may partially explain the proneness of children with Down's syndrome to infections with encapsulated bacteria. Although the underlying cause of these abnormalities is unknown, IgG subclass determination seems relevant in the clinical evaluation of children with Down's syndrome. PMID:1534650

  20. Hardware Development and Locomotion Control Strategy for an Over-Ground Gait Trainer: NaTUre-Gaits

    PubMed Central

    Low, Kin Huat; Qu, Xingda; Lim, Hup Boon; Hoon, Kay Hiang

    2014-01-01

    Therapist-assisted body weight supported (TABWS) gait rehabilitation was introduced two decades ago. The benefit of TABWS in functional recovery of walking in spinal cord injury and stroke patients has been demonstrated and reported. However, shortage of therapists, labor-intensiveness, and short duration of training are some limitations of this approach. To overcome these deficiencies, robotic-assisted gait rehabilitation systems have been suggested. These systems have gained attentions from researchers and clinical practitioner in recent years. To achieve the same objective, an over-ground gait rehabilitation system, NaTUre-gaits, was developed at the Nanyang Technological University. The design was based on a clinical approach to provide four main features, which are pelvic motion, body weight support, over-ground walking experience, and lower limb assistance. These features can be achieved by three main modules of NaTUre-gaits: 1) pelvic assistance mechanism, mobile platform, and robotic orthosis. Predefined gait patterns are required for a robotic assisted system to follow. In this paper, the gait pattern planning for NaTUre-gaits was accomplished by an individual-specific gait pattern prediction model. The model generates gait patterns that resemble natural gait patterns of the targeted subjects. The features of NaTUre-gaits have been demonstrated by walking trials with several subjects. The trials have been evaluated by therapists and doctors. The results show that 10-m walking trial with a reduction in manpower. The task-specific repetitive training approach and natural walking gait patterns were also successfully achieved. PMID:27170876

  1. Patterns of ventricular tachyarrhythmias associated with training, deconditioning and retraining in elite athletes without cardiovascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandro; Maron, Barry J; Culasso, Franco; Verdile, Luisa; Fernando, Fredrick; Di Giacinto, Barbara; Di Paolo, Fernando M; Spataro, Antonio; Delise, Pietro; Pelliccia, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias commonly occur in trained athletes during ambulatory Holter electrocardiography and are usually associated with a benign course. Such arrhythmias have been demonstrated to be sensitive to short periods of athletic deconditioning; however, their response to retraining is not known. Twenty-four hour Holter electrocardiographic monitoring was performed at peak training and after 3 to 6 months of deconditioning and was repeated in the present study after 2, 6, and 12 months of retraining in 37 athletes with frequent and complex ventricular tachyarrhythmias and without cardiovascular abnormalities. These subjects showed partial (101 to 500 ventricular premature complexes [VPCs]/24 hours) or marked (<100 VPCs) reversibility of arrhythmias after deconditioning. Retraining initially resulted in a significant increase in arrhythmia frequency compared with deconditioning (from 280 ± 475 to 1,542 ± 2,186 VPCs; p = 0.005), couplets (0.14 ± 0.42 to 4.4 ± 8.2; p = 0.005), and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (from 0 to 0.8 ± 1.8; p = 0.02). Subsequently, a progressive reduction was seen in the frequency of all ventricular arrhythmias during the 1 year of training to well below that at the peak training levels (VPCs 917 ± 1,630, couplets 1.8 ± 4.2, and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia 0.4 ± 1.2). Such annual arrhythmia reduction was significantly greater statistically in those athletes with marked reversibility after deconditioning than in the athletes with partial reversibility (69 ± 139 vs 1,496 ± 1,917 VPCs/24 hours, respectively; p = 0.007). No cardiac events or symptoms occurred during 1 year of follow-up. In conclusion, in elite athletes without cardiovascular disease, a resumption in intense training after deconditioning was associated with variable, but prolonged, suppression of ventricular ectopy. The absence of adverse clinical events or symptoms associated with the resumption of training supports the continued eligibility

  2. Methylation pattern of H19 exon 1 is closely related to preeclampsia and trophoblast abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linshan; Hou, Zheng; Li, Li; Yang, Yanhong; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Beilei; Ren, Mo; Zhao, Dan; Miao, Zhuo; Yu, Lili; Yao, Yuanqing

    2014-09-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-induced disorder characterized by the overproliferation of trophoblasts. Hydatidiform moles, which are associated with a high risk of developing PE, are characterized by the excessive proliferation of trophoblastic tissue. H19 is highly expressed in placental tissue; however, its biological function remains unclear. A fundamental modification of the H19 gene is DNA methylation, which typically occurs in CG-rich regions at the promoter or the first exon region. In this study, in order to investigate the DNA methylation pattern of the H19 exon 1 region in placental tissues and trophoblast cells, placental specimens were collected from women in the first trimester of pregrancy (FTP) and the third trimester of pregnancy (TTP), as well as from from women with severe preeclampsia (sPE). We found that the DNA methylation levels of H19 exon 1 were significantly higher in the tissues obtained from women in TTP than from those obtained from women in FFP. The methylation status of CpG 1 sites within exon 1 of H19 was markedly higher in the placental tissues obtained from women with sPE than in the tissues obtained from women in TTP. In addition, we used the human choriocarcinoma cell line, JEG-3, and treated the cells with the methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza‑Dc). Following treatment with 5-Aza-Dc, the methylation levels at this CpG site showed marked hypomethylation. In addtion, the cell proliferative, migratory and invasive capacities of the cells were remarkably inhibited. Our data suggest that hypermethylation at individual CpG sites within exon 1 of H19 may be involved in the dysfunction of trophoblasts and the pathogenesis of PE.

  3. Effect of the modulation of optic flow speed on gait parameters in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyungwon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effects of modulation of the optic flow speed on gait parameters in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. [Methods] We examined 10 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. The children underwent gait analysis under 3 different conditions of optic flow speed: slow, normal, and fast optic flow speed. The children walked across the walkway of a GAITRite system, while watching a virtual reality screen, and walking velocity, cadence, stride length, step length, single support time, and double support time were recorded. [Results] Compared with the other applied flow speed conditions, the fast optic flow speed (2 times the normal speed) significantly increased walking velocity, cadence, normalized step length, base of support, and single support cycle of both the paretic and non-paretic lower limbs. Moreover, compared with the other applied flow speed conditions, the slow optic flow speed (0.25 times the normal speed) yielded a significantly decreased walking velocity, cadence, normalized step length, base of support, and single support cycle for both the paretic and non-paretic lower limbs. [Conclusion] The gait parameters of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy are altered by modulation of the optic flow speed. Thus, we believe that gait training involving modulation of the optic flow speed is feasible and suitable for resolving abnormal gait patterns in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

  4. The Effect of Body Weight Support Treadmill Training on Gait Recovery, Proximal Lower Limb Motor Pattern, and Balance in Patients with Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yu-Rong; Lo, Wai Leung; Lin, Qiang; Li, Le; Xiao, Xiang; Raghavan, Preeti; Huang, Dong-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Gait performance is an indicator of mobility impairment after stroke. This study evaluated changes in balance, lower extremity motor function, and spatiotemporal gait parameters after receiving body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and conventional overground walking training (CT) in patients with subacute stroke using 3D motion analysis. Setting. Inpatient department of rehabilitation medicine at a university-affiliated hospital. Participants. 24 subjects with unilateral hemiplegia in the subacute stage were randomized to the BWSTT (n = 12) and CT (n = 12) groups. Parameters were compared between the two groups. Data from twelve age matched healthy subjects were recorded as reference. Interventions. Patients received gait training with BWSTT or CT for an average of 30 minutes/day, 5 days/week, for 3 weeks. Main Outcome Measures. Balance was measured by the Brunel balance assessment. Lower extremity motor function was evaluated by the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale. Kinematic data were collected and analyzed using a gait capture system before and after the interventions. Results. Both groups improved on balance and lower extremity motor function measures (P < 0.05), with no significant difference between the two groups after intervention. However, kinematic data were significantly improved (P < 0.05) after BWSTT but not after CT. Maximum hip extension and flexion angles were significantly improved (P < 0.05) for the BWSTT group during the stance and swing phases compared to baseline. Conclusion. In subacute patients with stroke, BWSTT can lead to improved gait quality when compared with conventional gait training. Both methods can improve balance and motor function. PMID:26649295

  5. Gait transitions in simulated reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, Yuri P; Labini, Francesca Sylos; Cappellini, Germana; Macellari, Velio; McIntyre, Joseph; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Gravity has a strong effect on gait and the speed of gait transitions. A gait has been defined as a pattern of locomotion that changes discontinuously at the transition to another gait. On Earth, during gradual speed changes, humans exhibit a sudden discontinuous switch from walking to running at a specific speed. To study the effects of altered gravity on both the stance and swing legs, we developed a novel unloading exoskeleton that allows a person to step in simulated reduced gravity by tilting the body relative to the vertical. Using different simulation techniques, we confirmed that at lower gravity levels the transition speed is slower (in accordance with the previously reported Froude number ∼0.5). Surprisingly, however, we found that at lower levels of simulated gravity the transition between walking and running was generally gradual, without any noticeable abrupt change in gait parameters. This was associated with a significant prolongation of the swing phase, whose duration became virtually equal to that of stance in the vicinity of the walk-run transition speed, and with a gradual shift from inverted-pendulum gait (walking) to bouncing gait (running).

  6. Automated classification of wall motion abnormalities by principal component analysis of endocardial shape motion patterns in echocardiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Johan G.; Nijland, Francisca; Mitchell, Steven C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Kamp, Otto; Sonka, Milan; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2003-05-01

    Principal Component Analysis of sets of temporal shape sequences renders eigenvariations of shape/motion, including typical normal and pathological endocardial contraction patterns. A previously developed Active Appearance Model for time sequences (AAMM) was employed to derive AAMM shape coefficients (ASCs) and we hypothesized these would allow classification of wall motion abnormalities (WMA). A set of stress echocardiograms (single-beat 4-chamber and 2-chamber sequences with expert-verified endocardial contours) of 129 infarct patients was split randomly into training (n=65) and testing (n=64) sets. AAMMs were generated from the training set and for all sequences ASCs were extracted and statistically related to regional/global Visual Wall Motion Scoring (VWMS) and clinical infarct severity and volumetric parameters. Linear regression showed clear correlations between ASCs and VWMS. Infarct severity measures correlated poorly to both ASCs and VWMS. Discriminant analysis showed good prediction from low #ASCs of both segmental (85% correctness) and global WMA (90% correctness). Volumetric parameters correlated poorly to regional VWMS. Conclusions: 1)ASCs show promising accuracy for automated WMA classification. 2)VWMS and endocardial border motion are closely related; with accurate automated border detection, automated WMA classification should be feasible. 3)ASC shape analysis allows contour set evaluation by direct comparison to clinical parameters.

  7. Gait analysis: clinical facts.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard; Esquenazi, Alberto; Benedetti, Maria G; Desloovere, Kaat

    2016-08-01

    Gait analysis is a well-established tool for the quantitative assessment of gait disturbances providing functional diagnosis, assessment for treatment planning, and monitoring of disease progress. There is a large volume of literature on the research use of gait analysis, but evidence on its clinical routine use supports a favorable cost-benefit ratio in a limited number of conditions. Initially gait analysis was introduced to clinical practice to improve the management of children with cerebral palsy. However, there is good evidence to extend its use to patients with various upper motor neuron diseases, and to lower limb amputation. Thereby, the methodology for properly conducting and interpreting the exam is of paramount relevance. Appropriateness of gait analysis prescription and reliability of data obtained are required in the clinical environment. This paper provides an overview on guidelines for managing a clinical gait analysis service and on the principal clinical domains of its application: cerebral palsy, stroke, traumatic brain injury and lower limb amputation.

  8. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  9. Gait analysis methods for rodent models of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Brittany Y; Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Allen, Kyle D

    2014-10-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models.

  10. [A modular method for automated evaluation of gait analysis data].

    PubMed

    Loose, T; Malberg, H; Mikut, R; Dieterle, J; Schablowski, M; Wolf, S; Abel, R; Döderlein, L; Rupp, R

    2002-01-01

    A modular methodology for automated gait data evaluation: The aim of Instrumented Gait Analysis is to measure data such as joint kinematics or kinetics during gait in a quantitative way. The data evaluation for clinical purposes is often performed by experienced physicians (diagnosis of specific motion dysfunction, planning and validation of therapy). Due to subjective evaluation and complexity of the pathologies, there exists no objective, standardized data analysis method for these tasks. This article covers the development of a modular, computer-based methodology to quantify the degree of pathological gait in comparison to normal behavior, as well as to automatically search for interpretable gait abnormalities and to visualize the results. The outcomes are demonstrated with two different patient groups.

  11. Primary and secondary gait deviations of stroke survivors and their association with gait performance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Sik; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Gim, Seon-Young; Kim, Woo-Ram; Tack, Gye-Rae; Lim, Dae-Woon; Chun, Sung-Kuk; Kim, Jin-Wook; Mun, Kyung-Ryoul

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Stroke survivors exhibit abnormal pelvic motion and significantly deteriorated gait performance. Although the gait of stroke survivors has been evaluated at the primary level pertaining to ankle, knee, and hip motions, secondary deviations involving the pelvic motions are strongly related to the primary level. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the kinematic differences of the primary and secondary joints and to identify mechanism differences that alter the gait performance of stroke survivors. [Subjects and Methods] Five healthy subjects and five stroke survivors were recruited. All the subjects were instructed to walk at a self-selected speed. The joint kinematics and gait parameters were calculated. [Results] For the stroke survivors, the range of motion of the primary-joint motions were significantly reduced, and the secondary-joint motions were significantly increased. Additionally, for the healthy subjects, the primary joint kinematics were the main factors ensuring gait performance, whereas for the stoke survivors, the secondary-joint motions were the main factors. [Conclusion] The results indicate that while increasing the range of motion of primary-joint movements is the main target to achieve, there is a strong need to constrain and support pelvic motions in order to improve the outcome of gait rehabilitation. PMID:27799710

  12. Altered vision destabilizes gait in older persons.

    PubMed

    Helbostad, Jorunn L; Vereijken, Beatrix; Hesseberg, Karin; Sletvold, Olav

    2009-08-01

    This study assessed the effects of dim light and four experimentally induced changes in vision on gait speed and footfall and trunk parameters in older persons walking on level ground. Using a quasi-experimental design, gait characteristics were assessed in full light, dim light, and in dim light combined with manipulations resulting in reduced depth vision, double vision, blurred vision, and tunnel vision, respectively. A convenience sample of 24 home-dwelling older women and men (mean age 78.5 years, SD 3.4) with normal vision for their age and able to walk at least 10 m without assistance participated. Outcome measures were gait speed and spatial and temporal parameters of footfall and trunk acceleration, derived from an electronic gait mat and accelerometers. Dim light alone had no effect. Vision manipulations combined with dim light had effect on most footfall parameters but few trunk parameters. The largest effects were found regarding double and tunnel vision. Men increased and women decreased gait speed following manipulations (p=0.017), with gender differences also in stride velocity variability (p=0.017) and inter-stride medio-lateral trunk acceleration variability (p=0.014). Gender effects were related to differences in body height and physical functioning. Results indicate that visual problems lead to a more cautious and unstable gait pattern even under relatively simple conditions. This points to the importance of assessing vision in older persons and correcting visual impairments where possible.

  13. Validation of a Footwear-Based Gait Analysis System With Action-Related Feedback.

    PubMed

    Minto, Simone; Zanotto, Damiano; Boggs, Emily Marie; Rosati, Giulio; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative gait analysis enables clinicians to evaluate patient mobility and to diagnose neuromuscular disorders. The clinical application of gait analysis is currently limited by the high operating costs of gait laboratories. The use of instrumented footwear that performs out of the lab measurements on subjects' walking patterns is a promising way to overcome this limitation. Besides serving as assessment tools, such devices can also act as retraining tools that help regulate a patient's gait with acoustic or vibrotactile stimuli.

  14. Dietary intake, food pattern, and abnormal blood glucose status of middle-aged adults: a cross-sectional community-based study in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Hlaing, Hlaing Hlaing; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan

    2016-01-01

    Background Lifestyle changes, particularly dietary intake, had resulted in increasing trends of type-2 diabetes mellitus worldwide. However, dietary intake is diverse across country contexts. This study aimed to compare the dietary intake, food patterns, and blood glucose among middle-aged adults living in urban and suburban areas in Mandalay city, Myanmar, and explore their relationships. Methods A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted during June–November 2014. Adults aged 35–64 were randomly selected and requested to record all food they ate in a 4-day diary. Fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose values were measured over two consecutive days. Dietary intakes were calculated in terms of energy, macronutrients, glycemic index, and glycemic load, and food patterns were identified by factor analysis. The relationships between food pattern, dietary intake, and blood glucose were assessed. Results Of 440 participants, dietary intake between urban and suburban residents was significantly different. Six food patterns were identified. There was no difference in fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose between urban and suburban residents, but a strong correlation between fasting blood glucose and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose was found (correlation coefficient=0.8). Identification of abnormal blood glucose status using original fasting and converted 2-hour postprandial values showed substantial agreement (prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted Kappa=0.8). Relationships between food patterns and blood glucose or abnormal blood glucose status were not found. Conclusion Food patterns were associated with dietary intake, not with abnormal blood glucose status. Two-hour postprandial blood glucose was highly correlated with fasting blood glucose and may be used for identifying abnormal blood glucose status. PMID:27150795

  15. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  16. Biofeedback for robotic gait rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Lünenburger, Lars; Colombo, Gery; Riener, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Background Development and increasing acceptance of rehabilitation robots as well as advances in technology allow new forms of therapy for patients with neurological disorders. Robot-assisted gait therapy can increase the training duration and the intensity for the patients while reducing the physical strain for the therapist. Optimal training effects during gait therapy generally depend on appropriate feedback about performance. Compared to manual treadmill therapy, there is a loss of physical interaction between therapist and patient with robotic gait retraining. Thus, it is difficult for the therapist to assess the necessary feedback and instructions. The aim of this study was to define a biofeedback system for a gait training robot and test its usability in subjects without neurological disorders. Methods To provide an overview of biofeedback and motivation methods applied in gait rehabilitation, previous publications and results from our own research are reviewed. A biofeedback method is presented showing how a rehabilitation robot can assess the patients' performance and deliver augmented feedback. For validation, three subjects without neurological disorders walked in a rehabilitation robot for treadmill training. Several training parameters, such as body weight support and treadmill speed, were varied to assess the robustness of the biofeedback calculation to confounding factors. Results The biofeedback values correlated well with the different activity levels of the subjects. Changes in body weight support and treadmill velocity had a minor effect on the biofeedback values. The synchronization of the robot and the treadmill affected the biofeedback values describing the stance phase. Conclusion Robot-aided assessment and feedback can extend and improve robot-aided training devices. The presented method estimates the patients' gait performance with the use of the robot's existing sensors, and displays the resulting biofeedback values to the patients and

  17. Gait Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Complete motion analysis laboratory has evolved out of analyzing walking patterns of crippled children at Stanford Children's Hospital. Data is collected by placing tiny electrical sensors over muscle groups of child's legs and inserting step-sensing switches in soles of shoes. Miniature radio transmitters send signals to receiver for continuous recording of abnormal walking pattern. Engineers are working to apply space electronics miniaturization techniques to reduce size and weight of telemetry system further as well as striving to increase signal bandwidth so analysis can be performed faster and more accurately using a mini-computer.

  18. Overground robot assisted gait trainer for the treatment of drug-resistant freezing of gait in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Pilleri, Manuela; Weis, Luca; Zabeo, Letizia; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Biundo, Roberta; Facchini, Silvia; Rossi, Simonetta; Masiero, Stefano; Antonini, Angelo

    2015-08-15

    Freezing of Gait (FOG) is a frequent and disabling feature of Parkinson disease (PD). Gait rehabilitation assisted by electromechanical devices, such as training on treadmill associated with sensory cues or assisted by gait orthosis have been shown to improve FOG. Overground robot assisted gait training (RGT) has been recently tested in patients with PD with improvement of several gait parameters. We here evaluated the effectiveness of RGT on FOG severity and gait abnormalities in PD patients. Eighteen patients with FOG resistant to dopaminergic medications were treated with 15 sessions of RGT and underwent an extensive clinical evaluation before and after treatment. The main outcome measures were FOG questionnaire (FOGQ) global score and specific tasks for gait assessment, namely 10 meter walking test (10 MWT), Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and 360° narrow turns (360 NT). Balance was also evaluated through Fear of Falling Efficacy Scale (FFES), assessing self perceived stability and Berg Balance Scale (BBS), for objective examination. After treatment, FOGQ score was significantly reduced (P=0.023). We also found a significant reduction of time needed to complete TUG, 10 MWT, and 360 NT (P=0.009, 0.004 and 0.04, respectively). By contrast the number of steps and the number of freezing episodes recorded at each gait task did not change. FFES and BBS scores also improved, with positive repercussions on performance on daily activity and quality of life. Our results indicate that RGT is a useful strategy for the treatment of drug refractory FOG.

  19. [Antibiotics and gait disorders].

    PubMed

    Gomez-Porro, P; Vinagre-Aragon, A; Zabala-Goiburu, J A

    2016-12-01

    The neurological toxicity of many antibiotics has been reported in a number of articles and clinical notes. In this review antibiotics are classified according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that can give rise to a gait disorder, taking both clinical and experimental data into account. An exhaustive search was conducted in Google Scholar and PubMed with the aim of finding reviews, articles and clinical cases dealing with gait disorders secondary to different antibiotics. The different antibiotics were separated according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that could cause them to trigger a gait disorder. They were classified into antibiotics capable of producing cerebellar ataxia, vestibular ataxia, sensitive ataxia or an extrapyramidal gait disorder. The main aim was to group all the drugs that can give rise to a gait disorder, in order to facilitate the clinical suspicion and, consequently, the management of patients.

  20. Recognition using gait.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William

    2007-09-01

    Gait or an individual's manner of walking, is one approach for recognizing people at a distance. Studies in psychophysics and medicine indicate that humans can recognize people by their gait and have found twenty-four different components to gait that taken together make it a unique signature. Besides not requiring close sensor contact, gait also does not necessarily require a cooperative subject. Using video data of people walking in different scenarios and environmental conditions we develop and test an algorithm that uses shape and motion to identify people from their gait. The algorithm uses dynamic time warping to match stored templates against an unknown sequence of silhouettes extracted from a person walking. While results under similar constraints and conditions are very good, the algorithm quickly degrades with varying conditions such as surface and clothing.

  1. Summary measures for clinical gait analysis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela

    2014-04-01

    Instrumented 3D-gait analysis (3D-GA) is an important method used to obtain information that is crucial for establishing the level of functional limitation due to pathology, observing its evolution over time and evaluating rehabilitative intervention effects. However, a typical 3D-GA evaluation produces a vast amount of data, and despite its objectivity, its use is complicated, and the data interpretation is difficult. It is even more difficult to obtain an overview on patient cohorts for a comparison. Moreover, there is a growing awareness of the need for a concise index, specifically, a single measure of the 'quality' of a particular gait pattern. Several gait summary measures, which have been used in conjunction with 3D-GA, have been proposed to objectify clinical impression, quantify the degree of gait deviation from normal, stratify the severity of pathology, document the changes in gait patterns over time and evaluate interventions.

  2. Classification of gait kinematics of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed subjects using principal component analysis and regressions modelling.

    PubMed

    Leporace, Gustavo; Batista, Luiz Alberto; Muniz, Adriane M; Zeitoune, Gabriel; Luciano, Thiago; Metsavaht, Leonardo; Nadal, Jurandir

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the knee kinematics of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) and healthy subjects (CG) during gait and classify the status of normality. Ten healthy and six ACL-R subjects had their gait analyzed at 60 fps. 3D knee angles were calculated and inserted into three separate matrices used to perform the principal component (PC) analysis. The scores of PCs retained in each analysis were used to calculate the standard distances (SD) of each participant in relation to the center of the CG. The PC scores of the three planes were used in a logistic regression to define normality. In the sagittal plane there was no difference between groups. In the frontal and transverse planes ACL-R subjects showed higher SD values than CG. PCs identified that ACL-R subjects showed increased adduction, internal and external rotation. All these subjects had their gait classified as abnormal by logistic regression. Therefore, in the studied ACL-R subjects the gait pattern did not return to normal levels after surgery. This may lead to degenerative injuries, as osteoarthritis, in the future.

  3. The relationship between clinical measurements and gait analysis data in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Domagalska, Małgorzata; Szopa, Andrzej; Syczewska, Małgorzata; Pietraszek, Stanisław; Kidoń, Zenon; Onik, Grzegorz

    2013-09-01

    Spasticity is a common impairment that interferes with motor function (particularly gait pattern) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Gait analysis and clinical measurements are equally important in evaluating and treating gait disorders in children with CP. This study aimed to explore the relationship between the spasticity of lower extremity muscles and deviations from the normal gait pattern in children with CP. Thirty-six children with spastic CP (18 with spastic hemiplegia [HS] and 18 with spastic diplegia [DS]), ranging in age from 7 to 12 years, participated in the study. The children were classified as level I (n=24) or level II (n=12) according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System. Spasticity levels were evaluated with the Dynamic Evaluation of Range of Motion (DAROM) using the accelerometer-based system, and gait patterns were evaluated with a three dimensional gait analysis using the Zebris system (Isny, Germany). The Gillette Gait Index (GGI) was calculated from the gait data. The results show that gait pathology in children with CP does not depend on the static and dynamic contractures of hip and knee flexors. Although significant correlations were observed for a few clinical measures with the gait data (GGI), the correlation coefficients were low. Only the spasticity of rectus femoris showed a fair to moderate correlation with GGI. In conclusion, the results indicate the independence of the clinical evaluation and gait pattern and support the view that both factors provide important information about the functional problems of children with CP.

  4. Patterns of Gray Matter Abnormalities in Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: A Meta-Analysis of Voxel-Based Morphology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hongwu; He, Xiaoming; Li, Feng; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Bingsheng

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to identify the consistent regions of gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), and to study the difference of GMV abnormalities among IGE subsyndromes by applying activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis. Methods A systematic review of VBM studies on GMV of patients with absence epilepsy (AE), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), IGE and controls indexed in PubMed and ScienceDirect from January 1999 to June 2016 was conducted. A total of 12 IGE studies, including 7 JME and 3 AE studies, were selected. Meta-analysis was performed on these studies by using the pooled and within-subtypes analysis (www.brainmap.org). Based on the above results, between-subtypes contrast analysis was carried out to detect the abnormal GMV regions common in and unique to each subtype as well. Results IGE demonstrated significant GMV increase in right ventral lateral nucleus (VL) and right medial frontal gyrus, and significant GMV decrease in bilateral pulvinar. For JME, significant GMV increase was seen in right medial frontal gyrus, right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), while significant GMV decrease was found in right pulvinar. In AE, the most significant GMV increase was found in right VL, and slight GMV reduction was seen in right medial dorsal nucleus, right subcallosal gyrus, left caudate and left precuneus. No overlapped and unique regions with significant GMV abnormalities were found between JME and AE. Significance This meta-analysis demonstrated that thalamo-frontal network was a structure with significant GMV abnormality in IGE, and the IGE subsyndromes showed different GMV abnormal regions. These observations may provide instructions on the clinical diagnosis of IGE. PMID:28060866

  5. DMRT3 is associated with gait type in Mangalarga Marchador horses, but does not control gait ability.

    PubMed

    Patterson, L; Staiger, E A; Brooks, S A

    2015-04-01

    The Mangalarga Marchador (MM) is a Brazilian horse breed known for a uniquely smooth gait. A recent publication described a mutation in the DMRT3 gene that the authors claim controls the ability to perform lateral patterned gaits (Andersson et al. 2012). We tested 81 MM samples for the DMRT3 mutation using extracted DNA from hair bulbs using a novel RFLP. Horses were phenotypically categorized by their gait type (batida or picada), as recorded by the Brazilian Mangalarga Marchador Breeders Association (ABCCMM). Statistical analysis using the plink toolset (Purcell, 2007) revealed significant association between gait type and the DMRT3 mutation (P = 2.3e-22). Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium suggests that selective pressure for gait type is altering allele frequencies in this breed (P = 1.00e-5). These results indicate that this polymorphism may be useful for genotype-assisted selection for gait type within this breed. As both batida and picada MM horses can perform lateral gaits, the DMRT3 mutation is not the only locus responsible for the lateral gait pattern.

  6. Wearable Device-Based Gait Recognition Using Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Images and a Convolutional Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongjia; Zhou, Suiping

    2017-01-01

    The widespread installation of inertial sensors in smartphones and other wearable devices provides a valuable opportunity to identify people by analyzing their gait patterns, for either cooperative or non-cooperative circumstances. However, it is still a challenging task to reliably extract discriminative features for gait recognition with noisy and complex data sequences collected from casually worn wearable devices like smartphones. To cope with this problem, we propose a novel image-based gait recognition approach using the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) without the need to manually extract discriminative features. The CNN’s input image, which is encoded straightforwardly from the inertial sensor data sequences, is called Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Image (AE-GDI). AE-GDI is a new two-dimensional representation of gait dynamics, which is invariant to rotation and translation. The performance of the proposed approach in gait authentication and gait labeling is evaluated using two datasets: (1) the McGill University dataset, which is collected under realistic conditions; and (2) the Osaka University dataset with the largest number of subjects. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves competitive recognition accuracy over existing approaches and provides an effective parametric solution for identification among a large number of subjects by gait patterns. PMID:28264503

  7. Objective Biomarkers of Balance and Gait for Parkinson’s Disease using Body-worn Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Horak, Fay B; Mancini, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Balance and gait impairments characterize progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD), predict fall risk, and are important contributors to reduced quality of life. Advances in technology of small, body-worn inertial sensors have made it possible to develop quick, objective measures of balance and gait impairments in the clinic for research trials and clinical practice. Objective balance and gait metrics may eventually provide useful biomarkers for PD. In fact, objective balance and gait measures are already being used as surrogate end-points for demonstrating clinical efficacy of new treatments, in place of counting falls from diaries, using stop-watch measures of gait speed, or clinical balance rating scales. This review summarizes the types of objective measures available from body-worn sensors. We organize the metrics based on the neural control system for mobility affected by PD: postural stability in stance, postural responses, gait initiation, gait (temporal-spatial lower and upper body coordination and dynamic equilibrium), postural transitions, and freezing of gait. However, the explosion of metrics derived by wearable sensors during prescribed balance and gait tasks that are abnormal in people with PD do not yet qualify as behavioral biomarkers because many balance and gait impairments observed in PD are not specific to the disease, nor shown to be related to specific pathophysiologic biomarkers. In the future, the most useful balance and gait biomarkers for PD will be those that are sensitive and specific for early PD and related to the underlying disease process. PMID:24132842

  8. Objective biomarkers of balance and gait for Parkinson's disease using body-worn sensors.

    PubMed

    Horak, Fay B; Mancini, Martina

    2013-09-15

    Balance and gait impairments characterize the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD), predict the risk of falling, and are important contributors to reduced quality of life. Advances in technology of small, body-worn, inertial sensors have made it possible to develop quick, objective measures of balance and gait impairments in the clinic for research trials and clinical practice. Objective balance and gait metrics may eventually provide useful biomarkers for PD. In fact, objective balance and gait measures are already being used as surrogate endpoints for demonstrating clinical efficacy of new treatments, in place of counting falls from diaries, using stop-watch measures of gait speed, or clinical balance rating scales. This review summarizes the types of objective measures available from body-worn sensors. The metrics are organized based on the neural control system for mobility affected by PD: postural stability in stance, postural responses, gait initiation, gait (temporal-spatial lower and upper body coordination and dynamic equilibrium), postural transitions, and freezing of gait. However, the explosion of metrics derived by wearable sensors during prescribed balance and gait tasks, which are abnormal in individuals with PD, do not yet qualify as behavioral biomarkers, because many balance and gait impairments observed in PD are not specific to the disease, nor have they been related to specific pathophysiologic biomarkers. In the future, the most useful balance and gait biomarkers for PD will be those that are sensitive and specific for early PD and are related to the underlying disease process.

  9. Stepping strategies for regulating gait adaptability and stability.

    PubMed

    Hak, Laura; Houdijk, Han; Steenbrink, Frans; Mert, Agali; van der Wurff, Peter; Beek, Peter J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-03-15

    Besides a stable gait pattern, gait in daily life requires the capability to adapt this pattern in response to environmental conditions. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the anticipatory strategies used by able-bodied people to attain an adaptive gait pattern, and how these strategies interact with strategies used to maintain gait stability. Ten healthy subjects walked in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation ENvironment (CAREN). To provoke an adaptive gait pattern, subjects had to hit virtual targets, with markers guided by their knees, while walking on a self-paced treadmill. The effects of walking with and without this task on walking speed, step length, step frequency, step width and the margins of stability (MoS) were assessed. Furthermore, these trials were performed with and without additional continuous ML platform translations. When an adaptive gait pattern was required, subjects decreased step length (p<0.01), tended to increase step width (p=0.074), and decreased walking speed while maintaining similar step frequency compared to unconstrained walking. These adaptations resulted in the preservation of equal MoS between trials, despite the disturbing influence of the gait adaptability task. When the gait adaptability task was combined with the balance perturbation subjects further decreased step length, as evidenced by a significant interaction between both manipulations (p=0.012). In conclusion, able-bodied people reduce step length and increase step width during walking conditions requiring a high level of both stability and adaptability. Although an increase in step frequency has previously been found to enhance stability, a faster movement, which would coincide with a higher step frequency, hampers accuracy and may consequently limit gait adaptability.

  10. Impaired gait pattern as a sensitive tool to assess hypoxic brain damage in a novel mouse model of atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lynn; Van Dam, Debby; Van der Donckt, Carole; Schrijvers, Dorien M; Lemmens, Katrien; Van Brussel, Ilse; De Deyn, Peter P; Martinet, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R Y

    2015-02-01

    Apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice with a heterozygous mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene (Fbn1(C1039G+/-)) show spontaneous atherosclerotic plaque ruptures, disturbances in cerebral flow and sudden death when fed a Western-type diet (WD). The present study focused on motor coordination and spatial learning of ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on WD for 20 weeks (n=21). ApoE(-/-) mice on WD (n=24) and ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on normal diet (ND, n=21) served as controls. Starting from 10 weeks of diet, coordination was assessed every two weeks by the following tests: gait analysis, stationary beam, wire suspension and accelerating rotarod. The Morris water maze test was performed after 13 weeks of diet to study spatial learning. At the end of the experiment (20 weeks of WD), the mice were sacrificed and the brachiocephalic artery and brain were isolated. From 12 weeks onward, gait analysis of ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on WD revealed a progressive increase in track width as compared to ApoE(-/-) mice on WD and ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on ND (at 20 weeks: 29.8±0.6 mm vs. 25.8±0.4 mm and 26.0±0.5 mm). Moreover, the stationary beam test showed a decrease in motor coordination of ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on WD at 18 and 20 weeks. The wire suspension test and accelerating rotarod could not detect signs of motor impairment. Spatial learning was also not affected. Histological analysis of the brachiocephalic artery showed larger and more stenotic plaques in ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on WD. Furthermore, the parietal cortex of ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on WD showed pyknotic nuclei as a sign of hypoxia and the percentage of pyknosis correlated with track width. In conclusion, gait analysis may be an efficient method for analyzing hypoxic brain damage in the ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mouse model. This test could be of value to assess the effect of potential anti-atherosclerotic therapies in mice.

  11. Toward Pervasive Gait Analysis With Wearable Sensors: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Lach, John; Lo, Benny; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-11-01

    After decades of evolution, measuring instruments for quantitative gait analysis have become an important clinical tool for assessing pathologies manifested by gait abnormalities. However, such instruments tend to be expensive and require expert operation and maintenance besides their high cost, thus limiting them to only a small number of specialized centers. Consequently, gait analysis in most clinics today still relies on observation-based assessment. Recent advances in wearable sensors, especially inertial body sensors, have opened up a promising future for gait analysis. Not only can these sensors be more easily adopted in clinical diagnosis and treatment procedures than their current counterparts, but they can also monitor gait continuously outside clinics - hence providing seamless patient analysis from clinics to free-living environments. The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of current techniques for quantitative gait analysis and to propose key metrics for evaluating both existing and emerging methods for qualifying the gait features extracted from wearable sensors. It aims to highlight key advances in this rapidly evolving research field and outline potential future directions for both research and clinical applications.

  12. Gait or Walking Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... a device is justified,” says Dr. Aisen. Gait Research & Technology At present, people with walking limitations related to ... independent through physical therapy, exercise, medication, and assistive ... is optimistic that research being done in other conditions, such as spinal ...

  13. Importance of Gait Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... that the prosthetist and therapist remain in close communication when gait train- ing is occurring since any ... of these strategies to get the best outcome. Communication and teamwork between prosthetists and physical thera- pists ...

  14. Symmetrical gait descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunajewski, Adam; Dusza, Jacek J.; Rosado Muñoz, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    The article presents a proposal for the description of human gait as a periodic and symmetric process. Firstly, the data for researches was obtained in the Laboratory of Group SATI in the School of Engineering of University of Valencia. Then, the periodical model - Mean Double Step (MDS) was made. Finally, on the basis of MDS, the symmetrical models - Left Mean Double Step and Right Mean Double Step (LMDS and RMDS) could be created. The method of various functional extensions was used. Symmetrical gait models can be used to calculate the coefficients of asymmetry at any time or phase of the gait. In this way it is possible to create asymmetry, function which better describes human gait dysfunction. The paper also describes an algorithm for calculating symmetric models, and shows exemplary results based on the experimental data.

  15. Gait Analysis Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications. PMID:22438763

  16. Gait analysis using wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications.

  17. Assessment of gait after bilateral hip replacement. Case study.

    PubMed

    Winiarski, Sławomir; Aleksandrowicz, Krzysztof; Jarząb, Sławomir; Pozowski, Andrzej; Rutkowska-Kucharska, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective methods of treatment of severe hip osteoarthritis (HOA). In many cases pathological gait patterns persist despite properly conducted surgery and disturb the normal wear of the artificial joint surfaces. The aim of the study was to conduct functional and biomechanical assessment of gait in a patient after bilateral THA due to severe degenerative changes in the hip. The assessment focused on the gait parameters which significantly deviate from a normal gait pattern at various stages of treatment. Physiotherapeutic assessment of the patient included measurements of the range of motion in lower limb joints, the Timed Up and Go test, and pain assessment. Biomechanical assessment involved measurements of spatiotemporal gait parameters and the dynamic range of motion using BTS Smart-E motion analysis system. Although clinical examinations after both the first and second procedure suggested recovery of the patient's physical function, biomechanical assessment of her gait after the second procedure indicated the presence of deviations from a normal gait pattern. Secondary to a limited range of internal/external hip rotation, extension, and abduction, corresponding indices were still in the pathological range.

  18. Managing gait disorders in older persons residing in nursing homes: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Canavan, Paul K; Cahalin, Lawrence P; Lowe, Susan; Fitzpatrick, Diane; Harris, Meredith; Plummer-D'Amato, Prudence

    2009-05-01

    Managing gait disorders in the nursing home setting is a challenge. Nursing home residents can present with a variety of factors that may contribute to the presentation of gait abnormalities. The development of an individualized intervention program can be effective in improving a resident's ability to ambulate. This article reviews the research pertaining to the management of gait disorders including deconditioning, therapeutic exercise intervention, dementia, and cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary systems. The review provides the reader with strategies to help improve and understand gait performance in older persons residing in nursing homes.

  19. Abnormal fatty acid pattern in the superior temporal gyrus distinguishes bipolar disorder from major depression and schizophrenia and resembles multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Rider, Therese; Jandacek, Ronald; Tso, Patrick

    2014-03-30

    This study investigated the fatty acid composition of the postmortem superior temporal gyrus (STG), a cortical region implicated in emotional processing, from normal controls (n=15) and patients with bipolar disorder (BD, n=15), major depressive disorder (MDD, n=15), and schizophrenia (SZ, n=15). For comparative purposes, STG fatty acid composition was determined in a separate cohort of multiple sclerosis patients (MS, n=15) and normal controls (n=15). Compared with controls, patients with BD, but not MDD or SZ, exhibited abnormal elevations in the saturated fatty acids (SFA) palmitic acid (16:0), stearic acid (18:0), the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) linoleic acid (18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), and reductions in the monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) oleic acid (18:1n-9). The total MUFA/SFA and 18:1/18:0 ratios were lower in the STG of BD patients and were inversely correlated with total PUFA composition. MS patients exhibited a pattern of fatty acid abnormalities similar to that observed in BD patients including elevated PUFA and a lower 18:1/18:0 ratio. Collectively, these data demonstrate that BD patients exhibit a pattern of fatty acid abnormalities in the STG that is not observed in MDD and SZ patients and closely resembles MS patients.

  20. View Invariant Gait Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, Richard D.; Goffredo, Michela; Carter, John N.; Nixon, Mark S.

    Recognition by gait is of particular interest since it is the biometric that is available at the lowest resolution, or when other biometrics are (intentionally) obscured. Gait as a biometric has now shown increasing recognition capability. There are many approaches and these show that recognition can achieve excellent performance on current large databases. The majority of these approaches are planar 2D, largely since the early large databases featured subjects walking in a plane normal to the camera view. To extend deployment capability, we need viewpoint invariant gait biometrics. We describe approaches where viewpoint invariance is achieved by 3D approaches or in 2D. In the first group, the identification relies on parameters extracted from the 3D body deformation during walking. These methods use several video cameras and the 3D reconstruction is achieved after a camera calibration process. On the other hand, the 2D gait biometric approaches use a single camera, usually positioned perpendicular to the subject’s walking direction. Because in real surveillance scenarios a system that operates in an unconstrained environment is necessary, many of the recent gait analysis approaches are orientated toward view-invariant gait recognition.

  1. Climbing favours the tripod gait over alternative faster insect gaits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdya, Pavan; Thandiackal, Robin; Cherney, Raphael; Asselborn, Thibault; Benton, Richard; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Floreano, Dario

    2017-02-01

    To escape danger or catch prey, running vertebrates rely on dynamic gaits with minimal ground contact. By contrast, most insects use a tripod gait that maintains at least three legs on the ground at any given time. One prevailing hypothesis for this difference in fast locomotor strategies is that tripod locomotion allows insects to rapidly navigate three-dimensional terrain. To test this, we computationally discovered fast locomotor gaits for a model based on Drosophila melanogaster. Indeed, the tripod gait emerges to the exclusion of many other possible gaits when optimizing fast upward climbing with leg adhesion. By contrast, novel two-legged bipod gaits are fastest on flat terrain without adhesion in the model and in a hexapod robot. Intriguingly, when adhesive leg structures in real Drosophila are covered, animals exhibit atypical bipod-like leg coordination. We propose that the requirement to climb vertical terrain may drive the prevalence of the tripod gait over faster alternative gaits with minimal ground contact.

  2. Gait Strategy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type: A Kinematic and Kinetic Evaluation Using 3D Gait Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the gait patterns of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT) hypermobility type, using Gait Analysis. We quantified the gait strategy in 12 JHS/EDS-HT adults individuals (age: 43.08 + 6.78 years) compared to 20 healthy controls (age: 37.23 plus or minus 8.91 years), in…

  3. The effects of ankle-foot orthoses on the ankle and knee in persons with myelomeningocele: an evaluation using three-dimensional gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomson, J D; Ounpuu, S; Davis, R B; DeLuca, P A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) on gait patterns in patients with low-level myelomeningocele and to identify any abnormal gait patterns that may lead to future knee instability and pain. A total of 28 children (26 L4-level sides, 18 L5-level sides, and 10 S1-2-level sides) underwent a three-dimensional gait analysis when ambulating barefoot and with AFOs. Results show significant improvements in sagittal plane function with reductions in excessive ankle dorsiflexion, increases in peak plantar flexor moment, and reductions in crouch and knee extensor moment in the L4 and L5 groups. The only improvement in the S1-2 group was a reduction in excessive dorsiflexion, but there was a reduction in power generation at the ankle. The S1-2 group had normal transverse plane knee motion in stance during barefoot walking that increased significantly (p < 0.01) with the AFO. Both the L5 and L4 groups showed greater-than-normal transverse plane knee motion in stance during barefoot walking that also increased significantly (p < 0.01) with the AFO. The results suggest that excessive knee transverse plane rotation may contribute to knee instability more than coronal plane abnormalities. The AFO in S1-2-level patients may be more detrimental for the knee than barefoot walking.

  4. A reinforcement learning approach to gait training improves retention

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Christopher J.; Manczurowsky, Julia; Yen, Sheng-Che

    2015-01-01

    Many gait training programs are based on supervised learning principles: an individual is guided towards a desired gait pattern with directional error feedback. While this results in rapid adaptation, improvements quickly disappear. This study tested the hypothesis that a reinforcement learning approach improves retention and transfer of a new gait pattern. The results of a pilot study and larger experiment are presented. Healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either a supervised group, who received explicit instructions and directional error feedback while they learned a new gait pattern on a treadmill, or a reinforcement group, who was only shown whether they were close to or far from the desired gait. Subjects practiced for 10 min, followed by immediate and overnight retention and over-ground transfer tests. The pilot study showed that subjects could learn a new gait pattern under a reinforcement learning paradigm. The larger experiment, which had twice as many subjects (16 in each group) showed that the reinforcement group had better overnight retention than the supervised group (a 32% vs. 120% error increase, respectively), but there were no differences for over-ground transfer. These results suggest that encouraging participants to find rewarding actions through self-guided exploration is beneficial for retention. PMID:26379524

  5. A reinforcement learning approach to gait training improves retention.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Christopher J; Manczurowsky, Julia; Yen, Sheng-Che

    2015-01-01

    Many gait training programs are based on supervised learning principles: an individual is guided towards a desired gait pattern with directional error feedback. While this results in rapid adaptation, improvements quickly disappear. This study tested the hypothesis that a reinforcement learning approach improves retention and transfer of a new gait pattern. The results of a pilot study and larger experiment are presented. Healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either a supervised group, who received explicit instructions and directional error feedback while they learned a new gait pattern on a treadmill, or a reinforcement group, who was only shown whether they were close to or far from the desired gait. Subjects practiced for 10 min, followed by immediate and overnight retention and over-ground transfer tests. The pilot study showed that subjects could learn a new gait pattern under a reinforcement learning paradigm. The larger experiment, which had twice as many subjects (16 in each group) showed that the reinforcement group had better overnight retention than the supervised group (a 32% vs. 120% error increase, respectively), but there were no differences for over-ground transfer. These results suggest that encouraging participants to find rewarding actions through self-guided exploration is beneficial for retention.

  6. Neurological and cognitive abnormalities associated with chronic petrol sniffing.

    PubMed

    Maruff, P; Burns, C B; Tyler, P; Currie, B J; Currie, J

    1998-10-01

    Substance abuse through the deliberate inhalation of petrol (petrol sniffing or gasoline sniffing) is prevalent in inner-urban and remote rural communities. Although acute toxic encephalopathy is a well-documented consequence of petrol sniffing, the neurological and cognitive effects of chronic petrol sniffing are unknown. A structured neurological examination and the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were used to assess neurological and cognitive function in 33 current-sniffers (individuals who had sniffed petrol for >6 months), 30 ex-sniffers (individuals who had sniffed petrol in the past but had abstained for 6 months) and 34 matched non-sniffers (individuals who had never sniffed petrol). No subject was, or had been, encephalopathic from petrol sniffing and all were residing in their community. Blood lead and hydrocarbon levels and information about petrol sniffing behaviour were obtained from each subject. When compared with non-sniffers, current-sniffers showed higher rates of abnormal tandem gait, rapid alternating hand movements, finger to nose movements, postural tremor, bilateral palmomental reflexes and brisk deep reflexes. Cognitive deficits occurred in the areas of visual attention, visual recognition memory and visual paired associate learning. Ex-petrol sniffers showed higher rates of abnormal tandem gait and bilateral palmomental reflexes and cognitive deficits in the areas of visual recognition memory and pattern-location paired associate learning. Blood lead levels and length of time of petrol sniffing correlated significantly with the magnitude of neurological and cognitive deficits. Blood hydrocarbon levels were not related to neurocognitive deficits, although this may have been due to methodological difficulties in obtaining hydrocarbon levels. These results suggest that subtle neurological and cognitive abnormalities do occur in individuals who abuse petrol but who do not have acute toxic encephalopathy and that the

  7. Analysis of Parallel and Transverse Visual Cues on the Gait of Individuals with Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Melo Roiz, Roberta; Azevedo Cacho, Enio Walker; Cliquet, Alberto, Jr.; Barasnevicius Quagliato, Elizabeth Maria Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) has been defined as a chronic progressive neurological disorder with characteristics that generate changes in gait pattern. Several studies have reported that appropriate external influences, such as visual or auditory cues may improve the gait pattern of patients with IPD. Therefore, the objective of this…

  8. The influence of focal cerebellar lesions on the control and adaptation of gait.

    PubMed

    Ilg, W; Giese, M A; Gizewski, E R; Schoch, B; Timmann, D

    2008-11-01

    Cerebellar ataxic gait is influenced greatly by balance disorders, most likely caused by lesions of the medial zone of the cerebellum. The contributions of the intermediate and lateral zone to the control of limb dynamics for gait and the adaptation of locomotor patterns are less well understood. In this study, we analysed locomotion and goal-directed leg movements in 12 patients with chronic focal lesions after resection of benign cerebellar tumours. The extent of the cortical lesion and possible involvement of the cerebellar nuclei was determined by 3D-MR imaging. The subjects (age range 13-39 years, mean 20.3; seven female; ICARS score: mean 5.7, SD 6.3) performed three tasks: goal-directed leg placement, walking and walking with additional weights on the shanks. Based on the performance on the first two tasks, patients were categorized as impaired or unimpaired for leg placement and for dynamic balance control in gait. The subgroup with impaired leg placement but not the subgroup with impaired balance showed abnormalities in the adaptation of locomotion to additional loads. A detailed analysis revealed specific abnormalities in the temporal aspects of intra-limb coordination for leg placement and adaptive locomotion. These findings indicate that common neural substrates could be responsible for intra-limb coordination in both tasks. Lesion-based MRI subtraction analysis revealed that the interposed and the adjacent dentate nuclei were more frequently affected in patients with impaired compared to unimpaired leg placement, whereas the fastigial nuclei (and to a lesser degree the interposed nuclei) were more frequently affected in patients with impaired compared with unimpaired dynamic balance control. The intermediate zone appears thus to be of particular importance for multi-joint limb control in both goal-directed leg movements and in locomotion. For locomotion, our results indicate an influence of the intermediate zone on dynamic balance control as well as on

  9. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  10. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  11. Gait analysis and cerebral volumes in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rigoldi, C; Galli, M; Condoluci, C; Carducci, F; Onorati, P; Albertini, G

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look for a relationship between cerebral volumes computed using a voxel-based morphometry algorithm and walking patterns in individuals with Down's syndrome (DS), in order to investigate the origin of the motor problems in these subjects with a view to developing appropriate rehabilitation programmes. Nine children with DS underwent a gait analysis (GA) protocol that used a 3D motion analysis system, force plates and a video system, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Analysis of GA graphs allowed a series of parameters to be defined and computed in order to quantify gait patterns. By combining some of the parameters it was possible to obtain a 3D description of gait in terms of distance from normal values. Finally, the results of cerebral volume analysis were compared with the gait patterns found. A strong relationship emerged between cerebellar vermis volume reduction and quality of gait and also between grey matter volume reduction of some cerebral areas and asymmetrical gait. An evaluation of high-level motor deficits, reflected in a lack or partial lack of proximal functions, is important in order to define a correct rehabilitation programme.

  12. Muscle contracture emulating system for studying artificially induced pathological gait in intact individuals.

    PubMed

    Olensek, Andrej; Matjacic, Zlatko; Bajd, Tadej

    2005-11-01

    When studying pathological gait it is important to correctly identify primary gait anomalies originating from damage to the central nervous and musculoskeletal system and separate them from compensatory changes of gait pattern, which is often challenging due to the lack of knowledge related to biomechanics of pathological gait. A mechanical system consisting of specially designed trousers, special shoe arrangement, and elastic ropes attached to selected locations on the trousers and shoes is proposed to allow emulation of muscle contractures of soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscles and both SOL-GAS. The main objective of this study was to evaluate and compare gait variability as recorded in normal gait and when being constrained with the proposed system. Six neurologically and orthopedically intact volunteers walked along a 7-m walkway while gait kinematics and kinetics were recorded using VICON motion analysis system and two AMTI forceplates. Statistical analysis of coefficient of variation of kinematics and kinetics as recorded in normal walking and during the most constrained SOL-GAS condition showed comparable gait variability. Inspection of resulting group averaged gait patterns revealed considerable resemblance to a selected clinical example of spastic diplegia, indicating that the proposed mechanical system potentially represents a novel method for studying emulated pathological gait arising from artificially induced muscle contractures in neurologically intact individuals.

  13. A Portable Gait Asymmetry Rehabilitation System for Individuals with Stroke Using a Vibrotactile Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad Raheel; Oh, Min-Kyun; Lee, Chang-Hee; Park, Young Sook; Yoon, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Gait asymmetry caused by hemiparesis results in reduced gait efficiency and reduced activity levels. In this paper, a portable rehabilitation device is proposed that can serve as a tool in diagnosing gait abnormalities in individuals with stroke and has the capability of providing vibration feedback to help compensate for the asymmetric gait. Force-sensitive resistor (FSR) based insoles are used to detect ground contact and estimate stance time. A controller (Arduino) provides different vibration feedback based on the gait phase measurement. It also allows wireless interaction with a personal computer (PC) workstation using the XBee transceiver module, featuring data logging capabilities for subsequent analysis. Walking trials conducted with healthy young subjects allowed us to observe that the system can influence abnormality in the gait. The results of trials showed that a vibration cue based on temporal information was more effective than intensity information. With clinical experiments conducted for individuals with stroke, significant improvement in gait symmetry was observed with minimal disturbance caused to the balance and gait speed as an effect of the biofeedback. Future studies of the long-term rehabilitation effects of the proposed system and further improvements to the system will result in an inexpensive, easy-to-use, and effective rehabilitation device. PMID:26161398

  14. Symmetry Analysis of Gait between Left and Right Limb Using Cross-Fuzzy Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qiang; Gao, Qingwei; Lu, Yixiang; Zhang, Dexiang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is the investigation of gait symmetry problem by using cross-fuzzy entropy (C-FuzzyEn), which is a recently proposed cross entropy that has many merits as compared to the frequently used cross sample entropy (C-SampleEn). First, we used several simulation signals to test its performance regarding the relative consistency and dependence on data length. Second, the gait time series of the left and right stride interval were used to calculate the C-FuzzyEn values for gait symmetry analysis. Besides the statistical analysis, we also realized a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to perform the classification of normal and abnormal gaits. The gait dataset consists of 15 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 16 control (CO) subjects. The results show that the C-FuzzyEn values of the PD patients' gait are significantly higher than that of the CO subjects with a p value of less than 10−5, and the best classification performance evaluated by a leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation method is an accuracy of 96.77%. Such encouraging results imply that the C-FuzzyEn-based gait symmetry measure appears as a suitable tool for analyzing abnormal gaits. PMID:27034706

  15. Prescription Patterns and Mineral Metabolism Abnormalities in the Cinacalcet Era: Results from the MBD-5D Study

    PubMed Central

    Fukagawa, Masafumi; Fukuma, Shingo; Onishi, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Akizawa, Tadao; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Prescription patterns for hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism have varied widely since market introduction of cinacalcet. This study examined associations between prescription patterns and subsequent laboratory values. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using a Mineral and Bone Disorder Outcomes Study for Japanese CKD Stage 5D Patients subcohort, 1716 prevalent hemodialysis patients (4048 sets for repeated measures between January 2008 and July 2009) with an intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level >180 pg/ml who used intravenous vitamin D receptor activator (VDRA) without cinacalcet were selected. Prescription patterns were defined based on cinacalcet administration (starting or not) and VDRA dosage change (decreased [<−25%], stable [−25% to 25%], or increased [>25%]). Proportion differences (PDs) were determined for decreasing iPTH levels by at least one category (<180, 180–299, 300–499, and ≥500 pg/ml) and for achieving target phosphorus (3.5–6.0 mg/dl) and calcium (8.4–10.0 mg/dl) levels, adjusting for potential confounders. Results The starting cinacalcet and increased VDRA patterns were associated with decreasing iPTH levels (PD, 0.25 and 0.13; 95% confidence intervals [95% CIs], 0.19–0.31 and 0.09–0.17, respectively); combination use had an additive association (PD, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.20–0.42). The starting cinacalcet and decreased VDRA combination was associated with simultaneously achieving target phosphorus (PD, 0.12; 95% CI: 0.04–0.20) and calcium (PD, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.01–0.17) levels. Conclusions Certain combinations of cinacalcet and VDRA were associated with decreasing iPTH and achieving targets for phosphorus and calcium. Combinations may prove advantageous versus VDRA alone in managing secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:22822017

  16. Statistical Approach to Background Subtraction for Production of High-Quality Silhouettes for Human Gait Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    and Little believe oscillations are the center of gait analysis . Thus frequency entrainment and phase locking are important in both model-free and...background scene from video containing a person walking. This data may be used in a variety of ways to perform continued gait analysis . This chapter...Jeffrey E. and James J. Little. “Phase Models in Gait Analysis ,” Exemplars versus Models Workshop Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, Kauai, HI

  17. Abnormal patterns of cerebral lateralisation as revealed by the Universal Chimeric Faces Task in individuals with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sandie; Workman, Lance; Yeomans, Heather

    2012-01-01

    A previous study by Workman, Chilvers, Yeomans, and Taylor (2006), using the "Universal" Chimeric Faces Task (UCFT) for six emotional expressions, demonstrated that an overall left hemispatial/right hemisphere (RH) advantage has begun to develop by the age of 7-8. Moreover, the development of this left hemispatial advantage was observed to correlate positively with the ability to read emotions in the faces of others. Adopting the UCFT, the current study compared autistic children (11-15) with unimpaired children of two age groups (5-6 and 7-8) from this previous study. The autistic children showed a left hemispatial/RH advantage only for the two emotional expressions of "happiness" and "anger". Results for the autistic children revealed a similar overall pattern of lateralisation to the 5-6-year-olds and one that is less lateralised than the pattern for the 7-8-year-olds. Autistic children appear to show a developmental deficit for left hemispatial/RH advantage for emotional expression with the exception of "happiness" and "anger." The findings are discussed in terms of role hemisphericity and an approach-avoidance model.

  18. A wireless gait analysis system by digital textile sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Ming; Chou, Chun-Mei; Hu, Jwu-Sheng; Hung, Shu-Hui; Yang, Chang-Hwa; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Ming-Yang; Yang, Tsi-Lin

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of spatio-temporal gait analysis based upon digital textile sensors. Digitized legs and feet patterns of healthy subjects and their relations with spatio-temporal gait parameters were analyzed. In the first experiment, spatio-temporal gait parameters were determined during over ground walking. In the second experiment, predicted running, backward walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs parameters were determined. From the results of the experiments, it is concluded that, for healthy subjects, the duration of subsequent stride cycles and left/right steps, the estimations of step length, cadence, walking speed, central of pressure and central of mass trajectory, can be obtained by analyzing the digital signals from the textile sensors on pants and socks. These parameters are easily displayed in several different graphs allowing the user to view the parameters during gait. Finally, the digital data are easily to analyze the feature of activity recognition.

  19. Abnormal N-glycosylation pattern for brain nucleotide pyrophosphatase-5 (NPP-5) in Mecp2-mutant murine models of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cortelazzo, Alessio; De Felice, Claudio; Guerranti, Roberto; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Scalabrì, Francesco; Madonna, Michele; Filosa, Stefania; Della Giovampaola, Cinzia; Capone, Antonietta; Durand, Thierry; Mirasole, Cristiana; Zolla, Lello; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Guy, Jacky; D'Esposito, Maurizio; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Neurological disorders can be associated with protein glycosylation abnormalities. Rett syndrome is a devastating genetic brain disorder, mainly caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Although its pathogenesis appears to be closely associated with a redox imbalance, no information on glycosylation is available. Glycoprotein detection strategies (i.e., lectin-blotting) were applied to identify target glycosylation changes in the whole brain of Mecp2 mutant murine models of the disease. Remarkable glycosylation pattern changes for a peculiar 50kDa protein, i.e., the N-linked brain nucleotide pyrophosphatase-5 were evidenced, with decreased N-glycosylation in the presymptomatic and symptomatic mutant mice. Glycosylation changes were rescued by selected brain Mecp2 reactivation. Our findings indicate that there is a causal link between the amount of Mecp2 and the N-glycosylation of NPP-5.

  20. The use of laboratory gait analysis for understanding gait deterioration in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; Khan, Fary; Lee, Peter Vs; Galea, Mary P

    2016-12-01

    Laboratory gait analysis or three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA), which uses motion capture, force plates and electromyography (EMG), has allowed a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of gait deterioration in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). This review will summarize the current knowledge on multiple sclerosis (MS)-related changes in kinematics (angles), kinetics (forces) and electromyographic (muscle activation) patterns and how these measures can be used as markers of disease progression. We will also discuss the potential causes of slower walking in PwMS and the implications for 3DGA. Finally, we will describe new technologies and methods that will increase precision and clinical utilization of 3DGA in PwMS. Overall, 3DGA studies have shown that functionality of the ankle joint is the most affected during walking and that compensatory actions to maintain a functional speed may be insufficient in PwMS. However, altered gait patterns may be a strategy to increase stability as balance is also affected in PwMS.

  1. Inactivation of ca10a and ca10b Genes Leads to Abnormal Embryonic Development and Alters Movement Pattern in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Aspatwar, Ashok; Barker, Harlan R.; Saralahti, Anni K.; Bäuerlein, Carina A.; Ortutay, Csaba; Pan, Peiwen; Kuuslahti, Marianne; Parikka, Mataleena; Rämet, Mika; Parkkila, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase related proteins (CARPs) X and XI are highly conserved across species and are predominantly expressed in neural tissues. The biological role of these proteins is still an enigma. Ray-finned fish have lost the CA11 gene, but instead possess two co-orthologs of CA10. We analyzed the expression pattern of zebrafish ca10a and ca10b genes during embryonic development and in different adult tissues, and studied 61 CARP X/XI-like sequences to evaluate their phylogenetic relationship. Sequence analysis of zebrafish ca10a and ca10b reveals strongly predicted signal peptides, N-glycosylation sites, and a potential disulfide, all of which are conserved, suggesting that all of CARP X and XI are secretory proteins and potentially dimeric. RT-qPCR showed that zebrafish ca10a and ca10b genes are expressed in the brain and several other tissues throughout the development of zebrafish. Antisense morpholino mediated knockdown of ca10a and ca10b showed developmental delay with a high rate of mortality in larvae. Zebrafish morphants showed curved body, pericardial edema, and abnormalities in the head and eye, and there was increased apoptotic cell death in the brain region. Swim pattern showed abnormal movement in morphant zebrafish larvae compared to the wild type larvae. The developmental phenotypes of the ca10a and ca10b morphants were confirmed by inactivating these genes with the CRISPR/Cas9 system. In conclusion, we introduce a novel zebrafish model to investigate the mechanisms of CARP Xa and CARP Xb functions. Our data indicate that CARP Xa and CARP Xb have important roles in zebrafish development and suppression of ca10a and ca10b expression in zebrafish larvae leads to a movement disorder. PMID:26218428

  2. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  3. Abnormalities in A-to-I RNA editing patterns in CNS injuries correlate with dynamic changes in cell type composition

    PubMed Central

    Gal-Mark, Nurit; Shallev, Lea; Sweetat, Sahar; Barak, Michal; Billy Li, Jin; Levanon, Erez Y.; Eisenberg, Eli; Behar, Oded

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine to Inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a co- or post-transcriptional mechanism that modifies genomically encoded nucleotides at the RNA level. A-to-I RNA editing is abundant in the brain, and altered editing levels have been reported in various neurological pathologies and following spinal cord injury (SCI). The prevailing concept is that the RNA editing process itself is dysregulated by brain pathologies. Here we analyzed recent RNA-seq data, and found that, except for few mammalian conserved editing sites, editing is significantly higher in neurons than in other cell populations of the brain. We studied A-to-I RNA editing in stab wound injury (SWI) and SCI models and showed that the apparent under-editing observed after injury correlates with an approximately 20% reduction in the relative density of neurons, due to cell death and immune cell infiltration that may account for the observed under-editing. Studies of neuronal and astrocyte cultures and a computational analysis of SCI RNA-seq data further supported the possibility that a reduction in neuronal density is responsible for alterations in the tissue-wide editing patterns upon injury. Thus, our data suggest that the case for a mechanistic linkage between A-to-I RNA editing and brain pathologies should be revisited. PMID:28266523

  4. Patterns of visual sensory and sensorimotor abnormalities in autism vary in relation to history of early language delay.

    PubMed

    Takarae, Yukari; Luna, Beatriz; Minshew, Nancy J; Sweeney, John A

    2008-11-01

    Visual motion perception and pursuit eye movement deficits have been reported in autism. However, it is unclear whether these impairments are related to each other or to clinical symptoms of the disorder. High-functioning individuals with autism (41 with and 36 without delayed language acquisition) and 46 control subjects participated in the present study. All three subject groups were matched on chronological age and Full-Scale IQ. The autism group with delayed language acquisition had bilateral impairments on visual motion discrimination tasks, whereas the autism group without delay showed marginal impairments only in the left hemifield. Both autism groups showed difficulty tracking visual targets, but only the autism group without delayed language acquisition showed increased pursuit latencies and a failure to show the typical rightward directional advantage in pursuit. We observed correlations between performance on the visual perception and pursuit tasks in both autism groups. However, pursuit performance was correlated with manual motor skills only in the autism group with delayed language, suggesting that general sensorimotor or motor disturbances are a significant additional factor related to pursuit deficits in this subgroup. These findings suggest that there may be distinct neurocognitive phenotypes in autism associated with patterns of early language development.

  5. Abnormalities in A-to-I RNA editing patterns in CNS injuries correlate with dynamic changes in cell type composition.

    PubMed

    Gal-Mark, Nurit; Shallev, Lea; Sweetat, Sahar; Barak, Michal; Billy Li, Jin; Levanon, Erez Y; Eisenberg, Eli; Behar, Oded

    2017-03-07

    Adenosine to Inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a co- or post-transcriptional mechanism that modifies genomically encoded nucleotides at the RNA level. A-to-I RNA editing is abundant in the brain, and altered editing levels have been reported in various neurological pathologies and following spinal cord injury (SCI). The prevailing concept is that the RNA editing process itself is dysregulated by brain pathologies. Here we analyzed recent RNA-seq data, and found that, except for few mammalian conserved editing sites, editing is significantly higher in neurons than in other cell populations of the brain. We studied A-to-I RNA editing in stab wound injury (SWI) and SCI models and showed that the apparent under-editing observed after injury correlates with an approximately 20% reduction in the relative density of neurons, due to cell death and immune cell infiltration that may account for the observed under-editing. Studies of neuronal and astrocyte cultures and a computational analysis of SCI RNA-seq data further supported the possibility that a reduction in neuronal density is responsible for alterations in the tissue-wide editing patterns upon injury. Thus, our data suggest that the case for a mechanistic linkage between A-to-I RNA editing and brain pathologies should be revisited.

  6. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0870 TITLE: Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool...Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0870 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Rajankumar...produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool to aid in the training of clinicians at military treatment facilities providing care for

  7. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    study is to produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool to aid in the training of clinicians at military treatment facilities...providing care for wounded service members. In Phase I of the effort, significant work was completed at the University of Iowa Center for Computer- Aided ...Gait Training Tool Introduction The objective of our study is to produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool (APGTT) to aid in

  8. Mutational Landscape and Gene Expression Patterns in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemias with Monosomy 7 as a Sole Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Volinia, Stefano; Blachly, James S; Nicolet, Deedra; Oakes, Christopher; Kroll, Karl; Orwick, Shelley; Carroll, Andrew J; Stone, Richard M; Byrd, John C; de la Chapelle, Albert; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2017-01-01

    Monosomy of chromosome 7 is the most frequent autosomal monosomy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where it associates with poor clinical outcomes. However, molecular features associated with this sole monosomy subtype (-7 AML), which may give insights into the basis for its poor prognosis, have not been characterized. In this study, we analyzed 36 cases of -7 AML for mutations in 81 leukemia/cancer-associated genes using a customized targeted next-generation sequencing panel (Miseq). Global gene and miRNA expression profiles were also determined using paired RNA and small RNA sequencing data. Notably, gene mutations were detected in all the major AML-associated functional groups, which include activated signaling, chromatin remodeling, cohesin complex, methylation, NPM1, spliceosome, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors. Gene mutations in the chromatin remodeling groups were relatively more frequent in patients <60 years of age, who also had less mutations in the methylation and spliceosome groups compared with patients ≥60 years of age. Novel recurrent mutational events in AML were identified in the SMARCA2 gene. In patients ≥60 years of age, the presence of spliceosome mutations associated with a lower complete remission rate (P = 0.03). RNA sequencing revealed distinct gene and miRNA expression patterns between the sole -7 and non -7 AML cases, with reduced expression, as expected, of many genes and miRNAs mapped to chromosome 7, and overexpression of ID1, MECOM, and PTPRM, among others. Overall, our findings illuminate a number of molecular features of the underlying aggressive pathobiology in -7 AML patients. Cancer Res; 77(1); 207-18. ©2016 AACR.

  9. Mutational landscape and gene-expression patterns in adult acute myeloid leukemias with monosomy 7 as a sole abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Volinia, Stefano; Blachly, James S.; Nicolet, Deedra; Oakes, Christopher; Kroll, Karl; Orwick, Shelley; Carroll, Andrew J.; Stone, Richard M.; Byrd, John C.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2016-01-01

    Monosomy of chromosome 7 is the most frequent autosomal monosomy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where it associates with poor clinical outcomes. However, molecular features associated with this sole monosomy subtype (-7 AML) which may give insights into the basis for its poor prognosis have not been characterized. In this study, we analyzed 36 cases of -7 AML for mutations in 81 leukemia/cancer-associated genes using a customized targeted next-generation sequencing panel (Miseq). Global gene and microRNA expression profiles were also determined using paired RNA and small RNA sequencing data. Notably, gene mutations were detected in all the major AML-associated functional groups, which include activated signaling, chromatin remodeling, cohesin complex, methylation, NPM1, spliceosome, transcription factors and tumor suppressors. Gene mutations in the activated signaling and chromatin remodeling groups were relatively more frequent in patients <60 years of age, who also had more mutations in the methylation and spliceosome groups compared to patients {greater than or equal to} 60 years of age. Novel recurrent mutational events in AML were identified in the SMARCA2 gene. In patients {greater than or equal to} 60 years of age, the presence of spliceosome mutations associated with a lower complete remission rate (p=0.03). RNA sequencing revealed distinct gene and microRNA expression patterns between the sole -7 and non-7 AML cases, with reduced expression as expected of many genes and microRNAs mapped to chromosome 7, and overexpression of ID1, MECOM, and PTPRM, among others. Overall, our findings illuminate a number of molecular features of the underlying aggressive pathobiology in -7 AML patients. PMID:27784745

  10. Gait Signal Analysis with Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons. PMID:25110724

  11. Gait and balance disorders.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on one of the most common types of neurologic disorders: altered walking. Walking impairment often reflects disease of the neurologic structures mediating gait, balance or, most often, both. These structures are distributed along the neuraxis. For this reason, this chapter is introduced by a brief description of the neurobiologic underpinning of walking, stressing information that is critical for imaging, namely, the anatomic representation of gait and balance mechanisms. This background is essential not only in order to direct the relevant imaging tools to the regions more likely to be affected but also to interpret correctly imaging findings that may not be related to the walking deficit object of clinical study. The chapter closes with a discussion on how to image some of the most frequent etiologies causing gait or balance impairment. However, it focuses on syndromes not already discussed in other chapters of this volume, such as Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders, already discussed in Chapter 48, or cerebellar ataxia, in Chapter 23, in the previous volume. As regards vascular disease, the spastic hemiplegia most characteristic of brain disease needs little discussion, while the less well-understood effects of microvascular disease are extensively reviewed here, together with the imaging approach.

  12. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Locomotion gaits of a rotating cylinder pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Novati, Guido; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-11-01

    Using 2D numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, we demonstrate that a simple pair of rotating cylinders can display a range of locomotion patterns of biological and engineering interest. Steadily counter-rotating the cylinders causes the pair to move akin to a vortex dipole for low rotation rates, but as the rotational velocity is increased the direction of motion reverses. Unsteady rotations lead to different locomotion gaits that resemble jellyfish (for in-phase rotations) and undulating swimmers (for out-of-phase rotations). The small number of parameters for this simple system allows us to systematically map the phase space of these gaits, and allows us to understand the underlying physical mechanisms using a minimal model with implications for biological locomotion and engineered analogs.

  14. Clinical prediction of fall risk and white matter abnormalities: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective: To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as deter...

  15. Triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice exhibit region-specific abnormalities in brain myelination patterns prior to appearance of amyloid and tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Maya K.; Sudol, Kelly L.; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Frazer, Maria E.; Bowers, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively debilitating brain disorder pathologically defined by extracellular amyloid plaques, intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic disintegrity. AD has not been widely considered a disease of white matter, but more recent evidence suggests the existence of abnormalities in myelination patterns and myelin attrition in AD-afflicted human brains. Herein, we demonstrate that triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice, which harbor the human amyloid precursor protein Swedish mutant transgene, presenilin knock-in mutation, and tau P301L mutant transgene, exhibit significant region-specific alterations in myelination patterns and in oligodendrocyte marker expression profiles at time points preceding the appearance of amyloid and tau pathology. These immunohistochemical signatures are coincident with age-related alterations in axonal and myelin sheath ultrastructure as visualized by comparative electron microscopic examination of 3xTg-AD and non-transgenic mouse brain tissue. Overall, these findings indicate 3xTg-AD mice represent a viable model in which to examine mechanisms underlying AD-related myelination and neural transmission defects that occur early during pre-symptomatic stages of the disease process. PMID:18661556

  16. Gait Analysis in a Mecp2 Knockout Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome Reveals Early-Onset and Progressive Motor Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, John S.; Bailey, Mark E. S.; Cobb, Stuart R.

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a genetic disorder characterized by a range of features including cognitive impairment, gait abnormalities and a reduction in purposeful hand skills. Mice harbouring knockout mutations in the Mecp2 gene display many RTT-like characteristics and are central to efforts to find novel therapies for the disorder. As hand stereotypies and gait abnormalities constitute major diagnostic criteria in RTT, it is clear that motor and gait-related phenotypes will be of importance in assessing preclinical therapeutic outcomes. We therefore aimed to assess gait properties over the prodromal phase in a functional knockout mouse model of RTT. In male Mecp2 knockout mice, we observed alterations in stride, coordination and balance parameters at 4 weeks of age, before the onset of other overt phenotypic changes as revealed by observational scoring. These data suggest that gait measures may be used as a robust and early marker of MeCP2-dysfunction in future preclinical therapeutic studies. PMID:25392929

  17. Quality of Life and Gait in Elderly Group

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Carlos Kazuo; Teixeira, Jacqueline Pitanga; Alves, Lucas Vieira; Oliveira, Priscila Feliciano; Raposo, Oscar Felipe Falcão

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  The process of aging could lead to seniors being more prone to falls, which affects their quality of life. Objective  The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between quality of life and gait in the elderly. Methods  We used World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief (WHOQOL-Brief) Brazilian version and the Dynamic Gait Index to assess fifty-six volunteers from the northeast of Brazil. Ages ranged from 60 to 85 years. Results  The Dynamic Gait Index, which indicates the probability of falls, resulted in 36.3% of the sample presenting abnormal results. There was correlation between domain 2 (psychological) and domain 4 (environment) with domain 1(Physical) and domain 3 (Social); a negative correlation between age and Domain 2; correlation between Question 1 (How would you rate your quality of life?) and domains 1, 2, and 4 and no correlation between questions 1 and 2 (How satisfied are you with your health?). Question 2 was correlated with all of the domains. There was negative association between question 1 and falls, and a slight correlation between the Dynamic Gait Index scores and Question 1. Conclusion  The self-perception of the study group about their quality of life was either good or very good, even though a considerable percentage of individuals had suffered falls or reported gait disturbances. PMID:27413405

  18. Motion of the body centre of gravity as a summary indicator of the mechanics of human pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Detrembleur, C; van den Hecke, A; Dierick, F

    2000-12-01

    Abnormal movements of the body segments due to lowest level gait disorders such as musculoskeletal disorders, peripheral neuropathies and radiculopathies or middle-level disorders such as hemiplegia, paraplegia and dystonia influence the motion of the centre of gravity (CG) during walking. The translation of the CG can be studied by the work done by muscles (WExt) with respect to the ground. The efficacy of gait's mechanism can be quantified by the energy transferred between gravitational potential and kinetic energies (recovery). WExt and recovery were investigated in lowest and middle-level gait disorders during level walking. No statistical significant difference was observed between patients with lowest-level gait disorders and normal subjects. However, WExt was increased for the patients with middle-level gait disorders and recovery decreased up to 20%. The measurement of changes in mechanical energy of the CG might be a summary indicator for the mechanics of pathological gait.

  19. Gait analysis in a mouse model resembling Leigh disease.

    PubMed

    de Haas, Ria; Russel, Frans G; Smeitink, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Leigh disease (LD) is one of the clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial OXPHOS disorders and also known as sub-acute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. The disease has an incidence of 1 in 77,000 live births. Symptoms typically begin early in life and prognosis for LD patients is poor. Currently, no clinically effective treatments are available. Suitable animal and cellular models are necessary for the understanding of the neuropathology and the development of successful new therapeutic strategies. In this study we used the Ndufs4 knockout (Ndufs4(-/-)) mouse, a model of mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Ndusf4(-/-) mice exhibit progressive neurodegeneration, which closely resemble the human LD phenotype. When dissecting behavioral abnormalities in animal models it is of great importance to apply translational tools that are clinically relevant. To distinguish gait abnormalities in patients, simple walking tests can be assessed, but in animals this is not easy. This study is the first to demonstrate automated CatWalk gait analysis in the Ndufs4(-/-) mouse model. Marked differences were noted between Ndufs4(-/-) and control mice in dynamic, static, coordination and support parameters. Variation of walking speed was significantly increased in Ndufs4(-/-) mice, suggesting hampered and uncoordinated gait. Furthermore, decreased regularity index, increased base of support and changes in support were noted in the Ndufs4(-/-) mice. Here, we report the ability of the CatWalk system to sensitively assess gait abnormalities in Ndufs4(-/-) mice. This objective gait analysis can be of great value for intervention and drug efficacy studies in animal models for mitochondrial disease.

  20. FreeWalker: a smart insole for longitudinal gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baitong; Rajput, Kuldeep Singh; Tam, Wing-Kin; Tung, Anthony K H; Yang, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Gait analysis is an important diagnostic measure to investigate the pattern of walking. Traditional gait analysis is generally carried out in a gait lab, with equipped force and body tracking sensors, which needs a trained medical professional to interpret the results. This procedure is tedious, expensive, and unreliable and makes it difficult to track the progress across multiple visits. In this paper, we present a smart insole called FreeWalker, which provides quantitative gait analysis outside the confinement of traditional lab, at low- cost. The insole consists of eight pressure sensors and two motion tracking sensors, i.e. 3-axis accelerometer and 3-axis gyroscope. This enables measurement of under-foot pressure distribution and motion sequences in real-time. The insole is enabled with onboard SD card as well as wireless data transmission, which help in continuous gait-cycle analysis. The data is then sent to a gateway, for analysis and interpretation of data, using a user interface where gait features are graphically displayed. We also present validation result of a subject's left foot, who was asked to perform a specific task. Experiment results show that we could achieve a data-sampling rate of over 1 KHz, transmitting data up to a distance of 20 meter and maintain a battery life of around 24 hours. Taking advantage of these features, FreeWalker can be used in various applications, like medical diagnosis, rehabilitation, sports and entertainment.

  1. A Multiple Regression Approach to Normalization of Spatiotemporal Gait Features.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Ferdous; Begg, Rezaul; Lythgo, Noel; Hass, Chris J; Halgamuge, Saman; Ackland, David C

    2016-04-01

    Normalization of gait data is performed to reduce the effects of intersubject variations due to physical characteristics. This study reports a multiple regression normalization approach for spatiotemporal gait data that takes into account intersubject variations in self-selected walking speed and physical properties including age, height, body mass, and sex. Spatiotemporal gait data including stride length, cadence, stance time, double support time, and stride time were obtained from healthy subjects including 782 children, 71 adults, 29 elderly subjects, and 28 elderly Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Data were normalized using standard dimensionless equations, a detrending method, and a multiple regression approach. After normalization using dimensionless equations and the detrending method, weak to moderate correlations between walking speed, physical properties, and spatiotemporal gait features were observed (0.01 < |r| < 0.88), whereas normalization using the multiple regression method reduced these correlations to weak values (|r| <0.29). Data normalization using dimensionless equations and detrending resulted in significant differences in stride length and double support time of PD patients; however the multiple regression approach revealed significant differences in these features as well as in cadence, stance time, and stride time. The proposed multiple regression normalization may be useful in machine learning, gait classification, and clinical evaluation of pathological gait patterns.

  2. Temporal and spatial organization of gait-related electrocortical potentials.

    PubMed

    Knaepen, Kristel; Mierau, Andreas; Tellez, Helio Fernandez; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-07-10

    To advance gait rehabilitation research it is of great importance to understand the supraspinal control of walking. In this study, the temporal and spatial characteristics of averaged electrocortical activity during treadmill walking in healthy subjects was assessed. Electroencephalography data were recorded from 32 scalp locations, averaged across trials, and related to phases of the gait cycle based on the detection of left heel strike. A characteristic temporal pattern of positive and negative potentials, similar to movement-related cortical potentials, and related to the gait cycle was observed over the cortical leg representation area. Source localization analysis revealed that mainly the primary somatosensory, somatosensory association, primary motor and cingulate cortex were activated during walking. The negative peaks of the gait-related cortical potential were associated with activity predominantly in the cingulate and prefrontal cortex, while the primary motor, primary somatosensory and somatosensory association cortex were mainly active during the positive peaks. This study identified gait-related cortical potentials during walking. The results indicate a widely distributed cortical network involved in gait control.

  3. Knee Joint Dysfunctions That Influence Gait in Cerebrovascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Greve, Julia Maria D’Andrea

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There is still no consensus among different specialists on the subject of kinematic variation during the hemiparetic gait, including the main changes that take place during the gait cycle and whether the gait velocity changes the patterns of joint mobility. One of the most frequently discussed joints is the knee. OBJECTIVES This study aims to evaluate the variables found in the angular kinematics of knee joint, and to describe the alterations found in the hemiparetic gait resulting from cerebrovascular injury. METHODS This study included 66 adult patients of both genders with a diagnosis of either right or left hemiparesis resulting from ischemic cerebrovascular injury. All the participants underwent three-dimensional gait evaluation, an the angular kinematics of the joint knee were selected for analysis. RESULTS The results were distributed into four groups formed based on the median of the gait speed and the side of hemiparesis. CONCLUSIONS The relevant clinical characteristics included the important mechanisms of loading response in the stance, knee hyperextension in single stance, and reduction of the peak flexion and movement amplitude of the knee in the swing phase. These mechanisms should be taken into account when choosing the best treatment. We believe that the findings presented here may aid in preventing the occurrence of the problems found, and also in identifying the origin of these problems. PMID:18719753

  4. Climbing favours the tripod gait over alternative faster insect gaits

    PubMed Central

    Ramdya, Pavan; Thandiackal, Robin; Cherney, Raphael; Asselborn, Thibault; Benton, Richard; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Floreano, Dario

    2017-01-01

    To escape danger or catch prey, running vertebrates rely on dynamic gaits with minimal ground contact. By contrast, most insects use a tripod gait that maintains at least three legs on the ground at any given time. One prevailing hypothesis for this difference in fast locomotor strategies is that tripod locomotion allows insects to rapidly navigate three-dimensional terrain. To test this, we computationally discovered fast locomotor gaits for a model based on Drosophila melanogaster. Indeed, the tripod gait emerges to the exclusion of many other possible gaits when optimizing fast upward climbing with leg adhesion. By contrast, novel two-legged bipod gaits are fastest on flat terrain without adhesion in the model and in a hexapod robot. Intriguingly, when adhesive leg structures in real Drosophila are covered, animals exhibit atypical bipod-like leg coordination. We propose that the requirement to climb vertical terrain may drive the prevalence of the tripod gait over faster alternative gaits with minimal ground contact. PMID:28211509

  5. A Microsoft Kinect-Based Point-of-Care Gait Assessment Framework for Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Farnood; Trojan, Daria; Kovecses, Jozsef; Haddad, Wassim; Gholami, Behnood

    2016-07-21

    Gait impairment is a prevalent and important difficulty for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a common neurological disorder. An easy to use tool to objectively evaluate gait in MS patients in a clinical setting can assist clinicians to perform an objective assessment. The overall objective of this study is to develop a framework to quantify gait abnormalities in MS patients using the Microsoft Kinect for Windows sensor; an inexpensive, easy to use, portable camera. Specifically, we aim to evaluate its feasibility for utilization in a clinical setting, assess its reliability, evaluate the validity of gait indices obtained, and evaluate a novel set of gait indices based on the concept of dynamic time warping. In this study, 10 ambulatory MS patients, and 10 age and sex-matched normal controls were studied at one session in a clinical setting with gait assessment using a Kinect camera. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) clinical ambulation score was calculated for the MS subjects, and patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS). Based on this study, we established the potential feasibility of using a Microsoft Kinect camera in a clinical setting. Seven out of the eight gait indices obtained using the proposed method were reliable with intra-class correlation coefficients ranging from 0.61 to 0.99. All eight MS gait indices were significantly different from those of the controls (p-values less than 0.05). Finally, seven out of the eight MS gait indices were correlated with the objective and subjective gait measures (Pearson's correlation coefficients greater than 0.40). The study shows that the Kinect camera is as an easy to use tool to assess gait in MS patients in a clinical setting.

  6. Gait phenotype from MCI to moderate dementia: results from the GOOD initiative

    PubMed Central

    Allali, Gilles; Annweiler, Cédric; Blumen, Helena M.; Callisaya, Michele L.; De Cock, Anne-Marie; Kressig, Reto W.; Srikanth, Velandai; Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Verghese, Joe; Beauchet, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background The differences in gait abnormalities from the earliest to the latter stages of dementia and in the different subtypes of dementia have not been fully examined. This study aims to compare spatio-temporal gait parameters in cognitively healthy individuals, patients with amnestic (aMCI) and non-amnestic (naMCI) MCI, and patients with mild and moderate stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and non-Alzheimer’s disease (non-AD). Methods Based on a cross-sectional design, 1719 participants (77.4±7.3 years, 53.9% female) were recruited from cohorts from seven countries participating in the “Gait, cOgnitiOn & Decline” initiative. Mean values and coefficients of variation of spatio-temporal gait parameters were measured during normal pace walking with the GAITRite system at all sites. Results Performance of spatio-temporal gait parameters declined in parallel to the stage of cognitive decline from MCI status to moderate dementia. Gait parameters of patients with naMCI were more disturbed compared to patients with aMCI, and MCI subgroups performed better than demented patients. Patients with non-AD dementia had worse gait performance than those with AD dementia. This degradation of the gait parameters was similar between mean values and coefficients of variation of spatio-temporal gait parameters in the earliest stages of cognitive decline, but different in the most advanced stages, especially in the non-AD subtypes. Conclusions Spatio-temporal gait parameters were more disturbed in the advanced stages of dementia, and more affected in the non-AD dementias than in AD. These findings suggest that quantitative gait parameters could be used as a surrogate marker for improving the diagnosis of dementia. PMID:26662508

  7. Rhythmic auditory stimulation using a portable smart device: short-term effects on gait in chronic hemiplegic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Byung-Woo; Lee, Hwi-Young; Song, Won-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effects of various rhythmic auditory stimulation tempos on stroke gait pattern changes when training patients with a smartphone-based rhythmic auditory stimulation application were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen patients with chronic stroke were included. Cadence during comfortable walking was measured (baseline). After the baseline findings were recorded, rhythmic auditory stimulation with five different tempos (i.e., −10%, −5%, 0%, +5%, and +10% change from baseline) was randomly applied. Finally, comfortable walking without rhythmic auditory stimulation was initiated to evaluate gait pattern changes. [Results] As the tempo increased, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of the stroke patients changed significantly. Gait speed, cadence, and gait cycle duration showed the greatest improvement in the +10% rhythmic auditory stimulation condition compared to baseline. After gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation, gait speed, cadence, stride length, gait cycle duration, and step length of the affected and unaffected sides improved significantly compared to baseline. [Conclusion] Significant changes in the gait pattern of stroke patients were noted for various tempos after training with rhythmic auditory stimulation. These findings could be used to customize rehabilitative gait training for patients who experience stroke with hemiplegia. PMID:27313366

  8. Extraction of human gait signatures: an inverse kinematic approach using Groebner basis theory applied to gait cycle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barki, Anum; Kendricks, Kimberly; Tuttle, Ronald F.; Bunker, David J.; Borel, Christoph C.

    2013-05-01

    This research highlights the results obtained from applying the method of inverse kinematics, using Groebner basis theory, to the human gait cycle to extract and identify lower extremity gait signatures. The increased threat from suicide bombers and the force protection issues of today have motivated a team at Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) to research pattern recognition in the human gait cycle. The purpose of this research is to identify gait signatures of human subjects and distinguish between subjects carrying a load to those subjects without a load. These signatures were investigated via a model of the lower extremities based on motion capture observations, in particular, foot placement and the joint angles for subjects affected by carrying extra load on the body. The human gait cycle was captured and analyzed using a developed toolkit consisting of an inverse kinematic motion model of the lower extremity and a graphical user interface. Hip, knee, and ankle angles were analyzed to identify gait angle variance and range of motion. Female subjects exhibited the most knee angle variance and produced a proportional correlation between knee flexion and load carriage.

  9. Three-dimensional gait analysis can shed new light on walking in patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lobet, Sébastien; Detrembleur, Christine; Massaad, Firas; Hermans, Cedric

    2013-01-01

    In patients with haemophilia (PWH) (from Greek "blood love"), the long-term consequences of repeated haemarthrosis include cartilage damage and irreversible arthropathy, resulting in severe impairments in locomotion. Quantifying the extent of joint damage is therefore important in order to prevent disease progression and compare the efficacy of treatment strategies. Musculoskeletal impairments in PWH may stem from structural and functional abnormalities, which have traditionally been evaluated radiologically or clinically. However, these examinations are performed in a supine position (i.e., non-weight-bearing condition). We therefore suggest three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) as an innovative approach designed to focus on the functional component of the joint during the act of walking. This is of the utmost importance, as pain induced by weight-bearing activities influences the functional performance of the arthropathic joints significantly. This review endeavors to improve our knowledge of the biomechanical consequences of multiple arthropathies on gait pattern in adult patients with haemophilia using 3DGA. In PWH with arthropathy, the more the joint function was altered, the more the metabolic energy was consumed. 3DGA analysis could highlight the effect of an orthopedic disorder in PWH during walking. Indeed, mechanical and metabolic impairments were correlated to the progressive loss of active mobility into the joints.

  10. Brain Activity during Mental Imagery of Gait Versus Gait-Like Plantar Stimulation: A Novel Combined Functional MRI Paradigm to Better Understand Cerebral Gait Control.

    PubMed

    Labriffe, Matthieu; Annweiler, Cédric; Amirova, Liubov E; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Ter Minassian, Aram; Leiber, Louis-Marie; Beauchet, Olivier; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Dinomais, Mickaël

    2017-01-01

    Human locomotion is a complex sensorimotor behavior whose central control remains difficult to explore using neuroimaging method due to technical constraints, notably the impossibility to walk with a scanner on the head and/or to walk for real inside current scanners. The aim of this functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study was to analyze interactions between two paradigms to investigate the brain gait control network: (1) mental imagery of gait, and (2) passive mechanical stimulation of the plantar surface of the foot with the Korvit boots. The Korvit stimulator was used through two different modes, namely an organized ("gait like") sequence and a destructured (chaotic) pattern. Eighteen right-handed young healthy volunteers were recruited (mean age, 27 ± 4.7 years). Mental imagery activated a broad neuronal network including the supplementary motor area-proper (SMA-proper), pre-SMA, the dorsal premotor cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior insula, and precuneus/superior parietal areas. The mechanical plantar stimulation activated the primary sensorimotor cortex and secondary somatosensory cortex bilaterally. The paradigms generated statistically common areas of activity, notably bilateral SMA-proper and right pre-SMA, highlighting the potential key role of SMA in gait control. There was no difference between the organized and chaotic Korvit sequences, highlighting the difficulty of developing a walking-specific plantar stimulation paradigm. In conclusion, this combined-fMRI paradigm combining mental imagery and gait-like plantar stimulation provides complementary information regarding gait-related brain activity and appears useful for the assessment of high-level gait control.

  11. Brain Activity during Mental Imagery of Gait Versus Gait-Like Plantar Stimulation: A Novel Combined Functional MRI Paradigm to Better Understand Cerebral Gait Control

    PubMed Central

    Labriffe, Matthieu; Annweiler, Cédric; Amirova, Liubov E.; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Ter Minassian, Aram; Leiber, Louis-Marie; Beauchet, Olivier; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Dinomais, Mickaël

    2017-01-01

    Human locomotion is a complex sensorimotor behavior whose central control remains difficult to explore using neuroimaging method due to technical constraints, notably the impossibility to walk with a scanner on the head and/or to walk for real inside current scanners. The aim of this functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study was to analyze interactions between two paradigms to investigate the brain gait control network: (1) mental imagery of gait, and (2) passive mechanical stimulation of the plantar surface of the foot with the Korvit boots. The Korvit stimulator was used through two different modes, namely an organized (“gait like”) sequence and a destructured (chaotic) pattern. Eighteen right-handed young healthy volunteers were recruited (mean age, 27 ± 4.7 years). Mental imagery activated a broad neuronal network including the supplementary motor area-proper (SMA-proper), pre-SMA, the dorsal premotor cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior insula, and precuneus/superior parietal areas. The mechanical plantar stimulation activated the primary sensorimotor cortex and secondary somatosensory cortex bilaterally. The paradigms generated statistically common areas of activity, notably bilateral SMA-proper and right pre-SMA, highlighting the potential key role of SMA in gait control. There was no difference between the organized and chaotic Korvit sequences, highlighting the difficulty of developing a walking-specific plantar stimulation paradigm. In conclusion, this combined-fMRI paradigm combining mental imagery and gait-like plantar stimulation provides complementary information regarding gait-related brain activity and appears useful for the assessment of high-level gait control. PMID:28321186

  12. Gait motion analysis in the unrestrained condition of trans-femoral amputee with a prosthetic limb.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichiro; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Uno, Ryuji; Matsuda, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Youtaro; Inoue, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Trans-femoral amputees must regain moving pattern by refined rehabilitation program using ground reaction forces, joint angles and joint moments applied on a prosthetic limb. On the other hand, understanding those loads and kinematic variables is indispensable for gait analysis based on the biomechanical consideration of trans-femoral amputees. However, conventional prosthetic gait training systems cannot measure long continuous walking motions. In this paper, ground reaction forces and kinematic parameters applied on trans-femoral prosthesis are measured by the prosthetic gait motion analysis system using mobile force plate and attitude sensor for the unrestrained gait measurement. As a result of the experiments, the patterns of antero-posterior axis ground reaction forces and joint moments about the medio-lateral axis are remarkably different among the five activities. Finally, the effectiveness of the developed prosthetic gait training system to consider biomechanics and kinematics in trans-femoral prosthesis is validated.

  13. Design of a gait training device for control of pelvic obliquity.

    PubMed

    Pietrusinski, Maciej; Severini, Giacomo; Cajigas, Iahn; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Bonato, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of a novel device for the control of pelvic obliquity during gait. The device, called the Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer, consists of a single actuator system designed to target secondary gait deviations, such as hip-hiking, affecting the movement of the pelvis. Secondary gait deviations affecting the pelvis are generated in response to primary gait deviations (e.g. limited knee flexion during the swing phase) in stroke survivors and contribute to the overall asymmetrical gait pattern often observed in these patients. The proposed device generates a force field able to affect the obliquity of the pelvis (i.e. the rotation of the pelvis around the anteroposterior axis) by using an impedance controlled single linear actuator acting on a hip orthosis. Tests showed that the RGR Trainer is able to induce changes in pelvic obliquity trajectories (hip-hiking) in healthy subjects. These results suggest that the RGR Trainer is suitable to test the hypothesis that has motivated our efforts toward developing the system, namely that addressing both primary and secondary gait deviations during robotic-assisted gait training may help promote a physiologically-sound gait behavior more effectively than when only primary deviations are addressed.

  14. Estimation of temporal gait parameters using Bayesian models on acceleration signals.

    PubMed

    López-Nava, I H; Muñoz-Meléndez, A; Pérez Sanpablo, A I; Alessi Montero, A; Quiñones Urióstegui, I; Núñez Carrera, L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system capable of performing calculation of temporal gait parameters using two low-cost wireless accelerometers and artificial intelligence-based techniques as part of a larger research project for conducting human gait analysis. Ten healthy subjects of different ages participated in this study and performed controlled walking tests. Two wireless accelerometers were placed on their ankles. Raw acceleration signals were processed in order to obtain gait patterns from characteristic peaks related to steps. A Bayesian model was implemented to classify the characteristic peaks into steps or nonsteps. The acceleration signals were segmented based on gait events, such as heel strike and toe-off, of actual steps. Temporal gait parameters, such as cadence, ambulation time, step time, gait cycle time, stance and swing phase time, simple and double support time, were estimated from segmented acceleration signals. Gait data-sets were divided into two groups of ages to test Bayesian models in order to classify the characteristic peaks. The mean error obtained from calculating the temporal gait parameters was 4.6%. Bayesian models are useful techniques that can be applied to classification of gait data of subjects at different ages with promising results.

  15. Transient effects of stretching exercises on gait parameters of elderly women.

    PubMed

    Rodacki, André L F; Souza, Ricardo M; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Cristopoliski, Fabiano; Fowler, Neil E

    2009-04-01

    This study aimed to analyse the effects of a single stretching exercise session on a number of gait parameters in elderly participants in an attempt to determine whether these exercises can influence the risk of fall. Fifteen healthy women living in the community volunteered to participate in the study. A kinematic gait analysis was performed immediately before and after a session of static stretching exercises applied on hip flexor/extensor muscles. Results showed a significant influence of stretching exercises on a number of gait parameters, which have previously been proposed as fall predictors. Participants showed increased gait velocity, greater step length and reduced double support time during stance after performing stretching exercises, suggesting improved stability and mobility. Changes around the pelvis (increased anterior-posterior tilt and rotation range of motion) resulting from the stretching exercises were suggested to influence the gait parameters (velocity, step length and double support time). Therefore, stretching exercises were shown to be a promising strategy to facilitate changes in gait parameters related to the risk of fall. Some other gait variables related to the risk of fall remained unaltered (e.g., toe clearance). The stable pattern of segmental angular velocities was proposed to explain the stability of these unchanged gait variables. The results indicate that stretching exercises, performed on a regular (daily) basis, result in gait adaptations which can be considered as indicative of reduced fall risk. Other studies to determine whether regular stretching routines are an effective strategy to reduce the risk of fall are required.

  16. Hip contact force in presence of aberrant bone geometry during normal and pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Lode; Wesseling, Mariska; Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; Scheys, Lennart; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-11-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often present aberrant hip geometry, specifically increased femoral anteversion and neck-shaft angle. Furthermore, altered gait patterns are present within this population. We analyzed the effect of aberrant femoral geometry, as present in CP subjects, on hip contact force (HCF) during pathological and normal gait. We ran dynamic simulations of CP-specific and normal gait using two musculoskeletal models (MSMs), one reflecting normal femoral geometry and one reflecting proximal femoral deformities. The combination of aberrant bone geometry and CP-specific gait characteristics reduced HCF compared to normal gait on a CP subject-specific MSM, but drastically changed the orientation of the HCF vector. The HCF was orientated more vertically and anteriorly than compared to HCF orientation during normal gait. Furthermore, subjects with more pronounced bony deformities encountered larger differences in resultant HCF and HCF orientation. When bone deformities were not accounted for in MSMs of pathologic gait, the HCF orientation was more similar to normal children. Thus, our results support a relation between aberrant femoral geometry and joint loading during pathological/normal gait and confirm a compensatory effect of altered gait kinematics on joint loading.

  17. Design of Patient-Specific Gait Modifications for Knee Osteoarthritis Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Fregly, Benjamin J.; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Rooney, Kelly L.; Mitchell, Kim H.; Chmielewski, Terese L.

    2007-01-01

    Gait modification is a nonsurgical approach for reducing the external knee adduction torque in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The magnitude of the first adduction torque peak in particular is strongly associated with knee OA progression. While toeing out has been shown to reduce the second peak, no clinically realistic gait modifications have been identified that effectively reduce both peaks simultaneously. This study predicts novel patient-specific gait modifications that achieve this goal without changing the foot path. The modified gait motion was designed for a single patient with knee OA using dynamic optimization of a patient-specific, full-body gait model. The cost function minimized the knee adduction torque subject to constraints limiting how much the new gait motion could deviate from the patient's normal gait motion. The optimizations predicted a “medial-thrust” gait pattern that reduced the first adduction torque peak between 32% and 54% and the second peak between 34% and 56%. The new motion involved three synergistic kinematic changes: slightly decreased pelvis obliquity, slightly increased leg flexion, and slightly increased pelvis axial rotation. After gait retraining, the patient achieved adduction torque reductions of 39% to 50% in the first peak and 37% to 55% in the second one. These reductions are comparable to those reported after high tibial osteotomy surgery. The associated kinematic changes were consistent with the predictions except for pelvis obliquity, which showed little change. This study demonstrates that it is feasible to design novel patient-specific gait modifications with potential clinical benefit using dynamic optimization of patient-specific, full-body gait models. Further investigation is needed to assess the extent to which similar gait modifications may be effective for other patients with knee OA. PMID:17867361

  18. Differences Between the Pattern of Developmental Abnormalities in Autism Associated with Duplications 15q11.2-q13 and Idiopathic Autism

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Jerzy; Schanen, N. Carolyn; Cook, Edwin H.; Sigman, Marian; Brown, W. Ted; Kuchna, Izabela; Nowicki, Krzysztof; Wegiel, Jarek; Imaki, Humi; Ma, Shuang Yong; Marchi, Elaine; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa; Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved; Cohen, Ira L.; London, Eric; Flory, Michael; Lach, Boleslaw; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify differences in patterns of developmental abnormalities between the brains of individuals with autism of unknown etiology and those of individuals with duplications of chromosome 15q11.2-q13 [dup(15)] and autism, and to identify alterations that may contribute to seizures and sudden death in the latter. Brains of 9 subjects with dup(15), 10 with idiopathic autism, and 7 controls were examined. In the dup(15) cohort, 7 subjects (78%) had autism, 7 (78%) had seizures, and 6 (67%) had experienced sudden unexplained death. Subjects with dup(15) autism were microcephalic, with mean brain weights 300 g less (1,177 g) than those of subjects with idiopathic autism (1,477 g; p < 0.001). Heterotopias in the alveus, CA4, and dentate gyrus and dysplasia in the dentate gyrus were detected in 89% of dup(15) autism cases but in only 10% idiopathic autism cases (p < 0.001). By contrast, cerebral cortex dysplasia was detected in 50% of subjects with idiopathic autism and in no dup(15) autism cases (p < 0.04). The different spectrum and higher prevalence of developmental neuropathological findings in the dup(15) cohort than in cases with idiopathic autism may contribute to the high risk of early onset of seizures and sudden death. PMID:22487857

  19. Diagnosis of abnormal patterns in multivariate microclimate monitoring: a case study of an open-air archaeological site in Pompeii (Italy).

    PubMed

    Merello, Paloma; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan; Zarzo, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Chemometrics has been applied successfully since the 1990s for the multivariate statistical control of industrial processes. A new area of interest for these tools is the microclimatic monitoring of cultural heritage. Sensors record climatic parameters over time and statistical data analysis is performed to obtain valuable information for preventive conservation. A case study of an open-air archaeological site is presented here. A set of 26 temperature and relative humidity data-loggers was installed in four rooms of Ariadne's house (Pompeii). If climatic values are recorded versus time at different positions, the resulting data structure is equivalent to records of physical parameters registered at several points of a continuous chemical process. However, there is an important difference in this case: continuous processes are controlled to reach a steady state, whilst open-air sites undergo tremendous fluctuations. Although data from continuous processes are usually column-centred prior to applying principal components analysis, it turned out that another pre-treatment (row-centred data) was more convenient for the interpretation of components and to identify abnormal patterns. The detection of typical trajectories was more straightforward by dividing the whole monitored period into several sub-periods, because the marked climatic fluctuations throughout the year affect the correlation structures. The proposed statistical methodology is of interest for the microclimatic monitoring of cultural heritage, particularly in the case of open-air or semi-confined archaeological sites.

  20. Laboratory in a box: wearable sensors and its advantages for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Bijan; Khan, Tahir; Wrobel, James

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, many gait studies explored potential gait alteration due to various disorders in the gait lab and using camera based systems and force platforms. However, these strategies may not replicate normal outdoor walking. Using this equipment, it is more difficult to measure the variability of walking which is important for maintaining balance and responding to different walking challenges. Additionally, subjects may mask their problem or exaggerate it when they are walking in a short walking distance offered by laboratory based-technology. This study overviews some of the key advantages of wearable technology compared to laboratory-based instrument. Additionally, it explored gait patterns over ample distance of walking compared to walking distance restricted to a gait laboratory environment. Walking patterns of ten healthy young subjects were examined using a wearable sensor technology in a random order over a distance of 7 m, 14 m, and 20 m. Results suggest that participants walk significantly faster by increasing walking distance on average by 15% and 3% when walking distance was increased respectively from 7 m to 14 and from 14 m to 20 m (p<0.05). Interestingly despite a high test-retest reliability for averaged gait parameters (ICC>0.89), the test-retest reliability for gait variability was only acceptable during 20 m walking distance (ICC<0.3 for 7 m and 14 m v. ICC=0.65 for 20 m). Taken together, our findings indicate that for valid and reliable assessment of gait parameters, gait should be performed over ample walking distances. Body worn sensor technology facilitates assessing gait outside of a gait laboratory, over ample walking distance, different footwear condition, different walking surface, and in environment where mimics better true environment where the subject is active in.

  1. Gait performance is not influenced by working memory when walking at a self-selected pace.

    PubMed

    Grubaugh, Jordan; Rhea, Christopher K

    2014-02-01

    Gait performance exhibits patterns within the stride-to-stride variability that can be indexed using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Previous work employing DFA has shown that gait patterns can be influenced by constraints, such as natural aging or disease, and they are informative regarding a person's functional ability. Many activities of daily living require concurrent performance in the cognitive and gait domains; specifically working memory is commonly engaged while walking, which is considered dual-tasking. It is unknown if taxing working memory while walking influences gait performance as assessed by DFA. This study used a dual-tasking paradigm to determine if performance decrements are observed in gait or working memory when performed concurrently. Healthy young participants (N = 16) performed a working memory task (automated operation span task) and a gait task (walking at a self-selected speed on a treadmill) in single- and dual-task conditions. A second dual-task condition (reading while walking) was included to control for visual attention, but also introduced a task that taxed working memory over the long term. All trials involving gait lasted at least 10 min. Performance in the working memory task was indexed using five dependent variables (absolute score, partial score, speed error, accuracy error, and math error), while gait performance was indexed by quantifying the mean, standard deviation, and DFA α of the stride interval time series. Two multivariate analyses of variance (one for gait and one for working memory) were used to examine performance in the single- and dual-task conditions. No differences were observed in any of the gait or working memory dependent variables as a function of task condition. The results suggest the locomotor system is adaptive enough to complete a working memory task without compromising gait performance when walking at a self-selected pace.

  2. A Personalized Multi-Channel FES Controller Based on Muscle Synergies to Support Gait Rehabilitation after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Simona; Chia Bejarano, Noelia; Ambrosini, Emilia; Nardone, Antonio; Turcato, Anna M.; Monticone, Marco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    It has been largely suggested in neuroscience literature that to generate a vast variety of movements, the Central Nervous System (CNS) recruits a reduced set of coordinated patterns of muscle activities, defined as muscle synergies. Recent neurophysiological studies have recommended the analysis of muscle synergies to finely assess the patient's impairment, to design personalized interventions based on the specific nature of the impairment, and to evaluate the treatment outcomes. In this scope, the aim of this study was to design a personalized multi-channel functional electrical stimulation (FES) controller for gait training, integrating three novel aspects: (1) the FES strategy was based on healthy muscle synergies in order to mimic the neural solutions adopted by the CNS to generate locomotion; (2) the FES strategy was personalized according to an initial locomotion assessment of the patient and was designed to specifically activate the impaired biomechanical functions; (3) the FES strategy was mapped accurately on the altered gait kinematics providing a maximal synchronization between patient's volitional gait and stimulation patterns. The novel intervention was tested on two chronic stroke patients. They underwent a 4-week intervention consisting of 30-min sessions of FES-supported treadmill walking three times per week. The two patients were characterized by a mild gait disability (walking speed > 0.8 m/s) at baseline. However, before treatment both patients presented only three independent muscle synergies during locomotion, resembling two different gait abnormalities. After treatment, the number of extracted synergies became four and they increased their resemblance with the physiological muscle synergies, which indicated a general improvement in muscle coordination. The originally merged synergies seemed to regain their distinct role in locomotion control. The treatment benefits were more evident for one patient, who achieved a clinically important change

  3. Terminology and forensic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Birch, Ivan; Vernon, Wesley; Walker, Jeremy; Young, Maria

    2015-07-01

    The use of appropriate terminology is a fundamental aspect of forensic gait analysis. The language used in forensic gait analysis is an amalgam of that used in clinical practice, podiatric biomechanics and the wider field of biomechanics. The result can often be a lack of consistency in the language used, the definitions used and the clarity of the message given. Examples include the use of 'gait' and 'walking' as synonymous terms, confusion between 'step' and 'stride', the mixing of anatomical, positional and pathological descriptors, and inability to describe appropriately movements of major body segments such as the torso. The purpose of this paper is to share the well-established definitions of the fundamental parameters of gait, common to all professions, and advocate their use in forensic gait analysis to establish commonality. The paper provides guidance on the selection and use of appropriate terminology in the description of gait in the forensic context. This paper considers the established definitions of the terms commonly used, identifies those terms which have the potential to confuse readers, and suggests a framework of terminology which should be utilised in forensic gait analysis.

  4. Morphological computation of multi-gaited robot locomotion based on free vibration.

    PubMed

    Reis, Murat; Yu, Xiaoxiang; Maheshwari, Nandan; Iida, Fumiya

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the study of gait patterns in both animals and robots, because it allows us to systematically investigate the underlying mechanisms of energetics, dexterity, and autonomy of adaptive systems. In particular, for morphological computation research, the control of dynamic legged robots and their gait transitions provides additional insights into the guiding principles from a synthetic viewpoint for the emergence of sensible self-organizing behaviors in more-degrees-of-freedom systems. This article presents a novel approach to the study of gait patterns, which makes use of the intrinsic mechanical dynamics of robotic systems. Each of the robots consists of a U-shaped elastic beam and exploits free vibration to generate different locomotion patterns. We developed a simplified physics model of these robots, and through experiments in simulation and real-world robotic platforms, we show three distinctive mechanisms for generating different gait patterns in these robots.

  5. Statistical Removal of Shadow for Applications to Gait Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    methods. “Human movement analysis aims at gathering quantitative information about the mechanics of the musculo -skeletal system during the execution of...basic walking pattern, but their gaits are influence[d] by functions of their entire musculo -skeletal structure” (Post, 2006:1). The individuality of

  6. Quadrupedal gaits in hexapod animals - inter-leg coordination in free-walking adult stick insects.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Martyna; Godlewska, Elzbieta; Schmidt, Joachim; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2012-12-15

    The analysis of inter-leg coordination in insect walking is generally a study of six-legged locomotion. For decades, the stick insect Carausius morosus has been instrumental for unravelling the rules and mechanisms that control leg coordination in hexapeds. We analysed inter-leg coordination in C. morosus that freely walked on straight paths on plane surfaces with different slopes. Consecutive 1.7 s sections were assigned inter-leg coordination patterns (which we call gaits) based on footfall patterns. Regular gaits, i.e. wave, tetrapod or tripod gaits, occurred in different proportions depending on surface slopes. Tetrapod gaits were observed most frequently, wave gaits only occurred on 90 deg inclining slopes and tripod gaits occurred most often on 15 deg declining slopes, i.e. in 40% of the sections. Depending on the slope, 36-66% of the sections were assigned irregular gaits. Irregular gaits were mostly due to multiple stepping by the front legs, which is perhaps probing behaviour, not phase coupled to the middle legs' cycles. In irregular gaits, middle leg and hindleg coordination was regular, related to quadrupedal walk and wave gaits. Apparently, front legs uncouple from and couple to the walking system without compromising middle leg and hindleg coordination. In front leg amputees, the remaining legs were strictly coordinated. In hindleg and middle leg amputees, the front legs continued multiple stepping. The coordination of middle leg amputees was maladapted, with front legs and hindlegs performing multiple steps or ipsilateral legs being in simultaneous swing. Thus, afferent information from middle legs might be necessary for a regular hindleg stepping pattern.

  7. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  8. Gait modification strategies in trunk over right stance phase in patients with right anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongliang; Li, Nannan; Wang, Yubin; Jiang, Shuyun; Lin, Jianping; Zhu, Wenhui

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the gait modification strategies of trunk over right stance phase in patients with right anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACL-D). Thirty-six patients with right chronic ACL-D were recruited, as well as 36 controls. A 3D optical video motion capture system was used during gait and stair ambulation. Kinematic variables of the trunk and kinematic and kinetic variables of the knee were calculated. Patients with chronic right ACL-D exhibited many significant abnormalities compared with controls. Trunk rotation with right shoulder trailing over the right stance phase was lower in all five motion patterns (P<0.05). Compared with controls, trunk posterior lean was higher from descending stairs to walking when the knee sagittal plane moment ended (P<0.01). Trunk lateral flexion to the left was higher when ascending stairs at the start of right knee coronal plane moment (P=0.01), when descending stairs at the maximal knee coronal plane moment (P<0.01), and when descending stairs at the end of the knee coronal plane moment (P=0.03). Trunk rotation with right shoulder forward was higher at the minimal knee transverse plane moment (P<0.01) and when the knee transverse plane moment ended (P<0.01); during walking, trunk rotation with right shoulder trailing was lower at other knee moments during other walking patterns (all P<0.01). In conclusion, gait modification strategies of the trunk were apparent in patients with ACL-D. These results provide new insights about diagnosis and rehabilitation of chronic ACL-D (better use of walking and stair tasks as part of a rehabilitation program).

  9. Ultrasonic Measurement of Dynamic Muscle Behavior for Poststroke Hemiparetic Gait

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Shi, Wenxiu; Wang, Jun; Xiang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of the hemiparesis status for a poststroke patient is still challenging. This study aims to measure and investigate the dynamic muscle behavior in poststroke hemiparetic gait using ultrasonography. Twelve hemiparetic patients walked on a treadmill, and EMG, joint angle, and ultrasonography were simultaneously recorded for the gastrocnemius medialis muscle. Pennation angle was automatically extracted from ultrasonography using a tracking algorithm reported previously. The characteristics of EMG, joint angle, and pennation angle in gait cycle were calculated for both (affected and unaffected) sides of lower limbs. The results suggest that pennation angle could work as an important morphological index to continuous muscle contraction. The change pattern of pennation angle between the affected and unaffected sides is different from that of EMG. These findings indicate that morphological parameter extracted from ultrasonography can provide different information from that provided by EMG for hemiparetic gait. PMID:28232945

  10. Secure and privacy enhanced gait authentication on smart phone.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thang; Choi, Deokjai

    2014-01-01

    Smart environments established by the development of mobile technology have brought vast benefits to human being. However, authentication mechanisms on portable smart devices, particularly conventional biometric based approaches, still remain security and privacy concerns. These traditional systems are mostly based on pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms, wherein original biometric templates or extracted features are stored under unconcealed form for performing matching with a new biometric sample in the authentication phase. In this paper, we propose a novel gait based authentication using biometric cryptosystem to enhance the system security and user privacy on the smart phone. Extracted gait features are merely used to biometrically encrypt a cryptographic key which is acted as the authentication factor. Gait signals are acquired by using an inertial sensor named accelerometer in the mobile device and error correcting codes are adopted to deal with the natural variation of gait measurements. We evaluate our proposed system on a dataset consisting of gait samples of 34 volunteers. We achieved the lowest false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR) of 3.92% and 11.76%, respectively, in terms of key length of 50 bits.

  11. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity. PMID:27622734

  12. Secure and Privacy Enhanced Gait Authentication on Smart Phone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Deokjai

    2014-01-01

    Smart environments established by the development of mobile technology have brought vast benefits to human being. However, authentication mechanisms on portable smart devices, particularly conventional biometric based approaches, still remain security and privacy concerns. These traditional systems are mostly based on pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms, wherein original biometric templates or extracted features are stored under unconcealed form for performing matching with a new biometric sample in the authentication phase. In this paper, we propose a novel gait based authentication using biometric cryptosystem to enhance the system security and user privacy on the smart phone. Extracted gait features are merely used to biometrically encrypt a cryptographic key which is acted as the authentication factor. Gait signals are acquired by using an inertial sensor named accelerometer in the mobile device and error correcting codes are adopted to deal with the natural variation of gait measurements. We evaluate our proposed system on a dataset consisting of gait samples of 34 volunteers. We achieved the lowest false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR) of 3.92% and 11.76%, respectively, in terms of key length of 50 bits. PMID:24955403

  13. Emotion recognition using Kinect motion capture data of human gaits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shun; Cui, Liqing; Zhu, Changye; Li, Baobin

    2016-01-01

    Automatic emotion recognition is of great value in many applications, however, to fully display the application value of emotion recognition, more portable, non-intrusive, inexpensive technologies need to be developed. Human gaits could reflect the walker’s emotional state, and could be an information source for emotion recognition. This paper proposed a novel method to recognize emotional state through human gaits by using Microsoft Kinect, a low-cost, portable, camera-based sensor. Fifty-nine participants’ gaits under neutral state, induced anger and induced happiness were recorded by two Kinect cameras, and the original data were processed through joint selection, coordinate system transformation, sliding window gauss filtering, differential operation, and data segmentation. Features of gait patterns were extracted from 3-dimentional coordinates of 14 main body joints by Fourier transformation and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The classifiers NaiveBayes, RandomForests, LibSVM and SMO (Sequential Minimal Optimization) were trained and evaluated, and the accuracy of recognizing anger and happiness from neutral state achieved 80.5% and 75.4%. Although the results of distinguishing angry and happiness states were not ideal in current study, it showed the feasibility of automatically recognizing emotional states from gaits, with the characteristics meeting the application requirements. PMID:27672492

  14. Emotion recognition using Kinect motion capture data of human gaits.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun; Cui, Liqing; Zhu, Changye; Li, Baobin; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Tingshao

    2016-01-01

    Automatic emotion recognition is of great value in many applications, however, to fully display the application value of emotion recognition, more portable, non-intrusive, inexpensive technologies need to be developed. Human gaits could reflect the walker's emotional state, and could be an information source for emotion recognition. This paper proposed a novel method to recognize emotional state through human gaits by using Microsoft Kinect, a low-cost, portable, camera-based sensor. Fifty-nine participants' gaits under neutral state, induced anger and induced happiness were recorded by two Kinect cameras, and the original data were processed through joint selection, coordinate system transformation, sliding window gauss filtering, differential operation, and data segmentation. Features of gait patterns were extracted from 3-dimentional coordinates of 14 main body joints by Fourier transformation and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The classifiers NaiveBayes, RandomForests, LibSVM and SMO (Sequential Minimal Optimization) were trained and evaluated, and the accuracy of recognizing anger and happiness from neutral state achieved 80.5% and 75.4%. Although the results of distinguishing angry and happiness states were not ideal in current study, it showed the feasibility of automatically recognizing emotional states from gaits, with the characteristics meeting the application requirements.

  15. When human walking becomes random walking: fractal analysis and modeling of gait rhythm fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Hausdorff, J M; Ashkenazy, Y; Peng, C K; Ivanov, P C; Stanley, H E; Goldberger, A L

    2001-12-15

    We present a random walk, fractal analysis of the stride-to-stride fluctuations in the human gait rhythm. The gait of healthy young adults is scale-free with long-range correlations extending over hundreds of strides. This fractal scaling changes characteristically with maturation in children and older adults and becomes almost completely uncorrelated with certain neurologic diseases. Stochastic modeling of the gait rhythm dynamics, based on transitions between different "neural centers", reproduces distinctive statistical properties of the gait pattern. By tuning one model parameter, the hopping (transition) range, the model can describe alterations in gait dynamics from childhood to adulthood including a decrease in the correlation and volatility exponents with maturation.

  16. Influence of velocity on variability in gait kinematics: implications for recognition in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sylvia X M; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjaer, Tine; Lynnerup, Niels; Simonsen, Erik B

    2014-09-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) footage is often available from crime scenes and may be used to compare perpetrators with suspects. Usually, the footage comprises incomplete gait cycles at different velocities, making gait pattern identification from crimes difficult. This study investigated the concurrence of joint angles throughout a gait cycle at three different velocities (3.0, 4.5, 6.0 km/h). Six datasets at each velocity were collected from 16 men. A variability range VR throughout the gait cycle at each velocity for each joint angle for each person was calculated. The joint angles at each velocity were compared pairwise, and whenever this showed values within the VR of this velocity, the case was positive. By adding the positives throughout the gait cycle, phases with high and low concurrences were located; peak concurrence was observed at mid-stance phase. Striving for the same velocity for the suspect and perpetrator is recommended.

  17. When human walking becomes random walking: fractal analysis and modeling of gait rhythm fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Peng, Chang-K.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Goldberger, Ary L.

    2001-12-01

    We present a random walk, fractal analysis of the stride-to-stride fluctuations in the human gait rhythm. The gait of healthy young adults is scale-free with long-range correlations extending over hundreds of strides. This fractal scaling changes characteristically with maturation in children and older adults and becomes almost completely uncorrelated with certain neurologic diseases. Stochastic modeling of the gait rhythm dynamics, based on transitions between different “neural centers”, reproduces distinctive statistical properties of the gait pattern. By tuning one model parameter, the hopping (transition) range, the model can describe alterations in gait dynamics from childhood to adulthood - including a decrease in the correlation and volatility exponents with maturation.

  18. Verbal instructional sets to normalise the temporal and spatial gait variables in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Behrman, A.; Teitelbaum, P.; Cauraugh, J.

    1998-01-01

    Gait in Parkinson's disease is characterised by slowed velocity; shuffling, small steps; and absent arm swing. Drug therapy intervention is beneficial in improving mobility, though with prolonged use its effects may diminish. The purpose of this study was to examine whether Parkinsonian patients could improve their gait patterns in response to five instructional sets: natural walking; walking while deliberately swinging the arms; walking with large steps; fast walking; and walking while counting aloud. Eight subjects with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and eight age matched control subjects were tested using motion analysis. The findings indicated that parkinsonian patients followed the instructions which immediately altered a series of single walking variables. Simultaneously, automatically activated changes occurred in other gait variables producing more normal gait. The instructional set is a strategy which can aid normalisation of Parkinsonian gait although its benefits may depend on the stage of disease progression and the degree of attention to the instructions.

 PMID:9771792

  19. Effect of Task Specific Exercises, Gait Training, and Visual Biofeedback on Equinovarus Gait among Individuals with Stroke: Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Khallaf, Mohamed Elsayed; Gabr, Ahmed Maher; Fayed, Eman Elsayed

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Equinovarus foot is a common sign after stroke. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback on correcting equinovarus gait among individuals with stroke. Subjects and Methods. Sixteen subjects with ischemic stroke were randomly assigned to two equal groups (G1 and G2). All the patients were at stage 4 of motor recovery of foot according to Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment without any cognitive dysfunction. E-med pedography was used to measure contact time, as well as force underneath hind and forefoot during walking. Outcome measures were collected before randomization, one week after the last session, and four weeks later. Participants in G1 received task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback and a traditional physical therapy program was applied for participants in G2 for 8 weeks. Results. Significant improvement was observed among G1 patients (P ≤ 0.05) which lasts one month after therapy termination. On the other hand, there were no significant differences between measurements of the participants in G2. Between groups comparison also revealed a significant improvement in G1 with long lasting effect. Conclusion. The results of this study showed a positive long lasting effect of the task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback on equinovarus gait pattern among individuals with stroke. PMID:25538853

  20. A Mobile Kalman-Filter Based Solution for the Real-Time Estimation of Spatio-Temporal Gait Parameters.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Alberto; Ginis, Pieter; Hardegger, Michael; Casamassima, Filippo; Rocchi, Laura; Chiari, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Gait impairments are among the most disabling symptoms in several musculoskeletal and neurological conditions, severely limiting personal autonomy. Wearable gait sensors have been attracting attention as diagnostic tool for gait and are emerging as promising tool for tutoring and guiding gait execution. If their popularity is continuously growing, still there is room for improvement, especially towards more accurate solutions for spatio-temporal gait parameters estimation. We present an implementation of a zero-velocity-update gait analysis system based on a Kalman filter and off-the-shelf shoe-worn inertial sensors. The algorithms for gait events and step length estimation were specifically designed to comply with pathological gait patterns. More so, an Android app was deployed to support fully wearable and stand-alone real-time gait analysis. Twelve healthy subjects were enrolled to preliminarily tune the algorithms; afterwards sixteen persons with Parkinson's disease were enrolled for a validation study. Over the 1314 strides collected on patients at three different speeds, the total root mean square difference on step length estimation between this system and a gold standard was 2.9%. This shows that the proposed method allows for an accurate gait analysis and paves the way to a new generation of mobile devices usable anywhere for monitoring and intervention.

  1. Fast head tilt has only a minor effect on quick compensatory reactions during the regulation of stance and gait.

    PubMed

    Dietz, V; Horstmann, G A; Berger, W

    1988-01-01

    Sudden tilts of the head to the front or rear were induced during stance, balancing, gait and during perturbations of gait. The most prominent response in the leg muscle electromyogram (e.m.g.) to head tilt occurred in the tibialis anterior muscle (latency about 55 ms) following a backward tilt induced during balancing. During stance and gait, the e.m.g. activity related to head tilt was only a minor component of the leg muscle activity normally occurring during gait. When the head tilt was induced shortly after a perturbation of gait (treadmill acceleration impulse), the compensatory reaction in the leg muscles did not significantly differ from that seen after the gait perturbation alone. In addition, the rate of acceleration of the head was tested against the compensatory e.m.g. responses: No correlation of influence could be discerned. The results indicate that sudden head tilts and the resulting head acceleration have little influence on the e.m.g. patterns that occur during gait and perturbations of gait. It is assumed that these patterns are regulated by central programs, and that the compensation for leg perturbation is achieved mainly by spinal reflex mechanisms. It is discussed whether the lack of head tilt responses is the result of an antagonistic vestibular-neck interaction, or whether it indicates a reduced effectiveness of vestibulo- and cervico-spinal reflexes during gait.

  2. Multi-complexity ensemble measures for gait time series analysis: application to diagnostics, monitoring and biometrics.

    PubMed

    Gavrishchaka, Valeriy; Senyukova, Olga; Davis, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have proposed to use complementary complexity measures discovered by boosting-like ensemble learning for the enhancement of quantitative indicators dealing with necessarily short physiological time series. We have confirmed robustness of such multi-complexity measures for heart rate variability analysis with the emphasis on detection of emerging and intermittent cardiac abnormalities. Recently, we presented preliminary results suggesting that such ensemble-based approach could be also effective in discovering universal meta-indicators for early detection and convenient monitoring of neurological abnormalities using gait time series. Here, we argue and demonstrate that these multi-complexity ensemble measures for gait time series analysis could have significantly wider application scope ranging from diagnostics and early detection of physiological regime change to gait-based biometrics applications.

  3. Inertial sensor based gait analysis discriminates subjects with and without visual impairment caused by simulated macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kanzler, Christoph M; Barth, Jens; Klucken, Jochen; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2016-08-01

    Macular degeneration is the third leading cause of blindness worldwide and the leading cause of blindness in the developing world. The analysis of gait parameters can be used to assess the influence of macular degeneration on gait. This study examines the effect of macular degeneration on gait using inertial sensor based 3D spatio-temporal gait parameters. We acquired gait data from 21 young and healthy subjects during a 40 m obstacle walk. All subjects had to perform the gait trial with and without macular degeneration simulation glasses. The order of starting with or without glasses alternated between each subject in order to test for training effects. Multiple 3D spatio-temporal gait parameters were calculated for the normal vision as well as the impaired vision groups. The parameters trial time, stride time, stride time coefficient of variation (CV), stance time, stance time CV, stride length, cadence, gait velocity and angle at toe off showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. Training effects were visible for the trials which started without vision impairment. Inter-group differences in the gait pattern occurred due to an increased sense of insecurity related with the loss of visual acuity from the simulation glasses. In summary, we showed that 3D spatio-temporal gait parameters derived from inertial sensor data are viable to detect differences in the gait pattern of subjects with and without a macular degeneration simulation. We believe that this study provides the basis for an in-depth analysis regarding the impact of macular degeneration on gait.

  4. The effects of gait strategy on metabolic rate and indicators of stability during downhill walking.

    PubMed

    Monsch, E D; Franz, C O; Dean, J C

    2012-07-26

    When walking at a given speed, humans often appear to prefer gait patterns that minimize metabolic rate, thereby maximizing metabolic economy. However, recent experiments have demonstrated that humans do not maximize economy when walking downhill. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this non-metabolically optimal behavior is the result of a trade-off between metabolic economy and gait stability. We hypothesized that humans have the ability to modulate their gait strategy to increase either metabolic economy or stability, but that increase in one measure will be accompanied by decrease in the other. Subjects walked downhill using gait strategies ranging from risky to conservative, which were either prescribed by verbal instructions or induced by the threat of perturbations. We quantified spatiotemporal gait characteristics, metabolic rate and several indicators of stability previously associated with fall risk: stride period variability; step width variability; Lyapunov exponents; Floquet multipliers; and stride period fractal index. When subjects walked using conservative gait strategies, stride periods and lengths decreased, metabolic rate increased, and anteroposterior maximum Lyapunov exponents increased, which has previously been interpreted as an indicator of decreased stability. These results do not provide clear support for the proposed trade-off between economy and stability, particularly when stability is approximated using complex metrics. However, several gait pattern changes previously linked to increased fall risk were observed when our healthy subjects walked with a conservative strategy, suggesting that these changes may be a response to, rather than a cause of, increased fall risk.

  5. Gait and cognition: Mapping the global and discrete relationships in ageing and neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, Rosie; Lord, Sue; Bunce, Jennifer; Burn, David; Rochester, Lynn

    2016-05-01

    Recent research highlights the association of gait and cognition in older adults but a stronger understanding is needed to discern coincident pathophysiology, patterns of change, examine underlying mechanisms and aid diagnosis. This structured review mapped associations and predictors of gait and cognition in older adults with and without cognitive impairment, and Parkinson's disease. Fifty papers out of an initial yield of 22,128 were reviewed and a model of gait guided analysis and interpretation. Associations were dominated by the pace domain of gait; the most frequently studied domain. In older adults pace was identified as a predictor for cognitive decline. Where comprehensive measurement of gait was conducted, more specific pathological patterns of association were evident highlighting the importance of this approach. This review confirmed a robust association between gait and cognition and argues for a selective, comprehensive measurement approach. Results suggest gait may be a surrogate marker of cognitive impairment and cognitive decline. Understanding the specific nature of this relationship is essential for refinement of diagnostics and development of novel therapies.

  6. Differences in implementation of gait analysis recommendations based on affiliation with a gait laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wren, Tishya A L; Elihu, Koorosh J; Mansour, Shaun; Rethlefsen, Susan A; Ryan, Deirdre D; Smith, Michelle L; Kay, Robert M

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the extent to which gait analysis recommendations are followed by orthopedic surgeons with varying degrees of affiliation with the gait laboratory. Surgical data were retrospectively examined for 95 patients with cerebral palsy who underwent lower extremity orthopedic surgery following gait analysis. Thirty-three patients were referred by two surgeons directly affiliated with the gait laboratory (direct affiliation), 44 were referred by five surgeons from the same institution but not directly affiliated with the gait laboratory (institutional affiliation), and 18 were referred by 10 surgeons from other institutions (no affiliation). Data on specific surgeries were collected from the gait analysis referral, gait analysis report, and operative notes. Adherence to the gait analysis recommendations was calculated by dividing the number of procedures where the surgery followed the gait analysis recommendation (numerator) by the total number of procedures initially planned, recommended by gait analysis, or done (denominator). Adherence with the gait analysis recommendations was 97%, 94%, and 77% for the direct, institutional, and no affiliation groups, respectively. Procedures recommended for additions to the surgical plan were added 98%, 87%, and 77% of the time. Procedures recommended for elimination were dropped 100%, 89%, and 88% of the time. Of 81 patients who had specific surgical plans prior to gait analysis, changes were implemented in 84% (68/81) following gait analysis recommendations. Gait analysis influences the treatment decisions of surgeons regardless of affiliation with the gait laboratory, although the influence is stronger for surgeons who practice within the same institution as the gait laboratory.

  7. Combined robotic-aided gait training and 3D gait analysis provide objective treatment and assessment of gait in children and adolescents with Acquired Hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Erika; Beretta, Elena; Altomonte, Daniele; Formica, Francesca; Strazzer, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a fully objective rehabilitative and assessment process of the gait abilities in children suffering from Acquired Hemiplegia (AH), we studied the combined employment of robotic-aided gait training (RAGT) and 3D-Gait Analysis (GA). A group of 12 patients with AH underwent 20 sessions of RAGT in addition to traditional manual physical therapy (PT). All the patients were evaluated before and after the training by using the Gross Motor Function Measures (GMFM), the Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ), and the 6 Minutes Walk Test. They also received GA before and after RAGT+PT. Finally, results were compared with those obtained from a control group of 3 AH children who underwent PT only. After the training, the GMFM and FAQ showed significant improvement in patients receiving RAGT+PT. GA highlighted significant improvement in stance symmetry and step length of the affected limb. Moreover, pelvic tilt increased, and hip kinematics on the sagittal plane revealed statistically significant increase in the range of motion during the hip flex-extension. Our data suggest that the combined program RAGT+PT induces improvements in functional activities and gait pattern in children with AH, and it demonstrates that the combined employment of RAGT and 3D-GA ensures a fully objective rehabilitative program.

  8. Stability in skipping gaits

    PubMed Central

    Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative to walking and running, humans are able to skip. However, adult humans avoid it. This fact seems to be related to the higher energetic costs associated with skipping. Still, children, some birds, lemurs and lizards use skipping gaits during daily locomotion. We combined experimental data on humans with numerical simulations to test whether stability and robustness motivate this choice. Parameters for modelling were obtained from 10 male subjects. They locomoted using unilateral skipping along a 12 m runway. We used a bipedal spring loaded inverted pendulum to model and to describe the dynamics of skipping. The subjects displayed higher peak ground reaction forces and leg stiffness in the first landing leg (trailing leg) compared to the second landing leg (leading leg). In numerical simulations, we found that skipping is stable across an amazing speed range from skipping on the spot to fast running speeds. Higher leg stiffness in the trailing leg permits longer strides at same system energy. However, this strategy is at the same time less robust to sudden drop perturbations than skipping with a stiffer leading leg. A slightly higher stiffness in the leading leg is most robust, but might be costlier. PMID:28018651

  9. Stability in skipping gaits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrada, Emanuel; Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-11-01

    As an alternative to walking and running, humans are able to skip. However, adult humans avoid it. This fact seems to be related to the higher energetic costs associated with skipping. Still, children, some birds, lemurs and lizards use skipping gaits during daily locomotion. We combined experimental data on humans with numerical simulations to test whether stability and robustness motivate this choice. Parameters for modelling were obtained from 10 male subjects. They locomoted using unilateral skipping along a 12 m runway. We used a bipedal spring loaded inverted pendulum to model and to describe the dynamics of skipping. The subjects displayed higher peak ground reaction forces and leg stiffness in the first landing leg (trailing leg) compared to the second landing leg (leading leg). In numerical simulations, we found that skipping is stable across an amazing speed range from skipping on the spot to fast running speeds. Higher leg stiffness in the trailing leg permits longer strides at same system energy. However, this strategy is at the same time less robust to sudden drop perturbations than skipping with a stiffer leading leg. A slightly higher stiffness in the leading leg is most robust, but might be costlier.

  10. Stability in skipping gaits.

    PubMed

    Andrada, Emanuel; Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-11-01

    As an alternative to walking and running, humans are able to skip. However, adult humans avoid it. This fact seems to be related to the higher energetic costs associated with skipping. Still, children, some birds, lemurs and lizards use skipping gaits during daily locomotion. We combined experimental data on humans with numerical simulations to test whether stability and robustness motivate this choice. Parameters for modelling were obtained from 10 male subjects. They locomoted using unilateral skipping along a 12 m runway. We used a bipedal spring loaded inverted pendulum to model and to describe the dynamics of skipping. The subjects displayed higher peak ground reaction forces and leg stiffness in the first landing leg (trailing leg) compared to the second landing leg (leading leg). In numerical simulations, we found that skipping is stable across an amazing speed range from skipping on the spot to fast running speeds. Higher leg stiffness in the trailing leg permits longer strides at same system energy. However, this strategy is at the same time less robust to sudden drop perturbations than skipping with a stiffer leading leg. A slightly higher stiffness in the leading leg is most robust, but might be costlier.

  11. Modelling gait transition in two-legged animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Carla M. A.; Santos, Alexandra P.

    2011-12-01

    The study of locomotor patterns has been a major research goal in the last decades. Understanding how intralimb and interlimb coordination works out so well in animals' locomotion is a hard and challenging task. Many models have been proposed to model animal's rhythms. These models have also been applied to the control of rhythmic movements of adaptive legged robots, namely biped, quadruped and other designs. In this paper we study gait transition in a central pattern generator (CPG) model for bipeds, the 4-cells model. This model is proposed by Golubitsky, Stewart, Buono and Collins and is studied further by Pinto and Golubitsky. We briefly resume the work done by Pinto and Golubitsky. We compute numerically gait transition in the 4-cells CPG model for bipeds. We use Morris-Lecar equations and Wilson-Cowan equations as the internal dynamics for each cell. We also consider two types of coupling between the cells: diffusive and synaptic. We obtain secondary gaits by bifurcation of primary gaits, by varying the coupling strengths. Nevertheless, some bifurcating branches could not be obtained, emphasizing the fact that despite analytically those bifurcations exist, finding them is a hard task and requires variation of other parameters of the equations. We note that the type of coupling did not influence the results.

  12. Gait analysis in hip viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, L

    2013-10-31

    Hip is a site very commonly affected by osteoarthritis and the intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid in the management of osteoarthritic pain is increasingly used. However, the debate about its usefulness is still ongoing, as not all results of clinical trials confirm its effectiveness. In order to achieve the best outcome, clinical assessment and treatment choices should be based on subjective outcome, pathological and mechanical findings that should be integrated with qualitative analysis of human movement. After viscosupplementation, clinical trials often evaluate as endpoint subjective outcomes (i.e. pain visual analogic scale) and static imaging such as radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In our clinical practice we use gait analysis as part of rehabilitation protocol to measure performance, enhancement and changes of several biomechanical factors. Taking advantage of available resources (BTS Bioengineering gait analysis Elite System) we studied a patient's gait after ultrasound guided hip injections for viscosupplementation. He showed an early clinical and biomechanical improvement during walking after a single intra articular injection of hyaluronic acid. Gait analysis parameters obtained suggest that the pre-treatment slower speed may be caused by antalgic walking patterns, the need for pain control and muscle weakness. After hip viscosupplementation, the joint displayed different temporal, kinetic and kinematic parameters associated with improved pain patterns.

  13. Probabilistic gait classification in children with cerebral palsy: a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Van Gestel, Leen; De Laet, Tinne; Di Lello, Enrico; Bruyninckx, Herman; Molenaers, Guy; Van Campenhout, Anja; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Schwartz, Mike; Wambacq, Hans; De Cock, Paul; Desloovere, Kaat

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) generates a wealth of highly variable data. Gait classifications help to reduce, simplify and interpret this vast amount of 3DGA data and thereby assist and facilitate clinical decision making in the treatment of CP. CP gait is often a mix of several clinically accepted distinct gait patterns. Therefore, there is a need for a classification which characterizes each CP gait by different degrees of membership for several gait patterns, which are considered by clinical experts to be highly relevant. In this respect, this paper introduces Bayesian networks (BN) as a new approach for classification of 3DGA data of the ankle and knee in children with CP. A BN is a probabilistic graphical model that represents a set of random variables and their conditional dependencies via a directed acyclic graph. Furthermore, they provide an explicit way of introducing clinical expertise as prior knowledge to guide the BN in its analysis of the data and the underlying clinically relevant relationships. BNs also enable to classify gait on a continuum of patterns, as their outcome consists of a set of probabilistic membership values for different clinically accepted patterns. A group of 139 patients with CP was recruited and divided into a training- (n=80% of all patients) and a validation-dataset (n=20% of all patients). An average classification accuracy of 88.4% was reached. The BN of this study achieved promising accuracy rates and was found to be successful for classifying ankle and knee joint motion on a continuum of different clinically relevant gait patterns.

  14. Gait post-stroke: Pathophysiology and rehabilitation strategies.

    PubMed

    Beyaert, C; Vasa, R; Frykberg, G E

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed neural control and biomechanical description of gait in both non-disabled and post-stroke subjects. In addition, we reviewed most of the gait rehabilitation strategies currently in use or in development and observed their principles in relation to recent pathophysiology of post-stroke gait. In both non-disabled and post-stroke subjects, motor control is organized on a task-oriented basis using a common set of a few muscle modules to simultaneously achieve body support, balance control, and forward progression during gait. Hemiparesis following stroke is due to disruption of descending neural pathways, usually with no direct lesion of the brainstem and cerebellar structures involved in motor automatic processes. Post-stroke, improvements of motor activities including standing and locomotion are variable but are typically characterized by a common postural behaviour which involves the unaffected side more for body support and balance control, likely in response to initial muscle weakness of the affected side. Various rehabilitation strategies are regularly used or in development, targeting muscle activity, postural and gait tasks, using more or less high-technology equipment. Reduced walking speed often improves with time and with various rehabilitation strategies, but asymmetric postural behaviour during standing and walking is often reinforced, maintained, or only transitorily decreased. This asymmetric compensatory postural behaviour appears to be robust, driven by support and balance tasks maintaining the predominant use of the unaffected side over the initially impaired affected side. Based on these elements, stroke rehabilitation including affected muscle strengthening and often stretching would first need to correct the postural asymmetric pattern by exploiting postural automatic processes in various particular motor tasks secondarily beneficial to gait.

  15. Reduced high-frequency motor neuron firing, EMG fractionation, and gait variability in awake walking ALS mice

    PubMed Central

    Hadzipasic, Muhamed; Ni, Weiming; Nagy, Maria; Steenrod, Natalie; McGinley, Matthew J.; Kaushal, Adi; Thomas, Eleanor; McCormick, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease prominently featuring motor neuron (MN) loss and paralysis. A recent study using whole-cell patch clamp recording of MNs in acute spinal cord slices from symptomatic adult ALS mice showed that the fastest firing MNs are preferentially lost. To measure the in vivo effects of such loss, awake symptomatic-stage ALS mice performing self-initiated walking on a wheel were studied. Both single-unit extracellular recordings within spinal cord MN pools for lower leg flexor and extensor muscles and the electromyograms (EMGs) of the corresponding muscles were recorded. In the ALS mice, we observed absent or truncated high-frequency firing of MNs at the appropriate time in the step cycle and step-to-step variability of the EMG, as well as flexor-extensor coactivation. In turn, kinematic analysis of walking showed step-to-step variability of gait. At the MN level, the higher frequencies absent from recordings from mutant mice corresponded with the upper range of frequencies observed for fast-firing MNs in earlier slice measurements. These results suggest that, in SOD1-linked ALS mice, symptoms are a product of abnormal MN firing due at least in part to loss of neurons that fire at high frequency, associated with altered EMG patterns and hindlimb kinematics during gait. PMID:27821773

  16. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  17. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  18. Nonstandard Gaits in Unsteady Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, Michael; Rowley, Clarence

    2016-11-01

    Marine biology has long inspired the design and engineering of underwater vehicles. The literature examining the kinematics and dynamics of fishes, ranging from undulatory anguilliform swimmers to oscillatory ostraciiform ones, is vast. Past numerical studies of these organisms have principally focused on gaits characterized by sinusoidal pitching and heaving motions. It is conceivable that more sophisticated gaits could perform better in some respects, for example as measured by thrust generation or by cost of transport. This work uses an unsteady boundary-element method to numerically investigate the hydrodynamics and propulsive efficiency of high-Reynolds-number swimmers whose gaits are encoded by Fourier series or by Jacobi elliptic functions. Numerical results are presented with an emphasis on identifying particular wake structures and modes of motion that are associated with optimal swimming. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research through MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  19. Biomechanics of Gait during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Filomena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. During pregnancy women experience several changes in the body's physiology, morphology, and hormonal system. These changes may affect the balance and body stability and can cause discomfort and pain. The adaptations of the musculoskeletal system due to morphological changes during pregnancy are not fully understood. Few studies clarify the biomechanical changes of gait that occur during pregnancy and in postpartum period. Purposes. The purpose of this review was to analyze the available evidence on the biomechanical adaptations of gait that occur throughout pregnancy and in postpartum period, specifically with regard to the temporal, spatial, kinematic, and kinetic parameters of gait. Methods. Three databases were searched and 9 studies with a follow-up design were retrieved for analysis. Results. Most studies performed temporal, spatial, and kinematic analysis. Only three studies performed kinetic analysis. Conclusion. The adaptation strategies to the anatomical and physiological changes throughout pregnancy are still unclear, particularly in a longitudinal perspective and regarding kinetic parameters. PMID:25587566

  20. Do sleep abnormalities and misaligned sleep/circadian rhythm patterns represent early clinical characteristics for developing psychosis in high risk populations?

    PubMed

    Zanini, Marcio; Castro, Juliana; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Bittencourt, Lia; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Tufik, Sergio; Brietzke, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    Sleep architecture changes, such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) percentage variations and reductions in latency and density of rapid eye movement (REM), are found in most patients with schizophrenia and are considered to be an important part of the pathophysiology of the disorder. In addition to these sleep parameters changes, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and the sleep/circadian rhythm also occur in these patients. Sleep/circadian rhythm abnormalities negatively affect neocortical plasticity and cognition and often precede the diagnosis of the illness. Thus, it has been suggested that the sleep/circadian rhythm might be involved in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Recent advances in the identification of individuals at a high risk for developing schizophrenia allow us to investigate several neurobiological processes involved in the development of psychosis. In this article, we review the current evidence of the effects of sleep parameter abnormalities, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and misalignments of sleep circadian rhythm on the early stages of schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the preliminary evidence of sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during the prodromal stages of psychosis and propose that these abnormalities can be explored as potential predictors, as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis, of developing a psychotic disorder in at risk populations.

  1. Therapy-related patterns of cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome post polycythemia vera: single center experience and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Swolin, Birgitta; Rödjer, Stig; Westin, Jan

    2008-06-01

    A minor fraction of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) develop a terminal acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Analysis of the cytogenetic abnormalities during AML or MDS may help in understanding if this development is part of the natural course of the disease or induced by myelosuppressive therapy. Thirty-six cases with AML or MDS post PV, collected in a single Swedish institution during a 33-year period, are described with special regard to time to development of AML or MDS, therapy given during active PV, and cytogenetic findings during AML or MDS. A further 118 cases of AML or MDS post PV, in whom type of therapy during active PV and cytogenetic findings during AML or MDS were reported, were collected from the literature. AML or MDS developed in our own series after 1-30 years with a fairly constant rate (two cases per year). The most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities were +1q, -5, 5q-, -7, 7q-, +8, +9, 11q-, 13q-, and 20q-. When patients in the total material (n = 154) were divided with regard to treatment during active PV, marked differences were observed. The highest frequency of abnormalities was found in patients given multiple lines of therapy (n = 61), dominating features being -5/5q- in 28 patients (46%), -7/7q- in 19 patients (31%), numerous translocations in 24 patients (39%), and unidentified markers in 22 patients (36%). Half of the patients treated with hydroxyurea alone showed a -5 or 5q- abnormality. In patients treated with phlebotomy alone, +8 and +9 were the most frequent findings. The type of therapy given during active PV influences the type of chromosome abnormalities present during terminal AML or MDS and can also be instrumental in the development of leukemia.

  2. Effects of Auditory Rhythm and Music on Gait Disturbances in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ashoori, Aidin; Eagleman, David M.; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Gait abnormalities, such as shuffling steps, start hesitation, and freezing, are common and often incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other parkinsonian disorders. Pharmacological and surgical approaches have only limited efficacy in treating these gait disorders. Rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS), such as playing marching music and dance therapy, has been shown to be a safe, inexpensive, and an effective method in improving gait in PD patients. However, RAS that adapts to patients’ movements may be more effective than rigid, fixed-tempo RAS used in most studies. In addition to auditory cueing, immersive virtual reality technologies that utilize interactive computer-generated systems through wearable devices are increasingly used for improving brain–body interaction and sensory–motor integration. Using multisensory cues, these therapies may be particularly suitable for the treatment of parkinsonian freezing and other gait disorders. In this review, we examine the affected neurological circuits underlying gait and temporal processing in PD patients and summarize the current studies demonstrating the effects of RAS on improving these gait deficits. PMID:26617566

  3. Effects of Auditory Rhythm and Music on Gait Disturbances in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ashoori, Aidin; Eagleman, David M; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Gait abnormalities, such as shuffling steps, start hesitation, and freezing, are common and often incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other parkinsonian disorders. Pharmacological and surgical approaches have only limited efficacy in treating these gait disorders. Rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS), such as playing marching music and dance therapy, has been shown to be a safe, inexpensive, and an effective method in improving gait in PD patients. However, RAS that adapts to patients' movements may be more effective than rigid, fixed-tempo RAS used in most studies. In addition to auditory cueing, immersive virtual reality technologies that utilize interactive computer-generated systems through wearable devices are increasingly used for improving brain-body interaction and sensory-motor integration. Using multisensory cues, these therapies may be particularly suitable for the treatment of parkinsonian freezing and other gait disorders. In this review, we examine the affected neurological circuits underlying gait and temporal processing in PD patients and summarize the current studies demonstrating the effects of RAS on improving these gait deficits.

  4. Gait variability and motor control in people with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Alkjaer, Tine; Raffalt, Peter C; Dalsgaard, Helle; Simonsen, Erik B; Petersen, Nicolas C; Bliddal, Henning; Henriksen, Marius

    2015-10-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease that impairs walking ability and function. We compared the temporal gait variability and motor control in people with knee OA with healthy controls. The purpose was to test the hypothesis that the temporal gait variability would reflect a more stereotypic pattern in people with knee OA compared with healthy age-matched subjects. To assess the gait variability the temporal structure of the ankle and knee joint kinematics was quantified by the largest Lyapunov exponent and the stride time fluctuations were quantified by sample entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis. The motor control was assessed by the soleus (SO) Hoffmann (H)-reflex modulation and muscle co-activation during walking. The results showed no statistically significant mean group differences in any of the gait variability measures or muscle co-activation levels. The SO H-reflex amplitude was significantly higher in the knee OA group around heel strike when compared with the controls. The mean group difference in the H-reflex in the initial part of the stance phase (control-knee OA) was -6.6% Mmax (95% CI: -10.4 to -2.7, p=0.041). The present OA group reported relatively small impact of their disease. These results suggest that the OA group in general sustained a normal gait pattern with natural variability but with suggestions of facilitated SO H-reflex in the swing to stance phase transition. We speculate that the difference in SO H-reflex modulation reflects that the OA group increased the excitability of the soleus stretch reflex as a preparatory mechanism to avoid sudden collapse of the knee joint which is not uncommon in knee OA.

  5. Neuromuscular adjustments of gait associated with unstable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanenko, Y. P.; d'Avella, A.; Serrao, M.; Ranavolo, A.; Draicchio, F.; Cappellini, G.; Casali, C.; Lacquaniti, F.

    2015-01-01

    A compact description of coordinated muscle activity is provided by the factorization of electromyographic (EMG) signals. With the use of this approach, it has consistently been shown that multimuscle activity during human locomotion can be accounted for by four to five modules, each one comprised of a basic pattern timed at a different phase of gait cycle and the weighting coefficients of synergistic muscle activations. These modules are flexible, in so far as the timing of patterns and the amplitude of weightings can change as a function of gait speed and mode. Here we consider the adjustments of the locomotor modules related to unstable walking conditions. We compared three different conditions, i.e., locomotion of healthy subjects on slippery ground (SL) and on narrow beam (NB) and of cerebellar ataxic (CA) patients on normal ground. Motor modules were computed from the EMG signals of 12 muscles of the right lower limb using non-negative matrix factorization. The unstable gait of SL, NB, and CA showed significant changes compared with controls in the stride length, stride width, range of angular motion, and trunk oscillations. In most subjects of all three unstable conditions, >70% of the overall variation of EMG waveforms was accounted for by four modules that were characterized by a widening of muscle activity patterns. This suggests that the nervous system adopts the strategy of prolonging the duration of basic muscle activity patterns to cope with unstable conditions resulting from either slippery ground, reduced support surface, or pathology. PMID:26378199

  6. [Gait Analysis in Patients with Hip Disorders].

    PubMed

    Urbášek, K; Poul, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the evaluation of both conservative and surgical therapy cannot do without gait analysis. Orthopaedic textbooks, with some exceptions, deal in great detail with a thorough clinical examination of the patient but gait assessment is mentioned only marginally. More attention is paid to gait analysis in rehabilitation medicine. Motion and gait analysis laboratories equipped with optoelectronic cameras and force platforms were first developed for cerebral palsy children. Recently, several studies have been published on the use of these methods in disorders of hip and knee joints or spine diseases. Key words: gait analysis, hip joint.

  7. Investigations on postural stability and spatiotemporal parameters of human gait using developed wearable smart insole.

    PubMed

    Das, Ratan; Kumar, Neelesh

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of spatiotemporal parameters of human gait is important for designing new, intelligent and efficient prosthetic and orthotic devices. The paper presents a novel application of smart insole for measuring force generated at various pressure points during dynamic gait on a human foot. Besides recording and analysing the spatiotemporal parameters during stance phase, the developed sensor is also used for development of active orthotic devices. Data from the sensors is analysed in LabVIEW software for detection of plantar force and temporal gait parameters. The smart instrumentation allows processing, display and storage of gait parameters and gait events in real time. Variations of pressure pattern reported by gait experiments can also be used in identifying an accidental fall. This information will be used as a feedback signal for controlling the motion of an indigenously developed gait assistive device, i.e. an active orthotic device. Pressure at the heel and great toe points is higher than the metatarsal heads during dynamic walk. It is higher at the heel and metatarsals points than the toe point during standing position.

  8. Gait Analysis From a Single Ear-Worn Sensor: Reliability and Clinical Evaluation for Orthopaedic Patients.

    PubMed

    Jarchi, Delaram; Lo, Benny; Wong, Charence; Ieong, Edmund; Nathwani, Dinesh; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Objective assessment of detailed gait patterns after orthopaedic surgery is important for post-surgical follow-up and rehabilitation. The purpose of this paper is to assess the use of a single ear-worn sensor for clinical gait analysis. A reliability measure is devised for indicating the confidence level of the estimated gait events, allowing it to be used in free-walking environments and for facilitating clinical assessment of orthopaedic patients after surgery. Patient groups prior to or following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and knee replacement were recruited to assess the proposed method. The ability of the sensor for detailed longitudinal analysis is demonstrated with a group of patients after lower limb reconstruction by considering parameters such as temporal and force-related gait asymmetry derived from gait events. The results suggest that the ear-worn sensor can be used for objective gait assessments of orthopaedic patients without the requirement and expense of an elaborate laboratory setup for gait analysis. It significantly simplifies the monitoring protocol and opens the possibilities for home-based remote patient assessment.

  9. Towards a Passive Low-Cost In-Home Gait Assessment System for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Stone, Erik; Skubic, Marjorie; Keller, James M.; Abbott, Carmen; Rantz, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a webcam-based system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed, step time and step length from a three-dimensional voxel reconstruction, which is built from two calibrated webcam views. The gait parameters are validated with a GAITRite mat and a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 44 tests, and again with GAITRite for 8 older adults in senior housing. An excellent agreement with intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.99 and repeatability coefficients between 0.7% and 6.6% was found for walking speed, step time and step length given the limitation of frame rate and voxel resolution. The system was further tested with 10 seniors in a scripted scenario representing everyday activities in an unstructured environment. The system results demonstrate the capability of being used as a daily gait assessment tool for fall risk assessment and other medical applications. Furthermore, we found that residents displayed different gait patterns during their clinical GAITRite tests compared to the realistic scenario, namely a mean increase of 21% in walking speed, a mean decrease of 12% in step time, and a mean increase of 6% in step length. These findings provide support for continuous gait assessment in the home for capturing habitual gait. PMID:24235111

  10. Nonlinear dynamical model of human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Scafetta, Nicola

    2003-05-01

    We present a nonlinear dynamical model of the human gait control system in a variety of gait regimes. The stride-interval time series in normal human gait is characterized by slightly multifractal fluctuations. The fractal nature of the fluctuations becomes more pronounced under both an increase and decrease in the average gait. Moreover, the long-range memory in these fluctuations is lost when the gait is keyed on a metronome. Human locomotion is controlled by a network of neurons capable of producing a correlated syncopated output. The central nervous system is coupled to the motocontrol system, and together they control the locomotion of the gait cycle itself. The metronomic gait is simulated by a forced nonlinear oscillator with a periodic external force associated with the conscious act of walking in a particular way.

  11. Pneumatic interactive gait rehabilitation orthosis: design and preliminary testing.

    PubMed

    Belforte, G; Eula, G; Appendino, S; Sirolli, S

    2011-02-01

    Motor rehabilitation techniques based on passive movement of the lower limbs have been developed over the past 15 years. Gait training automation is the latest innovation in these techniques. This paper describes the design and development of a pneumatic interactive gait rehabilitation orthosis (PIGRO), as well as the first experimental results obtained with healthy subjects. PIGRO consists of a modular and size-adaptable exoskeleton, pneumatic actuation systems for the six actuated degrees of freedom (DoF), and a control unit. The foot orthosis and ankle actuation can be removed and/or replaced with orthopaedic shoes so as to permit gait rehabilitation while advancing between parallel bars with ground contact and partial body weight support (i.e. not walking in place). Control logic provides closed-loop position control independently on each joint, with position feedback for each joint in real time. Imposed curves are physiological joint angles: it is also possible to choose between activating one or both legs and to modify curves to obtain different gait patterns if required. The paper concludes with a presentation of experimental results for the device's performance.

  12. Therapeutic electrical stimulation for spasticity: quantitative gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Pease, W S

    1998-01-01

    Improvement in motor function following electrical stimulation is related to strengthening of the stimulated spastic muscle and inhibition of the antagonist. A 26-year-old man with familial spastic paraparesis presented with gait dysfunction and bilateral lower limb spastic muscle tone. Clinically, muscle strength and sensation were normal. He was considered appropriate for a trial of therapeutic electrical stimulation following failed trials of physical therapy and baclofen. No other treatment was used concurrent with the electrical stimulation. Before treatment, quantitative gait analysis revealed 63% of normal velocity and a crouched gait pattern, associated with excessive electromyographic activity in the hamstrings and gastrocnemius muscles. Based on these findings, bilateral stimulation of the quadriceps and anterior compartment musculature was performed two to three times per week for three months. Repeat gait analysis was conducted three weeks after the cessation of stimulation treatment. A 27% increase in velocity was noted associated with an increase in both cadence and right step length. Right hip and bilateral knee stance motion returned to normal (rather than "crouched"). No change in the timing of dynamic electromyographic activity was seen. These findings suggest a role for the use of electrical stimulation for rehabilitation of spasticity. The specific mechanism of this improvement remains uncertain.

  13. Reflex Control of Robotic Gait Using Human Walking Data

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Catherine A.; Meng, Lin; Conway, Bernard A.; Porr, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Control of human walking is not thoroughly understood, which has implications in developing suitable strategies for the retraining of a functional gait following neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Bipedal robots allow us to investigate simple elements of the complex nervous system to quantify their contribution to motor control. RunBot is a bipedal robot which operates through reflexes without using central pattern generators or trajectory planning algorithms. Ground contact information from the feet is used to activate motors in the legs, generating a gait cycle visually similar to that of humans. Rather than developing a more complicated biologically realistic neural system to control the robot's stepping, we have instead further simplified our model by measuring the correlation between heel contact and leg muscle activity (EMG) in human subjects during walking and from this data created filter functions transferring the sensory data into motor actions. Adaptive filtering was used to identify the unknown transfer functions which translate the contact information into muscle activation signals. Our results show a causal relationship between ground contact information from the heel and EMG, which allows us to create a minimal, linear, analogue control system for controlling walking. The derived transfer functions were applied to RunBot II as a proof of concept. The gait cycle produced was stable and controlled, which is a positive indication that the transfer functions have potential for use in the control of assistive devices for the retraining of an efficient and effective gait with potential applications in SCI rehabilitation. PMID:25347544

  14. NUP98/JARID1A is a novel recurrent abnormality in pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia with a distinct HOX gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, J D E; Hollink, I H I M; Arentsen-Peters, S T C J M; van Galen, J F; Berna Beverloo, H; Baruchel, A; Trka, J; Reinhardt, D; Sonneveld, E; Zimmermann, M; Alonzo, T A; Pieters, R; Meshinchi, S; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Zwaan, C Michel

    2013-12-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities and early response to treatment are the main prognostic factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, NUP98/NSD1 (t(5; 11)(q35; p15)), a cytogenetically cryptic fusion, was described as recurrent event in AML, characterized by dismal prognosis and HOXA/B gene overexpression. Using split-signal fluorescence in situ hybridization, other NUP98-rearranged pediatric AML cases were identified, including several acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) cases with a cytogenetically cryptic fusion of NUP98 to JARID1A (t(11;15)(p15;q35)). In this study we screened 105 pediatric AMKL cases to analyze the frequency of NUP98/JARID1A and other recurrent genetic abnormalities. NUP98/JARID1A was identified in 11/105 patients (10.5%). Other abnormalities consisted of RBM15/MKL1 (n=16), CBFA2T3/GLIS2 (n=13) and MLL-rearrangements (n=13). Comparing NUP98/JARID1A-positive patients with other pediatric AMKL patients, no significant differences in sex, age and white blood cell count were found. NUP98/JARID1A was not an independent prognostic factor for 5-year overall (probability of overall survival (pOS)) or event-free survival (probability of event-free survival (pEFS)), although the 5-year pOS for the entire AMKL cohort was poor (42 ± 6%). Cases with RBM15/MLK1 fared significantly better in terms of pOS and pEFS, although this was not independent from other risk factors in multivariate analysis. NUP98/JARID1A cases were characterized by HOXA/B gene overexpression, which is a potential druggable pathway. In conclusion, NUP98/JARID1A is a novel recurrent genetic abnormality in pediatric AMKL.

  15. Residual Elimination Algorithm Enhancements to Improve Foot Motion Tracking During Forward Dynamic Simulations of Gait.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jennifer N; Hass, Chris J; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2015-11-01

    Patient-specific gait optimizations capable of predicting post-treatment changes in joint motions and loads could improve treatment design for gait-related disorders. To maximize potential clinical utility, such optimizations should utilize full-body three-dimensional patient-specific musculoskeletal models, generate dynamically consistent gait motions that reproduce pretreatment marker measurements closely, and achieve accurate foot motion tracking to permit deformable foot-ground contact modeling. This study enhances an existing residual elimination algorithm (REA) Remy, C. D., and Thelen, D. G., 2009, “Optimal Estimation of Dynamically Consistent Kinematics and Kinetics for Forward Dynamic Simulation of Gait,” ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(3), p. 031005) to achieve all three requirements within a single gait optimization framework. We investigated four primary enhancements to the original REA: (1) manual modification of tracked marker weights, (2) automatic modification of tracked joint acceleration curves, (3) automatic modification of algorithm feedback gains, and (4) automatic calibration of model joint and inertial parameter values. We evaluated the enhanced REA using a full-body three-dimensional dynamic skeletal model and movement data collected from a subject who performed four distinct gait patterns: walking, marching, running, and bounding. When all four enhancements were implemented together, the enhanced REA achieved dynamic consistency with lower marker tracking errors for all segments, especially the feet (mean root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 3.1 versus 18.4 mm), compared to the original REA. When the enhancements were implemented separately and in combinations, the most important one was automatic modification of tracked joint acceleration curves, while the least important enhancement was automatic modification of algorithm feedback gains. The enhanced REA provides a framework for future gait optimization studies that seek to predict subject

  16. Arnold Chiari I malformation with tip-toe gait: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gi Hoon; Kim, Ghi Chan; Jeong, Ho Joong; Sim, Young-Joo; Park, Yong Seok

    2013-03-01

    The Arnold-Chiari type I malformation has many symptoms such as headache, neck pain, gait impairment, abnormal movements or postures. But a few cases reported association of specific symptom including headache, neck pain, vertigo or ataxia. We report a case of 12 year-old boy presenting with tip-toe gait. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of brain and spine revealed underlying Arnold-Chiari type I malformation. This case shows that it is need for central nervous system evaluation in patients with changes of lower extremities tone.

  17. Understanding the complexity of human gait dynamics.

    PubMed

    Scafetta, Nicola; Marchi, Damiano; West, Bruce J

    2009-06-01

    Time series of human gait stride intervals exhibit fractal and multifractal properties under several conditions. Records from subjects walking at normal, slow, and fast pace speed are analyzed to determine changes in the fractal scalings as a function of the stress condition of the system. Records from subjects with different age from children to elderly and patients suffering from neurodegenerative disease are analyzed to determine changes in the fractal scalings as a function of the physical maturation or degeneration of the system. A supercentral pattern generator model is presented to simulate the above two properties that are typically found in dynamical network performance: that is, how a dynamical network responds to stress and to evolution.

  18. Understanding the complexity of human gait dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola; Marchi, Damiano; West, Bruce J.

    2009-06-01

    Time series of human gait stride intervals exhibit fractal and multifractal properties under several conditions. Records from subjects walking at normal, slow, and fast pace speed are analyzed to determine changes in the fractal scalings as a function of the stress condition of the system. Records from subjects with different age from children to elderly and patients suffering from neurodegenerative disease are analyzed to determine changes in the fractal scalings as a function of the physical maturation or degeneration of the system. A supercentral pattern generator model is presented to simulate the above two properties that are typically found in dynamical network performance: that is, how a dynamical network responds to stress and to evolution.

  19. Real-time gait analysis for diagnosing movement disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Richard D.; Guan, Ling; Burne, J. A.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes a video analysis system, free of markers and set-up procedures, that quantitatively identified gait abnormalities in real-time from standard video images. A novel color 3D body model was sized and texture mapped to the exact characteristics of a person from video images. The kinematics of the body model was represented by a transformation tree to track the position and orientation of a person relative to the camera. Joint angles were used to track the location and orientation of each body part, with the range of joint angles being constrained by associating degrees of freedom with each joint. To stabilize tracking, the joint angles were estimated for the next frame. The calculation of joint angles, for the next frame, was cast as an estimation problem which was solved using an iterated extended Kalman filter. Patients with dopa-responsive parkinsonism, and age matched normals, were video taped during several gait cycles with walking movements successfully tracked and classified. The results suggested that this approach has the potential to guide clinicians on the relative sensitivity of specific postural/gait features in diagnosis.

  20. Health Monitors for Chronic Disease by Gait Analysis with Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Juen, Joshua; Cheng, Qian; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Krishnan, Jerry A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We have developed GaitTrack, a phone application to detect health status while the smartphone is carried normally. GaitTrack software monitors walking patterns, using only accelerometers embedded in phones to record spatiotemporal motion, without the need for sensors external to the phone. Our software transforms smartphones into health monitors, using eight parameters of phone motion transformed into body motion by the gait model. GaitTrack is designed to detect health status while the smartphone is carried during normal activities, namely, free-living walking. The current method for assessing free-living walking is medical accelerometers, so we present evidence that mobile phones running our software are more accurate. We then show our gait model is more accurate than medical pedometers for counting steps of patients with chronic disease. Our gait model was evaluated in a pilot study involving 30 patients with chronic lung disease. The six-minute walk test (6MWT) is a major assessment for chronic heart and lung disease, including congestive heart failure and especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), affecting millions of persons. The 6MWT consists of walking back and forth along a measured distance for 6 minutes. The gait model using linear regression performed with 94.13% accuracy in measuring walk distance, compared with the established standard of direct observation. We also evaluated a different statistical model using the same gait parameters to predict health status through lung function. This gait model has high accuracy when applied to demographic cohorts, for example, 89.22% accuracy testing the cohort of 12 female patients with ages 50–64 years. PMID:24694291

  1. Development Aspects of a Robotised Gait Trainer for Neurological Rehabilitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    of the robotised gait training machine. Keywords - gait rehabilitation, gait trainer, gait analysis , robot, compliance control I. INTRODUCTION...pp. 423-428, 2000. [6] D.A. Winter, Biomechanics and motor control of human movement, 2 nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1990. [7] J. Perry, Gait Analysis , Slack

  2. Kinematic and kinetic interactions during normal and ACL-deficient gait: a longitudinal in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Atarod, Mohammad; Frank, Cyril B; Shrive, Nigel G

    2014-03-01

    The interactions between different tissues within the knee joint and between different kinematic DOF and joint flexion during normal gait were investigated. These interactions change following ACL transection, in both short (4 weeks) and long (20 weeks) term. Ten skeletally mature sheep were used in control (N = 5) and experimental (N = 5) groups. The 6-DOF stifle joint motion was first measured during normal gait. The control group were then euthanized and mounted on a unique robotic testing platform for kinetic measurements. The experimental group underwent ACL transection surgery, and kinematics measurements were repeated 4 and 20 weeks post-operatively. The experimental group were then euthanized and underwent kinetic assessment using the robotic system. Results indicated significant couplings between joint flexion vs. abduction and internal tibial rotation, as well as medial, anterior, and superior tibial translations during both normal and ACL-deficient gait. Distinct kinetic interactions were also observed between different tissues within the knee joint. Direct relationships were found between ACL vs. LM/MM, and PCL vs. MCL loads during normal gait; inverse relationships were detected between ACL vs. PCL and PCL vs. LM/MM loads. These kinetic interaction patterns were considerably altered by ACL injury. Significant inter-subject variability in joint kinematics and tissue loading patterns during gait was also observed. This study provides further understanding of the in vivo function of different tissues within the knee joint and their couplings with joint kinematics during normal gait and over time following ACL transection.

  3. Ankle arthrodesis. Long-term follow-up with gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Mazur, J M; Schwartz, E; Simon, S R

    1979-10-01

    A functional assessment of twelve patients after ankle arthrodesis for post-traumatic arthritis was carried out by means of an extensive clinical evaluation and gait analysis after an average follow-up of eight years. A weighted point system was developed to grade ankle function clinically. The data on gait analysis were examined to determine the effect of arthrodesis of the ankle on the over-all pattern of walking. Under conditions of normal daily living while wearing shoes, all patients functioned well after arthrodesis. The gait-analysis data obtained with the patients wearing shoes showed excellent gait characteristics, and the ankle motion that had been lost was compensated for by: (1) motion of the small joints of the ipsilateral foot; (2) altered motion of the ankle in the contralateral limb; and (3) appropriate footwear. While the patients were walking barefooted, some adverse effects of fusion of the ankle were evident. Velocity of gait was slowed and the length of stride was shortened in all twelve patients. One patient whose ankle had been fused in an equinus position had a back-knee deformity during stance phase, and another walked only on his toes when he was without shoes. The gait patterns of all patients were markedly improved when they were wearing shoes with appropriate heel heights.

  4. Towards Pervasive Gait Analysis for Medicine with Wearable Sensors: A Systematic Review for Clinicians and Medical Researchers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Lach, John; Lo, Benny; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-09-22

    After decades of evolution, measuring instruments for quantitative gait analysis have become an important clinical tool for assessing pathologies manifested by gait abnormalities. However, such instruments tend to be expensive and require expert operation and maintenance besides their high cost, thus limiting them to only a small number of specialized centers. Consequently, gait analysis in most clinics today still relies on observation-based assessment. Recent advances in wearable sensors, especially inertial body sensors, have opened up a promising future for gait analysis. Not only can these sensors be more easily adopted in clinical diagnosis and treatment procedures than their current counterparts, but they can also monitor gait continuously outside clinics - hence providing seamless patient analysis from clinics to free-living environments. The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of current techniques for quantitative gait analysis and to propose key metrics for evaluating the existing, as well as emerging methods for qualifying the gait features extracted from wearable sensors. It aims to highlight key advances in this rapidly evolving research field and outline potential future directions for both research and clinical applications.

  5. Abnormalities of CSF flow patterns in the cerebral aqueduct in treatment-resistant late-life depression: a potential biomarker of microvascular angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Naish, Josephine H; Baldwin, Robert C; Patankar, Tufail; Jeffries, Suzanne; Burns, Alistair S; Taylor, Christopher J; Waterton, John C; Jackson, Alan

    2006-09-01

    There is growing evidence that microvascular angiopathy (MVA) plays an important role in the development of dementia and affective disorders in older people. At currently available image resolutions it is not possible to image directly the vascular changes associated with MVA, but the effects on blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow may be detectable. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential biomarker for MVA based on MRI of abnormalities in CSF flow. Since there is considerable indirect evidence that treatment resistance in late-onset depressive disorder is related to MVA, we assessed the method in a group of 22 normal volunteers and 29 patients with responsive (N=21) or treatment-resistant (N=8) late-onset depressive disorder. Single-slice quantified phase-contrast (PC) images of cerebral blood and CSF flow were collected at 15 points over a cardiac cycle, and the resulting flow curves were parameterized. Significant differences in the CSF flow (width of systolic flow peak and diastolic flow volume, both P<0.01) through the cerebral aqueduct were observed for the group of treatment-resistant patients when compared to age matched controls. No significant difference was observed for a group of 21 patients with treatment-responsive depression. The findings support the hypothesis that MR measurement of CSF flow abnormalities provides a biomarker of MVA, and thus could have application in a wide range of age-related diseases.

  6. Contributions to the understanding of gait control.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Erik Bruun

    2014-04-01

    This thesis is based on ten published articles. The experimental work was carried out at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen. The aim was to investigate and describe a number of basic mechanical and physiological mechanisms behind human walking. The methodologies used were biomechanical movement analysis and electrophysiology. The walking experiments were carried out in a gait lab, where the subjects were video recorded while they walked across two force platforms, which measured the ground reaction forces. Net joint moments about the hip-, knee- and ankle joint were calculated by combining the movement data and the external reaction forces (inverse dynamics). Muscle activity and sensory input to the spinal cord were measured by electromyography (EMG) and electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves. The results showed that the gait pattern varies to a great degree between individuals. Some people choose to exert the highest forces about the ankle joint while others prefer to use the knee joint. By use of a cluster analysis, fifteen healthy subjects could be divided into two groups. The extensor moment about the knee joint was the main factor for separating the two gait patterns, but the group with the highest extensor moments about the knee joint also walked with more flexed knee joints, higher EMG activity in the quadriceps muscle and higher bone-on-bone forces. This may lead to development of osteoarthritis over the years. Walking on high-heeled shoes reduced the ankle joint moment significantly either because of reduced muscle fiber length and/or increased co-contraction about the joint. On the contrary, the extensor moment about the knee joint was almost doubled in the high-heeled condition compared to bare footed walking at the same velocity. Also the EMG activity increased in the leg muscles. This could be an explanation pertaining to the higher incidence of osteoarthritis in women than in men. Patients with a drop-foot cannot put the

  7. Entrainment to a real time fractal visual stimulus modulates fractal gait dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kiefer, Adam W; D'Andrea, Susan E; Warren, William H; Aaron, Roy K

    2014-08-01

    Fractal patterns characterize healthy biological systems and are considered to reflect the ability of the system to adapt to varying environmental conditions. Previous research has shown that fractal patterns in gait are altered following natural aging or disease, and this has potential negative consequences for gait adaptability that can lead to increased risk of injury. However, the flexibility of a healthy neurological system to exhibit different fractal patterns in gait has yet to be explored, and this is a necessary step toward understanding human locomotor control. Fifteen participants walked for 15min on a treadmill, either in the absence of a visual stimulus or while they attempted to couple the timing of their gait with a visual metronome that exhibited a persistent fractal pattern (contained long-range correlations) or a random pattern (contained no long-range correlations). The stride-to-stride intervals of the participants were recorded via analog foot pressure switches and submitted to detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to determine if the fractal patterns during the visual metronome conditions differed from the baseline (no metronome) condition. DFA α in the baseline condition was 0.77±0.09. The fractal patterns in the stride-to-stride intervals were significantly altered when walking to the fractal metronome (DFA α=0.87±0.06) and to the random metronome (DFA α=0.61±0.10) (both p<.05 when compared to the baseline condition), indicating that a global change in gait dynamics was observed. A variety of strategies were identified at the local level with a cross-correlation analysis, indicating that local behavior did not account for the consistent global changes. Collectively, the results show that a gait dynamics can be shifted in a prescribed manner using a visual stimulus and the shift appears to be a global phenomenon.

  8. Progressive frontal gait disturbance with atypical Alzheimer's disease and corticobasal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rossor, M; Tyrrell, P; Warrington, E; Thompson, P; Marsden, C; Lantos, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The clinical neuropsychological, neuroradiological, and neuropathological description of two patients presenting with a frontal gait disturbance.
METHODS—Clinical case note review, neuropsychological assessment, functional imaging with 15O2 and 18F-fluorodopa PET, and neuropathology.
RESULTS—Both patients presented with frontal gait impairment and only later developed more widespread cognitive impairment. In both cases 15O2 PET disclosed focal hypometabolism in the medial frontal lobes and in one patient 18F-fluorodopa uptake into the caudate and putamen was normal. The neuropathological examination in one patient showed Alzheimer's histopathology together with large swollen eosinophilic neurons characteristic of corticobasal degeneration, which were particularly prominent in the medial frontal lobes.
CONCLUSION—Focal degeneration of the medial frontal lobes may present as an isolated gait disturbance and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present without an obvious structural abnormality on neuroimaging.

 PMID:10449557

  9. A characterization of Parkinson's disease by describing the visual field motion during gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, David; Martínez, Fabio; Atehortúa, Angélica; Alvarez, Charlens; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    An early diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease (PD) is crucial towards devising successful rehabilitation programs. Typically, the PD diagnosis is performed by characterizing typical symptoms, namely bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, postural instability or freezing gait. However, traditional examination tests are usually incapable of detecting slight motor changes, specially for early stages of the pathology. Recently, eye movement abnormalities have correlated with early onset of some neurodegenerative disorders. This work introduces a new characterization of the Parkinson disease by describing the ocular motion during a common daily activity as the gait. This paper proposes a fully automatic eye motion analysis using a dense optical flow that tracks the ocular direction. The eye motion is then summarized using orientation histograms constructed during a whole gait cycle. The proposed approach was evaluated by measuring the χ2 distance between the orientation histograms, showing substantial differences between control and PD patients.

  10. Gait strategy in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type: a kinematic and kinetic evaluation using 3D gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the gait patterns of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT) hypermobility type, using Gait Analysis. We quantified the gait strategy in 12 JHS/EDS-HT adults individuals (age: 43.08+6.78 years) compared to 20 healthy controls (age: 37.23±8.91 years), in terms of kinematics and kinetics. JHS/EDS-HT individuals were characterized by a non-physiological gait pattern. In particular, spatio-temporal parameters evidenced lower anterior step length and higher stance phase duration in JHS/EDS-HT than controls. In term of kinematics, in JHS/EDS-HT patients the main gait limitations involved pelvis, distal joints and ankle joint. Conversely, hip and knee joint showed physiological values. Ankle moment and power revealed reduced peak values during terminal stance. Differences in stiffness at hip and ankle joints were found between JHS/EDS-HT and controls. JHS/EDS-HT patients showed significant decreased of Kh and Ka parameters very probably due to congenital hypotonia and ligament laxity. These findings help to elucidate the complex biomechanical changes in JHS/EDS-HT and may have a major role in the multidimensional evaluation and tailored management of these patients.

  11. The Effect of Two Different Cognitive Tests on Gait Parameters during Dual Tasks in Healthy Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Kałużny, Krystian; Hagner, Wojciech; Kałużna, Anna; Kochański, Bartosz; Borkowska, Alina; Budzyński, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The paper aims to evaluate the influence of two different demanding cognitive tasks on gait parameters using BTS SMART system analysis. Patients and Methods. The study comprised 53 postmenopausal women aged 64.5 ± 6.7 years (range: 47–79). For every subject, gait analysis using a BTS SMART system was performed in a dual-task study design under three conditions: (I) while walking only (single task), (II) walking while performing a simultaneous simple cognitive task (SCT) (dual task), and (III) walking while performing a simultaneous complex cognitive task (CCT) (dual task). Time-space parameters of gait pertaining to the length of a single support phase, double support phase, gait speed, step length, step width, and leg swing speed were analyzed. Results. Performance of cognitive tests during gait resulted in a statistically significant prolongation of the left (by 7%) and right (by 7%) foot gait cycle, shortening of the length of steps made with the right extremity (by 4%), reduction of speed of swings made with the left (by 11%) and right (by 8%) extremity, and reduction in gait speed (by 6%). Conclusions. Performance of cognitive tests during gait changes its individual pattern in relation to the level of the difficulty of the task. PMID:27022602

  12. The role of altered proximal femoral geometry in impaired pelvis stability and hip control during CP gait: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Lode; Jansen, Karen; Wesseling, Mariska; Molenaers, Guy; Scheys, Lennart; Jonkers, Ilse

    2016-02-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often present aberrant hip geometry, more specifically increased femoral anteversion and neck-shaft angle. Furthermore, altered gait patterns are present within this population. This study analyzed the effect of aberrant femoral geometry, as present in subjects with CP, on the ability of muscles to control hip and knee joint kinematics. Given the specific gait deficits observed during crouch gait, increased ability to abduct, externally rotate the hip and extend the knee and hip were denoted as beneficial effects. We ran dynamic simulations of CP and normal gait using two musculoskeletal models, one reflecting normal femoral geometry and one reflecting proximal femoral deformities. The results show that the combination of aberrant bone geometry and CP-specific gait characteristics beneficially increased the ability of gluteus medius and maximus to extend the hip and knee. In contrast, the potentials of the hamstrings to extend the hip decreased whereas the potentials to flex the knee increased. These changes closely followed the observed changes in the muscle moment arm lengths. In conclusion, this study emphasizes the concomitant effect of the presence of proximal femoral deformity and CP gait characteristics on the muscle control of hip and knee joint kinematics during single stance. Not accounting for subject-specific geometry will affect the calculated muscles' potential during gait. Therefore, the use of generic models to assess muscle function in the presence of femoral deformity and CP gait should be treated with caution.

  13. Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

  14. Lever arm dysfunction in cerebral palsy gait.

    PubMed

    Theologis, Tim

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal structures act as lever arms during walking. Muscle activity and the ground reaction against gravity exert forces on the skeleton, which generate torque (moments) around joints. These lead to the sequence of movements which form normal human gait. Skeletal deformities in cerebral palsy (CP) affect the function of bones as lever arms and compromise gait. Lever arm dysfunction should be carefully considered when contemplating treatment to improve gait in children with CP.

  15. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    capture sequences was provided by MPL to CCAD and OGAL. CCAD’s work focused on imposing these sequences on the SantosTM digital human avatar . An...capture sequences was provided by MPL to CCAD and OGAL. CCAD’s work focused on imposing these sequences on the Santos digital human avatar . An initial...levels of the patients. In addition, the differences in ability to detect variations in gait conditions for skinned avatar vs. line-skeletal avatar

  16. Repeatability of surface EMG during gait in children

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Kevin P.; Padua, Darin A.; Abel, Mark F.

    2006-01-01

    Although mean amplitude and ON–OFF timing of muscle recruitment and electromyography (EMG) activation during gait is achieved by an age of six to eight years in normally developing children, recruitment dynamics illustrated by the shape of the EMG waveform may require continued developmental practice to achieve a stable pattern. Previous analyses have quantified the repeatability of the EMG waveform in adult subjects, but EMG variability for a pediatric population may be significantly different. The goal of this study was to quantify intra-session and inter-session variability in the phasic EMG waveform patterns from the lower limb muscles during self-selected speeds of walking in healthy-normal children for comparison with adult variability in gait EMG. The variance ratio quantifies the repeatability of the integrated EMG waveform shape in a group of normally-developing children. Results reveal that between-session EMG waveform variability were similar in adult and pediatric populations, but within-session variability for the children was approximately twice the published value for adults. Clinical implications of this pediatric EMG variability suggest cautious interpretation of data from limited trial samples or inter-session changes in performance of gait data. PMID:16274917

  17. The Pathomechanics Of Calcaneal Gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, David H.; Cooper, Les

    1980-07-01

    The data acquisition system employed in our laboratory includes optical, electronic and computer subsystems. Three movie camera freeze the motion for analysis. The film is displayed on a motion analyzer, and the body segment positions are recorded in a three dimensional coordinate system with Graf/pen sonic digitizer. The angular rotations are calculated by computer and automatically plotted. The force plate provides measurements of vertical force, foreaft shear, medial-lateral shear, torque, and center of pressure. Electromyograms are superimposed upon gait movies to permit measurement of muscle phasic activity. The Hycam movie camera si-multaneously films (through separate lens) the subject and oscilloscope. Movement measurements, electromyograms, and floor reaction forces provide the data base for analysis. From a study of the gait changes in five normal subjects following tibial nerve block, and from additional studies of patients with paralysis of the ankle plantar flexors, the pathomechanics of calcaneal gait can be described. Inability to transfer weight to the forward part of the foot produces ankle instability and reduction of contralateral step length. Excessive drop of the center of mass necessitates com-pensatory increased lift energy output through the sound limb to restore the height of the center of mass. Excessive stance phase ankle dorsiflexion produces knee instability requiring prolonged quadriceps muscle phasic activity.

  18. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  19. Mixed gaits in small avian terrestrial locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Andrada, Emanuel; Haase, Daniel; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A.; M. Kilbourne, Brandon; Denzler, Joachim; Fischer, Martin S.; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Scientists have historically categorized gaits discretely (e.g. regular gaits such as walking, running). However, previous results suggest that animals such as birds might mix or regularly or stochastically switch between gaits while maintaining a steady locomotor speed. Here, we combined a novel and completely automated large-scale study (over one million frames) on motions of the center of mass in several bird species (quail, oystercatcher, northern lapwing, pigeon, and avocet) with numerical simulations. The birds studied do not strictly prefer walking mechanics at lower speeds or running mechanics at higher speeds. Moreover, our results clearly display that the birds in our study employ mixed gaits (such as one step walking followed by one step using running mechanics) more often than walking and, surprisingly, maybe as often as grounded running. Using a bio-inspired model based on parameters obtained from real quails, we found two types of stable mixed gaits. In the first, both legs exhibit different gait mechanics, whereas in the second, legs gradually alternate from one gait mechanics into the other. Interestingly, mixed gaits parameters mostly overlap those of grounded running. Thus, perturbations or changes in the state induce a switch from grounded running to mixed gaits or vice versa. PMID:26333477

  20. Gait recognition based on integral outline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Guan; Fang, Lv

    2017-02-01

    Biometric identification technology replaces traditional security technology, which has become a trend, and gait recognition also has become a hot spot of research because its feature is difficult to imitate and theft. This paper presents a gait recognition system based on integral outline of human body. The system has three important aspects: the preprocessing of gait image, feature extraction and classification. Finally, using a method of polling to evaluate the performance of the system, and summarizing the problems existing in the gait recognition and the direction of development in the future.

  1. Mixed gaits in small avian terrestrial locomotion.

    PubMed

    Andrada, Emanuel; Haase, Daniel; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A; Kilbourne, Brandon M; Denzler, Joachim; Fischer, Martin S; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2015-09-03

    Scientists have historically categorized gaits discretely (e.g. regular gaits such as walking, running). However, previous results suggest that animals such as birds might mix or regularly or stochastically switch between gaits while maintaining a steady locomotor speed. Here, we combined a novel and completely automated large-scale study (over one million frames) on motions of the center of mass in several bird species (quail, oystercatcher, northern lapwing, pigeon, and avocet) with numerical simulations. The birds studied do not strictly prefer walking mechanics at lower speeds or running mechanics at higher speeds. Moreover, our results clearly display that the birds in our study employ mixed gaits (such as one step walking followed by one step using running mechanics) more often than walking and, surprisingly, maybe as often as grounded running. Using a bio-inspired model based on parameters obtained from real quails, we found two types of stable mixed gaits. In the first, both legs exhibit different gait mechanics, whereas in the second, legs gradually alternate from one gait mechanics into the other. Interestingly, mixed gaits parameters mostly overlap those of grounded running. Thus, perturbations or changes in the state induce a switch from grounded running to mixed gaits or vice versa.

  2. Optics in gait analysis and anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Moreno, Alejandra Alicia

    2013-11-01

    Since antiquity, human gait has been studied to understand human movement, the kind of gait, in some cases, can cause musculoskeletal disorders or other health problems; in addition, also from antiquity, anthropometry has been important for the design of human items such as workspaces, tools, garments, among others. Nowadays, thanks to the development of optics and electronics, more accurate studies of gait and anthropometry can be developed. This work will describe the most important parameters for gait analysis, anthropometry and the optical systems used.

  3. Gait-related cerebral alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Anke H; Leunissen, Inge; Bakker, Maaike; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Helmich, Rick C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Freezing of gait is a common, debilitating feature of Parkinson's disease. We have studied gait planning in patients with freezing of gait, using motor imagery of walking in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging. This approach exploits the large neural overlap that exists between planning and imagining a movement. In addition, it avoids confounds introduced by brain responses to altered motor performance and somatosensory feedback during actual freezing episodes. We included 24 patients with Parkinson's disease: 12 patients with freezing of gait, 12 matched patients without freezing of gait and 21 matched healthy controls. Subjects performed two previously validated tasks--motor imagery of gait and a visual imagery control task. During functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, we quantified imagery performance by measuring the time required to imagine walking on paths of different widths and lengths. In addition, we used voxel-based morphometry to test whether between-group differences in imagery-related activity were related to structural differences. Imagery times indicated that patients with freezing of gait, patients without freezing of gait and controls engaged in motor imagery of gait, with matched task performance. During motor imagery of gait, patients with freezing of gait showed more activity than patients without freezing of gait in the mesencephalic locomotor region. Patients with freezing of gait also tended to have decreased responses in mesial frontal and posterior parietal regions. Furthermore, patients with freezing of gait had grey matter atrophy in a small portion of the mesencephalic locomotor region. The gait-related hyperactivity of the mesencephalic locomotor region correlated with clinical parameters (freezing of gait severity and disease duration), but not with the degree of atrophy. These results indicate that patients with Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait have structural and functional alterations in the

  4. Predicting postoperative gait in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Galarraga C, Omar A; Vigneron, Vincent; Dorizzi, Bernadette; Khouri, Néjib; Desailly, Eric

    2016-11-09

    In this work, postoperative lower limb kinematics are predicted with respect to preoperative kinematics, physical examination and surgery data. Data of 115 children with cerebral palsy that have undergone single-event multilevel surgery were considered. Preoperative data dimension was reduced utilizing principal component analysis. Then, multiple linear regressions with 80% confidence intervals were performed between postoperative kinematics and bilateral preoperative kinematics, 36 physical examination variables and combinations of 9 different surgical procedures. The mean prediction errors on test vary from 4° (pelvic obliquity and hip adduction) to 10° (hip rotation and foot progression), depending on the kinematic angle. The unilateral mean sizes of the confidence intervals vary from 5° to 15°. Frontal plane angles are predicted with the lowest errors, however the same performance is achieved when considering the postoperative average signals. Sagittal plane angles are better predicted than transverse plane angles, with statistical differences with respect to the average postoperative kinematics for both plane's angles except for ankle dorsiflexion. The mean prediction errors are smaller than the variability of gait parameters in cerebral palsy. The performance of the system is independent of the preoperative state severity of the patient. Even if the system is not yet accurate enough to define a surgery plan, it shows an unbiased estimation of the most likely outcome, which can be useful for both the clinician and the patient. More patients' data are necessary for improving the precision of the model in order to predict the kinematic outcome of a large number of possible surgeries and gait patterns.

  5. Atypical anticipatory postural adjustments during gait initiation among individuals with sub-acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Rajachandrakumar, Roshanth; Fraser, Julia E; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Inness, Elizabeth L; Biasin, Lou; Brunton, Karen; McIlroy, William E; Mansfield, Avril

    2017-02-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustments, executed prior to gait initiation, help preserve lateral stability when stepping. Atypical patterns of anticipatory activity prior to gait initiation may occur in individuals with unilateral impairment (e.g., stroke). This study aimed to determine the prevalence, correlates, and consequences of atypical anticipatory postural adjustment patterns prior to gait initiation in a sub-acute stroke population. Forty independently-ambulatory individuals with sub-acute stroke stood on two force plates and initiated gait at a self-selected speed. Medio-lateral centre of pressure displacement was calculated and used to define anticipatory postural adjustments (shift in medio-lateral centre of pressure >10mm from baseline). Stroke severity, motor recovery, and functional balance and mobility status were also obtained. Three patterns were identified: single (typical), absent (atypical), and multiple (atypical) anticipatory postural adjustments. Thirty-five percent of trials had atypical anticipatory postural adjustments (absent and multiple). Frequency of absent anticipatory postural adjustments was negatively correlated with walking speed. Multiple anticipatory postural adjustments were more prevalent when leading with the non-paretic than the paretic limb. Trials with multiple anticipatory postural adjustments had longer duration of anticipatory postural adjustment and time to foot-off, and shorter unloading time than trials with single anticipatory postural adjustments. A high prevalence of atypical anticipatory control prior to gait initiation was found in individuals with stroke. Temporal differences were identified with multiple anticipatory postural adjustments, indicating altered gait initiation. These findings provide insight into postural control during gait initiation in individuals with sub-acute stroke, and may inform interventions to improve ambulation in this population.

  6. Assessing interactions among multiple physiological systems during walking outside a laboratory: An Android based gait monitor

    PubMed Central

    Sejdić, E.; Millecamps, A.; Teoli, J.; Rothfuss, M. A.; Franconi, N. G.; Perera, S.; Jones, A. K.; Brach, J. S.; Mickle, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Gait function is traditionally assessed using well-lit, unobstructed walkways with minimal distractions. In patients with subclinical physiological abnormalities, these conditions may not provide enough stress on their ability to adapt to walking. The introduction of challenging walking conditions in gait can induce responses in physiological systems in addition to the locomotor system. There is a need for a device that is capable of monitoring multiple physiological systems in various walking conditions. To address this need, an Android-based gait-monitoring device was developed that enabled the recording of a patient's physiological systems during walking. The gait-monitoring device was tested during self-regulated overground walking sessions of fifteen healthy subjects that included 6 females and 9 males aged 18 to 35 years. The gait-monitoring device measures the patient's stride interval, acceleration, electrocardiogram, skin conductance and respiratory rate. The data is stored on an Android phone and is analyzed offline through the extraction of features in the time, frequency and time-frequency domains. The analysis of the data depicted multisystem physiological interactions during overground walking in healthy subjects. These interactions included locomotion-electrodermal, locomotion-respiratory and cardiolocomotion couplings. The current results depicting strong interactions between the locomotion system and the other considered systems (i.e., electrodermal, respiratory and cardivascular systems) warrant further investigation into multisystem interactions during walking, particularly in challenging walking conditions with older adults. PMID:26390946

  7. Gait deviations and compensations in pediatric patients with increased femoral torsion.

    PubMed

    Bruderer-Hofstetter, Marina; Fenner, Verena; Payne, Erika; Zdenek, Katja; Klima, Harry; Wegener, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Coxa antetorta describes an abnormal torsion of the femur. It is commonly considered a cosmetic problem and is treated surgically only in severe cases and the presence of physical complaints. The purpose of this study was to identify deviations in gait kinematics and kinetics in pediatric patients caused by coxa antetorta and to categorize these deviations into primary and secondary deviations. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional three-dimensional (3D) gait analysis study to detect gait deviations in adolescents (n = 18; age range 10.5-17.5 years) with coxa antetorta compared to age-matched healthy control subjects (n = 17). Principal component (PC) analysis was used for data reduction. Linear mixed models applied to PC-scores were used to estimate the main effects within retained PCs followed by a post-hoc subgroup analysis. Patients walked with smaller external foot progression angle, greater knee adduction, more internally rotated and flexed hips and greater anterior pelvic tilt. Subgroup analysis revealed that-depending on knee alignment-patients had higher knee and hip adduction moments. These deviations in joint kinematics and kinetics may be associated with physical complaints and accelerated development of osteoarthritis. Assessment of gait deviations related to coxa antetorta using 3D gait analysis may be an additional tool in individual clinical decision-making.

  8. Gait kinematics and kinetics are affected more by peripheral arterial disease than age

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Sara A.; Applequist, Bryon C.; Huisinga, Jessie M.; Pipinos, Iraklis I.; Johanning, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) produces abnormal gait and disproportionately affects older individuals. The current study investigated PAD gait biomechanics in young and older subjects. Sixty-one (31 < 65 years, age: 57.4 ± 5.3 years and 30 ≥ 65 years; age: 72.2 ± 5.4 years) patients with PAD and 52 healthy age matched controls were included. Patients with PAD were tested during pain free walking and compared to matched healthy controls. Joint kinematics and kinetics (torques) were compared using a 2 × 2 ANOVA (Groups: PAD vs. Control, Age: Younger vs. Older). Patients with PAD had significantly increased ankle and decreased hip range of motion during the stance phase as well as decreased ankle dorsiflexor torque compared to controls. Gait changes in older individuals are largely constrained to time-distance parameters. Joint kinematics and kinetics are significantly altered in patients with PAD during pain free ambulation. Symptomatic PAD produces a consistent ambulatory deficit across ages definable by advanced biomechanical analysis. The most important finding of the current study is that gait, in the absence of PAD and other ambulatory comorbidities, does not decline significantly with age based on advanced biomechanical analysis. Therefore, previous studies must be examined in the context of potential PAD patients being present in the population and future ambulatory studies must include PAD as a confounding factor when assessing the gait function of elderly individuals. PMID:27149635

  9. Differential Patterns of Abnormal Activity and Connectivity in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Circuitry in Bipolar-I and Bipolar-NOS Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Farchione, Tiffany; Diwadkar, Vaibhav; Pruitt, Patrick; Radwan, Jacqueline; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Phillips, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The functioning of neural systems supporting emotion processing and regulation in youth with bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) remains poorly understood. We sought to examine patterns of activity and connectivity in youth with BP-NOS relative to youth with bipolar disorder type I (BP-I) and healthy controls (HC). Method:…

  10. Estimation of muscle forces in gait using a simulation of the electromyographic activity and numerical optimization.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Crespo, Marcos José; Braidot, Ariel Andrés Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Clinical gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait patterns. However, a complete distribution of muscle forces throughout the gait cycle is a current challenge for many researchers. Two techniques are often used to estimate muscle forces: inverse dynamics with static optimization and computer muscle control that uses forward dynamics to minimize tracking. The first method often involves limitations due to changing muscle dynamics and possible signal artefacts that depend on day-to-day variation in the position of electromyographic (EMG) electrodes. Nevertheless, in clinical gait analysis, the method of inverse dynamics is a fundamental and commonly used computational procedure to calculate the force and torque reactions at various body joints. Our aim was to develop a generic musculoskeletal model that could be able to be applied in the clinical setting. The musculoskeletal model of the lower limb presents a simulation for the EMG data to address the common limitations of these techniques. This model presents a new point of view from the inverse dynamics used on clinical gait analysis, including the EMG information, and shows a similar performance to another model available in the OpenSim software. The main problem of these methods to achieve a correct muscle coordination is the lack of complete EMG data for all muscles modelled. We present a technique that simulates the EMG activity and presents a good correlation with the muscle forces throughout the gait cycle. Also, this method showed great similarities whit the real EMG data recorded from the subjects doing the same movement.

  11. Energy evaluation of a bio-inspired gait modulation method for quadrupedal locomotion.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Yasuhiro; Fukino, Kota; Habu, Yasushi; Mori, Yoshikazu

    2015-08-04

    We have proposed a bio-inspired gait modulation method, by means of which a simulated quadruped model can successfully perform smooth, autonomous gait transitions from a walk to a trot to a gallop, as observed in animals. The model is equipped with a rhythm generator called a central pattern generator (CPG) for each leg. The lateral neighbouring CPGs are mutually and inhibitorily coupled, and the CPG network is hardwired to produce a trot. Adding only the simple feedback of body tilt to each CPG, which was based on input from the postural reflex, led to the emergence of un-programmed walking and galloping at low and high speeds, respectively. Although this autonomous gait transition was a consequence of postural adaptation, it coincidentally also resulted in the minimization of energy consumption, as observed in real animals. In simulations at a variety of constant speeds the energy cost was lower for walking at low speeds and for galloping at high speeds than it was for trotting. Moreover, each gait transition occurred at the optimal speed, such that the model minimised its energy consumption. Thus, gait transitions in simulations that included the bio-inspired gait modulation method were similar to those observed in animals, even from the perspective of energy consumption. This method should therefore be a preferred choice for motion generation and control in biomimetic quadrupedal locomotion.

  12. Application of the Gillette Gait Index, Gait Deviation Index and Gait Profile Score to multiple clinical pediatric populations.

    PubMed

    McMulkin, Mark L; MacWilliams, Bruce A

    2015-02-01

    Gait indices are now commonly used to assess overall pathology and outcomes from studies with instrumented gait analyses. There are differences in how these indices are calculated and therefore inherent differences in their sensitivities to detect changes or differences between groups. The purpose of the current study was to examine the three most commonly used gait indices, Gillette Gait Index (GGI), Gait Deviation Index (GDI), and Gait Profile Score (GPS), comparing the statistical sensitivity and the ability to make meaningful interpretations of the clinical results. In addition, the GDI*, a log transformed and scaled version of the GPS score which closely matches the GDI was examined. For seven previous or ongoing studies representing varying gait pathologies seen in clinical laboratories, the GGI, GDI, and GPS/GDI* were calculated retrospectively. The GDI and GPS/GDI* proved to be the most sensitive measures in assessing differences pre/post-treatment or from a control population. A power analysis revealed the GDI and GDI* to be the most sensitive statistical measures (lowest sample sizes required). Subjectively, the GDI and GDI* interpretation seemed to be the most intuitive measure for assessing clinical changes. However, the gait variable sub-scores of the GPS determined several statistical differences which were not previously noted and was the only index tool for quantifying the relative contributions of specific joints or planes of motion. The GGI did not offer any advantages over the other two indices.

  13. Underwater gait analysis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Daniele; Pavan, Davide; Morris, Meg; Guiotto, Annamaria; Iansek, Robert; Fortuna, Sofia; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Sawacha, Zimi

    2017-02-01

    Although hydrotherapy is one of the physical therapies adopted to optimize gait rehabilitation in people with Parkinson disease, the quantitative measurement of gait-related outcomes has not been provided yet. This work aims to document the gait improvements in a group of parkinsonians after a hydrotherapy program through 2D and 3D underwater and on land gait analysis. Thirty-four parkinsonians and twenty-two controls were enrolled, divided into two different cohorts. In the first one, 2 groups of patients underwent underwater or land based walking training; controls underwent underwater walking training. Hence pre-treatment 2D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed, together with post-treatment on land gait analysis. Considering that current literature documented a reduced movement amplitude in parkinsonians across all lower limb joints in all movement planes, 3D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed on a second cohort of subjects (10 parkinsonians and 10 controls) who underwent underwater gait training. Baseline land 2D and 3D gait analysis in parkinsonians showed shorter stride length and slower speed than controls, in agreement with previous findings. Comparison between underwater and on land gait analysis showed reduction in stride length, cadence and speed on both parkinsonians and controls. Although patients who underwent underwater treatment exhibited significant changes on spatiotemporal parameters and sagittal plane lower limb kinematics, 3D gait analysis documented a significant (p<0.05) improvement in all movement planes. These data deserve attention for research directions promoting the optimal recovery and maintenance of walking ability.

  14. Reliability of the OptoGait portable photoelectric cell system for the quantification of spatial-temporal parameters of gait in young adults.

    PubMed

    Gomez Bernal, Antonio; Becerro-de-Bengoa-Vallejo, Ricardo; Losa-Iglesias, Marta Elena

    2016-10-01

    Determining progress in gait requires a reliable method. However, achieving standard assessment results in the clinical setting can be challenging. Searching for a reliable tool, we tested OptoGait, a tool that has floor-level, high-density photoelectric cells that can be used to determine patterns of spatial-temporal gait on the basis of 19 variables: step length, stride length, distance, total contact time, step time, walking speed, acceleration, progressive step time, cadence, gait cycle, stance phase, swing phase, heel contact phase, flatfoot phase, takeoff phase, single limb support, double limb support, load response phase, and pre-swing phase. The gait of 126 study participants (41 males, 85 females; 27.37±1.77 years) was assessed twice for each participant during 10 episodes of walking on a 10m walkway each 2 weeks apart. Intra-session and inter-session results were compared using data for each foot alone as well as both feet together. All variables resulted in a high consistency except for acceleration. The intra-session data showed substantial agreement; the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) ranged from 0.72-0.78 in the heel contact phase, 0.72-0.76 in the load response phase, and 0.76-0.85 in the pre-swing phase and a low SEM. The inter-session data for each foot alone and both feet together showed substantial agreement (0.77-0.79 in the load response phase) and slight agreement for acceleration (0.06-0.22) with a low SEM. Based on these results, we conclude that the OptoGait system can be used with confidence to evaluate spatial-temporal gait except for acceleration and progressive step time assessment.

  15. Comparison of Upright Gait with Supine Bungee-Cord Gait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boda, Wanda L.; Hargens, Alan R.; Campbell, J. A.; Yang, C.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Running on a treadmill with bungee-cord resistance is currently used on the Russian space station MIR as a countermeasure for the loss of bone and muscular strength which occurs during spaceflight. However, it is unknown whether ground reaction force (GRF) at the feet using bungee-cord resistance is similar to that which occurs during upright walking and running on Earth. We hypothesized-that the DRAMs generated during upright walking and running are greater than the DRAMs generated during supine bungee-cord gait. Eleven healthy subjects walked (4.8 +/- 0.13 km/h, mean +/- SE) and ran (9.1 +/- 0.51 km/h) during upright and supine bungee-cord exercise on an active treadmill. Subjects exercised for 3 min in each condition using a resistance of 1 body weight calibrated during an initial, stationary standing position. Data were sampled at a frequency of 500Hz and the mean of 3 trials was analyzed for each condition. A repeated measures analysis of variance tested significance between the conditions. Peak DRAMs during upright walking were significantly greater (1084.9 +/- 111.4 N) than during supine bungee-cord walking (770.3 +/- 59.8 N; p less than 0.05). Peak GRFs were also significantly greater for upright running (1548.3 +/- 135.4 N) than for supine bungee-cord running (1099.5 +/- 158.46 N). Analysis of GRF curves indicated that forces decreased throughout the stance phase for bungee-cord gait but not during upright gait. These results indicate that bungee-cord exercise may not create sufficient loads at the feet to counteract the loss of bone and muscular strength that occurs during long-duration exposure to microgravity.

  16. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Nukala, Bhargava Teja; Nakano, Taro; Rodriguez, Amanda; Tsay, Jerry; Lopez, Jerry; Nguyen, Tam Q.; Zupancic, Steven; Lie, Donald Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS). The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC), two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI) MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (KNN) and binary decision trees (BDT), based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected. PMID:27916817

  17. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor.

    PubMed

    Nukala, Bhargava Teja; Nakano, Taro; Rodriguez, Amanda; Tsay, Jerry; Lopez, Jerry; Nguyen, Tam Q; Zupancic, Steven; Lie, Donald Y C

    2016-11-29

    Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS). The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC), two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI) MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (KNN) and binary decision trees (BDT), based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected.

  18. Gastrocnemius and soleus lengths in cerebral palsy equinus gait--differences between children with and without static contracture and effects of gastrocnemius recession.

    PubMed

    Wren, Tishya A L; Do, K Patrick; Kay, Robert M

    2004-09-01

    Equinus gait is one of the most common abnormalities in children with cerebral palsy. Although it is generally assumed that the calf muscles are abnormally short in equinus gait, no studies have been done to confirm that the muscles are short and that this shortness contributes to the equinus. This study used musculoskeletal modeling combined with computerized gait analysis to examine medial gastrocnemius (MGAS), lateral gastrocnemius (LGAS), and soleus (SOL) musculotendinous lengths during equinus gait in children with cerebral palsy. All three muscles were abnormally short during equinus gait whether or not the children had equinus contractures (P < or = 0.005). Children with static contractures had shorter maximum static MGAS and LGAS lengths than children with dynamic equinus (P < or = 0.002). The children with static contractures had ratios of peak dynamic length to maximum static length close to 1.0 for MGAS and LGAS (1.005 +/- 0.015) but lower ratios for SOL (0.984 +/- 0.024). For the children with static contracture, these ratios did not change significantly after gastrocnemius recession (P > or = 0.14) because both static and dynamic lengths increased postoperatively (P < or = 0.04). These results support the current clinical understanding of the role of calf "tightness" in equinus gait, including the appropriateness and effectiveness of gastrocnemius recession for children with equinus contracture.

  19. Dependence of Gait Deviation on Weight-Bearing Asymmetry and Postural Instability in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Szopa, Andrzej; Czamara, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Postural control deficits have been suggested to be a major component of gait disorders in children with cerebral palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between postural stability and treadmill walking, in children with unilateral cerebral palsy, by defining dependence between the posturographic weight-bearing distribution and center of pressure (CoP) sway during quiet standing with Gillette Gait Index and the 16 distinct gait parameters that composed the Gillette Gait Index. Forty-five children with unilateral cerebral palsy from 7–12 years of age were included in this study. A posturographic procedure and 3-dimensional instrumented gait analysis was developed. In general, across the entire tested group, the significant correlations concerned only the asymmetry of the weight bearing and a few of the distinct gait parameters that compose the Gillette Gait Index; moreover, correlation coefficients were low. The division of subjects into two clinical subgroups: children that exhibited a tendency to overload (1) and to underload (2) the affected body side, modified the results of the explored relationships. Our findings revealed that the difficulties experienced by children with hemiplegia while controlled in a standing position result from tendency to excessively or insufficiently load the affected lower limbs, and thus establishes a direct relationship with inadequate affected peak ankle DF in both stance and swing gait phases. Given the presented relationship between postural instability and deviation of the particular gait parameters in children with unilateral cerebral palsy, a follow-up study will be needed to determine the therapeutic approaches that will be most effective in promoting increased improvement in gait pattern, as well as the static and dynamic balance in standing. PMID:27788247

  20. Biomechanical consideration based on the unrestrained gait measurement of trans-femoral amputee with a prosthetic limb.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichiro; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Matsuda, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Youtaro

    2011-01-01

    Trans-femoral amputees must regain moving pattern by refined rehabilitation program using loads applied on a prosthetic limb. On the other hand, understanding those loads is indispensable for biomechanical consideration of trans-femoral amputees. However, conventional prosthetic gait training systems cannot measure long continuous walking motions. In this paper, loads applied on trans-femoral prosthesis are measured by the prosthetic gait training system for the unrestrained gait measurement. As a result of the experiments, the patterns of moments about the medio-lateral axis are remarkably different among the six activities. Finally, the effectiveness of the developed prosthetic gait training system to analyze biomechanics in trans-femoral prosthesis is validated.

  1. Gait Analysis by High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Andre; van Dongen, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of motions with a video analysis tool and via…

  2. Diabetic Foot Biomechanics and Gait Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, James S.; Najafi, Bijan

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot complications represent significant morbidity and precede most of the lower extremity amputations performed. Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of diabetes shown to affect gait. Glycosylation of soft tissues can also affect gait. The purpose of this review article is to highlight the changes in gait for persons with diabetes and highlight the effects of glycosylation on soft tissues at the foot–ground interface. Methods PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and EBSCOhost® on-line databases were searched for articles pertaining to diabetes and gait. Bibliographies from relevant manuscripts were also searched. Findings Patients with diabetes frequently exhibit a conservative gait strategy where there is slower walking speed, wider base of gait, and prolonged double support time. Glycosylation affects are observed in the lower extremities. Initially, skin thickness decreases and skin hardness increases; tendons thicken; muscles atrophy and exhibit activation delays; bones become less dense; joints have limited mobility; and fat pads are less thick, demonstrate fibrotic atrophy, migrate distally, and may be stiffer. Interpretation In conclusion, there do appear to be gait changes in patients with diabetes. These changes, coupled with local soft tissue changes from advanced glycosylated end products, also alter a patient’s gait, putting them at risk of foot ulceration. Better elucidation of these changes throughout the entire spectrum of diabetes disease can help design better treatments and potentially reduce the unnecessarily high prevalence of foot ulcers and amputation. PMID:20663446

  3. Outcomes following kinesthetic feedback for gait training in a direct access environment: a case report on social wellness in relation to gait impairment.

    PubMed

    Blievernicht, Jessica; Sullivan, Kate; Erickson, Mark R

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe the outcomes following the use of kinesthetic feedback as a primary intervention strategy for gait training. The plan of care for this 22-year-old female addressed the patient's social wellness goal of "walking more normally," using motor learning principles. At initial examination, the patient demonstrated asymmetries for gait kinematics between the left and right lower extremity (analyzed using video motion analysis), pattern of force distribution at the foot, and activation of specific lower extremity muscles (as measured by surface electromyography). Interventions for this patient consisted of neuromuscular and body awareness training, with an emphasis on kinesthetic feedback. Weekly sessions lasted 30-60 minutes over 4 weeks. The patient was prescribed a home program of walking 30-60 minutes three times/week at a comfortable pace while concentrating on gait correction through kinesthetic awareness of specific deviations. Following intervention, the patient's gait improved across all objective measures. She reported receiving positive comments from others regarding improved gait and a twofold increase in her walking confidence. Outcomes support a broadened scope of practice that incorporates previously unreported integration of a patient's social wellness goals into patient management.

  4. Gait Generation for a Small Biped Robot using Approximated Optimization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tinh; Tao, Linh; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for gait pattern generation of a small biped robot to enhance its walking behavior. This is to aim to make the robot gait more natural and more stable in the walking process. In this study, we mention the approximated optimization method which applied the Differential Evolution algorithm (DE) to objective function approximated by Artificial Neural Network (ANN). In addition, we also present a new humanlike foot structure with toes for the biped robot in this paper. To evaluate this method achievement, the robot was simulated by multi-body dynamics simulation software, Adams (MSC software, USA). As a result, we confirmed that the biped robot with the proposed foot structure can walk naturally. The approximated optimization method based on DE algorithm and ANN is an effective approach to generate a gait pattern for the locomotion of the biped robot. This method is simpler than the conventional methods using Zero Moment Point (ZMP) criterion.

  5. Speed-dependent reference joint trajectory generation for robotic gait support.

    PubMed

    Koopman, B; van Asseldonk, E H F; van der Kooij, H

    2014-04-11

    For the control of actuated orthoses, or gait rehabilitation robotics, kinematic reference trajectories are often required. These trajectories, consisting of joint angles, angular velocities and accelerations, are highly dependent on walking-speed. We present and evaluate a novel method to reconstruct body-height and speed-dependent joint trajectories. First, we collected gait kinematics in fifteen healthy (middle) aged subjects (47-68), at a wide range of walking-speeds (0.5-5 kph). For each joint trajectory multiple key-events were selected (among which its extremes). Second, we derived regression-models that predict the timing, angle, angular velocity and acceleration for each key-event, based on walking-speed and the subject׳s body-height. Finally, quintic splines were fitted between the predicted key-events to reconstruct a full gait cycle. Regression-models were obtained for hip ab-/adduction, hip flexion/extension, knee flexion/extension and ankle plantar-/dorsiflexion. Results showed that the majority of the key-events were dependent on walking-speed, both in terms of timing and amplitude, whereas the body-height had less effect. The reconstructed trajectories matched the measured trajectories very well, in terms of angle, angular velocity and acceleration. For the angles the RMSE between the reconstructed and measured trajectories was 2.6°. The mean correlation coefficient between the reconstructed and measured angular trajectories was 0.91. The method and the data presented in this paper can be used to generate speed-dependent gait patterns. These patterns can be used for the control of several robotic gait applications. Alternatively they can assist the assessment of pathological gait, where they can serve as a reference for "normal" gait.

  6. Static optimization of muscle forces during gait in comparison to EMG-to-force processing approach.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Sofia; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2007-07-01

    Individual muscle forces evaluated from experimental motion analysis may be useful in mathematical simulation, but require additional musculoskeletal and mathematical modelling. A numerical method of static optimization was used in this study to evaluate muscular forces during gait. The numerical algorithm used was built on the basis of traditional optimization techniques, i.e., constrained minimization technique using the Lagrange multiplier method to solve for constraints. Measuring exact muscle forces during gait analysis is not currently possible. The developed optimization method calculates optimal forces during gait, given a specific performance criterion, using kinematics and kinetics from gait analysis together with muscle architectural data. Experimental methods to validate mathematical methods to calculate forces are limited. Electromyography (EMG) is frequently used as a tool to determine muscle activation in experimental studies on human motion. A method of estimating force from the EMG signal, the EMG-to-force approach, was recently developed by Bogey et al. [Bogey RA, Perry J, Gitter AJ. An EMG-to-force processing approach for determining ankle muscle forcs during normal human gait. IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 2005;13:302-10] and is based on normalization of activation during a maximum voluntary contraction to documented maximal muscle strength. This method was adapted in this study as a tool with which to compare static optimization during a gait cycle. Muscle forces from static optimization and from EMG-to-force muscle forces show reasonably good correlation in the plantarflexor and dorsiflexor muscles, but less correlation in the knee flexor and extensor muscles. Additional comparison of the mathematical muscle forces from static optimization to documented averaged EMG data reveals good overall correlation to patterns of evaluated muscular activation. This indicates that on an individual level, muscular force patterns from mathematical

  7. Research on gait-based human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Youguo

    Gait recognition refers to automatic identification of individual based on his/her style of walking. This paper proposes a gait recognition method based on Continuous Hidden Markov Model with Mixture of Gaussians(G-CHMM). First, we initialize a Gaussian mix model for training image sequence with K-means algorithm, then train the HMM parameters using a Baum-Welch algorithm. These gait feature sequences can be trained and obtain a Continuous HMM for every person, therefore, the 7 key frames and the obtained HMM can represent each person's gait sequence. Finally, the recognition is achieved by Front algorithm. The experiments made on CASIA gait databases obtain comparatively high correction identification ratio and comparatively strong robustness for variety of bodily angle.

  8. Gait analysis using gravitational acceleration measured by wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ryo; Tadano, Shigeru; Todoh, Masahiro; Morikawa, Manabu; Nakayasu, Minoru; Yoshinari, Satoshi

    2009-02-09

    A novel method for measuring human gait posture using wearable sensor units is proposed. The sensor units consist of a tri-axial acceleration sensor and three gyro sensors aligned on three axes. The acceleration and angular velocity during walking were measured with seven sensor units worn on the abdomen and the lower limb segments (both thighs, shanks and feet). The three-dimensional positions of each joint are calculated from each segment length and joint angle. Joint angle can be estimated mechanically from the gravitational acceleration along the anterior axis of the segment. However, the acceleration data during walking includes three major components; translational acceleration, gravitational acceleration and external noise. Therefore, an optimization analysis was represented to separate only the gravitational acceleration from the acceleration data. Because the cyclic patterns of acceleration data can be found during constant walking, a FFT analysis was applied to obtain some characteristic frequencies in it. A pattern of gravitational acceleration was assumed using some parts of these characteristic frequencies. Every joint position was calculated from the pattern under the condition of physiological motion range of each joint. An optimized pattern of the gravitational acceleration was selected as a solution of an inverse problem. Gaits of three healthy volunteers were measured by walking for 20s on a flat floor. As a result, the acceleration data of every segment was measured simultaneously. The characteristic three-dimensional walking could be shown by the expression using a stick figure model. In addition, the trajectories of the knee joint in the horizontal plane could be checked by visual imaging on a PC. Therefore, this method provides important quantitive information for gait diagnosis.

  9. Metric learning for Parkinsonian identification from IMU gait measurements.

    PubMed

    Cuzzolin, Fabio; Sapienza, Michael; Esser, Patrick; Saha, Suman; Franssen, Miss Marloes; Collett, Johnny; Dawes, Helen

    2017-02-27

    Diagnosis of people with mild Parkinson's symptoms is difficult. Nevertheless, variations in gait pattern can be utilised to this purpose, when measured via Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). Human gait, however, possesses a high degree of variability across individuals, and is subject to numerous nuisance factors. Therefore, off-the-shelf Machine Learning techniques may fail to classify it with the accuracy required in clinical trials. In this paper we propose a novel framework in which IMU gait measurement sequences sampled during a 10m walk are first encoded as hidden Markov models (HMMs) to extract their dynamics and provide a fixed-length representation. Given sufficient training samples, the distance between HMMs which optimises classification performance is learned and employed in a classical Nearest Neighbour classifier. Our tests demonstrate how this technique achieves accuracy of 85.51% over a 156 people with Parkinson's with a representative range of severity and 424 typically developed adults, which is the top performance achieved so far over a cohort of such size, based on single measurement outcomes. The method displays the potential for further improvement and a wider application to distinguish other conditions.

  10. Reinforcement learning of periodical gaits in locomotion robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svinin, Mikhail; Yamada, Kazuyaki; Ushio, S.; Ueda, Kanji

    1999-08-01

    Emergence of stable gaits in locomotion robots is studied in this paper. A classifier system, implementing an instance- based reinforcement learning scheme, is used for sensory- motor control of an eight-legged mobile robot. Important feature of the classifier system is its ability to work with the continuous sensor space. The robot does not have a prior knowledge of the environment, its own internal model, and the goal coordinates. It is only assumed that the robot can acquire stable gaits by learning how to reach a light source. During the learning process the control system, is self-organized by reinforcement signals. Reaching the light source defines a global reward. Forward motion gets a local reward, while stepping back and falling down get a local punishment. Feasibility of the proposed self-organized system is tested under simulation and experiment. The control actions are specified at the leg level. It is shown that, as learning progresses, the number of the action rules in the classifier systems is stabilized to a certain level, corresponding to the acquired gait patterns.

  11. First metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis: a clinical, pedobarographic and gait analysis study.

    PubMed

    DeFrino, Paul Francis; Brodsky, James White; Pollo, Fabian E; Crenshaw, Stephanie J; Beischer, Andrew D

    2002-06-01

    This study investigated the results of first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) arthrodesis in terms of clinical outcome measures, plantar pressure distribution, and gait patterns. Ten feet in nine patients with severe hallux rigidus (HR) who underwent first MTP arthrodesis were studied. The preoperative evaluation included a subjective questionnaire, physical exam, AOFAS hallux score, radiographs and dynamic pedobarography (EMED). At follow-up (average 34 months) these were repeated, and gait analysis studies were obtained. Patients showed significant clinical improvement based on the subjective criteria. The mean AOFAS score improved from 38 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively. Postoperative EMED analysis showed restoration of the weightbearing function of the first ray, with greater maximum force carried by the distal hallux at toe-off. Kinematic and kinetic gait analysis from each patient's operative limb were compared to the unaffected contralateral limb and to age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. The kinematic data indicated a significantly shorter step length with some loss in ankle plantar flexion at toe-off on the fused side. The kinetic data indicated a reduction in both ankle torque and ankle power at push-off. Clinical results indicated effective pain relief and a high level of patient satisfaction, consistent with previous reports in patients with symptomatic Hallux Rigidus.

  12. Attempt toward a development of aquatic exercise device for gait disorders.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Tasuku; Komatsu, Fumie; Takagi, Motoki; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2014-05-23

    Abstract Purpose: To develop an aquatic exercise device to facilitate locomotive motor output and achieve repetitive physiological gait patterns to improve movement dysfunctions. Methods: A custom designed leg movement apparatus (LMA) consisted of closed 4-linkage mechanisms and one-length changeable link using a spring. Three-dimensional motions and electromyographic (EMG) activities were recorded in eight healthy subjects to evaluate the reproducibility of the physiological gait patterns using the LMA with or without a spring apparatus in water. Results: Using the LMA with a spring apparatus compared to walking in water, the foot trajectories and the time course of the elevation angles in each lower limb joint kinematics were preserved. The time-series of the EMG showed reciprocal modulation between agonist and antagonist muscle groups in the hip and ankle joints. However, the amplitudes of the tibialis anterior muscle in the first half and rectus femoris in the last half of the movement cycle were reduced using the LMA with a spring apparatus. Conclusion: We developed a novel aquatic exercise device to reproduce physiological gait patterns. The LMA with a spring apparatus would be particularly valuable in therapy for movement dysfunctions to facilitate locomotive motor outputs. Implications for Rehabilitation The leg movement apparatus with spring for underwater use (LMA) would be effective gait training to induce the locomotor-like EMG activities. Hydrotherapy with the LMA has advantages over the partial body weight support treadmill training on land with a robotic device; (1) the LMA is electrically and mechanically safe, and (2) the LMA would require self-effort to generate the gait pattern for movement disorders, or also enable passive gait training by the physiotherapists.

  13. Gait analysis in low lumbar myelomeningocele patients with unilateral hip dislocation or subluxation.

    PubMed

    Gabrieli, Ana Paula T; Vankoski, Stephen J; Dias, Luciano S; Milani, Carlo; Lourenco, Alexandre; Filho, Jose Laredo; Novak, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The surgical indications for the treatment of unilateral hip dislocations or subluxations in patients with low lumbar myelomeningocele remain highly debatable. This study examines the influence of unilateral hip dislocation or subluxation on the gait of these patients using three-dimensional gait analysis. Twenty patients with a diagnosis of low lumbar myelomeningocele underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. All patients were community ambulators with solid ankle-foot orthoses and crutches who presented with unilateral hip dislocation or subluxation and no scoliosis. The patients were divided in two groups. Group 1 comprised 10 patients who demonstrated either no evidence of hip flexion or adduction contractures or symmetric hip contractures. Group 2 comprised 10 patients with unilateral hip flexion and/or adduction contractures. Pelvic and hip kinematics were assessed to determine the symmetry of motion between the involved and the noninvolved side during walking. Seven patients from group 1 walked with a symmetric gait pattern; only two patients from group 2 walked with a symmetric pattern. Gait symmetry corresponded to the absence of hip contractures or bilateral symmetrical hip contractures and had no relation to the presence of hip dislocation. The authors concluded that reduction of the hip is unnecessary.

  14. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  15. Comparison of gait of persons with partial foot amputation wearing prosthesis to matched control group: observational study.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Michael P; Barker, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of the gait mechanics of persons with partial foot amputation and the influence of prosthetic intervention has been limited by the reporting of isolated gait parameters in specific amputation levels and limited interpretation and discussion of results. This observational study aimed to more completely describe the gait patterns of persons with partial foot amputation wearing their existing prosthesis and footwear in comparison with a nonamputee control group. Major adaptations occurred once the metatarsal heads were compromised. Persons with transmetatarsal and Lisfranc amputation who were wearing insoles and slipper sockets maintained the center of pressure behind the end of the residuum until after contralateral heel contact. This gait pattern may be a useful adaptation to protect the residuum, moderate the requirement of the calf musculature, or compensate for the compliance of the forefoot. Power generation across the affected ankle was virtually negligible, necessitating increased power generation across the hip joints. The clamshell devices fitted to the persons with Chopart amputation restored their effective foot length and normalized many aspects of gait. These persons' ability to adopt this gait pattern may be the result of the broad anterior shell of the socket, a relatively stiff forefoot, and immobilization of the ankle. The hip joints still contributed significantly to the power generation required to walk.

  16. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  17. Effects of Physical Rehabilitation Integrated with Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation on Spatio-Temporal and Kinematic Parameters of Gait in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pau, Massimiliano; Corona, Federica; Pili, Roberta; Casula, Carlo; Sors, Fabrizio; Agostini, Tiziano; Cossu, Giovanni; Guicciardi, Marco; Murgia, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Movement rehabilitation by means of physical therapy represents an essential tool in the management of gait disturbances induced by Parkinson's disease (PD). In this context, the use of rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) has been proven useful in improving several spatio-temporal parameters, but concerning its effect on gait patterns, scarce information is available from a kinematic viewpoint. In this study, we used three-dimensional gait analysis based on optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry to investigate the effects of 5 weeks of supervised rehabilitation, which included gait training integrated with RAS on 26 individuals affected by PD (age 70.4 ± 11.1, Hoehn and Yahr 1-3). Gait kinematics was assessed before and at the end of the rehabilitation period and after a 3-month follow-up, using concise measures (Gait Profile Score and Gait Variable Score, GPS and GVS, respectively), which are able to describe the deviation from a physiologic gait pattern. The results confirm the effectiveness of gait training assisted by RAS in increasing speed and stride length, in regularizing cadence and correctly reweighting swing/stance phase duration. Moreover, an overall improvement of gait quality was observed, as demonstrated by the significant reduction of the GPS value, which was created mainly through significant decreases in the GVS score associated with the hip flexion-extension movement. Future research should focus on investigating kinematic details to better understand the mechanisms underlying gait disturbances in people with PD and the effects of RAS, with the aim of finding new or improving current rehabilitative treatments.

  18. Effects of Physical Rehabilitation Integrated with Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation on Spatio-Temporal and Kinematic Parameters of Gait in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Massimiliano; Corona, Federica; Pili, Roberta; Casula, Carlo; Sors, Fabrizio; Agostini, Tiziano; Cossu, Giovanni; Guicciardi, Marco; Murgia, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Movement rehabilitation by means of physical therapy represents an essential tool in the management of gait disturbances induced by Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this context, the use of rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) has been proven useful in improving several spatio-temporal parameters, but concerning its effect on gait patterns, scarce information is available from a kinematic viewpoint. In this study, we used three-dimensional gait analysis based on optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry to investigate the effects of 5 weeks of supervised rehabilitation, which included gait training integrated with RAS on 26 individuals affected by PD (age 70.4 ± 11.1, Hoehn and Yahr 1–3). Gait kinematics was assessed before and at the end of the rehabilitation period and after a 3-month follow-up, using concise measures (Gait Profile Score and Gait Variable Score, GPS and GVS, respectively), which are able to describe the deviation from a physiologic gait pattern. The results confirm the effectiveness of gait training assisted by RAS in increasing speed and stride length, in regularizing cadence and correctly reweighting swing/stance phase duration. Moreover, an overall improvement of gait quality was observed, as demonstrated by the significant reduction of the GPS value, which was created mainly through significant decreases in the GVS score associated with the hip flexion–extension movement. Future research should focus on investigating kinematic details to better understand the mechanisms underlying gait disturbances in people with PD and the effects of RAS, with the aim of finding new or improving current rehabilitative treatments. PMID:27563296

  19. Association of Gait Characteristics and Depression in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Assessed in Goal-Directed Locomotion Task.

    PubMed

    Kincses, Péter; Kovács, Norbert; Karádi, Kázmér; Feldmann, Ádám; Dorn, Krisztina; Aschermann, Zsuzsanna; Komoly, Sámuel; Szolcsányi, Tibor; Csathó, Árpád; Kállai, János

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. In the genesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) clinical phenomenology the exact nature of the association between bradykinesia and affective variables is unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the gait characteristics and level of depression in PD and healthy volunteers. Methods. Patients with PD (n = 48) and healthy controls (n = 52) were recruited for the present study. Walking speed, stride length, and cadence were compared between groups while participants completed a goal-directed locomotion task under visually controlled (VC) and visually noncontrolled conditions (VnC). Results. Significantly higher depression scores were found in PD comparing to healthy control groups. In PD, depression was associated with gait components in the VC wherein the place of the target was visible. In contrast, in healthy subjects the depression was associated with gait components in VnC wherein the location and image of the target were memorized and recalled. In patients with PD and depression, the visually deprived multitask augments the rate of cadence and diminishes stride length, while velocity remains relatively unchanged. The depression associated with gait characteristics as a comorbid affective factor in PD, and that impairs the coherence of gait pattern. Conclusion. The relationship between depression and gait parameters appears to indicate that PD not only is a neurological disease but also incorporates affective disturbances that associate with the regulation of gait characteristics.

  20. Association of Gait Characteristics and Depression in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Assessed in Goal-Directed Locomotion Task

    PubMed Central

    Kincses, Péter; Karádi, Kázmér; Feldmann, Ádám; Dorn, Krisztina; Aschermann, Zsuzsanna; Szolcsányi, Tibor; Csathó, Árpád

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. In the genesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) clinical phenomenology the exact nature of the association between bradykinesia and affective variables is unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the gait characteristics and level of depression in PD and healthy volunteers. Methods. Patients with PD (n = 48) and healthy controls (n = 52) were recruited for the present study. Walking speed, stride length, and cadence were compared between groups while participants completed a goal-directed locomotion task under visually controlled (VC) and visually noncontrolled conditions (VnC). Results. Significantly higher depression scores were found in PD comparing to healthy control groups. In PD, depression was associated with gait components in the VC wherein the place of the target was visible. In contrast, in healthy subjects the depression was associated with gait components in VnC wherein the location and image of the target were memorized and recalled. In patients with PD and depression, the visually deprived multitask augments the rate of cadence and diminishes stride length, while velocity remains relatively unchanged. The depression associated with gait characteristics as a comorbid affective factor in PD, and that impairs the coherence of gait pattern. Conclusion. The relationship between depression and gait parameters appears to indicate that PD not only is a neurological disease but also incorporates affective disturbances that associate with the regulation of gait characteristics. PMID:28293444

  1. Quantitative gait analysis of long-term locomotion deficits in classical unilateral striatal intracerebral hemorrhage rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Ao, Li Juan; Lu, Gang; Leong, Elizabeth; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Xiao Hong; Zhu, Xian Lun; Sun, Tin Fung David; Fei, Zhou; Jiu, Tian; Hu, Xiang; Poon, Wai Sang

    2013-11-15

    Gait analysis is a systematic collection of quantitative information on bodily movements during locomotion. Gait analysis has been employed clinically in stroke patients for their rehabilitation planning. In animal studies, gait analysis has been employed for the assessment of their locomotive disturbances in ischemic stroke, spinal cord injury and Parkinson's disease. The aims of the work reported here were to identify the gait parameters, collected from the computer-generated CatWalk System, that change after unilateral intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the acute stage and long term up to 56 days post-ICH. The results showed that with the collagenase-induced unilateral striatal lesion, the rats displayed a significant contralateral decrease in print and maximum contact area and paw intensity, a diagonal increase in the stance duration of the left front and right hind paws, a significant decrease in the stride length of all four limbs, and foot pattern instability as reflected by the base of support, support on styles, and cadence. These deficits, including those in print area, stance and pressure, were demonstrated throughout the long-term period following ICH. The correlations between the gait parameters, lesion volume and asymmetrical forelimb use were also reported in this paper. This work has provided a systematic description on gait parameters in the classical striatal ICH model, which might become an essential assessment tool in future studies of pathophysiology and the development of novel treatments for experimental unilateral intracerebral hemorrhage with gait deficits.

  2. Multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) reveals abnormal fMRI activity in both the “core” and “extended” face network in congenital prosopagnosia

    PubMed Central

    Rivolta, Davide; Woolgar, Alexandra; Palermo, Romina; Butko, Marina; Schmalzl, Laura; Williams, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to identify faces is mediated by a network of cortical and subcortical brain regions in humans. It is still a matter of debate which regions represent the functional substrate of congenital prosopagnosia (CP), a condition characterized by a lifelong impairment in face recognition, and affecting around 2.5% of the general population. Here, we used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to measure neural responses to faces, objects, bodies, and body-parts in a group of seven CPs and ten healthy control participants. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of the fMRI data we demonstrate that neural activity within the “core” (i.e., occipital face area and fusiform face area) and “extended” (i.e., anterior temporal cortex) face regions in CPs showed reduced discriminability between faces and objects. Reduced differentiation between faces and objects in CP was also seen in the right parahippocampal cortex. In contrast, discriminability between faces and bodies/body-parts and objects and bodies/body-parts across the ventral visual system was typical in CPs. In addition to MVPA analysis, we also ran traditional mass-univariate analysis, which failed to show any group differences in face and object discriminability. In sum, these findings demonstrate (i) face-object representations impairments in CP which encompass both the “core” and “extended” face regions, and (ii) superior power of MVPA in detecting group differences. PMID:25431556

  3. Multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) reveals abnormal fMRI activity in both the "core" and "extended" face network in congenital prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Rivolta, Davide; Woolgar, Alexandra; Palermo, Romina; Butko, Marina; Schmalzl, Laura; Williams, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    The ability to identify faces is mediated by a network of cortical and subcortical brain regions in humans. It is still a matter of debate which regions represent the functional substrate of congenital prosopagnosia (CP), a condition characterized by a lifelong impairment in face recognition, and affecting around 2.5% of the general population. Here, we used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to measure neural responses to faces, objects, bodies, and body-parts in a group of seven CPs and ten healthy control participants. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of the fMRI data we demonstrate that neural activity within the "core" (i.e., occipital face area and fusiform face area) and "extended" (i.e., anterior temporal cortex) face regions in CPs showed reduced discriminability between faces and objects. Reduced differentiation between faces and objects in CP was also seen in the right parahippocampal cortex. In contrast, discriminability between faces and bodies/body-parts and objects and bodies/body-parts across the ventral visual system was typical in CPs. In addition to MVPA analysis, we also ran traditional mass-univariate analysis, which failed to show any group differences in face and object discriminability. In sum, these findings demonstrate (i) face-object representations impairments in CP which encompass both the "core" and "extended" face regions, and (ii) superior power of MVPA in detecting group differences.

  4. Gait parameters associated with balance in healthy 2- to 4-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Guffey, Keegan; Regier, Michael; Mancinelli, Corrie; Pergami, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The use of validated measurements of gait and balance are crucial to establish baseline function and assess effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Gait in children changes with motor development requiring frequent observations to effectively track progress. Standardized baseline spatiotemporal measurements and a greater understanding of the relationship between gait and balance would provide important feedback to clinicians regarding the effectiveness of rehabilitation and guide treatment modifications. 84 subjects (2.0-4.9 years) walked along the GAITRite(®), a walkway that records spatiotemporal parameters. The Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS) was administered to assess balance. Comparison of spatiotemporal parameter means between age groups showed trends associated with motor development similar to the ones described in the literature such as decreased cadence and increased step/stride length with increasing age. However, no significant differences in normalized spatiotemporal parameters were found between age groups. Age, leg length, cadence, step/stride length, step/stance time, and single/double support time showed significant correlation with balance scores. When the parameters were grouped into spatial, temporal, and age-related components using principal components analysis and included in a multiple regression model, they significantly predicted 51% of the balance score variance. Age-related components most strongly predicted balance outcomes. We suggest that balance can potentially be evaluated by assessment of spatial, temporal, and age-related characteristics of gait such as step length, cadence, and leg length. This suggests the possibility of developing new gait measurement technology that could provide functional assessment and track improvements during rehabilitation regimens. If the same model can be applied to monitor treatment efficacy in children with gait abnormalities remains to be addressed.

  5. High levels of periostin correlate with increased fracture rate, diffuse MRI pattern, abnormal bone remodeling and advanced disease stage in patients with newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, E; Christoulas, D; Kastritis, E; Bagratuni, T; Gavriatopoulou, M; Roussou, M; Papatheodorou, A; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, E; Kanellias, N; Liakou, C; Panagiotidis, I; Migkou, M; Kokkoris, P; Moulopoulos, L A; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein that is implicated in the biology of normal bone remodeling and in different cancer cell growth and metastasis. However, there is no information on the role of periostin in multiple myeloma (MM). Thus, we evaluated periostin in six myeloma cell lines in vitro; in the bone marrow plasma and serum of 105 newly diagnosed symptomatic MM (NDMM) patients and in the serum of 23 monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 33 smoldering MM (SMM) patients, 30 patients at the plateau phase post-first-line therapy, 30 patients at first relapse and 30 healthy controls. We found high levels of periostin in the supernatants of myeloma cell lines compared with ovarian cancer cell lines that were not influenced by the incubation with the stromal cell line HS5. In NDMM patients the bone marrow plasma periostin was almost fourfold higher compared with the serum levels of periostin and correlated with the presence of fractures and of diffuse magnetic resonance imaging pattern of marrow infiltration. Serum periostin was elevated in NDMM patients compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients and correlated with advanced disease stage, high lactate dehydrogenase, increased activin-A, increased bone resorption and reduced bone formation. Patients at first relapse had also elevated periostin compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients, while even patients at the plateau phase had elevated serum periostin compared with healthy controls. These results support an important role of periostin in the biology of myeloma and reveal periostin as a possible target for the development of antimyeloma drugs. PMID:27716740

  6. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part III--kinetics and energy assessment.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, D H

    2005-06-01

    Historically, clinical applications of measurements of force and energy followed electromyography and kinematics in temporal sequence. This sequence is mirrored by the order of topics included in this trilogy on the Evolution of Clinical Gait Analysis, with part I [Sutherland DH. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part I: kinesiological EMG. Gait Posture 2001;14:61-70.] devoted to Kinesiological EMG and part II [Sutherland DH. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part II - kinematics. Gait Posture 2002;16(2):159-179.] to Kinematics. This final review in the series will focus on kinetics as it relates to gait applications. Kinematic measurements give the movements of the body segments, which can be compared with normal controls to identify pathological gait patterns, but they do not deal with the forces controlling the movements. As a major goal of scientifically minded clinicians is to understand the biomechanical forces producing movements, the objective measurement of ground reaction forces is essential. The force plate (platform) is now an indispensable tool in a state-of-the-art motion analysis laboratory. Nonetheless, it is not a stand-alone instrument as both kinematic and EMG measurements are needed for maximum clinical implementation and interpretation of force plate measurements. The subject of energy assessment is also given mention, as there is a compelling interest in whether walking has been made easier with intervention. The goals of this manuscript are to provide a historical background, recognize some of the important contributors, and describe the current multiple uses of the force plate in gait analysis. The widespread use of force plates for postural analyses is an important and more recent application of this technology, but this review will be restricted to measurements of gait rather than balance activities. Finally, this manuscript presents my personal perspective and discusses the developments and contributors that have shaped my

  7. Biomechanics and analysis of running gait.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Sheila A; Bhat, Krishna P

    2005-08-01

    Physical activity, including running, is important to general health by way of prevention of chronic illnesses and their precursors. To keep runners healthy, it is paramount that one has sound knowledge of the biomechanics of running and assessment of running gait. More so, improving performance in competitive runners is based in sound training and rehabilitation practices that are rooted firmly in biomechanical principles. This article summarized the biomechanics of running and the means with which one can evaluate running gait. The gait assessment techniques for collecting and analyzing kinetic and kinematic data can provide insights into injury prevention and treatment and performance enhancement.

  8. Robust Gait Recognition by Integrating Inertial and RGBD Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qin; Ni, Lihao; Wang, Qian; Li, Qingquan; Wang, Song

    2017-03-29

    Gait has been considered as a promising and unique biometric for person identification. Traditionally, gait data are collected using either color sensors, such as a CCD camera, depth sensors, such as a Microsoft Kinect, or inertial sensors, such as an accelerometer. However, a single type of sensors may only capture part of the dynamic gait features and make the gait recognition sensitive to complex covariate conditions, leading to fragile gait-based person identification systems. In this paper, we propose to combine all three types of sensors for gait data collection and gait recognition, which can be used for important identification applications, such as identity recognition to access a restricted building or area. We propose two new algorithms, namely EigenGait and TrajGait, to extract gait features from the inertial data and the RGBD (color and depth) data, respectively. Specifically, EigenGait extracts general gait dynamics from the accelerometer readings in the eigenspace and TrajGait extracts more detailed subdynamics by analyzing 3-D dense trajectories. Finally, both extracted features are fed into a supervised classifier for gait recognition and person identification. Experiments on 50 subjects, with comparisons to several other state-of-the-art gait-recognition approaches, show that the proposed approach can achieve higher recognition accuracy and robustness.

  9. Variations in kinematics during clinical gait analysis in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Boudarham, Julien; Roche, Nicolas; Pradon, Didier; Bonnyaud, Céline; Bensmail, Djamel; Zory, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In addition to changes in spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters, patients with stroke exhibit fear of falling as well as fatigability during gait. These changes could compromise interpretation of data from gait analysis. The aim of this study was to determine if the gait of hemiplegic patients changes significantly over successive gait trials. Forty two stroke patients and twenty healthy subjects performed 9 gait trials during a gait analysis session. The mean and variability of spatio-temporal and kinematic joint parameters were analyzed during 3 groups of consecutive gait trials (1-3, 4-6 and 7-9). Principal component analysis was used to reduce the number of variables from the joint kinematic waveforms and to identify the parts of the gait cycle which changed during the gait analysis session. The results showed that i) spontaneous gait velocity and the other spatio-temporal parameters significantly increased, and ii) gait variability decreased, over the last 6 gait trials compared to the first 3, for hemiplegic patients but not healthy subjects. Principal component analysis revealed changes in the sagittal waveforms of the hip, knee and ankle for hemiplegic patients after the first 3 gait trials. These results suggest that at the beginning of the gait analysis session, stroke patients exhibited phase of adaptation,characterized by a "cautious gait" but no fatigue was observed.

  10. A gait stability investigation into FES-assisted paraplegic walking based on the walker tipping index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Dong; Bai, Yanru; Liu, Xiuyun; Qi, Hongzhi; Cheng, Longlong; Wan, Baikun; Hu, Yong; Wong, Yatwa; Luk, Keith D. K.; Leong, John C. Y.

    2009-12-01

    The gait outcome measures used in clinical trials of paraplegic locomotor training determine the effectiveness of improved walking function assisted by the functional electrical stimulation (FES) system. Focused on kinematic, kinetic or physiological changes of paraplegic patients, traditional methods cannot quantify the walking stability or identify the unstable factors of gait in real time. Up until now, the published studies on dynamic gait stability for the effective use of FES have been limited. In this paper, the walker tipping index (WTI) was used to analyze and process gait stability in FES-assisted paraplegic walking. The main instrument was a specialized walker dynamometer system based on a multi-channel strain-gauge bridge network fixed on the frame of the walker. This system collected force information for the handle reaction vector between the patient's upper extremities and the walker during the walking process; the information was then converted into walker tipping index data, which is an evaluation indicator of the patient's walking stability. To demonstrate the potential usefulness of WTI in gait analysis, a preliminary clinical trial was conducted with seven paraplegic patients who were undergoing FES-assisted walking training and seven normal control subjects. The gait stability levels were quantified for these patients under different stimulation patterns and controls under normal walking with knee-immobilization through WTI analysis. The results showed that the walking stability in the FES-assisted paraplegic group was worse than that in the control subject group, with the primary concern being in the anterior-posterior plane. This new technique is practical for distinguishing useful gait information from the viewpoint of stability, and may be further applied in FES-assisted paraplegic walking rehabilitation.

  11. Positive force feedback in bouncing gaits?

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Hartmut; Seyfarth, Andre; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    During bouncing gaits (running, hopping, trotting), passive compliant structures (e.g. tendons, ligaments) store and release part of the stride energy. Here, active muscles must provide the required force to withstand the developing tendon strain and to compensate for the inevitable energy losses. This requires an appropriate control of muscle activation. In this study, for hopping, the potential involvement of afferent information from muscle receptors (muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs) is investigated using a two-segment leg model with one extensor muscle. It is found that: (i) positive feedbacks of muscle-fibre length and muscle force can result in periodic bouncing; (ii) positive force feedback (F+) stabilizes bouncing patterns within a large range of stride energies (maximum hopping height of 16.3 cm, almost twofold higher than the length feedback); and (iii) when employing this reflex scheme, for moderate hopping heights (up to 8.8 cm), an overall elastic leg behaviour is predicted (hopping frequency of 1.4-3 Hz, leg stiffness of 9-27 kN m(-1)). Furthermore, F+ could stabilize running. It is suggested that, during the stance phase of bouncing tasks, the reflex-generated motor control based on feedbacks might be an efficient and reliable alternative to central motor commands. PMID:14561282

  12. Feasibility Study of a Wearable Exoskeleton for Children: Is the Gait Altered by Adding Masses on Lower Limbs?

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Stefano; Colazza, Alessandra; Petrarca, Maurizio; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2013-01-01

    We are designing a pediatric exoskeletal ankle robot (pediatric Anklebot) to promote gait habilitation in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). Few studies have evaluated how much or whether the unilateral loading of a wearable exoskeleton may have the unwanted effect of altering significantly the gait. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether adding masses up to 2.5 kg, the estimated overall added mass of the mentioned device, at the knee level alters the gait kinematics. Ten healthy children and eight children with CP, with light or mild gait impairment, walked wearing a knee brace with several masses. Gait parameters and lower-limb joint kinematics were analyzed with an optoelectronic system under six conditions: without brace (natural gait) and with masses placed at the knee level (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 kg). T-tests and repeated measures ANOVA tests were conducted in order to find noteworthy differences among the trial conditions and between loaded and unloaded legs. No statistically significant differences in gait parameters for both healthy children and children with CP were observed in the five “with added mass” conditions. We found significant differences among “natural gait” and “with added masses” conditions in knee flexion and hip extension angles for healthy children and in knee flexion angle for children with CP. This result can be interpreted as an effect of the mechanical constraint induced by the knee brace rather than the effect associated with load increase. The study demonstrates that the mechanical constraint induced by the brace has a measurable effect on the gait of healthy children and children with CP and that the added mass up to 2.5 kg does not alter the lower limb kinematics. This suggests that wearable devices weighing 25 N or less will not noticeably modify the gait patterns of the population examined here. PMID:24023822

  13. The relation between spasticity and muscle behavior during the swing phase of gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Lynn; Molenaers, Guy; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Monari, Davide; Feys, Hilde; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-12-01

    There is much debate about how spasticity contributes to the movement abnormalities seen in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). This study explored the relation between stretch reflex characteristics in passive muscles and markers of spasticity during gait. Twenty-four children with CP underwent 3D gait analysis at three walking velocity conditions (self-selected, faster and fastest). The gastrocnemius (GAS) and medial hamstrings (MEHs) were assessed at rest using an instrumented spasticity assessment that determined the stretch-reflex threshold, expressed in terms of muscle lengthening velocity. Muscle activation was quantified with root mean square electromyography (RMS-EMG) during passive muscle stretch and during the muscle lengthening periods in the swing phase of gait. Parameters from passive stretch were compared to those from gait analysis. In about half the children, GAS peak muscle lengthening velocity during the swing phase of gait did not exceed its stretch reflex threshold. In contrast, in the MEHs the threshold was always exceeded. In the GAS, stretch reflex thresholds were positively correlated to peak muscle lengthening velocity during the swing phase of gait at the faster (r = 0.46) and fastest (r = 0.54) walking conditions. In the MEHs, a similar relation was found, but only at the faster walking condition (r = 0.43). RMS-EMG during passive stretch showed moderate correlations to RMS-EMG during the swing phase of gait in the GAS (r = 0.46-0.56) and good correlations in the MEHs (r = 0.69-0.77) at all walking conditions. RMS-EMG during passive stretch showed no correlations to peak muscle lengthening velocity during gait. We conclude that a reduced stretch reflex threshold in the GAS and MEHs constrains peak muscle lengthening velocity during gait in children with CP. With increasing walking velocity, this constraint is more marked in the GAS, but not in the MEHs. Hyper-activation of stretch reflexes during passive stretch is related to

  14. Gait recognition based on Gabor wavelets and modified gait energy image for human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Deng-Yuan; Lin, Ta-Wei; Hu, Wu-Chih; Cheng, Chih-Hsiang

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a method for recognizing human identity using gait features based on Gabor wavelets and modified gait energy images (GEIs). Identity recognition by gait generally involves gait representation, extraction, and classification. In this work, a modified GEI convolved with an ensemble of Gabor wavelets is proposed as a gait feature. Principal component analysis is then used to project the Gabor-wavelet-based gait features into a lower-dimension feature space for subsequent classification. Finally, support vector machine classifiers based on a radial basis function kernel are trained and utilized to recognize human identity. The major contributions of this paper are as follows: (1) the consideration of the shadow effect to yield a more complete segmentation of gait silhouettes; (2) the utilization of motion estimation to track people when walkers overlap; and (3) the derivation of modified GEIs to extract more useful gait information. Extensive performance evaluation shows a great improvement of recognition accuracy due to the use of shadow removal, motion estimation, and gait representation using the modified GEIs and Gabor wavelets.

  15. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  16. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  17. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  18. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  19. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    or unclothed  avatars ,  stick figures, or even skeletal models to support their analyses. The system will also allow trainees to  isolate specific...CCAD’s work focused on imposing these sequences on the Santos digital  human  avatar . An initial user interface for the training application was also...ability to detect variations in gait conditions for  skinned  avatar  vs. line‐skeletal  avatar , concurrent (side‐by‐side) image representation vs

  20. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  1. The Effect of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome on Gait Parameters: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Bahramian, Fateme; Abutorabi, Atefeh; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Alidousti, Ardeshir; Aslani, Hamidreza

    2016-10-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most frequent causes of anterior knee pain in adolescents and adults. This disorder can have a big effect on patients' ability and quality of life and gait. This review included all articles published during 1990 to 2016. An extensive literature search was performed in databases of Science Direct, Google Scholar, PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge using OR, AND, NOT between the selected keywords. Finally, 16 articles were selected from final evaluation. In PFPS subjects, there was lower gait velocity, decreased cadence, and reduced knee extensor moment in the loading response and terminal stance, delayed peak rear foot eversion during gait and greater hip adduction compared to healthy subjects, while for hip rotation, there was controversy in studies. Changes in the walking patterns of PFPS subjects may be associated with the strategy used for the reduction of patellofemoral joint reaction force and pain.

  2. Freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease: current treatments and the potential role for cognitive training.

    PubMed

    Walton, Courtney C; Shine, James M; Mowszowski, Loren; Naismith, Sharon L; Lewis, Simon J G

    2014-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is a complex motor symptom of Parkinson's disease that manifests as an inability to generate effective gait, leading to a significant falls risk and a severe impact on quality of life. Research into effective treatment options has provided relatively limited benefits and is often hindered by substantial limitations. In this article, current treatment and research options are briefly discussed and a proposal for the further exploration of non-invasive therapeutic approaches is given. Recent advances in the literature continue to identify a pattern of selective executive dysfunction in patients with freezing of gait and such findings highlight a possible common underlying pathophysiology. Therefore, cognitive training is of particular interest as it may be able to improve executive processes thus reducing the manifestation of FOG. This article focuses on the existing evidence for such intervention strategies and proposes that targeted cognitive training may offer a novel treatment option for FOG that is worthy of an increased research focus.

  3. Recognizing Non-Stationary Walking based on Gait Analysis using Laser Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Shao, Xiaowei; Zhao, Huijing; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    In this paper the authors propose a method for recognizing non-stationary walking based on a gait analysis using multiple laser range scanners. The proposed method consists of the following procedures: (1) people tracking; (2) detection of gait features; (3) recognition of non-stationary walking. First, people tracking is performed by recognizing patterns in which the range data obtained near ankle rhythmically. Next, gait analysis is performed by the spatio-temporal clustering using Mean Shift algorithm. Finally, One Class Support Vector Machine (One Class SVM) is applied for learning and classifying a non-stationary walking. The experiment in a station concourse in Tokyo shows the overall accuracy of 98.4% by the proposed method.

  4. The Effect of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome on Gait Parameters: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Bahramian, Fateme; Abutorabi, Atefeh; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Alidousti, Ardeshir; Aslani, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most frequent causes of anterior knee pain in adolescents and adults. This disorder can have a big effect on patients’ ability and quality of life and gait. This review included all articles published during 1990 to 2016. An extensive literature search was performed in databases of Science Direct, Google Scholar, PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge using OR, AND, NOT between the selected keywords. Finally, 16 articles were selected from final evaluation. In PFPS subjects, there was lower gait velocity, decreased cadence, and reduced knee extensor moment in the loading response and terminal stance, delayed peak rear foot eversion during gait and greater hip adduction compared to healthy subjects, while for hip rotation, there was controversy in studies. Changes in the walking patterns of PFPS subjects may be associated with the strategy used for the reduction of patellofemoral joint reaction force and pain. PMID:27847840

  5. The effects of ramp gait exercise with PNF on stroke patients’ dynamic balance

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyo Chul; Kim, Hyeon Ae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of ramp gait training using lower extremity patterns of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on chronic stroke patients’ dynamic balance ability. [Subjects and Methods] In total, 30 stroke patients participated in this study, and they were assigned randomly and equally to an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group received exercise treatment for 30 min and ramp gait training with PNF for 30 min. The control group received exercise treatment for 30 min and ground gait training for 30 min. The interventions were conducted in 30 min sessions, three times per week for four week. The subjects were assessed with the Berg balance scale test, timed up and go test, and functional reach test before and after the experiment and the results were compared. [Results] After the intervention, the BBS and FRT values had significantly increased and the TUG value had significantly decreased in the experimental group; however, the BBS, FRT, and TUG values showed no significant differences in the control group. In addition, differences between the two groups before the intervention and after the intervention were not significant. [Conclusion] In conclusion, ramp gait training with PNF improved stroke patients’ dynamic balance ability, and a good outcome of ramp gait training with PNF is also expected for other neurological system disease patients. PMID:26180312

  6. The Impact of Different Types of Assistive Devices on Gait Measures and Safety in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    White, Susan E.; Kostyk, Sandra K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Gait and balance impairments lead to frequent falls and injuries in individuals with Huntington's disease (HD). Assistive devices (ADs) such as canes and walkers are often prescribed to prevent falls, but their efficacy is unknown. We systematically examined the effects of different types of ADs on quantitative gait measures during walking in a straight path and around obstacles. Methods Spatial and temporal gait parameters were measured in 21 subjects with HD as they walked across a GAITRite walkway under 7 conditions (i.e., using no AD and 6 commonly prescribed ADs: a cane, a weighted cane, a standard walker, and a 2, 3 or 4 wheeled walker). Subjects also were timed and observed for number of stumbles and falls while walking around two obstacles in a figure-of-eight pattern. Results Gait measure variability (i.e., coefficient of variation), an indicator of fall risk, was consistently better when using the 4WW compared to other ADs. Subjects also walked the fastest and had the fewest number of stumbles and falls when using the 4WW in the figure-of-eight course. Subjects walked significantly slower using ADs compared to no AD both across the GAITRite and in the figure-of-eight. Measures reflecting gait stability and safety improved with the 4WW but were made worse by some other ADs. PMID:22363511

  7. Arboreal locomotion in Eurasian harvest mice Micromys Minutus (Rodentia: Muridae): The gaits of small mammals.

    PubMed

    Karantanis, Nikolaos-Evangelos; Rychlik, Leszek; Herrel, Anthony; Youlatos, Dionisios

    2017-03-23

    Body size imposes significant constraints on arboreal locomotion. Despite the wealth of research in larger arboreal mammals, there is a lack of data on arboreal gaits of small mammals. In this context, the present study explores arboreal locomotion in one of the smallest rodents, the Eurasian harvest mice Micromys minutus (∼10 g). We examined gait metrics (i.e., diagonality, duty factor [DF], DF index, velocity, stride length, and stride frequency) of six adult male mice on simulated arboreal substrates of different sizes (2, 5, 10, and 25 mm) and inclinations (0(0) and 45(0) ). Micromys minutus employed slow, lateral sequence symmetrical gaits on the smaller substrates, which shifted to progressively faster symmetrical gaits of higher diagonality on larger substrates. Both ascents and descents were associated with a higher diagonality, and ascents with a higher DF index compared to horizontal locomotion, underscoring the role of the grasping hind feet. Velocity increase was brought about primarily by an increase in stride frequency, a pattern often encountered in other small mammals, with a secondary and significant contribution of stride length. These findings indicate that, except for velocity and the way it is regulated, there are no significant differences in gait metrics between larger and smaller arboreal mammals. Moreover, the locomotor adaptations of Eurasian harvest mice represent behavioral mechanisms that promote stable, safe, and continuous navigation along slender substrates and ultimately contribute to the successful exploitation of the arboreal milieu.

  8. Acetabular cartilage defects cause altered hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait

    PubMed Central

    Samaan, Michael A.; Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Kumar, Deepak; Lee, Sonia; Link, Thomas; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with acetabular cartilage defects reported increased pain and disability compared to those without acetabular cartilage defects. The specific effects of acetabular cartilage defects on lower extremity coordination patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage defects. Methods A combined approach, consisting of a semi-quantitative MRI-based quantification method and vector coding, was used to assess hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage lesions. Findings The coordination variability of the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation, hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation and hip rotation/knee rotation joint couplings were reduced in the acetabular lesion group compared to the control group during loading response of the gait cycle. The lesion group demonstrated increased variability in the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation and hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation joint couplings, compared to the control group, during the terminal stance/pre-swing phase of gait. Interpretation Reduced variability during loading response in the lesion group may suggest reduced movement strategies and a possible compensation mechanism for lower extremity instability during this phase of the gait cycle. During terminal stance/pre-swing, a larger variability in the lesion group may suggest increased movement strategies and represent a compensation or pain avoidance mechanism caused by the load applied to the hip joint. PMID:26298706

  9. Abnormal sleep patterns in subjects with type II diabetes mellitus and its effect on diabetic microangiopathies: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetic Study (SN-DREAMS, report 20).

    PubMed

    Raman, Rajiv; Gupta, Aditi; Venkatesh, Kadri; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran; Sharma, Tarun

    2012-08-01

    To study the prevalence of Abnormal Sleep Patterns (ASPs), gender-wise, in subjects with type II diabetes mellitus and its influence on diabetic microangiopathies. A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1,414 patients having type II diabetes mellitus. Diabetic retinopathy was graded using stereoscopic digital fundus photography. Neuropathy was assessed by measuring vibration perception threshold using a sensitometer. Nephropathy was diagnosed by the presence of microalbuminuria in the first morning urine sample. ASPs were defined as either short (less than 5 h) or long (more than 9 h) duration of sleep with excessive daytime sleepiness. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was assessed to note excessive daytime sleepiness; a score of more than 10 was considered as abnormal. The prevalence of ASPs was more in subjects with diabetes than with those without diabetes (14.8 vs. 6.6%) (P = 0.009), especially in women (15.7 vs. 5.6%) (P = 0.021). Likewise, the prevalence of short duration of sleep was higher in subjects with diabetes compared to those without diabetes (6.6 vs. 2.2%) (P = 0.040). The mean age of women subjects with diabetes, having ASPs, was higher than those without diabetes (56.4 ± 8.9 years vs. 47.2 ± 5.9 years, P = 0.033). Women subjects with ASPs had a higher risk of diabetic neuropathy on both univariate and multivariate analysis. ASPs are not only related to diabetes but can also influence the microvascular complications arising due to diabetes, particularly diabetic neuropathy. Diabetology and sleep medicine specialists need to work together to prevent the negative interactions between these two groups.

  10. The relationship between isokinetic quadriceps strength and laxity on gait analysis parameters in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knees.

    PubMed

    Gokeler, Alli; Schmalz, Thomas; Knopf, Elmar; Freiwald, Jürgen; Blumentritt, Siegmar

    2003-11-01

    Gait alterations after ACL reconstruction have been reported in the literature. The current study examined a group of 14 patients who all had an ACL reconstruction with a patellar tendon autograft. Kinetic and kinematic data were obtained from the knee during walking. The flexion-extension deficit (FED) calculated from the angular difference between maximal flexion and maximal extension during the stance phase in the ACL-reconstructed and the normal knee was measured. We investigated whether these alterations in gait are related to quadriceps strength and residual laxity of the knee. It may be that patients modify their gait patterns to protect the knee from excessive anterior translation of the tibia by reducing the amount of extension during stance. On the other hand, persistent quadriceps weakness may also cause changes in gait patterns as the quadriceps is functioning as an important dynamic stabilizer of the knee during stance. Results showed that patients had a significantly higher FED value (4.9+/-4.0) than a healthy control group in a previous study (1.3+/-0.9). This is caused mainly by an extension deficit during midstance. External extension moments of the knee (TZMAX were significantly lower in the current patients group than in a healthy control group (TZMAX -0.27+/-0.19 Nm/kg in patients vs. -0.08+/-0.06 Nm/kg in controls). There were no significant correlations between quadriceps strength and gait analysis parameters. Furthermore no correlation was found between the amount of laxity of the knee and gait. The relevance of this study lies in the fact that apparently the measured gait alterations cannot be explained solely by often used biomechanical indicators such as laxity and strength. The measured gait alterations may be a result of the surgical procedure with subsequent modified motor programming.

  11. Toward understanding the limits of gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zongyi; Malave, Laura; Osuntogun, Adebola; Sudhakar, Preksha; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2004-08-01

    Most state of the art video-based gait recognition algorithms start from binary silhouettes. These silhouettes, defined as foreground regions, are usually detected by background subtraction methods, which results in holes or missed parts due to similarity of foreground and background color, and boundary errors due to video compression artifacts. Errors in low-level representation make it hard to understand the effect of certain conditions, such as surface and time, on gait recognition. In this paper, we present a part-level, manual silhouette database consisting of 71 subjects, over one gait cycle, with differences in surface, shoe-type, carrying condition, and time. We have a total of about 11,000 manual silhouette frames. The purpose of this manual silhouette database is twofold. First, this is a resource that we make available at http://www.GaitChallenge.org for use by the gait community to test and design better silhouette detection algorithms. These silhouettes can also be used to learn gait dynamics. Second, using the baseline gait recognition algorithm, which was specified along with the HumanID Gait Challenge problem, we show that performance from manual silhouettes is similar and only sometimes better than that from automated silhouettes detected by statistical background subtraction. Low performances when comparing sequences with differences in walking surfaces and time-variation are not fully explained by silhouette quality. We also study the recognition power in each body part and show that recognition based on just the legs is equal to that from the whole silhouette. There is also significant recognition power in the head and torso shape.

  12. Assessment of Waveform Similarity in Clinical Gait Data: The Linear Fit Method

    PubMed Central

    Iosa, M.; Cereatti, A.; Merlo, A.; Campanini, I.; Paolucci, S.; Cappozzo, A.

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of waveform similarity is a crucial issue in gait analysis for the comparison of kinematic or kinetic patterns with reference data. A typical scenario is in fact the comparison of a patient's gait pattern with a relevant physiological pattern. This study aims to propose and validate a simple method for the assessment of waveform similarity in terms of shape, amplitude, and offset. The method relies on the interpretation of these three parameters, obtained through a linear fit applied to the two data sets under comparison plotted one against the other after time normalization. The validity of this linear fit method was tested in terms of appropriateness (comparing real gait data of 34 patients with cerebrovascular accident with those of 15 healthy subjects), reliability, sensitivity, and specificity (applying a cluster analysis on the real data). Results showed for this method good appropriateness, 94.1% of sensitivity, 93.3% of specificity, and good reliability. The LFM resulted in a simple method suitable for analysing the waveform similarity in clinical gait analysis. PMID:25126548

  13. Can early subclinical gait changes in children with haemophilia be identified using the GAITRite walkway.

    PubMed

    Bladen, M; Alderson, L; Khair, K; Liesner, R; Green, J; Main, E

    2007-09-01

    Development of haemophilic arthropathy has long-term implications for functional mobility in people with haemophilia, but early manifestations are often asymptomatic and difficult to identify. Earlier identification of joint damage may improve outcomes. The aim of this case note review was to determine whether the GAITRite system (electronic pressure sensitive walkway) could identify early changes in gait patterns in boys with haemophilia compared with their peers. Clinic data from medical and physiotherapy notes of boys with severe haemophilia were compared with data from age and leg length-matched controls. Data from two consecutive walks at preferred speed were collected on all participants using the GAITRite system. Clinic assessment notes from 26 boys (aged 7-17 years) with severe haemophilia were identified. Of these, 20 boys had no evidence of joint pathology on assessment and six boys had radiographic evidence of arthropathy. When these data were compared with normal controls, there were statistically significant increases in swing time, stance time, single support and double support in the asymptomatic group (P < 0.01) suggesting subtle early compensatory changes in gait pattern. The children with arthropathy had additional significant differences in their gait compared with matched controls. These differences included normalized velocity, step length, stride length, step time and base of support (P < 0.01). The GAITRite system appears sensitive enough to identify early subtle changes in gait and differentiate between asymptomatic boys with haemophilia and those with arthropathy in comparison with a matched control group. The electronic walkway is an accessible and portable means of providing quantitative gait analysis in the clinical environment. This is an important finding as early identification of gait changes may provide clinicians with the opportunity to intervene with the aim of arresting progression of joint damage.

  14. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments. PMID:26751449

  15. Gait Recognition Using Wearable Motion Recording Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Snekkenes, Einar

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an alternative approach, where gait is collected by the sensors attached to the person's body. Such wearable sensors record motion (e.g. acceleration) of the body parts during walking. The recorded motion signals are then investigated for person recognition purposes. We analyzed acceleration signals from the foot, hip, pocket and arm. Applying various methods, the best EER obtained for foot-, pocket-, arm- and hip- based user authentication were 5%, 7%, 10% and 13%, respectively. Furthermore, we present the results of our analysis on security assessment of gait. Studying gait-based user authentication (in case of hip motion) under three attack scenarios, we revealed that a minimal effort mimicking does not help to improve the acceptance chances of impostors. However, impostors who know their closest person in the database or the genders of the users can be a threat to gait-based authentication. We also provide some new insights toward the uniqueness of gait in case of foot motion. In particular, we revealed the following: a sideway motion of the foot provides the most discrimination, compared to an up-down or forward-backward directions; and different segments of the gait cycle provide different level of discrimination.

  16. Pattern of extrapyramidal signs in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tosto, Giuseppe; Monsell, Sarah E; Hawes, Stephen E; Mayeux, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often develop extrapyramidal signs (EPS), which increase in frequency as the disease progresses. We aimed to investigate the patterns of presentation of EPS in AD and their correlation with clinical and neuropathological features. 4284 subjects diagnosed with AD from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) database with at least one abnormal Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) assessment were included. Individuals were assigned to a discovery sample and a sensitivity analysis sample (moderate and mild dementia, respectively) and a subset of subjects provided neuropathological data (n = 284). Individuals from the Washington Heights and Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP) served as validation sample. Patterns of presentation of EPS were identified employing categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA). Six principal components were identified in both mild and moderate AD samples: (I) hand movements, alternating movements, finger tapping, leg agility ("limbs bradykinesia"); (II) posture, postural instability, arising from chair, gait and body bradykinesia/hypokinesia ("axial"); (III) limb rigidity ("rigidity"); (IV) postural tremor; (V) resting tremor; (VI) speech and facial expression. Similar results were obtained in the WHICAP cohort. Individuals with hallucinations, apathy, aberrant night behaviors and more severe dementia showed higher axial and limb bradykinesia scores. "Limb bradykinesia" component was associated with a neuropathological diagnosis of Lewy body disease and "axial" component with reduced AD-type pathology. Patterns of EPS in AD show distinct clinical and neuropathological correlates; they share a pattern of presentation similar to that seen in Parkinson's disease, suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms across neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow, white matter abnormalities, and cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics in patients with idiopathic adult hydrocephalus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, B; Malm, J; Fagerland, M; Hietala, S O; Johansson, B; Ekstedt, J; Karlsson, T

    1996-03-01

    OBJECTIVES--(1) to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with single photon emission computed tomography and 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime in patients with the idiopathic adult hydrocephalus syndrome (IAHS); (2) to examine regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), gait, and psychometric functions before and after CSF removal (CSF tap test); (3) to assess abnormalities in subcortical white matter by MRI. METHODS--Thirty one patients fulfilling the criteria for IAHS (according to history and clinical and neuroradiological examination) were studied. Quantified gait measurements, psychometric testing, and rCBF before and after removal of CSF were obtained. Pressure of CSF and CSF outflow conductance were investigated with a constant pressure infusion method. Brain MRI was used to quantify the severity of white matter lesions and periventricular hyperintensities. In IAHS a widespread rCBF hypoperfusion pattern was depicted, with a caudal frontal and temporal grey matter and subcortical white matter reduction of rCBF as the dominant feature. Removal of CSF was not accompanied by a concomitant increase in rCBF. Significant white matter lesions were detected only in a minority of patients by MRI. An altered CSF hydrodynamic state with a higher CSF pressure and lower conductance was confirmed. IAHS is characterised by an abnormal CSF hydrodynamic state, associated with a widespread rCBF reduction with preference for subcortical white matter and frontal-temporal cortical regions. Furthermore in most patients MRI did not show white matter changes suggestive of a coexistent subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy. At least in the idiopathic group of patients with AHS, measurements of rCBF before and after temporary relief of the CSF hydrodynamic disturbance will not provide additional information that would be helpful in the preoperative evaluation but is suggestive of a preserved autoregulation of rCBF.

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow, white matter abnormalities, and cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics in patients with idiopathic adult hydrocephalus syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, B; Malm, J; Fagerland, M; Hietala, S O; Johansson, B; Ekstedt, J; Karlsson, T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--(1) to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with single photon emission computed tomography and 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime in patients with the idiopathic adult hydrocephalus syndrome (IAHS); (2) to examine regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), gait, and psychometric functions before and after CSF removal (CSF tap test); (3) to assess abnormalities in subcortical white matter by MRI. METHODS--Thirty one patients fulfilling the criteria for IAHS (according to history and clinical and neuroradiological examination) were studied. Quantified gait measurements, psychometric testing, and rCBF before and after removal of CSF were obtained. Pressure of CSF and CSF outflow conductance were investigated with a constant pressure infusion method. Brain MRI was used to quantify the severity of white matter lesions and periventricular hyperintensities. In IAHS a widespread rCBF hypoperfusion pattern was depicted, with a caudal frontal and temporal grey matter and subcortical white matter reduction of rCBF as the dominant feature. Removal of CSF was not accompanied by a concomitant increase in rCBF. Significant white matter lesions were detected only in a minority of patients by MRI. An altered CSF hydrodynamic state with a higher CSF pressure and lower conductance was confirmed. IAHS is characterised by an abnormal CSF hydrodynamic state, associated with a widespread rCBF reduction with preference for subcortical white matter and frontal-temporal cortical regions. Furthermore in most patients MRI did not show white matter changes suggestive of a coexistent subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy. At least in the idiopathic group of patients with AHS, measurements of rCBF before and after temporary relief of the CSF hydrodynamic disturbance will not provide additional information that would be helpful in the preoperative evaluation but is suggestive of a preserved autoregulation of rCBF. PMID:8609504

  19. Gait dynamics in Parkinson's disease: common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling.

    PubMed

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties.

  20. Gait dynamics in Parkinson's disease: Common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties.

  1. Changes in Post-Stroke Gait Biomechanics Induced by One Session of Gait Training.

    PubMed

    Kesar, T M; Reisman, D S; Higginson, J S; Awad, L N; Binder-Macleod, S A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether one session of targeted locomotor training can induce measurable improvements in the post-stroke gait impairments. Thirteen individuals with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis participated in one locomotor training session combining fast treadmill training and functional electrical stimulation (FES) of ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexor muscles. Three dimensional gait analysis was performed to assess within-session changes (after versus before training) in gait biomechanics at the subject's self-selected speed without FES. Our results showed that one session of locomotor training resulted in significant improvements in peak anterior ground reaction force (AGRF) and AGRF integral for the paretic leg. Additionally, individual subject data showed that a majority of study participants demonstrated improvements in the primary outcome variables following the training session. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that a single session of intense, targeted post-stroke locomotor retraining can induce significant improvements in post-stroke gait biomechanics. We posit that the within-session changes induced by a single exposure to gait training can be used to predict whether an individual is responsive to a particular gait intervention, and aid with the development of individualized gait retraining strategies. Future studies are needed to determine whether these single-session improvements in biomechanics are accompanied by short-term changes in corticospinal excitability, and whether single-session responses can serve as predictors for the longer-term effects of the intervention with other targeted gait interventions.

  2. Effects of Partial Absence of Visual Feedback Information on Gait Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Jae; Kayitesi, Marie Aimee; Chan, Amy; Graham, Kimberli

    2017-03-14

    The incorporation of real-time visual feedback during gait rehabilitation can improve the efficacy of training. Our prior work demonstrated that the imposed distortion of simple visual feedback information of step lengths entails an unintentional adaptive process in the subjects' spatial gait pattern, thereby suggesting the important role of implicit learning in the context of gait rehabilitation that employs visual feedback. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the removal of a portion of visual feedback information-after it had initially been provided-had any impact on gait symmetry. Eighteen healthy subjects walked on a treadmill for 10-min periods at their preferred walking speed and at a slower walking speed (1.3 mph) during the experimental trials, in which two simple vertical bars corresponding to subject's right and left step length were displayed on a computer screen. Halfway through the trial, one of the bars was removed from the visual feedback via random selection. Subjects were instructed to continually walk normally and also look at the visual feedback until the trials were completed. The changes in step length symmetry ratio were computed and analyzed. We found that displaying only one side of visual feedback influenced subjects to spontaneously modulate gait symmetry away from the baseline, and also that the amount of modulated gait symmetry slightly increased when their walking speed decreased. The changes in gait symmetry occurred by producing either longer right steps produced than left steps or vice versa, but we were unable to find any correlation between side of removal (right or left side) and the different types of trend in response. This warrants further investigation in a study with a larger population. Nonetheless, the results of this study demonstrated the effect of partial absence of visual feedback on changes in step symmetry, and that the perturbation of visual information caused implicit (unintentional) motor

  3. Modulation of gait coordination by subthalamic stimulation improves freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herzog, Jan; Seifert, Elena; Stolze, Henning; Falk, Daniela; Reese, René; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther

    2011-04-01

    The effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on gait coordination and freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease is incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which modulation of symmetry and coordination between legs by subthalamic deep brain stimulation alters the frequency and duration of freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease. We recruited 13 post-subthalamic deep brain stimulation patients with Parkinson's disease with off freezing of gait and evaluated them in the following 4 conditions: subthalamic deep brain stimulation on (ON) and stimulation off (OFF), 50% reduction of stimulation voltage for the leg with shorter step length (worse side reduction) and for the leg with longer step length (better side reduction). Gait analysis was performed on a treadmill and recorded by an optoelectronic analysis system. We measured frequency and duration of freezing of gait episodes. Bilateral coordination of gait was assessed by the Phase Coordination Index, quantifying the ability to generate antiphase stepping. From the OFF to the ON state, freezing of gait improved in frequency (2.0 ± 0.4 to 1.4 ± 0.5 episodes) and duration (12.2 ± 2.6 to 2.6 ± 0.8 seconds; P = .005). Compared with the ON state, only better side reduction further reduced freezing of gait frequency (0.2 ± 0.2) and duration of episodes (0.2 ± 0.2 seconds; P = .03); worse side reduction did not change frequency (1.3 ± 0.4) but increased freezing of gait duration (5.2 ± 2.1 seconds). The better side reduction-associated improvements were accompanied by normalization of gait coordination, as measured by phase coordination index (16.5% ± 6.0%), which was significantly lower than in the other 3 conditions. Reduction of stimulation voltage in the side contralateral to the leg with longer step length improves frequency and duration of freezing of gait through normalization of gait symmetry and coordination in subthalamic deep brain

  4. A Validated Smartphone-Based Assessment of Gait and Gait Variability in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Ng, Yee Sien; Zhu, Shenggao; Tan, Dawn M.; Anderson, Boyd; Schlaug, Gottfried; Wang, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Background A well-established connection exists between increased gait variability and greater fall likelihood in Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, a portable, validated means of quantifying gait variability (and testing the efficacy of any intervention) remains lacking. Furthermore, although rhythmic auditory cueing continues to receive attention as a promising gait therapy for PD, its widespread delivery remains bottlenecked. The present paper describes a smartphone-based mobile application (“SmartMOVE”) to address both needs. Methods The accuracy of smartphone-based gait analysis (utilizing the smartphone’s built-in tri-axial accelerometer and gyroscope to calculate successive step times and step lengths) was validated against two heel contact–based measurement devices: heel-mounted footswitch sensors (to capture step times) and an instrumented pressure sensor mat (to capture step lengths). 12 PD patients and 12 age-matched healthy controls walked along a 26-m path during self-paced and metronome-cued conditions, with all three devices recording simultaneously. Results Four outcome measures of gait and gait variability were calculated. Mixed-factorial analysis of variance revealed several instances in which between-group differences (e.g., increased gait variability in PD patients relative to healthy controls) yielded medium-to-large effect sizes (eta-squared values), and cueing-mediated changes (e.g., decreased gait variability when PD patients walked with auditory cues) yielded small-to-medium effect sizes—while at the same time, device-related measurement error yielded small-to-negligible effect sizes. Conclusion These findings highlight specific opportunities for smartphone-based gait analysis to serve as an alternative to conventional gait analysis methods (e.g., footswitch systems or sensor-embedded walkways), particularly when those methods are cost-prohibitive, cumbersome, or inconvenient. PMID:26517720

  5. Characterization of the Statistical Signatures of Micro-Movements Underlying Natural Gait Patterns in Children with Phelan McDermid Syndrome: Towards Precision-Phenotyping of Behavior in ASD

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Elizabeth B.; Nguyen, Jillian; Mistry, Sejal; Whyatt, Caroline; Kalampratsidou, Vilelmini; Kolevzon, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a critical need for precision phenotyping across neurodevelopmental disorders, especially in individuals who receive a clinical diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Phelan-McDermid deletion syndrome (PMS) is one such example, as it has a high penetrance of ASD. At present, no biometric characterization of the behavioral phenotype within PMS exists. Methods: We introduce a data-type and statistical framework that permits the personalized profiling of naturalistic behaviors. Walking patterns were assessed in 30 participants (16 PMS, 3 idiopathic-ASD and 11 age- and sex-matched controls). Each individual's micro-movement signatures were recorded at 240 Hz. We empirically estimated the parameters of the continuous Gamma family of probability distributions and calculated their ranges. These estimated stochastic signatures were then mapped on the Gamma plane to obtain several statistical indexes for each child. To help visualize complex patterns across the cohort, we introduce new tools that enable the assessment of connectivity and modularity indexes across the peripheral network of rotational joints. Results: Typical walking signatures are absent in all children with PMS as well as in the children with idiopathic-ASD (iASD). Underlying these patterns are atypical leg rotational acceleration signatures that render participants with PMS unstable with rotations that are much faster than controls. The median values of the estimated Gamma parameters serve as a cutoff to automatically separate children with PMS 5–7 years old from adolescents with PMS 12–16 years old, the former displaying more randomness and larger noise. The fluctuations in the arm's motions during the walking also have atypical statistics that separate males from females in PMS and show higher rates of noise accumulation in idiopathic ASD (iASD) children. Despite high heterogeneity, all iASD children have excess noise, a narrow range of probability-distribution shapes

  6. Listenmee and Listenmee smartphone application: synchronizing walking to rhythmic auditory cues to improve gait in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lopez, William Omar Contreras; Higuera, Carlos Andres Escalante; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Souza, Carolina de Oliveira; Albicker, Ulrich; Martinez, Jairo Alberto Espinoza

    2014-10-01

    Evidence supports the use of rhythmic external auditory signals to improve gait in PD patients (Arias & Cudeiro, 2008; Kenyon & Thaut, 2000; McIntosh, Rice & Thaut, 1994; McIntosh et al., 1997; Morris, Iansek, & Matyas, 1994; Thaut, McIntosh, & Rice, 1997; Suteerawattananon, Morris, Etnyre, Jankovic, & Protas , 2004; Willems, Nieuwboer, Chavert, & Desloovere, 2006). However, few prototypes are available for daily use, and to our knowledge, none utilize a smartphone application allowing individualized sounds and cadence. Therefore, we analyzed the effects on gait of Listenmee®, an intelligent glasses system with a portable auditory device, and present its smartphone application, the Listenmee app®, offering over 100 different sounds and an adjustable metronome to individualize the cueing rate as well as its smartwatch with accelerometer to detect magnitude and direction of the proper acceleration, track calorie count, sleep patterns, steps count and daily distances. The present study included patients with idiopathic PD presented gait disturbances including freezing. Auditory rhythmic cues were delivered through Listenmee®. Performance was analyzed in a motion and gait analysis laboratory. The results revealed significant improvements in gait performance over three major dependent variables: walking speed in 38.1%, cadence in 28.1% and stride length in 44.5%. Our findings suggest that auditory cueing through Listenmee® may significantly enhance gait performance. Further studies are needed to elucidate the potential role and maximize the benefits of these portable devices.

  7. Robotic gait rehabilitation and substitution devices in neurological disorders: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Cacciola, Alberto; Bertè, Francesco; Manuli, Alfredo; Leo, Antonino; Bramanti, Alessia; Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Bramanti, Placido

    2016-04-01

    Gait abnormalities following neurological disorders are often disabling, negatively affecting patients' quality of life. Therefore, regaining of walking is considered one of the primary objectives of the rehabilitation process. To overcome problems related to conventional physical therapy, in the last years there has been an intense technological development of robotic devices, and robotic rehabilitation has proved to play a major role in improving one's ability to walk. The robotic rehabilitation systems can be classified into stationary and overground walking systems, and several studies have demonstrated their usefulness in patients after severe acquired brain injury, spinal cord injury and other neurological diseases, including Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and cerebral palsy. In this review, we want to highlight which are the most widely used devices today for gait neurological rehabilitation, focusing on their functioning, effectiveness and challenges. Novel and promising rehabilitation tools, including the use of virtual reality, are also discussed.

  8. Neuroimaging of Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herman, Talia; Tessitore, Alessandro; Strafella, Antonio P.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional brain imaging techniques appear ideally suited to explore the pathophysiology of freezing of gait (FOG). In the last two decades, techniques based on magnetic resonance or nuclear medicine imaging have found a number of structural changes and functional disconnections between subcortical and cortical regions of the locomotor network in patients with FOG. FOG seems to be related in part to disruptions in the “executive-attention” network along with regional tissue loss including the premotor area, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the parietal and occipital areas involved in visuospatial functions of the right hemisphere. Several subcortical structures have been also involved in the etiology of FOG, principally the caudate nucleus and the locomotor centers in the brainstem. Maladaptive neural compensation may present transiently in the presence of acute conflicting motor, cognitive or emotional stimulus processing, thus causing acute network overload and resulting in episodic impairment of stepping. In this review we will summarize the state of the art of neuroimaging research for FOG. We will also discuss the limitations of current approaches and delineate the next steps of neuroimaging research to unravel the pathophysiology of this mysterious motor phenomenon. PMID:25757831

  9. Gait synchronization in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion is observed in swarms of swimmers of various sizes, ranging from self-propelled nanoparticles to fish. The mechanisms that govern interactions among individuals are debated, and vary from one species to another. Although the interactions among relatively large animals, such as fish, are controlled by their nervous systems, the interactions among microorganisms, which lack nervous systems, are controlled through physical and chemical pathways. Little is known, however, regarding the mechanism of collective movements in microscopic organisms with nervous systems. To attempt to remedy this, we studied collective swimming behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a microorganism with a compact nervous system. We evaluated the contributions of hydrodynamic forces, contact forces, and mechanosensory input to the interactions among individuals. We devised an experiment to examine pair interactions as a function of the distance between the animals and observed that gait synchronization occurred only when the animals were in close proximity, independent of genes required for mechanosensation. Our measurements and simulations indicate that steric hindrance is the dominant factor responsible for motion synchronization in C. elegans, and that hydrodynamic interactions and genotype do not play a significant role. We infer that a similar mechanism may apply to other microscopic swimming organisms and self-propelled particles. PMID:24778261

  10. Changes in gait and fatigue from morning to afternoon in people with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, M; Cantwell, C; Vowels, L; Dodd, K

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to measure changes in walking patterns and self rated fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with age matched control subjects, from the morning to the afternoon within a single day. Methods: Fourteen patients with MS and the same number of matched control subjects performed four 10 m gait trials at their preferred walking speed at 10 00 am and then again at 3 00 pm on the same day. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and the percentage of the gait cycle spent in double limb support were measured using a foot switch stride analyzer. Patients with MS also self rated their fatigue levels in the morning and afternoon using an 11 point scale. Results: Compared with control subjects, patients walked very slowly, with reduced stride length and around twice as much variability in gait performance. Although self rated fatigue significantly increased from the morning to the afternoon, walking patterns remained consistent in both groups over the course of the day. Conclusions: These findings imply that mechanisms controlling locomotion are separate from those regulating perceived fatigue. Objective measures of performance, rather than self report, should be used to monitor change in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:11861697

  11. A Low-Cost Body Inertial-Sensing Network for Practical Gait Discrimination of Hemiplegia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanwei; Wu, Dan; Liu, Guanzheng; Zhao, Guoru; Huang, Bangyu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Gait analysis is widely used in detecting human walking disorders. Current gait analysis methods like video- or optical-based systems are expensive and cause invasion of human privacy. This article presents a self-developed low-cost body inertial-sensin