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Sample records for abnormal heart rhythm

  1. Find a Heart Rhythm Specialist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace IBHRE Heart Rhythm Journal Heart Rhythm Case Reports EP Buyer's Guide Connect With Us ... Heart Rhythm Society 2016 Privacy Policy | Linking Policy | Patient Education Disclaimer You ...

  2. Circadian Rhythm Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Phyllis C.; Attarian, Hrayr; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the recent advances in understanding of the fundamental properties of circadian rhythms and discusses the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs). Recent Findings: Recent evidence strongly points to the ubiquitous influence of circadian timing in nearly all physiologic functions. Thus, in addition to the prominent sleep and wake disturbances, circadian rhythm disorders are associated with cognitive impairment, mood disturbances, and increased risk of cardiometabolic disorders. The recent availability of biomarkers of circadian timing in clinical practice has improved our ability to identify and treat these CRSDs. Summary: Circadian rhythms are endogenous rhythms with a periodicity of approximately 24 hours. These rhythms are synchronized to the physical environment by social and work schedules by various photic and nonphotic stimuli. CRSDs result from a misalignment between the timing of the circadian rhythm and the external environment (eg, jet lag and shift work) or a dysfunction of the circadian clock or its afferent and efferent pathways (eg, delayed sleep-phase, advanced sleep-phase, non–24-hour, and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorders). The most common symptoms of these disorders are difficulties with sleep onset and/or sleep maintenance and excessive sleepiness that are associated with impaired social and occupational functioning. Effective treatment for most of the CRSDs requires a multimodal approach to accelerate circadian realignment with timed exposure to light, avoidance of bright light at inappropriate times, and adherence to scheduled sleep and wake times. In addition, pharmacologic agents are recommended for some of the CRSDs. For delayed sleep-phase, non–24-hour, and shift work disorders, timed low-dose melatonin can help advance or entrain circadian rhythms; and for shift work disorder, wake-enhancing agents such as caffeine, modafinil, and armodafinil are options

  3. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... in others. These rhythm problems are rarely serious. Substance Abuse: Drugs and Inhalants Abusing legal or illegal drugs ... people, alcohol can cause heart rhythm disturbances. Alcohol abuse is a major risk factor for High ... herbs and other substances used in over-the-counter remedies are believed ...

  4. Assessment of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability and Interictal Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities in Drug-naïve Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Ozden; Cincin, Altug; Pehlivan, Aslihan; Midi, Ipek; Kepez, Alper; Agan, Kadriye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Epilepsy is a disease known to occur with autonomous phenomenons. Earlier studies indicate decreased heart rate variability (HRV) during ictal and interictal periods among epilepsy patients. In this study, we aim to investigate cardiac rhythm abnormalities and HRV during interictal period between drug-naïve patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and healthy control group. Methods: Twenty-six patients with IGE and 26 healthy individuals included in the study. In order to eliminate any structural cardiac pathology, transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all subjects and time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were evaluated after 24-hour rhythm holter monitoring. Results: Between two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of mean heart rate and maximum duration between the start of the Q waves and the end of the T waves (QT intervals). In the time domain analysis of HRV, no statically significant difference was detected for standard deviation of all R - R intervals and root-mean-square of successive differences between patient and control group (p = 0,070 and p = 0,104 respectively). In the frequency domain analysis of HRV, patients tended to display lower total power and very low frequency power than did healthy subjects, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is no major effect of the epilepsy on HRV in patients with IGE. It should be emphasized that, in this study, HRV was evaluated only in patients with IGE and that the results are not proper to be generalized for patients with partial seizures. PMID:27390676

  5. An Artificial Vector Model for Generating Abnormal Electrocardiographic Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Gari D.; Nemati, Shamim; Sameni, Reza

    2010-01-01

    We present generalizations of our previously published artificial models for generating multi-channel ECG to provide simulations of abnormal cardiac rhythms. Using a three-dimensional vectorcardiogram (VCG) formulation, we generate the normal cardiac dipole for a patient using a sum of Gaussian kernels, fitted to real VCG recordings. Abnormal beats are specified either as perturbations to the normal dipole or as new dipole trajectories. Switching between normal and abnormal beat types is achieved using a first-order Markov chain. Probability transitions can be learned from real data or modeled by coupling to heart rate and sympathovagal balance. Natural morphology changes from beat-to-beat are incorporated by varying the angular frequency of the dipole as a function of the inter-beat (RR) interval. The RR interval time series is generated using our previously described model whereby time- and frequency-domain heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability characteristics can be specified. QT-HR hysteresis is simulated by coupling the Gaussian kernels associated with the T-wave in the model with a nonlinear factor related to the local HR (determined from the last n RR intervals). Morphology changes due to respiration are simulated by introducing a rotation matrix couple to the respiratory frequency. We demonstrate an example of the use of this model by simulating HR-dependent T-Wave Alternans (TWA) with and without phase-switching due to ectopy. Application of our model also reveals previously unreported effects of common TWA estimation methods. PMID:20308774

  6. Heart Rhythm Genomic Fabric in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, Dumitru A; Iacobas, Sanda; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which chronic hypoxia, whether constant (CCH) or intermittent (CIH), alters the heart rhythm are still under debate. Expression level, control, maturational profile and intercoordination of 54 genes encoding heart rhythm determinants (HRDs) were analyzed in 36 mice subjected for one, two or four weeks of their early life to normal atmospheric conditions or to CCH or CIH. Our analysis revealed a complex network of genes encoding various heart rate, inotropy and development controllers, receptors, ion channels and transporters, ankyrins, epigenetic modulators and intercalated disc components (adherens, cadherins, catenins, desmosomal, gap and tight junction proteins). The network is remodeled during maturation and substantially and differently altered by CIH and CCH. Gene Prominence Analysis that ranks the genes according to their expression stability and networking within functional gene webs, confirmed the HRD status of certain epigenetic modulators and components of the intercalated discs not yet associated with arrhythmia. PMID:20044980

  7. European Heart Rhythm Association Summit report 2014.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Richard; Leclercq, Christophe; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2016-05-01

    Across Europe, the role of the welfare state is constantly being questioned and even eroded. At the same time, funding sources for post-graduate medical education and training are under attack as regulators review the working relationships between physicians and industry. Both of these issues have profound consequences for cardiologists and their patients, and were, therefore, chosen as the themes of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) 2014 Spring Summit held at Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, 25-26 March 2014. The meeting noted that some of the changes are already affecting patient care standards and that this is exacerbated by a reduction in research and education programmes. The principle conclusion was that EHRA must find better means of engagement with the authorities across Europe to ensure that its views are considered and that ethical patient care is preserved. Participants were particularly alarmed by the example from Sweden in which future healthcare planning appears to exclude the views of physicians, although this is not yet the case in other countries. The demand for greater transparency in relationships between physicians and industry was also discussed. Although intended to eliminate corruption, concern was expressed that such moves would cause long-term damage to education and research, threatening the future of congresses, whose role in these areas appears underestimated by the authorities. PMID:26467405

  8. European Heart Rhythm Association Summit report 2014.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Richard; Leclercq, Christophe; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2016-05-01

    Across Europe, the role of the welfare state is constantly being questioned and even eroded. At the same time, funding sources for post-graduate medical education and training are under attack as regulators review the working relationships between physicians and industry. Both of these issues have profound consequences for cardiologists and their patients, and were, therefore, chosen as the themes of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) 2014 Spring Summit held at Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, 25-26 March 2014. The meeting noted that some of the changes are already affecting patient care standards and that this is exacerbated by a reduction in research and education programmes. The principle conclusion was that EHRA must find better means of engagement with the authorities across Europe to ensure that its views are considered and that ethical patient care is preserved. Participants were particularly alarmed by the example from Sweden in which future healthcare planning appears to exclude the views of physicians, although this is not yet the case in other countries. The demand for greater transparency in relationships between physicians and industry was also discussed. Although intended to eliminate corruption, concern was expressed that such moves would cause long-term damage to education and research, threatening the future of congresses, whose role in these areas appears underestimated by the authorities.

  9. Circadian rhythm abnormalities of melatonin in Smith-Magenis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Potocki, L.; Glaze, D.; Tan, D.; Park, S.; Kashork, C.; Shaffer, L.; Reiter, R.; Lupski, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome associated with a hemizygous deletion of chromosome 17, band p11.2. Characteristic features include neurobehavioural abnormalities such as aggressive and self-injurious behaviour and significant sleep disturbances. The majority of patients have a common deletion characterised at the molecular level. Physical mapping studies indicate that all patients with the common deletion are haploinsufficient for subunit 3 of the COP9 signalosome (COPS3), which is conserved from plants to humans, and in the plant Arabidopis thaliana regulates gene transcription in response to light. Haploinsufficiency of this gene is hypothesised to be potentially involved in the sleep disturbances seen in these patients. Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland. SMS patients are reported to have fewer sleep disturbances when given a night time dose of this sleep inducing hormone.
METHODS—Urinary excretion of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), the major hepatic metabolite of melatonin, in 19 SMS patients were measured in conjunction with 24 hour sleep studies in 28 SMS patients. Five of the 28 patients did not have the common SMS deletion. To investigate a potential correlation of COPS3 haploinsufficiency and disturbed melatonin excretion, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) using two BACs containing coding exons of COPS3.
RESULTS—All SMS patients show significant sleep disturbances when assessed by objective criteria. Abnormalities in the circadian rhythm of aMT6s were observed in all but one SMS patient. Interestingly this patient did not have the common deletion. All patients studied, including the one patient with a normal melatonin rhythm, were haploinsufficient for COPS3.
CONCLUSIONS—Our data indicate a disturbed circadian rhythm in melatonin and document the disturbed sleep pattern in Smith-Magenis syndrome. Our findings suggest that the

  10. Skeletal Muscle Abnormalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, Shintaro; Takada, Shingo; Matsushima, Shouji; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Exercise capacity is lowered in patients with heart failure, which limits their daily activities and also reduces their quality of life. Furthermore, lowered exercise capacity has been well demonstrated to be closely related to the severity and prognosis of heart failure. Skeletal muscle abnormalities including abnormal energy metabolism, transition of myofibers from type I to type II, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduction in muscular strength, and muscle atrophy have been shown to play a central role in lowered exercise capacity. The skeletal muscle abnormalities can be classified into the following main types: 1) low endurance due to mitochondrial dysfunction; and 2) low muscle mass and muscle strength due to imbalance of protein synthesis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms of these skeletal muscle abnormalities have been studied mainly using animal models. The current review including our recent study will focus upon the skeletal muscle abnormalities in heart failure. PMID:26346520

  11. ECG patch monitors for assessment of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lobodzinski, S Suave

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of long-term monitoring is the improvement of diagnostic yield. Despite the clear utility of Holter monitoring in clinical cardiology, issues of relatively low diagnostic yield, cost and inconvenience have motivated the development of ultra-portable devices referred to as ECG patch monitors. Although the "gold standard" for assessing cardiac rhythm abnormalities remains a 12-lead Holter, there is an increasing interest in portable monitoring devices that provide the opportunity for evaluating cardiac rhythm in real-world environments such as the workplace or home. To facilitate patient acceptance these monitors underwent a radical miniaturization and redesign to include wireless communication, water proofing and a patch carrier for attaching devices directly to the skin. We review recent developments in the field of "patch" devices primarily designed for very long-term monitoring of cardiac arrhythmic events. As the body of supporting clinical validation data grows, these devices hold promise for a variety of cardiac monitoring applications. From a clinical and research standpoint, the capacity to obtain longitudinal cardiac activity data by patch devices may have significant implications for device selection, monitoring duration, and care pathways for arrhythmia evaluation and atrial fibrillation surveillance. From a research standpoint, the new devices may allow for the development of novel diagnostic algorithms with the goal of finding patterns and correlations with exercise and drug regimens.

  12. Musical rhythms in heart period dynamics: a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach to cardiac rhythms.

    PubMed

    Bettermann, H; Amponsah, D; Cysarz, D; van Leeuwen, P

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand classic heart period analysis methods by techniques from ethnomusicology that explicitly take complex musical rhythm principles into consideration. The methods used are based on the theory of African music, the theory of symbolic dynamics, and combinatorial theory. Heart period tachograms from 192 24-h electrocardiograms of 96 healthy subjects were transformed into binary symbol sequences that were interpretable as elementary rhythmic (percussive) patterns, the time lines in African music. Using a hierarchical rhythm pattern scheme closely related to the Derler Rhythm Classification (from jazz theory), we calculated the predominance and stability of pattern classes. The results show that during sleep certain classes, specific to individuals, occurred in a cyclically recurrent manner and many times more often than expected. Simultaneously, other classes disappeared more or less completely. Moreover, the most frequent classes obviously originate from phase-locking processes in autonomic regulation (e.g., between respiratory and cardiac cycles). In conclusion, the new interdisciplinary method presented here demonstrates that heart period patterns, in particular those occurring during night sleep, can be interpreted as musical rhythms. This method may be of great potential use in music therapy research.

  13. Reversible heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients with primary aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Xue-Ming; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Stowasser, Michael; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Excess aldosterone secretion in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) impairs their cardiovascular system. Heart rhythm complexity analysis, derived from heart rate variability (HRV), is a powerful tool to quantify the complex regulatory dynamics of human physiology. We prospectively analyzed 20 patients with aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) that underwent adrenalectomy and 25 patients with essential hypertension (EH). The heart rate data were analyzed by conventional HRV and heart rhythm complexity analysis including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE). We found APA patients had significantly decreased DFAα2 on DFA analysis and decreased area 1–5, area 6–15, and area 6–20 on MSE analysis (all p < 0.05). Area 1–5, area 6–15, area 6–20 in the MSE study correlated significantly with log-transformed renin activity and log-transformed aldosterone-renin ratio (all p < = 0.01). The conventional HRV parameters were comparable between PA and EH patients. After adrenalectomy, all the altered DFA and MSE parameters improved significantly (all p < 0.05). The conventional HRV parameters did not change. Our result suggested that heart rhythm complexity is impaired in APA patients and this is at least partially reversed by adrenalectomy. PMID:26282603

  14. Reversible heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients with primary aldosteronism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Xue-Ming; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Stowasser, Michael; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    Excess aldosterone secretion in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) impairs their cardiovascular system. Heart rhythm complexity analysis, derived from heart rate variability (HRV), is a powerful tool to quantify the complex regulatory dynamics of human physiology. We prospectively analyzed 20 patients with aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) that underwent adrenalectomy and 25 patients with essential hypertension (EH). The heart rate data were analyzed by conventional HRV and heart rhythm complexity analysis including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE). We found APA patients had significantly decreased DFAα2 on DFA analysis and decreased area 1-5, area 6-15, and area 6-20 on MSE analysis (all p < 0.05). Area 1-5, area 6-15, area 6-20 in the MSE study correlated significantly with log-transformed renin activity and log-transformed aldosterone-renin ratio (all p < = 0.01). The conventional HRV parameters were comparable between PA and EH patients. After adrenalectomy, all the altered DFA and MSE parameters improved significantly (all p < 0.05). The conventional HRV parameters did not change. Our result suggested that heart rhythm complexity is impaired in APA patients and this is at least partially reversed by adrenalectomy.

  15. Rhythms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents selected resources for elementary and secondary education that relate to rhythms, including literary rhythms, natural rhythms, and musical rhythms. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audio materials, magazines, professional resources, and suggested classroom activities. (LRW)

  16. Resonance of about-weekly human heart rate rhythm with solar activity change.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, G; Halberg, F; Wendt, H W; Bingham, C; Sothern, R B; Haus, E; Kleitman, E; Kleitman, N; Revilla, M A; Revilla, M; Breus, T K; Pimenov, K; Grigoriev, A E; Mitish, M D; Yatsyk, G V; Syutkina, E V

    1996-12-01

    In several human adults, certain solar activity rhythms may influence an about 7-day rhythm in heart rate. When no about-weekly feature was found in the rate of change in sunspot area, a measure of solar activity, the double amplitude of a circadian heart rate rhythm, approximated by the fit of a 7-day cosine curve, was lower, as was heart rate corresponds to about-weekly features in solar activity and/or relates to a sunspot cycle.

  17. Heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Heng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Lin, Lian-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in patients with advanced renal disease. The objective of this study was to investigate impairments in heart rhythm complexity in patients with end-stage renal disease. We prospectively analyzed 65 patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) without prior cardiovascular disease and 72 individuals with normal renal function as the control group. Heart rhythm analysis including complexity analysis by including detrended fractal analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE) were performed. In linear analysis, the PD patients had a significantly lower standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDRR) and percentage of absolute differences in normal RR intervals greater than 20 ms (pNN20). Of the nonlinear analysis indicators, scale 5, area under the MSE curve for scale 1 to 5 (area 1–5) and 6 to 20 (area 6–20) were significantly lower than those in the control group. In DFA anaylsis, both DFA α1 and DFA α2 were comparable in both groups. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, scale 5 had the greatest discriminatory power for two groups. In both net reclassification improvement model and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of SDRR, pNN20, and pNN50. In conclusion, PD patients had worse cardiac complexity parameters. MSE parameters are useful to discriminate PD patients from patients with normal renal function.

  18. Heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Heng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Lin, Lian-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in patients with advanced renal disease. The objective of this study was to investigate impairments in heart rhythm complexity in patients with end-stage renal disease. We prospectively analyzed 65 patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) without prior cardiovascular disease and 72 individuals with normal renal function as the control group. Heart rhythm analysis including complexity analysis by including detrended fractal analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE) were performed. In linear analysis, the PD patients had a significantly lower standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDRR) and percentage of absolute differences in normal RR intervals greater than 20 ms (pNN20). Of the nonlinear analysis indicators, scale 5, area under the MSE curve for scale 1 to 5 (area 1–5) and 6 to 20 (area 6–20) were significantly lower than those in the control group. In DFA anaylsis, both DFA α1 and DFA α2 were comparable in both groups. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, scale 5 had the greatest discriminatory power for two groups. In both net reclassification improvement model and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of SDRR, pNN20, and pNN50. In conclusion, PD patients had worse cardiac complexity parameters. MSE parameters are useful to discriminate PD patients from patients with normal renal function. PMID:27324066

  19. Sex-dependent gene regulatory networks of the heart rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, S.; Thomas, N.; Spray, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    Expression level, control, and intercoordination of 66 selected heart rhythm determinant (HRD) genes were compared in atria and ventricles of four male and four female adult mice. We found that genes encoding various adrenergic receptors, ankyrins, ion channels and transporters, connexins, cadherins, plakophilins, and other components of the intercalated discs form a complex network that is chamber dependent and differs between the two sexes. In addition, most HRD genes in atria had higher expression in males than in females, while in ventricles, expression levels were mostly higher in females than in males. Moreover, significant chamber differences were observed between the sexes, with higher expression in atria than ventricles for males and higher expression in ventricles than atria for females. We have ranked the selected genes according to their prominence (new concept) within the HRD gene web defined as extent of expression coordination with the other web genes and stability of expression. Interestingly, the prominence hierarchy was substantially different between the two sexes. Taken together, these findings indicate that the organizational principles of the heart rhythm transcriptome are sex dependent, with the newly introduced prominence analysis allowing identification of genes that are pivotal for the sexual dichotomy. PMID:19756788

  20. Predictability of normal heart rhythms and deterministic chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, J. H.; Goodings, D. A.; Kamath, M. V.; Fallen, E. L.

    1993-04-01

    The evidence for deterministic chaos in normal heart rhythms is examined. Electrocardiograms were recorded of 29 subjects falling into four groups—a young healthy group, an older healthy group, and two groups of patients who had recently suffered an acute myocardial infarction. From the measured R-R intervals, a time series of 1000 first differences was constructed for each subject. The correlation integral of Grassberger and Procaccia was calculated for several subjects using these relatively short time series. No evidence was found for the existence of an attractor having a dimension less than about 4. However, a prediction method recently proposed by Sugihara and May and an autoregressive linear predictor both show that there is a measure of short-term predictability in the differenced R-R intervals. Further analysis revealed that the short-term predictability calculated by the Sugihara-May method is not consistent with the null hypothesis of a Gaussian random process. The evidence for a small amount of nonlinear dynamical behavior together with the short-term predictability suggest that there is an element of deterministic chaos in normal heart rhythms, although it is not strong or persistent. Finally, two useful parameters of the predictability curves are identified, namely, the `first step predictability' and the `predictability decay rate,' neither of which appears to be significantly correlated with the standard deviation of the R-R intervals.

  1. Heart Rhythm Disorder May Be Tied to Wider Range of Ills

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tied to Wider Range of Ills Review links atrial fibrillation to increased risk for heart and kidney problems, ... 7, 2016 WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Atrial fibrillation, a common type of heart rhythm disorder, is ...

  2. Abnormal intermittency of heart rate in patients with neurocardiogenic syncope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Myung-Kul; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Kim, June-Soo

    2002-03-01

    Introduction: We aim to test our hypothesis that, during daily activity, though not as prominent as during HUT test, the patients may show different degree of intermittency in heart rates compared to healthy persons. METHOD AND RESULTS: Thirty patients with neurocardiogenic syncope who showed a positive HUT test and thirty healthy controls without history of syncope were included. Their twenty-four hour ambulatory electrocardiograms were digitized and RR interval (RRI) data of six-hour interval were analyzed. To quantify the intermittency (C1) behavior, The intermittency analysis was performed using Mexican hat wavelet. For the syncope group, the values of C1 were significantly higher at 6AM-6PM and lower at 6AM-midnight, respectively. However, the values were not different at midnight-6AM. The significant night-day circadian change shown in the control group was lost in C1. CONCLUSION: When compared to healthy control, the patients with neurocardiogenic syncope shows increased intermittency of heart rates in daytime during daily activity, and abnormal circadian rhythms of the index. These new findings may be useful for investigating the pathophysiology of neurocardiogenic syncope and early identification of the patients.

  3. Certain characteristics of myocardial contractility of isovolumic dog heart at randomly variable heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bershitskaya, O N; Izakov VYa; Lysenko, L T; Protsenko, J L; Trubetskoy, A V

    1985-01-01

    The relationship "heart rate - left ventricular pressure" was investigated in the isolated canine heart perfused with constant pressure at different preloads. Rhythmical stimulation was performed with constant stimulus interval duration and with stimulus intervals randomly changed near the average value (150-200 stimuli in series). Correlation and dispersion function analysis show that rhythm dispersion had a negative inotropic effect which was independent of the preload of the ventricle in the range of 120-180 beat/min, but this dependence occurred with low rats of stimulation. This method is proposed for the assessment of contractility under conditions of heart rate variations (physiological and pathological arrhythmias).

  4. [Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitors for treatment of hypertension with abnormal circadian rhythm of blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Shusuke; Sata, Masataka

    2014-08-01

    Circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) has recently been focused on because increase in nocturnal BP and morning BP surge have been shown to be risks for cardio-cerebrovascular diseases independent of 24-h BP level. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is involved in BP circadian rhythm, and RAAS inhibitors therefore play an important role in the control of circadian rhythm of BP. Bedtime administration of RAAS inhibitors is more effective than morning administration for reducing nocturnal and morning BP levels in addition to converting the BP profile into a dipper pattern, which is known as chronotherapy. For reducing cardio-cerebro-vascular events, controlling abnormal circadian rhythm of BP in addition to 24-h BP using RAAS inhibitors with optimal time dosing should be considered.

  5. Health economics and the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Vardas, Panos; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The management of healthcare is becoming extremely complex in developed countries, as a result of increasing age of the population and increasing costs of care, coupled with diminishing resources due to global financial crisis. This situation threatens access to appropriate care, and a more or less explicit rationing of some types of treatment may occur in 'real world' clinical practice. This is particularly true for those treatments or interventions with a relatively high up-front cost, such as cardioverter defibrillators, devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy or ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) is strongly convinced that the skills of electrophysiologists and cardiologists responsible for the management of rhythm disorders have to evolve, also embracing the knowledge of health economics, clinical epidemiology, health-care management and outcome research. These disciplines do not belong to what is considered as the conventional cultural background of physicians, but knowledge of comparative cost effectiveness and of other economic approaches nowadays appears fundamental for a dialogue with a series of stakeholders, such as policy makers, politicians, and administrators, involved in budgeting the activity of hospitals and health-care services, as well as in approaching health technology assessment.

  6. Health economics and the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Vardas, Panos; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    The management of healthcare is becoming extremely complex in developed countries, as a result of increasing age of the population and increasing costs of care, coupled with diminishing resources due to global financial crisis. This situation threatens access to appropriate care, and a more or less explicit rationing of some types of treatment may occur in 'real world' clinical practice. This is particularly true for those treatments or interventions with a relatively high up-front cost, such as cardioverter defibrillators, devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy or ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation. The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) is strongly convinced that the skills of electrophysiologists and cardiologists responsible for the management of rhythm disorders have to evolve, also embracing the knowledge of health economics, clinical epidemiology, health-care management and outcome research. These disciplines do not belong to what is considered as the conventional cultural background of physicians, but knowledge of comparative cost effectiveness and of other economic approaches nowadays appears fundamental for a dialogue with a series of stakeholders, such as policy makers, politicians, and administrators, involved in budgeting the activity of hospitals and health-care services, as well as in approaching health technology assessment. PMID:21518741

  7. Circadian blood pressure and heart rate rhythms in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Sur, S H; Mistlberger, R E; Morris, M

    1999-02-01

    The circadian pattern of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) was measured in C57BL mice with carotid arterial catheters. Cardiovascular parameters were recorded continuously with a computerized monitoring system at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. The tethered animals were healthy, showing stabilized drinking and eating patterns within 2 days of surgery and little loss of body weight. Analysis of the 24-h pattern of MAP and HR was conducted using data from 3-6 consecutive days of recording. A daily rhythm of MAP was evident in all mice, with group mean dark and light values of 101.4 +/- 7.3 and 93.1 +/- 2.9 mmHg, respectively. The group mean waveform was bimodal, with peak values evident early and late in the dark period, and a trough during the middle of the light period. The phase of maximum and minimum values showed low within-group variance. Mean heart rate was greater at night than during the day (561.9 +/- 22.7 vs. 530.3 +/- 22.3 beats/min). Peak values generally occurred at dark onset, and minimum values during the middle of both the dark and the light periods. We conclude that it is possible to perform measurements of circadian cardiovascular parameters in the mouse, providing new avenues for the investigation of genetic models.

  8. Maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythms of clock and metabolic genes in the offspring heart and liver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danfeng; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Mei; Liu, Chang

    2015-06-01

    Early life nutritional adversity is tightly associated with the development of long-term metabolic disorders. Particularly, maternal obesity and high-fat diets cause high risk of obesity in the offspring. Those offspring are also prone to develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, the precise underlying mechanisms leading to these metabolic dysregulation in the offspring remain unclear. On the other hand, disruptions of diurnal circadian rhythms are known to impair metabolic homeostasis in various tissues including the heart and liver. Therefore, we investigated that whether maternal obesity perturbs the circadian expression rhythms of clock, metabolic and inflammatory genes in offspring heart and liver by using RT-qPCR and Western blotting analysis. Offspring from lean and obese dams were examined on postnatal day 17 and 35, when pups were nursed by their mothers or took food independently. On P17, genes examined in the heart either showed anti-phase oscillations (Cpt1b, Pparα, Per2) or had greater oscillation amplitudes (Bmal1, Tnf-α, Il-6). Such phase abnormalities of these genes were improved on P35, while defects in amplitudes still existed. In the liver of 17-day-old pups exposed to maternal obesity, the oscillation amplitudes of most rhythmic genes examined (except Bmal1) were strongly suppressed. On P35, the oscillations of circadian and inflammatory genes became more robust in the liver, while metabolic genes were still kept non-rhythmic. Maternal obesity also had a profound influence in the protein expression levels of examined genes in offspring heart and liver. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock undergoes nutritional programing, which may contribute to the alternations in energy metabolism associated with the development of metabolic disorders in early life and adulthood.

  9. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... signal to your heart. The signal makes your heart beat at the correct pace. Pacemakers may be used: To correct abnormal heart rhythms. The heart may beat too slowly, too fast, or in an irregular ...

  10. Alterations in the heart rate and activity rhythms of three orbital astronauts on a space mission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhizhen; Wan, Yufeng; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Yu; Lv, Ke; Li, Yinghui; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors in space are dramatically different from those on Earth. The spaceflight environment has been known to influence human physiology and behavior on orbital missions. In this study, we investigated alterations in the diurnal rhythms of activity and heart rate of three Chinese astronauts on a space mission. An analysis of the heart rate data showed a significant decrease in heart rate amplitudes during flight in all three subjects. The heart rate amplitudes of all the three astronauts were significantly dampened during flight, and the minimum as well as the maximum value of heart rate increased after flight. A phase shift in heart rate was observed in one of the three astronauts after flight. These results demonstrate the influence of spaceflight on heart physiology and function. In addition, a significant decrease in body trunk activity and rhythmicity occurred during flight, demonstrating that the spaceflight environment disturbs motion adaptation and diurnal activity rhythms.

  11. Alterations in the heart rate and activity rhythms of three orbital astronauts on a space mission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhizhen; Wan, Yufeng; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Yu; Lv, Ke; Li, Yinghui; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors in space are dramatically different from those on Earth. The spaceflight environment has been known to influence human physiology and behavior on orbital missions. In this study, we investigated alterations in the diurnal rhythms of activity and heart rate of three Chinese astronauts on a space mission. An analysis of the heart rate data showed a significant decrease in heart rate amplitudes during flight in all three subjects. The heart rate amplitudes of all the three astronauts were significantly dampened during flight, and the minimum as well as the maximum value of heart rate increased after flight. A phase shift in heart rate was observed in one of the three astronauts after flight. These results demonstrate the influence of spaceflight on heart physiology and function. In addition, a significant decrease in body trunk activity and rhythmicity occurred during flight, demonstrating that the spaceflight environment disturbs motion adaptation and diurnal activity rhythms. PMID:26177621

  12. Pharmacologic Approaches to Electrolyte Abnormalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Grodin, Justin L

    2016-08-01

    Electrolyte abnormalities are common in heart failure and can arise from a variety of etiologies. Neurohormonal activation from ventricular dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and heart failure medications can perturb electrolyte homeostasis which impact both heart failure-related morbidity and mortality. These include disturbances in serum sodium, chloride, acid-base, and potassium homeostasis. Pharmacological treatments differ for each electrolyte abnormality and vary from older, established treatments like the vaptans or acetazolamide, to experimental or theoretical treatments like hypertonic saline or urea, or to newer, novel agents like the potassium binders: patiromer and zirconium cyclosilicate. Pharmacologic approaches range from limiting electrolyte intake or directly repleting the electrolyte, to blocking or promoting their resorption, and to neurohormonal antagonism. Because of the prevalence and clinical impact of electrolyte abnormalities, understanding both the older and newer therapeutic options is and will continue to be necessity for the management of heart failure. PMID:27278221

  13. The Korean Heart Rhythm Society's 2014 Statement on Antithrombotic Therapy for Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Korean Heart Rhythm Society

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ho; Nam, Gi Byung; Park, Hyung Wook; On, Young Keun; Lee, Young Soo; Lim, Hong Euy; Joung, Boyoung; Cha, Tae Joon; Hwang, Gyo Seung; Oh, Seil; Kim, June Soo

    2015-01-01

    In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF), the risk of stroke varies considerably according to individual clinical status. The CHA2DS2-VASc score is better than the CHADS2 score for identifying truly lower risk patients with AF. With the advent of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), the strategy for antithrombotic therapy has undergone significant changes due to its superior efficacy, safety and convenience compared with warfarin. Furthermore, new aspects of antithrombotic therapy and risk assessment of stroke have been revealed: the efficacy of stroke prevention with aspirin is weak, while the risk of major bleeding is not significantly different from that of oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy, especially in the elderly. Reflecting these pivotal aspects, previous guidelines have been updated in recent years by overseas societies and associations. The Korean Heart Rhythm Society has summarized the new evidence and updated recommendations for stroke prevention of patients with nonvalvular AF. First of all, antithrombotic therapy must be considered carefully and incorporate the clinical characteristics and circumstances of each individual patient, especially with regards to balancing the benefits of stroke prevention with the risk of bleeding, recommending the CHA2DS2-VASc score rather than the CHADS2 score for assessing the risk of stroke, and employing the HAS-BLED score to validate bleeding risk. In patients with truly low risk (lone AF, CHA2DS2-VASc score of 0), no antithrombotic therapy is recommended, whereas OAC therapy, including warfarin (international normalized ratio 2-3) or NOACs, is recommended for patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 unless contraindicated. In patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 1, OAC therapy should be preferentially considered, but depending on bleeding risk or patient preferences, antiplatelet therapy or no therapy could be permitted. PMID:25653698

  14. Resting state cortical electroencephalographic rhythms in subjects with normal and abnormal body weight.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Lizio, Roberta; Valenzano, Anna; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Petito, Annamaria; Bellomo, Antonello; Lecce, Brunello; Mundi, Ciro; Soricelli, Andrea; Limatola, Cristina; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Del Percio, Claudio

    2011-09-15

    It is well known that resting state regional cerebral blood flow is abnormal in obese when compared to normal-weight subjects but the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are poorly known. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that amplitude of resting state cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms differ among underweight, normal-weight, and overweight/obese subjects as a reflection of the relationship between cortical neural synchronization and regulation of body weight. Eyes-closed resting state EEG data were recorded in 16 underweight subjects, 25 normal-weight subjects, and 18 overweight/obese subjects. All subjects were psychophysically healthy (no eating disorders or major psychopathologies). EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4Hz), theta (4-8Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13Hz), beta 1 (13-20Hz), beta 2 (20-30Hz), and gamma (30-40Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Statistical results showed that parietal and temporal alpha 1 sources fitted the pattern underweight>normal-weight>overweight/obese (p<0.004), whereas occipital alpha 1 sources fitted the pattern normal-weight>underweight>overweight/obese (p<0.00003). Furthermore, amplitude of the parietal, occipital, and temporal alpha 2 sources was stronger in the normal-weight subjects than in the underweight and overweight/obese subjects (p<0.0007). These results suggest that abnormal weight in healthy overweight/obese subjects is related to abnormal cortical neural synchronization at the basis of resting state alpha rhythms and fluctuation of global brain arousal. PMID:21704716

  15. Circadian rhythm abnormalities - Association with the course of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Aleksandra; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Szemraj, Janusz; Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Fichna, Jakub; Wiśniewska-Jarosińska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the main representatives of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a group of chronic, immune system-mediated inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The pathogenesis of the intestinal lesions in IBD is not entirely identified and understood: excessive activation of the immune system may come as a result of the interaction of various environmental and infectious factors, genetic predisposition, and the mediation of abnormal intestinal flora. The main objective of the current study is to further identify the risk factors for the development of IBD. Currently, there is very little knowledge about circadian rhythm and IBD and there are only a few studies on the relationship between sleep disturbances and the course of the disease, as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine profile and general immune system functioning. Furthermore, the relationship between the expression of circadian rhythm genes and severe course of IBD is still unknown. The aim of this review is to show the current state of knowledge about the relationship between circadian rhythm disorders, sleep disturbance and inflammation in the GI tract and to analyze the possibility of employing this knowledge in diagnosis and treatment of IBD.

  16. Estimation of body temperature rhythm based on heart activity parameters in daily life.

    PubMed

    Sooyoung Sim; Heenam Yoon; Hosuk Ryou; Kwangsuk Park

    2014-01-01

    Body temperature contains valuable health related information such as circadian rhythm and menstruation cycle. Also, it was discovered from previous studies that body temperature rhythm in daily life is related with sleep disorders and cognitive performances. However, monitoring body temperature with existing devices during daily life is not easy because they are invasive, intrusive, or expensive. Therefore, the technology which can accurately and nonintrusively monitor body temperature is required. In this study, we developed body temperature estimation model based on heart rate and heart rate variability parameters. Although this work was inspired by previous research, we originally identified that the model can be applied to body temperature monitoring in daily life. Also, we could find out that normalized Mean heart rate (nMHR) and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability showed better performance than other parameters. Although we should validate the model with more number of subjects and consider additional algorithms to decrease the accumulated estimation error, we could verify the usefulness of this approach. Through this study, we expect that we would be able to monitor core body temperature and circadian rhythm from simple heart rate monitor. Then, we can obtain various health related information derived from daily body temperature rhythm.

  17. Abnormal Cerebral Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Ceschin, Rafael; Pruetz, Jay D.; Detterich, Jon A.; Del Castillo, Sylvia; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Kim, Richard; Painter, Michael J.; Gilles, Floyd H.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Williams, Roberta G.; Blüml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Abnormal cerebral microstructure has been documented in term neonates with congenital heart disease (CHD) portending risk for injury and poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate diffuse cerebral microstructural abnormalities when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between microstructural abnormalities, white matter injury (e.g., punctate white matter lesions, pWMLs) and other clinical variables, including heart lesion. Material and Methods Using Tract-Based-Spatial-Statistics (TBSS), an unbiased, voxel-wise method for analyzing diffusion tensor imaging data, we compared 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Results Compared to term neonates without CHD, preterm neonates with CHD had microstructural abnormalities in widespread regions of the central white matter. However, 42% of the preterm CHD neonates had pWMLs. When neonates with pWMLs were excluded, microstructural abnormalities remained only in the splenium. Preterms with CHD had similar microstructure to preterms without CHD. Conclusion Diffuse microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD, strongly associated with pWMLs. Independently, regional vulnerability of the splenium, a structure associated with visual spatial function, was observed in all preterm CHD neonates. PMID:23703146

  18. Reorganization of the brain and heart rhythm during autogenic meditation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Rhee, Jyoo-Hi; Kang, Seung Wan

    2014-01-01

    The underlying changes in heart coherence that are associated with reported EEG changes in response to meditation have been explored. We measured EEG and heart rate variability (HRV) before and during autogenic meditation. Fourteen subjects participated in the study. Heart coherence scores were significantly increased during meditation compared to the baseline. We found near significant decrease in high beta absolute power, increase in alpha relative power and significant increases in lower (alpha) and higher (above beta) band coherence during 3~min epochs of heart coherent meditation compared to 3~min epochs of heart non-coherence at baseline. The coherence and relative power increase in alpha band and absolute power decrease in high beta band could reflect relaxation state during the heart coherent meditation. The coherence increase in the higher (above beta) band could reflect cortico-cortical local integration and thereby affect cognitive reorganization, simultaneously with relaxation. Further research is still needed for a confirmation of heart coherence as a simple window for the meditative state. PMID:24454283

  19. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of `Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  20. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K L; Bartsch, Ronny P; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2016-05-13

    Within the framework of 'Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems. PMID:27044991

  1. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K L; Bartsch, Ronny P; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2016-05-13

    Within the framework of 'Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  2. Masking of the circadian rhythms of heart rate and core temperature by the rest-activity cycle in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Connell, Linda J.; Graeber, R. Curtis

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to estimate the magnitude of the masking effect produced in humans by alternate periods of physical activity and rest or sleep on the circadian rhythms of heart rate and core temperature. The heart rate, rectal temperature, and nondominant wrist activity were monitored in 12 male subjects during 6 days of normal routine at home and during 6 days of controlled bed-rest regimen. The comparisons of averaged waveforms for the activity, heart rate, and temperature indicated that about 45 percent of the range of the circadian heart rate rhythm during normal routine and about 14 percent of the range of the circadian temperature rhythm were attributable to the effects of activity. The smaller effect of activity on the temperature rhythm may be partially attributable to the fact that core temperature is being more rigorously conserved than heart rate, at least during moderate exercise.

  3. Electrocardiographic imaging of heart rhythm disorders: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Rudy, Yoram; Lindsay, Bruce D

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI; also called ECG mapping) can reconstruct potentials, electrograms, activation sequences, and repolarization patterns on the epicardial surface of the heart with high resolution. ECGI can possibly be used to quantify synchrony, identify potential responders/nonresponders to cardiac resynchronization therapy, and guide electrode placement for effective resynchronization therapy. This article provides a brief description of the ECGI procedure and selected previously published examples of its application in important clinical conditions, including heart failure, cardiac resynchronization therapy, atrial arrhythmias, and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:25722753

  4. Effect of suprachiasmatic lesions on diurnal heart rate rhythm in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleh, M. A.; Winget, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Heart rate and locomotor activity of rats kept under 12L/12D illumination regimen were recorded every six minutes for ten days using implantable radio transmitters. Some of the rats then received bilateral RF lesions into the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Control sham operations were performed on the rest of the animals. After recovery from surgery, recording of heart rate and locomotor activity was continued for ten days. SCN-lesioned rats showed no significant diurnal fluctuation in heart rate, while normal and sham-operated rats showed the normal diurnal rhythm in that function. The arrhythmic diurnal heart-rate pattern of SCN rats appeared to be correlated with their sporadic activity pattern. The integrity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus is therefore necessary for the generation and/or expression of diurnal rhythmicity in heart rate in the rat.

  5. Complex dynamics of the biological rhythms: gallbladder and heart cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imponente, Giovanni

    2004-07-01

    A theoretical analysis of the mechanisms underlying the dynamics of gallbladder and heart pulsation could clarify the question regarding the classification as chaotic of the associated behaviour, eventually related to a normal and healthy beat; this analysis is particularly relevant in view of the control of dynamic bifurcations arising in situations of disease. In this work a summary of the DFA method applied to gallbladder volume data for a modest number of healthy and ill patients is presented: the presence of signal correlation is found in both cases, but the fit shapes differ from some critical values.

  6. Computation of Nonlinear Parameters of Heart Rhythm Using Short Time ECG Segments

    PubMed Central

    Koichubekov, Berik; Korshukov, Ilya; Omarbekova, Nazgul; Riklefs, Viktor; Sorokina, Marina; Mkhitaryan, Xenia

    2015-01-01

    We propose the method to compute the nonlinear parameters of heart rhythm (correlation dimension D2 and correlation entropy K2) using 5-minute ECG recordings preferred for screening of population. Conversion of RR intervals' time series into continuous function x(t) allows getting the new time series with different sampling rate dt. It has been shown that for all dt (250, 200, 125, and 100 ms) the cross-plots of D2 and K2 against embedding dimension m for phase-space reconstruction start to level off at m = 9. The sample size N at different sampling rates varied from 1200 at dt = 250 ms to 3000 at dt = 100 ms. Along with, the D2 and K2 means were not statistically different; that is, the sampling rate did not influence the results. We tested the feasibility of the method in two models: nonlinear heart rhythm dynamics in different states of autonomous nervous system and age-related characteristics of nonlinear parameters. According to the acquired data, the heart rhythm is more complex in childhood and adolescence with more influential parasympathetic influence against the background of elevated activity of sympathetic autonomous nervous system. PMID:25688286

  7. Black Holes Are The Rhythm at The Heart of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    The powerful black holes at the center of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters act as hearts to the systems, pumping energy out at regular intervals to regulate the growth of the black holes themselves, as well as star formation, according to new data from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory. People Who Read This Also Read... Milky Way’s Giant Black Hole Awoke from Slumber 300 Years Ago A New Way To Weigh Giant Black Holes Discovery of Most Recent Supernova in Our Galaxy NASA Unveils Cosmic Images Book in Braille for Blind Readers Scientists from the University of Michigan, the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Jacobs University in Germany contributed to the results. The gravitational pull of black holes is so strong that not even light can escape from them. Supermassive black holes with masses of more than a billion suns have been detected at the center of large galaxies. The material falling on the black holes causes sporadic or isolated bursts of energy, by which black holes are capable of influencing the fate of their host galaxies. The insight gained by this new research shows that black holes can pump energy in a gentler and rhythmic fashion, rather then violently. The scientists observed and simulated how the black hole at the center of elliptical galaxy M84 dependably sends bubbles of hot plasma into space, heating up interstellar space. This heat is believed to slow both the formation of new stars and the growth of the black hole itself, helping the galaxy remain stable. Interstellar gases only coalesce into new stars when the gas is cool enough. The heating is more efficient at the sites where it is most needed, the scientists say. Alexis Finoguenov, of UMBC and the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, compares the central black hole to a heart muscle. "Just like our hearts periodically pump our

  8. Heart rate and respiratory rhythm dynamics on ascent to high altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsitz, L. A.; Hashimoto, F.; Lubowsky, L. P.; Mietus, J.; Moody, G. B.; Appenzeller, O.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the alterations in autonomic control of heart rate at high altitude and to test the hypothesis that hypoxaemic stress during exposure to high altitude induces non-linear, periodic heart rate oscillations, similar to those seen in heart failure and the sleep apnoea syndrome. SUBJECTS--11 healthy subjects aged 24-64. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--24 hour ambulatory electrocardiogram records obtained at baseline (1524 m) and at 4700 m. Simultaneous heart rate and respiratory dynamics during 2.5 hours of sleep by fast Fourier transform analysis of beat to beat heart rate and of an electrocardiographically derived respiration signal. RESULTS--All subjects had resting hypoxaemia at high altitude, with an average oxyhaemoglobin saturation of 81% (5%). There was no significant change in mean heart rate, but low frequency (0.01-0.05 Hz) spectral power was increased (P < 0.01) at high altitude. Time series analysis showed a complex range of non-linear sinus rhythm dynamics. Striking low frequency (0.04-0.06 Hz) heart rate oscillations were observed during sleep in eight subjects at high altitude. Analysis of the electrocardiographically derived respiration signal indicated that these heart rate oscillations correlated with low frequency respiratory oscillations. CONCLUSIONS--These data suggest (a) that increased low frequency power during high altitude exposure is not simply attributable to increased sympathetic modulation of heart rate, but relates to distinctive cardiopulmonary oscillations at approximately 0.05 Hz and (b) that the emergence of periodic heart rate oscillations at high altitude is consistent with an unstable cardiopulmonary control system that may develop on acute exposure to hypoxaemic stress.

  9. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (CHD) Fix heart valves that don't work well Control abnormal heart rhythms Place medical devices Replace a damaged heart with a healthy one If other treatments—such as lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical ... surgeon will work with you to decide whether you need heart ...

  10. Alignment of R-R interval signals using the circadian heart rate rhythm.

    PubMed

    Gayraud, Nathalie T H; Manis, George

    2015-01-01

    R-R interval signals that come from different subjects are regularly aligned and averaged according to the horological starting time of the recordings. We argue that the horological time is a faulty alignment criterion and provide evidence in the form of a new alignment method. Our main motivation is that the human heart rate (HR) rhythm follows a circadian cycle, whose pattern can vary among different classes of people. We propose two novel alignment algorithms that consider the HR circadian rhythm, the Puzzle Piece Alignment Algorithm (PPA) and the Event Based Alignment Algorithm (EBA). First, we convert the R-R interval signal into a series of time windows and compute the mean HR per window. Then our algorithms search for matching circadian patterns to align the signals. We conduct experiments using R-R interval signals extracted from two databases in the Physionet Data Bank. Both algorithms are able to align the signals with respect to the circadian rhythmicity of HR. Furthermore, our findings confirm the presence of more than one pattern in the circadian HR rhythm. We suggest an automatic classification of signals according to the three most prominent patterns. PMID:26737009

  11. Alignment of R-R interval signals using the circadian heart rate rhythm.

    PubMed

    Gayraud, Nathalie T H; Manis, George

    2015-01-01

    R-R interval signals that come from different subjects are regularly aligned and averaged according to the horological starting time of the recordings. We argue that the horological time is a faulty alignment criterion and provide evidence in the form of a new alignment method. Our main motivation is that the human heart rate (HR) rhythm follows a circadian cycle, whose pattern can vary among different classes of people. We propose two novel alignment algorithms that consider the HR circadian rhythm, the Puzzle Piece Alignment Algorithm (PPA) and the Event Based Alignment Algorithm (EBA). First, we convert the R-R interval signal into a series of time windows and compute the mean HR per window. Then our algorithms search for matching circadian patterns to align the signals. We conduct experiments using R-R interval signals extracted from two databases in the Physionet Data Bank. Both algorithms are able to align the signals with respect to the circadian rhythmicity of HR. Furthermore, our findings confirm the presence of more than one pattern in the circadian HR rhythm. We suggest an automatic classification of signals according to the three most prominent patterns.

  12. [Abnormal positions of the heart. An analysis on 1039 cases].

    PubMed

    Mătăsaru, Silvia; Crupa, Maria; Felea, Doina; Cosmescu, Adriana; Barbacariu, Liliana; Petroaie, Antoneta

    2003-01-01

    The aim was to study the impact of the cardiac malpositions into the group of the 1039 congenital heart diseases registered in the Pediatric Outpatient Department of "Sf. Spiridon" hospital. All patients were investigated noninvasively using clinical examination, electrocardiogram, routine Roentgenogram, two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, abdominal echography and, only in two cases, cardiac catheterisation. 23 (2.21%) from 1039 congenital heart diseases registered were cardiac malpositions: dextroposition--3 cases (13.04%), dextrocardia--7 cases (30.43%) and situs inversus--13 cases (56.52%). Most of the children were boys (65.21%), 70% from all cases coming from urban area. Only 3 children had structural cardiac anomalies: two cases with dextrocardia (one with atrial septal defect and one with atrioventricular canal) and one with situs inversus and tetralogy of Fallot, two of them suffering surgical correction. Psychological impact was the main problem of these children, especially during the adolescence, except the two cases with structural cardiac abnormalities who needed following and surgical treatment.

  13. Melatonin secretion is impaired in women with preeclampsia and an abnormal circadian blood pressure rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bouchlariotou, Sofia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Giannopoulou, Myrto; Arampatzis, Spyridon; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Mertens, Peter R; Zintzaras, Elias; Messinis, Ioannis E; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-08-01

    Non-dipping circadian blood pressure (BP) is a common finding in preeclampsia, accompanied by adverse outcomes. Melatonin plays pivotal role in biological circadian rhythms. This study investigated the relationship between melatonin secretion and circadian BP rhythm in preeclampsia. Cases were women with preeclampsia treated between January 2006 and June 2007 in the University Hospital of Larissa. Volunteers with normal pregnancy, matched for chronological and gestational age, served as controls. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP monitoring was applied. Serum melatonin and urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were determined in day and night time samples by enzyme-linked immunoassays. Measurements were repeated 2 months after delivery. Thirty-one women with preeclampsia and 20 controls were included. Twenty-one of the 31 women with preeclampsia were non-dippers. Compared to normal pregnancy, in preeclampsia there were significantly lower night time melatonin (48.4 ± 24.7 vs. 85.4 ± 26.9 pg/mL, p<0.001) levels. Adjustment for circadian BP rhythm status ascribed this finding exclusively to non-dippers (p<0.01). Two months after delivery, in 11 of the 21 non-dippers both circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm reappeared. In contrast, in cases with retained non-dipping status (n=10) melatonin secretion rhythm remained impaired: daytime versus night time melatonin (33.5 ± 13.0 vs. 28.0 ± 13.8 pg/mL, p=0.386). Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were, overall, similar to serum melatonin. Circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm follow parallel course in preeclampsia, both during pregnancy and, at least 2 months after delivery. Our findings may be not sufficient to implicate a putative therapeutic effect of melatonin, however, they clearly emphasize that its involvement in the pathogenesis of a non-dipping BP in preeclampsia needs intensive further investigation.

  14. Proceedings from Heart Rhythm Society's emerging technologies forum, Boston, MA, May 12, 2015.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Emily P; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Slotwiner, David; Kumar, Uday N; Varosy, Paul; Van Wagoner, David R; Marcus, Gregory M; Kusumoto, Fred M; Blum, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Physicians are in an excellent position to significantly contribute to medical device innovation, but the process of bringing an idea to the bedside is complex. To begin to address these perceived barriers, the Heart Rhythm Society convened a forum of stakeholders in medical device innovation in conjunction with the 2015 Heart Rhythm Society Annual Scientific Sessions. The forum facilitated open discussion on medical device innovation, including obstacles to physician involvement and possible solutions. This report is based on the themes that emerged. First, physician innovators must take an organized approach to identifying unmet clinical needs and potential solutions. Second, extensive funds, usually secured through solicitation for investment, are often required to achieve meaningful progress, developing an idea into a device. Third, planning for regulatory requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is essential. In addition to these issues, intellectual property and overall trends in health care, including international markets, are critically relevant considerations for the physician innovator. Importantly, there are a number of ways in which professional societies can assist physician innovators to navigate the complex medical device innovation landscape, bring clinically meaningful devices to market more quickly, and ultimately improve patient care. These efforts include facilitating interaction between potential collaborators through scientific meetings and other gatherings; collecting, evaluating, and disseminating state-of-the-art scientific information; and representing the interests of members in interactions with regulators and policymakers. PMID:26801401

  15. Improvement of Circadian Rhythm of Heart Rate Variability by Eurythmy Therapy Training

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Georg; Kanitz, Jenny-Lena; Pretzer, Kim; Henze, Günter; Witt, Katharina; Reulecke, Sina; Voss, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background. Impairment of circadian rhythm is associated with various clinical problems. It not only has a negative impact on quality of life but can also be associated with a significantly poorer prognosis. Eurythmy therapy (EYT) is an anthroposophic movement therapy aimed at reducing fatigue symptoms and stress levels. Objective. This analysis of healthy subjects was conducted to examine whether the improvement in fatigue symptoms was accompanied by improvements in the circadian rhythm of heart rate variability (HRV). Design. Twenty-three women performed 10 hours of EYT over six weeks. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded before and after the EYT trial. HRV was quantified by parameters of the frequency and time domains and the nonlinear parameters of symbolic dynamics. Results. The day-night contrast with predominance of vagal activity at night becomes more pronounced after the EYT training, and with decreased Ultralow and very low frequencies, the HRV shows evidence of calmer sleep. During the night, the complexity of the HRV is significantly increased indicated by nonlinear parameters. Conclusion. The analysis of the circadian patterns of cardiophysiological parameters before and after EYT shows significant improvements in HRV in terms of greater day-night contrast caused by an increase of vagal activity and calmer and more complex HRV patterns during sleep. PMID:23533496

  16. [Individual peculiarities of adaptation to long-term space flights: 24-hour heart rhythm monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baevskii, R. M.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Gol'dberger, A. L.; Nikulina, G. A.; Charl'z, D. B.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator); Charles, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Presented are results of studying 24-hr variability of the cardiac rhythm which characterizes individual difference in reactions of two crew members to the same set of stresses during a 115-day MIR mission. Spacelab (USA) cardiorecorders were used. Data of monitoring revealed significantly different baseline health statuses of the cosmonauts. These functional differences were also observed in the mission. In one of the cosmonauts, the cardiac regulation changed over to a more economic functioning with the autonomous balance shifted towards enhanced sympathetic activity. After 2-3 months on mission he had almost recovered pre-launch level of regulation. In the other, the regulatory system was appreciably strained at the beginning of the mission as compared with preflight baseline. Later on, on flight months 2-3, this strain kept growing till a drastic depletion of the functional reserve. On return to Earth, this was manifested by a strong stress reaction with a sharp decline in power of high-frequency and grow in power of very low frequency components of the heart rhythm. The data suggest that adaptation to space flight and reactions in the readaptation period are dependent on initial health status of crew members, and functional reserve.

  17. Inherited heart rhythm disease: negotiating the minefield for the practicing cardiologist.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Andrew D; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Gardner, Martin J; Arbour, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Inherited heart rhythm disorders are uncommon conditions that have emerged as a challenge to recognize and treat for the practicing clinician. The common electrical forms are long QT and Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic ventricular tachycardia, and early repolarization syndrome. Inherited cardiomyopathies, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction can also cause serious cardiac rhythm disturbances and sudden death. We review the key historic and diagnostic considerations to provide guidance for day-to-day management, and the resources accessible to health care professionals and patients including a Canadian network of expert clinics. This allows for the initiation of disease-specific treatments and enables family screening. These heterogenous conditions can be challenging to diagnose with equally difficult management decisions. However, some common measures can be applied that will assist health care providers and reduce risk for patients. Condition-specific treatment strategies that are deployed in regional clinics are discussed, including the role of the referring health care team.

  18. Circadian rhythms (temperature, heart rate, vigilance, mood) of short and long sleepers: effects of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Benoit, O; Foret, J; Merle, B; Reinberg, A

    1981-01-01

    Seven long sleepers (LS) (sleep greater than or equal to 9 h) and seven short sleepers (SS) (sleep less than or equal to 7 h), aged 20 to 23 years, were selected among medical students. They measured their axillary temperature (T), heart rate (HR) and self-estimated their vigilance (V) and mood (M) every 4 h from awakening to bed time during a ten-day control span and during the two sleep deprived nights. Polygraphic sleep recordings were performed on 3 control days and recovery from 24 h (day sleep) or 36 h (night sleep) sleep deprivations. For the 4 variables (T, HR, V and M), group circadian patterns were analyzed by means of the cosinor method for the control span and after both types of sleep deprivation. The acrophases of the 4 variables clustered more in LS than in SS. The acrophases of V and M were found to be more closely related to the sleep/wake rhythm than those of T and HR. Sleep deprivation resulted in a large change of the circadian rhythms in LS but had little effect in SS as indicated by the non detection of most acrophases in LS and the persistence of such acrophases in SS. This difference might be explained by the large interindividual variability of changes induced by the sleep deprivation in LS. Moreover, day sleep recovery was more disturbed in LS than in SS. PMID:7327054

  19. Do sleep abnormalities and misaligned sleep/circadian rhythm patterns represent early clinical characteristics for developing psychosis in high risk populations?

    PubMed

    Zanini, Marcio; Castro, Juliana; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Bittencourt, Lia; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Tufik, Sergio; Brietzke, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    Sleep architecture changes, such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) percentage variations and reductions in latency and density of rapid eye movement (REM), are found in most patients with schizophrenia and are considered to be an important part of the pathophysiology of the disorder. In addition to these sleep parameters changes, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and the sleep/circadian rhythm also occur in these patients. Sleep/circadian rhythm abnormalities negatively affect neocortical plasticity and cognition and often precede the diagnosis of the illness. Thus, it has been suggested that the sleep/circadian rhythm might be involved in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Recent advances in the identification of individuals at a high risk for developing schizophrenia allow us to investigate several neurobiological processes involved in the development of psychosis. In this article, we review the current evidence of the effects of sleep parameter abnormalities, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and misalignments of sleep circadian rhythm on the early stages of schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the preliminary evidence of sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during the prodromal stages of psychosis and propose that these abnormalities can be explored as potential predictors, as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis, of developing a psychotic disorder in at risk populations.

  20. Etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of seasonal and non-seasonal mood disorders: possible role of circadian rhythm abnormalities related to developmental alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Sher, Leo

    2004-01-01

    Developmental alcohol exposure adversely influences the developing brain. Alcohol exposure during rapid brain growth causes cell loss, alters connections between brain regions, and lowers the production of biological substances responsible for the communication among neurons. It is reasonable to suggest that alcohol may adversely affect the development of suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker. Multiple research reports suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythms are involved in the etiopathogenesis of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a syndrome in which depression develops during autumn or winter and remits the following spring or summer. Several lines of evidence suggest that changes in the circadian system are also involved in the development of nonseasonal mood disorders, such as major depression and bipolar disorder. Thus, developmental alcohol exposure produces subtle abnormalities in circadian rhythms that may contribute to the development of seasonal and nonseasonal mood disorders. Pharmacological, psychological, and light treatments of mood disorders have multiple effects on circadian function. The state of the circadian system may affect a response to treatment. Circadian rhythms have been reported for neurotransmitters, receptors, enzymes, and the second messenger system in the brain that are involved in the effects of treatments. Some of these rhythms have amplitudes as large as several 100%. Effects of many psychotropic medications depend on the time of administration in relation to body rhythmicity. Therefore, subtle circadian rhythm abnormalities related to developmental alcohol exposure may affect treatment response in patients with mood disorders.

  1. Warfarin and Aspirin in Patients with Heart Failure and Sinus Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Shunichi; Thompson, John L.P.; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Levin, Bruce; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Ammon, Susan E.; Graham, Susan; Sacco, Ralph L.; Mann, Douglas L.; Mohr, J.P.; Massie, Barry M.; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Anker, Stefan D.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Estol, Conrado J.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Sanford, Alexandra R.; Mejia, Vilma; Gabriel, Andre P.; del Valle, Mirna L.; Buchsbaum, Richard

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is unknown whether warfarin or aspirin therapy is superior for patients with heart failure who are in sinus rhythm. METHODS We designed this trial to determine whether warfarin (with a target international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.5) or aspirin (at a dose of 325 mg per day) is a better treatment for patients in sinus rhythm who have a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). We followed 2305 patients for up to 6 years (mean [±SD], 3.5±1.8). The primary outcome was the time to the first event in a composite end point of ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, or death from any cause. RESULTS The rates of the primary outcome were 7.47 events per 100 patient-years in the warfarin group and 7.93 in the aspirin group (hazard ratio with warfarin, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 1.10; P = 0.40). Thus, there was no significant overall difference between the two treatments. In a time-varying analysis, the hazard ratio changed over time, slightly favoring warfarin over aspirin by the fourth year of follow-up, but this finding was only marginally significant (P = 0.046). Warfarin, as compared with aspirin, was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of ischemic stroke throughout the follow-up period (0.72 events per 100 patient-years vs. 1.36 per 100 patient-years; hazard ratio, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.82; P = 0.005). The rate of major hemorrhage was 1.78 events per 100 patient-years in the warfarin group as compared with 0.87 in the aspirin group (P<0.001). The rates of intracerebral and intracranial hemorrhage did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups (0.27 events per 100 patient-years with warfarin and 0.22 with aspirin, P = 0.82). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with reduced LVEF who were in sinus rhythm, there was no significant overall difference in the primary outcome between treatment with warfarin and treatment with aspirin. A reduced risk of ischemic stroke with warfarin was offset by an

  2. Heart Rhythm Monitoring in the Constellation Lunar and Launch/Landing EVA Suit: Recommendations from an Expert Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Hamilton, Doug; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Alexander, David

    2009-01-01

    There are currently several physiological monitoring requirements for EVA in the Human-Systems Interface Requirements (HSIR) document. There are questions as to whether the capability to monitor heart rhythm in the lunar surface space suit is a necessary capability for lunar surface operations. Similarly, there are questions as to whether the capability to monitor heart rhythm during a cabin depressurization scenario in the launch/landing space suit is necessary. This presentation seeks to inform space medicine personnel of recommendations made by an expert panel of cardiovascular medicine specialists regarding in-suit ECG heart rhythm monitoring requirements during lunar surface operations. After a review of demographic information and clinical cases and panel discussion, the panel recommended that ECG monitoring capability as a clinical tool was not essential in the lunar space suit; ECG monitoring was not essential in the launch/landing space suit for contingency scenarios; the current hear rate monitoring capability requirement for both launch/landing and lunar space suits should be maintained; lunar vehicles should be required to have ECG monitoring capability with a minimum of 5-lead ECG for IVA medical assessments; and, exercise stress testing for astronaut selection and retention should be changed from the current 85% maximum heart rate limit to maximal, exhaustive 'symptom-limited' testing to maximize diagnostic utility as a screening tool for evaluating the functional capacity of astronauts and their cardiovascular health.

  3. The physiological rhythms of subjects living on a day of abnormal length.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J N; Minors, D S; Waterhouse, J M

    1977-01-01

    1. Fourteen subjects, singly or in groups, have been observed while living on a 21 hr day for 8 or 16 experimental 'days' and fifteen other subjects similarly on a 27 hr day. 2. Rhythmic components of body temperature and excretion of various urinary constituents were calculated. 3. On a 21 hr day, for most components and most subjects, two periods were present, one of 21 hr and one of around or somewhat over 24 hr. 4. On a 27 hr day two periods were less often present and a larger number of observed rhythms could be satisfactorily described by a single period, usually between 23 and 28 hr. 5. In subjects spending a second week on a 21 hr day the circadian component was no less prominent than during the first week. 6. When, after life on a 21 hr day, subjects were deprived of knowledge of time, there was evidence that the 21 hr component did not persist. 7. The results are interpreted as evidence of the continuing existance of an influence with a period of around 24 hr, simultaneously rhythmic influences resulting from the subjects' habits. On a 27 hr day there was sometimes evidence of entrainment, yielding an intermediate period. 8. An attempt is made to compare the relative potency of the exogenous and of the persistent circadian influences on the several variables. PMID:881648

  4. Heart Rhythm Monitoring in the Constellation Lunar and Launch/Landing EVA Suit: Recommendations from an Expert Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Hamilton, D.; Jones, J. A.; Alexander, D.

    2008-01-01

    Currently there are several physiological monitoring requirements for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) in the Human-Systems Interface Requirements (HSIR) document, including continuous heart rhythm monitoring. However, it is not known whether heart rhythm monitoring in the lunar surface space suit is a necessary capability for lunar surface operations or in launch/landing suit the event of a cabin depressurization enroute to or from the moon. Methods: Current US astronaut corps demographic information was provided to an expert panel of cardiovascular medicine experts, including specialists in electrophysiology, exercise physiology, interventional cardiology and arrhythmia. This information included averages for male/female age, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, cholesterol, inflammatory markers, echocardiogram, ranges for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores for long duration astronauts, and ranges for heart rate (HR) and metabolic (MET) rates obtained during microgravity and lunar EVA. Results: The panel determined that no uncontrolled hazard was likely to occur in the suit during lunar surface or contingency microgravity ops that would require ECG monitoring in the highly screened US astronaut population. However having the capability for rhythm monitoring inside the vehicle (IVA) was considered critical to manage an astronaut in distress. Discussion: Heart rate (HR) monitoring alone allows effective monitoring of astronaut health and function. Consequently, electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring capability as a clinical tool is not essential in the lunar or launch/landing space suit. However, the panel considered that rhythm monitoring could be useful in certain clinical situations, it was not considered required for safe operations. Also, lunar vehicles should be required to have ECG monitoring capability with a minimum of 5-lead ECG (derived 12- lead) for IVA medical assessments.

  5. Magnetographic assessment of fetal hiccups and their effect on fetal heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Popescu, E A; Popescu, M; Bennett, T L; Lewine, J D; Drake, W B; Gustafson, K M

    2007-06-01

    Fetal hiccups emerge as early as nine weeks post-conception, being the predominant diaphragmatic movement before 26 weeks of gestation. They are considered as a programmed isometric inspiratory muscle exercise of the fetus in preparation for the post-natal respiratory function, or a manifestation of a reflex circuitry underlying the development of suckling and gasping patterns. The present paper provides the first evidence of non-invasive biomagnetic measurements of the diaphragm spasmodic contractions associated with fetal hiccups. The magnetic field patterns generated by fetal hiccups exhibit well-defined morphological features, consisting of an initial high frequency transient waveform followed by a more prolonged low frequency component. This pattern is consistent across recordings obtained from two fetal subjects, and it is confirmed by signals recorded in a neonatal subject. These results demonstrate that fetal biomagnetometry can provide insights into the electrophysiological mechanisms of diaphragm motor function in the fetus. Additionally, we study the correlation between hiccup events and fetal cardiac rhythm and provide evidence that hiccups may modulate the fetal heart rate during the last trimester of pregnancy.

  6. Voluntary and involuntary running in the rat show different patterns of theta rhythm, physical activity, and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yi; Kuo, Terry B J; Yen, Jiin-Cherng; Tsai, Shih-Chih; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2014-05-01

    Involuntarily exercising rats undergo more physical and mental stress than voluntarily exercising rats; however, these findings still lack electrophysiological evidence. Many studies have reported that theta rhythm appears when there is mental stress and that it is affected by emotional status. Thus we hypothesized that the differences between voluntary and involuntary movement should also exist in the hippocampal theta rhythm. Using the wheel and treadmill exercise models as voluntary and involuntary exercise models, respectively, this study wirelessly recorded the hippocampal electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram, and three-dimensional accelerations of young male rats. Treadmill and wheel exercise produced different theta patterns in the rats before and during running. Even though the waking baselines for the two exercise types were recorded in different environments, there did not exist any significant difference after distinguishing the rats' sleep/wake status. When the same movement-related parameters are considered, the treadmill running group showed more changes in their theta frequency (4-12 Hz), in their theta power between 9.5-12 Hz, and in their heart rate than the wheel running group. A positive correlation between the changes in high-frequency (9.5-12 Hz) theta power and heart rate was identified. Our results reveal various voluntary and involuntary changes in hippocampal theta rhythm as well as divergences in heart rate and high-frequency theta activity that may represent the effects of an additional emotional state or the sensory interaction during involuntary running by rats. PMID:24623507

  7. Clinical trials update from Heart Rhythm 2007 and Heart Failure 2007: CARISMA, PREPARE, DAVID II, SAVE-PACE, PROTECT and AREA-IN-CHF.

    PubMed

    Cleland, John G F; Coletta, Alison P; Abdellah, Ahmed Tageldien; Witte, Klaus K; Hobson, Neil; Clark, Andrew L

    2007-08-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at Heart Rhythm 2007 organised by the Heart Rhythm Society which was held in Denver, USA and Heart Failure 2007 organised by the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology which was held in Hamburg, Germany. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. The CARISMA study suggests that non-invasive screening tests may help to identify post-MI patients who may benefit from ICD therapy. Data from the PREPARE study show that more conservative ICD programming can reduce morbidity at the cost of an increased risk of arrhythmic syncope. DAVID II indicates that atrial pacing may be a safe alternative to ventricular back-up pacing in patients with left ventricular dysfunction and standard indications for an ICD. The incidence of persistent atrial fibrillation in patients with sinus node disease in SAVE-PACE was reduced by dual chamber minimal ventricular pacing compared to conventional dual chamber pacing. The pilot phase of the PROTECT studies confirmed 30 mg as the dose of the selective A1 adenosine receptor antagonist KW-3902 to be used in pivotal studies. AREA-IN-CHF failed to show a beneficial effect of canrenone on LV volumes compared to placebo however some beneficial effects on secondary clinical endpoints were observed.

  8. Clinical trials update from Heart Rhythm 2007 and Heart Failure 2007: CARISMA, PREPARE, DAVID II, SAVE-PACE, PROTECT and AREA-IN-CHF.

    PubMed

    Cleland, John G F; Coletta, Alison P; Abdellah, Ahmed Tageldien; Witte, Klaus K; Hobson, Neil; Clark, Andrew L

    2007-08-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at Heart Rhythm 2007 organised by the Heart Rhythm Society which was held in Denver, USA and Heart Failure 2007 organised by the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology which was held in Hamburg, Germany. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. The CARISMA study suggests that non-invasive screening tests may help to identify post-MI patients who may benefit from ICD therapy. Data from the PREPARE study show that more conservative ICD programming can reduce morbidity at the cost of an increased risk of arrhythmic syncope. DAVID II indicates that atrial pacing may be a safe alternative to ventricular back-up pacing in patients with left ventricular dysfunction and standard indications for an ICD. The incidence of persistent atrial fibrillation in patients with sinus node disease in SAVE-PACE was reduced by dual chamber minimal ventricular pacing compared to conventional dual chamber pacing. The pilot phase of the PROTECT studies confirmed 30 mg as the dose of the selective A1 adenosine receptor antagonist KW-3902 to be used in pivotal studies. AREA-IN-CHF failed to show a beneficial effect of canrenone on LV volumes compared to placebo however some beneficial effects on secondary clinical endpoints were observed. PMID:17644412

  9. Increase in the embedding dimension in the heart rate variability associated with left ventricular abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, D. S.; Irurzun, I. M.; Mitelman, J.; Mola, E. E.

    2006-10-01

    In the present study, the authors report evidence that the existence of premature ventricular contractions increases the embedding dimension of the cardiac dynamics. They also analyze patients with congestive heart failure, a severe clinical condition associated with abnormal left ventricular function. Results also show an increase in the embedding dimension of the heart rate variability. They used electrocardiograms collected by themselves with quality standards that make them comparable with other databases.

  10. Teaching Recognition of Normal and Abnormal Heart Sounds Using Computer-Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musselman, Eugene E.; Grimes, George M.

    1976-01-01

    The computer is being used in an innovative manner to teach the recognition of normal and abnormal canine heart sounds at the University of Chicago. Experience thus far indicates that the PLATO program resources allow the maximum development of the student's proficiency in auscultation. (Editor/LBH)

  11. Evaluation and management of heart rhythm disturbances due to cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Selan, Jeffrey C; Michaelson, Melody; Fanburg, Barry L; Estes, N A Mark

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) affects less than 5% of patients with pulmonary or systemic sarcoidosis, but when present is often associated with a spectrum of clinically significant conduction abnormalities and arrhythmias. The cardinal manifestations of CS include conduction disturbances, arrhythmias, or congestive heart failure. Less commonly, there is concealed subclinical disease. The electrophysiologic evaluation for CS includes a history and physical exam, ECG, and echocardiogram for all sarcoidosis patients, along with MRI, PET/nuclear scans, and EPS for certain subsets of patients. Despite variable data to support their efficacy, glucocorticoids should still be considered in the treatment plan of CS. Antiarrhythmics in isolation are often ineffective in controlling ventricular arrhythmias. Cardiac pacemakers have provided important therapy for patients with conduction defects and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy provides the strongest insurance to prevent fatal arrhythmias from CS. A recent consensus statement provides guidance for clinicians on the diagnosis and management of arrhythmias associated with CS including indications for ICDs. The use of pacemakers, ICD implantation and early implementation of corticosteroid therapy have led to an improvement in the overall prognosis and clinical outcomes of CS.

  12. [Advance in diagnosis and treatment of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease with traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Rong; Wang, Jiel; Liu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    To discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, therapies and prescriptions of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease. According to the advance in modern diagnosis and treatment, the authors believed that psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease is closely related with mental stresses, like anxiety, depression and insomnia. It is mostly caused by emotional injury and expressed in heart, liver, spleen and kidney. The pathogenesis is heart-liver hyperactivity, yin deficiency in heart and kidney, and insufficiency in heart and spleen. The full recognition of etiology and pathogenesis of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease and the combined treatment of disease and syndromes are of great significance to reduce mental stress and other risk factors, prevent and treat coronary heart disease and improve prognosis.

  13. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further.

  14. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further. PMID:21728077

  15. Personnel, equipment, and facilities for electrophysiological and catheter ablation procedures in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Estner, Heidi L; Chen, Jian; Potpara, Tatjana; Proclemer, Alessandro; Todd, Derick; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-07-01

    Clinical electrophysiology (EP) and catheter ablation of arrhythmias are rapidly evolving in recent years. More than 50 000 catheter ablations are performed every year in Europe. Emerging indications, an increasing number of procedures, and an expected high quality require national and international standards as well as trained specialists. The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess the practice of requirements for EP personnel, equipment, and facilities in Europe. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 52 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume EP centres, performing >400, 100-399, and under 100 implants per year, respectively. The following topics were explored: (i) EP personnel issues including balance between female and male operators, responsibilities within the EP department, age profiles, role and training of fellows, and EP nurses, (ii) the equipments available in the EP laboratories, (iii) source of patient referrals, and (iv) techniques used for ablation for different procedures including sedation, and peri-procedural use of anticoagulation and antibiotics. The survey reflects the current EP personnel situation characterized by a high training requirement and specialization. Arrhythmia sections are still most often part of cardiology departments and the head of cardiology is seldom a heart rhythm specialist. Currently, the vast majority of EP physicians are men, although in the subgroup of physicians younger than 40 years, the proportion of women is increasing. Uncertainty exists regarding peri-procedural anticoagulation, antibiotic prophylaxis, and the need for sedation during specific procedures. PMID:24966009

  16. 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Training Standards and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Green, Martin S; Guerra, Peter G; Krahn, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    The last guidelines on training for adult cardiac electrophysiology (EP) were published by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society in 1996. Since then, substantial changes in the knowledge and practice of EP have mandated a review of the previous guidelines by the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society, an affiliate of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Novel tools and techniques also now allow electrophysiologists to map and ablate increasingly complex arrhythmias previously managed with pharmacologic or device therapy. Furthermore, no formal attempt had previously been made to standardize EP training across the country. The 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Training Standards and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology represent a consensus arrived at by panel members from both societies, as well as EP program directors across Canada and other select contributors. In describing program requirements, the technical and cognitive skills that must be acquired to meet training standards, as well as the minimum number of procedures needed in order to acquire these skills, the new guidelines provide EP program directors and committee members with a template to develop an appropriate curriculum for EP training for cardiology fellows here in Canada.

  17. Personalized management of atrial fibrillation: Proceedings from the fourth Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Aliot, Etienne; Al Khatib, Sana; Apostolakis, Stavros; Auricchio, Angelo; Bailleul, Christophe; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boersma, Lucas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Casadei, Barbara; Clemens, Andreas; Crijns, Harry; Derwand, Roland; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ezekowitz, Michael; Fetsch, Thomas; Gerth, Andrea; Gillis, Anne; Gulizia, Michele; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Häusler, Karl Georg; Heidbüchel, Hein; Hernandez-Brichis, Jessica; Jais, Pierre; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Joseph; Kim, Steven; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lane, Deirdre; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Moses, Gregory; Mueller, Markus; Münzel, Felix; Näbauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Oeff, Michael; Oto, Ali; Pieske, Burkert; Pisters, Ron; Potpara, Tatjana; Rasmussen, Lars; Ravens, Ursula; Reiffel, James; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle; Schäfer, Herbert; Schotten, Ulrich; Stegink, Wim; Stein, Kenneth; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Szumowski, Lukasz; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Thomitzek, Karen; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; von Stritzky, Berndt; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Lip, Gregory Y H; Camm, A John

    2013-11-01

    The management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has seen marked changes in past years, with the introduction of new oral anticoagulants, new antiarrhythmic drugs, and the emergence of catheter ablation as a common intervention for rhythm control. Furthermore, new technologies enhance our ability to detect AF. Most clinical management decisions in AF patients can be based on validated parameters that encompass type of presentation, clinical factors, electrocardiogram analysis, and cardiac imaging. Despite these advances, patients with AF are still at increased risk for death, stroke, heart failure, and hospitalizations. During the fourth Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association (AFNET/EHRA) consensus conference, we identified the following opportunities to personalize management of AF in a better manner with a view to improve outcomes by integrating atrial morphology and damage, brain imaging, information on genetic predisposition, systemic or local inflammation, and markers for cardiac strain. Each of these promising avenues requires validation in the context of existing risk factors in patients. More importantly, a new taxonomy of AF may be needed based on the pathophysiological type of AF to allow personalized management of AF to come to full fruition. Continued translational research efforts are needed to personalize management of this prevalent disease in a better manner. All the efforts are expected to improve the management of patients with AF based on personalized therapy.

  18. Personalized management of atrial fibrillation: Proceedings from the fourth Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Aliot, Etienne; Al Khatib, Sana; Apostolakis, Stavros; Auricchio, Angelo; Bailleul, Christophe; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boersma, Lucas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Casadei, Barbara; Clemens, Andreas; Crijns, Harry; Derwand, Roland; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ezekowitz, Michael; Fetsch, Thomas; Gerth, Andrea; Gillis, Anne; Gulizia, Michele; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Häusler, Karl Georg; Heidbüchel, Hein; Hernandez-Brichis, Jessica; Jais, Pierre; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Joseph; Kim, Steven; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lane, Deirdre; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Moses, Gregory; Mueller, Markus; Münzel, Felix; Näbauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Oeff, Michael; Oto, Ali; Pieske, Burkert; Pisters, Ron; Potpara, Tatjana; Rasmussen, Lars; Ravens, Ursula; Reiffel, James; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle; Schäfer, Herbert; Schotten, Ulrich; Stegink, Wim; Stein, Kenneth; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Szumowski, Lukasz; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Thomitzek, Karen; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; von Stritzky, Berndt; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Lip, Gregory Y H; Camm, A John

    2013-11-01

    The management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has seen marked changes in past years, with the introduction of new oral anticoagulants, new antiarrhythmic drugs, and the emergence of catheter ablation as a common intervention for rhythm control. Furthermore, new technologies enhance our ability to detect AF. Most clinical management decisions in AF patients can be based on validated parameters that encompass type of presentation, clinical factors, electrocardiogram analysis, and cardiac imaging. Despite these advances, patients with AF are still at increased risk for death, stroke, heart failure, and hospitalizations. During the fourth Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association (AFNET/EHRA) consensus conference, we identified the following opportunities to personalize management of AF in a better manner with a view to improve outcomes by integrating atrial morphology and damage, brain imaging, information on genetic predisposition, systemic or local inflammation, and markers for cardiac strain. Each of these promising avenues requires validation in the context of existing risk factors in patients. More importantly, a new taxonomy of AF may be needed based on the pathophysiological type of AF to allow personalized management of AF to come to full fruition. Continued translational research efforts are needed to personalize management of this prevalent disease in a better manner. All the efforts are expected to improve the management of patients with AF based on personalized therapy. PMID:23981824

  19. Identification of heart rate–associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    PubMed Central

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; Van Der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heijer, Martin Den; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O’Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Åsa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate–increasing and heart rate–decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:23583979

  20. Irregular Heart Rhythm Patients May Not Always Need Blood Thinners: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... of heart failure services at Northwell Health Long Island Jewish Valley Stream Hospital in Valley Stream, N. ... D., chief, heart failure services, Northwell Health Long Island Jewish Valley Stream Hospital, Valley Stream, N.Y.; ...

  1. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion in fetuses with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Wang, Shuyu

    2014-11-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion are implicated in congenital heart defects (CHDs). This study was designed to detect these abnormalities in fetuses and determine the effect of genetic factors on CHD etiology. Between January 2010 and December 2011, 113 fetuses with CHD treated at the Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital were investigated, using chromosome karyotyping of either amniotic fluid cell or umbilical cord blood cell samples. Fetuses with a normal result were then investigated for the 22q11 microdeletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of the 113 patients, 12 (10.6%) exhibited chromosomal abnormalities, while 6 (5.3%) of the remaining 101 cases presented with a 22q11 microdeletion. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly higher in the group of fetuses presenting with extracardiac malformations in addition to CHD (P<0.001), although the detection of the 22q11 microdeletion was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.583). In addition, all fetuses with the 22q11 microdeletion occurred de novo. In conclusion, genetic factors are important in the etiology of CHD. Where fetuses present with cardiac defects, additional chromosomal analysis is required to detect extracardiac abnormalities. Fetuses with heart defects should also be considered for 22q11 microdeletion detection to evaluate fetal prognosis, particularly prior to surgery.

  2. Biological rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberg, F.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of basic features of biological rhythms. The classification of periodic behavior of physical and psychological characteristics as circadian, circannual, diurnal, and ultradian is discussed, and the notion of relativistic time as it applies in biology is examined. Special attention is given to circadian rhythms which are dependent on the adrenocortical cycle. The need for adequate understanding of circadian variations in the basic physiological indicators of an individual (heart rate, body temperature, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, etc.) to ensure the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic measures is stressed.

  3. An ECG electrode-mounted heart rate, respiratory rhythm, posture and behavior recording system.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takahiro; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Ninomiya, Ishio; Morton Caldwell, W

    2004-01-01

    R-R interval, respiration rhythm, posture and behavior recording system has been developed for monitoring a patient's cardiovascular regulatory system in daily life. The recording system consists of three ECG chest electrodes, a variable gain instrumentation amplifier, a dual axis accelerometer, a low power 8-bit single-chip microcomputer and a 1024 KB EEPROM. The complete system is mounted on the chest electrodes. R-R interval and respiration rhythm are calculated by the R waves detected from the ECG. Posture and behavior such as walking and running are detected from the body movements recorded by the accelerometer. The detected data are stored by the EEPROM and, after recording, are downloaded to a desktop computer for analysis.

  4. Non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart: CT angiography findings.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ersin; Kafadar, Cahit; Tutar, Süleyman; Bozlar, Uğur; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) is most commonly performed for the evaluation of the coronary arteries; however, non-coronary cardiac pathologies are frequently detected on these scans. In cases where magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used, cardiac CT can serve as the first-line imaging modality to evaluate many non-coronary cardiac pathologies. In this article, we discuss congenital non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart and their cardiac CT imaging features. PMID:27609435

  5. Ecstasy (MDMA) Alters Cardiac Gene Expression and DNA Methylation: Implications for Circadian Rhythm Dysfunction in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Koczor, Christopher A; Ludlow, Ivan; Hight, Robert S; Jiao, Zhe; Fields, Earl; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Torres, Rebecca A; Lewis, William

    2015-11-01

    MDMA (ecstasy) is an illicit drug that stimulates monoamine neurotransmitter release and inhibits reuptake. MDMA's acute cardiotoxicity includes tachycardia and arrhythmia which are associated with cardiomyopathy. MDMA acute cardiotoxicity has been explored, but neither long-term MDMA cardiac pathological changes nor epigenetic changes have been evaluated. Microarray analyses were employed to identify cardiac gene expression changes and epigenetic DNA methylation changes. To identify permanent MDMA-induced pathogenetic changes, mice received daily 10- or 35-day MDMA, or daily 10-day MDMA followed by 25-day saline washout (10 + 25 days). MDMA treatment caused differential gene expression (p < .05, fold change >1.5) in 752 genes following 10 days, 558 genes following 35 days, and 113 genes following 10-day MDMA + 25-day saline washout. Changes in MAPK and circadian rhythm gene expression were identified as early as 10 days. After 35 days, circadian rhythm genes (Per3, CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2) persisted to be differentially expressed. MDMA caused DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation that was independent of gene expression; hypermethylation of genes was found to be 71% at 10 days, 68% at 35 days, and 91% at 10 + 25 days washout. Differential gene expression paralleled DNA methylation in 22% of genes at 10-day treatment, 17% at 35 days, and 48% at 10 + 25 days washout. We show here that MDMA induced cardiac epigenetic changes in DNA methylation where hypermethylation predominated. Moreover, MDMA induced gene expression of key elements of circadian rhythm regulatory genes. This suggests a fundamental organism-level event to explain some of the etiologies of MDMA dysfunction in the heart.

  6. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-06-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease.

  7. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  8. Advances in heart rate variability signal analysis: joint position statement by the e-Cardiology ESC Working Group and the European Heart Rhythm Association co-endorsed by the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Roberto; Cerutti, Sergio; Lombardi, Federico; Malik, Marek; Huikuri, Heikki V; Peng, Chung-Kang; Schmidt, Georg; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-09-01

    Following the publication of the Task Force document on heart rate variability (HRV) in 1996, a number of articles have been published to describe new HRV methodologies and their application in different physiological and clinical studies. This document presents a critical review of the new methods. A particular attention has been paid to methodologies that have not been reported in the 1996 standardization document but have been more recently tested in sufficiently sized populations. The following methods were considered: Long-range correlation and fractal analysis; Short-term complexity; Entropy and regularity; and Nonlinear dynamical systems and chaotic behaviour. For each of these methods, technical aspects, clinical achievements, and suggestions for clinical application were reviewed. While the novel approaches have contributed in the technical understanding of the signal character of HRV, their success in developing new clinical tools, such as those for the identification of high-risk patients, has been rather limited. Available results obtained in selected populations of patients by specialized laboratories are nevertheless of interest but new prospective studies are needed. The investigation of new parameters, descriptive of the complex regulation mechanisms of heart rate, has to be encouraged because not all information in the HRV signal is captured by traditional methods. The new technologies thus could provide after proper validation, additional physiological, and clinical meaning. Multidisciplinary dialogue and specialized courses in the combination of clinical cardiology and complex signal processing methods seem warranted for further advances in studies of cardiac oscillations and in the understanding normal and abnormal cardiac control processes. PMID:26177817

  9. Current implantable cardioverter-defibrillator programming in Europe: the results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Grazia Bongiorni, Maria; Etsner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to examine the current practice on the choice of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) type, use of defibrillation testing, and ICD programming for detection and therapy of ventricular arrhythmias. In accordance with recent guidelines and the results of observational studies, the majority of EHRA research network centres reported a high utilization rate of dual-chamber ICDs in the presence of symptomatic and asymptomatic sinus node dysfunction, biventricular ICD in high-degree atrioventricular block and QRS duration <120 ms, and a limited use of defibrillation testing either in primary and secondary prevention settings. Activation of the long ventricular tachycardia (VT) detection window, slow VT zone, antitachycardia pacing before shock for slow and fast VT, and atrial tachyarrhythmia discrimination were considered useful in ICD programming for the majority of patients.

  10. Chronic agomelatine treatment corrects the abnormalities in the circadian rhythm of motor activity and sleep/wake cycle induced by prenatal restraint stress in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Mairesse, Jerome; Silletti, Viviana; Laloux, Charlotte; Zuena, Anna Rita; Giovine, Angela; Consolazione, Michol; van Camp, Gilles; Malagodi, Marithe; Gaetani, Silvana; Cianci, Silvia; Catalani, Assia; Mennuni, Gioacchino; Mazzetta, Alessandro; van Reeth, Olivier; Gabriel, Cecilia; Mocaër, Elisabeth; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Maccari, Stefania

    2013-03-01

    Agomelatine is a novel antidepressant acting as an MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor agonist/5-HT2C serotonin receptor antagonist. Because of its peculiar pharmacological profile, this drug caters the potential to correct the abnormalities of circadian rhythms associated with mood disorders, including abnormalities of the sleep/wake cycle. Here, we examined the effect of chronic agomelatine treatment on sleep architecture and circadian rhythms of motor activity using the rat model of prenatal restraint stress (PRS) as a putative 'aetiological' model of depression. PRS was delivered to the mothers during the last 10 d of pregnancy. The adult progeny ('PRS rats') showed a reduced duration of slow wave sleep, an increased duration of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, an increased number of REM sleep events and an increase in motor activity before the beginning of the dark phase of the light/dark cycle. In addition, adult PRS rats showed an increased expression of the transcript of the primary response gene, c-Fos, in the hippocampus just prior to the beginning of the dark phase. All these changes were reversed by a chronic oral treatment with agomelatine (2000 ppm in the diet). The effect of agomelatine on sleep was largely attenuated by treatment with the MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor antagonist, S22153, which caused PRS-like sleep disturbances on its own. These data provide the first evidence that agomelatine corrects sleep architecture and restores circadian homeostasis in a preclinical model of depression and supports the value of agomelatine as a novel antidepressant that resynchronizes circadian rhythms under pathological conditions.

  11. Effects of long-term microgravity exposure in space on circadian rhythms of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naomune; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Kubo, Yutaka; Hayashi, Mitsutoshi; Mizuno, Koh; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Mukai, Chiaki

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated their circadian rhythms using data from electrocardiographic records and examined the change in circadian period related to normal RR intervals for astronauts who completed a long-term (≥6-month) mission in space. The examinees were seven astronauts, five men and two women, from 2009 to 2010. Their mean ± SD age was 52.0 ± 4.2 years (47-59 yr). Each stayed in space for more than 160 days; their average length of stay was 172.6 ± 14.6 days (163-199 days). We conducted a 24-h Holter electrocardiography before launch (Pre), at one month after launch (DF1), at two months after launch (DF2), at two weeks before return (DF3), and at three months after landing (Post), comparing each index of frequency-domain analysis and 24-h biological rhythms of the NN intervals (normal RR intervals). Results show that the mean period of Normal Sinus (NN) intervals was within 24 ± 4 h at each examination. Inter-individual variability differed among the stages, being significantly smaller at DF3 (Pre versus DF1 versus DF3 versus Post = 22.36 ± 2.50 versus 25.46 ± 4.37 versus 22.46 ± 1.75 versus 26.16 ± 7.18 h, p < 0.0001). The HF component increased in 2 of 7 astronauts, whereas it decreased in 3 of 7 astronauts and 1 was remained almost unchanged at DF1. During DF3, about 6 months after their stay in space, the HF component of 5 of 7 astronauts recovered from the decrease after launch, with prominent improvement to over 20% in 3 astronauts. Although autonomic nervous functions and circadian rhythms were disturbed until one month had passed in space, well-scheduled sleep and wake rhythms and meal times served as synchronizers.

  12. Fetal and neonatal mortality in patients with isolated congenital heart diseases and heart conditions associated with extracardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Marantz, Pablo; Sáenz Tejeira, M Mercedes; Peña, Gabriela; Segovia, Alejandra; Fustiñana, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    Congenital malformations are a known cause of intrauterine death; of them, congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are accountable for the highest fetal and neonatal mortality rates. They are strongly associated with other extracardiac malformations and an early fetal mortality. Two hundred and twenty fves cases of CHDs are presented. Of them, 155 were isolated CHDs (group A) and 70 were associated with extracardiac malformations, chromosomal disorders, or genetic syndromes (group B). The overall mortality in group B was higher than that observed in group A (p <0.01). Prenatal mortality was similar in both groups: A: 8.4% (13 out of 155); B: 15.7% (11 out of 70). Postnatal mortality was A: 16.8% (26 out of 155) (p <0.01), OR: 0.52 (95% CI: 0.16-1.7); B: 32.9% (23 out of 70) (p <0.01), OR: 0.41 (95% CI: 0.20-0.83). Heart diseases associated with extracardiac abnormalities had a higher mortality rate than isolated congenital heart diseases in the period up to 60 weeks of postmenstrual age (140 days post-term). No differences were observed between both groups of patients in terms of prenatal mortality.

  13. To beat or not to beat: degradation of Cx43 imposes the heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Martins-Marques, Tânia; Catarino, Steve; Marques, Carla; Pereira, Paulo; Girão, Henrique

    2015-06-01

    The main function of the heart is to pump blood to the different parts of the organism, a task that is efficiently accomplished through proper electric and metabolic coupling between cardiac cells, ensured by gap junctions (GJ). Cardiomyocytes are the major cell population in the heart, and as cells with low mitotic activity, are highly dependent upon mechanisms of protein degradation. In the heart, both the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy participate in the fine-tune regulation of cardiac remodelling and function, either in physiological or pathological conditions. Indeed, besides controlling cardiac signalling pathways, UPS and autophagy have been implicated in the turnover of several myocardial proteins. Degradation of Cx43, the major ventricular GJ protein, has been associated to up-regulation of autophagy at the onset of heart ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), which can have profound implications upon cardiac function. In this review, we present recent studies devoted to the involvement of autophagy and UPS in heart homoeostasis, with a particular focus on GJ.

  14. Detection of heart rate and rhythm with a smartphone-based electrocardiograph versus a reference standard electrocardiograph in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marc S; Gelzer, Anna R; Rishniw, Mark

    2016-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the diagnostic utility of ECGs acquired with a smartphone-based device, compared with reference 6-lead ECGs, for identification of heart rate and rhythm in dogs and cats. DESIGN Prospective study. ANIMALS 51 client-owned dogs and 27 client-owned cats. PROCEDURES Patients examined by a small animal referral cardiology service between April 2012 and January 2013 were enrolled consecutively. In each patient, a 30-second ECG was simultaneously acquired with a smartphone-based device (a bipolar, single-lead recorder coupled to a smartphone with an ECG application) and a standard 6-lead ECG machine. Recordings were evaluated by 3 board-certified cardiologists, and intra- and interobserver agreement were evaluated for both rhythm diagnosis and QRS polarity identification. RESULTS Values for instantaneous and mean heart rates for the smartphone-acquired and reference ECGs were within 1 beat of each other when mean heart rates were calculated. Intraobserver agreement for rhythm assessment was very high, with maximum disagreement for any observer for only 2 of 51 dogs and only 4 of 27 cats. There was minimal disagreement in the polarity of depolarization between the smartphone-acquired and reference ECGs in dogs but frequent disagreement in cats. Interobserver agreement for smartphone-acquired ECGs was similar to that for reference ECGs. with all 3 observers agreeing on the rhythm analysis and minimal disagreement on polarity. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that ECGs acquired with the smartphone-based device accurately identified heart rate and rhythm in dogs and cats. Thus, the device may allow veterinarians to evaluate and manage cardiac arrhythmias relatively inexpensively at the cage side and could also allow clinicians to rapidly share information via email for further consultation, potentially enhancing patient care. PMID:27379594

  15. Detection of heart rate and rhythm with a smartphone-based electrocardiograph versus a reference standard electrocardiograph in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marc S; Gelzer, Anna R; Rishniw, Mark

    2016-07-15

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the diagnostic utility of ECGs acquired with a smartphone-based device, compared with reference 6-lead ECGs, for identification of heart rate and rhythm in dogs and cats. DESIGN Prospective study. ANIMALS 51 client-owned dogs and 27 client-owned cats. PROCEDURES Patients examined by a small animal referral cardiology service between April 2012 and January 2013 were enrolled consecutively. In each patient, a 30-second ECG was simultaneously acquired with a smartphone-based device (a bipolar, single-lead recorder coupled to a smartphone with an ECG application) and a standard 6-lead ECG machine. Recordings were evaluated by 3 board-certified cardiologists, and intra- and interobserver agreement were evaluated for both rhythm diagnosis and QRS polarity identification. RESULTS Values for instantaneous and mean heart rates for the smartphone-acquired and reference ECGs were within 1 beat of each other when mean heart rates were calculated. Intraobserver agreement for rhythm assessment was very high, with maximum disagreement for any observer for only 2 of 51 dogs and only 4 of 27 cats. There was minimal disagreement in the polarity of depolarization between the smartphone-acquired and reference ECGs in dogs but frequent disagreement in cats. Interobserver agreement for smartphone-acquired ECGs was similar to that for reference ECGs. with all 3 observers agreeing on the rhythm analysis and minimal disagreement on polarity. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that ECGs acquired with the smartphone-based device accurately identified heart rate and rhythm in dogs and cats. Thus, the device may allow veterinarians to evaluate and manage cardiac arrhythmias relatively inexpensively at the cage side and could also allow clinicians to rapidly share information via email for further consultation, potentially enhancing patient care.

  16. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Prevalence of the Metabolically Abnormal Phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Angela K.; Jacques, Paul F.; Rogers, Gail; Fox, Caroline S.; Meigs, James B.; McKeown, Nicola M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. Design and Methods The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring (1998–2001) and Third Generation (2002–2005) cohorts. Adults were classified as normal weight, overweight or obese and, within these categories, metabolic health was defined based on five criteria – hypertension, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and insulin resistance. Individuals without metabolic abnormalities were considered metabolically healthy. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between categories of SSB consumption and risk of metabolic health after stratification by BMI. Results Comparing the highest category of SSB consumers (median of 7 SSB per week) to the lowest category (non-consumers), odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for metabolically abnormal phenotypes, compared to the metabolically normal, were 1.9 (1.1–3.4) among the obese, 2.0 (1.4–2.9) among the overweight, and 1.9 (1.4–2.6) among the normal weight individuals. Conclusions In this cross-sectional analysis, it is observed that, irrespective of weight status, consumers of SSB were more likely to display metabolic abnormalities compared to non-consumers in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24550031

  17. An exploration of heart rate response to differing music rhythm and tempos.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ariany G; Guida, Heraldo L; Antônio, Ana Márcia Dos S; Marcomini, Renata S; Fontes, Anne M G G; Carlos de Abreu, Luiz; Roque, Adriano L; Silva, Sidney B; Raimundo, Rodrigo D; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acute cardiac response and heart rate variability (HRV) when listening to differing forms of music. Eleven healthy men aged between 18 and 25 years old were included in the study. HRV was recorded at rest for ten minutes with no music, then were asked to listen to classical baroque or heavy metal music for a period of 20 min. It was noted that heart rate variability did not affect HRV indices for time and frequency. In conclusion, music with different tempos does not influence cardiac autonomic regulation in men. However more studies are suggested to explore this topic in greater detail. PMID:24767959

  18. An exploration of heart rate response to differing music rhythm and tempos.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ariany G; Guida, Heraldo L; Antônio, Ana Márcia Dos S; Marcomini, Renata S; Fontes, Anne M G G; Carlos de Abreu, Luiz; Roque, Adriano L; Silva, Sidney B; Raimundo, Rodrigo D; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acute cardiac response and heart rate variability (HRV) when listening to differing forms of music. Eleven healthy men aged between 18 and 25 years old were included in the study. HRV was recorded at rest for ten minutes with no music, then were asked to listen to classical baroque or heavy metal music for a period of 20 min. It was noted that heart rate variability did not affect HRV indices for time and frequency. In conclusion, music with different tempos does not influence cardiac autonomic regulation in men. However more studies are suggested to explore this topic in greater detail.

  19. Analysis of electrolyte abnormalities and the mechanisms leading to arrhythmias in heart failure. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Canino, B; Brucculeri, S; Firenze, A; Caimi, G

    2016-01-01

    About 50% of deaths from heart failure (HF) are sudden, presumably referable to arrhythmias. Electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities are a frequent and potentially dangerous complication in HF patients. Their incidence is almost always correlated with the severity of cardiac dysfunction; furthermore leading to arrhythmias, these imbalances are associated with a poor prognosis. The frequency of ventricular ectopic beats and sudden cardiac death correlate with both plasma and whole body levels of potassium, especially in alkalemia. The early recognition of these alterations and the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms are useful for the management of these HF patients.

  20. Analysis of electrolyte abnormalities and the mechanisms leading to arrhythmias in heart failure. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Canino, B; Brucculeri, S; Firenze, A; Caimi, G

    2016-01-01

    About 50% of deaths from heart failure (HF) are sudden, presumably referable to arrhythmias. Electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities are a frequent and potentially dangerous complication in HF patients. Their incidence is almost always correlated with the severity of cardiac dysfunction; furthermore leading to arrhythmias, these imbalances are associated with a poor prognosis. The frequency of ventricular ectopic beats and sudden cardiac death correlate with both plasma and whole body levels of potassium, especially in alkalemia. The early recognition of these alterations and the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms are useful for the management of these HF patients. PMID:27598028

  1. Aging and CaMKII alter intracellular Ca2+ transients and heart rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility.

  2. Aging and CaMKII Alter Intracellular Ca2+ Transients and Heart Rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A.; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility. PMID:25003749

  3. Effects of electromagnetic radiation (bright light, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields, infrared radiation) on the circadian rhythm of melatonin synthesis, rectal temperature, and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Griefahn, Barbara; Künemund, Christa; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Lerchl, Alexander; Degen, Gisela H

    2002-10-01

    Electromagnetic spectra reduce melatonin production and delay the nadirs of rectal temperature and heart rate. Seven healthy men (16-22 yrs) completed 4 permuted sessions. The control session consisted of a 24-hours bedrest at < 30 lux, 18 degrees C, and < 50 dBA. In the experimental sessions, either light (1500 lux), magnetic field (16.7 Hz, 0.2 mT), or infrared radiation (65 degrees C) was applied from 5 pm to 1 am. Salivary melatonin level was determined hourly, rectal temperature and heart rate were continuously recorded. Melatonin synthesis was completely suppressed by light but resumed thereafter. The nadirs of rectal temperature and heart rate were delayed. The magnetic field had no effect. Infrared radiation elevated rectal temperature and heart rate. Only bright light affected the circadian rhythms of melatonin synthesis, rectal temperature, and heart rate, however, differently thus causing a dissociation, which might enhance the adverse effects of shiftwork in the long run.

  4. Health-related quality of life experienced by children with chromosomal abnormalities and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Joffe, Ari R; Robertson, Charlene M T; Atallah, Joseph; Alton, Gwen; Sauve, Reg S; Dinu, Irina A; Ross, David B; Rebeyka, Ivan M

    2014-03-01

    Long-term outcomes are fundamental in advising parents about the potential future of their children with congenital heart disease (CHD). No published reports have described the health-related quality of life (HRQL) experienced by children with chromosomal abnormalities who had surgery in early infancy for CHD. A study was undertaken to assess HRQL among children with chromosomal abnormalities and CHD. The authors hypothesized that these children have a worse HRQL than healthy children or a cohort of children matched for CHD diagnosis. Infants with chromosomal abnormalities undergoing cardiac surgery for CHD at 6 weeks of age or younger at the Stollery Children's Hospital between July 2000 and June 2005 were included in the study. The HRQL of these infants was assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales completed by their parents at a 4-year follow-up evaluation. The study compared the scores for 16 children with normative data. The children with chromosomal abnormalities and CHD had significantly lower mean total PedsQL (71.3 vs. 87.3; p < 0.0001), Psychosocial Summary (70.3 vs. 86.1; p < 0.0001), and Physical Summary (74.3 vs. 89.2; p = 0.0006) scores. Compared with the matched children, those with chromosomal abnormalities had a significantly lower median total PedsQL (75.0 vs. 84.6; p = 0.03), Physical Summary (79.5 vs. 96.9; p = 0.007), and School Functioning (68.5 vs. 83.0; p = 0.03) scores. A better understanding of the mechanisms and determinants of HRQL in these children has the potential to yield important implications for clinical practice including clarity for treatment decision making as well as determination of targeted supports and services to meet the needs of these children and their families differentially.

  5. Noninvasive recovery of epicardial potentials in a realistic heart-torso geometry. Normal sinus rhythm.

    PubMed

    Messinger-Rapport, B J; Rudy, Y

    1990-04-01

    The inverse problem in electrocardiography implies the reconstruction of electrical events within the heart from information measured noninvasively on the body surface. Deduction of these electrical events is possible from measured epicardial potentials, and, thus, a noninvasive method of recovering epicardial potentials from body surface data is useful in experimental and clinical studies. In the present study, an inverse method that uses Tikhonov regularization was shown to reconstruct, with good accuracy, important events in cardiac excitation. The inverse procedure was employed on data obtained from a human-torso tank in which a beating canine heart was placed in the correct anatomical position. Comparison with the actual, measured epicardial potentials indicates that positions and shapes of potential features (maxima, minima, zero potential line, saddles, etc.) are recovered with good accuracy throughout the QRS. An error in position of up to 1 cm is typical, while amplitudes are slightly diminished. In addition, application was extended from the above setting, in which the geometry was precisely known and potentials at a large number of leads were measured accurately, to a situation that is more representative of clinical and experimental settings. Effects of inaccuracy in location of the position of the heart were examined. A stylized torso that approximates the actual geometry was designed, and its performance in the inverse computations was evaluated. A systematic method of reduction of the number of leads on the body surface was proposed, and the resulting lead configurations were evaluated in terms of the accuracy of inverse solutions. The results indicate that the inverse problem can be stabilized with respect to different types of uncertainties in measured data and offer promise in the use of the inverse procedure in clinical and experimental situations.

  6. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  7. Cardiac Rhythm Monitoring After Acute Decompensation for Heart Failure: Results from the CARRYING ON for HF Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mortara, Andrea; Diotallevi, Paolo; Gallone, Giuseppe; Mariconti, Barbara; Gronda, Edoardo; Gentili, Alessandra; Bisetti, Silvia; Botto, Giovanni Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background There’s scarce evidence about cardiovascular events (CV) in patients with hospitalization for acute heart failure (HF) and no indication for immediate device implant. Objective The CARdiac RhYthm monitorING after acute decompensatiON for Heart Failure study was designed to assess the incidence of prespecified clinical and arrhythmic events in this patient population. Methods In this pilot study, 18 patients (12 (67%) male; age 72±10; 16 (89%) NYHA II-III), who were hospitalized for HF with low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (<40%) and no immediate indication for device implant received an implantable loop recorder (ILR) before hospital discharge. Follow-up visits were scheduled at 3 and 6 months, and at every 6 months until study closure; device data were remotely reviewed monthly. CV mortality, unplanned CV hospitalization, and major arrhythmic events during follow-up were analyzed. Results During a median follow-up of 593 days, major CV occurred in 13 patients (72%); of those, 7 patients had at least 1 cardiac arrhythmic event, 2 had at least a clinical event (CV hospitalization or CV death), and 4 had both an arrhythmic and a CV event. Six (33%) patients experienced 10 major clinical events, 5 of them (50%) were HF related. During follow-up, 2 (11%) patients died due to a CV cause and 3 (16%) patients received a permanent cardiac device. Conclusions After an acute HF hospitalization, patients with LVEF<40% and who are not readily eligible for permanent cardiac device implant have a known high incidence of major CV event. In these patients, ILR allows early detection of major cardiac arrhythmias and the ability to react appropriately in a timely manner. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01216670; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01216670 PMID:27118481

  8. How are arrhythmias managed in the paediatric population in Europe? Results of the European Heart Rhythm survey.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Madrid, Antonio; Hocini, Mélèze; Chen, Jian; Potpara, Tatjana; Pison, Laurent; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this survey was to provide insight into current practice regarding the management of paediatric arrhythmias in Europe. The survey was based on a questionnaire sent via the Internet to the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) electrophysiology research network centres. The following topics were explored: patient and treatment selection, techniques and equipment, treatment outcomes and complications. The vast majority of paediatric arrhythmias concerns children older than 1 year and patients with grown-up congenital heart disease. In 65% of the hospitals there is a specialized paediatric centre, and the most commonly observed arrhythmias include Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardias (90.24%). The medical staff performing paediatric catheter ablations in Europe are mainly adult electrophysiology teams (82.05% of the centres). Radiofrequency is the preferred energy source used for paediatric arrhythmia ablation. Catheter ablation is only chosen if two or more antiarrhythmic drugs have failed (94.59% of the centres). The majority of the centres use flecainide (37.8%) or atenolol (32.4%) as their first choice drug for prevention of recurrent supraventricular arrhythmias. While none of the centres performed catheter ablation in asymptomatic infants with pre-excitation, 29.7% recommend ablation in asymptomatic children and adolescents. The preferred choice for pacemaker leads in infants less than 1 year old is implantation of epicardial leads in 97.3% of the centres, which continues to be the routine even in patients between 1 and 5 years of age as reported by 75.68% of the hospitals. Almost all centres (94.59%) report equally small number of complications of catheter ablation in children (aged 1-14 years) as observed in adults.

  9. Preferred tools and techniques for implantation of cardiac electronic devices in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Marinskis, Germanas; Pison, Laurent; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to the tools and techniques used for cardiac implantable electronic devices procedures in the European countries. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 62 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume implanting centres, performing, respectively, more than 200, 100-199 and under 100 implants per year. The following topics were explored: the side approach for implantation, surgical techniques for pocket incision, first venous access for lead implantation, preference of lead fixation, preferred coil number for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads, right ventricular pacing site, generator placement site, subcutaneous ICD implantation, specific tools and techniques for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), lead implantation sequence in CRT, coronary sinus cannulation technique, target site for left ventricular lead placement, strategy in left ventricular lead implant failure, mean CRT implantation time, optimization of the atrioventricular (AV) and ventriculo-ventricular intervals, CRT implants in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, AV node ablation in patients with permanent AF. This panoramic view allows us to find out the operator preferences regarding the techniques and tools for device implantation in Europe. The results showed different practices in all the fields we investigated, nevertheless the survey also outlines a good adherence to the common standards and recommendations.

  10. Benefit of Warfarin Compared With Aspirin in Patients With Heart Failure in Sinus Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Shunichi; Thompson, John L.P.; Sanford, Alexandra R.; Mann, Douglas L.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Graham, Susan; Mohr, J.P.; Massie, Barry M.; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Gabriel, André P.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Estol, Conrado J.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) trial found no difference in the primary outcome between warfarin and aspirin in 2305 patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction in sinus rhythm. However, it is unknown whether any subgroups benefit from warfarin or aspirin. Methods and Results We used a Cox model stepwise selection procedure to identify subgroups that may benefit from warfarin or aspirin on the WARCEF primary outcome. A secondary analysis added major hemorrhage to the outcome. The primary efficacy outcome was time to the first to occur of ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, or death. Only age group was a significant treatment effect modifier (P for interaction, 0.003). Younger patients benefited from warfarin over aspirin on the primary outcome (4.81 versus 6.76 events per 100 patient-years: hazard ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.48–0.84; P=0.001). In older patients, therapies did not differ (9.91 versus 9.01 events per 100 patient-years: hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.88–1.35; P=0.44). With major hemorrhage added, in younger patients the event rate remained lower for warfarin than aspirin (5.41 versus 7.25 per 100 patient-years: hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.52–0.89; P=0.005), but in older patients it became significantly higher for warfarin (11.80 versus 9.35 per 100 patient-years: hazard ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.53; P=0.03). Conclusions In patients <60 years, warfarin improved outcomes over aspirin with or without inclusion of major hemorrhage. In patients ≥60 years, there was no treatment difference, but the aspirin group had significantly better outcomes when major hemorrhage was included. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00041938. PMID:23881846

  11. Abnormal time course of low beta modulation in non-fluent preschool children: A magnetoencephalographic study of rhythm tracking.

    PubMed

    Etchell, Andrew C; Ryan, Margaret; Martin, Erin; Johnson, Blake W; Sowman, Paul F

    2016-01-15

    Stuttering is a disorder of speech affecting millions of people around the world. Whilst the exact aetiology of stuttering remains unknown, it has been hypothesised that it is a disorder of the neural mechanisms that support speech timing. In this article, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine activity from auditory regions of the brain in stuttering and non-stuttering children aged 3-9years. For typically developing children, we found that MEG oscillations in the beta band responded to rhythmic sounds with a peak near the time of stimulus onset. In contrast, stuttering children showed an opposite phase of beta band envelope, with a trough of activity at stimulus onset. These results suggest that stuttering may result from abnormalities in predictive brain responses which are reflected in abnormal entrainment of the beta band envelope to rhythmic sounds. PMID:26545455

  12. Following one's heart: cardiac rhythms gate central initiation of sympathetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gray, Marcus A; Rylander, Karin; Harrison, Neil A; Wallin, B Gunnar; Critchley, Hugo D

    2009-02-11

    Central nervous processing of environmental stimuli requires integration of sensory information with ongoing autonomic control of cardiovascular function. Rhythmic feedback of cardiac and baroreceptor activity contributes dynamically to homeostatic autonomic control. We examined how the processing of brief somatosensory stimuli is altered across the cardiac cycle to evoke differential changes in bodily state. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging of brain and noninvasive beat-to-beat cardiovascular monitoring, we show that stimuli presented before and during early cardiac systole elicited differential changes in neural activity within amygdala, anterior insula and pons, and engendered different effects on blood pressure. Stimulation delivered during early systole inhibited blood pressure increases. Individual differences in heart rate variability predicted magnitude of differential cardiac timing responses within periaqueductal gray, amygdala and insula. Our findings highlight integration of somatosensory and phasic baroreceptor information at cortical, limbic and brainstem levels, with relevance to mechanisms underlying pain control, hypertension and anxiety. PMID:19211888

  13. [HEART RHYTHM VARIABILITY ANALYSIS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE SPINAL PAIN SYNDROME DURING DRY IMMERSION].

    PubMed

    Sun, I; Voronkov, Yu I; Ardashev, V N; Glukhova, S I

    2015-01-01

    The spinal pain syndrome appears in cosmonauts on both short and long-duration missions. This untoward factor may affect body systems functioning and complicate the successful accomplishment of space mission. Purpose of the investigation was to examine the lumbar spine and to elucidate whether its condition relates to the spinal pain development and changes in heart rate variability (HRV) in the microgravity environment. The experiment was conducted in dry immersion as a method of microgravity effects simulation. It was shown that in dry immersion locomotion reproduces the patterns peculiar for significant gravitational unloading. Spinal pain intensity, angles and heights of the lumbar intervertebral discs and HRV were measured in 19 selected volunteers. During the experiment, all the volunteers developed pains in the back that abated gradually. Pain dependence on the height of intervertebral discs and cardiac regulatory mechanisms were investigated. PMID:26292423

  14. Soft tissue impact characterisation kit (STICK) for ex situ investigation of heart rhythm responses to acute mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Patricia J; Epstein, Avi; Macleod, Iain A; Schaaf, Sarah T M; Sheldon, Judith; Boulin, Christian; Kohl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Both mechanical induction and mechanical termination of arrhythmias have been reported in man. Examples include pre-cordial impacts by sports implements (baseballs, pucks) that can trigger arrhythmias, including ventricular fibrillation, or via the so-called pre-cordial thump, used as an emergency resuscitation measure to convert arrhythmias to normal sinus node rhythm. These interventions have been partially reproduced in experimental studies on whole animals. Relating observations at the system's level to underlying mechanisms has been difficult, however, largely because of: (i) a deficit in efficient and affordable pharmacological agents to selectively target (sub-)cellular responses in whole animal studies, and (ii) the lack of suitable experimental models to study the above responses at intermediate levels of functional and structural integration, such as the isolated heart or cardiac tissue. This paper presents a soft tissue impact characterisation kit (STICK), suitable for quantitative investigations into the effects of acute mechanical stimulation on cardiac electro-mechanical function in rodent isolated heart or tissue preparations. The STICK offers independent control over a range of relevant biophysical parameters, such as impact location and energy, pre-impact projectile speed and contact area, as well as over the timing of a mechanical stimulus relative to the cardiac cycle (monitored via electrocardiogram, ECG, here recorded directly from the cardiac surface). Projectile deceleration upon interaction with the tissue is monitored, contact-free, with a resolution of 175 microm, providing information on tissue deformation dynamics, force, pressure and work of the mechanical intervention. In order to study functional effects of cardiac mechanical stimulation in the absence of tissue damage, impacts must be limited (for juvenile Guinea pig heart) to 2-2.5 mJ in the slack left ventricle (diastolic impact) and 5-10 mJ in contracture (systolic impact), as

  15. Attenuation effect of Abnormal Savda Munziq on liver and heart toxicity caused by chemotherapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    AIKEMU, AINIWAER; AMAT, NURMUHAMAT; YUSUP, ABDIRYIM; SHAN, LIANLIAN; QI, XINWEI; UPUR, HALMURAT

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq), an Uighur medicine formula commonly used in the treatment of cancer, has been speculated to possess antioxidative and antiproliferative effects, and to regulate immune activity. The present study was designed to systematically elucidate the toxicity-reducing activity of ASMq in mice undergoing combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The mice were divided into normal (saline, 10 ml/kg) and doxorubicin + 5-FU groups (doxorubicin, 2.5 mg/kg; 5-FU, 10 mg/kg on alternate days). In addition, three groups received different doses of ASMq (2, 4 and 8 g/kg), in addition to doxorubicin (2.5 mg/kg) and 5-FU (10 mg/kg) treatment on alternate days. The histology of the heart and liver, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in heart homogenate, and various biochemical parameters of the liver were evaluated. Compared with the normal control group, ASMq dose-dependently improved a number of variables, including body weight, liver index, transaminase and total protein, and partially normalized liver and cardiac pathology. ASMq restored activities of defense antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px towards normal levels, and decreased MDA concentration in dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrated that ASMq provides significant protection against doxorubicin + 5-FU combination induced hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity. Further studies are required to determine the effects of ASMq against doxorubicin + 5-FU-induced toxicity during chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:27347066

  16. The Effect of Noncardiac and Genetic Abnormalities on Outcomes Following Neonatal Congenital Heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Gillespie, Scott; Mahle, William T; Deshpande, Shriprasad; Kogon, Brian; Maher, Kevin; Kanter, Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Significant noncardiac and genetic abnormalities (NC and GA) are common in neonates with congenital heart defects. We sought to examine current-era effect of those abnormalities on early and late outcomes following cardiac surgery. The method from 2002-2012, 1538 neonates underwent repair (n = 860, 56%) or palliation (n = 678, 44%) of congenital heart defects. Regression models examined the effect of NC and GA on operative results, resource utilization, and late outcomes. Neonates with NC and GA (n = 312, 20%) had higher incidence of prematurity (21% vs 13%; P < 0.001) and weight ≤2.5kg (24% vs 12%; P < 0.001) than neonates without NC and GA (n = 1226, 80%). Although the incidence of single ventricle was comparable (34% vs 31%; P = 0.37), neonates with NC and GA underwent more palliation (52% vs 42%; P = 0.001) and subsequently had higher percentage of STAT mortality categories (Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery (EACTS) Congenital Heart Surgery Mortality Categories) 4 and 5 procedures (78% vs 66%; P < 0.001). Adjusted logistic regression models that included disparate patient and operative variables showed that the presence of NC and GA was associated with increased unplanned reoperation (odds ratio = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1-2.7; P = 0.03) and hospital mortality (odds ratio = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.6; P = 0.002). Adjusted linear regression models showed significant association between NC and GA and increased postoperative mechanical ventilation duration, intensive care unit, and hospital stays (P < 0.001 each). Adjusted hazard analysis showed that the presence of NC and GA was associated with diminished late survival (hazard ratio = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.9-3.1; P < 0.001) and that was evident in all subgroups of patients (P < 0.001 each). Conclusion is neonates with NC and GA commonly have associated risk factors for morbidity and mortality such as prematurity and low weight. After adjusting for those factors, the presence

  17. Replacement of implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Tilz, Roland; Boveda, Serge; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Dobreanu, Dan; Haugaa, Kristina H; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this EP Wire was to assess the management, indications, and techniques for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device replacement in Europe. A total of 24 centres in 14 European countries completed the questionnaire. All centres were members of the European Heart Rhythm Association Electrophysiology Research Network. Replacement procedures were performed by electrophysiologists in 52% of the centres, by cardiologists in 33%, and both in the remaining centres. In the majority of centres, the procedures were performed during a short hospitalization (<2 days; 61.2%), or on an outpatient basis (28%). The overwhelming majority of centres reported that they replaced ICDs at the end of battery life. Only in a small subset (<10%) of patients with ICD for primary prevention and without ventricular tachycardia (VT) since implantation, ICD was not replaced. In inherited primary arrhythmia syndromes, 80% of the centres always replaced the ICD at the end of battery life. After VT ablation, only few centres (9%) explanted or downgraded the device that was previously implanted for secondary prevention, but only in those patients without new VT episodes. Patient's life expectancy <1 year was the most commonly reported reason (61%) to downgrade from a CRT-D to a CRT-P device. While warfarin therapy was continued in 47% of the centres, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants were discontinued without bridging 24 h prior to replacement procedures in 60%. Finally, in 65% of the centres, VT induction and shock testing during ICD and CRT-D replacement were performed only in the case of leads with a warning or with borderline measurements. This survey provides a snapshot of the perioperative management, indications, and techniques of ICD and CRT device replacement in Europe. It demonstrates some variations between participating centres, probably related to local policies and to the heterogeneity of the ICD population. PMID

  18. The acute effects of experimental short-term evening and night shifts on human circadian rhythm: the oral temperature, heart rate, serum cortisol and urinary catecholamines levels.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, S; Shinkai, S; Kurokawa, Y; Watanabe, T

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the temporal changes in circadian rhythm of oral temperature, heart rate, serum cortisol and urinary catecholamines levels due to experimental short-term shifts. The six subjects were assigned to consecutive day (work 0800-1600 hours; sleep 0000-0800 hours), evening (1600-2400 hours; 0400-1200 hours), and night (0000-0800 hours; 1200-2000 hours) shifts of 2 days each scheduled as hospital shiftwork by nurses, in random order, during which data were collected every 4 h throughout the experimental periods. According to acrophases of a fitted cosine curve and visual inspection on chronograms, the phases of circadian rhythms were delayed to different degrees in the evening shifts with a minimum of about 1 h for oral temperature and a maximum of about 4 h for urinary free noradrenaline. The corresponding phase delays were larger in the night shift for oral temperature (about 3 h), resting heart rate (about 5 h) and urinary free noradrenaline (about 13 h); the diurnal variations of serum cortisol and urinary free adrenaline were greatly modified, and their circadian rhythmicities disappeared, indicating that the normal circadian phase relations of these variables were disrupted more by the night shift. The comparison of chronograms and correlation analyses revealed that the 4-h mean heart rate and urinary free noradrenaline were largely affected by rest-activity level in connection with shifts, while the resting heart rate and urinary free adrenaline were less affected. On the other hand, the sleep factor (time of onset and/or period) seemed to be more potent in modifying the circadian rhythm of serum cortisol, especially with the night shifts.

  19. Noise Effects on the Complex Patterns of Abnormal Heartbeats

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Glass, Leon; Goldberger, Ary L.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-08-06

    Patients at high risk for sudden death often exhibit complex heart rhythms in which abnormal heartbeats are interspersed with normal heartbeats. We analyze such a complex rhythm in a single patient over a 12-h period and show that the rhythm can be described by a theoretical model consisting of two interacting oscillators with stochastic elements. By varying the magnitude of the noise, we show that for an intermediate level of noise, the model gives best agreement with key statistical features of the dynamics.

  20. Noise effects on the complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, V.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Ivanov, P. C.; Glass, L.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    Patients at high risk for sudden death often exhibit complex heart rhythms in which abnormal heartbeats are interspersed with normal heartbeats. We analyze such a complex rhythm in a single patient over a 12-h period and show that the rhythm can be described by a theoretical model consisting of two interacting oscillators with stochastic elements. By varying the magnitude of the noise, we show that for an intermediate level of noise, the model gives best agreement with key statistical features of the dynamics.

  1. Circadian Rhythms

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological clocks? No, but they are related. Our biological clocks drive our circadian rhythms. What are biological clocks? The biological clocks that control circadian rhythms ...

  2. Bleeding Risk and Antithrombotic Strategy in Patients With Sinus Rhythm and Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction Treated With Warfarin or Aspirin.

    PubMed

    Ye, Siqin; Cheng, Bin; Lip, Gregory Y H; Buchsbaum, Richard; Sacco, Ralph L; Levin, Bruce; Di Tullio, Marco R; Qian, Min; Mann, Douglas L; Pullicino, Patrick M; Freudenberger, Ronald S; Teerlink, John R; Mohr, J P; Graham, Susan; Labovitz, Arthur J; Estol, Conrado J; Lok, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; Thompson, John L P; Homma, Shunichi

    2015-09-15

    We sought to assess the performance of existing bleeding risk scores, such as the Hypertension, Abnormal Renal/Liver Function, Stroke, Bleeding History or Predisposition, Labile INR, Elderly, Drugs/Alcohol Concomitantly (HAS-BLED) score or the Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (OBRI), in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin or aspirin. We calculated HAS-BLED and OBRI risk scores for 2,305 patients with HFrEF in SR enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction trial. Proportional hazards models were used to test whether each score predicted major bleeding, and comparison of different risk scores was performed using Harell C-statistic and net reclassification improvement index. For the warfarin arm, both scores predicted bleeding risk, with OBRI having significantly greater C-statistic (0.72 vs 0.61; p = 0.03) compared to HAS-BLED, although the net reclassification improvement for comparing OBRI to HAS-BLED was not significant (0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.18 to 0.37). Performance of the OBRI and HAS-BLED risk scores was similar for the aspirin arm. For participants with OBRI scores of 0 to 1, warfarin compared with aspirin reduced ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 0.51, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.98, p = 0.042) without significantly increasing major bleeding (HR 1.24, 95% CI 0.66 to 2.30, p = 0.51). For those with OBRI score of ≥2, there was a trend for reduced ischemic stroke with warfarin compared to aspirin (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.27 to 1.15, p = 0.12), but major bleeding was increased (HR 4.04, 95% CI 1.99 to 8.22, p <0.001). In conclusion, existing bleeding risk scores can identify bleeding risk in patients with HFrEF in SR and could be tested for potentially identifying patients with a favorable risk/benefit profile for antithrombotic therapy with warfarin. PMID:26189039

  3. Circadian rhythm of heart rate in the rabbit: prolongation of action potential duration by sustained beta adrenoceptor blockade is not due to associated bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Vaughan Williams, E M; Dennis, P D; Garnham, C

    1986-07-01

    Six litters of six young rabbits were injected intraperitoneally, two per litter, with saline, alinidine, or nadolol once or twice daily for two weeks. In four litters successful radiotransmissions of electrocardiograms were recorded once hourly for four days before and during treatment. Alinidine and nadolol produced an overall mean bradycardia in comparison with saline treated animals, the effect of alinidine exceeding that of nadolol. At 48-70 hours after the end of treatment the hearts were used for in vitro electrophysiological study. Nadolol, but not alinidine, induced a prolongation of action potential duration compared with that of saline treated littermates in both atrial and ventricular muscle. An incidental observation was that heart rate in the rabbit followed a circadian rhythm, heart rates being slower in the morning and faster in late afternoon and evening. The circadian rhythm was attenuated but not abolished by alinidine and nadolol. These results suggest that if prolongation of action potential duration by sustained beta blockade in patients after myocardial infarction contributes to protection against sudden death (by a class III antiarrhythmic action) then alinidine would not be expected to provide a comparable prophylaxis.

  4. THE INTRINSIC RHYTHM OF THE TURTLE'S HEART STUDIED WITH A NEW TYPE OF CHRONOGRAPH, TOGETHER WITH THE EFFECTS OF SOME DRUGS AND HORMONES.

    PubMed

    Loomis, A L; Harvey, E N; Macrae, C

    1930-09-20

    A chronograph is described for recording continuously the rates of many different kinds of rhythmic processes over long time periods. The rate is read directly from the length of a line of ink, drawn by a moving pen. Rates of beat of excised turtle's hearts in Ringer's solution have been recorded at 25 degrees C. under constant conditions of temperature, pH, and oxygen supply for periods of 36 hours. Regular periodic variations in the fundamental rhythm are figured, as well as rates of extraordinary constancy. The effects of adrenalin, ephedrin, thyroxin, alpha and beta pituitary hormone insulin, nicotin, and atropin are described in the text. PMID:19872568

  5. Heart Rhythm Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF AFib Patient Brochure Now in Spanish and English! This twenty page up-to-date brochure explains the disease state and possible treatment options, including the importance of stroke prevention, in easy-to-understand language. ...

  6. Ultrastructural and cellular basis for the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics during the transition from hypertension to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanjiv J; Aistrup, Gary L; Gupta, Deepak K; O'Toole, Matthew J; Nahhas, Amanda F; Schuster, Daniel; Chirayil, Nimi; Bassi, Nikhil; Ramakrishna, Satvik; Beussink, Lauren; Misener, Sol; Kane, Bonnie; Wang, David; Randolph, Blake; Ito, Aiko; Wu, Megan; Akintilo, Lisa; Mongkolrattanothai, Thitipong; Reddy, Mahendra; Kumar, Manvinder; Arora, Rishi; Ng, Jason; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Although the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics represents a key step during the transition from hypertension to overt heart failure (HF), the underlying ultrastructural and cellular basis of abnormal myocardial mechanics remains unclear. We therefore investigated how changes in transverse (T)-tubule organization and the resulting altered intracellular Ca(2+) cycling in large cell populations underlie the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics in a model of chronic hypertension. Hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs; n = 72) were studied at different ages and stages of hypertensive heart disease and early HF and were compared with age-matched control (Wistar-Kyoto) rats (n = 34). Echocardiography, including tissue Doppler and speckle-tracking analysis, was performed just before euthanization, after which T-tubule organization and Ca(2+) transients were studied using confocal microscopy. In SHRs, abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occurred early in response to hypertension, before the development of overt systolic dysfunction and HF. Reduced longitudinal, circumferential, and radial strain as well as reduced tissue Doppler early diastolic tissue velocities occurred in concert with T-tubule disorganization and impaired Ca(2+) cycling, all of which preceded the development of cardiac fibrosis. The time to peak of intracellular Ca(2+) transients was slowed due to T-tubule disruption, providing a link between declining cell ultrastructure and abnormal myocardial mechanics. In conclusion, subclinical abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occur early in response to hypertension and coincide with the development of T-tubule disorganization and impaired intracellular Ca(2+) cycling. These changes occur before the development of significant cardiac fibrosis and precede the development of overt cardiac dysfunction and HF.

  7. Diurnal 24-hour rhythm in ambulatory heart rate variability during the day shift in rotating shift workers.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Takahiro; Kawano, Yukari; Tada, Yuki; Hida, Azumi; Midorikawa, Toru; Hasegawa, Kohe; Mitani, Takeshi; Komatsu, Taiki; Togo, Fumiharu

    2013-06-01

    Circadian variation in cardiac autonomic nervous system activity and behavior during the day shifts of shift workers has not hitherto been clarified. This study examined diurnal 24-h variation in heart rate variability (HRV), sleep-wake cycle, physical activity, and food intake during the day shift in rotating shift workers. The subjects were female nurses and caregivers working at a health care facility (14 day workers and 13 rotating shift workers). Each subject was asked to undergo 24-h electrocardiograph and step count recordings. Coarse graining spectral analysis was used for approximately 10-min segments of HRV (600 beats) to derive the total power (TOT: >0.04 Hz), integrated power in the low-frequency (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF: >0.15 Hz) ranges, the ratio of HF power to TOT (HF nu), and the ratio of LF power to HF power (LF/HF). Double cosinor analysis was used to obtain 24-h and 12-h period variations in variables of HRV and physical activity. While no difference was found in the acrophases of either period for step counts or in the 12-h period of HRV variables between the groups, the acrophases of the 24-h period for HRV variables were delayed by 1.3 to 5.5 h in rotating shift workers, and their differences in HF power, HF nu, and LF/HF reached a significant level (p < 0.05). On the days of the experiment, retiring time, waking up time, total time in bed, sleep efficiency, and mealtimes and energy intake for each diet did not differ between the groups. These results suggest that there is a possibility of an abnormal phase angle between circadian variation in cardiac autonomic nervous system activity and the sleep-wake cycle during the day shift in shift workers.

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor Is a Therapeutic Target for Immunological Unbalance and Cardiac Abnormalities in Chronic Experimental Chagas' Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Isabela Resende; Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Silva, Andrea Alice; Moreira, Otacilio Cruz; Britto, Constança; Sarmento, Ellen Diana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chagas disease (CD) is characterized by parasite persistence and immunological unbalance favoring systemic inflammatory profile. Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, the main manifestation of CD, occurs in a TNF-enriched milieu and frequently progresses to heart failure. Aim of the Study. To challenge the hypothesis that TNF plays a key role in Trypanosoma cruzi-induced immune deregulation and cardiac abnormalities, we tested the effect of the anti-TNF antibody Infliximab in chronically T. cruzi-infected C57BL/6 mice, a model with immunological, electrical, and histopathological abnormalities resembling Chagas' heart disease. Results. Infliximab therapy did not reactivate parasite but reshaped the immune response as reduced TNF mRNA expression in the cardiac tissue and plasma TNF and IFNγ levels; diminished the frequency of IL-17A+ but increased IL-10+ CD4+ T-cells; reduced TNF+ but augmented IL-10+ Ly6C+ and F4/80+ cells. Further, anti-TNF therapy decreased cytotoxic activity but preserved IFNγ-producing VNHRFTLV-specific CD8+ T-cells in spleen and reduced the number of perforin+ cells infiltrating the myocardium. Importantly, Infliximab reduced the frequency of mice afflicted by arrhythmias and second degree atrioventricular blocks and decreased fibronectin deposition in the cardiac tissue. Conclusions. Our data support that TNF is a crucial player in the pathogenesis of Chagas' heart disease fueling immunological unbalance which contributes to cardiac abnormalities. PMID:25140115

  9. Mortality from congenital abnormality in Malaysia 1991-1997: the effect of economic development on death due to congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, J J

    2001-06-01

    An analysis was done of available data from the Department of Statistics Malaysia, on the type of congenital abnormality contributing to death, to determine whether progress in health care over recent years was associated with any decline in mortality from congenital abnormality. A significant decline in death due to congenital abnormality was observed between 1991 and 1996. This was attributable to a decline in deaths due to congenital heart disease occurring because of improvements in cardiac surgical services for infants. In 1997 death due to congenital heart disease increased significantly. This could be attributed to improvements in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in the neonate.

  10. Cellular mechanism of the conduction abnormalities induced by serum from anti-Ro/SSA-positive patients in rabbit hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, S; Nascimento, J H; Bonfa, E; Levy, R; Oliveira, S F; Tavares, A V; de Carvalho, A C

    1994-01-01

    In this study, IgG fractions from sera of SLE patients with anti-Ro/SSA or anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB activity were tested in Langendorff preparations of adult rabbit hearts, aiming to reproduce the cardiac manifestations observed in neonatal lupus in an experimental model. The hearts were perfused with normal Tyrode's solution for 30 min, followed by perfusion with Tyrode's containing 0.3 mg/ml of anti-Ro/SSA- (or anti-Ro/La-) positive IgG (nine sera), anti-ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-positive IgG (five sera), or IgG fractions from normal donors (five sera). In one third of the experiments done with anti-Ro/La-positive IgG, heart block was observed. With the remaining fractions, a decrease in heart rate of 17.1% was observed, but normal sinus rhythm was maintained. The IgG fractions with anti-RNP activity (five experiments) and from normal sera (six experiments) reduced heart rates by 12.9 and 3.3%, respectively, but heart block was not observed. To further characterize the cellular mechanisms involved in the conduction disturbances observed in the whole rabbit hearts, we conducted experiments with ventricular myocytes isolated from young rabbit hearts, studied by whole cell patch-clamp technique. In these experiments, the slow inward currents were analyzed during the superfusion of the cell with normal Tyrode's solution and 5 min after superfusion with Tyrode's solution containing 0.3 mg/ml of anti-Ro/SSA- (or anti-Ro/La-) positive IgG (five sera), anti-RNP-positive IgG (three sera), or IgG from normal donors (four sera). Resting and action potential amplitudes were not affected by any of the sera used. The anti-Ro/SSA IgG fraction induced a mean reduction in the peak slow inward current of 31.6%. IgG fractions with anti-RNP activity reduced slow inward current by 4.4%, whereas IgG fractions from normal donors increased this current by 3.3%. IgG-free fractions from sera of patients with anti-Ro/SSA activity did not alter the peak slow inward current. These results

  11. Cardiomyocyte-specific loss of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) reproduces the abnormalities in lipids found in severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Trent, Chad M; Fang, Xiang; Son, Ni-Huiping; Jiang, HongFeng; Blaner, William S; Hu, Yunying; Yin, Yu-Xin; Farese, Robert V; Homma, Shunichi; Turnbull, Andrew V; Eriksson, Jan W; Hu, Shi-Lian; Ginsberg, Henry N; Huang, Li-Shin; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-10-24

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) catalyzes the final step in triglyceride synthesis, the conversion of diacylglycerol (DAG) to triglyceride. Dgat1(-/-) mice exhibit a number of beneficial metabolic effects including reduced obesity and improved insulin sensitivity and no known cardiac dysfunction. In contrast, failing human hearts have severely reduced DGAT1 expression associated with accumulation of DAGs and ceramides. To test whether DGAT1 loss alone affects heart function, we created cardiomyocyte-specific DGAT1 knock-out (hDgat1(-/-)) mice. hDgat1(-/-) mouse hearts had 95% increased DAG and 85% increased ceramides compared with floxed controls. 50% of these mice died by 9 months of age. The heart failure marker brain natriuretic peptide increased 5-fold in hDgat1(-/-) hearts, and fractional shortening (FS) was reduced. This was associated with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and cluster of differentiation 36. We crossed hDgat1(-/-) mice with previously described enterocyte-specific Dgat1 knock-out mice (hiDgat1(-/-)). This corrected the early mortality, improved FS, and reduced cardiac ceramide and DAG content. Treatment of hDgat1(-/-) mice with the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exenatide also improved FS and reduced heart DAG and ceramide content. Increased fatty acid uptake into hDgat1(-/-) hearts was normalized by exenatide. Reduced activation of protein kinase Cα (PKCα), which is increased by DAG and ceramides, paralleled the reductions in these lipids. Our mouse studies show that loss of DGAT1 reproduces the lipid abnormalities seen in severe human heart failure.

  12. Continuous exposure to a novel stressor based on water aversion induces abnormal circadian locomotor rhythms and sleep-wake cycles in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Koyomi; Itoh, Nanako; Ohyama, Sumika; Kadota, Koji; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2013-01-01

    Psychological stressors prominently affect diurnal rhythms, including locomotor activity, sleep, blood pressure, and body temperature, in humans. Here, we found that a novel continuous stress imposed by the perpetual avoidance of water on a wheel (PAWW) affected several physiological diurnal rhythms in mice. One week of PAWW stress decayed robust circadian locomotor rhythmicity, while locomotor activity was evident even during the light period when the mice are normally asleep. Daytime activity was significantly upregulated, whereas nighttime activity was downregulated, resulting in a low amplitude of activity. Total daily activity gradually decreased with increasing exposure to PAWW stress. The mice could be exposed to PAWW stress for over 3 weeks without adaptation. Furthermore, continuous PAWW stress enhanced food intake, but decreased body weight and plasma leptin levels, indicating that sleep loss and PAWW stress altered the energy balance in these mice. The diurnal rhythm of corticosterone levels was not severely affected. The body temperature rhythm was diurnal in the stressed mice, but significantly dysregulated during the dark period. Plasma catecholamines were elevated in the stressed mice. Continuous PAWW stress reduced the duration of daytime sleep, especially during the first half of the light period, and increased nighttime sleepiness. Continuous PAWW stress also simultaneously obscured sleep/wake and locomotor activity rhythms compared with control mice. These sleep architecture phenotypes under stress are similar to those of patients with insomnia. The stressed mice could be entrained to the light/dark cycle, and when they were transferred to constant darkness, they exhibited a free-running circadian rhythm with a timing of activity onset predicted by the phase of their entrained rhythms. Circadian gene expression in the liver and muscle was unaltered, indicating that the peripheral clocks in these tissues remained intact. PMID:23383193

  13. Painted Rhythms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastian, Duane

    1985-01-01

    In this art activity gifted students, ages 10 to 13, learn about internal and external rhythms and make a painting of an internal rhythm. The lesson can be expanded with a discussion of Kandinsky, Pollock, and other painters who have painted sound or have demonstrated rhythms. (RM)

  14. Abnormal Development of Thalamic Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Votava-Smith, Jodie K.; Ceschin, Rafael; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Jackson, Hollie A.; Blüml, Stefan; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Preterm birth is associated with alteration in cortico-thalamic development, which underlies poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate abnormal thalamic microstructure when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between thalamic microstructural abnormalities and peri-operative clinical variables. Material and Methods We compared thalamic DTI measurements in 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Comparison was made with three other selected white matter regions using ROI manual based measurements. Correlation was made with post-conceptional age and peri-operative clinical variables. Results In preterm neonates with CHD, there were age-related differences in thalamic diffusivity (axial and radial) compared to the preterm and term non-CHD group, in contrast to no differences in anisotropy. Contrary to our hypothesis, abnormal thalamic and optic radiation microstructure was most strongly associated with an elevated first arterial blood gas pO2 and elevated pre-operative arterial blood gas pH (p<0.05). Conclusion Age-related thalamic microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD. Perinatal hyperoxemia and increased peri-operative serum pH was associated with abnormal thalamic microstructure in preterm neonates with CHD. This study emphasizes the vulnerability of thalamo-cortical development in the preterm neonate with CHD. PMID:25608695

  15. Calcium handling in human heart failure--abnormalities and target for therapy.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Hannes; Schwinger, Robert H G

    2012-07-01

    The fast cycling of calcium between internal stores and the myofilaments with rapid diffusion down steep concentration gradients provides the cellular basis for cardiac contraction and relaxation. In heart failure, the intracellular Ca(2) (+) dynamics are impaired showing reduced systolic peak Ca(2) (+), elevated diastolic Ca(2) (+) levels, and prolonged diastolic Ca(2) (+) decay. The recognition that defects in the function of Ca(2) (+) handling proteins are central to the pathogenesis of heart failure has attracted attention to these proteins as potential targets for therapy. Besides pharmacologic interventions including digitalis, ranolazine, levosimendan and others, cardiac gene therapy holds great promise and the recent clinical studies have proven the feasibility of this therapeutic approach. In this review, the rationale underlying modern therapies that modulate intracellular Ca(2) (+) handling for the treatment of human heart failure are presented and discussed.

  16. A roadmap to improve the quality of atrial fibrillation management: proceedings from the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Calvert, Melanie; Christoffels, Vincent; Crijns, Harry; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ellinor, Patrick; Fabritz, Larissa; Fetsch, Thomas; Freedman, S Ben; Gerth, Andrea; Goette, Andreas; Guasch, Eduard; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Heidbüchel, Hein; Heinrich-Nols, Jutta; Hidden-Lucet, Francoise; Hindricks, Gerd; Juul-Möller, Steen; Kääb, Stefan; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kespohl, Stefanie; Kotecha, Dipak; Lane, Deirdre A; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Münzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens C; Oeff, Michael; Oldgren, Jonas; Oto, Ali; Piccini, Jonathan P; Pilmeyer, Art; Potpara, Tatjana; Ravens, Ursula; Reinecke, Holger; Rostock, Thomas; Rustige, Joerg; Savelieva, Irene; Schnabel, Renate; Schotten, Ulrich; Schwichtenberg, Lars; Sinner, Moritz F; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Stoll, Monika; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tse, Hung Fat; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Vardas, Panagiotis E; Varpula, Timo; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Ziegler, André; Lip, Gregory Y H; Camm, A John

    2016-01-01

    At least 30 million people worldwide carry a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF), and many more suffer from undiagnosed, subclinical, or 'silent' AF. Atrial fibrillation-related cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, including cardiovascular deaths, heart failure, stroke, and hospitalizations, remain unacceptably high, even when evidence-based therapies such as anticoagulation and rate control are used. Furthermore, it is still necessary to define how best to prevent AF, largely due to a lack of clinical measures that would allow identification of treatable causes of AF in any given patient. Hence, there are important unmet clinical and research needs in the evaluation and management of AF patients. The ensuing needs and opportunities for improving the quality of AF care were discussed during the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference in Nice, France, on 22 and 23 January 2015. Here, we report the outcome of this conference, with a focus on (i) learning from our 'neighbours' to improve AF care, (ii) patient-centred approaches to AF management, (iii) structured care of AF patients, (iv) improving the quality of AF treatment, and (v) personalization of AF management. This report ends with a list of priorities for research in AF patients.

  17. The role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to treatment of patients with cardiac arrhythmias: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Chen, Jian; Dobreanu, Dan; Madrid, Antonio Hernandez; Tilz, Roland; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias is increasingly complex because of continuous technological advance and multifaceted clinical conditions associated with ageing of the population, the presence of co-morbidities and the need for polypharmacy. The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association Scientific Initiatives Committee survey was to provide an insight into the role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias. Forty-eight centres from 18 European countries replied to the Web-based questionnaire. The presence of an Arrhythmia Team was reported by 44% of the respondents, whereas 17% were not familiar with this term. Apart from the electrophysiologist, health professionals who should belong to such teams, according to the majority of the respondents, include a clinical cardiologist, a nurse, a cardiac surgeon, a heart failure specialist, a geneticist, and a geriatrician. Its main activity should be dedicated to the management of patients with complex clinical conditions or refractory or inherited forms of arrhythmias. When present, the Arrhythmia Team was considered helpful by 95% of respondents; the majority of centres (79%) agreed that it should be implemented. The Arrhythmia Team seems to be connected to important expectations in the management of cardiac arrhythmias. The efficacy of such an integrated and multidisciplinary approach should be encouraged and tested in clinical practice.

  18. A roadmap to improve the quality of atrial fibrillation management: proceedings from the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Calvert, Melanie; Christoffels, Vincent; Crijns, Harry; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ellinor, Patrick; Fabritz, Larissa; Fetsch, Thomas; Freedman, S Ben; Gerth, Andrea; Goette, Andreas; Guasch, Eduard; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Heidbüchel, Hein; Heinrich-Nols, Jutta; Hidden-Lucet, Francoise; Hindricks, Gerd; Juul-Möller, Steen; Kääb, Stefan; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kespohl, Stefanie; Kotecha, Dipak; Lane, Deirdre A; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Münzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens C; Oeff, Michael; Oldgren, Jonas; Oto, Ali; Piccini, Jonathan P; Pilmeyer, Art; Potpara, Tatjana; Ravens, Ursula; Reinecke, Holger; Rostock, Thomas; Rustige, Joerg; Savelieva, Irene; Schnabel, Renate; Schotten, Ulrich; Schwichtenberg, Lars; Sinner, Moritz F; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Stoll, Monika; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tse, Hung Fat; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Vardas, Panagiotis E; Varpula, Timo; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Ziegler, André; Lip, Gregory Y H; Camm, A John

    2016-01-01

    At least 30 million people worldwide carry a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF), and many more suffer from undiagnosed, subclinical, or 'silent' AF. Atrial fibrillation-related cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, including cardiovascular deaths, heart failure, stroke, and hospitalizations, remain unacceptably high, even when evidence-based therapies such as anticoagulation and rate control are used. Furthermore, it is still necessary to define how best to prevent AF, largely due to a lack of clinical measures that would allow identification of treatable causes of AF in any given patient. Hence, there are important unmet clinical and research needs in the evaluation and management of AF patients. The ensuing needs and opportunities for improving the quality of AF care were discussed during the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference in Nice, France, on 22 and 23 January 2015. Here, we report the outcome of this conference, with a focus on (i) learning from our 'neighbours' to improve AF care, (ii) patient-centred approaches to AF management, (iii) structured care of AF patients, (iv) improving the quality of AF treatment, and (v) personalization of AF management. This report ends with a list of priorities for research in AF patients. PMID:26481149

  19. Sugar-sweetened beverages and prevalence of the metabolically abnormal phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the...

  20. Complete reversibility of physiological coronary vascular abnormalities in hypertrophied hearts produced by pressure overload in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Isoyama, S; Ito, N; Kuroha, M; Takishima, T

    1989-01-01

    Using an experimental model of ascending aortic banding in the rat, we examined whether coronary circulation abnormalities in hypertrophied hearts are reversible after debanding. 4-wk banding produced significant increases in in vivo left ventricular (LV) pressure (194 +/- 13 vs. 114 +/- 9 mmHg in shamoperated controls) and LV dry wt/body wt (48 +/- 5% above controls). In isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer, coronary flow rate (CFR) was estimated under nonworking conditions. During maximal vasodilation after 1 min-ischemia, CFR at a coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) of 100 mmHg and CFR/myocardidial mass at CPPs of 100 and 150 mmHg decreased significantly (72 +/- 5%; 53 +/- 4 and 61 +/- 4% of controls). 1 or 4 wk after debanding, LV systolic pressures were similar to control values, and the degree of myocardial hypertrophy decreased to levels 23 +/- 6 (P less than 0.01) and 11 +/- 6% (P less than 0.01) above their control values, respectively. At 1 wk there was no significant increase in CFR/myocardial mass, compared to values in the banded group (67 +/- 8 vs. 53 +/- 4% of controls at 100 mmHg and 67 +/- 9 vs. 61 +/- 4% at 150 mmHg of CPP). At 4 wk, CFR and the ratio had increased toward normal. Thus, decreased coronary perfusion in hypertrophied hearts is completely reversible. Images PMID:2525568

  1. Abnormal Mitochondrial L-Arginine Transport Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure and Rexoygenation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Melissa; Joshi, Mandar; Horlock, Duncan; Lam, Nicholas T.; Gregorevic, Paul; McGee, Sean L.; Kaye, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF) and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. Methods and Results In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model) we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively) and expression of the principal L-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (p<0.001, p<0.01) compared to controls. This was accompanied by significantly lower NO production and higher 3-nitrotyrosine levels (both p<0.05). The role of mitochondrial L-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1) exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. Conclusion These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury. PMID:25111602

  2. Genetic abnormalities in FOXP1 are associated with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sheng-Wei; Mislankar, Mona; Misra, Chaitali; Huang, Nianyuan; Dajusta, Daniel G; Harrison, Steven M; McBride, Kim L; Baker, Linda A; Garg, Vidu

    2013-09-01

    The etiology for the majority of congenital heart defects (CHD) is unknown. We identified a patient with unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and hypoplastic left ventricle who harbored an ~0.3 Mb monoallelic deletion on chromosome 3p14.1. The deletion encompassed the first four exons of FOXP1, a gene critical for normal heart development that represses cardiomyocyte proliferation and expression of Nkx2.5. To determine whether FOXP1 mutations are found in patients with CHD, we sequenced FOXP1 in 82 patients with AVSD or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We discovered two patients who harbored a heterozygous c.1702C>T variant in FOXP1 that predicted a potentially deleterious substitution of a highly conserved proline (p.Pro568Ser). This variant was not found in 287 controls but is present in dbSNP at a 0.2% frequency. The orthologous murine Foxp1 p.Pro596Ser mutant protein displayed deficits in luciferase reporter assays and resulted in increased proliferation and Nkx2.5 expression in cardiomyoblasts. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of FOXP1 is associated with human CHD.

  3. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options—a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Bax, Jeroen; Hylek, Elaine; Kaab, Stefan; Schotten, Ulrich; Wegscheider, Karl; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Ezekowitz, Michael; Diener, Hans; Haegeli, Laurent; Heidbuchel, Hein; Lane, Deirdre; Mont, Luis; Willems, Stephan; Dorian, Paul; Aunes-Jansson, Maria; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Borentain, Maria; Breitenstein, Stefanie; Brueckmann, Martina; Cater, Nilo; Clemens, Andreas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Dubner, Sergio; Edvardsson, Nils G.; Friberg, Leif; Goette, Andreas; Gulizia, Michele; Hatala, Robert; Horwood, Jenny; Szumowski, Lukas; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Josef; Leute, Angelika; Lobban, Trudie; Meyer, Ralf; Millerhagen, Jay; Morgan, John; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Baertels, Christoph; Oeff, Michael; Paar, Dieter; Polifka, Juergen; Ravens, Ursula; Rosin, Ludger; Stegink, W.; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Vardas, Panos; Vincent, Alphons; Walter, Maureen; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A. John

    2012-01-01

    While management of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is improved by guideline-conform application of anticoagulant therapy, rate control, rhythm control, and therapy of accompanying heart disease, the morbidity and mortality associated with AF remain unacceptably high. This paper describes the proceedings of the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET)/European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus conference that convened over 60 scientists and representatives from industry to jointly discuss emerging therapeutic and diagnostic improvements to achieve better management of AF patients. The paper covers four chapters: (i) risk factors and risk markers for AF; (ii) pathophysiological classification of AF; (iii) relevance of monitored AF duration for AF-related outcomes; and (iv) perspectives and needs for implementing better antithrombotic therapy. Relevant published literature for each section is covered, and suggestions for the improvement of management in each area are put forward. Combined, the propositions formulate a perspective to implement comprehensive management in AF. PMID:21791573

  4. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options--a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y H; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Bax, Jeroen; Hylek, Elaine; Kaab, Stefan; Schotten, Ulrich; Wegscheider, Karl; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Ezekowitz, Michael; Diener, Hans; Haegeli, Laurent; Heidbuchel, Hein; Lane, Deirdre; Mont, Luis; Willems, Stephan; Dorian, Paul; Aunes-Jansson, Maria; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Borentain, Maria; Breitenstein, Stefanie; Brueckmann, Martina; Cater, Nilo; Clemens, Andreas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Dubner, Sergio; Edvardsson, Nils G; Friberg, Leif; Goette, Andreas; Gulizia, Michele; Hatala, Robert; Horwood, Jenny; Szumowski, Lukas; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Josef; Leute, Angelika; Lobban, Trudie; Meyer, Ralf; Millerhagen, Jay; Morgan, John; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Baertels, Christoph; Oeff, Michael; Paar, Dieter; Polifka, Juergen; Ravens, Ursula; Rosin, Ludger; Stegink, W; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Vardas, Panos; Vincent, Alphons; Walter, Maureen; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A John

    2012-01-01

    While management of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is improved by guideline-conform application of anticoagulant therapy, rate control, rhythm control, and therapy of accompanying heart disease, the morbidity and mortality associated with AF remain unacceptably high. This paper describes the proceedings of the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET)/European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus conference that convened over 60 scientists and representatives from industry to jointly discuss emerging therapeutic and diagnostic improvements to achieve better management of AF patients. The paper covers four chapters: (i) risk factors and risk markers for AF; (ii) pathophysiological classification of AF; (iii) relevance of monitored AF duration for AF-related outcomes; and (iv) perspectives and needs for implementing better antithrombotic therapy. Relevant published literature for each section is covered, and suggestions for the improvement of management in each area are put forward. Combined, the propositions formulate a perspective to implement comprehensive management in AF. PMID:21791573

  5. Effect of forward rapidly rotating shift work on circadian rhythms of arterial pressure, heart rate and oral temperature in air traffic controllers.

    PubMed

    Stoynev, A G; Minkova, N K

    1998-02-01

    Twenty-four-hour records of arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), oral temperature (OT) and physical and mental performance were obtained in air traffic controllers during morning (n = 16), afternoon (n = 17) and night (n = 19) shifts. Data were analyzed by the cosinor method. The results obtained during the morning shift were as follows (mesor/amplitude/acrophase): systolic AP (mm Hg)--113.6/10.0/16:03 h; diastolic AP--71.1/8.2/15:19 h; mean AP--85.6/8.8/15:41 h; HR (beats/min)--77.5/8.9/16:00 h; OT (dg C)--36.71/0.21/15:49 h; right-hand grip strength (kg)--49.8/2.0/17:43 h; left-hand grip strength--46.1/2.0/16:08 h; mental performance (calculations/min)--14.9/1.1/16:39 h. During the night shift either no change of the circadian acrophases (HR, right-hand grip strength) or acrophase delays ranging from about 2 h (systolic AP, OT, mental performance) up to 3 h (diastolic and mean AP, left-hand grip strength) were observed. Our data suggest that the shift system studied does not significantly alter the circadian rhythms, and does not induce a desynchronization, particularly as concerns arterial pressure and oral temperature.

  6. Housing under abnormal light-dark cycles attenuates day/night expression rhythms of the clock genes Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the amygdala and hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Shunpei; Tahara, Yu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Ishigooka, Jun; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-10-01

    Although the results of previous studies have suggested that disruptions in circadian rhythms are involved in the pathogenesis of depression, no studies have examined the interaction of clock gene expression deficit and depression state. In this study, we examined clock gene expression levels and depressive-like behavior in mice housed under 3.5h light, 3.5h dark (T = 7) conditions to investigate the association between clock gene expression and depressive state. C57BL/6J mice were housed under a T = 24 cycle (12h light, 12h dark) or a T = 7 cycle and clock gene expression levels in the hippocampus and the amygdala were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Depressive state was evaluated by the forced swim test (FST). Although circadian rhythms of Per1 and Per2 clock gene expression in the hippocampus and amygdala were still detected under T = 7 conditions, rhythmicity and expression levels of both significantly decreased. Mice housed with a T = 7 cycle showed increased immobile time in the FST than those with a T = 24 cycle. The present results suggest that the presence of a depressive state around the early active phase of activity may be related to impairment of rhythmicity and expression levels of Per1 and Per2 genes under abnormal light-dark conditions.

  7. Insulin over expression induces heart abnormalities via reactive oxygen species regulation, might be step towards cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, S; Ali, T; Gul, M; Javed, Q; Emanueli, C; Murtaza, I

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is known to regulate blood—glucose level and promote its utilization as an energy source in cardiac tissues under normal physiological conditions as well as stimulates signaling pathways that involved cell growth and proliferation. Although recently insulin generated free radicals via NAD(P)H has been documented but the molecular mechanism is still under investigation. The aim of present study is to elucidate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent possible role of insulin in cardiac abnormalities, including hypertrophy by regulation of antioxidants enzyme (SOD) activity. In the current study, 60 cardiac patients and 50 healthy individuals as well as the rat model with insulin administration were under investigation. Oxidant, anti—oxidant biochemical assays, hypertrophic marker expression via immunobloting and histopathology were performed. We observed statistically significant elevation of the reactive oxygen species level in the serum of patients as well as in the insulin administrated rat model, a mild expression of cardiac marker in experimental models along with abnormal histopathology of hearts. However, super oxide dismutase free radical scavenger activity was down regulated upon insulin treatment compared to control rats. Conclusively, the present study showed that over expression of insulin might stimulate cardiac hypertrophic signal via up regulation of free radicals and down regulation of antioxidants enzymes including SOD activity.

  8. A neural network learned information measures for heart motion abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambakhsh, M. S.; Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Goela, Aashish; Islam, Ali; Peters, Terry; Li, Shuo

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we propose an information theoretic neural network for normal/abnormal left ventricular motion classification which outperforms significantly other recent methods in the literature. The proposed framework consists of a supervised 3-layer artificial neural network (ANN) which uses hyperbolic tangent sigmoid and linear transfer functions for hidden and output layers, respectively. The ANN is fed by information theoretic measures of left ventricular wall motion such as Shannon's differential entropy (SDE), Rényi entropy and Fisher information, which measure global information of subjects distribution. Using 395×20 segmented LV cavities of short-axis magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired from 48 subjects, the experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms Support Vector Machine (SVM) and thresholding based information theoretic classifiers. It yields a specificity equal to 90%, a sensitivity of 91%, and a remarkable Area Under Curve (AUC) for Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC), equal to 93.2%.

  9. Heart rate, conduction and ultrasound abnormalities in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Colotto, Marco; Amato, Silvia; Colella, Alessandra; Curione, Mario; Danese, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. Though not considered a diagnostic criterion for most EDS subtypes, cardiovascular involvement is a well-known complication in EDS. A case-control study was carried out on 28 adults with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosed according to current criteria, compared to 29 healthy subjects evaluating resting electrocardiographic (ECG), 24-h ECG and resting heart ultrasound data. Results obtained in the ECG studies showed a moderate excess in duration of the PR interval and P wave, an excess of heart conduction and rate abnormalities and an increased rate of mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency often complicating with "true" mitral valve prolapse in the ecocardiographic study. These variable ECG subclinical anomalies reported in our sample may represent the resting surrogate of such a subnormal cardiovascular response to postural changes that are known to be present in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings indicate the usefulness of a full cardiologic evaluation of adults with JHS/EDS-HT for the correct management. PMID:24752348

  10. Unhealthy lifestyles and ischaemic electrocardiographic abnormalities: the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Nabipour, I; Amiri, M; Imami, S R; Jahfari, S M; Nosrati, A; Iranpour, D; Soltanian, A R

    2008-01-01

    We assessed prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and unhealthy lifestyles in 3723 participants aged > or = 25 years in the northern Persian Gulf region; 96.0% had > or = 1 cardiovascular risk factor. Over 60% had unhealthy body weight, only 8.3% ate the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables, 70.6% were physically inactive and 19.0% were current smokers. Prevalence of electrocardiogram (ECG) with evidence of IHD was 12.7%. Present or past smoking and truncal obesity were independently associated with IHD ECGs in men, and past or present smoking and obesity in women. Hypertension and diabetes were independently associated with increased risk of IHD ECG.

  11. Usefulness of verapamil for congestive heart failure associated with abnormal left ventricular diastolic filling and normal left ventricular systolic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Setaro, J.F.; Zaret, B.L.; Schulman, D.S.; Black, H.R.; Soufer, R. )

    1990-10-15

    Normal left ventricular systolic performance with impaired left ventricular diastolic filling may be present in a substantial number of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). To evaluate the effect of oral verapamil in this subset, 20 men (mean age 68 +/- 5 years) with CHF, intact left ventricular function (ejection fraction greater than 45%) and abnormal diastolic filling (peak filling rate less than 2.5 end-diastolic volumes per second (edv/s)) were studied in a placebo-controlled, double-blind 5-week crossover trial. All patients underwent echocardiography to rule out significant valvular disease, and thallium-201 stress scintigraphy to exclude major active ischemia. Compared to baseline values, verapamil significantly improved exercise capacity by 33% (13.9 +/- 4.3 vs 10.7 +/- 3.4 minutes at baseline) and peak filling rate by 30% (2.29 +/- 0.54 vs 1.85 +/- 0.45 edv/s at baseline) (all p less than 0.05). Placebo values were 12.3 +/- 4.0 minutes and 2.16 +/- 0.48 edv/s, respectively (difference not significant for both). Improvement from baseline in an objective clinico-radiographic heart failure score (scale 0 to 13) was significantly greater with verapamil compared to placebo (median improvement in score: 3 vs 1, p less than 0.01). Mean ejection fraction and systolic blood pressure were unchanged from baseline; diastolic blood pressure and heart rate decreased to a small degree. Verapamil may have therapeutic efficacy in patients with CHF, preserved systolic function and impaired diastolic filling.

  12. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed.

  13. Effects of music composed by Mozart and Ligeti on blood pressure and heart rate circadian rhythms in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Björn

    2008-11-01

    There is continuing discussion on the effect of music ("Mozart effect") on numerous functions in man and experimental animals. Radiotelemetry now allows one to monitor cardiovascular functions in freely-moving unrestrained experimental animals. Radiotelemetry was used to monitor systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), heart rate (HR), and motor activity (MA) in male normotensive WKY and hypertensive SHR animals. Rats were synchronized to a 12 h light (L): 12 h dark (D) regimen in an isolated, ventilated, light-controlled, sound-isolated animal container. Music (Mozart, Symphony # 40; Ligeti, String Quartet # 2) were played for 2 h at 75 dB in the animal cabin starting at the onset of L or D in a cross-over design. Data were collected every 5 min for 24 h under control conditions and during and after music. In addition, plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) were determined in unrestrained animals at 3 h intervals over 24 h. In both WKY and SHR, highly significant circadian rhythms were obtained in SBP, DBP, HR, and MA under control conditions; HR was lower and BP higher in SHR than in WKY. NE was circadian rhythmic in both strains with higher values in D; the increase in NE with immobilization was much more pronounced in SHR than in WKY. The music of Mozart had no effect on either parameter in WKY, neither in L nor in D. In contrast, in SHR, the music of Mozart presented in L significantly decreased HR and left BP unaffected, leading to a small decrease in cardiac output. The music of Ligeti significantly increased BP both in L and in D and reflexively reduced HR in L, the effects being long-lasting over 24 h. Interestingly, white noise at 75 dB had no effect at all on either function in both strains. The effects of both Mozart and Ligeti cannot be attributed to a stress reaction, as stress due to cage switch increased HR and BP both in WKY and SHR. The study clearly demonstrates that music of different character (tempo, rhythm, pitch, tonality) can

  14. Introduction: December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young - Highlights of HeartWeek 2015: Challenges and Dilemmas of Pediatric Cardiac Care including Heart Failure in Children and Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 13th annual publication in Cardiology in the Young generated from the two meetings that composed "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Centre at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine, and entering its 16th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Paediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia entering its 19th year. This December 2015 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of the two meetings that compose HeartWeek. Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 15th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from Friday, 6 February, 2015, to Monday, 9 February, 2015. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery and its special focus was "Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries". The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's annual meeting - Cardiology 2015, the 18th Annual Update on Paediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease: "Challenges and Dilemmas" - was held at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, from Wednesday, 11 February, 2015, to Sunday, 15 February, 2015. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care

  15. Abnormalities in intracellular calcium regulation and contractile function in myocardium from dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perreault, C. L.; Shannon, R. P.; Komamura, K.; Vatner, S. F.; Morgan, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    24 d of rapid ventricular pacing induced dilated cardiomyopathy with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in conscious, chronically instrumented dogs. We studied mechanical properties and intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) transients of trabeculae carneae isolated from 15 control dogs (n = 32) and 11 dogs with pacing-induced cardiac failure (n = 26). Muscles were stretched to maximum length at 30 degrees C and stimulated at 0.33 Hz; a subset (n = 17 control, n = 17 myopathic) was loaded with the [Ca2+]i indicator aequorin. Peak tension was depressed in the myopathic muscles, even in the presence of maximally effective (i.e., 16 mM) [Ca2+] in the perfusate. However, peak [Ca2+]i was similar (0.80 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.71 +/- 0.05 microM; [Ca2+]o = 2.5 mM), suggesting that a decrease in Cai2+ availability was not responsible for the decreased contractility. The time for decline from the peak of the Cai2+ transient was prolonged in the myopathic group, which correlated with prolongation of isometric contraction and relaxation. However, similar end-diastolic [Ca2+]i was achieved in both groups (0.29 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.02 microM), indicating that Cai2+ homeostasis can be maintained in myopathic hearts. The inotropic response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was depressed compared with the controls. However, when cAMP production was stimulated by pretreatment with forskolin, the response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was improved. Our findings provide direct evidence that abnormal [Ca2+]i handling is an important cause of contractile dysfunction in dogs with pacing-induced heart failure and suggest that deficient production of cAMP may be an important cause of these changes in excitation-contraction coupling.

  16. Bleeding Risk and Antithrombotic Strategy in Patients with Sinus Rhythm Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction Treated with Warfarin or Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Siqin; Cheng, Bin; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Sacco, Ralph L.; Levin, Bruce; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Qian, Min; Mann, Douglas L.; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Mohr, J.P.; Graham, Susan; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Estol, Conrado J.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.; Thompson, John L.P.; Homma, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    We sought to assess the performance of existing bleeding risk scores, such as HAS-BLED or OBRI, in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin or aspirin. We calculated HAS-BLED and OBRI risk scores for 2,305 patients with HFrEF in SR enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) trial. Proportional hazards models were used to test whether each score predicted major bleeding, and comparison of different risk scores was performed using Harell’s c-statistic and net-reclassification improvement (NRI) index. For the warfarin arm, both scores predicted bleeding risk, with OBRI having significantly higher c-statistic (0.72 vs 0.61; p=0.03) compared to HAS-BLED, though the NRI for comparing OBRI to HAS-BLED was not significant (0.32, 95% CI - 0.18-0.37). Performance of the OBRI and HAS-BLED risk scores were similar for the aspirin arm. For participants with OBRI score of 0 to 1, warfarin compared with aspirin reduced ischemic stroke (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26-0.98, p=0.042) without significantly increasing major bleeding (HR 1.24, 95% CI 0.66-2.30, p=0.51). For those with OBRI score of ≥2, there was a trend for reduced ischemic stroke with warfarin compared to aspirin (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.27-1.15, p=0.12), but major bleeding was increased (HR 4.04, 95% CI 1.99-8.22, p<0.001). In conclusion, existing bleeding risk scores can identify bleeding risk in HFrEF patients in SR, and could be tested for potentially identifying patients with a favorable risk / benefit profile for antithrombotic therapy with warfarin. PMID:26189039

  17. Heart murmurs

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... classified ("graded") depending on how loud the murmur sounds with a stethoscope. The grading is on a ...

  18. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  19. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is related to both reduced contractile function and incomplete relaxation: an electromechanically detailed biophysical modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, David H.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) accounts for about 50% of heart failure cases. It has features of incomplete relaxation and increased stiffness of the left ventricle. Studies from clinical electrophysiology and animal experiments have found that HFpEF is associated with impaired calcium homeostasis, ion channel remodeling and concentric left ventricle hypertrophy (LVH). However, it is still unclear how the abnormal calcium homeostasis, ion channel and structural remodeling affect the electro-mechanical dynamics of the ventricles. In this study we have developed multiscale models of the human left ventricle from single cells to the 3D organ, which take into consideration HFpEF-induced changes in calcium handling, ion channel remodeling and concentric LVH. Our simulation results suggest that at the cellular level, HFpEF reduces the systolic calcium level resulting in a reduced systolic contractile force, but elevates the diastolic calcium level resulting in an abnormal residual diastolic force. In our simulations, these abnormal electro-mechanical features of the ventricular cells became more pronounced with the increase of the heart rate. However, at the 3D organ level, the ejection fraction of the left ventricle was maintained due to the concentric LVH. The simulation results of this study mirror clinically observed features of HFpEF and provide new insights toward the understanding of the cellular bases of impaired cardiac electromechanical functions in heart failure. PMID:25852567

  20. Circadian rhythms in Macaca mulatta monkeys during Bion 11 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.; Tumurova, E. G.; Fuller, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of primate brain temperature, head and ankle skin temperature, motor activity, and heart rate were studied during spaceflight and on the ground. In space, the circadian rhythms of all the parameters were synchronized with diurnal Zeitgebers. However, in space the brain temperature rhythm showed a significantly more delayed phase angle, which may be ascribed to an increase of the endogenous circadian period.

  1. Ventricular conduction abnormalities as predictors of long‐term survival in acute de novo and decompensated chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Siirila‐Waris, Krista; Harjola, Veli‐Pekka; Marono, David; Parenica, Jiri; Kreutzinger, Philipp; Nieminen, Tuomo; Pavlusova, Marie; Tarvasmaki, Tuukka; Twerenbold, Raphael; Tolonen, Jukka; Miklik, Roman; Nieminen, Markku S.; Spinar, Jindrich; Mueller, Christian; Lassus, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims Data on the prognostic role of left and right bundle branch blocks (LBBB and RBBB), and nonspecific intraventricular conduction delay (IVCD; QRS ≥ 110 ms, no BBB) in acute heart failure (AHF) are controversial. Our aim was to investigate electrocardiographic predictors of long‐term survival in patients with de novo AHF and acutely decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF). Methods and Results We analysed the admission electrocardiogram of 982 patients from a multicenter European cohort of AHF with 3.9 years' mean follow‐up. Half (51.5%, n = 506) of the patients had de novo AHF. LBBB, and IVCD were more common in ADCHF than in de novo AHF: 17.2% vs. 8.7% (P < 0.001) and 20.6% vs. 13.2% (P = 0.001), respectively, and RBBB was almost equally common (6.9% and 8.1%; P = 0.5), respectively. Mortality during the follow‐up was higher in patients with RBBB (85.4%) and IVCD (73.7%) compared with patients with normal ventricular conduction (57.0%); P < 0.001 for both. The impact of RBBB on prognosis was prominent in de novo AHF (adjusted HR 1.93, 1.03–3.60; P = 0.04), and IVCD independently predicted death in ADCHF (adjusted HR 1.79, 1.28–2.52; P = 0.001). Both findings were pronounced in patients with reduced ejection fraction. LBBB showed no association with increased mortality in either of the subgroups. The main results were confirmed in a validation cohort of 1511 AHF patients with 5.9 years' mean follow‐up. Conclusions Conduction abnormalities predict long‐term survival differently in de novo AHF and ADCHF. RBBB predicts mortality in de novo AHF, and IVCD in ADCHF. LBBB has no additive predictive value in AHF requiring hospitalization.

  2. The impact of steroid withdrawal on the development of lipid abnormalities and obesity in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lake, K D; Reutzel, T J; Pritzker, M R; Jorgensen, C R; Emery, R W

    1993-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia and obesity are common problems after heart transplantation, which may increase the risk of chronic graft atherosclerosis. The intent of this study was to (1) determine the impact of a history of hyperlipidemia on the occurrence of lipid abnormalities after transplantation, (2) compare lipid profiles of those patients being treated with triple-drug immunosuppression versus those patients weaned from prednisone therapy, and (3) identify any factors that would predict which patients are at highest risk for the development of hyperlipidemia after transplantation. Of 89 patients who lived for more than 12 months, 35 patients had a history of hyperlipidemia before heart transplantation (cholesterol level of more than 240 mg/dl; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of more than 160 mg/dl). The most dramatic rise in cholesterol level was observed in patients with no history of hyperlipidemia who were treated with triple-drug immunosuppression, in whom a 64% increase occurred versus a 24% increase in patients receiving steroid-free immunosuppression (p < 0.001). In patients with a history of hyperlipidemia, cholesterol level increased by 20% with triple-drug immunosuppression versus 14% with steroid-free immunosuppression (p = 0.613); however, 83% of the patients in the triple-drug group and 92% in the steroid-free group had elevated cholesterol levels. Multiple regression analysis revealed that significant independent and additive (p < 0.00001) contributions with respect to percent change in cholesterol level were evident for (1) a negative history of hyperlipidemia (p = 0.005), (2) triple-drug immunosuppression (p = 0.0021), and (3) female sex (p = 0.0113). A negative history of hyperlipidemia was predictive of the percent change in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (p = 0.0049), and triple-drug immunosuppression administration predicted the percent change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.0119). Patients with a positive history

  3. Time-dependent remodeling of transmural architecture underlying abnormal ventricular geometry in chronic volume overload heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Covell, James W.

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the abnormal ventricular geometry in failing hearts may be accounted for by regionally selective remodeling of myocardial laminae or sheets, we investigated remodeling of the transmural architecture in chronic volume overload induced by an aortocaval shunt. We determined three-dimensional finite deformation at apical and basal sites in left ventricular anterior wall of six dogs with the use of biplane cineradiography of implanted markers. Myocardial strains at end diastole were measured at a failing state referred to control to describe remodeling of myofibers and sheet structures over time. After 9 ± 2 wk (means ± SE) of volume overload, the myocardial volume within the marker sets increased by >20%. At 2 wk, the basal site had myofiber elongation (0.099 ± 0.030; P < 0.05), whereas the apical site did not [P = not significant (NS)]. Sheet shear at the basal site increased progressively toward the final study (0.040 ± 0.003 at 2 wk and 0.054 ± 0.021 at final; both P < 0.05), which contributed to a significant increase in wall thickness at the final study (0.181 ± 0.047; P < 0.05), whereas the apical site did not (P = NS). We conclude that the remodeling of the transmural architecture is regionally heterogeneous in chronic volume overload. The early differences in fiber elongation seem most likely due to a regional gradient in diastolic wall stress, whereas the late differences in wall thickness are most likely related to regional differences in the laminar architecture of the wall. These results suggest that the temporal progression of ventricular remodeling may be anatomically designed at the level of regional laminar architecture. PMID:15242833

  4. Suppression of the ELO-2 FA elongation activity results in alterations of the fatty acid composition and multiple physiological defects, including abnormal ultradian rhythms, in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Kniazeva, Marina; Sieber, Matt; McCauley, Scott; Zhang, Kang; Watts, Jennifer L; Han, Min

    2003-01-01

    While the general steps of fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis are well understood, the individual enzymes involved in the elongation of long chain saturated and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) are largely unknown. Recent research indicates that these enzymes might be of considerable physiological importance for human health. We use Caenorhabditis elegans to study FA elongation activities and associated abnormal phenotypes. In this article we report that the predicted C. elegans F11E6.5/ELO-2 is a functional enzyme with the FA elongation activity. It is responsible for the elongation of palmitic acid and is involved in PUFA biosynthesis. RNAi-mediated suppression of ELO-2 causes an accumulation of palmitate and an associated decrease in the PUFA fraction in triacylglycerides and phospholipid classes. This imbalance in the FA composition results in multiple phenotypic defects such as slow growth, small body size, reproductive defects, and changes in rhythmic behavior. ELO-2 cooperates with the previously reported ELO-1 in 20-carbon PUFA production, and at least one of the enzymes must function to provide normal growth and development in C. elegans. The presented data indicate that suppression of a single enzyme of the FA elongation machinery is enough to affect various organs and systems in worms. This effect resembles syndromic disorders in humans. PMID:12586704

  5. Echocardiography for cardiac resynchronization therapy: recommendations for performance and reporting--a report from the American Society of Echocardiography Dyssynchrony Writing Group endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society.

    PubMed

    Gorcsan, John; Abraham, Theodore; Agler, Deborah A; Bax, Jeroen J; Derumeaux, Genevieve; Grimm, Richard A; Martin, Randy; Steinberg, Jonathan S; Sutton, Martin St John; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2008-03-01

    Echocardiography plays an evolving and important role in the care of heart failure patients treated with biventricular pacing, or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Numerous recent published reports have utilized echocardiographic techniques to potentially aide in patient selection for CRT prior to implantation and to optimized device settings afterwards. However, no ideal approach has yet been found. This consensus report evaluates the contemporary applications of echocardiography for CRT including relative strengths and technical limitations of several techniques and proposes guidelines regarding current and possible future clinical applications. Principal methods advised to qualify abnormalities in regional ventricular activation, known as dyssynchrony, include longitudinal velocities by color-coded tissue Doppler and the difference in left ventricular to right ventricular ejection using routine pulsed Doppler, or interventricular mechanical delay. Supplemental measures of radial dynamics which may be of additive value include septal-to-posterior wall delay using M-mode in patients with non-ischemic disease with technically high quality data, or using speckle tracking radial strain. A simplified post-CRT screening for atrioventricular optimization using Doppler mitral inflow velocities is also proposed. Since this is rapidly changing field with new information being added frequently, future modification and refinements in approach are anticipated to continue. PMID:18314047

  6. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques. PMID:27560278

  7. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques.

  8. Potential effects of intrinsic heart pacemaker cell mechanisms on dysrhythmic cardiac action potential firing

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Tsutsui, Kenta; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The heart's regular electrical activity is initiated by specialized cardiac pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node. The rate and rhythm of spontaneous action potential firing of sinoatrial node cells are regulated by stochastic mechanisms that determine the level of coupling of chemical to electrical clocks within cardiac pacemaker cells. This coupled-clock system is modulated by autonomic signaling from the brain via neurotransmitter release from the vagus and sympathetic nerves. Abnormalities in brain-heart clock connections or in any molecular clock activity within pacemaker cells lead to abnormalities in the beating rate and rhythm of the pacemaker tissue that initiates the cardiac impulse. Dysfunction of pacemaker tissue can lead to tachy-brady heart rate alternation or exit block that leads to long atrial pauses and increases susceptibility to other cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review evidence for the idea that disturbances in the intrinsic components of pacemaker cells may be implemented in arrhythmia induction in the heart. PMID:25755643

  9. Comparative proteomics reveals abnormal binding of ATGL and dysferlin on lipid droplets from pressure overload-induced dysfunctional rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Li, Linghai; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Weiyi; Hong, Yun; Wang, Jifeng; Zhang, Shuyan; Xu, Shimeng; Shu, Qingbo; Li, Juanfen; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Min; Qian, Zongjie; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Excessive retention of neutral lipids in cardiac lipid droplets (LDs) is a common observation in cardiomyopathy. Thus, the systematic investigation of the cardiac LD proteome will help to dissect the underlying mechanisms linking cardiac steatosis and myocardial dysfunction. Here, after isolation of LDs from normal and dysfunctional Sprague-Dawley rat hearts, we identified 752 heart-associated LD proteins using iTRAQ quantitative proteomic method, including 451 proteins previously unreported on LDs. The most noteworthy finding was the identification of the membrane resealing protein, dysferlin. An analysis of dysferlin truncation mutants indicated that its C2 domain was responsible for its LD localization. Quantitative proteomic results further determined that 27 proteins were increased and 16 proteins were decreased in LDs from post pressure overload-induced dysfunctional hearts, compared with normal hearts. Notably, adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) was dramatically decreased and dysferlin was substantially increased on dysfunctional cardiac LDs. This study for the first time reveals the dataset of the heart LD proteome in healthy tissue and the variation of it under cardiac dysfunction. These findings highlight an association between the altered LD protein localization of dysferlin and ATGL and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26795240

  10. Comparative proteomics reveals abnormal binding of ATGL and dysferlin on lipid droplets from pressure overload-induced dysfunctional rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linghai; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Weiyi; Hong, Yun; Wang, Jifeng; Zhang, Shuyan; Xu, Shimeng; Shu, Qingbo; Li, Juanfen; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Min; Qian, Zongjie; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Excessive retention of neutral lipids in cardiac lipid droplets (LDs) is a common observation in cardiomyopathy. Thus, the systematic investigation of the cardiac LD proteome will help to dissect the underlying mechanisms linking cardiac steatosis and myocardial dysfunction. Here, after isolation of LDs from normal and dysfunctional Sprague-Dawley rat hearts, we identified 752 heart-associated LD proteins using iTRAQ quantitative proteomic method, including 451 proteins previously unreported on LDs. The most noteworthy finding was the identification of the membrane resealing protein, dysferlin. An analysis of dysferlin truncation mutants indicated that its C2 domain was responsible for its LD localization. Quantitative proteomic results further determined that 27 proteins were increased and 16 proteins were decreased in LDs from post pressure overload-induced dysfunctional hearts, compared with normal hearts. Notably, adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) was dramatically decreased and dysferlin was substantially increased on dysfunctional cardiac LDs. This study for the first time reveals the dataset of the heart LD proteome in healthy tissue and the variation of it under cardiac dysfunction. These findings highlight an association between the altered LD protein localization of dysferlin and ATGL and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26795240

  11. [Sleep rhythm and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Maemura, Koji

    2012-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common problem in general adult population. Recent evidence suggests the link between the occurrence of cardiovascular events and several sleep disturbances including sleep apnea syndrome, insomnia and periodic limb movements during sleep. Sleep duration may affect the cardiovascular outcome. Shift work also may increase the risk of ischemic heart disease. Normalization of sleep rhythm has a potential to be a therapeutic target of ischemic heart diseases, although further study is required to evaluate the preventive effect on cardiovascular events. Here we describe the current understandings regarding the roles of sleep disorders during the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events. PMID:22844804

  12. Physiological basis for human autonomic rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressures, heart periods, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity have been studied intensively in recent years to explore otherwise obscure human neurophysiological mechanisms. The best-studied rhythms are those occurring at breathing frequencies. Published evidence indicates that respiratory fluctuations of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and electrocardiographic R-R intervals result primarily from the action of a central 'gate' that opens during expiration and closes during inspiration. Parallel respiratory fluctuations of arterial pressures and R-R intervals are thought to be secondary to arterial baroreflex physiology: changes in systolic pressure provoke changes in the R-R interval. However, growing evidence suggests that these parallel oscillations result from the influence of respiration on sympathetic and vagal-cardiac motoneurones rather than from baroreflex physiology. There is a rapidly growing literature on the use of mathematical models of low- and high-frequency (respiratory) R-R interval fluctuations in characterizing instantaneous 'sympathovagal balance'. The case for this approach is based primarily on measurements made with patients in upright tilt. However, the strong linear relation between such measures as the ratio of low- to high-frequency R-R interval oscillations and the angle of the tilt reflects exclusively the reductions of the vagal (high-frequency) component. As the sympathetic component does not change in tilt, the low- to high-frequency R-R interval ratio provides no proof that sympathetic activity increases. Moreover, the validity of extrapolating from measurements performed during upright tilt to measurements during supine rest has not been established. Nonetheless, it is clear that measures of heart rate variability provide important prognostic information in patients with cardiovascular diseases. It is not known whether reduced heart rate variability is merely a marker for the severity of disease or a

  13. Interaction among cardiac, respiratory, and locomotor rhythms during cardiolocomotor synchronization.

    PubMed

    Niizeki, K; Kawahara, K; Miyamoto, Y

    1993-10-01

    The nature of entrainment between cardiac and locomotor rhythms was investigated while normal human subjects walked or ran on a treadmill. To detect the incidence of entrainment occurrence, the phase relationships among cardiac, respiratory, and locomotor rhythms were analyzed. The phase relationship between heartbeats and gait signals showed that entrainment of cardiac rhythm to locomotor rhythm occurred in all subjects at one or more treadmill speeds. To elucidate interactions among cardiac, respiratory, and locomotor rhythms during the cardiolocomotor synchronization, spectral and coherence analyses were done for these three rhythms. Spectral and coherence analyses on fluctuations in the heart period and respiratory rhythms revealed that the strength of coupling between cardiac and respiratory rhythms decreased in the presence of cardiolocomotor synchronization. In addition, the coupling of cardiac and locomotor rhythms appeared to induce dissociation of coupling between respiratory and locomotor rhythms. These results were similar to those observed when stepping was voluntarily synchronized with cardiac rhythm. Possible mechanisms to explain coordination and interaction among the neural oscillators innervating these three rhythms are discussed.

  14. Troxerutin suppresses lipid abnormalities in the heart of high-fat-high-fructose diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Geetha, Rajagopalan; Yogalakshmi, Baskaran; Sreeja, S; Bhavani, K; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2014-02-01

    The reversal effect of troxerutin (TX) on obesity, insulin resistance, lipid accumulation, oxidative damage, and hypertension induced in the high-fat-high-fructose diet (HFFD)-fed mice model of metabolic syndrome was investigated. Adult male Mus musculus mice of body weight 25-30 g were fed either control diet or HFFD. Each group was divided into two and treated or untreated with TX (150 mg/kg bw, p.o.) from the 16th day. Assays were done in plasma and heart after 30 and 60 days of the experimental period. Significant increase in the levels of glucose and insulin, blood pressure (BP), and oxidative stress were observed after 30 days of HFFD feeding as compared to control. Animals fed HFFD for 60 days developed more severe changes in the above parameters compared to those fed for 30 days. Hearts of HFFD-fed mice registered downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, carnitine palmitoyl transferse-1b and AMP-activated protein kinase; and upregulation of cluster of differentiation 36, fatty acid-binding protein-1, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c after 60 days. TX administration restricted obesity (as seen by Lee's index); improved whole body insulin sensitivity; reduced BP, lipid accumulation, and oxidative damage; upregulated fatty acid (FA) oxidation; and downregulated FA transport and lipogenesis. Histology of heart revealed that TX diminishes inflammatory cell infiltration and fatty degeneration in HFFD-fed mice. The antioxidant property of TX and its ability to influence lipid regulatory genes could be the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects. PMID:24173620

  15. Troxerutin suppresses lipid abnormalities in the heart of high-fat-high-fructose diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Geetha, Rajagopalan; Yogalakshmi, Baskaran; Sreeja, S; Bhavani, K; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2014-02-01

    The reversal effect of troxerutin (TX) on obesity, insulin resistance, lipid accumulation, oxidative damage, and hypertension induced in the high-fat-high-fructose diet (HFFD)-fed mice model of metabolic syndrome was investigated. Adult male Mus musculus mice of body weight 25-30 g were fed either control diet or HFFD. Each group was divided into two and treated or untreated with TX (150 mg/kg bw, p.o.) from the 16th day. Assays were done in plasma and heart after 30 and 60 days of the experimental period. Significant increase in the levels of glucose and insulin, blood pressure (BP), and oxidative stress were observed after 30 days of HFFD feeding as compared to control. Animals fed HFFD for 60 days developed more severe changes in the above parameters compared to those fed for 30 days. Hearts of HFFD-fed mice registered downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, carnitine palmitoyl transferse-1b and AMP-activated protein kinase; and upregulation of cluster of differentiation 36, fatty acid-binding protein-1, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c after 60 days. TX administration restricted obesity (as seen by Lee's index); improved whole body insulin sensitivity; reduced BP, lipid accumulation, and oxidative damage; upregulated fatty acid (FA) oxidation; and downregulated FA transport and lipogenesis. Histology of heart revealed that TX diminishes inflammatory cell infiltration and fatty degeneration in HFFD-fed mice. The antioxidant property of TX and its ability to influence lipid regulatory genes could be the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects.

  16. Rhythm, Timing and the Timing of Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Arvaniti, Amalia

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence for rhythmic categorization that has emerged on the basis of rhythm metrics, and argues that the metrics are unreliable predictors of rhythm which provide no more than a crude measure of timing. It is further argued that timing is distinct from rhythm and that equating them has led to circularity and a psychologically questionable conceptualization of rhythm in speech. It is thus proposed that research on rhythm be based on the same principles for all languages, something that does not apply to the widely accepted division of languages into stress- and syllable-timed. The hypothesis is advanced that these universal principles are grouping and prominence and evidence to support it is provided. PMID:19390230

  17. Correlation between echocardiographic endocardial surface mapping of abnormal wall motion and pathologic infarct size in autopsied hearts.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, G T; Southern, J F; Choong, C Y; Thomas, J D; Fallon, J T; Guyer, D E; Weyman, A E

    1988-05-01

    We previously developed a cross-sectional echocardiographic technique for quantitatively mapping the endocardial surface of the left ventricle and on which regions of abnormal wall motion can be superimposed in their correct spatial distribution. This endocardial mapping technique (EMT) provides a measure of the left ventricular endocardial surface area (ESA in cm2), the area of abnormal wall motion (AWM in cm2), and the overall percent dysfunction (%AWM) as a measure of the functional "infarct size." To test this approach, we compared the EMT measurements with the actual endocardial surface area (in cm2) and pathologic infarct size (both percent infarct by volume and percent endocardial surface overlying infarct) measured at later autopsy in 20 adults (14 men, six women) ranging in age from 47 to 76 years (mean 64 +/- 9.6 years). The median interval from echocardiographic study to death was 19 days (range 1 to 269 days). Patients were divided into two groups based on the age of their infarcts at the time of death: (1) recent (infarct age less than 14 days; mean age 5.3 +/- 4.6 days) and (2) old (infarct age greater than 6 months; mean age 3.6 +/- 3 years). When the left ventricular endocardial surface area at autopsy was compared with the EMT-derived ESA, a close correlation was found (EMT area = 1.17 X autopsy area + 20.4; r = .94, p = .0001), with the systematic difference in the measurements accounted for by systolic arrest, loss of distending pressure, and specimen shrinkage. The echocardiographic measure of infarct size (%AWM) correlated well with the autopsy percent infarction by volume (%AWM = 1.1 X infarct volume + 5.5; r = .82, p = .0001). Similarly, a good correlation was found for the percent abnormal wall motion and the autopsy percent endocardial surface area overlying infarction (%AWM = 0.89 X infarct area - 0.9; r = .89, p = .0001). When the data were examined in relation to the age of the myocardial infarct, the echocardiographic %AWM appeared to

  18. Echocardiographic findings and abnormalities in HIV-infected patients: results from a large, prospective, multicenter HIV-heart study

    PubMed Central

    Reinsch, Nico; Kahlert, Philipp; Esser, Stefan; Sundermeyer, Andreas; Neuhaus, Katrin; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Potthoff, Anja; Erbel, Raimund; Buck, Thomas; Neumann, Till

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the current study was to assess cardiac structure and function as well as cardiac abnormalities in a large patient-population based multicenter study of HIV-infected subjects. Materials and methods: We enrolled 803 HIV-positive adults (83.4% men, mean age: 44.2 ± 10.3 yrs) in this prospective, cross-sectional cohort study. The study protocol included a standardized documentation of patient history, medical treatment and clinical examination. All subjects underwent a standardized transthoracic echocardiographic examination protocol including Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Echocardiographic measurements revealed a structural dilatation of the left ventricle in 10.1% of all HIV-infected subjects. Interventricular septum and posterior wall thickness were increased in 18.0% and 11.1%, respectively, with elevated muscle mass in 14.3% male and 19.4% female patients. Of all participants 13.5% exhibited a pathologic contraction characteristic of one or more myocardial segments. Prevalence of systolic and diastolic dysfunction was 34.3% and 48.0%, respectively. However, severe forms of ventricular dysfunction were rare. Conclusions: In conclusion our results demonstrate the relevance of echocardiography in this patient-population in the era of antiretroviral therapy. Above all, left ventricular wall thickness and function should be controlled regularly in HIV-infected subjects. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01119729). PMID:22254197

  19. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  20. Contractile abnormalities and altered drug response in engineered heart tissue from Mybpc3-targeted knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Andrea; Friedrich, Felix W; Flenner, Frederik; Geertz, Birgit; Eder, Alexandra; Schaaf, Sebastian; Hirt, Marc N; Uebeler, June; Schlossarek, Saskia; Carrier, Lucie; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Myosin-binding protein C (Mybpc3)-targeted knock-in mice (KI) recapitulate typical aspects of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We evaluated whether these functional alterations can be reproduced in engineered heart tissue (EHT) and yield novel mechanistic information on the function of cMyBP-C. EHTs were generated from cardiac cells of neonatal KI, heterozygous (HET) or wild-type controls (WT) and developed without apparent morphological differences. KI had 70% and HET 20% lower total cMyBP-C levels than WT, accompanied by elevated fetal gene expression. Under standard culture conditions and spontaneous beating, KI EHTs showed more frequent burst beating than WT and occasional tetanic contractions (14/96). Under electrical stimulation (6Hz, 37°C) KI EHTs exhibited shorter contraction and relaxation times and a twofold higher sensitivity to external [Ca(2+)]. Accordingly, the sensitivity to verapamil was 4-fold lower and the response to isoprenaline or the Ca(2+) sensitizer EMD 57033 2- to 4-fold smaller. The loss of EMD effect was verified in 6-week-old KI mice in vivo. HET EHTs were apparently normal under basal conditions, but showed similarly altered contractile responses to [Ca(2+)], verapamil, isoprenaline and EMD. In contrast, drug-induced changes in intracellular Ca(2+) transients (Fura-2) were essentially normal. In conclusion, the present findings in auxotonically contracting EHTs support the idea that cMyBP-C's normal role is to suppress force generation at low intracellular Ca(2+) and stabilize the power-stroke step of the cross bridge cycle. Pharmacological testing in EHT unmasked a disease phenotype in HET. The altered drug response may be clinically relevant.

  1. The rhythms of life: what your body clock means to you!

    PubMed

    Foster, Russell G; Kreitzman, Leon

    2014-04-01

    Until we turned our nights into days and began to travel in aircraft across multiple time zones, we were largely unaware that we possess a 'day within' driven by an internal body clock. Yet the striking impairment of our abilities in the early hours of the morning soon reminds us that we are slaves to our biology. Our ability to perform mathematical calculations or other intellectual tasks between 04.00 and 06.00 h is worse than if we had consumed several shots of whisky and would be classified as legally drunk. Biological clocks drive or alter our sleep patterns, alertness, mood, physical strength, blood pressure and every other aspect of our physiology and behaviour. Our emerging understanding of how these 24 h rhythms are generated and regulated is not only one of the great success stories of modern biology, but is also informing many areas of human health. Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD) is a feature shared by some of the most challenging diseases of our time, including neuropsychiatric illness and serious disorders of the eye. Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption is also commonly seen across many sectors of society, from teenagers to shift workers. We also now appreciate that SCRD is far more than feeling sleepy at an inappropriate time. It promotes multiple illnesses ranging across abnormal metabolism, heart disease, reduced immunity, increased stress and abnormal cognition and mood states. This short review considers how 24 h rhythms are generated and regulated, the consequences of working against our body clock and the emerging relationship between SCRD and mental illness. PMID:24363383

  2. How are European patients at risk of malignant arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death identified and informed about their risk profile: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dagres, Nikolaos; Sciaraffia, Elena; Todd, Derick; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this EP wire is to examine clinical practice in the field of screening of patients of risk of ventricular arrhythmias and/or sudden cardiac death (SCD) in European countries. A systematic screening programme existed in the majority of centres and was organized by a multidisciplinary dedicated team or by an activity programme of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or heart failure clinics. In particular, high-risk subgroups of patients with ischaemic and non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy ICD implantation are considered strongly indicated within 90 days of myocardial revascularization or initial diagnosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging appears as an important tool to better characterize the left ventricular arrhythmogenic substrate in patients at risk of SCD.

  3. Congenital anophthalmia: a circadian rhythm study.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Julio; Andres, Jesus; Aragon, Maria P; Agapito, Teresa

    2004-03-01

    A circadian rhythm of heart rate and respiratory rate was seen at 1, 8, and 12 months of age in an infant born without ocular tissue, which supports the possibility that the time cues were nonphotic. No melatonin circadian rhythm was detected at any age up to 9 years of age, and this is most likely associated with the anophthalmia and lack of photic input to the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Usually circadian organization is present after the neonatal period and approaches adult levels with development.

  4. Circadian rhythm asynchrony in man during hypokinesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Cronin, S. E.; Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.; Mack, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Posture and exercise were investigated as synchronizers of certain physiologic rhythms in eight healthy male subjects in a defined environment. Four subjects exercised during bed rest. Body temperature (BT), heart rate, plasma thyroid hormone, and plasma steroid data were obtained from the subjects for a 6-day ambulatory equilibration period before bed rest, 56 days of bed rest, and a 10-day recovery period after bed rest. The results indicate that the mechanism regulating the circadian rhythmicity of the cardiovascular system is rigorously controlled and independent of the endocrine system, while the BT rhythm is more closely aligned to the endocrine system.

  5. Disruption of cardiovascular circadian rhythms in mice post myocardial infarction: relationship with central angiotensin II receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Tarek M.; Schiller, Alicia M.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Angiotensin II (Ang II) is well known to participate in the abnormal autonomic cardiovascular control that occurs during the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Disrupted cardiovascular circadian rhythm in CHF is also well accepted; however, the mechanisms underlying and the role of central Ang II type 1 receptors (AT1R) and oxidative stress in mediating such changes are not clear. In a post myocardial infarction (MI) CHF mouse model we investigated the circadian rhythm for mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) following MI. The cardiovascular parameters represent the middle 6‐h averages during daytime (6:00–18:00) and nighttime (18:00–6:00). HR increased with the severity of CHF reaching its maximum by 12 weeks post‐MI; loss of circadian HR and BRS rhythms were observed as early as 4 weeks post‐MI in conjunction with a significant blunting of the BRS and an upregulation in the AT1R and gp91phox proteins in the brainstem. Loss of MAP circadian rhythm was observed 8 weeks post‐MI. Circadian AT1R expression was demonstrated in sham animals but was lost 8 weeks following MI. Losartan reduced AT1R expression in daytime (1.18 ± 0.1 vs. 0.85 ± 0.1; P < 0.05) with a trend toward a reduction in the AT1R mRNA expression in the nighttime (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1; P > 0.05) but failed to restore circadian variability. The disruption of circadian rhythm for HR, MAP and BRS along with the upregulation of AT1 and gp91phox suggests a possible role for central oxidative stress as a mediator of circadian cardiovascular parameters in the post‐MI state. PMID:25413327

  6. Anomalies of cardiac venous drainage associated with abnormalities of cardiac conduction system.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D R; Hanratty, C G; Dixon, L J; Trimble, M; O'Keeffe, D B

    2002-07-01

    The embryological development of the superior vena cava (SVC) is complex. If the left common cardinal vein fails to occlude it can, along with the left duct of Cuvier form a left SVC, which frequently drains into the coronary sinus. This may result in abnormalities in the anatomy of this structure. A persistent left SVC occurs in 0.5% of the normal population, and 3% to 4.3% of patients with congenital heart anomalies. The pacemaking tissue of the heart is derived from two sites near the progenitors of the superior vena cava. The right-sided site forms the sinoatrial node, the left-sided site is normally carried down to an area near the coronary sinus. Out of 300 patients with cardiac rhythm abnormalities, who have undergone electrophysiological studies (EPS), or permanent pacemaker insertion (PPI), we identified 12 patients with cardiac conduction abnormalities and anomalies of venous drainage. Anomalies of the coronary sinus may be associated with abnormalities of the conduction system of the heart. This may be due to the close proximity of the coronary sinus to the final position of the left-sided primitive pacemaking tissue. In our series of 300 patients, 4% had an associated left SVC, a similar incidence to that found in previous studies of congenital heart disease.

  7. Implementation and reimbursement of remote monitoring for cardiac implantable electronic devices in Europe: a survey from the health economics committee of the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    PubMed

    Mairesse, Georges H; Braunschweig, Frieder; Klersy, Katherine; Cowie, Martin R; Leyva, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) permits early detection of arrhythmias, device, and lead failure and may also be useful in risk-predicting patient-related outcomes. Financial benefits for patients and healthcare organizations have also been shown. We sought to assess the implementation and funding of RM of CIEDs, including conventional pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices in Europe. Electronic survey from 43 centres in 15 European countries. In the study sample, RM was available in 22% of PM patients, 74% of ICD patients, and 69% of CRT patients. The most significant perceived benefits were the early detection of atrial arrhythmias in pacemaker patients, lead failure in ICD patients, and worsening heart failure in CRT patients. Remote monitoring was reported to lead a reduction of in-office follow-ups for all devices. The most important reported barrier to the implementation of RM for all CIEDs was lack of reimbursement (80% of centres). Physicians regard RM of CIEDs as a clinically useful technology that affords significant benefits for patients and healthcare organizations. Remote monitoring, however, is perceived as increasing workload. Reimbursement for RM is generally perceived as a major barrier to implementation.

  8. The Study of Biobehavioral Rhythms in a Psychology Laboratory Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David L.; Wesselhoft, Theresa

    1998-01-01

    Reports on a laboratory experiment where students measured their heart rate, blood pressure, mood, alertness, and cognitive performance. Measures showed significant circadian heart rhythm variations. They were strongly correlated and peaked at different times. Discusses the implications of this and students' reactions to the experiment. (MJP)

  9. Rhythm in Translations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Renlun

    2008-01-01

    This research is an attempt at the elucidation of the significance of rhythmic in translations. According to Eugene A. Nada's functional equivalence, the comprehensive effect which the receptors of the versions get should be the same as the one the readers of the original get, and since rhythm is an integral part of the style, rhythm should be…

  10. Circahoralian (ultradian) metabolic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, V Y

    2014-06-01

    This review presents data concerning metabolic rhythms with periods close to one hour (20 to 120 min): their occurrence, biochemical organization, nature, and significance for adaptations and age-related changes of cells and organs. Circahoralian (ultradian) rhythms have been detected for cell mass and size, protein synthesis, enzyme activities, concentration of ATP and hormones, cell respiration, and cytoplasm pH. Rhythms have been observed in bacteria, yeasts, and protozoa, as well as in many cells of metazoans, including mammals, in vivo and in cell cultures. In cell populations, the rhythms are organized by direct cell-cell communication. The biochemical mechanism involves membrane signal factors and cytoplasmic processes resulting in synchronization of individual oscillations to a common rhythm. Phosphorylation of proteins is the key process of coordination of protein synthesis and enzyme activity kinetics. The fractal nature of circahoralian rhythms is discussed as well as the involvement of these rhythms in adaptations of the cells and organs. Senescent decrease in rhythm amplitudes and correspondingly in cell-cell communication has been observed. The possibility of remodeling these changes through the intercellular medium has been predicted and experimentally shown. Perspectives for studies of the organizers and disorganizers of cell-cell communication in the intercellular medium along with appropriate receptors are discussed with special emphasis on aging and pathology. One perspective can be more precise definition of the range of normal biochemical and physiological state with the goal of correction of cellular functions.

  11. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... or stomach. Diagnosis Key heart tests include: Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) —This records the electrical activity of the heart as it contracts and relaxes. The ECG can detect abnormal heartbeats, some areas of damage, ...

  12. Distal 8p deletion (8) (p23.1): An easily missed chromosomal abnormality that may be associated with congenital heart defect and mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bai-Lin; Schneider, G.H.; Sabatino, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    We describe the clinical manifestations and molecular cytogenetic analyses of three patients with a similar distal deletion of chromosome 8. Each child had mild developmental delay and subtle minor anomalies. Two had cardiac anomalies but no other major congenital anomalies were present. High resolution G and R banding showed in all three patients del(8)(p23.1), but the breakpoint in case 1 was distal to 8p23.1, in case 2 was in the middle of 8p23.1, and in case 3 proximal to 8p23.1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies with a chromosome 8 paint probe confirmed that no other rearrangement had occurred. FISH with a chromosome 8-specific telomere probe indicated that two patients had terminal deletions. Chromosome analysis of the parents of case 1 and mother of case 2 were normal; the remaining parents were not available for study. Thirteen individual patients including the three in this study, and three relatives in one family with del(8)(p23.1), have been reported in the past 5 years. Major congenital anomalies, especially congenital heart defects, are most often associated with a breakpoint proximal to 8p23.1. Three patients were found within a 3-year period in this study and five cases were found within 4 years by another group, indicating that distal 8p deletion might be a relatively common chromosomal abnormality. This small deletion is easily overlooked (i.e., cases 1 and 2 were reported as normal at amniocentesis) and can be associated with few or no major congenital anomalies. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lirong; Zee, Phyllis C

    2012-11-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular, cellular, and physiologic mechanisms underlying the regulation of circadian rhythms, and of the impact of circadian dysfunction on health and disease. This information has transformed our understanding of the effect of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) on health, performance, and safety. CRSDs are caused by alterations of the central circadian timekeeping system, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. This article reviews circadian biology and discusses the pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of the most commonly encountered CRSDs in clinical practice.

  14. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lirong; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2012-01-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying the regulation of circadian rhythms, as well as the impact of circadian dysfunction on health and disease. This information has transformed our understanding of the effect of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) on health, performance and safety. CRSDs are caused by alterations of the central circadian time-keeping system, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. In this section, we provide a review of circadian biology and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of the most commonly encountered CRSDs in clinical practice. PMID:23099133

  15. Circadian rhythms of visual accommodation responses and physiological correlations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Randle, R. J.; Williams, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Use of a recently developed servocontrolled infrared optometer to continuously record the state of monocular focus while subjects viewed a visual target for which the stimulus to focus was systematically varied. Calculated parameters form recorded data - e.g., speeds of accommodation to approaching and receding targets, magnitude of accommodation to step changes in target distance, and amplitude and phase lag of response to sinusoidally varying stimuli were submitted to periodicity analyses. Ear canal temperature (ECT) and heart rate (HR) rhythms were also recorded for physiological correlation with accommodation rhythms. HR demonstrated a 24-hr rhythm, but ECT data did not.

  16. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  17. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Kanathur, Naveen; Harrington, John; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo

    2010-06-01

    Because there is insufficient cellular energy for organisms to perform their functions at the same constant rate and at the same time, all biologic processes show rhythmicity, each with its own unique frequency, amplitude, and phase. Optimal sleep and wakefulness requires proper timing and alignment of desired sleep-wake schedules and circadian rhythm-related periods of alertness. Persistent or recurrent mismatch between endogenous circadian rhythms and the conventional sleep-wake schedules of the environmental day can give rise to several circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Evaluation of suspected circadian rhythm sleep disorders requires proper monitoring of sleep diaries, often over several days to weeks. This article discusses the disorders of the circadian sleep-wake cycle and the therapeutic measures to correct the same.

  18. Local dynamics of heart rate: detection and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Moss, Travis J; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall

    2014-10-01

    The original observation that reduced heart rate variability (HRV) confers poor prognosis after myocardial infarction has been followed by many studies of heart rate dynamics. We tested the hypothesis that an entropy-based local dynamics measure gave prognostic information in ambulatory patients undergoing 24-h electrocardiography. In this context, entropy is the probability that short templates will find matches in the time series. We studied RR interval time series from 24-h Holter monitors of 1564 consecutive patients over age 39. We generated histograms of the count of templates as a function of the number of templates matches in short RR interval time series, and found characteristic appearance of histograms for atrial fibrillation, sinus rhythm with normal HRV, and sinus rhythm with reduced HRV and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). We developed statistical models to detect the abnormal dynamic phenotype of reduced HRV with PVCs and fashioned a local dynamics score (LDs) that, after controlling for age, added more prognostic information than other standard risk factors and common HRV metrics, including, to our surprise, the PVC count and the HRV of normal-to-normal intervals. Addition of the LDs to a predictive model using standard risk factors significantly increased the ROC area and the net reclassification improvement was 27%. We conclude that abnormal local dynamics of heart rate confer adverse prognosis in patients undergoing 24-h ambulatory electrocardiography.

  19. Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation guidelines 2010: rate and rhythm management.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Anne M; Verma, Atul; Talajic, Mario; Nattel, Stanley; Dorian, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The goals of atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL) arrhythmia management are to alleviate patient symptoms, improve patient quality of life, and minimize the morbidity associated with AF and AFL. Arrhythmia management usually commences with drugs to slow the ventricular rate. The addition of class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs for restoration or maintenance of sinus rhythm is largely determined by patient symptoms and preferences. For rate control, treatment of persistent or permanent AF and AFL should aim for a resting heart rate of <100 beats per minute. Beta-blockers or nondihydropyridine calcium channel blockers are the initial therapy for rate control of AF and AFL in most patients without a history of myocardial infarction or left ventricular dysfunction. Digoxin is not recommended as monotherapy for rate control in active patients. Digoxin and dronedarone may be used in combination with other agents to optimize rate control. The first-choice antiarrhythmic drug for maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with non structural heart disease can be any one of dronedarone, flecainide, propafenone, or sotalol. In patients with abnormal ventricular function but left ventricular ejection fraction >35%, dronedarone, sotalol, or amiodarone is recommended. In patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <35%, amiodarone is the only drug usually recommended. Intermittent antiarrhythmic drug therapy ("pill in the pocket") may be considered in symptomatic patients with infrequent, longer-lasting episodes of AF or AFL as an alternative to daily antiarrhythmic therapy. Referral for ablation of AF may be considered for patients who remain symptomatic after adequate trials of antiarrhythmic drug therapy and in whom a rhythm control strategy remains desired.

  20. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  1. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention & Treatment of High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources ... signals in the heart's upper chambers fire abnormally, which interferes with electrical signals coming from ...

  2. Development of fetal and neonatal sleep and circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Mirmiran, Majid; Maas, Yolanda G H; Ariagno, Ronald L

    2003-08-01

    The origin of sleep and circadian rhythms development is found during the fetal period. Both quiet (NREM) and active (REM) sleep are distinguishable during the last 10 weeks of gestation. Comparable to fetuses, low risk preterm infants recorded at 30-40 weeks postconceptional age, had a similar development of sleep i.e. an increase in quiet sleep and a decrease in indeterminate sleep. A further development in sleep organization characterized by increased slow wave and spindle activity during quiet sleep and coupling with circadian rhythm takes place during the first 6 months of life in both term and preterm infants.Circadian rhythm of fetal heart rate synchronized with maternal rest-activity, heart rate, cortisol, melatonin, and body temperature rhythms is present during the last 10 weeks of gestation. Although maternally influenced, circadian rhythm antenatally becomes ultradian at birth. Both preterm and term infants show a significant increase in circadian body temperature rhythm amplitude during the first 3 months of life.

  3. Cardiac abnormalities in acromegaly. Pathophysiology and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Giovanni; Pivonello, Rosario; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is claimed to be one of the most severe complications of acromegaly, contributing significantly to mortality in this disease. In fact, an excess of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) causes a specific derangement of cardiomyocytes, leading to abnormalities in cardiac muscle structure and function, inducing a specific cardiomyopathy. In the early phase of acromegaly the excess of GH and IGF-I induces a hyperkinetic syndrome, characterized by increased heart rate and increased systolic output. Concentric hypertrophy is the most common feature of cardiac involvement in acromegaly, found in more than two thirds of patients at diagnosis. This abnormality is commonly associated with diastolic dysfunction and eventually with impaired systolic function ending in heart failure, if the GH/IGF-I excess is left untreated. In addition, abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and of heart valves have also been described in acromegaly. The coexistence of other complications, such as arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus, aggravates acromegalic cardiomyopathy. Successful control of acromegaly induces a decrease in left ventricular mass and an improvement in diastolic function, while the effects of GH/IGF-I suppression on systolic function are more variable. However, since cardiovascular alterations in young patients with short disease duration are milder than in those with longer disease duration, it is likely to be easier to reverse and/or arrest acromegalic cardiomyopathy in young patients with early-onset disease. In conclusion, careful assessments of cardiac function, morphology, and activity are required in patients with acromegaly. An early diagnosis and prompt effective treatment are important in order to reverse acromegalic cardiomyopathy.

  4. Abnormal energetics and ATP depletion in pressure-overload mouse hearts: in vivo high-energy phosphate concentration measures by noninvasive magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Chacko, V P; Weiss, Robert G

    2009-07-01

    (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers a unique means to noninvasively quantify the major cardiac high-energy phosphates, creatine phosphate (PCr) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), that are critical for normal myocardial contractile function and viability. Spatially localized (31)P MRS has been used to quantify the in vivo PCr-to-ATP ratio (PCr/ATP) of murine hearts, including those with pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by thoracic aortic constriction (TAC). To date, there has been no approach for measuring the absolute tissue concentrations of PCr and ATP in the in vivo mouse heart that promise a better understanding of high-energy metabolism. A method to quantify in vivo murine myocardial concentrations of PCr and ATP using an external reference is described, validated, and applied to normal and TAC hearts. This new method does not prolong the scan times in mice beyond those previously required to measure PCr/ATP. The new method renders an [ATP] of 5.0 +/- 0.9 (mean +/- SD) and [PCr] of 10.4 +/- 1.4 micromol/g wet wt in normal mouse hearts (n = 7) and significantly lower values in TAC hearts (n = 10) of 4.0 +/- 0.8 and 6.7 +/- 2.0 micromol/g wet wt for [ATP] (P < 0.04) and [PCr] (P < 0.001), respectively. The in vivo magnetic resonance [ATP] results are in good agreement with those obtained using an in vitro enzyme luminescent assay of perchloric acid extracts of the same hearts. In conclusion, a validated (31)P MRS method for quantifying [ATP] and [PCr] in the in vivo mouse heart using spatial localization and an external reference is described and used to demonstrate significant reductions in not only PCr/ATP but [ATP] in hypertrophied TAC hearts.

  5. Ablation of the CLP-1 gene leads to down-regulation of the HAND1 gene and abnormality of the left ventricle of the heart and fetal death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Facan; Wagner, Michael; Siddiqui, M A Q

    2004-06-01

    We have recently reported that cardiac lineage protein-1 (CLP-1), a nuclear protein with an acidic region that constitutes a potential protein-protein interaction domain, regulates transcription of the cardiac myosin light chain-2v (MLC-2v) gene promoter in a manner consistent with its being a transcriptional co-activator or regulator. To test the postulate that CLP-1 is a regulator of cardiac genes we ablated the CLP-1 gene in mice. Past embryonic day (E)16.5, CLP-1 null alleles did not show Mendelian inheritance suggesting that absence of CLP-1 was lethal in late fetal stages. CLP-1 (-/-) fetal hearts exhibited a reduced left ventricular chamber with thickened myocardial walls, features suggestive of cardiac hypertrophy. Electron microscopic analysis of E16.5 CLP-1 (-/-) ventricular myocardium showed a marked decline in cell density and altered nuclear and myofibril morphologies similar to that seen in animal models of hypertrophic heart. Analysis of contractile and non-contractile protein genes known to be re-expressed during cardiac hypertrophy showed them to have higher expression levels in CLP-1 (-/-) hearts thereby confirming the hypertrophic phenotype at the molecular level. Analysis of cardiac development genes showed that expression of the HAND1 transcription factor, a gene involved in patterning of the heart tube and down-regulated in hypertrophic hearts, was also significantly reduced in CLP-1 (-/-) fetal hearts. CLP-1 and HAND1 have similar expression patterns in the developing heart ventricles. These data suggest that CLP-1 and the HAND transcription factors may be part of a genetic program critical to proper heart development, perturbation of which can lead to cardiomyopathy.

  6. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  7. Speech rhythm: a metaphor?

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Francis; Jeon, Hae-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Is speech rhythmic? In the absence of evidence for a traditional view that languages strive to coordinate either syllables or stress-feet with regular time intervals, we consider the alternative that languages exhibit contrastive rhythm subsisting merely in the alternation of stronger and weaker elements. This is initially plausible, particularly for languages with a steep ‘prominence gradient’, i.e. a large disparity between stronger and weaker elements; but we point out that alternation is poorly achieved even by a ‘stress-timed’ language such as English, and, historically, languages have conspicuously failed to adopt simple phonological remedies that would ensure alternation. Languages seem more concerned to allow ‘syntagmatic contrast’ between successive units and to use durational effects to support linguistic functions than to facilitate rhythm. Furthermore, some languages (e.g. Tamil, Korean) lack the lexical prominence which would most straightforwardly underpin prominence of alternation. We conclude that speech is not incontestibly rhythmic, and may even be antirhythmic. However, its linguistic structure and patterning allow the metaphorical extension of rhythm in varying degrees and in different ways depending on the language, and it is this analogical process which allows speech to be matched to external rhythms. PMID:25385774

  8. Speech rhythm: a metaphor?

    PubMed

    Nolan, Francis; Jeon, Hae-Sung

    2014-12-19

    Is speech rhythmic? In the absence of evidence for a traditional view that languages strive to coordinate either syllables or stress-feet with regular time intervals, we consider the alternative that languages exhibit contrastive rhythm subsisting merely in the alternation of stronger and weaker elements. This is initially plausible, particularly for languages with a steep 'prominence gradient', i.e. a large disparity between stronger and weaker elements; but we point out that alternation is poorly achieved even by a 'stress-timed' language such as English, and, historically, languages have conspicuously failed to adopt simple phonological remedies that would ensure alternation. Languages seem more concerned to allow 'syntagmatic contrast' between successive units and to use durational effects to support linguistic functions than to facilitate rhythm. Furthermore, some languages (e.g. Tamil, Korean) lack the lexical prominence which would most straightforwardly underpin prominence of alternation. We conclude that speech is not incontestibly rhythmic, and may even be antirhythmic. However, its linguistic structure and patterning allow the metaphorical extension of rhythm in varying degrees and in different ways depending on the language, and it is this analogical process which allows speech to be matched to external rhythms.

  9. Measuring Child Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Elinor; Post, Brechtje; Astruc, Lluisa; Prieto, Pilar; Vanrell, Maria del Mar

    2012-01-01

    Interval-based rhythm metrics were applied to the speech of English, Catalan and Spanish 2, 4 and 6 year-olds, and compared with the (adult-directed) speech of their mothers. Results reveal that child speech does not fall into a well-defined rhythmic class: for all three languages, it is more "vocalic" (higher %V) than adult speech and has a…

  10. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders.

  11. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders. PMID:26118041

  12. First report of a de novo 18q11.2 microdeletion including GATA6 associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bui, Peter H; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Wong, Derek; Perens, Gregory; Dipple, Katrina M; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 have been previously reported in many patients. Most cases involve the more distal regions of the long arm (18q21.1->qter). However, proximal interstitial deletions involving 18q11.2 are extremely rare. Here we report on a 14-month-old female with a 4.7 Mb (19,667,062-24,401,876 hg19) de novo interstitial deletion within chromosomal band 18q11.2, which includes GATA6 and 24 other RefSeq genes. The clinical features of our patient include complex congenital heart defects, a double outlet right ventricle, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, D-malposed great arteries, an atrial septal defect, a dysplastic aortic valve and patent ductus arteriosus. In addition, she had renal anomalies-a duplicated collecting system on the left and mild right hydronephrosis. These heart and renal defects are not reported in other patients with 18q proximal interstitial deletions. Heterozygous point mutations in GATA6, encoding for a zinc finger transcription factor, have been shown to cause congenital heart defects. Given the well-established biological role of GATA6 in cardiac development, a deletion of GATA6 is very likely responsible for our patient's complex congenital heart defects. This is the smallest and most proximal 18q11.2 deletion involving GATA6 that is associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal anomalies.

  13. [The concept of biological rhythm in psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Souêtre, E; Salvati, E; Darcourt, G

    1987-12-01

    The chronobiological hypotheses of depression are based on epidemiological, biological as well as therapeutical pieces of evidence. The seasonal pattern of depression and suicide rates tend to link affective disorders and the daylight duration. Disturbances of circadian rhythms have been reported in endogenous depression. Treatments of depression, such as manipulations of the sleep/wake cycle, phototherapy or tricyclics, may involve chronobiological mechanisms on endogenous pacemakers. Beside the phase advance hypothesis of depression, present data seem to involve a disturbance of the mechanisms of entrainment of the internal clocks by external synchronizers. Other psychiatric illnesses may thus be linked to chronobiological abnormalities. PMID:3326073

  14. Ordinal pattern statistics for the assessment of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, G.; Graff, B.; Kaczkowska, A.; Makowiec, D.; Amigó, J. M.; Piskorski, J.; Narkiewicz, K.; Guzik, P.

    2013-06-01

    The recognition of all main features of a healthy heart rhythm (the so-called sinus rhythm) is still one of the biggest challenges in contemporary cardiology. Recently the interesting physiological phenomenon of heart rate asymmetry has been observed. This phenomenon is related to unbalanced contributions of heart rate decelerations and accelerations to heart rate variability. In this paper we apply methods based on the concept of ordinal pattern to the analysis of electrocardiograms (inter-peak intervals) of healthy subjects in the supine position. This way we observe new regularities of the heart rhythm related to the distribution of ordinal patterns of lengths 3 and 4.

  15. Acromegalic heart disease: influence of treatment of the acromegaly on the heart.

    PubMed

    Hayward, R P; Emanuel, R W; Nabarro, J D

    1987-01-01

    In a series of 256 patients with acromegaly, 10 had evidence of heart disease for which no explanation apart from the acromegaly could be found. Heart disease presented with effort dyspnoea, cardiac failure, palpitation, ECG changes or cardiomegaly. Initial chest radiographs showed cardiac enlargement in seven patients. Electrocardiograms were abnormal in nine patients with repolarisation disorders or intraventricular conduction defects. Rhythm disturbances were found in six. Echocardiograms were performed on six patients; all were abnormal showing left ventricular hypertrophy or impaired function. In five patients radionuclide ventriculography was also performed. Cardiac catheterisation was undertaken on seven patients; all showed either hypertrophy or dilatation of the left ventricle. Coronary arteries were widely dilated in two patients and in another there was dilation of the proximal segment only. In six of the 10 patients, acromegaly was cured by transsphenoidal surgery. This resulted in limited improvement of cardiac function in two patients only. Of the four patients who were not cured, three died and one was lost to the study. Four patients in total died and autopsies were obtained in two: one showed changes suggesting myocarditis and the other diffuse fibrosis. It is concluded that acromegaly may infrequently lead to heart disease, and that if recognised at an early stage progression may, in a proportion of patients, be arrested by successful treatment.

  16. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jung Hie; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including underlying causes, diagnostic considerations, and typical treatments. Methods Literature review and discussion of specific cases. Results Survey studies 1,2 suggest that up to 3% of the adult population suffers from a circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD). However, these sleep disorders are often confused with insomnia, and an estimated 10% of adult and 16% of adolescent sleep disorders patients may have a CRSD 3-6. While some CRSD (such as jet lag) can be self-limiting, others when untreated can lead to adverse medical, psychological, and social consequences. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders classifies CRSD as dyssomnias, with six subtypes: Advanced Sleep Phase Type, Delayed Sleep Phase Type, Irregular Sleep Wake Type, Free Running Type, Jet Lag Type, and Shift Work Type. The primary clinical characteristic of all CRSD is an inability to fall asleep and wake at the desired time. It is believed that CRSD arise from a problem with the internal biological clock (circadian timing system) and/or misalignment between the circadian timing system and the external 24-hour environment. This misalignment can be the result of biological and/or behavioral factors. CRSD can be confused with other sleep or medical disorders. Conclusions Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a distinct class of sleep disorders characterized by a mismatch between the desired timing of sleep and the ability to fall asleep and remain asleep. If untreated, CRSD can lead to insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, with negative medical, psychological, and social consequences. It is important for physicians to recognize potential circadian rhythm sleep disorders so that appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and referral can be made. PMID:25368503

  17. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorder].

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kazuo

    2013-12-01

    Primary pathophysiology of circadian rhythm sleep disorders(CRSDs) is a misalignment between the endogenous circadian rhythm phase and the desired or socially required sleep-wake schedule, or dysfunction of the circadian pacemaker and its afferent/efferent pathways. CRSDs consist of delayed sleep phase type, advanced sleep phase type, free-running type, irregular sleep-wake type, shift work type and jet lag type. Chronotherapy using strong zeitgebers (time cues), such as bright light and melatonin/ melatonin type 2 receptor agonist, is effective when administered with proper timing. Bright light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms. Bright light therapy (appropriately-timed exposure to bright light) for CRSDs is an effective treatment option, and can shift the sleep-wake cycle to earlier or later times, in order to correct for misalignment between the circadian system and the desired sleep-wake schedule. Timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has also been shown to be useful in the treatment of CRSDs.

  18. The primate seahorse rhythm.

    PubMed

    Campos, L M G; Cruz-Rizzolo, Roelf J; Pinato, L

    2015-07-10

    The main Zeitgeber, the day-night cycle, synchronizes the central oscillator which determines behaviors rhythms as sleep-wake behavior, body temperature, the regulation of hormone secretion, and the acquisition and processing of memory. Thus, actions such as acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval performed in the hippocampus are modulated by the circadian system and show a varied dependence on light and dark. To investigate changes in the hippocampus' cellular mechanism invoked by the day and night in a diurnal primate, this study analyzed the expression of PER2 and the calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in the hippocampus of Sapajus apella, a diurnal primate, at two different time points, one during the day and one during the dark phase. The PER2 protein expression peaked at night in the antiphase described for the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the same primate, indicating that hippocampal cells can present independent rhythmicity. This hippocampal rhythm was similar to that presented by diurnal but not nocturnal rodents. The CaBPs immunoreactivity also showed day/night variations in the cell number and in the cell morphology. Our findings provide evidence for the claim that the circadian regulation in the hippocampus may involve rhythms of PER2 and CaBPs expression that may contribute to the adaptation of this species in events and activities relevant to the respective periods.

  19. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Golden, Susan S

    2015-12-01

    Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  20. Circadian rhythm in handwriting.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Isabelle; Häussler, Andreas; Marquardt, Christian; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the motor process of handwriting is influenced by a circadian rhythm. Nine healthy young male subjects underwent a 40-h sleep deprivation protocol under constant routine conditions. Starting at 09:00 hours, subjects performed every 3 h two handwriting tasks of different complexity. Handwriting performance was evaluated by writing speed, writing fluency and script size. The frequency of handwriting, as a measure of movement speed, revealed a circadian rhythm, validated by harmonic regression, with a slowing at the time of the onset of melatonin secretion (22:17 hours) and a trough in the very early morning at around 03:30 hours. In the temporal variability of handwriting an effect of task complexity was suggested in the direction of circadian variations in parallel with speed only for the sentence. Despite deficits of speed and temporal variability, writing fluency did not change significantly across sessions indicating that the basic automation of handwriting was preserved at any time. On the second day, daytime levels of the kinematics of handwriting did not reflect impaired performance after sleep deprivation. Our results show for the first time a clear circadian rhythm for the production of handwriting.

  1. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Normal Sinus Rhythm-Sinus Bradycardia is Common in Young Children Post-extracardiac Fontan.

    PubMed

    Evans, William N; Acherman, Ruben J; Restrepo, Humberto

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesized that normal sinus rhythm-sinus bradycardia is common in young children following extracardiac Fontan. After excluding patients with sinus pauses, junctional rhythm, tachy-brady syndrome, frequent ectopics, or ectopic atrial rhythm, we found an ambulatory 24-h Holter monitor average heart rate of 78 ± 12 beats per minute (bpm) in 33 post-extracardiac Fontan children with a median age of 6 years (5-10). A 24-h average heart rate of 78 ± 12 bpm is statistically significantly lower than a 24-h average heart rate value of 90 ± 10 bpm derived from a similarly aged control population (p < 0.01). We conclude that after excluding those with significant arrhythmias, normal sinus rhythm-sinus bradycardia is common in children post-extracardiac Fontan.

  3. Light phase-restricted feeding slows basal heart rate to exaggerate the type-3 long QT syndrome phenotype in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Burgess, Don E.; Manning, Cody L.; Zhao, Yihua; Moss, Arthur J.; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Elayi, Claude S.; Esser, Karyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) is caused by mutations in the SCN5A-encoded Nav1.5 channel. LQT3 patients exhibit time of day-associated abnormal increases in their heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) intervals and risk for life-threatening episodes. This study determines the effects of uncoupling environmental time cues that entrain circadian rhythms (time of light and time of feeding) on heart rate and ventricular repolarization in wild-type (WT) or transgenic LQT3 mice (Scn5a+/ΔKPQ). We used an established light phase-restricted feeding paradigm that disrupts the alignment among the circadian rhythms in the central pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues including heart. Circadian analysis of the RR and QT intervals showed the Scn5a+/ΔKPQ mice had QT rhythms with larger amplitudes and 24-h midline means and a more pronounced slowing of the heart rate. For both WT and Scn5a+/ΔKPQ mice, light phase-restricted feeding shifted the RR and QT rhythms ∼12 h, increased their amplitudes greater than twofold, and raised the 24-h midline mean by ∼10%. In contrast to WT mice, the QTc interval in Scn5a+/ΔKPQ mice exhibited time-of-day prolongation that was flipped after light phase-restricted feeding. The time-of-day changes in the QTc intervals of Scn5a+/ΔKPQ mice were secondary to a steeper power relation between their QT and RR intervals. We conclude that uncoupling time of feeding from normal light cues can dramatically slow heart rate to unmask genotype-specific differences in the QT intervals and aggravate the LQT3-related phenotype. PMID:25343952

  4. Light phase-restricted feeding slows basal heart rate to exaggerate the type-3 long QT syndrome phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Schroder, Elizabeth A; Burgess, Don E; Manning, Cody L; Zhao, Yihua; Moss, Arthur J; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Elayi, Claude S; Esser, Karyn A; Delisle, Brian P

    2014-12-15

    Long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) is caused by mutations in the SCN5A-encoded Nav1.5 channel. LQT3 patients exhibit time of day-associated abnormal increases in their heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) intervals and risk for life-threatening episodes. This study determines the effects of uncoupling environmental time cues that entrain circadian rhythms (time of light and time of feeding) on heart rate and ventricular repolarization in wild-type (WT) or transgenic LQT3 mice (Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ)). We used an established light phase-restricted feeding paradigm that disrupts the alignment among the circadian rhythms in the central pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues including heart. Circadian analysis of the RR and QT intervals showed the Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice had QT rhythms with larger amplitudes and 24-h midline means and a more pronounced slowing of the heart rate. For both WT and Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice, light phase-restricted feeding shifted the RR and QT rhythms ~12 h, increased their amplitudes greater than twofold, and raised the 24-h midline mean by ~10%. In contrast to WT mice, the QTc interval in Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice exhibited time-of-day prolongation that was flipped after light phase-restricted feeding. The time-of-day changes in the QTc intervals of Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice were secondary to a steeper power relation between their QT and RR intervals. We conclude that uncoupling time of feeding from normal light cues can dramatically slow heart rate to unmask genotype-specific differences in the QT intervals and aggravate the LQT3-related phenotype.

  5. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    (ECG). Testing for the evaluation of new or worsening symptoms following a prior test or procedure was found to be Appropriate. In addition, testing was found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate for patients within 90 days of an abnormal or uncertain prior result. Pre-operative testing was rated Appropriate or May Be Appropriate only for patients who had poor functional capacity and were undergoing vascular or intermediate risk surgery with 1 or more clinical risk factors or an organ transplant. The exercise ECG was suggested as an Appropriate test for cardiac rehabilitation clearance or for exercise prescription purposes. Testing in asymptomatic patients was generally found to be Rarely Appropriate, except for calcium scoring and exercise testing in intermediate and high-risk individuals and either stress or anatomic imaging in higher-risk individuals, which were all rated as May Be Appropriate. All modalities of follow-up testing after a prior test or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 2 years and within 5 years after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in the absence of new symptoms were rated Rarely Appropriate. Pre-operative testing for patients with good functional capacity, prior normal testing within 1 year, or prior to low-risk surgery also were found to be Rarely Appropriate. Imaging for an exercise prescription or prior to the initiation of cardiac rehabilitation was Rarely Appropriate except for cardiac rehabilitation clearance for heart failure patients.

  6. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    ). Testing for the evaluation of new or worsening symptoms following a prior test or procedure was found to be Appropriate. In addition, testing was found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate for patients within 90 days of an abnormal or uncertain prior result. Pre-operative testing was rated Appropriate or May Be Appropriate only for patients who had poor functional capacity and were undergoing vascular or intermediate risk surgery with 1 or more clinical risk factors or an organ transplant. The exercise ECG was suggested as an Appropriate test for cardiac rehabilitation clearance or for exercise prescription purposes. Testing in asymptomatic patients was generally found to be Rarely Appropriate, except for calcium scoring and exercise testing in intermediate and high-risk individuals and either stress or anatomic imaging in higher-risk individuals, which were all rated as May Be Appropriate. All modalities of follow-up testing after a prior test or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 2 years and within 5 years after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in the absence of new symptoms were rated Rarely Appropriate. Pre-operative testing for patients with good functional capacity, prior normal testing within 1 year, or prior to low-risk surgery also were found to be Rarely Appropriate. Imaging for an exercise prescription or prior to the initiation of cardiac rehabilitation was Rarely Appropriate except for cardiac rehabilitation clearance for heart failure patients.

  7. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  8. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  9. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  10. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  11. Electrocardiographic abnormalities among arsenic-exposed persons through groundwater in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S Akhtar; Khatun, Fatema; Sayed, M H Salim Ullah; Khan, Manzurul Haque; Aziz, Rashed; Hossain, Mohammed Zakir; Faruquee, M H

    2006-06-01

    This study was carried out among arsenic-exposed and non-exposed people of Bangladesh to assess and compare their cardiac status based on electrocardiographic (ECG) findings. For the purpose of the study, participants were included in three groups: arsenic-exposed persons with arsenicosis (arsenicosis group), arsenic-exposed persons without arsenicosis (non-arsenicosis group), and persons not exposed to arsenic (non-exposed group). Each group included 50 respondents. In this study, no significant difference in heart rate, rhythm, axis, and pulse rate interval was detected among the arsenicosis, non-arsenicosis and non-exposed groups. A significant difference in corrected QT interval between the arsenicosis and the non-exposed group (p<0.05) was observed. On the contrary, no statistically significant difference in corrected QT interval between the non-arsenicosis and the non-exposed group was found. Abnormal QRS complex was found among 14%, 8%, and 2% of the arsenicosis, non-arsenicosis, and non-exposed groups respectively. ECG findings, indicative of left ventricular hypertrophy, ischaemic heart disease, and right bundle branch block, were high among the arsenicosis group. Overall, abnormal ECG findings were high (58%) among the respondents of the arsenicosis group and were highly significant (p<0.001). The findings revealed that there was a significant association between ECG abnormalities and arsenic exposure.

  12. Regional Microstructural and Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Abnormalities in the Corpus Callosum of Neonates With Congenital Heart Defect Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Cornelia; Singer, Jitka; Latal, Beatrice; Knirsch, Walter; Makki, Malek

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the structural development of the corpus callosum in term neonates with congenital heart defect before and after surgery using diffusion tensor imaging and 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared parallel and radial diffusions, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy, and volume of 5 substructures of the corpus callosum: genu, rostral body, body, isthmus, and splenium. Compared to healthy controls, we found a significantly lower volume of the splenium and total corpus callosum and a higher radial diffusion and lower fractional anisotropy in the splenium of patients presurgery; a lower volume in all substructures in the postsurgery group; higher radial diffusion in the rostral body, body, and splenium; and a higher apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of postsurgery patients. Similar fractional anisotropy changes in congenital heart defect patients were reported in preterm infants. Our findings in apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of these patients (pre and postsurgery) are comparable to findings in preterm neonates with psychomotor delay. Delayed maturation of the isthmus was also reported in preterm infants.

  13. Strange musical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Hortt, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Music, along with its attached rhythm, has been with man for centuries, developing and evolving along with him. Its influence on human behavior and mood can reach levels whose limits are still unknown, especially in everything related to perception, where the whole nervous system is involved. Thus, physiology and psychology become strongly connected areas, while technology, through, for example, the production of music by electronic means, appears as a new unexpected ingredient that traditional composers and musicians of older times could not imagine. Obviously, bioengineering and its multiple branches are not absent either [1]?[4]. The literature is enormous with several specialized journals. When one looks back in time at the evolution of this complex area, the appearance of some kind of sudden jump (as a step function), which took place within a relatively recent short interval, is evident: music is now much more than what it used to be, and rhythm has made a step forward as if resurrecting and renewing the ancient Indian or African drums. PMID:25437475

  14. Sleep, Memory & Brain Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Buzsáki, György

    2015-01-01

    Sleep occupies roughly one-third of our lives, yet the scientific community is still not entirely clear on its purpose or function. Existing data point most strongly to its role in memory and homeostasis: that sleep helps maintain basic brain functioning via a homeostatic mechanism that loosens connections between overworked synapses, and that sleep helps consolidate and re-form important memories. In this review, we will summarize these theories, but also focus on substantial new information regarding the relation of electrical brain rhythms to sleep. In particular, while REM sleep may contribute to the homeostatic weakening of overactive synapses, a prominent and transient oscillatory rhythm called “sharp-wave ripple” seems to allow for consolidation of behaviorally relevant memories across many structures of the brain. We propose that a theory of sleep involving the division of labor between two states of sleep–REM and non-REM, the latter of which has an abundance of ripple electrical activity–might allow for a fusion of the two main sleep theories. This theory then postulates that sleep performs a combination of consolidation and homeostasis that promotes optimal knowledge retention as well as optimal waking brain function. PMID:26097242

  15. Strange musical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Hortt, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Music, along with its attached rhythm, has been with man for centuries, developing and evolving along with him. Its influence on human behavior and mood can reach levels whose limits are still unknown, especially in everything related to perception, where the whole nervous system is involved. Thus, physiology and psychology become strongly connected areas, while technology, through, for example, the production of music by electronic means, appears as a new unexpected ingredient that traditional composers and musicians of older times could not imagine. Obviously, bioengineering and its multiple branches are not absent either [1]?[4]. The literature is enormous with several specialized journals. When one looks back in time at the evolution of this complex area, the appearance of some kind of sudden jump (as a step function), which took place within a relatively recent short interval, is evident: music is now much more than what it used to be, and rhythm has made a step forward as if resurrecting and renewing the ancient Indian or African drums.

  16. An interstitial deletion of 7.1Mb in chromosome band 6p22.3 associated with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including heart defects, short neck, and eye abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Anna; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Giacobini, Maibritt

    2009-01-01

    Seven cases with an interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 6 involving the 6p22 region have previously been reported. The clinical phenotype of these cases includes developmental delay, brain-, heart-, and kidney defects, eye abnormalities, short neck, craniofacial malformations, hypotonia, as well as clinodactyly or syndactyly. Here, we report a patient with a 7.1Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome band 6p22.3, detected by genome-wide screening array CGH. The patient is a 4-year-old girl with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including eye abnormalities, short neck, and a ventricular septum defect. The deleted region at 6p22.3 in our patient overlaps with six out of the seven previously reported cases with a 6p22-24 interstitial deletion. This enabled us to further narrow down the critical region for the 6p22 deletion phenotype to 2.2Mb. Twelve genes are mapped to the overlapping deleted region, among them the gene encoding the ataxin-1 protein, the ATXN1 gene. Mice with homozygous deletions in ATXN1 are phenotypically normal but show cognitive delay. Haploinsufficiency of ATXN1 may therefore contribute to the learning difficulties observed in the patients harboring a 6p22 deletion.

  17. A de novo 0.63 Mb 6q25.1 deletion associated with growth failure, congenital heart defect, underdeveloped cerebellar vermis, abnormal cutaneous elasticity and joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Ruggieri, Martino; Mankad, Kshitij; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Granata, Francesca; Loddo, Italia; Moschella, Emanuela; Calabro, Maria Pia; Capalbo, Anna; Bernardini, Laura; Novelli, Antonio; Polizzi, Agata; Seidler, Daniela G; Arrigo, Teresa; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-09-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are rare and are characterized by great clinical variability according to the deletion breakpoint. We report a on 6-year-old girl with a de novo 0.63 Mb deletion on chromosome 6q25.1 who demonstrated multiple congenital anomalies including a ventricular septal defect and an underdeveloped cerebellar vermis. She presented with severe pre- and post-natal growth failure, hyperextensible small joints (Beighton scores = 8/9; with normal parental scores), and an abnormally elastic, redundant skin. Abnormally high upper/lower segment ratio (i.e., 1.34 = > 3SD), mild dysmorphic facial features and developmental delay were also present. The girl's phenotype was compared with: (i) two girls, each previously reported by Bisgaard et al. and Caselli et al. with similar albeit larger (2.6-7.21 Mb) deletions; (ii) seven additional individuals (6 M; 1 F) harboring deletions within the 6q25.1 region reported in the literature; and (iii) ten further patients (5 M; 4 F; 1 unrecorded sex) recorded in the DECIPHER 6.0 database. We reported on the present girl as her findings could contribute to advance the phenotype of 6q deletions. In addition, the present deletion is the smallest so far recorded in the 6q25 region encompassing eight known genes [vs. 41 of Bisgaard et al., and 23 of Caselli et al.,], including the TAB2 (likely responsible for the girl's congenital heart defect), LATS1 gene, and the UST gene (a regulator of the homeostasis of proteoglycans, which could have played a role in the abnormal dermal and cartilage elasticity).

  18. A de novo 0.63 Mb 6q25.1 deletion associated with growth failure, congenital heart defect, underdeveloped cerebellar vermis, abnormal cutaneous elasticity and joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Ruggieri, Martino; Mankad, Kshitij; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Granata, Francesca; Loddo, Italia; Moschella, Emanuela; Calabro, Maria Pia; Capalbo, Anna; Bernardini, Laura; Novelli, Antonio; Polizzi, Agata; Seidler, Daniela G; Arrigo, Teresa; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-09-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are rare and are characterized by great clinical variability according to the deletion breakpoint. We report a on 6-year-old girl with a de novo 0.63 Mb deletion on chromosome 6q25.1 who demonstrated multiple congenital anomalies including a ventricular septal defect and an underdeveloped cerebellar vermis. She presented with severe pre- and post-natal growth failure, hyperextensible small joints (Beighton scores = 8/9; with normal parental scores), and an abnormally elastic, redundant skin. Abnormally high upper/lower segment ratio (i.e., 1.34 = > 3SD), mild dysmorphic facial features and developmental delay were also present. The girl's phenotype was compared with: (i) two girls, each previously reported by Bisgaard et al. and Caselli et al. with similar albeit larger (2.6-7.21 Mb) deletions; (ii) seven additional individuals (6 M; 1 F) harboring deletions within the 6q25.1 region reported in the literature; and (iii) ten further patients (5 M; 4 F; 1 unrecorded sex) recorded in the DECIPHER 6.0 database. We reported on the present girl as her findings could contribute to advance the phenotype of 6q deletions. In addition, the present deletion is the smallest so far recorded in the 6q25 region encompassing eight known genes [vs. 41 of Bisgaard et al., and 23 of Caselli et al.,], including the TAB2 (likely responsible for the girl's congenital heart defect), LATS1 gene, and the UST gene (a regulator of the homeostasis of proteoglycans, which could have played a role in the abnormal dermal and cartilage elasticity). PMID:25940952

  19. Selection and collection of multi parameter physiological data for cardiac rhythm diagnostic algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, J.; Weller, P.; Cooklin, M.

    2010-07-01

    Automated diagnostic algorithms are used in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD's) to detect abnormal heart rhythms. Algorithms misdiagnose and improved specificity is needed to prevent inappropriate therapy. Knowledge engineering (KE) and artificial intelligence (AI) could improve this. A pilot study of KE was performed with artificial neural network (ANN) as AI system. A case note review analysed arrhythmic events stored in patients ICD memory. 13.2% patients received inappropriate therapy. The best ICD algorithm had sensitivity 1.00, specificity 0.69 (p<0.001 different to gold standard). A subset of data was used to train and test an ANN. A feed-forward, back-propagation network with 7 inputs, a 4 node hidden layer and 1 output had sensitivity 1.00, specificity 0.71 (p<0.001). A prospective study was performed using KE to list arrhythmias, factors and indicators for which measurable parameters were evaluated and results reviewed by a domain expert. Waveforms from electrodes in the heart and thoracic bio-impedance; temperature and motion data were collected from 65 patients during cardiac electrophysiological studies. 5 incomplete datasets were due to technical failures. We concluded that KE successfully guided selection of parameters and ANN produced a usable system and that complex data collection carries greater risk of technical failure, leading to data loss.

  20. Ultrastructural correlates of left ventricular contraction abnormalities in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease: determinants of reversible segmental asynergy postrevascularization surgery.

    PubMed

    Flameng, W; Suy, R; Schwarz, F; Borgers, M; Piessens, J; Thone, F; Van Ermen, H; De Geest, H

    1981-11-01

    The relationships between structural alterations and left ventricular (LV) contraction abnormalities were studied in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Transmural biopsies of the LV anterior free wall were taken during aortocoronary bypass surgery (CABG) in 62 patients. When preoperative anterior wall motion (AWM) was reduced, significant myocardial cell degeneration was found in patients with as well as without previous anterior infarction (MI). The amount of myocardial fibrosis was increased only in patients with ECG evidence of previous anterior MI (p less than 0.001). In a second series of 139 CAD patients, cineventriculograms performed before and 8 months after CABG were examined. In patients with patent grafts to the LV anterior wall not previously infarcted, reduced AWM became normal. In patients with previous anterior MI the outcome of AWM was unpredictable (usually unimproved). Thus the histologic correlate of reduced AWM in segments not previously infarcted was progressive loss of contractile material in otherwise viable myocardial cells. Some reversibility was suggested by restoration of resting function after CABG. Unpredictable results in segments associated with pathologic Q waves appear related to the fibrous component of these previously infarcted areas. PMID:6975559

  1. Therapeutic progress of two sibling cases exhibiting sleep-wake rhythm disorder.

    PubMed

    Mukai, M; Uchimura, N; Takeuchi, N; Waseda, Y; Takaishi, J; Sakamoto, T; Maeda, H

    2000-06-01

    In this study, two females, siblings who exhibited a non-24 h sleep-wake rhythm (non-24 h) at home were observed. However, they showed a delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) immediately after admission to Kurume University Hospital. Melatonin (3 mg) was commenced following chronotherapy and this improved their sleep-wake rhythm. Polysomnography (PSG) showed decreased sleep latency and increased sleep stage. In these cases, the involvement of environmental factors was strongly suggested for the sleep-wake rhythm abnormalities as well as familial factors. PMID:11186111

  2. Biological rhythms, higher brain function, and behavior: Gaps, opportunities, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Benca, Ruth; Duncan, Marilyn J; Frank, Ellen; McClung, Colleen; Nelson, Randy J; Vicentic, Aleksandra

    2009-12-11

    Increasing evidence suggests that disrupted temporal organization impairs behavior, cognition, and affect; further, disruption of circadian clock genes impairs sleep-wake cycle and social rhythms which may be implicated in mental disorders. Despite this strong evidence, a gap in understanding the neural mechanisms of this interaction obscures whether biological rhythms disturbances are the underlying causes or merely symptoms of mental disorder. Here, we review current understanding, emerging concepts, gaps, and opportunities pertinent to (1) the neurobiology of the interactions between circadian oscillators and the neural circuits subserving higher brain function and behaviors of relevance to mental health, (2) the most promising approaches to determine how biological rhythms regulate brain function and behavior under normal and pathological conditions, (3) the gaps and challenges to advancing knowledge on the link between disrupted circadian rhythms/sleep and psychiatric disorders, and (4) the novel strategies for translation of basic science discoveries in circadian biology to clinical settings to define risk, prevent or delay onset of mental illnesses, design diagnostic tools, and propose new therapeutic strategies. The review is organized around five themes pertinent to (1) the impact of molecular clocks on physiology and behavior, (2) the interactions between circadian signals and cognitive functions, (3) the interface of circadian rhythms with sleep, (4) a clinical perspective on the relationship between circadian rhythm abnormalities and affective disorders, and (5) the pre-clinical models of circadian rhythm abnormalities and mood disorders.

  3. “Biological rhythms, higher brain function, and behavior: gaps, opportunities and challenges”

    PubMed Central

    Benca, Ruth; Duncan, Marilyn J.; Frank, Ellen; McClung, Colleen; Nelson, Randy J.; Vicentic, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that disrupted temporal organization impairs behavior, cognition, and affect; further, disruption of circadian clock genes impairs sleep/wake cycle and social rhythms which may be implicated in mental disorders. Despite this strong evidence, a gap in understanding the neural mechanisms of this interaction obscures whether biological rhythms disturbances are the underlying causes or merely symptoms of these diseases. Here, we review current understanding, emerging concepts, gaps and opportunities pertinent to: (1) the neurobiology of the interactions between circadian oscillators and the neural circuits subserving higher brain function and behaviors of relevance to mental health, (2) the most promising approaches to determine how biological rhythms regulate brain function and behavior under normal and pathological conditions, (3) gaps and challenges to advancing knowledge on the link between disrupted circadian rhythms/sleep and psychiatric disorders, and (4) novel strategies for translation of basic science discoveries in circadian biology to clinical settings to define risk, prevent or delay onset of mental illnesses, design diagnostic tools and propose new therapeutic strategies. The review is organized around five themes pertinent to: (1) the impact of molecular clocks on physiology and behavior, (2) interactions between circadian signals and cognitive functions, (3) the interface of circadian rhythms with sleep (4) a clinical perspective on the relationship between circadian rhythm abnormalities and affective disorders, and (5) pre-clinical models of circadian rhythm abnormalities and mood disorders. PMID:19766673

  4. An evaluation of the use of new Doppler methods for detecting longitudinal function abnormalities in a pacing-induced heart failure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabata, Tomotsugu; Cardon, Lisa A.; Armstrong, Guy P.; Fukamach, Kiyotaka; Takagaki, Masami; Ochiai, Yoshie; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Doppler tissue echocardiography and color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity have proven useful in evaluating cross-sections of patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, but experience with serial changes is limited. Purpose and methods: We tested their use by evaluating the temporal changes of LV function in a pacing-induced congestive heart failure model. Rapid ventricular pacing was initiated and maintained in 20 dogs for 4 weeks. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and weekly during brief pacing cessation. RESULTS: With rapid pacing, LV volume significantly increased and ejection fraction (57%-28%), stroke volume (37-18 mL), and mitral annulus systolic velocity (16.1-6.6 cm/s) by Doppler tissue echocardiography significantly decreased, with ejection fraction and mitral annulus systolic velocity closely correlated (r = 0.706, P <.0001). In contrast to the mitral inflow velocities, mitral annulus early diastolic velocity decreased steadily (12.3-7.3 cm/s) resulting in a dramatic decrease in mitral annulus early/late (1.22-0.57) diastolic velocity with no tendency toward pseudonormalization. The color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity also showed significant steady decrease (57-24 cm/s) throughout the pacing period. Multiple regression analysis chose mitral annulus systolic velocity (r = 0.895, P <.0001) and propagation velocity (r = 0.782, P <.0001) for the most important factor predicting LV systolic and diastolic function, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Doppler tissue echocardiography and color M-mode Doppler flow could evaluate the serial deterioration in LV dysfunction throughout the pacing period. These were more useful in quantifying progressive LV dysfunction than conventional ehocardiographic techniques, and were probably relatively independent of preload. These techniques could be suitable for longitudinal evaluation in addition to the cross-sectional study.

  5. Rhythms of the hippocampal network.

    PubMed

    Colgin, Laura Lee

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampal local field potential (LFP) shows three major types of rhythms: theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma. These rhythms are defined by their frequencies, they have behavioural correlates in several species including rats and humans, and they have been proposed to carry out distinct functions in hippocampal memory processing. However, recent findings have challenged traditional views on these behavioural functions. In this Review, I discuss our current understanding of the origins and the mnemonic functions of hippocampal theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma rhythms on the basis of findings from rodent studies. In addition, I present an updated synthesis of their roles and interactions within the hippocampal network. PMID:26961163

  6. Evaluating the influence of sleep deprivation upon circadian rhythms of exercise metabolism.

    PubMed

    Montelpare, W J; Plyley, M J; Shephard, R J

    1992-06-01

    Cardiorespiratory and gas exchange responses to a moderate, standardized treadmill walking task showed a weak circadian rhythm, with larger superimposed peaks attributable to feeding. However, both rhythms became progressively attenuated during a period of sleep deprivation. A method of exploring this phenomenon is illustrated by an analysis of data on walking heart rate, respiratory minute volume, oxygen intake, and rating of perceived exertion, collected on 11 young men at 3-hr intervals during 60 hours of sleep deprivation.

  7. [Manifestations of polymorphism of β1-adrenoreceptors in patients with newly diagnosed cardiac rhythm disorders].

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, S A; Rebrova, T Iu; Batalov, R E; Muslimova, É F; Borisova, E V; Popov, S V

    2013-01-01

    Individual peculiarities of the receptor apparatus of cardiomyocytes may determine pathological features of heart activity and susceptibility to pharmaceuticals. The possible role of beta-adrenoreceptor polymorphism in the development of cardiac rhythm disturbances is assessed by PCR. Special attention is given to A145G polymorphism of the ADRB1 gene in 127 patients with primary cardiac rhythm disorders. It was shown that AJ45G polymorphism (Ser49Gly) at DNA sites encoding for the amino acid sequence of beta-1 adrenoreceptors can influence the development of sex-specific cardiac rhythm disorders. PMID:24437165

  8. Relationships between behavioral rhythms, plasma corticosterone and hypothalamic circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kafka, M S; Benedito, M A; Steele, L K; Gibson, M J; Zerbe, R L; Jacobowitz, D M; Roth, R H; Zander, K

    1986-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiological processes and behaviors were compared with hypothalamic circadian rhythms in norepinephrine (NE) metabolites, adrenergic transmitter receptors, cAMP, cGMP and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) arginine vasopressin (AVP) in a single population of rats under D:D conditions. Eating, drinking and locomotor activity were high during the subjective night (the time when lights were out in L:D) and low during the subjective day (the time when lights were on in L:D). Plasma corticosterone concentration rose at subjective dusk and remained high until subjective dawn. Binding to hypothalamic alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic receptors also peaked during the subjective night. Cyclic cGMP concentration was elevated throughout the 24-hr period except for a trough at dusk, whereas DHPG concentration peaked at dawn. Arginine vasopressin levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus peaked in the middle of the day. No rhythm was found either in binding to the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor, or in MHPG or cAMP concentration. Behavioral and corticosterone rhythms, therefore, are parallel to rhythms in hypothalamic alpha 1- and beta-receptor binding and NE-release. Cyclic GMP falls only at dusk, suggesting the possibility that cGMP inhibits activity much of the day and that at dusk the inhibition of nocturnal activity is removed. SCN AVP, on the other hand, peaking at 1400 hr, may play a role in the pacemaking function of the SCN that drives these other rhythms.

  9. Daily rhythm changes associated with variations in light intensity and color.

    PubMed

    Winget, C M; Card, D H

    1967-01-01

    Asynchronosis with its symptoms of fatigue, confusion, and discomfort is perhaps the most frequently experienced problem of jet travel; and without synchronization it will represent a major problem with supersonic and interplanetary travel. Current observations suggest that light is the most important environmental factor for the regulation of daily rhythms. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate daily rhythm changes associated with changes in light intensity at given wavelengths of light. Biological rhythm data of birds have been useful for the interpretation of data collected on man. Two normal chickens were used to study three daily physiological rhythms in a controlled environment for approximately 80 days. Variables included the light intensity and wavelength. Heart rate, deep body temperature, and activity were recorded at 6 min intervals. The first two measurements were received from miniature radio transmitters and the third directly from the cage floor. The presence of the cycles was established by periodogram and correlogram analysis. The data were described further by harmonic regression analysis and cross correlations between the three daily rhythms. The physiologic systems studied are arrhythmic in continuous red light. There was no change observed in the periods of the daily rhythms with an increase in light intensity. Deep body temperature oscillations were greater at the higher light intensities and appeared to dissociate from heart rate. Activity and heart rate have a high degree of correlation even at the higher intensities.

  10. Late prognostic value of scintigraphic parameters of acute myocardial infarction size in complicated myocardial infarction without heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Perez-Gonzalez, J.F.; Dunn, R.; Ports, T.; Chatterjee, K.; Parmley, W.

    1983-04-01

    Perfusion scintigraphy with thallium-201, infarct scintigraphy with technetium-99m pyrophosphate (TcPYP), and equilibrium blood pool scintigraphy were performed during the initial hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (MI) in 25 patients without evidence of heart failure who presented with advanced electrocardiographic rhythm and conduction disturbances requiring treatment. Scintigraphic findings during short-term hospitalization were related to the late clinical follow-up performed an average of 14 months later, where patients were grouped as asymptomatic, 8 patients; symptomatic, 9 patients; and deceased, 8 patients. Quantitation of perfusion abnormalities, TcPYP image abnormalities, and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) revealed that the deceased group had significantly larger TcPYP abnormalities (36 +/- 20 cm2), absolute perfusion abnormalities (32 +/- 16 cm2), and perfusion abnormalities expressed as a percentage of the projected left ventricular area (42 +/- 8%) than the asymptomatic group (13 +/- 8 cm2, 14 +/- 6 cm2, and 20 +/- 9%; p less than 0.05, p greater than 0.05, and p less than 0.01, respectively). The percent perfusion abnormality was significantly larger in the deceased group (42 +/- 8%, p less than 0.01) than in either the symptomatic group (35 +/- 13%, p less than 0.01) or the asymptomatic group (20 +/- 9%), and this parameter in the symptomatic group also differed from that in the asymptomatic group (p less than 0.01). The study indicates that patients with rhythm and conduction disturbances and without congestive heart failure during acute MI may follow an uncomplicated or a complicated late clinical course. Early scintigraphic measurements of MI and perfusion correlate well with this outcome; however, EF could not differentiate among prognostic subgroups.

  11. Biological rhythms and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Paola; Indic, Premananda; Murray, Greg; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2012-12-01

    Integration of several approaches concerning time and temporality can enhance the pathophysiological study of major mood disorders of unknown etiology. We propose that these conditions might be interpreted as disturbances of temporal profile of biological rhythms, as well as alterations of time-consciousness. Useful approaches to study time and temporality include philological suggestions, phenomenological and psychopathological conceptualizatíons, clinical descriptions, and research on circadian and ultradían rhythms, as well as nonlinear dynamics approaches to their analysis.

  12. Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Performance During Space Shuttle Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neri, David F.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Wyatt, James K.; Ronda, Joseph M.; Hughes, Rod J.

    2003-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms may be disturbed during spaceflight, and these disturbances can affect crewmembers' performance during waking hours. The mechanisms underlying sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in space are not well understood, and effective countermeasures are not yet available. We investigated sleep, circadian rhythms, cognitive performance, and light-dark cycles in five astronauts prior to, during, and after the 16-day STS-90 mission and the IO-day STS-95 mission. The efficacy of low-dose, alternative-night, oral melatonin administration as a countermeasure for sleep disturbances was evaluated. During these missions, scheduled rest activity cycles were 20-35 minutes shorter than 24 hours. Light levels on the middeck and in the Spacelab were very low; whereas on the flight deck (which has several windows), they were highly variable. Circadian rhythm abnormalities were observed. During the second half of the missions, the rhythm of urinary cortisol appeared to be delayed relative to the sleep-wake schedule. Performance during wakefulness was impaired. Astronauts slept only about 6.5 hours per day, and subjective sleep quality was lower in space. No beneficial effects of melatonin (0.3 mg administered prior to sleep episodes on alternate nights) were observed. A surprising finding was a marked increase in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep upon return to Earth. We conclude that these Space Shuttle missions were associated with circadian rhythm disturbances, sleep loss, decrements in neurobehavioral performance, and alterations in REM sleep homeostasis. Shorter than 24-hour rest-activity schedules and exposure to light-dark cycles inadequate for optimal circadian synchronization may have contributed to these disturbances.

  13. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  14. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  15. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Otto; Qualls, Clifford; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello; Porta, Alberto

    2007-07-25

    Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.

  16. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Otto; Qualls, Clifford; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello; Porta, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals. PMID:17653263

  17. Clinical and epidemiological study of chronic heart involvment in Chagas' disease*

    PubMed Central

    Puigbó, J. J.; Rhode, J. R. Nava; Barrios, H. García; Suárez, J. A.; Yépez, C. Gil

    1966-01-01

    It has been estimated that, in vast areas of the American continent, there is a high prevalence of human infection by Trypanosoma cruzi. Such infection can lead to a variety of heart diseases, predominantly with involvement of the myocardium. The aim of the present work was to determine the prevalence of heart disease in two rural areas of Venezuela with a high endemicity of Chagas' disease and to try to determine the natural history of the disease. It is shown that a form of chronic myocardial disease in patients with positive specific serology and good functional capacity is highly prevalent. Electrocardiographic patterns typical of the initial and developing stages of the disease, as well as early abnormalities of the cardiac rhythm, are described and illustrated. The present work forms part of a longitudinal study still in progress. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 3FIG. 5FIG. 4 PMID:4957485

  18. Remission of congenital complete heart block without anti-Ro/La antibodies: A case report.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Souvik; Saha, Anindya Kumar; Sardar, Syamal Kumar; Singh, Arun Kumarendu

    2013-07-01

    Anti-Ro/La negative congenital heart block (CHB) is uncommon. We report one such case of CHB, with no associated structural heart disease or maternal autoantibodies. The heart block reverted to sinus rhythm spontaneously at two weeks of age, and the patient remains in sinus rhythm at a one year followup. Whether patients with antibody negative complete heart block have a different clinical course is conjectural.

  19. Hearts and flowers: Bryophyllum poisoning of cattle.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, R A; Dunster, P J

    1986-07-01

    Findings from natural cases and experiments with cattle emphasise that flowering plants are the most important form of Bryophyllum (Kalanchoe) spp in poisonings in Australia. The main life-threatening lesion is myocardial. The effects on the alimentary tract are less important than was believed previously. B. tubiflorum, B. daigremontianum x B. tubiflorum, B. pinnatum and B. proliferum caused 41 recorded poisoning incidents affecting 379 cattle in Queensland between 1960 and 1984. Poisoning occurred between May and October--the flowering season of these plants. Experimental B. tubiflorum poisoning and natural poisonings produced anorexia, depression, ruminal atony, diarrhoea, heart rate and rhythm abnormalities, dyspnoea and death. Increased plasma concentrations of urea, creatinine and glucose and decreased chloride were measured experimentally. Both natural and experimental cases had myocardial degeneration and necrosis with haemorrhages of the heart and alimentary tract. Cattle with severe dyspnoea had atelectasis and emphysema of the lungs. Some cattle had mild nephrosis. The median lethal doses of B. tubiflorum flowers, roots and leaf plus stem were 0.7, 2.3 and 5.0 g dry matter/kg liveweight respectively (7, 7 and 40 g wet weight/kg). Bufadienolides have been isolated recently from B. tubiflorum flowers and the syndrome is consistent with cardiac glycoside poisoning. PMID:3778371

  20. [Autonomic nervous system unbalance in patients with ischemic heart disease and depression].

    PubMed

    Dolynna, O V

    2013-01-01

    It is set that in 26.9% patients with coronary desease there are the depressed disorders. The easy degree of depression was observed in 61.1% persons, maskable depression--in 27.8% persons, middle degree of depression--in 11.1% persons. For such patients the decline of heart rhythm variability, increase of sympathetic tone, violation of day's rhythm of vegetative nervous system, prevalence of humoral influence on a heart rhythm were revealed. PMID:24605628

  1. [Autonomic nervous system unbalance in patients with ischemic heart disease and depression].

    PubMed

    Dolynna, O V

    2013-01-01

    It is set that in 26.9% patients with coronary desease there are the depressed disorders. The easy degree of depression was observed in 61.1% persons, maskable depression--in 27.8% persons, middle degree of depression--in 11.1% persons. For such patients the decline of heart rhythm variability, increase of sympathetic tone, violation of day's rhythm of vegetative nervous system, prevalence of humoral influence on a heart rhythm were revealed.

  2. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination. PMID:26820249

  3. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  4. Circadian rhythms, Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPAR alpha/gamma profiles in diseases with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Duthoit, Guillaume; Hébert, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clock mechanisms are far-from-equilibrium dissipative structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha, beta/delta, and gamma) play a key role in metabolic regulatory processes, particularly in heart muscle. Links between circadian rhythms (CRs) and PPARs have been established. Mammalian CRs involve at least two critical transcription factors, CLOCK and BMAL1 (Gekakis et al., 1998; Hogenesch et al., 1998). PPAR gamma plays a major role in both glucose and lipid metabolisms and presents circadian properties which coordinate the interplay between metabolism and CRs. PPAR gamma is a major component of the vascular clock. Vascular PPAR gamma is a peripheral regulator of cardiovascular rhythms controlling circadian variations in blood pressure and heart rate through BMAL1. We focused our review on diseases with abnormalities of CRs and with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction. Moreover, these diseases presented changes in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPARs, according to two opposed profiles. Profile 1 was defined as follows: inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with increased expression of PPAR gamma. Profile 2 was defined as follows: activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with decreased expression of PPAR gamma. A typical profile 1 disease is arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a genetic cardiac disease which presents mutations of the desmosomal proteins and is mainly characterized by fatty acid accumulation in adult cardiomyocytes mainly in the right ventricle. The link between PPAR gamma dysfunction and desmosomal genetic mutations occurs via inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway presenting oscillatory properties. A typical profile 2 disease is type 2 diabetes, with activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and decreased expression of PPAR gamma. CRs abnormalities are present in numerous pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases, sympathetic/parasympathetic dysfunction, hypertension, diabetes

  5. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... findings suggesting, abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis,...

  6. Noisy unmaskers of multistability of periodic rhythms in a model of the ventricular cardiac action potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovyatkina, Elena; Egorchenkov, Roman; Ivanov, Guennady

    2007-06-01

    The coexistence of different dynamical regimes of cardiac cell-model at a fixed set of stimulation parameters, i.e. multistability, revealed by noise is presented in this paper. Numerical simulations are performed using Luo-Rudy (LR1) action potential model. Numerical experiments with LR1 model conducted via noisy periodical stimulation showed the coexistence of several periodic rhythms. Weak noise in period of stimulation causes a hopping process between all the (meta-) stable rhythms of cell-model. This process is reflected in several parallel branches of the bifurcation diagram: noise unveils new, invisible before, stable rhythms which could appear in this model at different initial conditions. The phenomenon of multistability is directly evidenced by other numerical experiments: we have established the multistability property of a cell consisting in the fact that different initial conditions of stimulation (different extrasystole application times) lead to different stable periodic rhythms. We have obtained the shaping of attraction basins on the action potential curves. Such basins of attraction contain a set of initial conditions which determinate a stable periodic rhythm. We have found a close association between the attraction basins of the complex rhythms on the curves of action potential and the cardiac vulnerable windows on ECG record, during which extra stimuli can induce life threatening arrhythmias. Obtained results allow us to make a conclusion that multistability is very important for the electrical conduction system of the heart from the cell level to the integrated function of the heart.

  7. Circadian rhythm disorder in a rare disease: Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Leersnyder, Hélène; Claustrat, Bruno; Munnich, Arnold; Verloes, Alain

    2006-06-27

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable contiguous gene syndrome, caused by interstitial deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. The SMS phenotype include distinctive facial features, developmental delay and neurobehavioral abnormalities. The patients present major sleep disturbances ascribed to a phase shift of their circadian rhythm of melatonin with a paradoxical diurnal secretion of the hormone. Treatment with morning beta-blockers and evening melatonin reinstated a normally timed melatonin circadian rhythm, improved daytime behavior and restored normal sleep habits, resulting in a greatly improved quality of life for both SMS patients and their family. SMS is the demonstration of biological basis for sleep disorder in a genetic disease. Considering that clock genes mediate generation of circadian rhythms, we suggest that haploinsufficiency for a circadian system gene mapping to chromosome 17p11.2 may cause the inversion of circadian rhythm in SMS. PMID:16723183

  8. Control mechanisms in physiological rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizell, S.

    1973-01-01

    A search was made for the factors involved in regulating rhythmic body functions. The basic premise was that at a particular point in time, any cell can normally act in one of two ways. It can either be engaged in dividing or carrying out its particular function. Experimental results indicate rhythmic functions are controlled by a lighting regime and that an inverse correlation exists between rhythms of cell division and cell function. Data also show rhythms are a function of animal sex and environment.

  9. Biological rhythms and mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Paola; Indic, Premananda; Murray, Greg; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2012-01-01

    Integration of several approaches concerning time and temporality can enhance the pathophysiological study of major mood disorders of unknown etiology. We propose that these conditions might be interpreted as disturbances of temporal profile of biological rhythms, as well as alterations of time-consciousness. Useful approaches to study time and temporality include philological suggestions, phenomenological and psychopathological conceptualizatíons, clinical descriptions, and research on circadian and ultradían rhythms, as well as nonlinear dynamics approaches to their analysis. PMID:23393414

  10. Circadian genes, rhythms and the biology of mood disorders.

    PubMed

    McClung, Colleen A

    2007-05-01

    For many years, researchers have suggested that abnormalities in circadian rhythms may underlie the development of mood disorders such as bipolar disorder (BPD), major depression and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Furthermore, some of the treatments that are currently employed to treat mood disorders are thought to act by shifting or "resetting" the circadian clock, including total sleep deprivation (TSD) and bright light therapy. There is also reason to suspect that many of the mood stabilizers and antidepressants used to treat these disorders may derive at least some of their therapeutic efficacy by affecting the circadian clock. Recent genetic, molecular and behavioral studies implicate individual genes that make up the clock in mood regulation. As well, important functions of these genes in brain regions and neurotransmitter systems associated with mood regulation are becoming apparent. In this review, the evidence linking circadian rhythms and mood disorders, and what is known about the underlying biology of this association, is presented.

  11. Circadian rhythms and the suprachiasmatic nucleus in perinatal development, aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mirmiran, M; Swaab, D F; Kok, J H; Hofman, M A; Witting, W; Van Gool, W A

    1992-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are already present in the fetus. At a certain stage of pre-natal hypothalamic development (around 30 weeks of gestation) the fetus becomes responsive to maternal circadian signals. Moreover, recent studies showed that the fetal biological clock is able to generate circadian rhythms, as exemplified by the rhythms of body temperature and heart rate of pre-term babies in the absence of maternal or environmental entrainment factors. Pre-term babies that are deprived of maternal entrainment and kept under constant environmental conditions (e.g., continuous light) in the neonatal intensive care unit run the risk of developing a biological clock dysfunctioning. However, the fact should be acknowledged that at least in mice the development of the circadian pacemaker (i.e., SCN) does not depend on environmental influences (Davis and Menaker, 1981), although other data suggest that severe disruption of the maternal circadian rhythm indeed abolishes the circadian rhythm of the fetal SCN (Shibata and Moore, 1988). During aging and in particular in AD circadian rhythms are disturbed. These disturbances include phase advance and reduced period and amplitude, as well as an increased intradaily variability and a decreased interdaily stability of the rhythm. Among the factors underlying these changes the loss of SCN neurons seems to play a central role. Other contributory factors may be reduced amount of light, degenerative changes in the visual system and the level of activity and decreased melatonin. PMID:1480747

  12. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  13. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors is likely why the rates of heart disease are coming down. These factors include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, overweight and obesity. The rates of high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol haven' ...

  14. The Contribution of Sensitivity to Speech Rhythm and Non-Speech Rhythm to Early Reading Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliman, Andrew J.; Wood, Clare; Sheehy, Kieron

    2010-01-01

    Both sensitivity to speech rhythm and non-speech rhythm have been associated with successful phonological awareness and reading development in separate studies. However, the extent to which speech rhythm, non-speech rhythm and literacy skills are interrelated has not been examined. As a result, five- to seven-year-old English-speaking children…

  15. Melatonin modifies the rhythm of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, V Y; Dubovaya, N D; Zvezdina, T K; Fateeva, V I; Mal'chenko, L A

    2010-07-01

    Melatonin (5 nM) added to medium with primary hepatocyte cultures shifted the phase of circahoralian rhythm of protein synthesis and hence, can be a factor synchronizing fluctuations in protein synthesis and rhythm organizer in the hepatocyte population. Blockade of melatonin receptors with luzindole (20 nM) arrested rhythm organization of protein synthesis by melatonin. Prospects of studying biochemical mechanisms of protein synthesis rhythm organization with other drugs (calcium agonists, similarly to melatonin) are discussed.

  16. Unexpected Complete Heart Block and Anesthetic Implications.

    PubMed

    Torres, Arturo G

    2015-08-01

    A healthy, active duty military 25-year-old female with a history of congenital complete heart block presented for a routine septorhinoplasty. During the preoperative interview, she did not disclose her heart condition. A preordered electrocardiogram was not available. During induction of anesthesia, she became extremely bradycardic, approaching asystole, requiring resuscitation. This case highlights the potential anesthetic risks in individuals with a history of congenital heart rhythm disease.

  17. Chaos control applied to cardiac rhythms represented by ECG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borem Ferreira, Bianca; Amorim Savi, Marcelo; Souza de Paula, Aline

    2014-10-01

    The control of irregular or chaotic heartbeats is a key issue in cardiology. In this regard, chaos control techniques represent a good alternative since they suggest treatments different from those traditionally used. This paper deals with the application of the extended time-delayed feedback control method to stabilize pathological chaotic heart rhythms. Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals are employed to represent the cardiovascular behavior. A mathematical model is employed to generate ECG signals using three modified Van der Pol oscillators connected with time delay couplings. This model provides results that qualitatively capture the general behavior of the heart. Controlled ECG signals show the ability of the strategy either to control or to suppress the chaotic heart dynamics generating less-critical behaviors.

  18. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Rbin M.; Burgess, Helen J.; Swanson, Garth R.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20–30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyper-permeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in ClockΔ19 mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  19. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Burgess, Helen J; Swanson, Garth R; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20-30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in Clock(▵19) mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  20. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Burgess, Helen J; Swanson, Garth R; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20-30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in Clock(▵19) mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  1. Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160227.html Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause 'Danger zone' for women earlier ... WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease risk factors -- such as abnormal cholesterol levels and high blood ...

  2. Ultradian rhythms in walking gastric activity.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, J F; Kripke, D F

    1975-01-01

    Ninety to 120 min ultradian rhythms have been described in physiologic and behavioral functions relating to biologic drives. Gastric contractility rhythms were examined in isolated fasting volunteers to supplement behavioral observations of "oral" drives. A clear ultradian rhythms was observed, indicating inherent physiologic oscillation in stomach contractions.

  3. Circadian rhythms, the molecular clock, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harfmann, Brianna D; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Esser, Karyn A

    2015-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle. PMID:25512305

  4. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Harfmann, Brianna D.; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Esser, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle. PMID:25512305

  5. Circadian rhythms, the molecular clock, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harfmann, Brianna D; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Esser, Karyn A

    2015-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle.

  6. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  7. Urinary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm in a Group of High-Functioning Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richdale, Amanda L.; Prior, Margot R.

    1992-01-01

    This study found no evidence for abnormal temporal placement of the basal urinary cortisol circadian rhythm in a group of 18 high-functioning children (ages 4-14) with autism. There was a tendency toward cortisol hypersecretion during the day, predominantly in autistic children who were integrated into the normal school system. (Author/JDD)

  8. A Comparative Study of Circadian Rhythm Functioning and Sleep in People with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Dougal Julian; Jones, Steven; Evershed, Kate

    2006-01-01

    The circadian rhythm functioning and sleep patterns of 10 adults with Asperger syndrome were investigated using actigraphy. When compared with data from neurotypical adults, both statistical and clinically significant differences were found between the two groups, with the adults with Asperger syndrome showing marked abnormalities in both the…

  9. Evidence of a Faster Posterior Dominant EEG Rhythm in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Michael D.; Mandelbaum, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities have been associated with autism. In the course of clinical work, we have observed a posterior dominant EEG rhythm at higher frequency in children with autism. To test this observation, 56 EEG tracings of children with autism were compared to the EEGs of age-matched controls. Children with autism…

  10. Adaptation of sleep and circadian rhythms to the Antarctic summer - A question of zeitgeber strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Macdonald, John A.; Montgomery, John C.; Paulin, Michael G.

    1991-01-01

    Adaptation of sleep and circadian rhythms was examined in three temperate zone dwellers arriving in Antarctica during summer. Rectal temperature, wrist activity, and heart rate were monitored continuously, sleep timing and quality noted on awakening, and mood and fatigue rated every 2 h while awake. Sleep was poorer in 2/3 subjects in Antarctica, where all subjects reported more difficulty rising. Sleep occurred at the same clock times in New Zealand and Antarctica, however, the rhythms of temperature, activity, and heart rate underwent a delay of about of 2 h. The subject with the most Antarctic experience had the least difficulty adapting to sleeping during constant daylight. The subject with the most delayed circadian rhythms had the most difficulty. The delay in the circadian system with respect to sleep and clock time is hypothesized to be due to differences in zeitgeber strength and/or zeitgeber exposure between Antarctica and New Zealand.

  11. Don't Miss a Beat: Why Rhythm Is Used in Waldorf Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopata, Peg

    2000-01-01

    The Waldorf philosophy of education is about awakening and growing an active, inquiring, imaginative mind; a healthy body; and a heart of compassion. This is accomplished by tapping into the natural well of children's rhythmic natures using multisensory approaches. The importance of rhythm in nature, developmental stages, sequencing, and…

  12. [Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (circadian rhythm sleep disorder)].

    PubMed

    Tagaya, Hirokuni; Murayama, Norio; Fukase, Yuko

    2015-06-01

    The role of the circadian system is forecasting the daily and yearly change of environment. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (CRSWD) is defined as physical and social impairment caused by misalignment between circadian rhythm and desirable social schedule. CRSWDs are induced by medical or environmental factors as well as dysfunctions of circadian system. Clinicians should be aware that sleep-inducing medications, restless legs syndrome, delirium and less obedience to social schedule are frequent cause of CRSWD among elderly. Bright light therapy and orally administered small dose of melatonin or melatonin agonist at proper circadian phase are recommended treatments. Sleep-inducing medications should not be considered as CRSWD treatments, especially to elderly.

  13. Circadian Rhythm Control: Neurophysiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotzbach, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was implicated as a primary component in central nervous system mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Disruption of the normal synchronization of temperature, activity, and other rhythms is detrimental to health. Sleep wake disorders, decreases in vigilance and performance, and certain affective disorders may result from or be exacerbated by such desynchronization. To study the basic neurophysiological mechanisms involved in entrainment of circadian systems by the environment, Parylene-coated, etched microwire electrode bundles were used to record extracellular action potentials from the small somata of the SCN and neighboring hypothalamic nuclei in unanesthetized, behaving animals. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and chronically prepared with EEG ane EMG electrodes in addition to a moveable microdrive assembly. The majority of cells had firing rates 10 Hz and distinct populations of cells which had either the highest firing rate or lowest firing rate during sleep were seen.

  14. Neurophysiological and Computational Principles of Cortical Rhythms in Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2010-01-01

    Synchronous rhythms represent a core mechanism for sculpting temporal coordination of neural activity in the brainwide network. This review focuses on oscillations in the cerebral cortex that occur during cognition, in alert behaving conditions. Over the last two decades, experimental and modeling work has made great strides in elucidating the detailed cellular and circuit basis of these rhythms, particularly gamma and theta rhythms. The underlying physiological mechanisms are diverse (ranging from resonance and pacemaker properties of single cells, to multiple scenarios for population synchronization and wave propagation), but also exhibit unifying principles. A major conceptual advance was the realization that synaptic inhibition plays a fundamental role in rhythmogenesis, either in an interneuronal network or in a recipropocal excitatory-inhibitory loop. Computational functions of synchronous oscillations in cognition are still a matter of debate among systems neuroscientists, in part because the notion of regular oscillation seems to contradict the common observation that spiking discharges of individual neurons in the cortex are highly stochastic and far from being clock-like. However, recent findings have led to a framework that goes beyond the conventional theory of coupled oscillators, and reconciles the apparent dichotomy between irregular single neuron activity and field potential oscillations. From this perspective, a plethora of studies will be reviewed on the involvement of long-distance neuronal coherence in cognitive functions such as multisensory integration, working memory and selective attention. Finally, implications of abnormal neural synchronization are discussed as they relate to mental disorders like schizophrenia and autism. PMID:20664082

  15. Biological Rhythms in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mary S.; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism’s rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional–translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism’s sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin. PMID:27231897

  16. Biological Rhythms in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mary S; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism's rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism's sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin. PMID:27231897

  17. Psychiatric features and disturbance of circadian rhythm of temperature, pulse, and blood pressure in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, Eneida B

    2002-01-01

    Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration), a disease of genetic origin, is due to abnormal copper metabolism affecting many organs and systems, especially the liver and the nervous system. The initial symptoms can be exclusively or predominantly psychiatric, including psychotic features. Three cases are reported in which the clinical picture at the beginning was compatible with a psychiatric diagnosis. During hospitalization, before treatment, there were abnormal and spontaneous changes in the circadian rhythm of temperature, pulse, and blood pressure, recorded every 6 hours, with febrile peaks in the absence of infectious focus. Because the hypothalamus is important in the regulation of these autonomic functions, the hypothesis of a possible hypothalamic dysfunction was made, justifying a wide clinical and laboratory investigation that allowed the diagnosis of Wilson's disease. Alertness to circadian rhythm abnormalities in such cases may help the psychiatrist avoid an erroneous diagnosis.

  18. Nonlinear and Stochastic Dynamics in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhilin; Hu, Gang; Garfinkel, Alan; Weiss, James N.

    2014-01-01

    In a normal human life span, the heart beats about 2 to 3 billion times. Under diseased conditions, a heart may lose its normal rhythm and degenerate suddenly into much faster and irregular rhythms, called arrhythmias, which may lead to sudden death. The transition from a normal rhythm to an arrhythmia is a transition from regular electrical wave conduction to irregular or turbulent wave conduction in the heart, and thus this medical problem is also a problem of physics and mathematics. In the last century, clinical, experimental, and theoretical studies have shown that dynamical theories play fundamental roles in understanding the mechanisms of the genesis of the normal heart rhythm as well as lethal arrhythmias. In this article, we summarize in detail the nonlinear and stochastic dynamics occurring in the heart and their links to normal cardiac functions and arrhythmias, providing a holistic view through integrating dynamics from the molecular (microscopic) scale, to the organelle (mesoscopic) scale, to the cellular, tissue, and organ (macroscopic) scales. We discuss what existing problems and challenges are waiting to be solved and how multi-scale mathematical modeling and nonlinear dynamics may be helpful for solving these problems. PMID:25267872

  19. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and cardiac rhythm disturbances: Present and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Santos-Pardo, Irene; Villuendas, Roger; Salvador-Corres, Iñaki; Martínez-Morillo, Melania; Olivé, Alejandro; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2015-04-01

    Several case reports, small case series, and original research papers have recently suggested that the action of certain auto-antibodies related to connective tissue diseases may be responsible for significant cardiac rhythm disturbances in adults. The relationship between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and congenital complete atrioventricular block is well recognized in the fetal heart. Herein we review the emerging evidences of the link to increased levels of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies with rhythm disorders of unknown origin in the adult. Confirmation of this distinct etiology may eventually be the basis for new therapies.

  20. Electrophysiological actions of somatostatin on the atrioventricular junction in sinus rhythm and reentry tachycardia.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, S C; Krikler, D M; Hendry, W G; Adrian, T E; Bloom, S R

    1986-01-01

    Because somatostatin, a neuroregulatory peptide, is found in abundance in the atria and atrioventricular node, its electrophysiological and antiarrhythmic properties were compared with those of verapamil in ten patients with paroxysmal atrioventricular tachycardia. During sinus rhythm, intravenous somatostatin slowed the heart rate whereas verapamil increased it. Though both agents prolonged atrioventricular conduction time and refractoriness, verapamil was more potent. They were equally effective at terminating reentry atrioventricular tachycardia, restoring sinus rhythm in six of seven patients. Whereas verapamil consistently blocked conduction in the atrioventricular node, somatostatin usually induced ventricular extrasystoles at the time of conversion. Somatostatin may have physiological importance in the neurohumoral control of cardiac impulse formation and conduction. PMID:2875723

  1. Comparison of circadian rhythms in male and female humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Deroshia, C. W.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Rosenblatt, W. S.; Hetherington, N. W.

    1977-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) and rectal temperature (RT) data were obtained from 12 female and 27 male subjects. The subjects were housed in a facility where the environment was controlled. Human male and female RT and HR exhibit a circadian rhythm with an excursion of about 1.2 C and 30 beats/min, respectively. The acrophases, amplitudes, and level crossings are only slightly different between the sexes. The male HR and RT circadian wave forms are more stable than those of the females. However, the actual RT and HR of males were always lower than that of females at all time points around the clock. The HR during sleep in females is 15 per cent below the daily mean heart rate and in males, 22 per cent.

  2. [Relation between dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kei; Meguro, Kenichi

    2014-03-01

    Dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance are closely linked. First, dementia patient shows circadian rhythm disorders (e.g. insomnia, night wandering, daytime sleep). These symptoms are a burden for caregivers. Circadian rhythm disturbance of dementia relates ADL and cognitive impairment, and diurnal rhythm disorder of blood pressure and body temperature. Some study shows that circadian rhythm disorders in dementia are a disturbance of neural network between suprachiasmatic nucleus and cerebral white matter, and involvement of both frontal lobes, left parietal and occipital cortex, left temporoparietal region. The first-line treatment of circadian rhythm disturbance should be non-drug therapy (e.g. exercise, bright light exposure, reduce caffeine intake, etc.). If physician prescribe drugs, keep the rule of low-dose and short-term and avoid benzodiazepines. Atypical antipsychotic drugs like risperidone and some antidepressants are useful for treatment of insomnia in dementia. But this usage is off-label. So we must well inform to patient and caregiver, and get consent about treatment. Second, some study shows circadian rhythm disorder is a risk factor of dementia. However, we should discuss that circadian rhythm disturbance is "risk factor of dementia" or "prodromal symptom of dementia". If a clinician finds circadian rhythm disorder in elderly people, should be examined cognitive and ADL function, and careful about that patients have dementia or will develop dementia.

  3. Acquisition of speech rhythm in first language.

    PubMed

    Polyanskaya, Leona; Ordin, Mikhail

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of English rhythm in speech produced by children and adults revealed that speech rhythm becomes increasingly more stress-timed as language acquisition progresses. Children reach the adult-like target by 11 to 12 years. The employed speech elicitation paradigm ensured that the sentences produced by adults and children at different ages were comparable in terms of lexical content, segmental composition, and phonotactic complexity. Detected differences between child and adult rhythm and between rhythm in child speech at various ages cannot be attributed to acquisition of phonotactic language features or vocabulary, and indicate the development of language-specific phonetic timing in the course of acquisition.

  4. Left ventricular partitioning in systolic heart failure subjects: addressing a mechanistic void with current therapies.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ulrich

    2016-05-17

    ICD patients with narrow QRS, CRT non-responders, and functional MR patients all have one mechanistic failure mode that is left untreated - the scar left behind following an MI. ICDs, CRTs, and MitraClip implantation are all well-proven therapies, but the Parachute device may address the mechanistic void that remains after each of these therapies has been used and may further improve patients' outcomes. A pooled analysis of 134 subjects was conducted using the first three clinical trials which included subjects with symptomatic ischaemic HF with LV wall motion abnormalities secondary to MI, and an LV ejection fraction less than 40%. The two-year cumulative mortality rate was 12.9%, with 8.7% in the first year and an increment of 4.2% in the second, which is a 53% reduction as compared to the first year. There is a significant proportion of patients with ischaemic heart failure being excluded from cardiac rhythm management (CRT, etc.), leaving a large treatment gap until mechanical support devices (LVAD) or heart transplantation in progressive heart failure are indicated. Along with other heart failure devices, Parachute may be a useful treatment modality, addressing a mechanistic void in the treatment of this disease. Current data support improvements in haemodynamics, functional capacity, six-minute walk distance, quality of life and a promising decline in mortality two years after Parachute implantation. PMID:27174122

  5. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death.

  6. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. PMID:24215748

  7. Gravitational considerations with animal rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunder, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    As established in the laboratory and largely confirmed by others, simulated high-g environments influence growth and development of animals as small as or smaller than baby turtles, sometimes accelerating and sometimes decelerating these processes. High-g environments result in many functional changes or adjustments in feeding, metabolism, circulation, fluid balances, and structures for support, and influence life expectancy. An assembly of equipment suitable for measuring oxygen consumption of small mammals as influenced by chronic centrifugation and/or by day-night rhythms is discussed.

  8. Effect of ramipril therapy on abnormal left atrial appendage function.

    PubMed

    Asker, M; Timucin, O B; Asker, S; Karadag, M F

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether ramipril treatment has a beneficial effect on left atrial appendage (LAA) function in patients with systemic hypertension in sinus rhythm. Patients with untreated systemic hypertension and normal left ventricular systolic function in sinus rhythm (n = 20; six males/14 females; age 35 - 69 years, mean ± SD 52.8 ± 8.9 years) were evaluated using transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography at baseline and after 6 months of treatment with 5 mg/day ramipril. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased significantly after ramipril therapy. Baseline LAA emptying velocity was below the age-related reference value for this parameter, indicating abnormal LAA function. There were significant increases in the LAA filling and emptying velocities after ramipril treatment. It is concluded that the decrease in blood pressure and haemodynamic improvements brought about by ramipril therapy resulted in improved LAA function in hypertensive patients with normal left ventricular systolic function in sinus rhythm.

  9. [Transient abnormal Q-waves].

    PubMed

    Godballe, C; Hoeck, H C; Sørensen, J A

    1990-01-01

    We present a case of transient abnormal Q-waves (TAQ) and a review of the literature. TAQ are defined as abnormal Q-waves, which disappear within ten days. They are most often seen in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) but are also seen in other conditions. Brief episodes of myocardial ischemia giving rise to reversible biochemical and ultrastructural myocardial changes, resulting in transient ECG changes, provide an accepted theory for the pathogenesis of TAO. Investigations have shown that the occurrence of exercise-induced TAQ may be a symptom of IHD. It is impossible to distinguish TAQ from Q-waves induced by myocardial infarction. Appearance of TAQ during exercise-testing frequently indicates IHD. PMID:2301045

  10. Aberrant Development of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus and Circadian Rhythms in Mice Lacking the Homeodomain Protein Six6

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Daniel D.; Gorman, Michael R.; Hatori, Megumi; Meadows, Jason D.; Panda, Satchidananda; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus is the central pacemaker for peripheral and organismal circadian rhythms. The development of this hypothalamic structure depends on genetic programs throughout embryogenesis. We have investigated the role of the homeodomain transcription factor Six6 in the development of the SCN. We first showed that Six6 mRNA has circadian regulation in the mouse SCN. We then characterized the behavioral activity patterns of Six6-null mice under various photoperiod manipulations and stained their hypothalami using SCN-specific markers. Six6-null mice display abnormal patterns of circadian behavior indicative of SCN abnormalities. The ability of light exposure to reset rhythms correlates with the presence or absence of optic nerves, but all Six6-null mice show irregular rhythms. In contrast, wild-type mice with crushed optic nerves maintain regular rhythms regardless of light exposure. Using immunohistochemistry for arginine vasopressin (AVP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and β-galactosidase, we demonstrated the lack of these SCN markers in all Six6- null mice regardless of the presence of optic nerve or partial circadian rhythms. Therefore, Six6 is required for the normal development of the SCN, and the Six6-null mouse can mount independent, although irregular, circadian rhythms despite the apparent absence of a histochemically defined SCN. PMID:23382588

  11. Clustering of ventricular arrhythmic complexes in heart rhythm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Anastasia; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Bunde, Armin

    2011-02-01

    We study the statistics of intervals τ between ventricular premature complexes (VPCs) in 24-h electrocardiogram records obtained from PhysioNet data source. We find that the long-term memory inherent in the heartbeat intervals leads to power laws in the probability density function P(τ) between VPCs for τ>6 s. As a consequence, the probability W(t,Δt) that at least one VPC will occur within the next time interval Δt, if the last VPC occurred t time units intervals ago, decays by a power law of t. Based on these results, we suggest a method to obtain a priori information about the occurrence of the next VPC, and how to predict it. We think that usage of this a priori information could be useful for the improvement of the algorithms in healthcare monitoring devices with alarm facilities.

  12. Pete Maravich's incredible heart.

    PubMed

    Choi, J H; Kornblum, R N

    1990-07-01

    Postmortem examination of a former professional basketball player revealed an abnormal heart, most notably a single coronary artery. The literature on single coronary arteries is briefly reviewed, and the possible mechanism which caused the patient's condition is considered. This case is particularly unusual because of the patient's profession, which is so physically demanding.

  13. Enhanced effect of daytime restricted feeding on the circadian rhythm of streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; ZhuGe, Fen; Sun, Lu; Ni, Yinhua; Fu, Ou; Gao, Guangang; Chen, Junjie; Kato, Hisanori; Fu, Zhengwei

    2012-05-15

    There is increasing awareness of the link between impaired circadian clocks and multiple metabolic diseases. However, the impairment of the circadian clock by type 2 diabetes has not been fully elucidated. To understand whether and how the function of circadian clock is impaired under the diabetic condition, we examined not only the expression of circadian genes in the heart and pineal gland but also the behavioral rhythm of type 2 diabetic and control rats in both the nighttime restricted feeding (NRF) and daytime restricted feeding (DRF) conditions. In the NRF condition, the circadian expression of clock genes in the heart and pineal gland was conserved in the diabetic rats, being similar to that in the control rats. DRF shifted the circadian phases of peripheral clock genes more efficiently in the diabetic rats than those in the control rats. Moreover, the activity rhythm of rats in the diabetic group was completely shifted from the dark phase to the light phase after 5 days of DRF treatment, whereas the activity rhythm of rats in the control group was still under the control of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) after the same DRF treatment. Furthermore, the serum glucose rhythm of type 2 diabetic rats was also shifted and controlled by the external feeding schedule, ignoring the SCN rhythm. Therefore, DRF shows stronger effect on the reentrainment of circadian rhythm in the type 2 diabetic rats, suggesting that the circadian system in diabetes is unstable and more easily shifted by feeding stimuli.

  14. Diurnal rhythms of visual accommodation and blink responses - Implication for flight-deck visual standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Randle, R. J.; Williams, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Possible 24-h variations in accommodation responses were investigated. A recently developed servo-controlled optometer and focus stimulator were used to obtain monocular accommodation response data on four college-age subjects. No 24-h rhythm in accommodation was shown. Heart rate and blink rate also were measured and periodicity analysis showed a mean 24-h rhythm for both; however, blink rate periodograms were significant for only two of the four subjects. Thus, with the qualifications that college students were tested instead of pilots and that they performed monocular laboratory tasks instead of binocular flight-deck tasks, it is concluded that 24-h rhythms in accommodation responses need not be considered in setting visual standards for flight-deck tasks.

  15. Rhythms essential to logical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, John M.; Madjid, F. Hadi

    2011-05-01

    In the context of quantum theory, recently we distinguished mathematics for expressing evidence from mathematics for explaining evidence. Here this distinction is made in spacetime physics. We offer a system of mathematical thought-or as termed in geodesy a reference system-for evidence, separated out from additional assumptions of a geometry in terms of which to explain that evidence. The offered reference system for evidence, free of any assumption of a particular explanatory geometry, whether Euclidean or general relativistic, amounts to a (theoretical) "assemblage of histories accumulated in the memories of parties to a synchronous communications network." The assemblage of histories gives voice to the known experimental finding, sometimes forgotten by theorists, that any memory device for recording logical symbols must be insensitive to variations in signals in which those symbols are carried. Out of acknowledging this insensitivity comes an appreciation of rhythms essential to the communication of digital symbols and of the need for analog measurements to maintain these rhythms. The separate reference system for evidence reconciles what otherwise is a conflict between the demand in quantum mechanics for repeatable experiments and the lack in spacetime metrics appropriate to the Global Positioning System of any exact symmetry, a lack that rules out an isometry between two spacetime regions for two occurrences of an experiment.

  16. Detecting and Correcting Speech Rhythm Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurtbasi, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Every language has its own rhythm. Unlike many other languages in the world, English depends on the correct pronunciation of stressed and unstressed or weakened syllables recurring in the same phrase or sentence. Mastering the rhythm of English makes speaking more effective. Experiments have shown that we tend to hear speech as more rhythmical…

  17. The Essential Connection between Rhythm and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, Adam

    2009-01-01

    It is the most fundamental aspect of music, yet so many students struggle with rhythm. How does one effectively teach budding young musicians to properly feel and read the rhythms all around them? Eileen Benedict, vocal music specialist at the Edith L. Slocum School in Ronkonkoma, New York, finds it best to start teaching her young students not…

  18. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  19. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeat, A.; Chiolero, R.; Mosimann, B.; Freeman, J.

    1987-03-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed severe hypoxemia and an unusual arrhythmia, accelerated idioventricular rhythm, during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Coronary artery disease was subsequently suspected despite an unremarkable history and physical examination, and confirmed by a thallium 201 imaging. The appearance of accelerated idioventricular rhythm during fiberoptic bronchoscopy should raise the possibility of underlying coronary artery disease.

  20. The Incarnate Rhythm of Geometrical Knowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bautista, Alfredo; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is a fundamental dimension of human nature at both biological and social levels. However, existing research literature has not sufficiently investigated its role in mathematical cognition and behavior. The purpose of this article is to bring the concept of "incarnate rhythm" into current discourses in the field of mathematical learning and…

  1. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression.

  2. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression. PMID:27476975

  3. Resting and Task-Modulated High-Frequency Brain Rhythms Measured by Scalp Encephalography in Infants with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Degregorio, Geneva; Jeste, Shafali S.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    The electrophysiological correlates of cognitive deficits in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are not well understood, and modulations of neural dynamics by neuroanatomical abnormalities that characterize the disorder remain elusive. Neural oscillations (rhythms) are a fundamental aspect of brain function, and have dominant frequencies in a wide…

  4. Circadian rhythms: glucocorticoids and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Sulli, Alberto; Pizzorni, Carmen; Secchi, Maria Elena; Soldano, Stefano; Seriolo, Bruno; Straub, Rainer H; Otsa, Kati; Maestroni, Georges J

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are driven by biological clocks and are endogenous in origin. Therefore, circadian changes in the metabolism or secretion of endogenous glucocorticoids are certainly responsible in part for the time-dependent changes observed in the inflammatory response and arthritis. More recently, melatonin (MLT), another circadian hormone that is the secretory product of the pineal gland, has been found implicated in the time-dependent inflammatory reaction with effects opposite those of cortisol. Interestingly, cortisol and MLT show an opposite response to the light. The light conditions in the early morning have a strong impact on the morning cortisol peak, whereas MLT is synthesized in a strictly nocturnal pattern. Recently, a diurnal rhythmicity in healthy humans between cellular (Th1 type) or humoral (Th2 type) immune responses has been found and related to immunomodulatory actions of cortisol and MLT. The interferon (IFN)-gamma/interleukin (IL)-10 ratio peaked during the early morning and correlated negatively with plasma cortisol and positively with plasma MLT. Accordingly, the intensity of the arthritic pain varies consistently as a function of the hour of the day: pain is greater after waking up in the morning than in the afternoon or evening. The reduced cortisol and adrenal androgen secretion, observed during testing in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not treated with glucocoticoids, should be clearly considered as a "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the presence of a sustained inflammatory process, and allows Th1 type cytokines to be produced in higher amounts during the late night. In conclusion, the right timing (early morning) for the glucocorticoid therapy in arthritis is fundamental and well justified by the circadian rhythms of the inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:16855156

  5. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  6. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis, cancer... to the miner by MSHA in accordance with section 203 of the act (see 30 CFR part 90)....

  7. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis, cancer... to the miner by MSHA in accordance with section 203 of the act (see 30 CFR part 90)....

  8. The effect of restraining on the heart rate in guinea pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikiskova, H.

    1980-01-01

    The emotional effect of different applications of electrodes and the fixation for cariographic examination was investigated using guinea pigs. The effect of the stress is discussed in terms of heart rhythm and behavior.

  9. Circadian Rhythm Disorders and Melatonin Production in 127 Blind Women with and without Light Perception.

    PubMed

    Flynn-Evans, Erin E; Tabandeh, Homayoun; Skene, Debra J; Lockley, Steven W

    2014-06-10

    Light is the major environmental time cue that synchronizes the endogenous central circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus, and is detected exclusively by the eyes primarily via specialized non-rod, non-cone ganglion cell photoreceptors. Consequently, most blind people with no perception of light (NPL) have either nonentrained or abnormally phased circadian rhythms due to this inability to detect light. Conversely, most visually impaired participants with some degree of light perception (LP) exhibit normal entrainment, emphasizing the functional separation of visual and "nonvisual" photoreception. The aims of the study were to identify the prevalence of circadian disorders in blind women, with the further aim of examining how eye disease may relate to the type of circadian disorder. Participants (n = 127, age 50.8 ± 13.4 years) completed an 8-week field study including daily sleep diaries and sequential 4 to 8 hourly urine collections over 48 h on 2 to 3 occasions separated by at least 2 weeks. Circadian type was determined from the timing and time course of the melatonin rhythm measured by cosinor-derived urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin rhythm peak. Of the participants with NPL (n = 41), the majority were abnormally phased (24%) or nonentrained (39%), with 37% classified as normally entrained. Of the participants with LP (n = 86), the majority were normally entrained (69%). Eighteen LP participants (21%) were abnormally phased (8 advanced, 10 delayed). Nine LP participants (10%) were nonentrained. The eye conditions most associated with abnormal phase and/or nonentrained circadian rhythms were bilateral enucleation (67%) and retinopathy of prematurity (57%). By contrast, 84% of participants with retinitis pigmentosa and 83% of those with age-related macular degeneration were normally entrained. These findings suggest that the etiology of blindness in addition to LP status is related to an individual's ability to process the

  10. Dissociation in circadian rhythms in a pseudohypersomnia form of fatal familial insomnia.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Y; Cervena, K; Carlander, B; Espa, F; Bassetti, C; Claustrat, B; Laplanche, J L; Billiard, M; Touchon, J

    2004-12-28

    The authors present clinical, sleep, and neuroendocrine features of a patient with genetically confirmed fatal familial insomnia (D178N mutation with heterozygosity at codon 129 of the prion protein gene). The patient exhibited pseudohypersomnia behavior instead of insomnia. There was profound alteration in the sleep-wake cycle with a clear dissociation in the disappearance of circadian and neuroendocrine rhythms, findings unrelated to abnormalities in the hypocretinergic system.

  11. Analysing Biological Rhythms in Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, M; Sarp, Ü; Gül, Aİ; Tanik, N; Yetisgin, A; Arik, HO; Nas, O; Yılmaz, YK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: This study evaluated biological rhythm disorders in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods: The study enrolled 82 patients with FMS and 82 controls. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The psychological conditions of the patients were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) was used to assess disturbances in biological rhythms (ie sleep, activity, social and eating patterns). Results: There was no difference between the two groups at baseline (all p > 0.05). The BDI, BRIAN total, sleep, activity, social, and eating scores were higher in patients with FMS than in the controls (all p < 0.001). Further, a significant correlation was found between biological rhythms and BDI scores (p < 0.001) and there were positive correlations between the VAS score and BRIAN total, sleep, and eating and BDI in patients with FMS (all p < 0.001). Conclusion: There are marked biological rhythm disturbances in FMS. There is an important relationship between rhythm disorders and FMS. The disturbances in sleep, functional activities, social participation, and disordered rhythms like eating patterns show the need for a multidisciplinary approach to treating patients with FMS. PMID:26426177

  12. Primate circadian rhythms during spaceflight: results from Cosmos 2044 and 2229.

    PubMed

    Fuller, C A; Hoban-Higgins, T M; Klimovitsky, V Y; Griffin, D W; Alpatov, A M

    1996-07-01

    The circadian timing system (CTS) coordinates an animal's physiology and behavior both internally and with the 24-h day. Previous studies have suggested that the CTS is sensitive to changes in gravity. To examine this question, the expression of the CTS in four juvenile male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were studied in space. These animals were flown on the Cosmos 2044 and 2229 missions. Activity, heart rate, and axillary and brain (Cosmos 2229) temperatures were recorded. In both flights, the subjects exhibited delays in the phasing of their temperature rhythms and a decrease in mean heart rate compared with ground control studies. These data are in support of other studies that demonstrate that the CTS is sensitive to changes in the gravitational environment. Furthermore, the data also support the concept of a multioscillator organization of the primate CTS due to the differential responses of the rhythms measured.

  13. If Your Child Has a Heart Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... septal defect , atrial septal defect , atrioventricular canal, and patent ductus arteriosus). Or the congestion could be the ... for Congenital Heart Defects Many heart abnormalities (including patent ductus arteriosus , ventricular septal defect , truncus arteriosus, atrioventricular ...

  14. Connexins and impulse propagation in the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Jalife, J; Morley, G E; Vaidya, D

    1999-12-01

    Gap junction channels are essential for normal cardiac impulse propagation. Three gap junction proteins, known as connexins, are expressed in the heart: Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45. Each of these proteins forms channels with unique biophysical and electrophysiologic properties, as well as spatial distribution of expression throughout the heart. However, the specific functional role of the individual connexins in normal and abnormal propagation is unknown. The availability of genetically engineered mouse models, together with new developments in optical mapping technology, makes it possible to integrate knowledge about molecular mechanisms of intercellular communication and its regulation with our growing understanding of the microscopic and global dynamics of electrical impulse propagation during normal and abnormal cardiac rhythms. This article reviews knowledge on the mechanisms of cardiac impulse propagation, with particular focus on the role of cardiac connexins in electrical communication between cells. It summarizes results of recent studies on the electrophysiologic consequences of defects in the functional expression of specific gap junction channels in mice lacking either the Cx43 or Cx40 gene. It also reviews data obtained in a transgenic mouse model in which cell loss and remodeling of gap junction distribution leads to increased susceptibility to arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Overall, the results demonstrate that these are potentially powerful strategies for studying fundamental mechanisms of cardiac electrical activity and for testing the hypothesis that certain cardiac arrhythmias involve gap junction or other membrane channel dysfunction. These new approaches, which permit one to manipulate electrical wave propagation at the molecular level, should provide new insight into the detailed mechanisms of initiation, maintenance, and termination of cardiac arrhythmias, and may lead to more effective means to treat arrhythmias and prevent sudden cardiac

  15. Musical alexia for rhythm notation: a discrepancy between pitch and rhythm.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Akira; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Kezuka, Machiko

    2003-06-01

    In the process of reading music, the reading of rhythm and pitch might be differentiated, although there is no evidence of this to date. There have been cases of disorders restricted to the reading of pitch, but none in which the disorder has been restricted to the reading of rhythm. We present a case of musical alexia and agraphia with Wernicke's aphasia. An in-depth assessment of the subject's musical reading ability showed that her musical alexia was restricted to unfamiliar melodies. When a melody was divided into rhythm elements and pitch elements, pitch reading was preserved, but rhythm reading was severely disturbed. This is the first case reported of a disorder restricted to rhythm reading, and suggests the independence of rhythm reading and pitch reading. PMID:12925929

  16. Electrocardiographic Abnormalities and QTc Interval in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yuxin; Zou, Jianzhou; Liang, Yixiu; Shen, Bo; Liu, Zhonghua; Cao, Xuesen; Chen, Xiaohong; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac death is one of the primary causes of mortality in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Prolonged QTc interval is associated with increased rate of sudden cardiac death. The aim of this article is to assess the abnormalities found in electrocardiograms (ECGs), and to explore factors that can influence the QTc interval. Methods A total of 141 conventional HD patients were enrolled in this study. ECG tests were conducted on each patient before a single dialysis session and 15 minutes before the end of dialysis session (at peak stress). Echocardiography tests were conducted before dialysis session began. Blood samples were drawn by phlebotomy immediately before and after the dialysis session. Results Before dialysis, 93.62% of the patients were in sinus rhythm, and approximately 65% of the patients showed a prolonged QTc interval (i.e., a QTc interval above 440 ms in males and above 460ms in females). A comparison of ECG parameters before dialysis and at peak stress showed increases in heart rate (77.45±11.92 vs. 80.38±14.65 bpm, p = 0.001) and QTc interval (460.05±24.53 ms vs. 470.93±24.92 ms, p<0.001). After dividing patients into two groups according to the QTc interval, lower pre-dialysis serum concentrations of potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), phosphorus, calcium* phosphorus (Ca*P), and higher concentrations of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were found in the group with prolonged QTc intervals. Patients in this group also had a larger left atrial diameter (LAD) and a thicker interventricular septum, and they tended to be older than patients in the other group. Then patients were divided into two groups according to ΔQTc (ΔQTc = QTc peak-stress- QTc pre-HD). When analyzing the patients whose QTc intervals were longer at peak stress than before HD, we found that they had higher concentrations of Ca2+ and P5+ and lower concentrations of K+, ferritin, UA, and BNP. They were also more likely to be female. In addition, more cardiac

  17. Protecting the Melatonin Rhythm through Circadian Healthy Light Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bonmati-Carrion, Maria Angeles; Arguelles-Prieto, Raquel; Martinez-Madrid, Maria Jose; Reiter, Russel; Hardeland, Ruediger; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night), whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD), including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs) and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system. PMID:25526564

  18. Spontaneous Group Synchronization of Movements and Respiratory Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Vandoni, Matteo; Bernardi, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    We tested whether pre-assigned arm movements performed in a group setting spontaneously synchronized and whether synchronization extended to heart and respiratory rhythms. We monitored arm movements, respiration and electrocardiogram at rest and during spontaneous, music and metronome-associated arm-swinging. No directions were given on whether or how the arm swinging were to be synchronized between participants or with the external cues. Synchronization within 3 groups of 10 participants studied collectively was compared with pseudo-synchronization of 3 groups of 10 participants that underwent an identical protocol but in an individual setting. Motor synchronization was found to be higher in the collective groups than in the individuals for the metronome-associated condition. On a repetition of the protocol on the following day, motor synchronization in the collective groups extended to the spontaneous, un-cued condition. Breathing was also more synchronized in the collective groups than in the individuals, particularly at rest and in the music-associated condition. Group synchronization occurs without explicit instructions, and involves both movements and respiratory control rhythms. PMID:25216280

  19. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack treatment works best when it's given right after symptoms occur. Prompt treatment of a heart attack can help prevent or limit damage to the heart and prevent sudden death. Call 9-1-1 Right Away A heart ...

  20. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The ... of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso Heart anatomy illustrations and animations for grades K-6. Heart ...

  1. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  2. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... heart block. Doctors use a test called an EKG (electrocardiogram) to help diagnose heart block. This test ...

  3. Nutrients and Circadian Rhythms in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Yao, Cencen; Huang, Liangfeng; Mao, Youxiang; Zhang, Wanjing; Jiang, Jianguo; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    The circadian rhythm is generally existed in mammalian behavior and metabolic processes, which results from the self-sustained circadian clocks. The mammalian circadian clocks are composed of a master clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and of many peripheral clocks in tissues and extra-SCN brain regions. It is indicated that feeding could take over part of the SCN signaling, and affect internal synchrony between the master clock and the peripheral clocks. Thus, recent studies focus more on the relationship between the nutrients and circadian rhythms. Various nutrient components (glucose, amino acid, alcohol) are found to be able to directly affect the circadian rhythm of clock genes. Moreover, the feeding schedule of nutrients is as important as the nutrient components in maintaining a healthy circadian rhythm. Therefore, the circadian homeostasis needs not only balanced nutrient components but also regular timed nutrients.

  4. Circadian rhythm reprogramming during lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Jeffrey A; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E; Choi, Augustine M K

    2014-09-11

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian programme exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared with the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level, endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex re-organization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury.

  5. Studying circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Emery, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have a profound influence on most bodily functions: from metabolism to complex behaviors. They ensure that all these biological processes are optimized with the time-of-day. They are generated by endogenous molecular oscillators that have a period that closely, but not exactly, matches day length. These molecular clocks are synchronized by environmental cycles such as light intensity and temperature. Drosophila melanogaster has been a model organism of choice to understand genetically, molecularly and at the level of neural circuits how circadian rhythms are generated, how they are synchronized by environmental cues, and how they drive behavioral cycles such as locomotor rhythms. This review will cover a wide range of techniques that have been instrumental to our understanding of Drosophila circadian rhythms, and that are essential for current and future research. PMID:24412370

  6. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  7. Altered brain rhythms and functional network disruptions involved in patients with generalized fixation-off epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Solana, Ana Beatriz; Martínez, Kenia; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; San Antonio-Arce, Victoria; Toledano, Rafael; García-Morales, Irene; Alvárez-Linera, Juan; Gil-Nágel, Antonio; Del Pozo, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    Generalized Fixation-off Sensitivity (CGE-FoS) patients present abnormal EEG patterns when losing fixation. In the present work, we studied two CGE-FoS epileptic patients with simultaneous EEG-fMRI. We aim to identify brain areas that are specifically related to the pathology by identifying the brain networks that are related to the EEG brain altered rhythms. Three main analyses were performed: EEG standalone, where the voltage fluctuations in delta, alpha, and beta EEG bands were obtained; fMRI standalone, where resting-state fMRI ICA analyses for opened and closed eyes conditions were computed per subject; and, EEG-informed fMRI, where EEG delta, alpha and beta oscillations were used to analyze fMRI. Patient 1 showed EEG abnormalities for lower beta band EEG brain rhythm. Fluctuations of this rhythm were correlated with a brain network mainly composed by temporo-frontal areas only found in the closed eyes condition. Patient 2 presented alterations in all the EEG brain rhythms (delta, alpha, beta) under study when closing eyes. Several biologically relevant brain networks highly correlated (r > 0.7) to each other in the closed eyes condition were found. EEG-informed fMRI results in patient 2 showed hypersynchronized patterns in the fMRI correlation spatial maps. The obtained findings allow a differential diagnosis for each patient and different profiles with respect to healthy volunteers. The results suggest a different disruption in the functional brain networks of these patients that depends on their altered brain rhythms. This knowledge could be used to treat these patients by novel brain stimulation approaches targeting specific altered brain networks in each patient.

  8. Therapeutics for Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Ehren R.; Zee, Phyllis C

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The sleep-wake cycle is regulated by the interaction of endogenous circadian and homeostatic processes. The circadian system provides timing information for most physiological rhythms, including the sleep and wake cycle. In addition, the central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus has been shown to promote alertness during the day. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders arise when there is a misalignment between the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythms and the external environment or when there is dysfunction of the circadian clock or its entrainment pathways. The primary synchronizing agents of the circadian system are light and melatonin. Light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms and timed exposure to bright light is often used in the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders. In addition, timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has been shown to be useful in the treatment of the following circadian rhythm sleep disorders: delayed sleep phase, advanced sleep phase, free-running, irregular sleep wake, jet lag and shift work. PMID:21243069

  9. Monitoring chaos of cardiac rhythms

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer-Kress, G.

    1989-01-01

    Chaos theory provides a new paradigm in monitoring complexity changes in heart rate variability. Even in cases where the spectral analysis only shows broad band characteristics estimations of dimensional complexity parameters can show quantitative changes in the degree of chaos present in the interbeat interval dynamics. We introduce the concept of dimensional complexity as dynamical monitoring parameter and discuss its properties in connection with control data and data taken during cardiac arrest. Whereas dimensional complexity provides a quantitative indicator of overall chaotic behavior, recurrence plots allow direct visualization of recurrences in arbitrary high dimensional pattern-space. In combination these two methods from non-linear dynamics exemplify a new approach in the problem of heart rate monitoring and identification of precursors of cardiac arrest. Finally we mention a new method of chaotic control, by which selective and highly effective perturbations of nonlinear dynamical systems could be used for improved pacing patterns. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Dysregulation of neuroendocrine crossroads: depression, circadian rhythms and the retina--a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, M; Werstiuk, E S; Seggie, J

    1987-01-01

    The pathophysiology of depression and the mechanism of action of lithium and other antidepressant drugs involve alterations in circadian rhythms. These include changes in both the intrinsic rhythm of circadian oscillators and in the sensitivity of the retina to LIGHT. The retina in humans is the only photoreceptor for circadian entrainment. The retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis is the essential pathway for neuronal entrainment of rhythms which use light as a phase cue. A common substance throughout this axis in many species is MELATONIN. Retinal melatonin has been implicated in regulation of the sensitivity of the retina to light. The hypothalamus, at THE NEUROENDOCRINE CROSSROADS, has a central role in the integration of neurotransmitters and hormones in circadian rhythms. DYSREGULATION of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, as well as -gonadal, axes has been documented in depressed patients. Abnormalities in circulating melatonin have also been found in patients with affective disorders. It is speculated that the availability of melatonin along the retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis may have important implications in the genesis of affective disorders. More specifically--is there a latent biochemical defect which causes a phase shift and change in circadian rhythms of melatonin and/or other neurotransmitters in the retina which then alters the sensitivity of the retina to light (for the visible spectrum) which in turn desynchronizes all other biological rhythms thus disrupting mental well-being? We suggest that variations of retinal photosensitivity in humans can be measured by using a visual testing system, and that depressed patients might show changes in photosensitivity which could be corrected when treated with lithium and/or antidepressants. It is our working hypothesis that the primary defect in depression may be a change in retinal function, and that behavioural and neuroendocrine concomitants of this disorder are secondary events.

  11. Dysregulation of neuroendocrine crossroads: depression, circadian rhythms and the retina--a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, M; Werstiuk, E S; Seggie, J

    1987-01-01

    The pathophysiology of depression and the mechanism of action of lithium and other antidepressant drugs involve alterations in circadian rhythms. These include changes in both the intrinsic rhythm of circadian oscillators and in the sensitivity of the retina to LIGHT. The retina in humans is the only photoreceptor for circadian entrainment. The retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis is the essential pathway for neuronal entrainment of rhythms which use light as a phase cue. A common substance throughout this axis in many species is MELATONIN. Retinal melatonin has been implicated in regulation of the sensitivity of the retina to light. The hypothalamus, at THE NEUROENDOCRINE CROSSROADS, has a central role in the integration of neurotransmitters and hormones in circadian rhythms. DYSREGULATION of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, as well as -gonadal, axes has been documented in depressed patients. Abnormalities in circulating melatonin have also been found in patients with affective disorders. It is speculated that the availability of melatonin along the retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis may have important implications in the genesis of affective disorders. More specifically--is there a latent biochemical defect which causes a phase shift and change in circadian rhythms of melatonin and/or other neurotransmitters in the retina which then alters the sensitivity of the retina to light (for the visible spectrum) which in turn desynchronizes all other biological rhythms thus disrupting mental well-being? We suggest that variations of retinal photosensitivity in humans can be measured by using a visual testing system, and that depressed patients might show changes in photosensitivity which could be corrected when treated with lithium and/or antidepressants. It is our working hypothesis that the primary defect in depression may be a change in retinal function, and that behavioural and neuroendocrine concomitants of this disorder are secondary events. PMID:2888161

  12. Impairment of heme biosynthesis induces short circadian period in body temperature rhythms in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Reiko; Satoh, Yoko; Watanabe, Yukino; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kudo, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoichi; Mashino, Tadahiko; Mitsumoto, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that the function of mammalian clock gene transcripts is controlled by the binding of heme in vitro. To examine the effects of heme on biological rhythms in vivo, we measured locomotor activity (LA) and core body temperature (T(b)) in a mouse model of porphyria with impaired heme biosynthesis by feeding mice a griseofulvin (GF)-containing diet. Mice fed with a 2.0% GF-containing diet (GF2.0) transiently exhibited phase advance or phase advance-like phenomenon by 1-3 h in terms of the biological rhythms of T(b) or LA, respectively (both, P < 0.05) while mice were kept under conditions of a light/dark cycle (12 h:12 h). We also observed a transient, ~0.3 h shortening of the period of circadian T(b) rhythms in mice kept under conditions of constant darkness (P < 0.01). Interestingly, the observed duration of abnormal circadian rhythms in GF2.0 mice lasted between 1 and 3 wk after the onset of GF ingestion; this finding correlated well with the extent of impairment of heme biosynthesis. When we examined the effects of therapeutic agents for acute porphyria, heme, and hypertonic glucose on the pathological status of GF2.0 mice, it was found that the intraperitoneal administration of heme (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or glucose (9 g·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 7 days partially reversed (50%) increases in urinary δ-aminolevulinic acids levels associated with acute porphyria. Treatment with heme, but not with glucose, suppressed the phase advance (-like phenomenon) in the diurnal rhythms (P < 0.05) and restored the decrease of heme (P < 0.01) in GF2.0 mice. These results suggest that impairments of heme biosynthesis, in particular a decrease in heme, may affect phase and period of circadian rhythms in animals.

  13. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  14. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described

  15. The 'athletic heart syndrome'. A critical review.

    PubMed

    George, K P; Wolfe, L A; Burggraf, G W

    1991-05-01

    Cardiological findings in athletes are often similar to those observed in clinical cases. Electrocardiographic and cardiac imaging abnormalities as well as physical findings may be the same in both of these groups. Bradycardia and rhythm disturbances are the most common abnormalities in athletes. Most athletes with abnormal electrocardiograms are asymptomatic and numerous investigators have failed to detect heart disease in association with such electrocardiograms. In contrast to cardiac dysfunction observed in clinical cases, enhanced or normal ventricular systolic and diastolic function have been reported in athletes. In endurance athletes, this is associated with very high values for maximal aerobic power (VO2max). Absolute and body size-normalised cardiac dimensions in most athletes do not approach values from chronic disease states, and may not exceed echocardiographic normal limits. In addition, pathological and physiological enlargement appear to be biochemically and functionally different. Myosin ATPase enzyme expression and calcium metabolism are different in rats with pathologically or physiologically induced enlargement. The reported biochemical differences underlie systolic and diastolic dysfunction in pathological enlargement. Conversely, trained rodents and humans have demonstrated enhanced systolic and diastolic function. It is important to note that cardiac enlargement observed in athletes is the result of normal adaptation to physical conditioning and/or hereditary influences. Conversely, pathological changes result from disease processes which can lead in turn to reduced function, morbidity and mortality. Since the mid 1970s echocardiography has been used to compare cardiac dimensions in male endurance- and resistance-trained athletes. A sport-specific profile of eccentric and concentric enlargement has been documented in endurance and resistance athletes, respectively. Subsequent studies of athletes have examined factors such as age, sex and

  16. Life Events and Social Rhythms in Bipolar Spectrum Disorders: An Examination of Social Rhythm Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Elaine M.; Bender, Rachel E.; Alloy, Lauren B.; Conner, Bradley T.; LaBelle, Denise R.; Abramson, Lyn Y.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the presence of an underlying social rhythm sensitivity in individuals with bipolar spectrum disorders. METHODS The present study examined the impact of life events on sleep loss and social rhythm disruption in 184 individuals with bipolar spectrum disorders (BSD) compared to 197 demographically similar normal controls (NC) drawn from the Longitudinal Investigation of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders (LIBS) project. Life events data were obtained at three time points, each spaced four months apart, and included information on the intensity of the event (high or low), valence (negative or positive), and levels of sleep loss and social rhythm disruption brought about the event. We hypothesized that BSD participants would exhibit higher levels of social rhythm disruption and sleep loss than normal controls as a consequence of the same life events. RESULTS BSD participants experienced significantly more social rhythm disruption and sleep loss following all classes of life events. LIMITATIONS The cross-sectional design of this study limits the strength of the conclusions that can be drawn, primarily cause and effect relationships between social rhythms and symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Findings support the presence of an underlying social rhythm sensitivity in individuals with bipolar spectrum disorders. An additive effect of sleep loss and social rhythm disruption may contribute to subsequent mood symptomatology. Results from this study may inform early psychosocial interventions for at-risk individuals. PMID:22381951

  17. Plasma antibodies to heat shock protein 60 and heat shock protein 70 are associated with increased risk of electrocardiograph abnormalities in automobile workers exposed to noise.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Yang, Miao; Yao, Huiling; Zheng, Jianru; Yang, Qiaoling; Chen, Sheng; Wei, Qingyi; Tanguay, Robert M; Wu, Tangchun

    2005-01-01

    In the living and working environment, stressful factors, such as noise, can cause health problems including cardiovascular diseases and noise-induced hearing loss. Some heat shock proteins (Hsps) play an important role in protecting cardiac cells against ischemic injury, and antibodies against these Hsps are associated with the development and prognosis of atherogenesis, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. Whether the presence of such antibodies is associated with abnormal electrocardiography (ECG) in stressed autoworkers exposed to chronic noise is presently unknown. Therefore, we investigated the association between the levels of plasma anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 with electrocardiograph abnormality in 396 autoworkers exposed to different noise levels by using Western blot, ECG, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The results showed that the increase in levels of anti-Hsp70 was associated with a higher risk of ECG abnormalities characteristic of chronic myocardial ischemia (P < 0.05), conductive abnormality (P < 0.01), or heart displacement (P < 0.05); in contrast, elevated anti-Hsp60 was related to ECG abnormalities characteristic of sinus arrhythmia, chronic myocardial ischemia, and ectopic rhythm (P < 0.01 for all). Overall, high levels of both anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 were associated with significantly increased risk of ECG abnormalities (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73 and 95% confidence interval [Cl] = 1.04-2.86 for anti-Hsp70 and OR = 1.36 and 95% Cl = 1.07-1.72 for anti-Hsp60) with and without adjustment for cumulative noise exposure (OR = 1.96 and 95% Cl = 1.20-3.21 for anti-Hsp70 and OR = 3.93 and 95% Cl = 1.72-8.92 for anti-Hsp60). These findings suggest that the production of both anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 may be independent risk factors for the development and progression of abnormal ECG and therefore possibly cardiovascular diseases in autoworkers exposed to occupational noise.

  18. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  19. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  20. Convergent Rhythm Generation from Divergent Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jason C.; Blitz, Dawn M.

    2013-01-01

    Different modulatory inputs commonly elicit distinct rhythmic motor patterns from a central pattern generator (CPG), but they can instead elicit the same pattern. We are determining the rhythm-generating mechanisms in this latter situation, using the gastric mill (chewing) CPG in the crab (Cancer borealis) stomatogastric ganglion, where stimulating the projection neuron MCN1 (modulatory commissural neuron 1) or bath applying CabPK (C. borealis pyrokinin) peptide elicits the same gastric mill motor pattern, despite configuring different gastric mill circuits. In both cases, the core rhythm generator includes the same reciprocally inhibitory neurons LG (lateral gastric) and Int1 (interneuron 1), but the pyloric (food-filtering) circuit pacemaker neuron AB (anterior burster) is additionally necessary only for CabPK rhythm generation. MCN1 drives this rhythm generator by activating in the LG neuron the modulator-activated inward current (IMI), which waxes and wanes periodically due to phasic feedback inhibition of MCN1 transmitter release. Each buildup of IMI enables the LG neuron to generate a self-terminating burst and thereby alternate with Int1 activity. Here we establish that CabPK drives gastric mill rhythm generation by activating in the LG neuron IMI plus a slowly activating transient, low-threshold inward current (ITrans-LTS) that is voltage, time, and Ca2+ dependent. Unlike MCN1, CabPK maintains a steady IMI activation, causing a subthreshold depolarization in LG that facilitates a periodic postinhibitory rebound burst caused by the regular buildup and decay of the availability of ITrans-LTS. Thus, different modulatory inputs can use different rhythm-generating mechanisms to drive the same neuronal rhythm. Additionally, the same ionic current (IMI) can play different roles under these different conditions, while different currents (IMI, ITrans-LTS) can play the same role. PMID:24227716

  1. Circadian rhythms in the green sunfish retina

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence of circadian rhythms in retinomotor movements and retinal sensitivity in the green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus. When green sunfish were kept in constant darkness, cone photoreceptors exhibited circadian retinomotor movements; rod photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pigment granules did not. Cones elongated during subjective night and contracted during subjective day. These results corroborate those of Burnside and Ackland (1984. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 25:539-545). Electroretinograms (ERGs) recorded in constant darkness in response to dim flashes (lambda = 640 nm) exhibited a greater amplitude during subjective night than during subjective day. The nighttime increase in the ERG amplitude corresponded to a 3-10-fold increase in retinal sensitivity. The rhythmic changes in the ERG amplitude continued in constant darkness with a period of approximately 24 h, which indicates that the rhythm is generated by a circadian oscillator. The spectral sensitivity of the ERG recorded in constant darkness suggests that cones contribute to retinal responses during both day and night. Thus, the elongation of cone myoids during the night does not abolish the response of the cones. To examine the role of retinal efferents in generating retinal circadian rhythms, we cut the optic nerve. This procedure did not abolish the rhythms of retinomotor movement or of the ERG amplitude, but it did reduce the magnitude of the nighttime phases of both rhythms. Our results suggest that more than one endogenous oscillator regulates the retinal circadian rhythms in green sunfish. Circadian signals controlling the rhythms may be either generated within the eye or transferred to the eye via a humoral pathway. PMID:3598559

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  3. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Pitx2 modulates a Tbx5-dependent gene regulatory network to maintain atrial rhythm.

    PubMed

    Nadadur, Rangarajan D; Broman, Michael T; Boukens, Bastiaan; Mazurek, Stefan R; Yang, Xinan; van den Boogaard, Malou; Bekeny, Jenna; Gadek, Margaret; Ward, Tarsha; Zhang, Min; Qiao, Yun; Martin, James F; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jon; Christoffels, Vincent; Efimov, Igor R; McNally, Elizabeth M; Weber, Christopher R; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2016-08-31

    Cardiac rhythm is extremely robust, generating 2 billion contraction cycles during the average human life span. Transcriptional control of cardiac rhythm is poorly understood. We found that removal of the transcription factor gene Tbx5 from the adult mouse caused primary spontaneous and sustained atrial fibrillation (AF). Atrial cardiomyocytes from the Tbx5-mutant mice exhibited action potential abnormalities, including spontaneous depolarizations, which were rescued by chelating free calcium. We identified a multitiered transcriptional network that linked seven previously defined AF risk loci: TBX5 directly activated PITX2, and TBX5 and PITX2 antagonistically regulated membrane effector genes Scn5a, Gja1, Ryr2, Dsp, and Atp2a2 In addition, reduced Tbx5 dose by adult-specific haploinsufficiency caused decreased target gene expression, myocardial automaticity, and AF inducibility, which were all rescued by Pitx2 haploinsufficiency in mice. These results defined a transcriptional architecture for atrial rhythm control organized as an incoherent feed-forward loop, driven by TBX5 and modulated by PITX2. TBX5/PITX2 interplay provides tight control of atrial rhythm effector gene expression, and perturbation of the co-regulated network caused AF susceptibility. This work provides a model for the molecular mechanisms underpinning the genetic implication of multiple AF genome-wide association studies loci and will contribute to future efforts to stratify patients for AF risk by genotype. PMID:27582060

  5. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  6. Microglia modulate respiratory rhythm generation and autoresuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lorea-Hernández, Jonathan-Julio; Morales, Teresa; Rivera-Angulo, Ana-Julia; Alcantara-Gonzalez, David; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation has been linked to the induction of apneas and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, whereas proinflammatory mediators inhibit breathing when applied peripherally or directly into the CNS. Considering that peripheral inflammation can activate microglia in the CNS and that this cell type can directly release all proinflammatory mediators that modulate breathing, it is likely that microglia can modulate breathing generation. It might do so also in hypoxia, since microglia are sensitive to hypoxia, and peripheral proinflammatory conditions affect gasping generation and autoresuscitation. Here, we tested whether microglial activation or inhibition affected respiratory rhythm generation. By measuring breathing as well as the activity of the respiratory rhythm generator (the preBötzinger complex), we found that several microglial activators or inhibitors, applied intracisternally in vivo or in the recording bath in vitro, affect the generation of the respiratory rhythms both in normoxia and hypoxia. Furthermore, microglial activation with lipopolysaccharide affected the ability of the animals to autoresuscitate after hypoxic conditions, an effect that is blocked when lipopolysaccharide is co-applied with the microglial inhibitor minocycline. Moreover, we found that the modulation of respiratory rhythm generation induced in vitro by microglial inhibitors was reproduced by microglial depletion. In conclusion, our data show that microglia can modulate respiratory rhythm generation and autoresuscitation.

  7. Mu rhythm desynchronization by tongue thrust observation

    PubMed Central

    Sakihara, Kotoe; Inagaki, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the mu rhythm in the sensorimotor area during tongue thrust observation and to obtain an answer to the question as to how subtle non-verbal orofacial movement observation activates the sensorimotor area. Ten healthy volunteers performed finger tap execution, tongue thrust execution, and tongue thrust observation. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 128 electrodes placed on the scalp, and regions of interest were set at sensorimotor areas. The event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) for the mu rhythm (8–13 Hz) and beta (13−25 Hz) bands were measured. Tongue thrust observation induced mu rhythm ERD, and the ERD was detected at the left hemisphere regardless whether the observed tongue thrust was toward the left or right. Mu rhythm ERD was also recorded during tongue thrust execution. However, temporal analysis revealed that the ERD associated with tongue thrust observation preceded that associated with execution by approximately 2 s. Tongue thrust observation induces mu rhythm ERD in sensorimotor cortex with left hemispheric dominance. PMID:26441599

  8. Daily Rhythms in Mobile Telephone Communication

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Talayeh; López, Eduardo; Roberts, Sam G. B.; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I. M.; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals’ social networks. Further, women’s calls were longer than men’s calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls were typically focused on a small number of emotionally intense relationships. These results demonstrate that individual differences in circadian rhythms are not just related to broad patterns of morningness and eveningness, but have a strong social component, in directing phone calls to specific individuals at specific times of day. PMID:26390215

  9. Nonlinear control of heart rate variability in human infants.

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, G; Allan, W; Sobel, D; Allan, K D

    1996-01-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation greater than or equal to 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation > or = to 27 weeks) where parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A.L., Rigney, D.R. & West, B.J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states. PMID:8637921

  10. Nonlinear Control of Heart Rate Variability in Human Infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, George; Allan, Walter; Sobel, Daniel; Allan, Kenneth D.

    1996-03-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation >= 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation <= 27 weeks) where parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A. L., Rigney, D. R. & West, B. J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states.

  11. Circadian rhythm disruption was observed in hand, foot, and mouth disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Jiang, Zhou; Xiao, Guoguang; Cheng, Suting; Wen, Yang; Wan, Chaomin

    2015-03-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with central nerve system complications may rapidly progress to fulminated cardiorespiratory failure, with higher mortality and worse prognosis. It has been reported that circadian rhythms of heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate are useful in predicting prognosis of severe cardiovascular and neurological diseases. The present study aims to investigate the characteristics of the circadian rhythms of HR, respiratory rate, and temperature in HFMD patients with neurological complications. Hospitalized HFMD patients including 33 common cases (common group), 61 severe cases (severe group), and 9 critical cases (critical group) were contrasted retrospectively. Their HR, respiratory rate, and temperatures were measured every 4 hours during the first 48-hour in the hospital. Data were analyzed with the least-squares fit of a 24-hour cosine function by the single cosinor and population-mean cosinor method. Results of population-mean cosinor analysis demonstrated that the circadian rhythm of HR, respiratory rate, and temperature was present in the common and severe group, but absent in the critical group. The midline-estimating statistic of rhythm (MESOR) (P = 0.016) and acrophase (P < 0.01) of temperature and respiratory rate were significantly different among 3 groups. But no statistical difference of amplitude in temperature and respiratory rate was observed among the 3 groups (P = 0.14). MESOR value of HR (P < 0.001) was significantly different in 3 groups. However, amplitude and acrophase revealed no statistical difference in circadian characteristics of HR among 3 groups. Compared with the common group, the MESOR of temperature and respiratory rate was significantly higher, and acrophase of temperature and respiratory rate was 2 hours ahead in the severe group, critical HFMD patients lost their population-circadian rhythm of temperature, HR, and respiratory rate. The high values of temperature and respiratory rate for

  12. Adjustment of sleep and the circadian temperature rhythm after flights across nine time zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Myhre, Grete; Graeber, R. Curtis; Lauber, John K.; Andersen, Harald T.

    1989-01-01

    The adjustment of sleep-wake patterns and the circadian temperature rhythm was monitored in nine Royal Norwegian Airforce volunteers operating P-3 aircraft during a westward training deployment across nine time zones. Subjects recorded all sleep and nap times, rated nightly sleep quality, and completed personality inventories. Rectal temperature, heart rate, and wrist activity were continuously monitored. Adjustment was slower after the return eastward flight than after the outbound westward flight. The eastward flight produced slower readjustment of sleep timing to local time and greater interindividual variability in the patterns of adjustment of sleep and temperature. One subject apparently exhibited resynchronization by partition, with the temperature rhythm undergoing the reciprocal 15-h delay. In contrast, average heart rates during sleep were significantly elevated only after westward flight. Interindividual differences in adjustment of the temperature rhythm were correlated with some of the personality measures. Larger phase delays in the overall temperature waveform (as measured on the 5th day after westward flight) were exhibited by extraverts, and less consistently by evening types.

  13. Adjustment of sleep and the circadian temperature rhythm after flights across nine time zones.

    PubMed

    Gander, P H; Myhre, G; Graeber, R C; Andersen, H T; Lauber, J K

    1989-08-01

    The adjustment of sleep-wake patterns and the circadian temperature rhythm was monitored in nine Royal Norwegian Air-force volunteers operating P-3 aircraft during a westward training deployment across nine time zones. Subjects recorded all sleep and nap times, rated nightly sleep quality, and completed personality inventories. Rectal temperature, heart rate, and wrist activity were continuously monitored. Adjustment was slower after the return eastward flight than after the outbound westward flight. The eastward flight produced slower readjustment of sleep timing to local time and greater interindividual variability in the patterns of adjustment of sleep and temperature. One subject apparently exhibited resynchronization by partition, with the temperature rhythm undergoing the reciprocal 15-h delay. In contrast, average heart rates during sleep were significantly elevated only after westward flight. Interindividual differences in adjustment of the temperature rhythm were correlated with some of the personality measures. Larger phase delays in the overall temperature waveform (as measured on the 5th day after westward flight) were exhibited by extraverts, and less consistently by evening types.

  14. Genetic Basis of Human Circadian Rhythm Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher R.; Huang, Angela L.; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disorders constitute a group of phenotypes that usually present as altered sleep-wake schedules. Until a human genetics approach was applied to investigate these traits, the genetic components regulating human circadian rhythm and sleep behaviors remained mysterious. Steady advances in the last decade have dramatically improved our understanding of the genes involved in circadian rhythmicity and sleep regulation. Finding these genes presents new opportunities to use a wide range of approaches, including in vitro molecular studies and in vivo animal modeling, to elevate our understanding of how sleep and circadian rhythms are regulated and maintained. Ultimately, this knowledge will reveal how circadian and sleep disruption contribute to various ailments and shed light on how best to maintain and recover good health. PMID:22849821

  15. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  16. Improvement of pedestrian flow by slow rhythm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Daichi; Tomoeda, Akiyasu; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a simple model for pedestrians by dividing walking velocity into two parts, which are step size and pace of walking (number of steps per unit time). Theoretical analysis on pace indicates that rhythm that is slower than normal-walking pace in a low-density regime increases flow if the flow-density diagram is convex downward in a high-density regime. In order to verify this result, we have performed an experiment with real pedestrians and observed the improvement of flow in a congested situation using slow rhythm.

  17. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options.

  18. [Biological rhythm, sleep and jet lag].

    PubMed

    Zulley, Jürgen

    2014-11-01

    Sleep is an active recovery process, which is governed by biological rhythms. This rhythmic variation influences almost all bodily functions and dictates the optimal time for sleep. Sleep itself is an inconsistent state mainly characterized by the alteration between REM and NREM sleep. Vital regenerative processes occur during sleep. Sleep is a basic prerequisite for wellbeing, health and performance. If the synchronization between sleep and the biological rhythms is disturbed, malfunctions of the organism have to be expected. Such a state can be found by a sudden shift of local time by travelling across time zones (jet lag). Therapeutic strategies can reduce the symptoms associated with the state of jet lag.

  19. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  20. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  1. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  2. [Congenital heart diseases in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Ratti, Carlo; Veronesi, Benedetta; Grassi, Laura; Bompani, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Congenital heart diseases are abnormalities in the heart's structure that are present at birth. Some are known to be associated with genetic disorders. They affect 8 out of every 1,000 newborns. They range from simple defects with no symptoms to complex defects. They are divided in two types: cyanotic and not cyanotic.

  3. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 per minute or coming in groups of 3 or more). You have risk factors for heart disease, such as high cholesterol, diabetes, or high blood pressure. You have new or different heart palpitations. ...

  4. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with heart disease? What do my cholesterol and triglyceride numbers mean? How can I lower my cholesterol? ... weight Know your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides) You can reduce your chances of getting heart ...

  5. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 28. Bernstein D. Pediatric heart and heart-lung transplantation. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 19th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap ...

  6. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 ounce. Most pacemakers have 2 parts: The generator contains the battery and the information to control ... are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart. ...

  7. Modeling heart rate variability by stochastic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amaral, L. A.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the question of how the cardiac rhythm spontaneously self-regulates and propose a new mechanism as a possible answer. We model the neuroautonomic regulation of the heart rate as a stochastic feedback system and find that the model successfully accounts for key characteristics of cardiac variability, including the 1/f power spectrum, the functional form and scaling of the distribution of variations of the interbeat intervals, and the correlations in the Fourier phases which indicate nonlinear dynamics.

  8. Melatonin ineffective in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis patients with fragmented or normal motor activity rhythms recorded by wrist actigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hätönen, T; Kirveskari, E; Heiskala, H; Sainio, K; Laakso, M L; Santavuori, P

    1999-04-01

    Melatonin was tested as a sleeping pill in five patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. The single-blind, placebo-controlled study consisted of motor activity recordings, sleep logs, and administration of placebo or melatonin (2.5 or 5 mg). Daily motor activity rhythms were measured by wrist actigraphy during four 7-day periods (baseline, placebo, melatonin 2.5 mg, and melatonin 5 mg). The placebo or melatonin was administered in the evenings for 3 weeks, and the recordings were made during the last week of the 3-week treatment. Sleep logs were kept by the caregivers during the recordings. Based on period analyses, the activity recordings were evaluated to display a normal (24-h) or fragmented rhythm. Three patients had normal motor activity patterns during the baseline recordings, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not affect their rest/activity rhythms. Two patients had abnormally fragmented activity rhythms during the baseline periods, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not induce synchronization. According to the actigraphic data, there were no changes in activity rhythms resulting from administration of melatonin. However, based on the observations, three families reported that melatonin slightly improved the sleep quality of the patients. These controversial findings show the difficulties involved in specifying the role of melatonin in modulating sleep. Thus, we conclude that more evidence is required before the significance of melatonin as a sleeping pill is defined. PMID:10191137

  9. Melatonin ineffective in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis patients with fragmented or normal motor activity rhythms recorded by wrist actigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hätönen, T; Kirveskari, E; Heiskala, H; Sainio, K; Laakso, M L; Santavuori, P

    1999-04-01

    Melatonin was tested as a sleeping pill in five patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. The single-blind, placebo-controlled study consisted of motor activity recordings, sleep logs, and administration of placebo or melatonin (2.5 or 5 mg). Daily motor activity rhythms were measured by wrist actigraphy during four 7-day periods (baseline, placebo, melatonin 2.5 mg, and melatonin 5 mg). The placebo or melatonin was administered in the evenings for 3 weeks, and the recordings were made during the last week of the 3-week treatment. Sleep logs were kept by the caregivers during the recordings. Based on period analyses, the activity recordings were evaluated to display a normal (24-h) or fragmented rhythm. Three patients had normal motor activity patterns during the baseline recordings, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not affect their rest/activity rhythms. Two patients had abnormally fragmented activity rhythms during the baseline periods, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not induce synchronization. According to the actigraphic data, there were no changes in activity rhythms resulting from administration of melatonin. However, based on the observations, three families reported that melatonin slightly improved the sleep quality of the patients. These controversial findings show the difficulties involved in specifying the role of melatonin in modulating sleep. Thus, we conclude that more evidence is required before the significance of melatonin as a sleeping pill is defined.

  10. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  11. Perceptual Tests of Rhythmic Similarity: I. Mora Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murty, Lalita; Otake, Takashi; Cutler, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Listeners rely on native-language rhythm in segmenting speech; in different languages, stress-, syllable- or mora-based rhythm is exploited. The rhythmic similarity hypothesis holds that where two languages have similar rhythm, listeners of each language should segment their own and the other language similarly. Such similarity in listening was…

  12. A rhythm landscape approach to the developmental dynamics of birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Kazutoshi; Tchernichovski, Ofer; Takahasi, Miki; Suzuki, Kenta; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Unlike simple biological rhythms, the rhythm of the oscine bird song is a learned time series of diverse sounds that change dynamically during vocal ontogeny. How to quantify rhythm development is one of the most important challenges in behavioural biology. Here, we propose a simple method, called ‘rhythm landscape’, to visualize and quantify how rhythm structure, which is measured as durational patterns of sounds and silences, emerges and changes over development. Applying this method to the development of Bengalese finch songs, we show that the rhythm structure begins with a broadband rhythm that develops into diverse rhythms largely through branching from precursors. Furthermore, an information-theoretic measure, the Jensen–Shannon divergence, was used to characterize the crystallization process of birdsong rhythm, which started with a high rate of rhythm change and progressed to a stage of slow refinement. This simple method provides a useful description of rhythm development, thereby helping to reveal key temporal constraints on complex biological rhythms. PMID:26538559

  13. The Features and Training of English Stress and Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Cui-yun

    2008-01-01

    In second language learning, to possess a perfect pronunciation, the importance of stress and rhythm should not be ignored. This articles explores the nature of sentence and word stress as well as rhythm, thus putting forward some feasible ways of training and acquiring a good English stress and rhythm in EFLT (English as Foreign Language…

  14. Monkey Lipsmacking Develops Like the Human Speech Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrill, Ryan J.; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F.; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2012-01-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved "de novo" in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial…

  15. Does Melody Assist in the Reproduction of Novel Rhythm Patterns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Daryl W.; Forsythe, Jere L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined music education majors' ability to reproduce rhythmic stimuli presented in melody and rhythm only conditions. Participants reproduced rhythms of two-measure music examples by immediately echo-performing through a method of their choosing (e.g., clapping, tapping, vocalizing). Forty examples were presented in melody and rhythm only…

  16. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J.; Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Ha, C. Y.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied eight young men (age range: 20-37 years) with chronic, clinically complete high cervical spinal cord injuries and ten age-matched healthy men to determine how interruption of connections between the central nervous system and spinal sympathetic motoneurones affects autonomic cardiovascular control. 2. Baseline diastolic pressures and R-R intervals (heart periods) were similar in the two groups. Slopes of R-R interval responses to brief neck pressure changes were significantly lower in tetraplegic than in healthy subjects, but slopes of R-R interval responses to steady-state arterial pressure reductions and increases were comparable. Plasma noradrenaline levels did not change significantly during steady-state arterial pressure reductions in tetraplegic patients, but rose sharply in healthy subjects. The range of arterial pressure and R-R interval responses to vasoactive drugs (nitroprusside and phenylephrine) was significantly greater in tetraplegic than healthy subjects. 3. Resting R-R interval spectral power at respiratory and low frequencies was similar in the two groups. During infusions of vasoactive drugs, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power was directly proportional to arterial pressure in tetraplegic patients, but was unrelated to arterial pressure in healthy subjects. Vagolytic doses of atropine nearly abolished both low- and respiratory-frequency R-R interval spectral power in both groups. 4. Our conclusions are as follows. First, since tetraplegic patients have significant levels of low-frequency arterial pressure and R-R interval spectral power, human Mayer arterial pressure waves may result from mechanisms that do not involve stimulation of spinal sympathetic motoneurones by brainstem neurones. Second, since in tetraplegic patients, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power is proportional to arterial pressure, it is likely to be mediated by a baroreflex mechanism. Third, since low-frequency R-R interval rhythms were nearly abolished

  17. A timely review of state-of-the-art chronopharmaceuticals synchronized with biological rhythms.

    PubMed

    Sewlall, Seshni; Pillay, Viness; Danckwerts, Michael P; Choonara, Yahya E; Ndesendo, Valence M K; du Toit, Lisa C

    2010-12-01

    Extensive research into circadian rhythms and their influence on biological systems has given rise to the science of chronobiology and subsequently chronotherapy, the science of delivering drugs in synchrony with biological rhythms. The field of chronotherapeutics paves the way for advances and complexities in current drug delivery technology. The ultimate goal of current chronopharmaceutical research strives to design ideal chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems that respond to such therapeutic needs. Considering the fact that physiological events such as heart rate, blood pressure, plasma concentration of hormones, plasma proteins and enzymes display constancy over time, drug delivery systems with constant release profiles have thus been favored. However, due to circadian rhythms, the conventional paradigm of constant drug delivery may not be what is needed. Instead, precisely timed drug delivery systems are required in order to correlate drug delivery with circadian rhythms to provide maximum therapeutic efficacy for chronotherapeutic diseases when most needed. The aim of this review paper is to outline the concepts in designing chronopharmaceuticals from a clinical viewpoint of major chronotherapeutic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer as well as relatively minor niche areas of interest such as in glaucoma, diabetes, immunity, pain, gastric ulcers, epilepsy and even HIV/AIDS that would require chronotherapy. In addition this review paper attempts to concisely assimilate and explicate the role of circadian rhythms in these various disease states and provide a focused overview of the current state-of-the-art in designing strategies for chronopharmaceutical formulations employed for treating chronotherapeutic diseases. PMID:20950265

  18. Cardiorespiratory Coupling: Common Rhythms in Cardiac, Sympathetic, and Respiratory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dhingra, Rishi R.; Baekey, David M.; Galán, Roberto F.; Wehrwein, Erica; Morris, Kendall F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory coupling is an encompassing term describing more than the well-recognized influences of respiration on heart rate and blood pressure. Our data indicate that cardiorespiratory coupling reflects a reciprocal interaction between autonomic and respiratory control systems, and the cardiovascular system modulates the ventilatory pattern as well. For example, cardioventilatory coupling refers to the influence of heart beats and arterial pulse pressure on respiration and is the tendency for the next inspiration to start at a preferred latency after the last heart beat in expiration. Multiple complementary, well-described mechanisms mediate respiration’s influence on cardiovascular function, whereas mechanisms mediating the cardiovascular system’s influence on respiration may only be through the baroreceptors but are just being identified. Our review will describe a differential effect of conditioning rats with either chronic intermittent or sustained hypoxia on sympathetic nerve activity but also on ventilatory pattern variability. Both intermittent and sustained hypoxia increase sympathetic nerve activity after 2 weeks but affect sympatho-respiratory coupling differentially. Intermittent hypoxia enhances sympatho-respiratory coupling, which is associated with low variability in the ventilatory pattern. In contrast, after constant hypobaric hypoxia, 1-to-1 coupling between bursts of sympathetic and phrenic nerve activity is replaced by 2-to-3 coupling. This change in coupling pattern is associated with increased variability of the ventilatory pattern. After baro-denervating hypobaric hypoxic-conditioned rats, splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity becomes tonic (distinct bursts are absent) with decreases during phrenic nerve bursts and ventilatory pattern becomes regular. Thus, conditioning rats to either intermittent or sustained hypoxia accentuates the reciprocal nature of cardiorespiratory coupling. Finally, identifying a compelling physiologic

  19. Wheel running improves REM sleep and attenuates stress-induced flattening of diurnal rhythms in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders and that exercise both promotes stress resistance and is a powerful non-photic biological entrainment cue, we tested if wheel running could reduce stress-induced disruptions of sleep/wake behavior and diurnal rhythms. Adult, male F344 rats with or without access to running wheels were instrumented for biotelemetric recording of diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity, heart rate, core body temperature (CBT), and sleep (i.e. REM, NREM, and WAKE) in the presence of a 12 h light/dark cycle. Following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise rats expressed higher stress-induced hyperthermia than sedentary rats. Stressor exposure disrupted diurnal rhythms in sedentary rats; and wheel running reduced these effects. Improvements in sleep and reduced diurnal rhythm disruptions following stress could contribute to the health promoting and stress protective effects of exercise. PMID:27124542

  20. Wheel running improves REM sleep and attenuates stress-induced flattening of diurnal rhythms in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders and that exercise both promotes stress resistance and is a powerful non-photic biological entrainment cue, we tested if wheel running could reduce stress-induced disruptions of sleep/wake behavior and diurnal rhythms. Adult, male F344 rats with or without access to running wheels were instrumented for biotelemetric recording of diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity, heart rate, core body temperature (CBT), and sleep (i.e. REM, NREM, and WAKE) in the presence of a 12 h light/dark cycle. Following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise rats expressed higher stress-induced hyperthermia than sedentary rats. Stressor exposure disrupted diurnal rhythms in sedentary rats; and wheel running reduced these effects. Improvements in sleep and reduced diurnal rhythm disruptions following stress could contribute to the health promoting and stress protective effects of exercise.

  1. Effects of light on the circadian rhythm of diabetic rats under restricted feeding.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; ZhuGe, Fen; Zhu, Yali; Wang, Nan; Jiang, Qianru; Fu, Haoxuan; Li, Yongjun; Fu, Zhengwei

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the entrainment of light cue is affected or not in diabetic animals. We found that the individual light/dark (LD) reversal showed a tissue- and gene-specific effect on the circadian phases of peripheral clock genes, which was generally similar between the control and diabetic rats. In the liver and heart, the peak phases of examined clock genes (Bmal1, Rev-erbα, Per1, and Per2) were slightly shifted by 0∼4 h in the liver and heart of control and diabetic rats. However, we found that the peak phases of these clock genes were greatly shifted by 8∼12 h after the LD reversal for 7 days in the pineal gland of both control and diabetic rats. However, the activity rhythm was greatly different between two groups. After the individual LD reversal, the activity rhythm was completely shifted in the control rats but retained in the diabetic rats. These observations suggested that the behavioral rhythm of diabetic rats may be uncoupled from the master clock after the individual LD reversal. Moreover, we also found that the serum glucose levels of diabetic rats kept equally high throughout the whole day without any shift of peak phase after the individual reversal of LD cycle. While the serum glucose levels of control rats were tightly controlled during the normal and LD reversal conditions. Thus, the impaired insulin secretion induced uncontrollable serum glucose level may result in uncoupled activity rhythm in the diabetic rats after the individual LD reversal.

  2. Assessing circadian rhythms in propofol PK and PD during prolonged infusion in ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Agnieszka; Kusza, Krzysztof; Wawrzyniak, Katarzyna; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Kokot, Zenon J; Matysiak, Jan; Grabowski, Tomasz; Wolc, Anna; Wiczling, Paweł; Regulski, Miłosz

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluates possible circadian rhythms during prolonged propofol infusion in patients in the intensive care unit. Eleven patients were sedated with a constant propofol infusion. The blood samples for the propofol assay were collected every hour during the second day, the third day, and after the termination of the propofol infusion. Values of electroencephalographic bispectral index (BIS), arterial blood pressure, heart rate, blood oxygen saturation and body temperature were recorded every hour at the blood collection time points. A two-compartment model was used to describe propofol pharmacokinetics. Typical values of the central and peripheral volume of distribution and inter-compartmental clearance were V(C) = 27.7 l, V(T) = 801 l, and CL(D) = 2.73 l/min. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) was found to influence the propofol metabolic clearance according to Cl (l/min) = 2.65 x (1-0.00714 x (SBP-135)). There was no significant circadian rhythm detected with respect to propofol pharmacokinetics. The BIS score was assessed as a direct effect model with EC(50) equal 1.98 mg/l. There was no significant circadian rhythm detected within the BIS scores. We concluded that the light-dark cycle did not influence propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in intensive care units patients. The lack of night-day differences was also noted for systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and blood oxygenation. Circadian rhythms were detected for heart rate and body temperature, however they were severely disturbed from the pattern of healthy patients.

  3. Assessing circadian rhythms in propofol PK and PD during prolonged infusion in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    Kusza, Krzysztof; Wawrzyniak, Katarzyna; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Kokot, Zenon J.; Matysiak, Jan; Grabowski, Tomasz; Wolc, Anna; Wiczling, Paweł; Regulski, Miłosz

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates possible circadian rhythms during prolonged propofol infusion in patients in the intensive care unit. Eleven patients were sedated with a constant propofol infusion. The blood samples for the propofol assay were collected every hour during the second day, the third day, and after the termination of the propofol infusion. Values of electroencephalographic bispectral index (BIS), arterial blood pressure, heart rate, blood oxygen saturation and body temperature were recorded every hour at the blood collection time points. A two-compartment model was used to describe propofol pharmacokinetics. Typical values of the central and peripheral volume of distribution and inter-compartmental clearance were VC = 27.7 l, VT = 801 l, and CLD = 2.73 l/min. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) was found to influence the propofol metabolic clearance according to Cl (l/min) = 2.65·(1 − 0.00714·(SBP − 135)). There was no significant circadian rhythm detected with respect to propofol pharmacokinetics. The BIS score was assessed as a direct effect model with EC50 equal 1.98 mg/l. There was no significant circadian rhythm detected within the BIS scores. We concluded that the light–dark cycle did not influence propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in intensive care units patients. The lack of night–day differences was also noted for systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and blood oxygenation. Circadian rhythms were detected for heart rate and body temperature, however they were severely disturbed from the pattern of healthy patients. PMID:20544262

  4. Rest/Activity Rhythms and Cardiovascular Disease in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Misti L.; Taylor, Brent C.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Stone, Katie L.; Tranah, Greg; Redline, Susan; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested an increased risk of CVD-related mortality in older adults with disturbed circadian rest/activity rhythms (RARs). The objective goal of this study was to examine the association between disrupted RARs and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in older men. A total of 2,968 men aged 67 yrs and older wore wrist actigraphs for 115±18 consecutive hours. RAR parameters were computed from wrist actigraphy data and expressed as quartiles (Q). CVD events consisted of a composite outcome of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) events. Secondary analyses examined associations between RARs and individual components of the composite outcome (CHD, stroke, and PVD). There were 490 CVD events over an average of 4.0±1.2 yrs. Overall, reduced amplitude (HR = 1.31, 95%CI 1.01–1.71 for Q2 vs. Q4) and greater minimum (HR = 1.33, 95%CI 1.01–1.73 for Q4 vs. Q1) were associated with an increased risk of CVD events in multivariable-adjusted models. In secondary analyses, there was an independent association between reduced amplitude (HR = 1.36, 95%CI 1.00–1.86) and greater minimum activity counts (HR = 1.39, 95%CI 1.02–1.91) with increased risk of CHD events. Reduced F-value (HR = 2.88, 95%CI 1.41–5.87 for Q1 vs. Q4 and HR = 2.71, 95%CI 1.34–5.48 for Q2 vs. Q4) and later occurring acrophase of the RAR (HR = 1.65, 95%CI 1.04–2.63 for Q4 vs. Q2–3) were associated with an increased risk of PVD events. Results were similar in men without a history of CVD events. The findings revealed among older men, measures of decreased circadian activity rhythm robustness (reduced amplitude and greater minimum activity) were associated with an increased risk of CVD events, primarily through increased risk of CHD or stroke events, whereas measures of reduced circadian activity rhythm robustness were not associated with risk of CVD events overall, but were associated with an increased risk of PVD events. These results

  5. Development of sucking rhythm in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Hack, M; Estabrook, M M; Robertson, S S

    1985-07-01

    We studied the ontogeny and temporal organization of non-nutritive sucking during active sleep in 6 healthy preterm infants (mean birthweight 1.1 kg (range 0.8-1.3 kg) gestational age 28.6 weeks (range 26-30 w] from 30 to 35 weeks of post-menstrual (PM) age. Recognizable rhythmical sucking bursts were recorded at 28 weeks in one infant and by 31-33 weeks in the others. Results were analyzed for the periods 30-31, 32-33 and 34-35 PM weeks. The number of bursts/min increased with age, while the duration of each burst was stable (mean 4.1 s). The pause between bursts decreased. Sucking pace within bursts increased with age which resulted in an increase in the overall rate of sucking. The coefficient of variation (CV) for intersuck time within bursts and for interburst time was computed to examine the stability of the sucking rhythm. For intersuck time the CV was relatively low and constant across ages. However, for interburst time CV was relatively large across ages. Thus, there appears to be a stability of the intraburst sucking rhythm from 30 weeks of gestation, whereas the interburst rhythm is less regular. This documentation of temporal organization in sucking from 30 weeks is one of the earliest indications of an intrinsic rhythm in human behavior.

  6. Procedures for numerical analysis of circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    REFINETTI, ROBERTO; LISSEN, GERMAINE CORNÉ; HALBERG, FRANZ

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews various procedures used in the analysis of circadian rhythms at the populational, organismal, cellular and molecular levels. The procedures range from visual inspection of time plots and actograms to several mathematical methods of time series analysis. Computational steps are described in some detail, and additional bibliographic resources and computer programs are listed. PMID:23710111

  7. Molecular Regulation of Circadian Rhythms by Polyamines.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Pietrocola, Federico; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-01

    In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Zwighaft and colleagues (Zwighaft et al., 2015) describe a novel mechanism through which intracellular polyamines regulate circadian rhythms. These findings are significant, as they add yet another layer of complexity to the interplay between environmental, dietary, and organismal factors in the molecular control of daily behavioral oscillations.

  8. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry.

  9. Neuroscience: A Sleep Rhythm with Multiple Facets.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ping Chai; Marshall, Lisa

    2016-09-12

    Sleep spindles were one of the first rhythms associated with learning and memory consolidation. Current research shows spindles can reflect features of trait and time-varying properties of neuroplasticity. A new study has now used feedback-controlled spindle frequency stimulation to show that sleep spindles modulate endogenous brain electric activity and behavior.

  10. Characterization of neurospora circadian rhythms in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, James S.

    1987-01-01

    To determine whether the circadian rhythm of conidiation in neurospora crassa is endogenously derived or is driven by some geophysical time cue, an experiment was conducted on space shuttle flight STS-9, where inoculated race tubes were exposed to the microgravity environment of space. The results demonstated that the rhythm can persist in space. However, there were several minor alterations noted; an increase in the period of the oscillation and the variability of the growth rate and a diminished rhythm amplitude, which eventually damped out in 25% of the flight tubes. On day seven of the flight, the tubes were exposed to light while their growth fronts were marked. It appears that some aspects of this marking process reinstated a robust rhythm in all the tubes which continued throughout the remainder of the flight. It was hypothesized that the damping found prior to the marking procedure on STS-9 may have been a result of the hypergravity pulse of launch and not due to the microgravity of the orbital lab; furthermore, that the marking procedure, by exposing the samples to light, had reinstated rhythmicity. To test this, an investigation was conducted into the effects of acute and chronic exposure to hypergravity.

  11. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys was examined. In the absence of other time cues, 24-hr cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of the rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 hr with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined.

  12. Circadian temperature rhythms of older people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Kupfer, D. J.; Houck, P. R.

    1995-01-01

    This collection of studies had the aim of exploring whether older (77+ years) men and women have circadian body temperature rhythms different from those of younger adults. A total of 20 older men and 28 older women were compared with either 22 young men or 14 middle-aged men in four protocols; all but the first protocol using a subset of the sample. The four protocols were: 1) 24 h, and 2) 72 h data collections on a normal laboratory routine (sleeping at night); 3) between 36 h and 153 h of field data collection at home; and 4) 36 h of a constant conditions routine (wakeful bedrest under temporal isolation) in the laboratory. There was some evidence for an age-related phase advance in temperature rhythm, especially for the older men on a normal routine, though this was not present in the constant conditions protocol, where 5 of the older subjects showed major delays in the timing of the body temperature trough (10:00 or later). There was no statistically significant evidence from any of the protocols that older subjects generally had lower temperature rhythm amplitudes than younger adults. Only when older men were compared with younger men in 24-h rhythm amplitude by simple t-test did any comparison involving amplitude achieve statistical significance (p < 0.05).

  13. Neuroscience: A Sleep Rhythm with Multiple Facets.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ping Chai; Marshall, Lisa

    2016-09-12

    Sleep spindles were one of the first rhythms associated with learning and memory consolidation. Current research shows spindles can reflect features of trait and time-varying properties of neuroplasticity. A new study has now used feedback-controlled spindle frequency stimulation to show that sleep spindles modulate endogenous brain electric activity and behavior. PMID:27623266

  14. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Sulzman, F M; Fuller, C A; Moore-Ede, M C

    1977-11-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation was examined on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys. In the absence of other time cues, 24-h cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 h with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined. PMID:412829

  15. Emotion and Rhythm in Critical Learning Incidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soini, Hannu; Flynn, Mark

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the descriptions of learning provided by 234 College of Education students from Finland and Canada and compared them with Whitehead's (1932/1962) epistemological theory of the rhythm of mental growth. The students were asked to "Give a concrete example of a situation in which you really learned something." The…

  16. Influence of head-down bed rest on the circadian rhythms of hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millet, C.; Custaud, M. A.; Allevard, A. M.; Zaouali-Ajina, M.; Monk, T. H.; Arnaud, S. B.; Claustrat, B.; Gharib, C.; Gauquelin-Koch, G.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of a 17-day head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic an actual spaceflight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (AVP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cortisol, electrolytes (Na+ and K+) and creatinine were determined. HDBR resulted in a significant reduction of body mass (P < 0.01) and of caloric intake [mean (SEM) 2,778 (37) kcal.24 h(-1) to 2,450 (36) kcal.24 h(-1), where 1 kcal.h(-1) = 1.163 J.s(-1); P< 0.01]. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure [71.8 (0.7) mmHg vs 75.6 (0.91) mmHg], with no significant changes in either systolic blood pressure or heart rate. The nocturnal hormonal decrease of aldosterone was clearly evident only before and after HDBR, but the day/night difference did not appear during HDBR. The rhythm of K+ excretion was unchanged during HDBR, whereas for Na+ excretion, a large decrease was shown during the night as compared to the day. The circadian rhythm of cortisol persisted. These data suggest that exposure to a 17-day HDBR could induce an exaggeration of the amplitude of the Na+ rhythm and abolition of the aldosterone rhythm.

  17. Influence of head-down bed rest on the circadian rhythms of hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation.

    PubMed

    Millet, C; Custaud, M A; Allevard, A M; Zaouali-Ajina, M; Monk, T H; Arnaud, S B; Claustrat, B; Gharib, C; Gauquelin-Koch, G

    2001-07-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of a 17-day head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic an actual spaceflight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (AVP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cortisol, electrolytes (Na+ and K+) and creatinine were determined. HDBR resulted in a significant reduction of body mass (P < 0.01) and of caloric intake [mean (SEM) 2,778 (37) kcal.24 h(-1) to 2,450 (36) kcal.24 h(-1), where 1 kcal.h(-1) = 1.163 J.s(-1); P< 0.01]. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure [71.8 (0.7) mmHg vs 75.6 (0.91) mmHg], with no significant changes in either systolic blood pressure or heart rate. The nocturnal hormonal decrease of aldosterone was clearly evident only before and after HDBR, but the day/night difference did not appear during HDBR. The rhythm of K+ excretion was unchanged during HDBR, whereas for Na+ excretion, a large decrease was shown during the night as compared to the day. The circadian rhythm of cortisol persisted. These data suggest that exposure to a 17-day HDBR could induce an exaggeration of the amplitude of the Na+ rhythm and abolition of the aldosterone rhythm.

  18. From Biological Rhythms to Social Rhythms: Physiological Precursors of Mother-Infant Synchrony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Links between neonatal biological rhythms and the emergence of interaction rhythms were examined in 3 groups (N=71): high-risk preterms (HR; birth weight less than 1,000 g), low-risk preterms (LR; birth weight=1,700-1,850 g), and full-term (FT) infants. Once a week for premature infants and on the 2nd day for FT infants, sleep-wake cyclicity was…

  19. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    PubMed

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  20. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    PubMed

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna. PMID:21747920

  1. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths Hairs

    SciTech Connect

    M Spilde; A Lanzirotti; C Qualls; G Phillips; A Ali; L Agenbroad; O Appenzeller

    2011-12-31

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was {approx}31 cms/year and {approx}16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  2. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds. PMID:24942699

  3. Daily rhythms in plasma levels of homocysteine

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, Lena; Lavie, Peretz

    2004-01-01

    Background There is accumulated evidence that plasma concentration of the sulfur-containing amino-acid homocysteine (Hcy) is a prognostic marker for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Both fasting levels of Hcy and post methionine loading levels are used as prognostic markers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of a daily rhythm in plasma Hcy under strictly controlled nutritional and sleep-wake conditions. We also investigated if the time during which methionine loading is performed, i.e., morning or evening, had a different effect on the resultant plasma Hcy concentration. Methods Six healthy men aged 23–26 years participated in 4 experiments. In the first and second experiments, the daily rhythm in Hcy as well as in other amino acids was investigated under a normal or an inverse sleep-wake cycle. In the third and fourth, Hcy concentrations were investigated after a morning and evening methionine loading. To standardize food consumption in the first two experiments, subjects received every 3 hours 150 ml of specially designed low-protein liquid food (Ensure® formula). Results In both the first and second experiments there was a significant daily rhythm in Hcy concentrations with a mid-day nadir and a nocturnal peak. Strikingly different 24-h patterns were observed in methionine, leucine, isoleucine and tyrosine. In all, the 24-h curves revealed a strong influence of both the sleep-wake cycle and the feeding schedule. Methionine loading resulted in increased plasma Hcy levels during both morning and evening experiments, which were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions There is a daily rhythm in plasma concentration of the amino acid Hcy, and this rhythm is independent of sleep-wake and food consumption. In view of the fact that increased Hcy concentrations may be associated with increased cardiovascular risks, these findings may have clinical implications for the health of rotating shift workers. PMID:15347422

  4. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths' Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna. PMID:21747920

  5. The anatomy and development of normal and abnormal coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Diane E; Henderson, Deborah J; Chaudhry, Bill; Mohun, Timothy J; Anderson, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    At present, there is significant interest in the morphology of the coronary arteries, not least due to the increasingly well-recognised association between anomalous origin of the arteries and sudden cardiac death. Much has also been learnt over the last decade regarding the embryology of the arteries. In this review, therefore, we provide a brief introduction into the recent findings regarding their development. In particular, we emphasise that new evidence, derived using the developing murine heart, points to the arterial stems growing out from the adjacent sinuses of the aortic root, rather than the arteries growing in, as is currently assumed. As we show, the concept of outgrowth provides an excellent explanation for several of the abnormal arrangements encountered in the clinical setting. Before summarising these abnormal features, we draw attention to the need to describe the heart in an attitudinally appropriate manner, following the basic rule of human anatomy, rather than describing the cardiac components with the heart in the "Valentine" orientation. We then show how the major abnormalities involving the coronary arteries in humans can be summarised in terms of abnormal origin from the pulmonary circulation, abnormal aortic origin, or fistulous communications between the coronary arteries and the cardiac cavities. In the case of abnormal aortic origin, we highlight those malformations known to be associated with sudden cardiac death.

  6. The Validity and Reliability of Rhythm Measurements in Automatically Scoring the English Rhythm Proficiency of Chinese EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jin; Lin, Jianghao; Li, Xinguang

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to find out the validity of rhythm measurements to capture the rhythmic features of Chinese English. Besides, the reliability of the valid rhythm measurements applied in automatically scoring the English rhythm proficiency of Chinese EFL learners is also explored. Thus, two experiments were carried out. First, thirty students of…

  7. [Possibilities of ultrasonic methods in the diagnosis of crisscross heart].

    PubMed

    Mitina, I N; Makhachev, O A; Ivanitskiĭ, A V

    1989-01-01

    Ultrasonographic methods were used in the diagnosis of the criss-cross heart, a rare congenital rotation abnormality of the heart. The ultracardiosonographic diagnosis of the criss-cross heart does not exclude the necessity of using catheterization and angiography to verify the anatomic characteristics.

  8. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  9. [Heart arrest].

    PubMed

    Chiarella, F; Giovannini, E; Bozzano, A; Caristo, G; Delise, P; Fedele, F; Fera, M S; Lavalle, C; Roghi, A; Valagussa, F

    2001-03-01

    Cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of mortality in industrialized countries and is mainly due to ischemic heart disease. According to ISTAT estimates, approximately 45,000 sudden deaths occur annually in Italy whereas according to the World Health Organization, its incidence is 1 per 1000 persons. The most common cause of cardiac arrest is ventricular fibrillation due to an acute ischemic episode. During acute ischemia the onset of a ventricular tachyarrhythmia is sudden, unpredictable and often irreversible and lethal. Each minute that passes, the probability that the patient survives decreases by 10%. For this reason, the first 10 min are considered to be priceless for an efficacious first aid. The possibility of survival depends on the presence of witnesses, on the heart rhythm and on the resolution of the arrhythmia. In the majority of cases, the latter is possible by means of electrical defibrillation followed by the reestablishment of systolic function. An increase in equipment alone does not suffice for efficacious handling of cardiac arrest occurring outside the hospital premises. Above all, an adequate intervention strategy is required. Ambulance personnel must be well trained and capable of intervening rapidly, possibly within the first 5 min. The key to success lies in the diffusion and proper use of defibrillators. The availability of new generation instruments, the external automatic defibrillators, encourages their widespread use. On the territory, these emergencies are the responsibility of the 118 organization based, according to the characteristics specific to each country, on the regulated coordination between the operative command, the crews and the first-aid means. Strategies for the handling of these emergencies within hospitals have been proposed by the Conference of Bethesda and tend to guarantee an efficacious resuscitation with a maximum latency of 2 min between cardiac arrest and the first electric shock. The diffusion of external

  10. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke.

  11. Hypoxia and fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Patterson, A J; Zhang, L

    2010-10-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not the only gene involved in adaptation to hypoxia, its role places it as a central figure in orchestrating events needed for adaptation to hypoxic stress. Although "normal" hypoxia (lower oxygen tension in the fetus as compared with the adult) is essential in heart formation, further abnormal hypoxia in utero adversely affects cardiogenesis. Prenatal hypoxia alters myocardial structure and causes a decline in cardiac performance. Not only are the effects of hypoxia apparent during the perinatal period, but prolonged hypoxia in utero also causes fetal programming of abnormality in the heart's development. The altered expression pattern of cardioprotective genes such as protein kinase c epsilon, heat shock protein 70, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, likely predispose the developing heart to increased vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury later in life. The events underlying the long-term changes in gene expression are not clear, but likely involve variation in epigenetic regulation.

  12. Intracardiac electrophysiology study (EPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rhythms - EPS; Bradycardia - EPS; Tachycardia - EPS; Fibrillation - EPS; Arrhythmia - EPS; Heart block - EPS ... you have signs of an abnormal heart rhythm ( arrhythmia ). You may need to have other tests before ...

  13. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  14. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  15. Phase sensitivity analysis of circadian rhythm entrainment.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Rudiyanto; Doyle, Francis J

    2007-04-01

    As a biological clock, circadian rhythms evolve to accomplish a stable (robust) entrainment to environmental cycles, of which light is the most obvious. The mechanism of photic entrainment is not known, but two models of entrainment have been proposed based on whether light has a continuous (parametric) or discrete (nonparametric) effect on the circadian pacemaker. A novel sensitivity analysis is developed to study the circadian entrainment in silico based on a limit cycle approach and applied to a model of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The comparative analyses of complete and skeleton photoperiods suggest a trade-off between the contribution of period modulation (parametric effect) and phase shift (nonparametric effect) in Drosophila circadian entrainment. The results also give suggestions for an experimental study to (in)validate the two models of entrainment.

  16. Circadian rhythms, athletic performance, and jet lag

    PubMed Central

    Manfredini, R.; Manfredini, F.; Fersini, C.; Conconi, F.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid air travel across several time zones exposes the traveller to a shift in his/her internal biological clock. The result is a transient desynchronisation of the circadian rhythm, called jet lag, lasting until the rhythm is rephased to the new environmental conditions. The most commonly experienced symptoms are sleep disorders, difficulties with concentrating, irritability, depression, fatigue, disorientation, loss of appetite, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Apart from the decrements in mental and physical performance directly consequent on such symptoms, competitive athletes are also exposed to the additional negative consequences of a shift from the optimal circadian window of performance. A brief summary of the possible negative effects of jet lag on athletic performance and potentially alleviating strategies is given. 




 PMID:9631214

  17. Caffeine lengthens circadian rhythms in mice.

    PubMed

    Oike, Hideaki; Kobori, Masuko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ishida, Norio

    2011-07-01

    Although caffeine alters sleep in many animals, whether or not it affects mammalian circadian clocks remains unknown. Here, we found that incubating cultured mammalian cell lines, human osteosarcoma U2OS cells and mouse fibroblast NIH3T3 cells, with caffeine lengthened the period of circadian rhythms. Adding caffeine to ex vivo cultures also lengthened the circadian period in mouse liver explants from Per2::Luciferase reporter gene knockin mice, and caused a phase delay in brain slices containing the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where the central circadian clock in mammals is located. Furthermore, chronic caffeine consumption ad libitum for a week delayed the phase of the mouse liver clock in vivo under 12 h light-dark conditions and lengthened the period of circadian locomotor rhythms in mice under constant darkness. Our results showed that caffeine alters circadian clocks in mammalian cells in vitro and in the mouse ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:21684260

  18. Sleep, circadian rhythms, and athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Thun, Eirunn; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Flo, Elisabeth; Harris, Anette; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-10-01

    Sleep deprivation and time of day are both known to influence performance. A growing body of research has focused on how sleep and circadian rhythms impact athletic performance. This review provides a systematic overview of this research. We searched three different databases for articles on these issues and inspected relevant reference lists. In all, 113 articles met our inclusion criteria. The most robust result is that athletic performance seems to be best in the evening around the time when the core body temperature typically is at its peak. Sleep deprivation was negatively associated with performance whereas sleep extension seems to improve performance. The effects of desynchronization of circadian rhythms depend on the local time at which performance occurs. The review includes a discussion of differences regarding types of skills involved as well as methodological issues.

  19. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    2014-12-15

    Essential facts Heart failure affects about 900,000 people in the UK. The condition can affect people of all ages, but it is more common in older people, with more than half of all patients over the age of 75. It is caused by the heart failing to pump enough blood around the body at the right pressure, usually because the heart muscle has become too weak or stiff to work properly. Acute heart failure, which occurs when symptoms develop quickly, is the leading cause of hospital admission in people over 65. PMID:25492766

  20. Circadian rhythms of performance: new trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, J.; Monk, T. H.

    2000-01-01

    This brief review is concerned with how human performance efficiency changes as a function of time of day. It presents an overview of some of the research paradigms and conceptual models that have been used to investigate circadian performance rhythms. The influence of homeostatic and circadian processes on performance regulation is discussed. The review also briefly presents recent mathematical models of alertness that have been used to predict cognitive performance. Related topics such as interindividual differences and the postlunch dip are presented.

  1. [Genetic Control of Circadian Rhythms and Aging].

    PubMed

    Solovyeva, I A; Dobrovolskayaa, E V; Moskalev, A A

    2016-04-01

    The review establishes a link between a group of genes which are conserved in evolution and form a molecular oscillator responsible for generation of circadian rhythms and genetic determinants of aging including associated pathways of intracellular signaling. An analysis of mechanisms of development of age-dependent pathologies is conducted from the viewpoint of circadian genetics. Systematic data of circadian gene expression studies in animals demonstrating different rates of aging from accelerated to negligible are presented. PMID:27529973

  2. Speech timing and linguistic rhythm: on the acoustic bases of rhythm typologies.

    PubMed

    Rathcke, Tamara V; Smith, Rachel H

    2015-05-01

    Research into linguistic rhythm has been dominated by the idea that languages can be classified according to rhythmic templates, amenable to assessment by acoustic measures of vowel and consonant durations. This study tested predictions of two proposals explaining the bases of rhythmic typologies: the Rhythm Class Hypothesis which assumes that the templates arise from an extensive vs a limited use of durational contrasts, and the Control and Compensation Hypothesis which proposes that the templates are rooted in more vs less flexible speech production strategies. Temporal properties of segments, syllables and rhythmic feet were examined in two accents of British English, a "stress-timed" variety from Leeds, and a "syllable-timed" variety spoken by Panjabi-English bilinguals from Bradford. Rhythm metrics were calculated. A perception study confirmed that the speakers of the two varieties differed in their perceived rhythm. The results revealed that both typologies were informative in that to a certain degree, they predicted temporal patterns of the two varieties. None of the metrics tested was capable of adequately reflecting the temporal complexity found in the durational data. These findings contribute to the critical evaluation of the explanatory adequacy of rhythm metrics. Acoustic bases and limitations of the traditional rhythmic typologies are discussed.

  3. Circadian Rhythm Disruption in Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Savvidis, Christos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms show universally a 24-h oscillation pattern in metabolic, physiological and behavioral functions of almost all species. This pattern is due to a fundamental adaptation to the rotation of Earth around its own axis. Molecular mechanisms of generation of circadian rhythms organize a biochemical network in suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues, building cell autonomous clock pacemakers. Rhythmicity is observed in transcriptional expression of a wide range of clock-controlled genes that regulate a variety of normal cell functions, such as cell division and proliferation. Desynchrony of this rhythmicity seems to be implicated in several pathologic conditions, including tumorigenesis and progression of cancer. In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorized “shiftwork that involves circadian disruption [as] probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A in the IARC classification system of carcinogenic potency of an agentagent) (Painting, Firefighting, and Shiftwork; IARC; 2007). This review discusses the potential relation between disruptions of normal circadian rhythms with genetic driving machinery of cancer. Elucidation of the role of clockwork disruption, such as exposure to light at night and sleep disruption, in cancer biology could be important in developing new targeted anticancer therapies, optimizing individualized chronotherapy and modifying lighting environment in workplaces or homes. PMID:22811066

  4. Tonic Neuromodulation of the Inspiratory Rhythm Generator

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neural network dynamics relies on the interactions between the intrinsic and synaptic properties of their neural components. Moreover, neuromodulators allow networks to change these properties and adjust their activity to specific challenges. Endogenous continuous (“tonic”) neuromodulation can regulate and sometimes be indispensible for networks to produce basal activity. This seems to be the case for the inspiratory rhythm generator located in the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC). This neural network is necessary and sufficient for generating inspiratory rhythms. The preBötC produces normal respiratory activity (eupnea) as well as sighs under normoxic conditions, and it generates gasping under hypoxic conditions after a reconfiguration process. The reconfiguration leading to gasping generation involves changes of synaptic and intrinsic properties that can be mediated by several neuromodulators. Over the past years, it has been shown that endogenous continuous neuromodulation of the preBötC may involve the continuous action of amines and peptides on extrasynaptic receptors. I will summarize the findings supporting the role of endogenous continuous neuromodulation in the generation and regulation of different inspiratory rhythms, exploring the possibility that these neuromodulatory actions involve extrasynaptic receptors along with evidence of glial modulation of preBötC activity. PMID:22934010

  5. Subjective alertness rhythms in elderly people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Kupfer, D. J.; Houck, P. R.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related changes in the circadian rhythm of subjective alertness and to explore the circadian mechanisms underlying such changes. Using a visual analogue scale (VAS) instrument, 25 older men and women (71 y and older; 15 female, 10 male) rated their subjective alertness about 7 times per day during 5 baseline days of temporal isolation during which habitual bedtimes and waketimes were enforced. Comparisons were made with 13 middle-aged men (37-52 y) experiencing the same protocol. Advancing age (particularly in the men) resulted in less rhythmic alertness patterns, as indicated by lower amplitudes and less reliability of fitted 24-h sinusoids. This appeared in spite of the absence of any reliable age-related diminution in circadian temperature rhythm amplitude, thus suggesting the effect was not due to SCN weakness per se, but to weakened transduction of SCN output. In a further experiment, involving 36 h of constant wakeful bedrest, differences in the amplitude of the alertness rhythm were observed between 9 older men (79 y+), 7 older women (79 y+), and 17 young controls (9 males, 8 females, 19-28 y) suggesting that with advancing age (particularly in men) there is less rhythmic input into subjective alertness from the endogenous circadian pacemaker. These results may explain some of the nocturnal insomnia and daytime hypersomnia that afflict many elderly people.

  6. Circadian rhythms in handwriting kinematics and legibility.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Isabelle; Gordijn, Marijke; Häussler, Andreas; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the circadian rhythmicity in handwriting kinematics and legibility and to compare the performance between Dutch and German writers. Two subject groups underwent a 40 h sleep deprivation protocol under Constant Routine conditions either in Groningen (10 Dutch subjects) or in Berlin (9 German subjects). Both groups wrote every 3h a test sentence of similar structure in their native language. Kinematic handwriting performance was assessed with a digitizing tablet and evaluated by writing speed, writing fluency, and script size. Writing speed (frequency of strokes and average velocity) revealed a clear circadian rhythm, with a parallel decline during night and a minimum around 3:00 h in the morning for both groups. Script size and movement fluency did not vary with time of day in neither group. Legibility of handwriting was evaluated by intra-individually ranking handwriting specimens of the 13 sessions by 10 German and 10 Dutch raters. Whereas legibility ratings of the German handwriting specimens deteriorated during night in parallel with slower writing speed, legibility of the Dutch handwriting deteriorated not until the next morning. In conclusion, the circadian rhythm of handwriting kinematics seems to be independent of script language at least among the two tested western countries. Moreover, handwriting legibility is also subject to a circadian rhythm which, however, seems to be influenced by variations in the assessment protocol.

  7. Respiratory modulation of human autonomic rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badra, L. J.; Cooke, W. H.; Hoag, J. B.; Crossman, A. A.; Kuusela, T. A.; Tahvanainen, K. U.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the influence of three types of breathing [spontaneous, frequency controlled (0.25 Hz), and hyperventilation with 100% oxygen] and apnea on R-R interval, photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, and muscle sympathetic rhythms in nine healthy young adults. We integrated fast Fourier transform power spectra over low (0.05-0.15 Hz) and respiratory (0.15-0.3 Hz) frequencies; estimated vagal baroreceptor-cardiac reflex gain at low frequencies with cross-spectral techniques; and used partial coherence analysis to remove the influence of breathing from the R-R interval, systolic pressure, and muscle sympathetic nerve spectra. Coherence among signals varied as functions of both frequency and time. Partialization abolished the coherence among these signals at respiratory but not at low frequencies. The mode of breathing did not influence low-frequency oscillations, and they persisted during apnea. Our study documents the independence of low-frequency rhythms from respiratory activity and suggests that the close correlations that may exist among arterial pressures, R-R intervals, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity at respiratory frequencies result from the influence of respiration on these measures rather than from arterial baroreflex physiology. Most importantly, our results indicate that correlations among autonomic and hemodynamic rhythms vary over time and frequency, and, thus, are facultative rather than fixed.

  8. The Teaching of Abnormal Psychology through the Cinema.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissim-Sabat, Denis

    1979-01-01

    Describes abnormal psychology course centered around films which include "King of Hearts,""A Woman Under the Influence,""David and Lisa,""In Cold Blood," and "The Boys in the Band." Each film deals with a fundamental concept such as psychopathology, neurosis, psychosis, insanity, and sexuality. (KC)

  9. Arm and wrist surface potential mapping for wearable ECG rhythm recording devices: a pilot clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, W. D.; Escalona, O. J.; McEneaney, D. J.

    2013-06-01

    This study addresses an important question in the development of a ECG device that enables long term monitoring of cardiac rhythm. This device would utilise edge sensor technologies for dry, non-irritant skin contact suitable for distal limb application and would be supported by embedded ECG denoising processes. Contemporary ECG databases including those provided by MIT-BIH and Physionet are focused on interpretation of cardiac disease and rhythm tracking. The data is recorded using chest leads as in standard clinical practise. For the development of a peripherally located heart rhythm monitor, such data would be of limited use. To provide a useful database adequate for the development of the above mentioned cardiac monitoring device a unipolar body surface potential map from the left arm and wrist was gathered in 37 volunteer patients and characterized in this study. For this, the reference electrode was placed at the wrist. Bipolar far-field electrogram leads were derived and analysed. Factors such as skin variability, 50Hz noise interference, electrode contact noise, motion artifacts and electromyographic noise, presented a challenge. The objective was quantify the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the far-field locations. Preliminary results reveal that an electrogram indicative of the QRS complex can be recorded on the distal portion of the left arm when denoised using signal averaging techniques.

  10. Genetic and clinical factors predict lithium's effects on PER2 gene expression rhythms in cells from bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M J; Wei, H; Marnoy, Z; Darvish, R M; McPhie, D L; Cohen, B M; Welsh, D K

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with abnormal circadian rhythms. In treatment responsive BD patients, lithium (Li) stabilizes mood and reduces suicide risk. Li also affects circadian rhythms and expression of 'clock genes' that control them. However, the extent to which BD, Li and the circadian clock share common biological mechanisms is unknown, and there have been few direct measurements of clock gene function in samples from BD patients. Hence, the role of clock genes in BD and Li treatment remains unclear. Skin fibroblasts from BD patients (N=19) or healthy controls (N=19) were transduced with Per2::luc, a rhythmically expressed, bioluminescent circadian clock reporter gene, and rhythms were measured for 5 consecutive days. Rhythm amplitude and period were compared between BD cases and controls with and without Li. Baseline period was longer in BD cases than in controls. Li 1 mM increased amplitude in controls by 36%, but failed to do so in BD cases. Li 10 mM lengthened period in both BD cases and controls. Analysis of clock gene variants revealed that PER3 and RORA genotype predicted period lengthening by Li, whereas GSK3β genotype predicted rhythm effects of Li, specifically among BD cases. Analysis of BD cases by clinical history revealed that cells from past suicide attempters were more likely to show period lengthening with Li 1 mM. Finally, Li enhanced the resynchronization of damped rhythms, suggesting a mechanism by which Li could act therapeutically in BD. Our work suggests that the circadian clock's response to Li may be relevant to molecular pathology of BD.

  11. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are ... treatments fail. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  12. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  13. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  14. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  15. Automatic Evaluation of Speech Rhythm Instability and Acceleration in Dysarthrias Associated with Basal Ganglia Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rusz, Jan; Hlavnička, Jan; Čmejla, Roman; Růžička, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Speech rhythm abnormalities are commonly present in patients with different neurodegenerative disorders. These alterations are hypothesized to be a consequence of disruption to the basal ganglia circuitry involving dysfunction of motor planning, programing, and execution, which can be detected by a syllable repetition paradigm. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to design a robust signal processing technique that allows the automatic detection of spectrally distinctive nuclei of syllable vocalizations and to determine speech features that represent rhythm instability (RI) and rhythm acceleration (RA). A further aim was to elucidate specific patterns of dysrhythmia across various neurodegenerative disorders that share disruption of basal ganglia function. Speech samples based on repetition of the syllable /pa/ at a self-determined steady pace were acquired from 109 subjects, including 22 with Parkinson's disease (PD), 11 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 9 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 24 ephedrone-induced parkinsonism (EP), 20 Huntington's disease (HD), and 23 healthy controls. Subsequently, an algorithm for the automatic detection of syllables as well as features representing RI and RA were designed. The proposed detection algorithm was able to correctly identify syllables and remove erroneous detections due to excessive inspiration and non-speech sounds with a very high accuracy of 99.6%. Instability of vocal pace performance was observed in PSP, MSA, EP, and HD groups. Significantly increased pace acceleration was observed only in the PD group. Although not significant, a tendency for pace acceleration was observed also in the PSP and MSA groups. Our findings underline the crucial role of the basal ganglia in the execution and maintenance of automatic speech motor sequences. We envisage the current approach to become the first step toward the development of acoustic technologies allowing automated assessment of rhythm in dysarthrias. PMID:26258122

  16. Activity in the ferret: oestradiol effects and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, E. R.; Albers, H. E.; Baum, M. J.; Wurtman, R. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether oestradiol increases activity in the European ferret (Mustela furo), whether this effect is sexually dimorphic, and whether a 24-h rhythm is present in the ferret's daily activity. The activity of male and female adult, postpubertally gonadectomized ferrets was monitored while they were maintained singly on a 13:11 light-dark cycle, before and after implantation with oestradiol-17 beta. Gonadectomized male and female ferrets exhibited equal levels of activity, and neither sex exhibited a significant change in activity following oestradiol implantation. None of the ferrets exhibited a strong circadian rhythm, although weak 24-h rhythms and shorter harmonic rhythms were present. Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), monitored in an identical manner, exhibited strong circadian rhythms. It was concluded that oestradiol administration may not cause an increase in activity in the ferret, and that this species lacks a strong circadian activity rhythm.

  17. The influence of biological rhythms on host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Bakker, Micaela; Helm, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Biological rhythms, from circadian control of cellular processes to annual cycles in life history, are a main structural element of biology. Biological rhythms are considered adaptive because they enable organisms to partition activities to cope with, and take advantage of, predictable fluctuations in environmental conditions. A flourishing area of immunology is uncovering rhythms in the immune system of animals, including humans. Given the temporal structure of immunity, and rhythms in parasite activity and disease incidence, we propose that the intersection of chronobiology, disease ecology, and evolutionary biology holds the key to understanding host-parasite interactions. Here, we review host-parasite interactions while explicitly considering biological rhythms, and propose that rhythms: influence within-host infection dynamics and transmission between hosts, might account for diel and annual periodicity in host-parasite systems, and can lead to a host-parasite arms race in the temporal domain.

  18. Electrocardiogram of the failing heart.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Vinzenz

    2002-09-01

    In the failing heart general specific (e.g., Q-waves after acute myocardial infarction, persistent ST-elevations in post-myocardial infarction left ventricular aneurysm) and unspecific ECG changes (e.g., left bundle branch block, right bundle branch block, ST-T-alterations due to digitalis glycosides or antiarrhythmic drugs) may be seen in the conventional 12-lead ECG. In addition, atrial and ventricular tachy-arrhythmias may be detected and quantified by 24-hour-Holter ECG recordings, that may be relevant for a worse prognosis of patients with congestive heart failure. Heart rate variability as the most relevant derived ECG parameter of sympathetic tone fluctuations may be of important prognostic significance in congestive heart failure patients. An abnormal signal averaged P-wave duration may predict the incidence of atrial fibrillation, as may apply to QRS-prolongation and/or ventricular late potentials in the signal averaged ECG for the incidence of serious life-threatening ventricular tachy-arrhythmias or death from pump failure. Last but not least, cardiac repolarization abnormalities may be detected by QT dispersion-, QT-/QTc-fluctuation- or T-wave alternans studies, but the true prognostic significance of these parameters for predicting sudden cardiac death or death from pump failure in patients with congestive heart failure remains unclear. PMID:12114840

  19. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  20. Experiment K-7-35: Circadian Rhythms and Temperature Regulation During Spaceflight. Part 1; Circadian Rhythms and Temperature Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.; Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.

    1994-01-01

    Mammals have developed the ability to adapt to most variations encountered in their everyday environment. For example, homeotherms have developed the ability to maintain the internal cellular environment at a relatively constant temperature. Also, in order to compensate for temporal variations in the terrestrial environment, the circadian timing system has evolved. However, throughout the evolution of life on earth, living organisms have been exposed to the influence of an unvarying level of earth's gravity. As a result changes in gravity produce adaptive responses which are not completely understood. In particular, spaceflight has pronounced effects on various physiological and behavioral systems. Such systems include body temperature regulation and circadian rhythms. This program has examined the influence of microgravity on temperature regulation and circadian timekeeping systems in Rhesus monkeys. Animals flown on the Soviet Biosatellite, COSMOS 2044, were exposed to 14 days of microgravity while constantly monitoring the circadian patterns temperature regulation, heart rate and activity. This experiment has extended our previous observations from COSMOS 1514, as well as providing insights into the physiological mechanisms that produce these changes.

  1. [Evaluation of the principles of distribution of electrocardiographic R-R intervals for elaboration of methods of automated diagnosis of cardiac rhythm disorders].

    PubMed

    Tsukerman, B M; Finkel'shteĭn, I E

    1987-07-01

    A statistical analysis of prolonged ECG records has been carried out in patients with various heart rhythm and conductivity disorders. The distribution of absolute R-R duration values and relationships between adjacent intervals have been examined. A two-step algorithm has been constructed that excludes anomalous and "suspicious" intervals from a sample of consecutively recorded R-R intervals, until only the intervals between contractions of veritably sinus origin remain in the sample. The algorithm has been developed into a programme for microcomputer Electronica NC-80. It operates reliably even in cases of complex combined rhythm and conductivity disorders.

  2. New insights into the management of rhythm and conduction disorders after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Korostovtseva, Lyudmila; Sviryaev, Yurii; Zvartau, Nadezhda; Druzhkova, Tatiana; Tikhonenko, Viktor; Konradi, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 53 Final Diagnosis: Myocardial infarction Symptoms: Chest pain • tachycardia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Comorbidities, including obesity and sleep-breathing disorders, can adversely influence outcomes in acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and should be considered in diagnosis and treatment administration. Case Report: The case demonstrates the difficulties of treating a middle-aged Caucasian patient with multiple comorbidities that could be overcome by a personalized approach and evaluation of concomitant sleep-breathing disorders (by polysomnography study). Diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea by positive airway pressure (PAP therapy) played a pivotal role in heart rate and rhythm control. Conclusions: In this case, effective PAP therapy enabled titration of antiarrhythmic drugs (to maximal doses) to achieve heart rate control and to eliminate severe ventricular tachyarrhythmias and contributed to the better recovery in a post-AMI patient with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. PMID:24782917

  3. Effect of prolonged free-walking fatigue on gait and physiological rhythm.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kohzoh; Motoshige, Tomoko; Araki, Tsutomu; Matsuoka, Katsunori

    2004-08-01

    This study examined the ways in which gait patterns and physiological rhythms such as those of muscle activity (tibialis anterior (TA) and biceps femoris (BF)) and cardiac activity are affected by the fatigue induced by prolonged free walking. Twelve normal subjects who walked for 3 h at their preferred pace were divided into two groups according to whether their mean gait cycle time (reciprocal of stride rate) during the second 90 min was higher (Group A: n=8) or lower (Group B: n=4) than that during the first 90 min. For Group A, the level of subjective fatigue during the walking task was significantly higher and the heart rate at rest was significantly lower than Group B. In Group A, prolonged walking significantly decreased the mean power frequency of the electromyography from TA, increased the variability of gait rhythm, decreased the largest Lyapunov exponent of the vertical component of back-waist acceleration, and decreased the amplitude of the vertical component of back-waist acceleration. Taking the onset timings of these changes into account, we propose that subjects who tire easily during prolonged walking first show local muscle fatigue at TA followed by instability of gait rhythm and then they slow their gait rhythm to enhance local dynamic stability. For both groups we constructed a physical fatigue index described by linear regression of gait and physiological variables. When we compared the subjective fatigue level with the fatigue level predicted using the index, we obtained a relatively high correlation coefficient for both groups (r=0.77).

  4. Chronic phase advance alters circadian physiological rhythms and peripheral molecular clocks

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Gretchen; Duncan, Marilyn J.

    2013-01-01

    Shifting the onset of light, acutely or chronically, can profoundly affect responses to infection, tumor progression, development of metabolic disease, and mortality in mammals. To date, the majority of phase-shifting studies have focused on acute exposure to a shift in the timing of the light cycle, whereas the consequences of chronic phase shifts alone on molecular rhythms in peripheral tissues such as skeletal muscle have not been studied. In this study, we tested the effect of chronic phase advance on the molecular clock mechanism in two phenotypically different skeletal muscles. The phase advance protocol (CPA) involved 6-h phase advances (earlier light onset) every 4 days for 8 wk. Analysis of the molecular clock, via bioluminescence recording, in the soleus and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles and lung demonstrated that CPA advanced the phase of the rhythm when studied immediately after CPA. However, if the mice were placed into free-running conditions (DD) for 2 wk after CPA, the molecular clock was not phase shifted in the two muscles but was still shifted in the lung. Wheel running behavior remained rhythmic in CPA mice; however, the endogenous period length of the free-running rhythm was significantly shorter than that of control mice. Core body temperature, cage activity, and heart rate remained rhythmic throughout the experiment, although the onset of the rhythms was significantly delayed with CPA. These results provide clues that lifestyles associated with chronic environmental desynchrony, such as shift work, can have disruptive effects on the molecular clock mechanism in peripheral tissues, including both types of skeletal muscle. Whether this can contribute, long term, to increased incidence of insulin resistance/metabolic disease requires further study. PMID:23703115

  5. Aged rats show dominant modulation of lower frequency hippocampal theta rhythm during running.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yi; Kuo, Terry B J; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2016-10-01

    Aging causes considerable decline in both physiological and mental functions, particularly cognitive function. The hippocampal theta rhythm (4-12Hz) is related to both cognition and locomotion. Aging-related findings of the frequency and amplitude of hippocampal theta oscillations are inconsistent and occasionally contradictory. This inconsistency may be due to the effects of the sleep/wake state and different frequency subbands being overlooked. We assumed that aged rats have lower responses of the hippocampal theta rhythm during running, which is mainly due to the dominant modulation of theta frequency subbands related to cognition. By simultaneously recording electroencephalography, physical activity (PA), and the heart rate (HR), this experiment explored the theta oscillations before, during, and after treadmill running at a constant speed in 8-week-old (adult) and 60-week-old (middle-aged) rats. Compared with adult rats, the middle-aged rats exhibited lower theta activity in all frequency ranges before running. Running increased the theta frequency (Frq, 4-12Hz), total activity of the whole theta band (total power, TP), activity of the middle theta frequency (MT, 6.5-9.5Hz), and PA in both age groups. However, the middle-aged rats still showed fewer changes in these parameters during the whole running process. After the waking baseline values were substracted, middle-aged rats showed significantly fewer differences in ΔFrq, ΔTP, and ΔMT but significantly more differences in low-frequency theta activity (4.0-6.5Hz) and HR than the adult rats did. Therefore, the decreasing activity and response of the whole theta band in the middle-aged rats resulted in dominant modulation of the middle to lower frequency (4.0-9.5Hz) theta rhythm. The different alterations in the theta rhythm during treadmill running in the two groups may reflect that learning decline with age.

  6. Aged rats show dominant modulation of lower frequency hippocampal theta rhythm during running.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yi; Kuo, Terry B J; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2016-10-01

    Aging causes considerable decline in both physiological and mental functions, particularly cognitive function. The hippocampal theta rhythm (4-12Hz) is related to both cognition and locomotion. Aging-related findings of the frequency and amplitude of hippocampal theta oscillations are inconsistent and occasionally contradictory. This inconsistency may be due to the effects of the sleep/wake state and different frequency subbands being overlooked. We assumed that aged rats have lower responses of the hippocampal theta rhythm during running, which is mainly due to the dominant modulation of theta frequency subbands related to cognition. By simultaneously recording electroencephalography, physical activity (PA), and the heart rate (HR), this experiment explored the theta oscillations before, during, and after treadmill running at a constant speed in 8-week-old (adult) and 60-week-old (middle-aged) rats. Compared with adult rats, the middle-aged rats exhibited lower theta activity in all frequency ranges before running. Running increased the theta frequency (Frq, 4-12Hz), total activity of the whole theta band (total power, TP), activity of the middle theta frequency (MT, 6.5-9.5Hz), and PA in both age groups. However, the middle-aged rats still showed fewer changes in these parameters during the whole running process. After the waking baseline values were substracted, middle-aged rats showed significantly fewer differences in ΔFrq, ΔTP, and ΔMT but significantly more differences in low-frequency theta activity (4.0-6.5Hz) and HR than the adult rats did. Therefore, the decreasing activity and response of the whole theta band in the middle-aged rats resulted in dominant modulation of the middle to lower frequency (4.0-9.5Hz) theta rhythm. The different alterations in the theta rhythm during treadmill running in the two groups may reflect that learning decline with age. PMID:27496645

  7. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  8. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  9. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  11. Radiation and non-radiation factors and their impact on the natural history of coronary heart disease in Chornobyl accident clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Bilyi, D O; Nastina, O M; Gabulavichene, Zh M; Sydorenko, G V; Bazyka, O D; Bilaya, V V; Kovalyov, O S

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of a range of risk factors and ionizing radiation on the severity of clinical presentation of coronary heart disease (CHD) in Chornobyl accident clean-up workers (ACW). Materials and methods. A total of 376 ACW and 123 Kiev city residents with no exposure to radiation participated in the study. Study scope included the case history recording, clinical check-up, electrocardiography (ECG), daily ECG-monitoring, daily arterial blood pressure monitoring, exercise ECG, Doppler ultrasound (Doppler echocardiography), and serum lipid profile assay. The severity of CHD was scored as a sum of functional class (FC) of angina pectoris and stage of heart failure (HF) to estimate the combined impact of several risk factors. Participation in the clean-up work, age, gender, body mass excess, hypercholesterolemia, CHD, diabetes mellitus (DM), survived myocardial infarction (MI) and acute cerebral stroke, heart rhythm abnormalities, and a complete bundle branch block were accounted as risk factors. Both separate and combined impact of those factors was assayed. The combined effect was scored as a sum where value zero corresponded to no sign and value one corresponded to its presence, whereas values from 1 to 4 explained the expression of a sign according to severity or stage of a disease according to contemporary classifications. Results and conclusions. Despite the fact that clinical characterization, functional state of cardiovascular system, and comorbidities in ACW were almost similar to that in control group the onset of CHD in ACW was significantly earlier (55.9 vs. 59.8 years old). According to Spearman's rank-order correlation data there was a reliable link of FC grades and HF severity values sum to the sum of indices scoring the age group of patients, their gender, presence of arterial hypertension, MI in a history, DM type 2, heart rhythm abnormalities, and a complete bundle branch block. Cluster of risk factors

  12. Radiation and non-radiation factors and their impact on the natural history of coronary heart disease in Chornobyl accident clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Bilyi, D O; Nastina, O M; Gabulavichene, Zh M; Sydorenko, G V; Bazyka, O D; Bilaya, V V; Kovalyov, O S

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of a range of risk factors and ionizing radiation on the severity of clinical presentation of coronary heart disease (CHD) in Chornobyl accident clean-up workers (ACW). Materials and methods. A total of 376 ACW and 123 Kiev city residents with no exposure to radiation participated in the study. Study scope included the case history recording, clinical check-up, electrocardiography (ECG), daily ECG-monitoring, daily arterial blood pressure monitoring, exercise ECG, Doppler ultrasound (Doppler echocardiography), and serum lipid profile assay. The severity of CHD was scored as a sum of functional class (FC) of angina pectoris and stage of heart failure (HF) to estimate the combined impact of several risk factors. Participation in the clean-up work, age, gender, body mass excess, hypercholesterolemia, CHD, diabetes mellitus (DM), survived myocardial infarction (MI) and acute cerebral stroke, heart rhythm abnormalities, and a complete bundle branch block were accounted as risk factors. Both separate and combined impact of those factors was assayed. The combined effect was scored as a sum where value zero corresponded to no sign and value one corresponded to its presence, whereas values from 1 to 4 explained the expression of a sign according to severity or stage of a disease according to contemporary classifications. Results and conclusions. Despite the fact that clinical characterization, functional state of cardiovascular system, and comorbidities in ACW were almost similar to that in control group the onset of CHD in ACW was significantly earlier (55.9 vs. 59.8 years old). According to Spearman's rank-order correlation data there was a reliable link of FC grades and HF severity values sum to the sum of indices scoring the age group of patients, their gender, presence of arterial hypertension, MI in a history, DM type 2, heart rhythm abnormalities, and a complete bundle branch block. Cluster of risk factors

  13. Effects of 9-hour time zone changes on fatigue and circadian rhythms of sleep/wake and core temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, P. H.; Myhre, G.; Graeber, R. C.; Andersen, H. T.; Lauber, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological and psychological disruptions caused by transmeridian flights may affect the ability of flight crews to meet operational demands. To study these effects, 9 Royal Norwegian Airforces P3-Orion crewmembers flew from Norway to California (-9 hr), and back (+9 hr). Rectal temperature, heart rate and wrist activity were recorded every 2 min, fatigue and mood were rated every 2 hr during the waking day, and logs were kept of sleep times and ratings. Subjects also completed 4 personality inventories. The time-zone shifts produced negative changes in mood which persisted longer after westward flights. Sleep quality (subjective and objective) and duration were slightly disrupted (more after eastward flights). The circadian rhythms of sleep/wake and temperature both completed the 9-hr delay by day 5 in California, although temperature adjusted more slowly. The size of the delay shift was significantly correlated with scores on extraversion and achievement need personality scales. Response to the 9-hr advance were more variable. One subject exhibited a 15-hr delay in his temperature rhythm, and an atypical sleep/nap pattern. On average, the sleep/wake cycle (but not the temperature rhythm), completed the 9-hr advance by the end of the study. Both rhythms adapted more slowly after the eastward flight.

  14. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  15. Standing down Straight: Jump Rhythm Technique's Rhythm-Driven, Community-Directed Approach to Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenfeld, Billy

    2009-01-01

    "Standing down straight" means to stand on two feet with both stability and relaxation. Using standing down straight as the foundation of class work, Jump Rhythm Technique offers a fresh alternative to conventional systems of dance study. It bases its pedagogy on three behaviors: grounding the body so that it can move with power and efficiency,…

  16. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT)

    MedlinePlus

    PSVT; Supraventricular tachycardia; Abnormal heart rhythm - PSVT; Arrhythmia - PSVT; Rapid heart rate - PSVT; Fast heart rate - PSVT ... Normally, the chambers of the heart (atria and ventricles) contract in ... are caused by an electrical signal that begins in an area ...

  17. Digoxin Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias). It helps the heart work better and it ... have or have ever had thyroid problems, heart arrhythmias, cancer, or kidney disease.tell your doctor if ...

  18. How does the brain create rhythms?

    PubMed

    Szirmai, Imre

    2010-01-30

    Connection was found between rhythmic cortical activity and motor control. The 10 Hz micro-rhythm and the 20-30 Hz bursts represent two functional states of the somatomotor system. A correspondence of the central micro-rhythm of the motor cortex and the physiological hand tremor (8-12 Hz) is presumed. The precise tuning of the motor system can be estimated by the frequency of repetitive finger movements. In complex tapping exercise, the index finger is the most skillful, the 3rd, 4th and 5th fingers keep rhythm with less precision. It was found that the organization of mirror movements depends on the cortical representation of fingers. Mirror finger movements are more regular if the subject begins the motor action with the 5th (small) finger. Concerning cortical regulation of finger movements, it was suggested that there are two time-keeping systems in the brain; one with a sensitivity above and another with a sensitivity below the critical frequency of 3 Hz. The preferred meter which helps to maintain synchronous finger movements is the cadence of 4/4 and 8/8. We observed that the unlearned inward-outward sequential finger movement was equally impaired in nonmusician controls and patients with Parkinson-disease. In movement disorders, the ability of movement and the "clock-mechanism" are equally involved. The polyrhythmic finger movement is not our inborn ability, it has to be learned. The "timer" function, which regulates the rhythmic movement, is presumably localised in the basal ganglia or in the cerebellum. The meter of the music is built on the reciprocal values of 2 raised to the second to fifth power (1/1(2), 1/2(2), 1/2(3), 1/2(4), 1/2(5)). The EEG frequencies that we consider important in the regulation of conscious motor actions are approximately in the same domain (4, 8, 16, 32, 64 Hz). During music performance, an important neural process is the coupling of distant brain areas. Concerning melody, the musical taste of Europeans is octave-based. Musical

  19. Scapulothoracic rhythm in normal male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Talkhani, I S; Kelly, C P

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic pattern of Scapulothoracic rhythm during arm abduction in scapular plane is studied using computer-imaging technique. Aim of the study is to produce a reproducible and reliable way of calculating the scapular movement and glenohumeral movement using least possible roentgenographic exposure. Moving X-ray screening picture of the shoulder joint is analysed using video capture computer programme and the images at different degrees of abduction are then analysed for scapular movement using computer aided designer and drafting software. Results were comparable to the authoritative shoulder analysis carried out in the past, the difference of radiation exposure, approximately 10 times less. PMID:9603061

  20. Abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Amir A; Grace, Norman D

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in hematological indices are frequently encountered in cirrhosis. Multiple causes contribute to the occurrence of hematological abnormalities. Recent studies suggest that the presence of hematological cytopenias is associated with a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. The present article reviews the pathogenesis, incidence, prevalence, clinical significance and treatment of abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis. PMID:19543577

  1. RNAi of the circadian clock gene period disrupts the circadian rhythm but not the circatidal rhythm in the mangrove cricket.

    PubMed

    Takekata, Hiroki; Matsuura, Yu; Goto, Shin G; Satoh, Aya; Numata, Hideharu

    2012-08-23

    The clock mechanism for circatidal rhythm has long been controversial, and its molecular basis is completely unknown. The mangrove cricket, Apteronemobius asahinai, shows two rhythms simultaneously in its locomotor activity: a circatidal rhythm producing active and inactive phases as well as a circadian rhythm modifying the activity intensity of circatidal active phases. The role of the clock gene period (per), one of the key components of the circadian clock in insects, was investigated in the circadian and circatidal rhythms of A. asahinai using RNAi. After injection of double-stranded RNA of per, most crickets did not show the circadian modulation of activity but the circatidal rhythm persisted without a significant difference in the period from controls. Thus, per is functionally involved in the circadian rhythm but plays no role, or a less important role, in the circatidal rhythm. We conclude that the circatidal rhythm in A. asahinai is controlled by a circatidal clock whose molecular mechanism is different from that of the circadian clock.

  2. Atrial rhythm influences catheter tissue contact during radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: comparison of contact force between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisao; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Attanasio, Philipp; Huemer, Martin; Wutzler, Alexander; Blaschke, Florian; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    Catheter tissue contact force (CF) is an important factor for durable lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Since CF varies in the beating heart, atrial rhythm during RFCA may influence CF. A high-density map and RFCA points were obtained in 25 patients undergoing RFCA of AF using a CF-sensing catheter (Tacticath, St. Jude Medical). The operators were blinded to the CF information. Contact type was classified into three categories: constant, variable, and intermittent contact. Average CF and contact type were analyzed according to atrial rhythm (SR vs. AF) and anatomical location. A total of 1364 points (891 points during SR and 473 points during AF) were analyzed. Average CFs showed no significant difference between SR (17.2 ± 11.3 g) and AF (17.2 ± 13.3 g; p = 0.99). The distribution of points with an average CF of ≥20 and <10 g also showed no significant difference. However, the distribution of excessive CF (CF ≥40 g) was significantly higher during AF (7.4 %) in comparison with SR (4.2 %; p < 0.05). At the anterior area of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV), the average CF during AF was significantly higher than during SR (p < 0.05). Constant contact was significantly higher during AF (32.2 %) when compared to SR (9.9 %; p < 0.01). Although the average CF was not different between atrial rhythms, constant contact was more often achievable during AF than it was during SR. However, excessive CF also seems to occur more frequently during AF especially at the anterior part of RIPV.

  3. Atrial rhythm influences catheter tissue contact during radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: comparison of contact force between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisao; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Attanasio, Philipp; Huemer, Martin; Wutzler, Alexander; Blaschke, Florian; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    Catheter tissue contact force (CF) is an important factor for durable lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Since CF varies in the beating heart, atrial rhythm during RFCA may influence CF. A high-density map and RFCA points were obtained in 25 patients undergoing RFCA of AF using a CF-sensing catheter (Tacticath, St. Jude Medical). The operators were blinded to the CF information. Contact type was classified into three categories: constant, variable, and intermittent contact. Average CF and contact type were analyzed according to atrial rhythm (SR vs. AF) and anatomical location. A total of 1364 points (891 points during SR and 473 points during AF) were analyzed. Average CFs showed no significant difference between SR (17.2 ± 11.3 g) and AF (17.2 ± 13.3 g; p = 0.99). The distribution of points with an average CF of ≥20 and <10 g also showed no significant difference. However, the distribution of excessive CF (CF ≥40 g) was significantly higher during AF (7.4 %) in comparison with SR (4.2 %; p < 0.05). At the anterior area of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV), the average CF during AF was significantly higher than during SR (p < 0.05). Constant contact was significantly higher during AF (32.2 %) when compared to SR (9.9 %; p < 0.01). Although the average CF was not different between atrial rhythms, constant contact was more often achievable during AF than it was during SR. However, excessive CF also seems to occur more frequently during AF especially at the anterior part of RIPV. PMID:26498938

  4. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... lower “bad” cholesterol (also called LDL, or low-density lipoprotein) levels and may help increase “good” cholesterol (also called HDL, or high-density lipoprotein). If you have had a heart attack, ...

  5. Hearts Wish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates characteristics and themes in 102 drawings by sexually abused children. Themes of the drawings included genitalia, the absence of specific body parts, phallic symbols, inappropriate smiles, distorted body images, kinetic activity, prominent hands and fingers, and hearts. (RJC)

  6. Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctors remove the patient's heart by transecting the aorta , the main pulmonary artery and the superior and ... sewing together the recipient and donor vena cavae, aorta, pulmonary artery and left atrium. In patients with ...

  7. Wine and heart health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and liver. ...

  8. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  9. The Heart in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kereiakes, Dean J.; Naughton, James L.; Brundage, Bruce; Schiller, Nelson B.

    1984-01-01

    Since the introduction of insulin, heart disease has become a major impediment to survival in persons with diabetes mellitus. Coronary disease has increased severity and accelerated development in diabetic persons compared with an age- and sex-matched nondiabetic population. A peculiar vulnerability of women to the influence of diabetes with loss of premenopausal coronary disease protection has been found. The symptomatology of coronary events may differ and coronary care data show a higher incidence of sudden death in diabetic patients who have a myocardial infarction than in their non-diabetic counterparts. Insulin may play a role in the myocardial adjustment to an ischemic insult by enhancing glucose intake and suppressing lipolysis and ketogenesis. Carbohydrate intolerance in dogs, rhesus monkeys and humans appears associated with similar histologic and compositional changes in the myocardium. Abnormalities in diastolic ventricular function not attributable to large- or small-vessel coronary disease have been found in the diabetic subjects of each species. Studies in humans who have diabetes have assessed single pressure-volume relationships and more exacting measures of ventricular compliance are needed. Abnormalities of myocardial function in patients with diabetes have been found using echo and radionuclide techniques. Many of these findings need to be correlated with invasive data or confirmed in larger populations. Autonomic dysfunction is common in diabetic persons and may imply an associated poor prognosis. Reflex abnormalities in parasympathetic function are most prevalent and occur before sympathetic dysfunction. PMID:6372249

  10. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  11. The Effects of Rhythm Training on Tennis Performance

    PubMed Central

    Söğüt, Mustafa; Kirazci, Sadettin; Korkusuz, Feza

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm training is an integral part of sports. The purposes of the study were to analyze the effects of rhythm training on tennis performance and rhytmic competence of tennis players, to compare the improvement levels of tennis specific and general rhythm training and to examine the effects of shorter and longer tempos on rhythmic competence. Thirty university students whose mean score of International Tennis Number (ITN) was 7.3 (±0.9) were divided randomly into three sub-groups: Tennis Group, General Rhythm Training Group and Tennis-Specific Rhythm Training Group. The experimental procedure lasted 8 weeks. During this period, all groups had the same tennis training twice a week. The Tennis Group had regular tennis training sessions. In addition to regular tennis training sessions, the General Rhythm Training Group followed the general rhythm training sessions and the Tennis-Specific Rhythm Training Group had tennis-specific rhythm training. The measurement instruments were ITN, Rhythmic Competence Analysis Test and Untimed Consecutive Rally Test. The results indicated that participation in tennis-specific or general rhythm training resulted in progress in tennis playing levels, forehand consistency performance and rhythmic competence of the participants. On the other hand, attendance to the regular 8-week tennis training was enough to solely increase the tennis playing level but not sufficient to develop forehand consistency performance and rhythmic competence. Although the participants in the TRTG had better improvement scores than the ones in the GRTG, no significant difference was found between the rhythm training groups. The results also revealed that participants exhibited higher rhythmic competence scores on fast tempo compared to slow tempo. PMID:23486093

  12. The management of atrial fibrillation in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bala, Rupa; Callans, David J

    2006-08-01

    The development of atrial fibrillation (AF) can greatly complicate the course of heart failure (HF). Although recent trials have indicated the nonsuperiority of a rhythm control strategy in the general population with AF, this may not apply to patients with HF. We feel strongly that AF be treated aggressively in patients with HF, defaulting toward an initial rhythm control strategy, to avoid the hemodynamic detriment of irregular rapid ventricular response and the development of tachycardia-related myopathy. The index episode is treated with cardioversion and antiarrhythmic therapy. If significant benefit is demonstrated, the rhythm control strategy is maintained, to the point of catheter ablation for AF if necessary. If there is no change in cardiac performance or symptoms after cardioversion, strict rate control is enforced, to the point of atrioventricular node ablation and pacing if necessary.

  13. Obesity and heart failure.

    PubMed

    De Pergola, Giovanni; Nardecchia, Adele; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Minischetti, Manuela Castiglione; Silvestris, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have recently shown that obesity, and abdominal obesity in particular, is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure (HF). Higher cardiac oxidative stress is the early stage of heart dysfunction due to obesity, and it is the result of insulin resistance, altered fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and impaired mitochondrial biogenesis. Extense myocyte hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis are early microscopic changes in patients with HF, whereas circumferential strain during the left ventricular (LV) systole, LV increase in both chamber size and wall thickness (LV hypertrophy), and LV dilatation are the early macroscopic and functional alterations in obese developing heart failure. LV hypertrophy leads to diastolic dysfunction and subendocardial ischemia in obesity, and pericardial fat has been shown to be significantly associated with LV diastolic dysfunction. Evolving abnormalities of diastolic dysfunction may include progressive hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction, and various degrees of eccentric and/or concentric LV hypertrophy may be present with time. Once HF is established, overweight and obese have a better prognosis than do their lean counterparts with the same level of cardiovascular disease, and this phenomenon is called "obesity paradox". It is mainly due to lower muscle protein degradation, brain natriuretic peptide circulating levels and cardio-respiratory fitness than normal weight patients with HF.

  14. Electrocardiogram abnormalities in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Doane, Cynthia J; Lee, D Rick; Sleeper, Meg M

    2006-12-01

    Although cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the captive chimpanzee population, little is known about the prevalence and etiology of heart disease in this species. We reviewed the physical exam records of 265 common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) for electrocardiogram abnormalities. During the 24-mo period reviewed (August 2003 through August 2005), 34 animals were diagnosed with cardiac arrhythmias consisting of ventricular arrhythmias, supraventricular arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, mixed arrhythmias, and bradycardia. The incidence of cardiac arrhythmia was significantly higher in male animals, chimpanzees 20 to 39 y old, and those with structural heart disease. Incidence of cardiac arrhythmia was not significantly higher in animals with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or chronic viral infections. During the retrospective period, 7 animals with cardiac arrhythmias died or were euthanized. Mortality was significantly higher in animals with ventricular arrhythmias compared with those without ventricular arrhythmias. We conclude that in the common chimpanzee, age, male gender, and structural heart disease are risk factors for developing cardiac arrhythmias and that ventricular arrhythmias are risk factors for mortality. PMID:17219782

  15. Rhythms for Cognition: Communication through Coherence.

    PubMed

    Fries, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    I propose that synchronization affects communication between neuronal groups. Gamma-band (30-90 Hz) synchronization modulates excitation rapidly enough that it escapes the following inhibition and activates postsynaptic neurons effectively. Synchronization also ensures that a presynaptic activation pattern arrives at postsynaptic neurons in a temporally coordinated manner. At a postsynaptic neuron, multiple presynaptic groups converge, e.g., representing different stimuli. If a stimulus is selected by attention, its neuronal representation shows stronger and higher-frequency gamma-band synchronization. Thereby, the attended stimulus representation selectively entrains postsynaptic neurons. The entrainment creates sequences of short excitation and longer inhibition that are coordinated between pre- and postsynaptic groups to transmit the attended representation and shut out competing inputs. The predominantly bottom-up-directed gamma-band influences are controlled by predominantly top-down-directed alpha-beta-band (8-20 Hz) influences. Attention itself samples stimuli at a 7-8 Hz theta rhythm. Thus, several rhythms and their interplay render neuronal communication effective, precise, and selective. PMID:26447583

  16. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2012-06-01

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles.

  17. Circadian rhythms in rheumatology - a glucocorticoid perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis plays an important role in regulating and controlling immune responses. Dysfunction of the HPA axis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other rheumatic diseases. The impact of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy on HPA axis function also remains a matter of concern, particularly for longer treatment duration. Knowledge of circadian rhythms and the influence of GC in rheumatology is important: on the one hand we aim for optimal treatment of the daily undulating inflammatory symptoms, for example morning stiffness and swelling; on the other, we wish to disturb the HPA axis as little as possible. This review describes circadian rhythms in RA and other chronic inflammatory diseases, dysfunction of the HPA axis in RA and other rheumatic diseases and the recent concept of the hepato-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-renal axis, the problem of adrenal suppression by GC therapy and how it can be avoided, and evidence that chronotherapy with modified release prednisone effective at 02:00 a.m. can inhibit proinflammatory sequelae of nocturnal inflammation better compared with GC administration in the morning but does not increase the risk of HPA axis insufficiency in RA. PMID:25608777

  18. Subjective pain perception mediated by alpha rhythms.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weiwei; Babiloni, Claudio; Mao, Yanhui; Hu, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Suppression of spontaneous alpha oscillatory activities, interpreted as cortical excitability, was observed in response to both transient and tonic painful stimuli. The changes of alpha rhythms induced by pain could be modulated by painful sensory inputs, experimental tasks, and top-down cognitive regulations such as attention. The temporal and spatial characteristics, as well as neural functions of pain induced alpha responses, depend much on how these factors contribute to the observed alpha event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS). How sensory-, task-, and cognitive-related changes of alpha oscillatory activities interact in pain perception process is reviewed in the current study, and the following conclusions are made: (1) the functional inhibition hypothesis that has been proposed in auditory and visual modalities could be applied also in pain modality; (2) the neural functions of pain induced alpha ERD/ERS were highly dependent on the cortical regions where it is observed, e.g., somatosensory cortex alpha ERD/ERS in pain perception for painful stimulus processing; (3) the attention modulation of pain perception, i.e., influences on the sensory and affective dimensions of pain experience, could be mediated by changes of alpha rhythms. Finally, we propose a model regarding the determinants of pain related alpha oscillatory activity, i.e., sensory-discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive-modulative aspects of pain experience, would affect and determine pain related alpha oscillatory activities in an integrated way within the distributed alpha system. PMID:26026894

  19. Dissociable systems of working memory for rhythm and melody.

    PubMed

    Jerde, Trenton A; Childs, Stephanie K; Handy, Sarah T; Nagode, Jennifer C; Pardo, José V

    2011-08-15

    Specialized neural systems are engaged by the rhythmic and melodic components of music. Here, we used PET to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a working memory task for sequences of rhythms and melodies, which were presented in separate blocks. Healthy subjects, without musical training, judged whether a target rhythm or melody was identical to a series of subsequently presented rhythms or melodies. When contrasted with passive listening to rhythms, working memory for rhythm activated the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, right anterior insular cortex, and left anterior cingulate gyrus. These areas were not activated in a contrast between passive listening to rhythms and a non-auditory control, indicating their role in the temporal processing that was specific to working memory for rhythm. The contrast between working memory for melody and passive listening to melodies activated mainly a right-hemisphere network of frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices: areas involved in pitch processing and auditory working memory. Overall, these results demonstrate that rhythm and melody have unique neural signatures not only in the early stages of auditory processing, but also at the higher cognitive level of working memory. PMID:21645625

  20. Rhythm's Gonna Get You: Regular Meter Facilitates Semantic Sentence Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothermich, Kathrin; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is a phenomenon that fundamentally affects the perception of events unfolding in time. In language, we define "rhythm" as the temporal structure that underlies the perception and production of utterances, whereas "meter" is defined as the regular occurrence of beats (i.e. stressed syllables). In stress-timed languages such as German, this…