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Sample records for abnormal heart sounds

  1. Teaching Recognition of Normal and Abnormal Heart Sounds Using Computer-Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musselman, Eugene E.; Grimes, George M.

    1976-01-01

    The computer is being used in an innovative manner to teach the recognition of normal and abnormal canine heart sounds at the University of Chicago. Experience thus far indicates that the PLATO program resources allow the maximum development of the student's proficiency in auscultation. (Editor/LBH)

  2. Heart sounds: are you listening? Part 2.

    PubMed

    Reimer-Kent, Jocelyn

    2013-01-01

    The first of this two-part article on heart sounds was in the Spring 2013 issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing (Reimer-Kent, 2013). Part 1 emphasized the importance of all nurses having an understanding of heart sounds and being proficient in cardiac auscultation. The article also focused on an overview of the fundamentals of cardiac auscultation and basic heart sounds. This article provides an overview of the anatomy and pathophysiology related to valvular heart disease and describes the array of heart sounds associated with stenotic or regurgitant aortic and mitral valve conditions.

  3. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  4. Heart murmurs

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  5. Heart sounds: are you listening? Part 1.

    PubMed

    Reimer-Kent, Jocelyn

    2013-01-01

    All nurses should have an understanding of heart sounds and be proficient in cardiac auscultation. Unfortunately, this skill is not part of many nursing school curricula, nor is it necessarily a required skillfor employment. Yet, being able to listen and accurately describe heart sounds has tangible benefits to the patient, as it is an integral part of a complete cardiac assessment. In this two-part article, I will review the fundamentals of cardiac auscultation, how cardiac anatomy and physiology relate to heart sounds, and describe the various heart sounds. Whether you are a beginner or a seasoned nurse, it is never too early or too late to add this important diagnostic skill to your assessment tool kit.

  6. Heart sound and lung sound separation algorithms: a review.

    PubMed

    Nersisson, Ruban; Noel, Mathew M

    2017-01-01

    Breath and cardiac sounds are two major bio sound signals. In this, heart sounds are produced by movement of some body parts such as heart valve, leaflets and the blood flow through the vessels, whereas lung sounds generates due to the air in and out flow through airways during breathing cycle. These two signals are recorded from chest region. These two signals have very high clinical importance for the patient who is critically ill. The lung functions and the cardiac cycles are continuously monitored for such patients with the help of the bio sound signal captured using suitable sensing mechanism or with auscultation techniques. But these two signals mostly superimpose with each other, so the separation of these heart sound signals (HSS) and the lung sound signals (LSS) is of great research interest. There are so many different techniques proposed for this purpose. In this paper, a study is carried out on different algorithms used for the separation of HSS from LSS, and also the results of major four separation algorithms are compared.

  7. Denoising method of heart sound signals based on self-construct heart sound wavelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiefeng; Zhang, Zheng

    2014-08-01

    In the field of heart sound signal denoising, the wavelet transform has become one of the most effective measures. The selective wavelet basis is based on the well-known orthogonal db series or biorthogonal bior series wavelet. In this paper we present a self-construct wavelet basis which is suitable for the heart sound denoising and analyze its constructor method and features in detail according to the characteristics of heart sound and evaluation criterion of signal denoising. The experimental results show that the heart sound wavelet can effectively filter out the noise of the heart sound signals, reserve the main characteristics of the signal. Compared with the traditional wavelets, it has a higher signal-to-noise ratio, lower mean square error and better denoising effect.

  8. Frequency Dynamics of the First Heart Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, John Charles

    Cardiac auscultation is a fundamental clinical tool but first heart sound origins and significance remain controversial. Previous clinical studies have implicated resonant vibrations of both the myocardium and the valves. Accordingly, the goals of this thesis were threefold, (1) to characterize the frequency dynamics of the first heart sound, (2) to determine the relative contribution of the myocardium and the valves in determining first heart sound frequency, and (3) to develop new tools for non-stationary signal analysis. A resonant origin for first heart sound generation was tested through two studies in an open-chest canine preparation. Heart sounds were recorded using ultralight acceleration transducers cemented directly to the epicardium. The first heart sound was observed to be non-stationary and multicomponent. The most dominant feature was a powerful, rapidly-rising frequency component that preceded mitral valve closure. Two broadband components were observed; the first coincided with mitral valve closure while the second significantly preceded aortic valve opening. The spatial frequency of left ventricular vibrations was both high and non-stationary which indicated that the left ventricle was not vibrating passively in response to intracardiac pressure fluctuations but suggested instead that the first heart sound is a propagating transient. In the second study, regional myocardial ischemia was induced by left coronary circumflex arterial occlusion. Acceleration transducers were placed on the ischemic and non-ischemic myocardium to determine whether ischemia produced local or global changes in first heart sound amplitude and frequency. The two zones exhibited disparate amplitude and frequency behavior indicating that the first heart sound is not a resonant phenomenon. To objectively quantify the presence and orientation of signal components, Radon transformation of the time -frequency plane was performed and found to have considerable potential for pattern

  9. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  11. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  12. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  13. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  14. The loud first heart sound in left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Gershlick, A H; Leech, G; Mills, P G; Leatham, A

    1984-10-01

    The interrelation between the loudness of the first heart sound, the time interval from the Q wave to the onset of the first heart sound (QM1), and the mitral valve closure rate was studied in nine patients presenting with left atrial myxomata. In seven patients the first heart sound was loud preoperatively and was associated with delayed mitral valve closure. After removal of the myxoma the onset of mitral valve closure returned towards normal, the mitral valve closure rate was reduced, and the first heart sound became softer. In two patients the first heart sound was normal before and after operation as were both the time of onset of mitral valve closure and the mitral valve closure rate. In neither of these patients did the myxoma completely fill the mitral orifice during diastole. The loud first heart sound in left atrial myxoma is a useful clinical sign, and intensity is directly related to the delay in onset of closure of mitral leaflets.

  15. Automated Diagnosis of Heart Sounds Using Rule-Based Classification Tree.

    PubMed

    Karar, Mohamed Esmail; El-Khafif, Sahar H; El-Brawany, Mohamed A

    2017-04-01

    In order to assist the diagnosis procedure of heart sound signals, this paper presents a new automated method for classifying the heart status using a rule-based classification tree into normal and three abnormal cases; namely the aortic valve stenosis, aortic insufficient, and ventricular septum defect. The developed method includes three main steps as follows. First, one cycle of the heart sound signals is automatically detected and segmented based on time properties of the heart signals. Second, the segmented cycle is preprocessed with the discrete wavelet transform and then largest Lyapunov exponents are calculated to generate the dynamical features of heart sound time series. Finally, a rule-based classification tree is fed by these Lyapunov exponents to give the final decision of the heart health status. The developed method has been tested successfully on twenty-two datasets of normal heart sounds and murmurs with success rate of 95.5%. The resulting error can be easily corrected by modifying the classification rules; consequently, the accuracy of automated heart sounds diagnosis is further improved.

  16. Design of the MEMS Piezoresistive Electronic Heart Sound Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojun; Liu, Mengran; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-11-07

    This paper proposes the electronic heart sound sensor, based on the piezoresistive principle and MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) technology. Firstly, according to the characteristics of heart sound detection, the double-beam-block microstructure has been proposed, and the theoretical analysis and finite element method (FEM) simulation have been carried out. Combined with the natural frequency response of the heart sound (20~600 Hz), its structure sizes have been determined. Secondly, the processing technology of the microstructure with the stress concentration grooves has been developed. The material and sizes of the package have been determined by the three-layer medium transmission principle. Lastly, the MEMS piezoresistive electronic heart sound sensor has been tested compared with the 3200-type electronic stethoscope from 3M (São Paulo, MN, USA). The test results show that the heart sound waveform tested by the MEMS electronic heart sound sensor are almost the same as that tested by the 3200-type electronic stethoscope. Moreover, its signal-to-noise ratio is significantly higher. Compared with the traditional stethoscope, the MEMS heart sound sensor can provide the first and second heart sounds containing more abundant information about the lesion. Compared with the 3200-type electronic stethoscope from 3M, it has better performance and lower cost.

  17. Design of the MEMS Piezoresistive Electronic Heart Sound Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guojun; Liu, Mengran; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the electronic heart sound sensor, based on the piezoresistive principle and MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) technology. Firstly, according to the characteristics of heart sound detection, the double-beam-block microstructure has been proposed, and the theoretical analysis and finite element method (FEM) simulation have been carried out. Combined with the natural frequency response of the heart sound (20~600 Hz), its structure sizes have been determined. Secondly, the processing technology of the microstructure with the stress concentration grooves has been developed. The material and sizes of the package have been determined by the three-layer medium transmission principle. Lastly, the MEMS piezoresistive electronic heart sound sensor has been tested compared with the 3200-type electronic stethoscope from 3M (São Paulo, MN, USA). The test results show that the heart sound waveform tested by the MEMS electronic heart sound sensor are almost the same as that tested by the 3200-type electronic stethoscope. Moreover, its signal-to-noise ratio is significantly higher. Compared with the traditional stethoscope, the MEMS heart sound sensor can provide the first and second heart sounds containing more abundant information about the lesion. Compared with the 3200-type electronic stethoscope from 3M, it has better performance and lower cost. PMID:27827981

  18. Localizing heart sounds in respiratory signals using singular spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Foad; Mohseni, Hamid R; Sanei, Saeid

    2011-12-01

    Respiratory sounds are always contaminated by heart sound interference. An essential preprocessing step in some of the heart sound cancellation methods is localizing primary heart sound components. Singular spectrum analysis (SSA), a powerful time series analysis technique, is used in this paper. Despite the frequency overlap of the heart and lung sound components, two different trends in the eigenvalue spectra are recognizable, which leads to find a subspace that contains more information about the underlying heart sound. Artificially mixed and real respiratory signals are used for evaluating the performance of the method. Selecting the appropriate length for the SSA window results in good decomposition quality and low computational cost for the algorithm. The results of the proposed method are compared with those of well-established methods, which use the wavelet transform and entropy of the signal to detect the heart sound components. The proposed method outperforms the wavelet-based method in terms of false detection and also correlation with the underlying heart sounds. Performance of the proposed method is slightly better than that of the entropy-based method. Moreover, the execution time of the former is significantly lower than that of the latter.

  19. Heart Sound Biometric System Based on Marginal Spectrum Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhidong; Shen, Qinqin; Ren, Fangqin

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a heart sound biometric system based on marginal spectrum analysis, which is a new feature extraction technique for identification purposes. This heart sound identification system is comprised of signal acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction, training, and identification. Experiments on the selection of the optimal values for the system parameters are conducted. The results indicate that the new spectrum coefficients result in a significant increase in the recognition rate of 94.40% compared with that of the traditional Fourier spectrum (84.32%) based on a database of 280 heart sounds from 40 participants. PMID:23429515

  20. Heart sound biometric system based on marginal spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhidong; Shen, Qinqin; Ren, Fangqin

    2013-02-18

    This work presents a heart sound biometric system based on marginal spectrum analysis, which is a new feature extraction technique for identification purposes. This heart sound identification system is comprised of signal acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction, training, and identification. Experiments on the selection of the optimal values for the system parameters are conducted. The results indicate that the new spectrum coefficients result in a significant increase in the recognition rate of 94.40% compared with that of the traditional Fourier spectrum (84.32%) based on a database of 280 heart sounds from 40 participants. 

  1. Measurement and classification of heart and lung sounds by using LabView for educational use.

    PubMed

    Altrabsheh, B

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the design, development and implementation of a simple low-cost method of phonocardiography signal detection. Human heart and lung signals are detected by using a simple microphone through a personal computer; the signals are recorded and analysed using LabView software. Amplitude and frequency analyses are carried out for various phonocardiography pathological cases. Methods for automatic classification of normal and abnormal heart sounds, murmurs and lung sounds are presented. Various cases of heart and lung sound measurement are recorded and analysed. The measurements can be saved for further analysis. The method in this study can be used by doctors as a detection tool aid and may be useful for teaching purposes at medical and nursing schools.

  2. A study of heart sound and lung sound separation by independent component analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jen-Chien; Huang, Ming-Chuan; Lin, Yue-Der; Chong, Fok-ching

    2006-01-01

    In the hospital, using percussion and auscultation are the most common ways for physical examination. Recently, in order to develop tele-medicine and home care system and to assist physician getting better auscultation results; electric stethoscope and computer analysis have become an inevitable trend. However, two important physical signals heart sound and lung sound recorded from chest overlap on spectrum chart. Therefore, in order to reduce human factor (ex. misplace or untrained of using) and minimize correlated effect in computer analysis; it's necessary for separated heart sound and lung sound. Independent component analysis can divide these sounds efficiency. In this paper, we use two microphones to collect signals from left and right chest. We have successfully divide heart and lung sounds by fast ICA algorithm. Therefore, it can assist physician examine and also using on tele-medicine and home care by this way.

  3. [Frequency and peculiarities of sound pronunciation abnormalities in children with defects and deformations of dentomaxillary system].

    PubMed

    Vodolatskiĭ, V M

    2007-01-01

    When examining children of the ages from 7 till 15 years it was found out that sound pronunciation abnormalities were caused by deformations of dental-maxillary system. Frequency and degree of sound pronunciation abnormalities in childhood depended upon character and degree of dentomaxillary system deformations.

  4. An adaptive singular spectrum analysis approach to murmur detection from heart sounds.

    PubMed

    Sanei, Saeid; Ghodsi, Mansoureh; Hassani, Hossein

    2011-04-01

    Murmur is the result of various heart abnormalities. A new robust approach for separation of murmur from heart sound has been suggested in this article. Singular spectrum analysis (SSA) has been adapted to the changes in the statistical properties of the data and effectively used for detection of murmur from single-channel heart sound (HS) signals. Incorporating a cleverly selected a priori within the SSA reconstruction process, results in an accurate separation of normal HS from the murmur segment. Another contribution of this work is selection of the correct subspace of the desired signal component automatically. In addition, the subspace size can be identified iteratively. A number of HS signals with murmur have been processed using the proposed adaptive SSA (ASSA) technique and the results have been quantified both objectively and subjectively.

  5. Visualization of Heart Sounds and Motion Using Multichannel Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogata, Fumio; Yokota, Yasunari; Kawamura, Yoko

    2010-06-01

    As there are various difficulties associated with auscultation techniques, we have devised a technique for visualizing heart motion in order to assist in the understanding of heartbeat for both doctors and patients. Auscultatory sounds were first visualized using FFT and Wavelet analysis to visualize heart sounds. Next, to show global and simultaneous heart motions, a new technique for visualization was established. The visualization system consists of a 64-channel unit (63 acceleration sensors and one ECG sensor) and a signal/image analysis unit. The acceleration sensors were arranged in a square array (8×8) with a 20-mm pitch interval, which was adhered to the chest surface. The heart motion of one cycle was visualized at a sampling frequency of 3 kHz and quantization of 12 bits. The visualized results showed a typical waveform motion of the strong pressure shock due to closing tricuspid valve and mitral valve of the cardiac apex (first sound), and the closing aortic and pulmonic valve (second sound) in sequence. To overcome difficulties in auscultation, the system can be applied to the detection of heart disease and to the digital database management of the auscultation examination in medical areas.

  6. Processing of prosthetic heart valve sounds for classification. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E.

    1994-04-01

    People with serious heart conditions have had their expected life span extended considerably with the development of the prosthetic heart valve especially with the great strides made in valve design. Even though the designs are extremely reliable, the valves are mechanical and operating continuously over a long period, therefore, structural failures can occur due to fatigue. Measuring heart sounds non-invasively in a noisy environment puts more demands on the signal processing to extract the desired signals from the noise. In this paper the authors discuss acoustical signal processing techniques developed to process noisy heart valve sounds measured by a sensitive, surface contact microphone and used for the eventual classification of the valve.

  7. [Synchronous playing and acquiring of heart sounds and electrocardiogram based on labVIEW].

    PubMed

    Dan, Chunmei; He, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Que, Xiaosheng

    2008-12-01

    In this paper is described a comprehensive system, which can acquire heart sounds and electrocardiogram (ECG) in parallel, synchronize the display; and play of heart sound and make auscultation and check phonocardiogram to tie in. The hardware system with C8051F340 as the core acquires the heart sound and ECG synchronously, and then sends them to indicators, respectively. Heart sounds are displayed and played simultaneously by controlling the moment of writing to indicator and sound output device. In clinical testing, heart sounds can be successfully located with ECG and real-time played.

  8. Heart sounds as a result of acoustic dipole radiation of heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasoev, S. G.

    2005-11-01

    Heart sounds are associated with impulses of force acting on heart valves at the moment they close under the action of blood-pressure difference. A unified model for all the valves represents this impulse as an acoustic dipole. The near pressure field of this dipole creates a distribution of the normal velocity on the breast surface with features typical of auscultation practice: a pronounced localization of heart sound audibility areas, an individual area for each of the valves, and a noncoincidence of these areas with the projections of the valves onto the breast surface. In the framework of the dipole theory, the optimum size of the stethoscope’s bell is found and the spectrum of the heart sounds is estimated. The estimates are compared with the measured spectrum.

  9. Online estimation of lower and upper bounds for heart sound boundaries in chest sound using Convex-hull algorithm.

    PubMed

    Çağlar, F; Ozbek, I Y

    2012-01-01

    Heart sound localization in chest sound is an essential part for many heart sound cancellation algorithms. The main difficulty for heart sound localization methods is the precise determination of the onset and offset boundaries of the heart sound segment. This paper presents a novel method to estimate lower and upper bounds for the onset and offset of the heart sound segment, which can be used as anchor points for more precise estimation. For this purpose, first chest sound is divided into frames and then entropy and smoothed entropy features of these frames are extracted, and used in the Convex-hull algorithm to estimate the upper and lower bounds for heart sound boundaries. The Convex-hull algorithm constructs a special type of envelope function for entropy features and if the maximal difference between the envelope function and the entropy is larger than a certain threshold, this point is considered as a heart sound bound. The results of the proposed method are compared with a baseline method which is a modified version of a well-known heart sound localization method. The results show that the proposed method outperforms the baseline method in terms of accuracy and detection error rate. Also, the experimental results show that smoothing entropy features significantly improves the performance of both baseline and proposed methods.

  10. Abnormal heart rate variability and atrial fibrillation after aortic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Compostella, Leonida; Russo, Nicola; D’Onofrio, Augusto; Setzu, Tiziana; Compostella, Caterina; Bottio, Tomaso; Gerosa, Gino; Bellotto, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complete denervation of transplanted heart exerts protective effect against postoperative atrial fibrillation; various degrees of autonomic denervation appear also after transection of ascending aorta during surgery for aortic aneurysm. Objective This study aimed to evaluate if the level of cardiac denervation obtained by resection of ascending aorta could exert any effect on postoperative atrial fibrillation incidence. Methods We retrospectively analysed the clinical records of 67 patients submitted to graft replacement of ascending aorta (group A) and 132 with aortic valve replacement (group B); all episodes of postoperative atrial fibrillation occurred during the 1-month follow-up have been reported. Heart Rate Variability parameters were obtained from a 24-h Holter recording; clinical, echocardiographic and treatment data were also evaluated. Results Overall, 45% of patients (group A 43%, group B 46%) presented at least one episode of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Older age (but not gender, abnormal glucose tolerance, ejection fraction, left atrial diameter) was correlated with incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Only among a subgroup of patients with aortic transection and signs of greater autonomic derangement (heart rate variability parameters below the median and mean heart rate over the 75th percentile), possibly indicating more profound autonomic denervation, a lower incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation was observed (22% vs. 54%). Conclusion Transection of ascending aorta for repair of an aortic aneurysm did not confer any significant protective effect from postoperative atrial fibrillation in comparison to patients with intact ascending aorta. It could be speculated that a limited and heterogeneous cardiac denervation was produced by the intervention, creating an eletrophysiological substrate for the high incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation observed. PMID:25859868

  11. Using K-Nearest Neighbor Classification to Diagnose Abnormal Lung Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Hsing; Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Tan, Tan-Hsu; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    A reported 30% of people worldwide have abnormal lung sounds, including crackles, rhonchi, and wheezes. To date, the traditional stethoscope remains the most popular tool used by physicians to diagnose such abnormal lung sounds, however, many problems arise with the use of a stethoscope, including the effects of environmental noise, the inability to record and store lung sounds for follow-up or tracking, and the physician’s subjective diagnostic experience. This study has developed a digital stethoscope to help physicians overcome these problems when diagnosing abnormal lung sounds. In this digital system, mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) were used to extract the features of lung sounds, and then the K-means algorithm was used for feature clustering, to reduce the amount of data for computation. Finally, the K-nearest neighbor method was used to classify the lung sounds. The proposed system can also be used for home care: if the percentage of abnormal lung sound frames is > 30% of the whole test signal, the system can automatically warn the user to visit a physician for diagnosis. We also used bend sensors together with an amplification circuit, Bluetooth, and a microcontroller to implement a respiration detector. The respiratory signal extracted by the bend sensors can be transmitted to the computer via Bluetooth to calculate the respiratory cycle, for real-time assessment. If an abnormal status is detected, the device will warn the user automatically. Experimental results indicated that the error in respiratory cycles between measured and actual values was only 6.8%, illustrating the potential of our detector for home care applications. PMID:26053756

  12. Liver Abnormalities in Cardiac Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Alicia M.; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is characterized by the inability of systemic perfusion to meet the body's metabolic demands and is usually caused by cardiac pump dysfunction and may occasionally present with symptoms of a noncardiac disorder such as hepatic dysfunction. The primary pathophysiology involved in hepatic dysfunction from HF is either passive congestion from increased filling pressures or low cardiac output and the consequences of impaired perfusion. Passive hepatic congestion due to increased central venous pressure may cause elevations of liver enzymes and both direct and indirect serum bilirubin. Impaired perfusion from decreased cardiac output may be associated with acute hepatocellular necrosis with marked elevations in serum aminotransferases. Cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis (“shock liver”) may ensue following an episode of profound hypotension in patients with acute HF. We discuss pathophysiology and identification of liver abnormalities that are commonly seen in patients with HF. PMID:22942628

  13. A novel murmur-based heart sound feature extraction technique using envelope-morphological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hao-Dong; Ma, Jia-Li; Fu, Bin-Bin; Wang, Hai-Yang; Dong, Ming-Chui

    2015-07-01

    Auscultation of heart sound (HS) signals serves as an important primary approach to diagnose cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) for centuries. Confronting the intrinsic drawbacks of traditional HS auscultation, computer-aided automatic HS auscultation based on feature extraction technique has witnessed explosive development. Yet, most existing HS feature extraction methods adopt acoustic or time-frequency features which exhibit poor relationship with diagnostic information, thus restricting the performance of further interpretation and analysis. Tackling such a bottleneck problem, this paper innovatively proposes a novel murmur-based HS feature extraction method since murmurs contain massive pathological information and are regarded as the first indications of pathological occurrences of heart valves. Adapting discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and Shannon envelope, the envelope-morphological characteristics of murmurs are obtained and three features are extracted accordingly. Validated by discriminating normal HS and 5 various abnormal HS signals with extracted features, the proposed method provides an attractive candidate in automatic HS auscultation.

  14. Abnormal shortened diastolic time length at increasing heart rates in patients with abnormal exercise-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The degree of pulmonary hypertension is not independently related to the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction but is frequently associated with diastolic filling abnormalities. The aim of this study was to assess diastolic times at increasing heart rates in normal and in patients with and without abnormal exercise-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure (PASP). Methods. We enrolled 109 patients (78 males, age 62 ± 13 years) referred for exercise stress echocardiography and 16 controls. The PASP was derived from the tricuspid Doppler tracing. A cut-off value of PASP ≥ 50 mmHg at peak stress was considered as indicative of abnormal increase in PASP. Diastolic times and the diastolic/systolic time ratio were recorded by a precordial cutaneous force sensor based on a linear accelerometer. Results At baseline, PASP was 30 ± 5 mmHg in patients and 25 ± 4 in controls. At peak stress the PASP was normal in 95 patients (Group 1); 14 patients (Group 2) showed an abnormal increase in PASP (from 35 ± 4 to 62 ± 12 mmHg; P < 0.01). At 100 bpm, an abnormal (< 1) diastolic/systolic time ratio was found in 0/16 (0%) controls, in 12/93 (13%) Group 1 and 7/14 (50%) Group 2 patients (p < 0.05 between groups). Conclusion The first and second heart sound vibrations non-invasively monitored by a force sensor are useful for continuously assessing diastolic time during exercise. Exercise-induced abnormal PASP was associated with reduced diastolic time at heart rates beyond 100 beats per minute. PMID:22104611

  15. Abnormal intermittency of heart rate in patients with neurocardiogenic syncope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Myung-Kul; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Kim, June-Soo

    2002-03-01

    Introduction: We aim to test our hypothesis that, during daily activity, though not as prominent as during HUT test, the patients may show different degree of intermittency in heart rates compared to healthy persons. METHOD AND RESULTS: Thirty patients with neurocardiogenic syncope who showed a positive HUT test and thirty healthy controls without history of syncope were included. Their twenty-four hour ambulatory electrocardiograms were digitized and RR interval (RRI) data of six-hour interval were analyzed. To quantify the intermittency (C1) behavior, The intermittency analysis was performed using Mexican hat wavelet. For the syncope group, the values of C1 were significantly higher at 6AM-6PM and lower at 6AM-midnight, respectively. However, the values were not different at midnight-6AM. The significant night-day circadian change shown in the control group was lost in C1. CONCLUSION: When compared to healthy control, the patients with neurocardiogenic syncope shows increased intermittency of heart rates in daytime during daily activity, and abnormal circadian rhythms of the index. These new findings may be useful for investigating the pathophysiology of neurocardiogenic syncope and early identification of the patients.

  16. Influence of sound and light on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Hori, Kiyokazu; Yamakawa, Masanobu; Tanaka, Nobuo; Murakami, Hiromi; Kaya, Mitsuharu; Hori, Seiki

    2005-12-01

    The effects of acoustic and visual stimuli and their synergistic effects on heart rate variability including gender differences were investigated. Of particular interest was the influence of visual stimulus on heart rate variability during listening to simple sounds of different characters. Twelve male and 12 female university students were selected as subjects. The subjects listened at rest to 7 different figures of sound at loudness levels averaging 60 dB. Beat-to-beat R-R intervals were continuously recorded under the closed-eye condition (CEC) and the open-eye condition (OEC) prior to, during, and immediately after the exposure to acoustic stimuli. Low frequency (LF) power was defined over 0.04-0.15 Hz and high frequency (HF) power over 0.15-0.40 Hz. Cardiac autonomic function was estimated by plotting LF/HF in standard measure against HF in standard measure and by plotting LF/HF (%) against HF (%), accompanied by a demarcated central area. Values of LF/HF tended to be smaller under CEC than under OEC. Values of HF while listening to a 110 Hz sine wave under CEC were significantly greater than values for 880 Hz and 3520 Hz sine waves, or for 110 Hz or 880 Hz sawtooth waves, under OEC. Under CEC, values of HF for 7 figures of sound were greater in females than in males. The value of HF of sine wave for 110 Hz under CEC and OEC was significantly greater than that for white noise under the OEC. The results suggest that the cardiac parasympathetic nervous activity during auditory excitation increases with elimination of visual stimuli and tends to be greater in females than in males.

  17. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano Machado; da Silva, Juliane Nascimento; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo Gazzola

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) are an important cause of congenital heart disease (CHD). Objective Determine the frequency, types and clinical characteristics of CAs identified in a sample of prospective and consecutive patients with CHD. Method Our sample consisted of patients with CHD evaluated during their first hospitalization in a cardiac intensive care unit of a pediatric referral hospital in Southern Brazil. All patients underwent clinical and cytogenetic assessment through high-resolution karyotype. CHDs were classified according to Botto et al. Chi-square, Fisher exact test and odds ratio were used in the statistical analysis (p < 0.05). Results Our sample consisted of 298 patients, 53.4% males, with age ranging from 1 day to 14 years. CAs were observed in 50 patients (16.8%), and 49 of them were syndromic. As for the CAs, 44 (88%) were numeric (40 patients with +21, 2 with +18, 1 with triple X and one with 45,X) and 6 (12%) structural [2 patients with der(14,21), +21, 1 with i(21q), 1 with dup(17p), 1 with del(6p) and 1 with add(18p)]. The group of CHDs more often associated with CAs was atrioventricular septal defect. Conclusions CAs detected through karyotyping are frequent in patients with CHD. Thus, professionals, especially those working in Pediatric Cardiology Services, must be aware of the implications that performing the karyotype can bring to the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis and for genetic counseling of patients and families. PMID:24145389

  18. Fluid Dynamics of the Generation and Transmission of Heart Sounds: (2): Direct Simulation using a Coupled Hemo-Elastodynamic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung-Hee; Bakhshaee, Hani; Zhu, Chi; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Patterns of blood flow associated with abnormal heart conditions generate characteristic sounds that can be measured on the chest surface using a stethoscope. This technique of `cardiac auscultation' has been used effectively for over a hundred years to diagnose heart conditions, but the mechanisms that generate heart sounds, as well as the physics of sound transmission through the thorax, are not well understood. Here we present a new computational method for simulating the physics of heart murmur generation and transmission and use it to simulate the murmurs associated with a modeled aortic stenosis. The flow in the model aorta is simulated by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the three-dimensional elastic wave generation and propagation on the surrounding viscoelastic structure are solved with a high-order finite difference method in the time domain. The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements and show good agreement. The present study confirms that the pressure fluctuations on the vessel wall are the source of these heart murmurs, and both compression and shear waves likely plan an important role in cardiac auscultation. Supported by the NSF Grants IOS-1124804 and IIS-1344772, Computational resource by XSEDE NSF grant TG-CTS100002.

  19. Extraction of fault component from abnormal sound in diesel engines using acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayong, Ning; Changle, Sun; Yongjun, Gong; Zengmeng, Zhang; Jiaoyi, Hou

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a method for extracting fault components from abnormal acoustic signals and automatically diagnosing diesel engine faults is presented. The method named dislocation superimposed method (DSM) is based on the improved random decrement technique (IRDT), differential function (DF) and correlation analysis (CA). The aim of DSM is to linearly superpose multiple segments of abnormal acoustic signals because of the waveform similarity of faulty components. The method uses sample points at the beginning of time when abnormal sound appears as the starting position for each segment. In this study, the abnormal sound belonged to shocking faulty type; thus, the starting position searching method based on gradient variance was adopted. The coefficient of similar degree between two same sized signals is presented. By comparing with a similar degree, the extracted fault component could be judged automatically. The results show that this method is capable of accurately extracting the fault component from abnormal acoustic signals induced by faulty shocking type and the extracted component can be used to identify the fault type.

  20. Processing of Prosthetic Heart Valve Sounds from Anechoic Tank Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Meyer, A W

    2001-03-20

    People with serious cardiac problems have had their life span extended with the development of the prosthetic heart valve. However, the valves operate continuously at approximately 39 million cycles per year and are therefore subject to structural failures either by faulty design or material fatigue. The development of a non-invasive technique using an acoustic contact microphone and sophisticated signal processing techniques has been proposed and demonstrated on limited data sets. In this paper we discuss an extension of the techniques to perform the heart valve tests in an anechoic like. Here the objective is to extract a ''pure'' sound or equivalently the acoustical vibration response of the prosthetic valves in a quiet environment. The goal is to demonstrate that there clearly exist differences between values which have a specific mechanical defect known as single leg separation (SLS) and non-defective valves known as intact (INT). We discuss the signal processing and results of anechoic acoustic measurements on 50 prosthetic valves in the tank. Finally, we show the results of the individual runs for each valve, point out any of the meaningful features that could be used to distinguish the SLS from INT and summarize the experiments.

  1. The Analysis of Heart Sounds Based on Linear and High Order Statistical Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Normal heart sound. (b) Mitral Stenosis . (c) Aortic Stenosis . sequence to an instrumental process derived from the data [10]. The AR estimation...heart sound. (b) Mitral Stenosis . (c) Aortic Stenosis . C. Data Acquisition The database used to evaluate the methods is from a compact disk...modeling methods can be used to detect sound associated with coronary stenosis [1], [3], [8], [7]. The parametric modeling methods in these studies

  2. Unknown syndrome: abnormal facies, congenital heart defects, hypothyroidism, and severe retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Young, I D; Simpson, K

    1987-01-01

    We present a female infant with (1) abnormal facies: microcephaly, blepharophimosis, small, low set, posteriorly rotated ears, bulbous nose, carp shaped mouth, micrognathia; (2) congenital heart abnormalities: large atrial and ventricular septal defects; (3) congenital hypothyroidism; (4) severe global retardation. Images PMID:3430551

  3. [Analysis of the heart sound with arrhythmia based on nonlinear chaos theory].

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaorong; Guo, Xingming; Zhong, Lisha; Xiao, Shouzhong

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a new method based on the nonlinear chaos theory was proposed to study the arrhythmia with the combination of the correlation dimension and largest Lyapunov exponent, through computing and analyzing these two parameters of 30 cases normal heart sound and 30 cases with arrhythmia. The results showed that the two parameters of the heart sounds with arrhythmia were higher than those with the normal, and there was significant difference between these two kinds of heart sounds. That is probably due to the irregularity of the arrhythmia which causes the decrease of predictability, and it's more complex than the normal heart sound. Therefore, the correlation dimension and the largest Lyapunov exponent can be used to analyze the arrhythmia and for its feature extraction.

  4. [Development of heart sound signal detection system based on USB interface].

    PubMed

    Ji, An; Guo, Xingming; Guo, Weizhen; Xiao, Shouzhong

    2008-10-01

    This paper introduces a type of heart sound recording, analysis and processing system based on USB interface. The system consists of high performance sensor sampling heart sounds, the preprocessing circuit, the A/D conversion module and the USB based high-speed computer communications interface. The experiments show that it is noninvasive, convenient, inexpensive and rapid in detecting the cardiac contractility of patients with heart disease as well as of healthy subjects. This system has provided a reliable technical platform for evaluating the cardiac contractility reserve.

  5. [The acquisition and analysis of heart sound signals based on DSP].

    PubMed

    Xing, Suxia; Chen, Tianhua

    2011-04-01

    Heart sound signals acquisition is the primary basis for achieving non-invasive diagnosis of coronary heart disease. In this paper, a digital signal processor (DSP)-based on miniaturized circuit of heart sound signals acquisition and analysis platform was designed to achieve the functions of filtering, collecting, processing, displaying and the communicating with PC. With the self-developed experimental platform, we collected 228 cases of heart sounds of clinical data, and processed the signals using de-noising method with wavelet transform. These experimental results indicated that the db6 wavelet has the most obvious de-noising effect among the four most commonly used wavelets, i.e., haar, db6, sym8, and coif5. One wavelet at different levels possessed different de-noising effects, with level-5 db6 decomposition obtaining the most desirable result.

  6. Increase in the embedding dimension in the heart rate variability associated with left ventricular abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, D. S.; Irurzun, I. M.; Mitelman, J.; Mola, E. E.

    2006-10-01

    In the present study, the authors report evidence that the existence of premature ventricular contractions increases the embedding dimension of the cardiac dynamics. They also analyze patients with congestive heart failure, a severe clinical condition associated with abnormal left ventricular function. Results also show an increase in the embedding dimension of the heart rate variability. They used electrocardiograms collected by themselves with quality standards that make them comparable with other databases.

  7. SEX DIFFERENCES IN THE EFFECTS OF DIVERSE SOUNDS ON HEART RATE VARIABILITY.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Haruka; Uetake, Teruo; Shimoda, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    With the goal of facilitating the creation of relaxing sound environments in stressful places, such as offices, we examined differences in the heart rate fluctuations of men and women induced by different sounds. Twenty-three healthy students (13 males and 10 females) aged between 18 and 23 listened to seven different sounds while we collected electrocardiogram data. We extracted the high frequency component (HF) and low frequency component (LF) of the signals using the wavelet method, and calculated LF/HF. We found no statistically significant differences between males and females in the frequency distribution of a no change group, increased group, and decreased group for any sound. However, certain sounds had somewhat similar patterns for men and women for all three groups. Additionally, the pairs of experimental sounds with highly similar effects on individuals were different for men and women.

  8. Processing of prosthetic heart valve sounds for single leg separation classification

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E.

    1995-06-01

    Efforts are concentrated on the sounds corresponding to the heart valve opening cycle. Valve opening and closing acoustics present additional information about the outlet strut condition---the structural component implicated in valve failure. The importance of the opening sound for single leg separation detection/classification is based on the fact that as the valve opens, the disk passively hits the outlet strut. The opening sounds thus yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal amount of disturbance caused by the energy radiated from the disk. Hence the opening sound is a very desirable acoustic signal to extract. Unfortunately, the opening sounds have much lower signal levels relative to the closing sounds and therefore noise plays a more significant role than during the closing event. Because of this it is necessary to screen the sounds for outliers in order to insure a high sensitivity of classification. Because of the sharp resonances appearing in the corresponding spectrum, a parametric processing approach is developed based on an autoregressive model which was selected to characterize the sounds emitted by the Bjork--Shiley convexo--concave (BSCC) valve during opening cycle. First the basic signals and the extraction process used to create an ensemble of heart valve sounds are briefly discussed. Next, a {ital beat} {ital monitor} capable of rejecting beats that fail to meet an acceptance criteria based on their spectral content is developed. Various approaches that have been utilized to enhance the screened data and produce a reliable {ital heart} {ital valve} {ital spectrogram} which displays the individual sounds (power) as a function of beat number and temporal frequency are discussed. Once estimated, the spectrogram and associated parameters are used to develop features supplied to the various classification schemes. Finally, future work aimed at even further signal enhancement and improved classifier performance is discussed.

  9. Performance Evaluation of Heart Sound Cancellation in FPGA Hardware Implementation for Electronic Stethoscope

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chun-Tang

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of the hardware circuit for electronic stethoscopes with heart sound cancellation capabilities using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The adaptive line enhancer (ALE) was adopted as the filtering methodology to reduce heart sound attributes from the breath sounds obtained via the electronic stethoscope pickup. FPGAs were utilized to implement the ALE functions in hardware to achieve near real-time breath sound processing. We believe that such an implementation is unprecedented and crucial toward a truly useful, standalone medical device in outpatient clinic settings. The implementation evaluation with one Altera cyclone II–EP2C70F89 shows that the proposed ALE used 45% resources of the chip. Experiments with the proposed prototype were made using DE2-70 emulation board with recorded body signals obtained from online medical archives. Clear suppressions were observed in our experiments from both the frequency domain and time domain perspectives. PMID:24790573

  10. Classification of heart valve sounds from experiments in an anechoic water tank

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, M C; Clark, G A; Scott, D

    1999-06-01

    In vivo studies in both sheep and humans were plagued by a number of problems including movement artifacts, biological noise, low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), chest-wall reverberation, and limited bandwidth recordings as discussed by [1]. To overcome these problems it was decided to record heart valve sounds under controlled conditions deep in an anechoic water tank, free from reverberation noise. The main goal of this experiment was to obtain measurements of ''pure'' heart valve sounds free of the scattering effects of the body. Experiments were conducted at the Transdec facility in San Diego [2]. We used a high quality hydrophone together with a wide-band data acquisition system [2]. We recorded sounds from 100 repetitions of the opening-closing cycles on each of 50 different heart valves, including 21 SLS valves and 29 intact valves. The power spectrum of the opening and closing phases of each cycle were calculated and outlier spectra removed as described by Candy [2]. In this report, we discuss the results of our classification of the heart valve sound measurements. The goal of this classification task was to apply the fundamental classification algorithms developed for the clinical data in 1994 and 1996 to the measurements from the anechoic water tank. From the beginning of this project, LLNL's responsibility has been to process and classify the heart valve sounds. For this experiment, however, we processed both the opening sounds and closing sounds for comparison purposes. The results of this experiment show that the classifier did not perform well because of low signal-to-noise ratio and excessive variability in signal power from beat-to-beat for a given valve.

  11. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further.

  12. Variation in artificial heart acceleration and sound production with prosthetic valve selection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pantalos, G M; Kim, C H; Flatau, A

    1996-03-01

    In an attempt to explore methods to reduce total artificial heart (TAH) acceleration and sound production, in vitro measurements of TAH acceleration and sound were made when using a variety of prosthetic valves in a test ventricle. A miniature, uniaxial, high fidelity accelerometer was glued to the housing of a UTAH-100 left ventricle adjacent to the inflow and outflow ports and parallel to the axis of diaphragm excursion. A miniature, high fidelity contact microphone was glued to the opposite side of the ventricular housing between the inflow and outflow ports. Data was collected over a range of heart rates, ventricular filling volumes and control modes while using tilting disc valves (TDV) and polymer trileaflet valves (PTV). For both valve types, the peak systolic acceleration impulse was lower (approximately equal to 50%) when the ventricle was fully rather than partially filled and the peak diastolic acceleration impulse was lower (approximately equal to 50%) when the ventricle was fully rather than partially ejected. The magnitude of the acceleration with PTVs was approximately equal to 20x less than the TDVs (0.5 to 2.2 g vs. 10 to 49g). The magnitude of the sound production was also considerably less with the PTVs (28 to 49 db vs. 50 to 64 db). Diastolic acceleration and sound production was approximately twice the systolic value for the TDVs; the reserse was true for PTV sound production. These data demonstrate the substantial reduction in TAH impulse acceleration and sound production by selecting PTVs over TDSs. With PTVs, the TAH impulse acceleration is the same as the natural heart. Consequently, this ability to lower TAH acceleration and sound production to the level of the natural heart may lead to a reduction in component wear, patient discomfort and other undesirable consequences of TAH implantation.

  13. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion in fetuses with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Wang, Shuyu

    2014-11-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion are implicated in congenital heart defects (CHDs). This study was designed to detect these abnormalities in fetuses and determine the effect of genetic factors on CHD etiology. Between January 2010 and December 2011, 113 fetuses with CHD treated at the Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital were investigated, using chromosome karyotyping of either amniotic fluid cell or umbilical cord blood cell samples. Fetuses with a normal result were then investigated for the 22q11 microdeletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of the 113 patients, 12 (10.6%) exhibited chromosomal abnormalities, while 6 (5.3%) of the remaining 101 cases presented with a 22q11 microdeletion. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly higher in the group of fetuses presenting with extracardiac malformations in addition to CHD (P<0.001), although the detection of the 22q11 microdeletion was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.583). In addition, all fetuses with the 22q11 microdeletion occurred de novo. In conclusion, genetic factors are important in the etiology of CHD. Where fetuses present with cardiac defects, additional chromosomal analysis is required to detect extracardiac abnormalities. Fetuses with heart defects should also be considered for 22q11 microdeletion detection to evaluate fetal prognosis, particularly prior to surgery.

  14. Nonspecific electrocardiographic abnormality as a predictor of coronary heart disease: the Framingham Study.

    PubMed

    Kannel, W B; Anderson, K; McGee, D L; Degatano, L S; Stampfer, M J

    1987-02-01

    The risk of developing overt coronary heart disease is examined in relation to occurrence of non-specific electrocardiographic S-T and T-wave abnormalities (NSA-ECG) in the Framingham Study. In the course of follow-up, 14% of the 5127 men and women had or developed NSA-ECG without clinically apparent intervening coronary heart disease. During 30 years of surveillance, 760 men and 578 women developed a first overt clinical manifestation of coronary heart disease. NSA-ECG appears to be a hallmark of a compromised coronary circulation which predicted the occurrence of every clinical manifestation of coronary heart disease independently of known risk factors including hypertension, its chief determinant. Coronary morbidity and mortality was increased twofold in each sex. The more common T-wave abnormality alone carried a significant increased risk, although the combination of S-T and T-wave seemed most hazardous. Persons who develop NSA-ECG without other explanation warrant vigorous preventive management against coronary heart disease.

  15. Activation of Notch1 signaling in cardiogenic mesoderm induces abnormal heart morphogenesis in mouse.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Kokubo, Hiroki; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko; Endo, Maho; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Aisaki, Ken ichi; Kanno, Jun; Saga, Yumiko

    2006-05-01

    Notch signaling is implicated in many developmental processes. In our current study, we have employed a transgenic strategy to investigate the role of Notch signaling during cardiac development in the mouse. Cre recombinase-mediated Notch1 (NICD1) activation in the mesodermal cell lineage leads to abnormal heart morphogenesis, which is characterized by deformities of the ventricles and atrioventricular (AV) canal. The major defects observed include impaired ventricular myocardial differentiation, the ectopic appearance of cell masses in the AV cushion, the right-shifted interventricular septum (IVS) and impaired myocardium of the AV canal. However, the fates of the endocardium and myocardium were not disrupted in NICD1-activated hearts. One of the Notch target genes, Hesr1, was found to be strongly induced in both the ventricle and the AV canal of NICD1-activated hearts. However, a knockout of the Hesr1 gene from NICD-activated hearts rescues only the abnormality of the AV myocardium. We searched for additional possible targets of NICD1 activation by GeneChip analysis and found that Wnt2, Bmp6, jagged 1 and Tnni2 are strongly upregulated in NICD1-activated hearts, and that the activation of these genes was also observed in the absence of Hesr1. Our present study thus indicates that the Notch1 signaling pathway plays a suppressive role both in AV myocardial differentiation and the maturation of the ventricular myocardium.

  16. Classification of prosthetic heart valve sounds. A parametric approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E. |

    1995-06-01

    People with heart problems have had their lives extended considerably with the development of the prosthetic heart valve. Great strides have been made in the development of the valves through the use of improved materials as well as efficient mechanical designs. However, since the valves operate continuously over a long period, structural failures can occur-even though they are relatively uncommon. Here the development of techniques to classify the valve either as having intact struts or as having a separated strut, commonly called single leg separation, is discussed. In this paper the signal processing techniques employed to extract the required signals/parameters are briefly reviewed and then it is shown how they can be used to simulate a synthetic heart valve database for eventual Monte Carlo testing. Next, the optimal classifier is developed under assumed conditions and its performance is compared to that of an adpative-type classifier implemented with a probabilistic neural network. Finally, the adaptive classifier is applied to a data set and its performance is analyzed. Based on synthetic data it is shown that excellent performance of the classifiers can be achieved implying a potentially robust solution to this classification problem. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Maternal sounds elicit lower heart rate in preterm newborns in the first month of life

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Katherine; Lahav, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background The preferential response to mother’s voice in the fetus and term newborn is well documented. However, the response of preterm neonates is not well understood and more difficult to interpret due to the intensive clinical care and range of medical complications. Aim This study examined the physiological response to maternal sounds and its sustainability in the first month of life in infants born very pretermaturely. Methods Heart rate changes were monitored in 20 hospitalized preterm infants born between 25 and 32 weeks of gestation during 30-minute exposure vs. non-exposure periods of recorded maternal sounds played inside the Neonatal incubator. A total of 13,680 min of HR data was sampled throughout the first month of life during gavage feeds Heart rate with and without exposure to maternal sounds. Results During exposure periods, infants had significantly lower heart rate compared to matched periods of care Auditory without exposure on the same day (p < .0001). This effect was observed in all infants, across the first month of life, irrespective of day of life, gestational age at birth, birth weight, age at testing, Apgar score, caffeine therapy, and requirement for respiratory support. No adverse effects were observed. Conclusion Preterm newborns responded to maternal sounds with decreased heart rate throughout the first month of life. It is possible that maternal sounds improve autonomic stability and provide a more relaxing environment for this population of newborns. Further studies are needed to determine the therapeutic implications of maternal sound exposure for optimizing care practices and developmental outcomes. PMID:25194837

  18. Classification of heart valve sounds from experiments in an anechoic water tank

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, M C; Clark, G A; Scott, D

    1999-06-01

    In vivo studies in both sheep and humans were plagued by a number of problems including movement artifacts, biological noise, low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), chest-wall reverberation, and limited bandwidth recordings as discussed by [1]. To overcome these problems it was decided to record heart valve sounds under controlled conditions deep in an anechoic water tank, free from reverberation noise, including surface reflections. Experiments were conducted in a deep water tank at the Transdec facility in San Diego, which satisfies these requirements. The Transdec measurements are free of reverberations, but not totally free of acoustic and electrical noise. We used a high quality hydrophone together with a wide-band data acquisition system [2]. We recorded sounds from 100 repetitions of the opening-closing cycles on each of 50 different heart valves, including 21 SLS valves and 29 intact valves. The power spectrum of the opening and closing phases of each cycle were calculated and outlier spectra removed as described by Candy [2]. In this report, we discuss the results of our classification of the heart valve sound measurements. The goal of this classification task was to apply the fundamental classification algorithms developed for the clinical data in 1994 and 1996 to the measurements from the anechoic water tank. From the beginning of this project, LLNL's responsibility has been to process and classify the heart valve opening sounds. For this experiment, however, we processed both the opening sounds and closing sounds for comparison purposes. The results of this experiment show that the classifier did not perform well. We believe this is because of low signal-to-noise ratio and excessive variability in signal power from beat-to-beat for a given valve.

  19. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is associated with structural and vascular placental abnormalities and leptin dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Helen N.; Olbrych, Stephanie K.; Smith, Kathleen L.; Cnota, James F.; Habli, Mounira; Gonzales-Ramos, Osniel; Owens, Kathryn J; Hinton, Andrea C.; Polzin, William J.; Muglia, Louis J.; Hinton, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe cardiovascular malformation (CVM) associated with fetal growth abnormalities. Genetic and environmental factors have been identified that contribute to pathogenesis, but the role of the placenta is unknown. The purpose of this study was to systematically examine the placenta in HLHS with and without growth abnormalities. Methods HLHS term singleton births were identified from a larger cohort when placenta tissue was available. Clinical data were collected from maternal and neonatal medical records, including anthropometrics and placental pathology reports. Placental tissues from cases and controls were analyzed to assess parenchymal morphology, vascular architecture and leptin signaling. Results HLHS cases (n = 16) and gestational age-matched controls (n = 18) were analyzed. Among cases, the average birth weight was 2993 grams, including 31% that were small for gestational age. When compared with controls, gross pathology of HLHS cases demonstrated significantly reduced placental weight and increased fibrin deposition, while micropathology showed increased syncytial nuclear aggregates, decreased terminal villi, reduced vasculature and increased leptin expression in syncytiotrophoblast and endothelial cells. Discussion Placentas from pregnancies complicated by fetal HLHS are characterized by abnormal parenchymal morphology, suggesting immature structure may be due to vascular abnormalities. Increased leptin expression may indicate an attempt to compensate for these vascular abnormalities. Further investigation into the regulation of angiogenesis in the fetus and placenta may elucidate the causes of HLHS and associated growth abnormalities in some cases. PMID:26278057

  20. Abnormal myocardial perfusion and risk of heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Utrera-Lagunas, Marcelo; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Balderas-Muñoz, Karla; Keirns-Davis, Candace; Espinoza-Rosas, Sarahi; Sánchez-Ortíz, Néstor Alonso; Olvera-Mayorga, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes is a major risk factor for heart failure (HF), although the pathophysiological processes have not been clarified. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of HF and of abnormal myocardial perfusion in diabetic patients evaluated using technetium (99m) sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography. METHODS: An observational cross-sectional study was conducted that included patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who underwent echocardiography to diagnose HF and a pharmacological stress test with intravenous dipyridamole to examine cardiac scintigraphic perfusion abnormalities. Clinical and biochemical data were also collected. RESULTS: Of the 160 diabetic patients included, 92 (57.6%) were in HF and 68 (42.5%) were not. When patients were stratified according to the presence of abnormal myocardial perfusion, those with abnormal perfusion had a higher prevalence of HF (93%) than those with normal perfusion (44.4%) (P<0.0001). Patients with HF weighed more (P=0.03), used insulin less frequently (P=0.01), had lower total cholesterol (P=0.05) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations (P=0.002), and a greater number of their myocardial segments showed abnormal perfusion (P≤0.001). More HF patients had a history of myocardial infarction (P<0.001) compared with those without HF. In a logistic regression analysis, the number of segments exhibiting abnormal myocardial perfusion was an independent risk factor for HF. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HF in diabetic patients was high and HF predominantly occured in association with myocardial ischemia. PMID:24294048

  1. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  2. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-06-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease.

  3. Serum Lipoprotein Abnormalities in Patients with Ischaemic Heart Disease: Comparisons with a Control Population

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, B.; Chait, A.; Oakley, C. M. O.; Wootton, I. D. P.; Krikler, D. M.; Onitiri, A.; Sigurdsson, G.; February, A.

    1974-01-01

    The frequency and nature of abnormalities of serum lipoproteins have been studied, using quantitative techniques, in 143 patients with ischaemic heart disease (I.H.D.). Rigorous selection criteria were used. The findings were related to the distribution of lipoprotein concentrations in a carefully screened control population. Hyperlipoproteinaemia occurred in 55% of patients and in 11 out of 15 patients aged less than 40 years. Raised triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations in very low density lipoprotein were the most frequent abnormalities followed by raised cholesterol content of low density lipoprotein. In young patients high density lipoprotein levels were subnormal. Hyperlipoproteinaemia of W.H.O. types IIa, IIb, III, IV, and V all seemed to be over-represented in I.H.D. I.H.D. patients with type IIa, IIb, and IV abnormalities were all significantly younger than I.H.D. patients with normal lipoprotein levels. PMID:4370367

  4. [Realization of Heart Sound Envelope Extraction Implemented on LabVIEW Based on Hilbert-Huang Transform].

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhixiang; Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Deping; Wang, Hua

    2015-04-01

    We proposed a research of a heart sound envelope extraction system in this paper. The system was implemented on LabVIEW based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). We firstly used the sound card to collect the heart sound, and then implemented the complete system program of signal acquisition, pretreatment and envelope extraction on LabVIEW based on the theory of HHT. Finally, we used a case to prove that the system could collect heart sound, preprocess and extract the envelope easily. The system was better to retain and show the characteristics of heart sound envelope, and its program and methods were important to other researches, such as those on the vibration and voice, etc.

  5. The design of heart sounds and electrocardiogram monitor system based Atmega 128L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Miao; An, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ying

    2006-11-01

    This paper introduces a realtime system which can acquire,process,store and display heart sounds and electrocardiogram(ECG) of the human body at the same time.It is composed of superior microprocessor--Atmega128L,large capacity Flash and the new type LCD.All hardwares adopt low power design and surface mounting package. The specialities of the system are low power, compact, and high intelligence. In consideration of transplant and solidity of the system, at the same time, it ensures that some complicated arithmetic can be realized.The system software applies mold construction and programs in C language. A model for automatic arithmetic is established for the feature extraction of ECG, realtime cardiotach ambulatory analysis is realized. The system is capable of recording ECG and heart sounds information in succession for 48 hours and it stores the no compression data synchronously. More than ten types of familiar heart diseases can be diagnosed in time by it automatically. The testing data achieved from this system is dependable, the diagnosing result is accurate and the waveform is no distortion. It solved a problem within the same kind of products effectively, that is, the dynamic ECG and heart sounds signal are acquired separately. The system do not affect the daily living and working of human being when it is used, so it is suited for clinical and family monitoring.

  6. Abnormal heart rate recovery and chronotropic incompetence on exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mansi; Bansal, Vishal; Chhabra, Sunil K

    2013-08-01

    Chronotropic incompetence (CI; failure to reach the targeted heart rate (HR) on exercise) and a delayed HR recovery (HRR; ≤12 beats decline within the first minute after cessation) reflect autonomic dysfunction (AD) and predict adverse cardiac prognosis. As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is known to be associated with AD, we hypothesized that these patients may manifest these responses on exercise. The prevalence and predictors of these responses in COPD and their association with its severity have not been evaluated. Normoxemic, stable male patients with COPD (n = 39) and 11 healthy controls underwent lung function testing and incremental leg ergometry. HR responses were monitored during exercise and recovery to compute the HRR and CI. Of all the patients, 33 (84.6%) had at least one of the two exercise responses as abnormal, with the majority (23, 58.9%) having both an abnormal HRR and CI. The frequency of abnormal responses increased with increasing Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage and body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea and exercise capacity index. After adjusting for smoking history and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second, only a reduced diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide predicted abnormal HRR, though weakly. We concluded that abnormal HRR and CI are common in patients with COPD. These responses are observed with increasing frequency as the severity of disease increases.

  7. Perception of binary acoustic events associated with the first heart sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spodick, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    The resolving power of the auditory apparatus permits discrete vibrations associated with cardiac activity to be perceived as one or more events. Irrespective of the vibratory combinations recorded by conventional phonocardiography, in normal adults and in most adult patients auscultators tend to discriminate only two discrete events associated with the first heart sound S1. It is stressed that the heart sound S4 may be present when a binary acoustic event associated with S1 occurs in the sequence 'low pitched sound preceding high pitched sound', i.e., its components are perceived by auscultation as 'dull-sharp'. The question of S4 audibility arises in those individuals, normal and diseased, in whom the major components of S1 ought to be, at least clinically, at their customary high pitch and indeed on the PCG appear as high frequency oscillations. It is revealed that the apparent audibility of recorded S4 is not related to P-R interval, P-S4 interval, or relative amplitude of S4. The significant S4-LFC (low frequency component of S1) differences can be related to acoustic modification of the early component of S1.

  8. High-calcium exposure to frog heart: a simple model representing hypercalcemia-induced ECG abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro

    2017-01-20

    By simply adding a high concentration of calcium solution to the surface of the bullfrog heart, we reproduced electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities representing those observed in hypercalcemia, such as Osborn waves and shortening of the QT interval. The rise in extracellular calcium concentration may have activated the outward potassium currents during phase 3 of the action potential, and thus decreased its duration. In addition to the known decrease in the duration of phase 2, such changes in phase 3 were also likely to contribute to the shortening of the QT interval. The dual recordings of the action potential in cardiomyocytes and the ECG waves enabled us to demonstrate the mechanisms of ECG abnormalities induced by hypercalcemia.

  9. High-calcium exposure to frog heart: a simple model representing hypercalcemia-induced ECG abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    KAZAMA, Itsuro

    2016-01-01

    By simply adding a high concentration of calcium solution to the surface of the bullfrog heart, we reproduced electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities representing those observed in hypercalcemia, such as Osborn waves and shortening of the QT interval. The rise in extracellular calcium concentration may have activated the outward potassium currents during phase 3 of the action potential, and thus decreased its duration. In addition to the known decrease in the duration of phase 2, such changes in phase 3 were also likely to contribute to the shortening of the QT interval. The dual recordings of the action potential in cardiomyocytes and the ECG waves enabled us to demonstrate the mechanisms of ECG abnormalities induced by hypercalcemia. PMID:27773880

  10. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Prevalence of the Metabolically Abnormal Phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Angela K.; Jacques, Paul F.; Rogers, Gail; Fox, Caroline S.; Meigs, James B.; McKeown, Nicola M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. Design and Methods The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring (1998–2001) and Third Generation (2002–2005) cohorts. Adults were classified as normal weight, overweight or obese and, within these categories, metabolic health was defined based on five criteria – hypertension, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and insulin resistance. Individuals without metabolic abnormalities were considered metabolically healthy. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between categories of SSB consumption and risk of metabolic health after stratification by BMI. Results Comparing the highest category of SSB consumers (median of 7 SSB per week) to the lowest category (non-consumers), odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for metabolically abnormal phenotypes, compared to the metabolically normal, were 1.9 (1.1–3.4) among the obese, 2.0 (1.4–2.9) among the overweight, and 1.9 (1.4–2.6) among the normal weight individuals. Conclusions In this cross-sectional analysis, it is observed that, irrespective of weight status, consumers of SSB were more likely to display metabolic abnormalities compared to non-consumers in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24550031

  11. Comparison between users of a new methodology for heart sound auscultation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ana; Gomes, Pedro; Mattos, Sandra S; Coimbra, Miguel T

    2016-08-01

    Auscultation is a routine exam and the first line of screening in heart pathologies. The objective of this study was to assess if using a new data collection system, the DigiScope Collector, with a guided and automatic annotation of heart auscultation, different levels of expertise/experience users could collect similar digital auscultations. Data were collected within the Heart Caravan Initiative (Paraíba, Brasil). Patients were divided into two study groups: Group 1 evaluated by a third year medical student (User 1), and an experienced nurse (User 2); Group 2 evaluated by User 2 and an Information Technology professional (User 3). Patients were auscultated sequentially by the two users, according to the randomization. Features extracted from each data set included the length (HR) of the audio files, the number of repetitions per auscultation area, heart rate, first (S1) and second (S2) heart sound amplitudes, S2/S1, and aortic (A2) and pulmonary (P2) components of the second heart sound and relative amplitudes (P2/A2). Features extracted were compared between users using paired-sample test Wilcoxon test, and Spearman correlations (P<;0.05 considered significant). Twenty-seven patients were included in the study (13 Group 1, and 14 Group 2). No statistical significant differences were found between groups, except in the time of auscultation (User 2 consistently presented longer auscultation time). Correlation analysis showed significant correlations between extracted features from both groups: S2/S1 in Group 1, and S1, S2, A2, P2, P2/A2 amplitudes, and HR in Group 2. Using the DigiScope Collector, we were able to collect similar digital auscultations, according to the features evaluated. This may indicate that in sites with limited access to specialized clinical care, auscultation files may be acquired and used in telemedicine for an expert evaluation.

  12. Fetal diagnosis - obligations of the clinician. Case studies in the prenatal diagnosis of major heart abnormality.

    PubMed

    Menahem, Samuel; Gillam, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    Fetal echocardiography allows for accurate diagnosis of major heart abnormalities by 16-18 weeks. The parents have up to 22 weeks to consider possible termination. What are the obligations of the clinician once an abnormality is found? Should only information be provided or is there a role in influencing the parents' decision? Two diverse examples are provided to discuss these questions. Mrs A., aged 40 years was noted at the 18-week and then the 20-week scan to have a fetus with a complete atrio-ventricular septal defect. In addition, the fetus had a Danny-Walker cyst. There was thickened nuchal folds and echogenic bowel all suggestive of a chromosomal abnormality. Amniocentesis was refused and the pregnancy continued. Mrs B., aged 34 years was noted at 19 weeks and again at 20 weeks to have a fetus with mild thickening of the walls of both the right and left ventricles. The flow patterns appeared normal. Despite a probable good outlook, the parents asked for a repeat scan at 22 weeks to allow them to consider possible termination. Despite a probable chromosomal abnormality, definite major cardiac and neurological abnormalities, Mrs A. refused karotyping and planned to proceed with the pregnancy. Mrs B., despite a probable good outcome for the fetus asserted pressure for us to prognosticate by 22 weeks. While non-directive counselling is the accepted norm, is that appropriate for all situations? Should one strongly influence Mrs A. to have an amniocentesis to confirm a probable Trisomy thereby allowing her to make a more informed decision? How reassuring can the clinician be to Mrs B. and if termination is sought should one counsel against that? Arguments for these positions are described, highlighting the difficulties faced by clinicians as they counsel parents often with incomplete information and in a setting of acute emotional distress.

  13. Health-related quality of life experienced by children with chromosomal abnormalities and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Joffe, Ari R; Robertson, Charlene M T; Atallah, Joseph; Alton, Gwen; Sauve, Reg S; Dinu, Irina A; Ross, David B; Rebeyka, Ivan M

    2014-03-01

    Long-term outcomes are fundamental in advising parents about the potential future of their children with congenital heart disease (CHD). No published reports have described the health-related quality of life (HRQL) experienced by children with chromosomal abnormalities who had surgery in early infancy for CHD. A study was undertaken to assess HRQL among children with chromosomal abnormalities and CHD. The authors hypothesized that these children have a worse HRQL than healthy children or a cohort of children matched for CHD diagnosis. Infants with chromosomal abnormalities undergoing cardiac surgery for CHD at 6 weeks of age or younger at the Stollery Children's Hospital between July 2000 and June 2005 were included in the study. The HRQL of these infants was assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales completed by their parents at a 4-year follow-up evaluation. The study compared the scores for 16 children with normative data. The children with chromosomal abnormalities and CHD had significantly lower mean total PedsQL (71.3 vs. 87.3; p < 0.0001), Psychosocial Summary (70.3 vs. 86.1; p < 0.0001), and Physical Summary (74.3 vs. 89.2; p = 0.0006) scores. Compared with the matched children, those with chromosomal abnormalities had a significantly lower median total PedsQL (75.0 vs. 84.6; p = 0.03), Physical Summary (79.5 vs. 96.9; p = 0.007), and School Functioning (68.5 vs. 83.0; p = 0.03) scores. A better understanding of the mechanisms and determinants of HRQL in these children has the potential to yield important implications for clinical practice including clarity for treatment decision making as well as determination of targeted supports and services to meet the needs of these children and their families differentially.

  14. Regional heart motion abnormality detection via information measures and unscented Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Islam, Ali; Ross, Ian G; Li, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates regional heart motion abnormality detection using various classifier features with Shannon's Differential Entropy (SDE). Rather than relying on elementary measurements or a fixed set of moments, the SDE measures global distribution information and, as such, has more discriminative power in classifying distributions. Based on functional images, which are subject to noise and segmentation inaccuracies, heart wall motion analysis is acknowledged as a difficult problem and, therefore, incorporation of prior knowledge is desirable to enhance the accuracy. Given noisy data and nonlinear dynamic model to describe the myocardial motion, unscented Kalman filter, a recursive nonlinear Bayesian filter, is devised in this study so as to estimate LV cavity points. Subsequently, a naive Bayes classifier algorithm is constructed from the SDEs of different features in order to automatically detect abnormal functional regions of the myocardium. Using 90 x 20 segmented LV cavities of short-axis magnetic resonance images obtained from 30 subjects, the experimental analysis carried over 480 myocardial segments demonstrates that the proposed method perform significantly better than other recent methods, and can lead to a promising diagnostic support tool to assist clinicians.

  15. Systolic Strain Abnormalities to Predict Hospital Readmission in Patients With Heart Failure and Normal Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Borer, Steven M.; Kokkirala, Aravind; O'Sullivan, David M.; Silverman, David I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite intensive investigation, the pathogenesis of heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) remains unclear. We hypothesized that subtle abnormalities of systolic function might play a role, and that abnormal systolic strain and strain rate would provide a marker for adverse outcomes. Methods Patients of new CHF and left ventricular ejection fraction > 50% were included. Exclusion criteria were recent myocardial infarction, severe valvular heart disease, severe left ventricular hypertrophy (septum >1.8 cm), or a technically insufficient echocardiogram. Average peak systolic strain and strain rate were measured using an off-line grey scale imaging technique. Systolic strain and strain rate for readmitted patients were compared with those who remained readmission-free. Results One hundred consecutive patients with a 1st admission for HFNEF from January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2007, inclusive, were analyzed. Fifty two patients were readmitted with a primary diagnosis of heart failure. Systolic strain and strain rates were reduced in both study groups compared to controls. However, systolic strain did not differ significantly between the two groups (-11.7% for those readmitted compared with -12.9% for those free from readmission, P = 0.198) and systolic strain rates also were similar (-1.05 s-1 versus -1.09 s-1, P = 0.545). E/e’ was significantly higher in readmitted patients compared with those who remained free from readmission (14.5 versus 11.0, P = 0.013). E/e’ (OR 1.189, 95% CI 1.026-1.378; P = 0.021) was found to be an independent predictor for HFNEF readmission. Conclusions Among patients with new onset HFNEF, SS and SR rates are reduced compared with patients free of HFNEF, but do not predict hospital readmission. Elevated E/e’ is a predictor of readmission in these patients.

  16. Intrinsic connective tissue abnormalities in the heart muscle of cardiomyopathic Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Gould, L.; Robinson, T. F.; Factor, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    Significant connective tissue abnormalities occurring in hearts of cardiomyopathic Syrian hamsters are reported. These abnormalities include a pronounced loss of the intrinsic connective tissue skeletal framework around foci of myocytolytic necrosis within the non-necrotic myocardium. These changes were demonstrated by a silver impregnation technique, and they were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Quantitation demonstrated more than a twofold increase in the area of ventricular wall affected by pathologic changes, when the connective tissue alterations were included with the myocardial necrosis. In addition, the authors also observed focal, thick "tethering" connective tissue fibers at the termini of necrotic lesions, seemingly connecting them to normal muscle. These connective tissue abnormalities may contribute to the progressive loss of ventricular function that occurs in this model of cardiomyopathy. They may permit greater wall thinning than would occur with focal necrosis alone, and they may increase focal mural stiffness in the tethered regions. Further investigation of the pathogenesis of these changes and their mechanical significance is indicated. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3578490

  17. Electrophysiological consequences of KATP Gain-of-function in the heart: Conduction abnormalities in Cantu Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Mark D.; Zhang, Haixia; Uchida, Keita; Grange, Dorothy K.; Singh, Gautam K.; Nichols, Colin G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in the KATP channel subunits Kir6.1 and SUR2 cause Cantu syndrome (CS), a disease characterized by multiple cardiovascular abnormalities. Objective To better understand the electrophysiological consequences of such GOF mutations in the heart. Methods We generated transgenic mice (Kir6.1-GOF) expressing ATP-insensitive Kir6.1[G343D] subunits under α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) promoter control, to target gene expression specifically in cardiomyocytes, and carried out patch-clamp experiments on isolated ventricular myocytes, invasive electrophysiology on anesthetized mice. Results In Kir6.1-GOF ventricular myocytes, KATP channels show decreased ATP sensitivity, but there is no significant change in current density. Ambulatory ECG recordings on Kir6.1-GOF mice reveal AV nodal conduction abnormalities and junctional rhythm. Invasive electrophysiological analyses reveal slowing of conduction and conduction failure through the AV node, but no increase in susceptibility to atrial or ventricular ectopic activity. Surface electrocardiograms recorded from CS patients also demonstrate first degree AV block, and fascicular block. Conclusions The primary electrophysiological consequence of cardiac KATP GOF is on the conduction system, particularly the AV node, resulting in conduction abnormalities in CS patients, who carry KATP GOF mutations. PMID:26142302

  18. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  19. Detection of the valvular split within the second heart sound using the reassigned smoothed pseudo Wigner–Ville distribution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this paper, we developed a novel algorithm to detect the valvular split between the aortic and pulmonary components in the second heart sound which is a valuable medical information. Methods The algorithm is based on the Reassigned smoothed pseudo Wigner–Ville distribution which is a modified time–frequency distribution of the Wigner–Ville distribution. A preprocessing amplitude recovery procedure is carried out on the analysed heart sound to improve the readability of the time–frequency representation. The simulated S2 heart sounds were generated by an overlapping frequency modulated chirp–based model at different valvular split durations. Results Simulated and real heart sounds are processed to highlight the performance of the proposed approach. The algorithm is also validated on real heart sounds of the LGB–IRCM (Laboratoire de Génie biomédical–Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal) cardiac valve database. The A2–P2 valvular split is accurately detected by processing the obtained RSPWVD representations for both simulated and real data. PMID:23631738

  20. Attenuation effect of Abnormal Savda Munziq on liver and heart toxicity caused by chemotherapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    AIKEMU, AINIWAER; AMAT, NURMUHAMAT; YUSUP, ABDIRYIM; SHAN, LIANLIAN; QI, XINWEI; UPUR, HALMURAT

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq), an Uighur medicine formula commonly used in the treatment of cancer, has been speculated to possess antioxidative and antiproliferative effects, and to regulate immune activity. The present study was designed to systematically elucidate the toxicity-reducing activity of ASMq in mice undergoing combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The mice were divided into normal (saline, 10 ml/kg) and doxorubicin + 5-FU groups (doxorubicin, 2.5 mg/kg; 5-FU, 10 mg/kg on alternate days). In addition, three groups received different doses of ASMq (2, 4 and 8 g/kg), in addition to doxorubicin (2.5 mg/kg) and 5-FU (10 mg/kg) treatment on alternate days. The histology of the heart and liver, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in heart homogenate, and various biochemical parameters of the liver were evaluated. Compared with the normal control group, ASMq dose-dependently improved a number of variables, including body weight, liver index, transaminase and total protein, and partially normalized liver and cardiac pathology. ASMq restored activities of defense antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px towards normal levels, and decreased MDA concentration in dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrated that ASMq provides significant protection against doxorubicin + 5-FU combination induced hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity. Further studies are required to determine the effects of ASMq against doxorubicin + 5-FU-induced toxicity during chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:27347066

  1. Risk Factors for Abnormal Developmental Trajectories in Young Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mussatto, Kathleen A.; Hoffmann, Raymond; Hoffman, George; Tweddell, James S.; Bear, Laurel; Cao, Yumei; Tanem, Jena; Brosig, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at risk for developmental delay (DD). This study sought to identify early risk factors for abnormal developmental trajectories in children with CHD. Methods and Results Children with CHD at high risk for DD, without known genetic abnormality, and with ≥3 assessments using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-III (BSID-III) were studied. Logistic regression was used to assess the impact of patient and clinical factors on cognitive, language, and motor score trajectories; classified as: “Average or Improved” if all scores were ≥ 85 (< 1SD below mean) or increased to ≥ 85 and never decreased; or “Abnormal” if all scores were < 85, fell to < 85 and never improved, or fluctuated above and below 85. Data on 131 children with 527 BSID-III assessments were analyzed. Subject age was 5.5–37.4 months. Overall, 56% had cognitive, language, and motor development in the average range. Delays occurred in single domains in 23%. Multiple domains were delayed in 21%. More cardiac surgeries, longer hospital stay, poorer linear growth, and tube feeding were associated with worse outcomes in all domains (p<0.05). In the multivariable model, need for tube feeding was a risk factor for having an abnormal developmental trajectory (OR = 5.1–7.9). Minority race and lack of private insurance had significant relationships with individual domains. Conclusions Longitudinal developmental surveillance identified early factors that can help quantify risk of DD over time. Strategies to improve modifiable factors and early therapeutic intervention can be targeted to children at highest risk. PMID:26304667

  2. [Mode of splitting of the second heart sound in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, N; Oki, T; Sakai, H; Asai, M; Ohshima, C; Kusaka, Y; Tominaga, T; Murao, A; Niki, T; Mori, H

    1983-06-01

    Mode of the splitting of the second heart sound ( IIs ) and left ventricular systolic time intervals (STIs) in patients (pts) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were compared with those in hypertension (HT) with the global hypertrophy of the left ventricular wall. Forty-seven pts with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy [non-obstructive type (HCM, 30 pts), obstructive type (HOCM, 17 pts)] and 21 pts with HT were studied. The pts with HCM were classified as septal hypertrophic type (19 pts) and apical hypertrophic type (11 pts) on the basis of the echocardiographic findings. The pts with HOCM were classified as resting type (13 pts) and latent type (provoked by amyl nitrite: 4 pts) on the basis of the obstructive sign at rest. Mode of the splitting of the IIs : a) The pts with HCM showed a wide splitting of the IIs . The mean split interval during held expiration (IIA-IIP) was 41.0 +/- 9.9 msec. Twenty pts (67%) showed abnormal respiratory splitting. The mean IIA-IIP interval in septal hypertrophic type (45.3 +/- 9.0 msec) was significantly wider than that in apical hypertrophic type (33.6 +/- 6.7 msec) (p less than 0.05). There was a positive correlation between IIA-IIP interval and the thickness of the upper portion of the interventricular septum (r = 0.63). b) Nine out of 13 pts with resting type of HOCM showed a paradoxical (reversed) splitting with a mean IIA-IIP interval of -23.8 +/- 24.4 msec. On the other hand, pts with latent type showed a wide splitting similar to HCM with a mean IIA-IIP interval of 35.0 +/- 7.1 msec. c) The pts with HT showed a single IIs or physiological splitting. The mean IIA-IIP interval was 14.5 +/- 9.3 msec, which was significantly decreased than that of normals or the pts with HCM (p less than 0.01). Left ventricular systolic time intervals: a) The pts with an either type of HCM showed a short corrected left ventricular electromechanical systole [(Q-IIA)c] due to the shortening of the corrected left ventricular ejection time (LVETc). b) The

  3. Lung function and heart disease in American Indian adults with high frequency of metabolic abnormalities (from the Strong Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Fawn; Dixon, Anne E; Best, Lyle G; Marion, Susan M; Lee, Elisa T; Ali, Tauqeer; Yeh, Jeunliang; Rhoades, Everett R; Howard, Barbara V; Devereux, Richard B

    2014-07-15

    The associations of pulmonary function with cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome have not been examined in a population-based setting. We examined prevalence and incidence CVD in relation to lower pulmonary function in the Strong Heart Study second examination (1993 to 1995) in 352 CVD and 2,873 non-CVD adults free of overt lung disease (mean age 60 years). Lung function was assessed by standard spirometry. Participants with metabolic syndrome or DM with or without CVD had lower pulmonary function than participants without these conditions after adjustment for hypertension, age, gender, abdominal obesity, smoking, physical activity index, and study field center. CVD participants with DM had significantly lower forced vital capacity than participants with CVD alone. Significant associations were observed between reduced pulmonary function, preclinical CVD, and prevalent CVD after adjustment for multiple CVD risk factors. During follow-up (median 13.3 years), pulmonary function did not predict CVD incidence, it predicted CVD mortality. Among 3,225 participants, 412 (298 without baseline CVD) died from CVD by the end of 2008. In models adjusted for multiple CVD risk factors, DM, metabolic syndrome, and baseline CVD, compared with highest quartile of lung function, lower lung function predicted CVD mortality (relative risk up to 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p<0.05). In conclusion, a population with a high prevalence of DM and metabolic syndrome and lower lung function was independently associated with prevalent clinical and preclinical CVD, and its impairment predicted CVD mortality. Additional research is needed to identify mechanisms linking metabolic abnormalities, low lung function, and CVD.

  4. Stroke prevention strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart valve abnormalities: perceptions of 'valvular' atrial fibrillation: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Lip, Gregory Y H; Larsen, Torben B; Madrid, Antonio; Dobreanu, Dan; Jędrzejczyk-Patej, Ewa; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) Survey was to assess the perceptions of 'valvular' atrial fibrillation (AF) and management of AF patients with various heart valve abnormalities in daily clinical practice in European electrophysiology (EP) centres. Questionnaire survey was sent via the Internet to the EHRA-EP Research Network Centres. Of the 52 responding centres, 42 (80.8%) were university hospitals. Choosing the most comprehensive definition of valvular AF, a total of 49 centres (94.2%) encountered a mechanical prosthetic heart valve and significant rheumatic mitral stenosis, 35 centres (67.3%) also considered bioprosthetic valves, and 25 centres (48.1%) included any significant valvular heart disease, requiring surgical repair in the definition of valvular AF. Only three centres (5.8%) would define valvular AF as the presence of any (even mild) valvular abnormality. None of the centres would use non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in AF patients with mechanical prosthetic valves, only 5 centres (9.8%) would use NOACs in patients with significant mitral stenosis, 17 centres (32.7%) would consider the use of NOACs in patients with bioprosthetic valves, and 21 centres (41.2%) would use NOACs in patients with a non-recent transcatheter valve replacement/implantation, while 13 centres (25.5%) would never consider the use of NOACs in AF patients with even mild native heart valve abnormality. Our survey showed marked heterogeneity in the definition of valvular AF and thromboprophylactic treatments, with the use of variable NOACs in patients with valvular heart disease other than prosthetic heart valves or significant mitral stenosis, indicating that this term may be misleading and should not be used.

  5. Diaphragm Abnormalities in Patients with End-Stage Heart Failure: NADPH Oxidase Upregulation and Protein Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Bumsoo; Coblentz, Philip D.; Beharry, Adam W.; Patel, Nikhil; Judge, Andrew R.; Moylan, Jennifer. S.; Hoopes, Charles W.; Bonnell, Mark R.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) have diaphragm abnormalities that contribute to disease morbidity and mortality. Studies in animals suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause diaphragm abnormalities in HF. However, the effects of HF on ROS sources, antioxidant enzymes, and protein oxidation in the diaphragm of humans is unknown. NAD(P)H oxidase, especially the Nox2 isoform, is an important source of ROS in the diaphragm. Our main hypothesis was that diaphragm from patients with HF have heightened Nox2 expression and p47phox phosphorylation (marker of enzyme activation) that is associated with elevated protein oxidation. We collected diaphragm biopsies from patients with HF and brain-dead organ donors (controls). Diaphragm mRNA levels of Nox2 subunits were increased 2.5–4.6-fold over controls (p < 0.05). Patients also had increased protein levels of Nox2 subunits (p47phox, p22phox, and p67phox) and total p47phox phosphorylation, while phospho-to-total p47phox levels were unchanged. The antioxidant enzyme catalase was increased in patients, whereas glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutases were unchanged. Among markers of protein oxidation, carbonyls were increased by ~40% (p < 0.05) and 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosines were unchanged in patients with HF. Overall, our findings suggest that Nox2 is an important source of ROS in the diaphragm of patients with HF and increases in levels of antioxidant enzymes are not sufficient to maintain normal redox homeostasis. The net outcome is elevated diaphragm protein oxidation that has been shown to cause weakness in animals. PMID:28119629

  6. Participants' above-chance recognition of own-heart sound combined with poor metacognitive awareness suggests implicit knowledge of own heart cardiodynamics.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ruben T; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2016-05-23

    Mounting evidence suggests that interoceptive signals are fundamentally important for the experience of the self. Thus far, studies on interoception have mainly focused on the ability to monitor the timing of ongoing heartbeats and on how these influence emotional and self-related processes. However, cardiac afferent signalling is not confined to heartbeat timing and several other cardiac parameters characterize cardiodynamic functioning. Building on the fact that each heart has its own self-specific cardio-dynamics, which cannot be expressed uniquely by heart rate, we devised a novel task to test whether people could recognize the sound of their own heart even when perceived offline and thus not in synchrony with ongoing heartbeats. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants discriminated between sounds of their own heartbeat (previously recorded with a Doppler device) versus another person's heart. Participants identified the sound of their own heart above chance, whereas their metacognition of performance - as calculated by contrasting performance against ratings of confidence - was considerably poorer. These results suggest an implicit access to fine-grained neural representations of elementary cardio-dynamic parameters beyond heartbeat timing.

  7. Participants’ above-chance recognition of own-heart sound combined with poor metacognitive awareness suggests implicit knowledge of own heart cardiodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Ruben T.; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that interoceptive signals are fundamentally important for the experience of the self. Thus far, studies on interoception have mainly focused on the ability to monitor the timing of ongoing heartbeats and on how these influence emotional and self-related processes. However, cardiac afferent signalling is not confined to heartbeat timing and several other cardiac parameters characterize cardiodynamic functioning. Building on the fact that each heart has its own self-specific cardio-dynamics, which cannot be expressed uniquely by heart rate, we devised a novel task to test whether people could recognize the sound of their own heart even when perceived offline and thus not in synchrony with ongoing heartbeats. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants discriminated between sounds of their own heartbeat (previously recorded with a Doppler device) versus another person’s heart. Participants identified the sound of their own heart above chance, whereas their metacognition of performance – as calculated by contrasting performance against ratings of confidence - was considerably poorer. These results suggest an implicit access to fine-grained neural representations of elementary cardio-dynamic parameters beyond heartbeat timing. PMID:27211283

  8. Fluid Dynamics of the Generation and Transmission of Heart Sounds: (1) A Cardiothoracic Phantom Based Study of Aortic Stenosis Murmurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshaee, Hani; Seo, Jung-Hee; Zhu, Chi; Welsh, Nathaniel; Garreau, Guillaume; Tognetti, Gaspar; Andreou, Andreas; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    A novel and versatile cardiothoracic phantom has been designed to study the biophysics of heart murmurs associated with aortic stenosis. The key features of the cardiothoracic phantom include the use of tissue-mimetic gel to model the sound transmission through the thorax and the embedded fluid circuit that is designed to mimic the heart sound mechanisms in large vessels with obstructions. The effect of the lungs on heart murmur propagation can also be studied through the insertion of lung-mimicking material into gel. Sounds on the surface of the phantom are measured using a variety of sensors and the spectrum of the recorded signal and the streamwise variation in total signal strength is recorded. Based on these results, we provide insights into the biophysics of heart murmurs and the effect of lungs on sound propagation through the thorax. Data from these experiments is also used to validate the results of a companion computational study. Authors want to acknowledge the financial supports for this study by SCH grant (IIS 1344772) from National Science Foundation.

  9. A mobile phone-based ecg and heart sound monitoring system - biomed 2011.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Junichi; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Maki, Hiromichi; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a telemedicine system to monitor a patient’s electrocardiogram (ECG) and heart sounds (PCG) during daily activity. The complete system, consisting of an ECG recorder, an accelerometer and a 2.4 GHz low power mobile phone, is mounted on three chest sensing electrodes. The accelerometer records the PCG produced by closing of the mitral and aortic valves (S1 and S2). The sampled ECG and PCG are stored in the system for two minutes and continuously updated. When a patient feels heart discomfort such as angina or an arrhythmia, he/she pushes the data transmission switch on the system. The ECG and PCG for the next two minutes are stored in the system, and then the system then sends the four minutes of stored data directly to a hospital server computer via the 1.9 GHz low power mobile phone. These data are stored on the server and then downloaded to the physician’s Java configured mobile phone. The physician can then check the patient’s cardiac condition, regardless of patient or physician locations, and then take appropriate actions.

  10. Ultrastructural and cellular basis for the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics during the transition from hypertension to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanjiv J; Aistrup, Gary L; Gupta, Deepak K; O'Toole, Matthew J; Nahhas, Amanda F; Schuster, Daniel; Chirayil, Nimi; Bassi, Nikhil; Ramakrishna, Satvik; Beussink, Lauren; Misener, Sol; Kane, Bonnie; Wang, David; Randolph, Blake; Ito, Aiko; Wu, Megan; Akintilo, Lisa; Mongkolrattanothai, Thitipong; Reddy, Mahendra; Kumar, Manvinder; Arora, Rishi; Ng, Jason; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Although the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics represents a key step during the transition from hypertension to overt heart failure (HF), the underlying ultrastructural and cellular basis of abnormal myocardial mechanics remains unclear. We therefore investigated how changes in transverse (T)-tubule organization and the resulting altered intracellular Ca(2+) cycling in large cell populations underlie the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics in a model of chronic hypertension. Hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs; n = 72) were studied at different ages and stages of hypertensive heart disease and early HF and were compared with age-matched control (Wistar-Kyoto) rats (n = 34). Echocardiography, including tissue Doppler and speckle-tracking analysis, was performed just before euthanization, after which T-tubule organization and Ca(2+) transients were studied using confocal microscopy. In SHRs, abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occurred early in response to hypertension, before the development of overt systolic dysfunction and HF. Reduced longitudinal, circumferential, and radial strain as well as reduced tissue Doppler early diastolic tissue velocities occurred in concert with T-tubule disorganization and impaired Ca(2+) cycling, all of which preceded the development of cardiac fibrosis. The time to peak of intracellular Ca(2+) transients was slowed due to T-tubule disruption, providing a link between declining cell ultrastructure and abnormal myocardial mechanics. In conclusion, subclinical abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occur early in response to hypertension and coincide with the development of T-tubule disorganization and impaired intracellular Ca(2+) cycling. These changes occur before the development of significant cardiac fibrosis and precede the development of overt cardiac dysfunction and HF.

  11. Detection of Heart Sounds in Children with and without Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension―Daubechies Wavelets Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Kumar, Shine; Guo, Long; Rutledge, Jennifer; Coe, James Y.; Zemp, Roger; Schuurmans, Dale; Adatia, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background Automatic detection of the 1st (S1) and 2nd (S2) heart sounds is difficult, and existing algorithms are imprecise. We sought to develop a wavelet-based algorithm for the detection of S1 and S2 in children with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Method Heart sounds were recorded at the second left intercostal space and the cardiac apex with a digital stethoscope simultaneously with pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). We developed a Daubechies wavelet algorithm for the automatic detection of S1 and S2 using the wavelet coefficient ‘D6’ based on power spectral analysis. We compared our algorithm with four other Daubechies wavelet-based algorithms published by Liang, Kumar, Wang, and Zhong. We annotated S1 and S2 from an audiovisual examination of the phonocardiographic tracing by two trained cardiologists and the observation that in all subjects systole was shorter than diastole. Results We studied 22 subjects (9 males and 13 females, median age 6 years, range 0.25–19). Eleven subjects had a mean PAP < 25 mmHg. Eleven subjects had PAH with a mean PAP ≥ 25 mmHg. All subjects had a pulmonary artery wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg. The sensitivity (SE) and positive predictivity (+P) of our algorithm were 70% and 68%, respectively. In comparison, the SE and +P of Liang were 59% and 42%, Kumar 19% and 12%, Wang 50% and 45%, and Zhong 43% and 53%, respectively. Our algorithm demonstrated robustness and outperformed the other methods up to a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 dB. For all algorithms, detection errors arose from low-amplitude peaks, fast heart rates, low signal-to-noise ratio, and fixed thresholds. Conclusion Our algorithm for the detection of S1 and S2 improves the performance of existing Daubechies-based algorithms and justifies the use of the wavelet coefficient ‘D6’ through power spectral analysis. Also, the robustness despite ambient noise may improve real world clinical performance. PMID:26629704

  12. Platelet abnormalities in adults with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension related to congenital heart defects (Eisenmenger syndrome).

    PubMed

    Remková, Anna; Šimková, Iveta; Valkovičová, Tatiana; Kaldarárová, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension suffer from life-threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications. The aim of this study was to compare selected platelet, endothelial, and coagulation parameters in healthy volunteers and patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension because of congenital heart defects. The study included healthy volunteers (n = 50) and patients with cyanotic congenital heart defects classified as Eisenmenger syndrome (n = 41). We investigated platelet count, mean platelet volume, and platelet aggregation - spontaneous and induced by various concentrations of five agonists. Von Willebrand factor (vWF), fibrinogen, factor VIII and XII, plasminogen activator inhibitor, antithrombin, D-dimer, and antiphospholipid antibodies were also investigated. We found a decreased platelet count [190 (147-225) vs. 248 (205-295) 10 l, P < 0.0001], higher mean platelet volume [10.9 (10.1-12.0) vs. 10.2 (9.4-10.4) fl, P < 0.0001], and significantly decreased platelet aggregation (induced by five agonists, in various concentrations) in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome compared with controls. These changes were accompanied by an increase of plasma vWF antigen [141.6 (108.9-179.1) vs. 117.4 (9.2-140.7) IU/dl, P = 0.022] and serum anti-β2-glycoprotein [2.07 (0.71-3.41) vs. 0.47 (0.18-0.99) U/ml, P < 0.0001]. Eisenmenger syndrome is accompanied by platelet abnormalities. Thrombocytopenia with increased platelet size is probably due to a higher platelet turnover associated with platelet activation. Impaired platelet aggregation can reflect specific platelet behaviour in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome. These changes can be related both to bleeding and to thrombotic events. A higher vWF antigen may be a consequence of endothelial damage in Eisenmenger syndrome, but the cause for an increase of anti-β2-glycoprotein is unknown.

  13. Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capstick, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    1. The nature of sound; 2. Elasticity and vibrations; 3. Transverse waves; 4. Longitudinal waves; 5. Velocity of longitudinal waves; 6. Reflection and refraction. Doppler's principle; 7. Interference. Beats. Combination tones; 8. Resonance and forced vibrations; 9. Quality of musical notes; 10. Organ pipes; 11. Rods. Plates. Bells; 12. Acoustical measurements; 13. The phonograph, microphone and telephone; 14. Consonance; 15. Definition of intervals. Scales. Temperament; 16. Musical instruments; 17. Application of acoustical principles to military purposes; Questions; Answers to questions; Index.

  14. Abnormal heart rate characteristics preceding neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M Pamela; O'Shea, T Michael; Bissonette, Eric A; Harrell, Frank E; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall

    2003-06-01

    Late-onset neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and early detection could prove beneficial. Previously, we found that abnormal heart rate characteristics (HRC) of reduced variability and transient decelerations occurred early in the course of neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness in infants in a single neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We hypothesized that this finding can be generalized to other NICUs. We prospectively collected clinical data and continuously measured RR intervals in all infants in two NICUs who stayed for >7 d. We defined episodes of sepsis and sepsis-like illness as acute clinical deteriorations that prompted physicians to obtain blood cultures and start antibiotics. A predictive statistical model yielding an HRC index was developed on a derivation cohort of 316 neonates in the University of Virginia NICU and then applied to the validation cohort of 317 neonates in the Wake Forest University NICU. In the derivation cohort, there were 155 episodes of sepsis and sepsis-like illness in 101 infants, and in the validation cohort, there were 118 episodes in 93 infants. In the validation cohort, the HRC index 1) showed highly significant association with impending sepsis and sepsis-like illness (receiver operator characteristic area 0.75, p < 0.001) and 2) added significantly to the demographic information of birth weight, gestational age, and days of postnatal age in predicting sepsis and sepsis-like illness (p < 0.001). Continuous HRC monitoring is a generally valid and potentially useful noninvasive tool in the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness.

  15. Complete right bundle-branch block: echophonocardiographic study of first heart sound and right ventricular contraction times.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, N; Leech, G; Leatham, A

    1979-01-01

    High speed enchocardiograms of the mitral, tricuspid, and pulmonary valves were recorded with a simultaneous electrocardiogram and phonocardiogram in 20 patients with complete right bundle-branch block and in 67 normal subjects. Late opening of the pulmonary valve indicating late right ventricular ejection was found in all patients. In 8 patients with wide splitting of the first heart sound the late ejection was related mainly to delay in tricuspid valve closure, suggesting a late onset of the right ventricular pressure pulse. In 10 patients with a single first heart sound the delayed ejection was associated with a long interval between tricuspid valve closure and pulmonary valve opening, suggesting a slow rising right ventricular pressure pulse; 3 of these patients also had late tricuspid valve closure but the tricuspid component of the first sound was absent. Late onset of pressure rise is thought to result from block in the main right bundle-branch, and a slow rising pulse from block in the distal Purkinje network. These findings explain the conflicting results in previous studies of the first heart sound and right ventricular pressure pulse in patients with right bundle-branch block, and may have prognostic significance. Images PMID:465238

  16. Mortality from congenital abnormality in Malaysia 1991-1997: the effect of economic development on death due to congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, J J

    2001-06-01

    An analysis was done of available data from the Department of Statistics Malaysia, on the type of congenital abnormality contributing to death, to determine whether progress in health care over recent years was associated with any decline in mortality from congenital abnormality. A significant decline in death due to congenital abnormality was observed between 1991 and 1996. This was attributable to a decline in deaths due to congenital heart disease occurring because of improvements in cardiac surgical services for infants. In 1997 death due to congenital heart disease increased significantly. This could be attributed to improvements in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in the neonate.

  17. A study of the first heart sound spectra in normal anesthetized cats: possible origins and chest wall influences.

    PubMed

    Fazzalari, N L; Mazumdar, J; Ghista, D N; Allen, D G; de Bruin, H

    1984-01-01

    Heart sound recordings were taken from cats. The heart sounds were recorded directly from the chest wall and through an esophageal tube. The phono transducer and the esophageal tube were both placed over the base of the heart. Ultrasound M-mode, or motion-mode, recordings were taken to study the mitral valve dynamics. After analogue to digital conversion, electrocardiogram gated first heart sounds of each phono record were analyzed by the fast Fourier transform to obtain a frequency spectrum. Relative energies in 15 Hz bandwidths up to 150 Hz were correlated with the mitral valve closing velocity of the anterior mitral leaflet, obtained from the M-mode echocardiograms. The closing velocity correlated best with the energy in the 30-45 Hz bandwidth and 60-75 Hz bandwidth for the externally and internally monitored phonocardiogram respectively. The chest wall acted as a low pass filter, that is, the wall favoured the transmission of low frequencies and the energy transmitted decreased as wall thickness increased.

  18. Automated signal quality assessment of mobile phone-recorded heart sound signals.

    PubMed

    Springer, David B; Brennan, Thomas; Ntusi, Ntobeko; Abdelrahman, Hassan Y; Zühlke, Liesl J; Mayosi, Bongani M; Tarassenko, Lionel; Clifford, Gari D

    Mobile phones, due to their audio processing capabilities, have the potential to facilitate the diagnosis of heart disease through automated auscultation. However, such a platform is likely to be used by non-experts, and hence, it is essential that such a device is able to automatically differentiate poor quality from diagnostically useful recordings since non-experts are more likely to make poor-quality recordings. This paper investigates the automated signal quality assessment of heart sound recordings performed using both mobile phone-based and commercial medical-grade electronic stethoscopes. The recordings, each 60 s long, were taken from 151 random adult individuals with varying diagnoses referred to a cardiac clinic and were professionally annotated by five experts. A mean voting procedure was used to compute a final quality label for each recording. Nine signal quality indices were defined and calculated for each recording. A logistic regression model for classifying binary quality was then trained and tested. The inter-rater agreement level for the stethoscope and mobile phone recordings was measured using Conger's kappa for multiclass sets and found to be 0.24 and 0.54, respectively. One-third of all the mobile phone-recorded phonocardiogram (PCG) signals were found to be of sufficient quality for analysis. The classifier was able to distinguish good- and poor-quality mobile phone recordings with 82.2% accuracy, and those made with the electronic stethoscope with an accuracy of 86.5%. We conclude that our classification approach provides a mechanism for substantially improving auscultation recordings by non-experts. This work is the first systematic evaluation of a PCG signal quality classification algorithm (using a separate test dataset) and assessment of the quality of PCG recordings captured by non-experts, using both a medical-grade digital stethoscope and a mobile phone.

  19. An Intelligent Pattern Recognition System Based on Neural Network and Wavelet Decomposition for Interpretation of Heart Sounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    sound Apex 1.13 2 S3 Apex 1.13 3 S4 Apex 0.9 4 Aortic stenosis Right base 0.9 5 Mitral regurgitation Apex 0.79 6 Midsystolic click Apex 1.13 7...Ventricular septal defect Lower left sternal border 0.9 8 Atrial septal defect Left base 0.9 9 Mitral stenosis Apex 1.13 10 Aortic regurgitation Mid...Number ARP (%) Normal heart sound 9 98 1 92 S3 10 99 -- -- S4 9 99 1 99 Aortic stenosis 10 99 -- -- Mitral regurgitation 10 99 -- -- Midsystolic

  20. [Possible mechanism of production of the musical second heart sound and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, N; Hosoi, K; Iuchi, A; Ogawa, S; Kageji, Y; Hayashi, M; Yoshimoto, K; Tanimoto, M; Oki, T

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the predisposing factors and the clinical significance of the musical aortic component of the second heart sound (musical S2), 18 patients with musical S2 (musical group) among the consecutive 2,000 patients with phonocardiographic examination were noninvasively studied by analyzing underlying diseases, phonocardiographic findings, organic changes of the aortic valve, severity of aortic regurgitation and left ventricular dysfunction. Organic changes of the aortic valve were assessed by two-dimensional echocardiography, and aortic regurgitation was assessed by color Doppler flow imaging. Twenty-two normal subjects (normal group) and 17 patients with essential hypertension (hypertensive group) served as controls. Mean ages were matched among the three groups. 1. Left ventricular dilatation (seven patients) and hypertension (six patients) were the dominant part of underlying disease in the musical group. 2. Musical S2 was classified in the following two types based on the phonocardiographic characteristics; musical vibrations followed immediately after the accentuated S2, and the S2 which was replaced by regular vibratory waves. 3. Frequency of the musical vibrations ranged from 120 to 200 Hz, and its duration ranged from 60 to 120 msec. Amplitude of the musical vibrations decreased by inhalation of amyl nitrite, but increased by infusion of methoxamine. In a case with mild rheumatic valve disease, methoxamine induced marked intensification of the amplitude and prolongation of the duration of the musical vibrations, finally giving a typical cooing murmur. 4. Echo intensity of the aortic valve tended to be higher in the musical group than in the other two groups. 5. Echocardiographically, aortic regurgitation appeared more frequently in the musical group (88%) than in the normal (36%) and hypertensive (41%) groups. Area of the aortic regurgitant signal was significantly larger in the musical group (4.1 +/- 1.4 cm2) than in the normal (1.2 +/- 0.8 cm2

  1. Ventricular tachycardia and exercise related syncope in children with structurally normal hearts: emphasis on repolarisation abnormality.

    PubMed Central

    Noh, C. I.; Song, J. Y.; Kim, H. S.; Choi, J. Y.; Yun, Y. S.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To emphasize the importance of ventricular tachycardia associated with repolarisation abnormality in syncope associated with exercise. DESIGN--Retrospective analysis of data on children presenting with syncope between 1985 and 1993. PATIENTS--5 apparently normal children with recurrent exercise related syncope associated with electrocardiographically abnormal TU complexes. RESULTS--3 children were diagnosed as having an intermediate form of the long QT syndrome and catecholamine sensitive ventricular tachycardia because the abnormal TU complexes were associated with polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that was not typical of torsades de pointes. Tachycardia was induced by exercise in all patients and by isoprenaline in the one patient who was tested. One patient also had sinus node dysfunction. One child had incessant salvos of polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and intermittent abnormal TU complexes suggestive of repolarisation abnormalities. The other had typical congenital long QT syndrome. Treatment was effective in three patients; two patients took a beta blocker alone and one took a beta blocker and low doses of amiodarone. One patient died suddenly, death being associated with sinus node dysfunction. In one patient with incessant ventricular arrhythmias treatment with a beta blocker, amiodarone, or Ic drugs was ineffective and always associated with proarrhythmia or syncope. He was not given further treatment and was asymptomatic despite having mild cardiomegaly. CONCLUSIONS--Ventricular tachycardia associated with repolarisation abnormality was an important cause of exercise related syncope in apparently normal children. TU complex abnormalities can be identified by repeated electrocardiography. beta Blockers are effective in preventing recurrent episodes. The role of amiodarone in this type of ventricular tachycardia needs further evaluation. PMID:7626354

  2. Abdominal sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be a sign of early bowel obstruction. Causes Most of the sounds you hear in your stomach and intestines are ... a list of more serious conditions that can cause abnormal bowel sounds. Hyperactive, hypoactive, or missing bowel sounds may be ...

  3. Abnormal 18 F-FDG and 82 Rb PET Findings in Chagas Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Salimy, Medhi S; Parwani, Purvi J; Mukai, Kanae; Pampaloni, Miguel Hernandez; Flavell, Robert R

    2017-03-03

    Uptake of the radiopharmaceutical F-FDG visualized by PET imaging can reflect abnormal myocardial inflammation. When utilized in conjunction with other imaging modalities, such as echocardiography, PET F-FDG imaging can help distinguish between active cardiac sarcoidosis and other etiologies of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. We present a case of a 46-year-old man with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and ventricular tachycardia who underwent an echocardiogram suggestive of cardiac Chagas disease. A subsequent F-FDG PET demonstrated abnormal hypermetabolism. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive serologic examination results.

  4. Sugar-sweetened beverages and prevalence of the metabolically abnormal phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the...

  5. A portable fetal heart monitor and its adaption to the detection of certain prenatal abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A.

    1994-01-01

    There were three primary objectives for this task: (1) The investigation of the feasibility of making the fetal heart rate monitor portable, using a laptop computer; (2) Improvements in the signal processing for the monitor; and (3) Implementation of a real-time hardware software system. These tasks have been completed as discussed in the following section.

  6. Abnormalities of capillary microarchitecture in a rat model of coronary ischemic congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiqiu; Yaniz-Galende, Elisa; Kagan, Heather J; Liang, Lifan; Hekmaty, Saboor; Giannarelli, Chiara; Hajjar, Roger

    2015-04-15

    The aim of the present study is to explore the role of capillary disorder in coronary ischemic congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF was induced in rats by aortic banding plus ischemia-reperfusion followed by aortic debanding. Coronary arteries were perfused with plastic polymer containing fluorescent dye. Multiple fluorescent images of casted heart sections and scanning electric microscope of coronary vessels were obtained to characterize changes in the heart. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. Stenosis was found in all levels of the coronary arteries in CHF. Coronary vasculature volume and capillary density in remote myocardium were significantly increased in CHF compared with control. This occurred largely in microvessels with a diameter of ≤3 μm. Capillaries in CHF had a tortuous structure, while normal capillaries were linear. Capillaries in CHF had inconsistent diameters, with assortments of narrowed and bulged segments. Their surfaces appeared rough, potentially indicating endothelial dysfunction in CHF. Segments of main capillaries between bifurcations were significantly shorter in length in CHF than in control. Transiently increasing preload by injecting 50 μl of 30% NaCl demonstrated that the CHF heart had lower functional reserve; this may be associated with congestion in coronary microcirculation. Ischemic coronary vascular disorder is not limited to the main coronary arteries, as it occurs in arterioles and capillaries. Capillary disorder in CHF included stenosis, deformed structure, proliferation, and roughened surfaces. This disorder in the coronary artery architecture may contribute to the reduction in myocyte contractility in the setting of heart failure.

  7. Abnormalities of capillary microarchitecture in a rat model of coronary ischemic congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiqiu; Yaniz-Galende, Elisa; Kagan, Heather J.; Liang, Lifan; Hekmaty, Saboor; Giannarelli, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore the role of capillary disorder in coronary ischemic congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF was induced in rats by aortic banding plus ischemia-reperfusion followed by aortic debanding. Coronary arteries were perfused with plastic polymer containing fluorescent dye. Multiple fluorescent images of casted heart sections and scanning electric microscope of coronary vessels were obtained to characterize changes in the heart. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. Stenosis was found in all levels of the coronary arteries in CHF. Coronary vasculature volume and capillary density in remote myocardium were significantly increased in CHF compared with control. This occurred largely in microvessels with a diameter of ≤3 μm. Capillaries in CHF had a tortuous structure, while normal capillaries were linear. Capillaries in CHF had inconsistent diameters, with assortments of narrowed and bulged segments. Their surfaces appeared rough, potentially indicating endothelial dysfunction in CHF. Segments of main capillaries between bifurcations were significantly shorter in length in CHF than in control. Transiently increasing preload by injecting 50 μl of 30% NaCl demonstrated that the CHF heart had lower functional reserve; this may be associated with congestion in coronary microcirculation. Ischemic coronary vascular disorder is not limited to the main coronary arteries, as it occurs in arterioles and capillaries. Capillary disorder in CHF included stenosis, deformed structure, proliferation, and roughened surfaces. This disorder in the coronary artery architecture may contribute to the reduction in myocyte contractility in the setting of heart failure. PMID:25659485

  8. Genetic abnormalities in FOXP1 are associated with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sheng-Wei; Mislankar, Mona; Misra, Chaitali; Huang, Nianyuan; Dajusta, Daniel G; Harrison, Steven M; McBride, Kim L; Baker, Linda A; Garg, Vidu

    2013-09-01

    The etiology for the majority of congenital heart defects (CHD) is unknown. We identified a patient with unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and hypoplastic left ventricle who harbored an ~0.3 Mb monoallelic deletion on chromosome 3p14.1. The deletion encompassed the first four exons of FOXP1, a gene critical for normal heart development that represses cardiomyocyte proliferation and expression of Nkx2.5. To determine whether FOXP1 mutations are found in patients with CHD, we sequenced FOXP1 in 82 patients with AVSD or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We discovered two patients who harbored a heterozygous c.1702C>T variant in FOXP1 that predicted a potentially deleterious substitution of a highly conserved proline (p.Pro568Ser). This variant was not found in 287 controls but is present in dbSNP at a 0.2% frequency. The orthologous murine Foxp1 p.Pro596Ser mutant protein displayed deficits in luciferase reporter assays and resulted in increased proliferation and Nkx2.5 expression in cardiomyoblasts. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of FOXP1 is associated with human CHD.

  9. Clarifying the anatomy of hearts with concordant ventriculo-arterial connections but abnormally related arterial trunks.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Gulati, Gurpreet S; Henry, G William; Spicer, Diane E; Backer, Carl L; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Hearts in which the arterial trunks arise from the morphologically appropriate ventricles, but in a parallel manner, rather than the usual spiralling arrangement, have long fascinated anatomists. These rare entities, for quite some time, were considered embryological impossibilities, but ongoing experience has shown that they can be found in various segmental combinations. Problems still exist about how best to describe them, as the different variants are often described with esoteric terms, such as anatomically corrected malposition or isolated ventricular inversion. In this review, based on our combined clinical and morphological experience, we demonstrate that the essential feature of all hearts described in this manner is a parallel arrangement of the arterial trunks as they exit from the ventricular mass. We show that the relationship of the arterial roots needs to be described in terms of the underlying ventricular topology, rather than according to the arrangement of the atrial chambers. We then discuss the importance of determining atrial arrangement on the basis of the morphology of the appendages, following the precepts as set out in the so-called "morphological method" and distinguished according to the extent of the pectinate muscles relative to the atrioventricular junctions as opposed to basing diagnosis on the venoatrial connections. We show that, when approached in this manner, the various combinations can be readily diagnosed in the clinical setting and described in straightforward way.

  10. What Is a Heart Murmur?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Murmur Related Topics Anemia Congenital Heart Defects Heart Valve Disease Holes in the Heart How the Heart Works ... heart defect that is present since birth or heart valve disease. Depending on the heart problem causing the abnormal ...

  11. Usefulness of verapamil for congestive heart failure associated with abnormal left ventricular diastolic filling and normal left ventricular systolic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Setaro, J.F.; Zaret, B.L.; Schulman, D.S.; Black, H.R.; Soufer, R. )

    1990-10-15

    Normal left ventricular systolic performance with impaired left ventricular diastolic filling may be present in a substantial number of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). To evaluate the effect of oral verapamil in this subset, 20 men (mean age 68 +/- 5 years) with CHF, intact left ventricular function (ejection fraction greater than 45%) and abnormal diastolic filling (peak filling rate less than 2.5 end-diastolic volumes per second (edv/s)) were studied in a placebo-controlled, double-blind 5-week crossover trial. All patients underwent echocardiography to rule out significant valvular disease, and thallium-201 stress scintigraphy to exclude major active ischemia. Compared to baseline values, verapamil significantly improved exercise capacity by 33% (13.9 +/- 4.3 vs 10.7 +/- 3.4 minutes at baseline) and peak filling rate by 30% (2.29 +/- 0.54 vs 1.85 +/- 0.45 edv/s at baseline) (all p less than 0.05). Placebo values were 12.3 +/- 4.0 minutes and 2.16 +/- 0.48 edv/s, respectively (difference not significant for both). Improvement from baseline in an objective clinico-radiographic heart failure score (scale 0 to 13) was significantly greater with verapamil compared to placebo (median improvement in score: 3 vs 1, p less than 0.01). Mean ejection fraction and systolic blood pressure were unchanged from baseline; diastolic blood pressure and heart rate decreased to a small degree. Verapamil may have therapeutic efficacy in patients with CHF, preserved systolic function and impaired diastolic filling.

  12. Recovery after aerobic exercise is manipulated by tempo change in a rhythmic sound pattern, as indicated by autonomic reaction on heart functioning

    PubMed Central

    Wallert, John; Madison, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Physical prowess is associated with rapid recovery from exhaustion. Here we examined whether recovery from aerobic exercise could be manipulated with a rhythmic sound pattern that either decreased or increased in tempo. Six men and six women exercised repeatedly for six minutes on a cycle ergometer at 60 percent of their individual maximal oxygen consumption, and then relaxed for six minutes while listening to one of two sound pattern conditions, which seemed to infinitely either decrease or increase in tempo, during which heart and breathing activity was measured. Participants exhibited more high-frequent heart rate variability when listening to decreasing tempo than when listening to increasing tempo, accompanied by a non-significant trend towards lower heart rate. The results show that neuropsychological entrainment to a sound pattern may directly affect the autonomic nervous system, which in turn may facilitate physiological recovery after exercise. Applications using rhythmic entrainment to aid physical recovery are discussed. PMID:25285076

  13. Introduction: December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young - Highlights of HeartWeek 2015: Challenges and Dilemmas of Pediatric Cardiac Care including Heart Failure in Children and Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 13th annual publication in Cardiology in the Young generated from the two meetings that composed "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Centre at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine, and entering its 16th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Paediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia entering its 19th year. This December 2015 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of the two meetings that compose HeartWeek. Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 15th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from Friday, 6 February, 2015, to Monday, 9 February, 2015. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery and its special focus was "Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries". The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's annual meeting - Cardiology 2015, the 18th Annual Update on Paediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease: "Challenges and Dilemmas" - was held at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, from Wednesday, 11 February, 2015, to Sunday, 15 February, 2015. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care

  14. Abnormal nocturnal heart rate variability response among chronic kidney disease and dialysis patients during wakefulness and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni; Ranpuria, Reena; Hall, Martica; Hotchkiss, John R.; Chan, Chris T.; Unruh, Mark L.; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Background. Dialysis patients and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience a substantial risk for abnormal autonomic function and abnormal heart rate variability (HRV). It remains unknown whether HRV changes across sleep stages in patients with different severity of CKD or dialysis dependency. We hypothesized that high-frequency (HF) HRV (vagal tone) will be attenuated from wakefulness to non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and then to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in dialysis patients as compared to patients with CKD. Methods. In-home polysomnography was performed in 95 patients with stages 4–5 CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD). HRV was measured using fast Fourier transform of interbeat intervals during wakefulness and sleep. Low-frequency (LF) and HF intervals were generated. Natural logarithm HF (LNHF) and the logarithm LF/HF ratio (sympathovagal tone) were analysed by multivariable quantile regression and generalized estimating equations. Results. Of the 95 patients, 63.2% (n = 60) was male, 35.8% (n = 34) was African American and 20.4% (n = 19) was diabetic. Average age was 51.6 ± 15.1 (range 19–82). HRV variables were significantly associated with diabetic status, higher periodic limb movement indices and lower bicarbonate levels. Patients with advanced CKD did not differ from dialysis patients in their inability to increase vagal tone during sleep. During wakefulness, female gender (P = 0.05) was associated with the increases in the vagal tone. Conclusions. Patients with CKD/ESRD exhibit dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system tone manifesting as a failure to increase HRV during wakefulness and sleep. Different patient characteristics are associated with changes in HRV at different sleep stages. PMID:20466675

  15. Abnormalities in intracellular calcium regulation and contractile function in myocardium from dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perreault, C. L.; Shannon, R. P.; Komamura, K.; Vatner, S. F.; Morgan, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    24 d of rapid ventricular pacing induced dilated cardiomyopathy with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in conscious, chronically instrumented dogs. We studied mechanical properties and intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) transients of trabeculae carneae isolated from 15 control dogs (n = 32) and 11 dogs with pacing-induced cardiac failure (n = 26). Muscles were stretched to maximum length at 30 degrees C and stimulated at 0.33 Hz; a subset (n = 17 control, n = 17 myopathic) was loaded with the [Ca2+]i indicator aequorin. Peak tension was depressed in the myopathic muscles, even in the presence of maximally effective (i.e., 16 mM) [Ca2+] in the perfusate. However, peak [Ca2+]i was similar (0.80 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.71 +/- 0.05 microM; [Ca2+]o = 2.5 mM), suggesting that a decrease in Cai2+ availability was not responsible for the decreased contractility. The time for decline from the peak of the Cai2+ transient was prolonged in the myopathic group, which correlated with prolongation of isometric contraction and relaxation. However, similar end-diastolic [Ca2+]i was achieved in both groups (0.29 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.02 microM), indicating that Cai2+ homeostasis can be maintained in myopathic hearts. The inotropic response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was depressed compared with the controls. However, when cAMP production was stimulated by pretreatment with forskolin, the response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was improved. Our findings provide direct evidence that abnormal [Ca2+]i handling is an important cause of contractile dysfunction in dogs with pacing-induced heart failure and suggest that deficient production of cAMP may be an important cause of these changes in excitation-contraction coupling.

  16. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  17. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is related to both reduced contractile function and incomplete relaxation: an electromechanically detailed biophysical modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, David H.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) accounts for about 50% of heart failure cases. It has features of incomplete relaxation and increased stiffness of the left ventricle. Studies from clinical electrophysiology and animal experiments have found that HFpEF is associated with impaired calcium homeostasis, ion channel remodeling and concentric left ventricle hypertrophy (LVH). However, it is still unclear how the abnormal calcium homeostasis, ion channel and structural remodeling affect the electro-mechanical dynamics of the ventricles. In this study we have developed multiscale models of the human left ventricle from single cells to the 3D organ, which take into consideration HFpEF-induced changes in calcium handling, ion channel remodeling and concentric LVH. Our simulation results suggest that at the cellular level, HFpEF reduces the systolic calcium level resulting in a reduced systolic contractile force, but elevates the diastolic calcium level resulting in an abnormal residual diastolic force. In our simulations, these abnormal electro-mechanical features of the ventricular cells became more pronounced with the increase of the heart rate. However, at the 3D organ level, the ejection fraction of the left ventricle was maintained due to the concentric LVH. The simulation results of this study mirror clinically observed features of HFpEF and provide new insights toward the understanding of the cellular bases of impaired cardiac electromechanical functions in heart failure. PMID:25852567

  18. [Experimental research on heart rate variability analysis with application of acquisition system of R peak of electrocardiosignal based on sound card].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Jia, Xiaoning; Shen, Dai; Zhou, Peng

    2013-08-01

    This study designed an audio signal acquisition system to achieve real-time detection of R peak for heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, substituting ECG-specific data acquisition board with sound card. It is proved that the R peak with low frequency can be gathered by sound card. The comparison with PowerLab signal acquisition system has shown that the acquisition system of R peak could accurately detect the R peak. The R peak detected by sound card and PowerLab signal acquisition system completely overlap each other, while RR intervals has no difference. The HRV analysis was accurate and reliable with the RR interval from sound card. This low cost, high performance, strong compatibility and easy upgraded acquisition system of R peak compared with the traditional data acquisition board has the value of practical uses and might have broad applications in the future.

  19. (13)N-Ammonia PET/CT Detection of Myocardial Perfusion Abnormalities in Beagle Dogs After Local Heart Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianbo; Yan, Rui; Wu, Zhifang; Li, Jianguo; Yan, Min; Hao, Xinzhong; Liu, Jianzhong; Li, Sijin

    2017-04-01

    Our objective was to determine the potential value of (13)N-ammonia PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for early detection of myocardial perfusion changes induced by radiation damage. Methods: Thirty-six Beagle dogs were randomly divided into a control group (n = 18) or an irradiation group (n = 18). The latter underwent local irradiation to the left ventricular anterior cardiac wall with a single dose of 20 Gy, whereas the former received sham irradiation. All dogs underwent (13)N-ammonia PET/CT MPI 1 wk before irradiation and at 3, 6, and 12 mo after sham or local irradiation. One week after undergoing (13)N-ammonia PET/CT MPI, the irradiation group underwent coronary angiography. Six randomly selected dogs from each group were sacrificed and used to detect pathologic cardiac injury at 3, 6, and 12 mo after irradiation. Results: Compared with the control group and baseline, the irradiation group showed significantly increased perfusion in the irradiated area of the heart at 3 mo after irradiation, perfusion reduction at 6 mo after irradiation, and a perfusion defect at 12 mo after irradiation. There was no significant difference in the left ventricular ejection fraction between the control and irradiation groups at baseline or at 3 mo after irradiation. The irradiation group showed a reduction of left ventricular ejection fraction compared with the control group at 6 mo (50.0% ± 8.1% vs. 59.3% ± 4.1%, P = 0.016) and 12 mo (47.2% ± 6.7% vs. 57.4% ± 3.3%, P = 0.002) after irradiation. No coronary stenosis was observed in the irradiation group. Regional wall motion abnormalities appeared in the irradiated area at 6 mo after irradiation, and its extent was enlarged at 12 mo after irradiation. Pathologic changes were observed; radiation-induced myocardial tissue damage and microvascular fibrosis in the irradiated area progressively increased over time. Conclusion:(13)N-ammonia PET/CT MPI can dynamically detect myocardial perfusion changes together with

  20. Clinical application of three-dimensional printing to the management of complex univentricular hearts with abnormal systemic or pulmonary venous drainage.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Eimear; Kelleher, Eoin; Snow, Aisling; Walsh, Kevin; Gadallah, Bassem; Kutty, Shelby; Redmond, John M; McMahon, Colin J

    2017-02-06

    In recent years, three-dimensional printing has demonstrated reliable reproducibility of several organs including hearts with complex congenital cardiac anomalies. This represents the next step in advanced image processing and can be used to plan surgical repair. In this study, we describe three children with complex univentricular hearts and abnormal systemic or pulmonary venous drainage, in whom three-dimensional printed models based on CT data assisted with preoperative planning. For two children, after group discussion and examination of the models, a decision was made not to proceed with surgery. We extend the current clinical experience with three-dimensional printed modelling and discuss the benefits of such models in the setting of managing complex surgical problems in children with univentricular circulation and abnormal systemic or pulmonary venous drainage.

  1. Time-dependent remodeling of transmural architecture underlying abnormal ventricular geometry in chronic volume overload heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Omens, Jeffrey H; Covell, James W

    2004-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the abnormal ventricular geometry in failing hearts may be accounted for by regionally selective remodeling of myocardial laminae or sheets, we investigated remodeling of the transmural architecture in chronic volume overload induced by an aortocaval shunt. We determined three-dimensional finite deformation at apical and basal sites in left ventricular anterior wall of six dogs with the use of biplane cineradiography of implanted markers. Myocardial strains at end diastole were measured at a failing state referred to control to describe remodeling of myofibers and sheet structures over time. After 9 +/- 2 wk (means +/- SE) of volume overload, the myocardial volume within the marker sets increased by >20%. At 2 wk, the basal site had myofiber elongation (0.099 +/- 0.030; P <0.05), whereas the apical site did not [P=not significant (NS)]. Sheet shear at the basal site increased progressively toward the final study (0.040 +/- 0.003 at 2 wk and 0.054 +/- 0.021 at final; both P <0.05), which contributed to a significant increase in wall thickness at the final study (0.181 +/- 0.047; P < 0.05), whereas the apical site did not (P=NS). We conclude that the remodeling of the transmural architecture is regionally heterogeneous in chronic volume overload. The early differences in fiber elongation seem most likely due to a regional gradient in diastolic wall stress, whereas the late differences in wall thickness are most likely related to regional differences in the laminar architecture of the wall. These results suggest that the temporal progression of ventricular remodeling may be anatomically designed at the level of regional laminar architecture.

  2. RESP-24: a computer program for the investigation of 24-h breathing abnormalities in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Maestri, R; Pinna, G D; Robbi, E; Varanini, M; Emdin, M; Raciti, M; La Rovere, M T

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a computer program (RESP-24) specifically devised to assess the prevalence and characteristics of breathing disorders in ambulant chronic heart failure patients during the overall 24 h period. The system works on a single channel respiratory signal (RS) recorded through a Holter-like portable device. In the pre-processing stage RESP-24 removes noise, baseline drift and motion artefacts from the RS using a non-linear filter, enhances respiratory frequency components through high-pass filtering and derives an instantaneous tidal volume (ITV) signal. The core processing is devoted to the identification and classification of the breathing pattern into periodic breathing (PB), normal breathing or non-classifiable breathing using a 60 s segmentation, and to the identification and estimation of apnea and hypopnea events. Sustained episodes of PB are detected by cross analysis of both the spectral content and time behavior of the ITV signal. User-friendly interactive facilities allow all the results of the automatic analysis procedure to be edited. The final report provides a set of standard and non-standard parameters quantifying breathing abnormalities during the 24 h period, the night-time and the day-time, including the apnea/hypopnea index, the apnea index, the total time spent in apnea or in hypopnea and the prevalence of non-apneic and apneic PB. The accuracy of these measurements was appraised on a data set of 14 recordings, by comparing them with those provided by a trained analyst. The mean and standard deviation of the error of the automatic procedure were below respectively 6 and 8% of the reference value for all parameters considered and the mean total classification accuracy was 92%. In most cases, the individual error was <12%. We conclude that measurements provided automatically by the RESP-24 software are suitable for screening purposes and clinical trials, although a preventive check of signal quality should be recommended.

  3. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  4. Auscultation of the heart: The Basics with Anatomical Correlation.

    PubMed

    Voin, Vlad; Oskouian, Rod J; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-01-01

    Proficiency in heart auscultation continues to be important even in an era of modern technology. However, many physicians and health care providers are uncomfortable and often inaccurate in their ability to identify normal and abnormal heart sounds. The following review was performed to provide a basis that health care providers can use to strengthen their understanding and improve their techniques when auscultating the human heart. Clin. Anat. 30:58-60, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Abnormal splicing in the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T impairs systolic function of the heart with preserved Frank‐Starling compensation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Han‐Zhong; Chen, Guozhen; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Jin, Jian‐Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Abnormal splice‐out of the exon 7‐encoded segment in the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T (cTnT‐ΔE7) was found in turkeys and, together with the inclusion of embryonic exon (eTnT), in adult dogs with a correlation with dilated cardiomyopathy. Overexpression of these cTnT variants in transgenic mouse hearts significantly decreased cardiac function. To further investigate the functional effect of cTnT‐ΔE7 or ΔE7+eTnT in vivo under systemic regulation, echocardiography was carried out in single and double‐transgenic mice. No atrial enlargement, ventricular hypertrophy or dilation was detected in the hearts of 2‐month‐old cTnT‐ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice in comparison to wild‐type controls, indicating a compensated state. However, left ventricular fractional shortening and ejection fraction were decreased in ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice, and the response to isoproterenol was lower in ΔE7+eTnT mice. Left ventricular outflow tract velocity and gradient were decreased in the transgenic mouse hearts, indicating decreased systolic function. Ex vivo working heart function showed that high afterload or low preload resulted in more severe decreases in the systolic function and energetic efficiency of cTnT‐ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT hearts. On the other hand, increases in preload demonstrated preserved Frank‐Starling responses and minimized the loss of cardiac function and efficiency. The data demonstrate that the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac TnT regulates systolic function of the heart. PMID:25194024

  6. Abnormal splicing in the N-terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T impairs systolic function of the heart with preserved Frank-Starling compensation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Guozhen; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal splice-out of the exon 7-encoded segment in the N-terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T (cTnT-ΔE7) was found in turkeys and, together with the inclusion of embryonic exon (eTnT), in adult dogs with a correlation with dilated cardiomyopathy. Overexpression of these cTnT variants in transgenic mouse hearts significantly decreased cardiac function. To further investigate the functional effect of cTnT-ΔE7 or ΔE7+eTnT in vivo under systemic regulation, echocardiography was carried out in single and double-transgenic mice. No atrial enlargement, ventricular hypertrophy or dilation was detected in the hearts of 2-month-old cTnT-ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice in comparison to wild-type controls, indicating a compensated state. However, left ventricular fractional shortening and ejection fraction were decreased in ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice, and the response to isoproterenol was lower in ΔE7+eTnT mice. Left ventricular outflow tract velocity and gradient were decreased in the transgenic mouse hearts, indicating decreased systolic function. Ex vivo working heart function showed that high afterload or low preload resulted in more severe decreases in the systolic function and energetic efficiency of cTnT-ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT hearts. On the other hand, increases in preload demonstrated preserved Frank-Starling responses and minimized the loss of cardiac function and efficiency. The data demonstrate that the N-terminal variable region of cardiac TnT regulates systolic function of the heart.

  7. Development of an electro-stethoscope system and design of an optimum filter based on tissue sound transmission for noninvasive early diagnosis of malfunction of an implanted mechanical total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Inoue, Taku; Hashimoto, Takuya; Saito, Itsuro; Abe, Yusuke; Chinzei, Tsuneo; Isoyama, Takashi; Imachi, Kou; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2004-02-01

    Early diagnosis of the malfunction of a mechanical artificial heart implanted in a patient who has been discharged from hospital is very important. We have developed an electro-stethoscope system that enables the malfunction of an artificial heart to be detected from the analysis of sound signals from the artificial heart. The sound data can be transmitted to a hospital via a mobile telephone or the Internet, so that doctors can examine the condition of the artificial heart. The optimum frequency characteristics of a low-pass filter for the elimination of ambient sound through the electro-stethoscope casing were obtained by simulating sound transmission through tissue. We evaluated the usefulness of the electro-stethoscope system using a goat in which an undulation pump total artificial heart had been implanted. A frequency analysis of the sound signal provided information on the degree of degradation of each mechanical component of the artificial heart. The results of this study showed that the electro-stethoscope system is useful for the early detection of the malfunction of an artificial heart at home, and that the use of the system contributes to improvement in the quality of life of patients.

  8. Anti-SSA/Ro antibodies and the heart: more than complete congenital heart block? A review of electrocardiographic and myocardial abnormalities and of treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Amoura, Zahir; Villain, Elisabeth; Cohen, Laurence; Piette, Jean-Charles

    2005-01-01

    Apart from complete and incomplete congenital heart block (CHB), new cardiac manifestations related to anti-SSA/Ro antibodies have been reported in children born to mothers bearing these antibodies. These manifestations include transient fetal first-degree heart block, prolongation of corrected QT (QTc) interval, sinus bradycardia, late-onset cardiomyopathy, endocardial fibroelastosis and cardiac malformations. Anti-SSA/Ro antibodies are not considered pathogenic to the adult heart, but a prolongation of the QTc interval has recently been reported in adult patients and is still a matter of debate. Treatment of CHB is not well established and needs to be assessed carefully. The risks and benefits of prenatal fluorinated steroids are discussed. PMID:15743492

  9. Chronic melatonin consumption prevents obesity-related metabolic abnormalities and protects the heart against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury in a prediabetic model of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Nduhirabandi, Frederic; Du Toit, Eugene F; Blackhurst, Dee; Marais, David; Lochner, Amanda

    2011-03-01

    Obesity, a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease, is associated with increased oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant status. Melatonin, a potent free radical scavenger and antioxidant, has powerful cardioprotective effects in lean animals but its efficacy in obesity is unknown. We investigated the effects of chronic melatonin administration on the development of the metabolic syndrome as well as ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male Wistar rats received a control diet, a control diet with melatonin, a high-calorie diet, or a high-calorie diet with melatonin (DM). Melatonin (4 mg/kg/day) was administered in the drinking water. After 16 wk, biometric and blood metabolic parameters were measured. Hearts were perfused ex vivo for the evaluation of myocardial function, infarct size (IFS) and biochemical changes [activation of PKB/Akt, ERK, p38 MAPK, AMPK, and glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 expression). The high-calorie diet caused increases in body weight (BW), visceral adiposity, serum insulin and triglycerides (TRIG), with no change in glucose levels. Melatonin treatment reduced the BW gain, visceral adiposity, blood TRIG, serum insulin, homeostatic model assessment index and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in the DIO group. Melatonin reduced IFS in DIO and control groups and increased percentage recovery of functional performance of DIO hearts. During reperfusion, hearts from melatonin-treated rats had increased activation of PKB/Akt, ERK42/44 and reduced p38 MAPK activation. Chronic melatonin treatment prevented the metabolic abnormalities induced by DIO and protected the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. These beneficial effects were associated with activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinases pathway.

  10. Risk stratification for recurrent heart failure in patients post-myocardial infarction with electrocardiographic and echocardiographic left atrial abnormality.

    PubMed

    Ariyarajah, Vignendra; Malinski, Maciej; Zieroth, Shelley; Harizi, Robert; Morris, Andrew; Spodick, David H

    2008-05-15

    Left atrial enlargement is predictive of cardiovascular events. The predictive power, however, of the combination of electrocardiographic (LAE-ECG) and echocardiographic left atrial enlargement (LAE-Echo) has not been extensively evaluated. We prospectively identified patients admitted with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) who developed new-onset heart failure during admission. Baseline electrocardiograms obtained < or =12 months before admission were evaluated for LAE-ECG, such as prolonged P-wave duration or positive P-wave terminal force in lead V1, and in-hospital echocardiographic reports obtained < or =1 month after admission were assessed for linear, anteroposterior LAE-Echo. Follow-up was directed toward pertinent cardiovascular events and death. Of the 462 patients with NSTEMI, 108 developed new-onset heart failure (23%); 71 patients had LAE-Echo. Follow-up was 23.2 months (mean 22.1 months). Although in-hospital (early) cardiovascular complications (other than heart failure) were not significantly higher in patients with LAE-Echo, these patients demonstrated more postdischarge (late) cardiovascular complications, predominantly recurrent heart failure. In addition, those with a combination of LAE-Echo and LAE-ECG demonstrated significantly higher recurrence of heart failure (hazard ratio 1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 4.35; p = 0.02 for interatrial conduction delay, and hazard ratio 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 3.27 for P-wave terminal force in lead V1; p = 0.03) and increased mortality compared with those with LAE-Echo alone. In conclusion, our data suggest that a combination of electrical and mechanical left atrial dysfunction is significantly more predictive of increased cardiovascular events and mortality compared with left atrial mechanical dysfunction alone.

  11. Long-Term Persistency of Abnormal Heart Rate Variability following Long NICU Stay and Surgery at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Mélanie; Lafrenaye, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with painful procedures during the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) stay. Full-term newborns can also experience pain, following surgery. These procedures can have long-lasting consequences. It has been shown that children born preterm show pain responses and cardiac alterations. This study aimed to explore the heart rate reactivity to pain in 107 subjects born either preterm or full-term who were between 7 and 25 years old at testing. We also evaluated the effect of pain experienced at birth, as represented by a longer NICU stay, time under ventilation, and surgery at birth. Participants were asked to immerse their right forearm in 10°C water for 2 minutes. Electrocardiograms were recorded at baseline and during the immersion procedure. Full-term subjects showed a stable increase in heart rate throughout the procedure, whereas preterm ones showed a strong increase at the beginning, which decreased over time. Also, preterm and full-term subjects who experienced pain at birth showed higher resting heart rate, stronger sympathetic activity, and lower cardiac vagal activity. Our study demonstrated a long-term impact of a long NICU stay and surgery at birth on cardiac autonomic activity. This could lead to impaired reactions to pain or stress in later life. PMID:24724021

  12. Algorithm for heart rate extraction in a novel wearable acoustic sensor

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Syed Anas; Aguilar–Pelaez, Eduardo; Rodriguez–Villegas, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Phonocardiography is a widely used method of listening to the heart sounds and indicating the presence of cardiac abnormalities. Each heart cycle consists of two major sounds – S1 and S2 – that can be used to determine the heart rate. The conventional method of acoustic signal acquisition involves placing the sound sensor at the chest where this sound is most audible. Presented is a novel algorithm for the detection of S1 and S2 heart sounds and the use of them to extract the heart rate from signals acquired by a small sensor placed at the neck. This algorithm achieves an accuracy of 90.73 and 90.69%, with respect to heart rate value provided by two commercial devices, evaluated on more than 38 h of data acquired from ten different subjects during sleep in a pilot clinical study. This is the largest dataset for acoustic heart sound classification and heart rate extraction in the literature to date. The algorithm in this study used signals from a sensor designed to monitor breathing. This shows that the same sensor and signal can be used to monitor both breathing and heart rate, making it highly useful for long-term wearable vital signs monitoring. PMID:26609401

  13. Algorithm for heart rate extraction in a novel wearable acoustic sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangwei; Imtiaz, Syed Anas; Aguilar-Pelaez, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2015-02-01

    Phonocardiography is a widely used method of listening to the heart sounds and indicating the presence of cardiac abnormalities. Each heart cycle consists of two major sounds - S1 and S2 - that can be used to determine the heart rate. The conventional method of acoustic signal acquisition involves placing the sound sensor at the chest where this sound is most audible. Presented is a novel algorithm for the detection of S1 and S2 heart sounds and the use of them to extract the heart rate from signals acquired by a small sensor placed at the neck. This algorithm achieves an accuracy of 90.73 and 90.69%, with respect to heart rate value provided by two commercial devices, evaluated on more than 38 h of data acquired from ten different subjects during sleep in a pilot clinical study. This is the largest dataset for acoustic heart sound classification and heart rate extraction in the literature to date. The algorithm in this study used signals from a sensor designed to monitor breathing. This shows that the same sensor and signal can be used to monitor both breathing and heart rate, making it highly useful for long-term wearable vital signs monitoring.

  14. A new 48, XXYY/47, XYY syndrome associated with multiple skeletal abnormalities, congenital heart disease and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Mutesa, Leon; Jamar, Mauricette; Hellin, Anne Cecile; Pierquin, Genevieve; Bours, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    While the XYY and XXYY syndromes have been several time described in patients, the combination of both syndromes in an individual is a rare event and may result in a severe phenotype. In the present observation, a boy with congenital scoliosis due to segmented thoracic hemivertebra associated with radioulnar synostosis and congenital heart disease is described. Chromosome G-banding and FISH analysis demonstrated a de novo mosaic karyotype 48, XXYY/47, XYY in this patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a combination of XYY and XXYY syndromes.

  15. Improving the performance of cardiac abnormality detection from PCG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujit, N. R.; Kumar, C. Santhosh; Rajesh, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    The Phonocardiogram (PCG) signal contains important information about the condition of heart. Using PCG signal analysis prior recognition of coronary illness can be done. In this work, we developed a biomedical system for the detection of abnormality in heart and methods to enhance the performance of the system using SMOTE and AdaBoost technique have been presented. Time and frequency domain features extracted from the PCG signal is input to the system. The back-end classifier to the system developed is Decision Tree using CART (Classification and Regression Tree), with an overall classification accuracy of 78.33% and sensitivity (alarm accuracy) of 40%. Here sensitivity implies the precision obtained from classifying the abnormal heart sound, which is an essential parameter for a system. We further improve the performance of baseline system using SMOTE and AdaBoost algorithm. The proposed approach outperforms the baseline system by an absolute improvement in overall accuracy of 5% and sensitivity of 44.92%.

  16. Heath monitoring of a glass transfer robot in the mass production line of liquid crystal display using abnormal operating sounds based on wavelet packet transform and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eui-Youl; Lee, Young-Joon; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the fault detect method of a moving transfer robot in the mass production line of liquid crystal display (LCD) manufacturers based on the wavelet packet transform (WPT) for feature extraction and the artificial neural network (ANN) for fault classification. Most of fault detection methods in a mechanical system have been researched based on the vibration signal. Unlike the existing methodologies, this study aims to minimize the uncertainty of a field engineer's decision making process for determining whether a fault is present or not based on the human auditory perception by developing a fault diagnosis system that uses the abnormal operating sound radiated from a moving transfer robot as a source signal. Abnormal operating sound radiated from a moving transfer robot has been used for this work instead of other source signals such as vibration, acoustic emission, electrical signal, etc. Its advantage as a source signal makes it possible to monitor the status of multiple faults by using only a microphone despite a relatively low sensitivity. In the application of ANN, since it is important to minimize the error of trained ANN in terms of the accuracy of fault diagnosis logic, in the paper, the number of input and target data samples was increased through a regeneration process based on statistical properties, and then the uncorrelated nodes in the input vector were also removed to improve the orthogonality of the input vector based on the entropy based feature selection method. Consequently, it can be concluded that the abnormal operating sound is sufficiently useful as a source signal for the fault diagnosis of mechanical components as well as other source signals.

  17. Heart Surgery Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hearts of humans who have died (cadavers). Angina pectoris The discomfort experienced by individuals when their heart ... performed during symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease angina pectoris , abnormalities may confirm the diagnosis of ischemic heart ...

  18. Contractile abnormalities and altered drug response in engineered heart tissue from Mybpc3-targeted knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Andrea; Friedrich, Felix W; Flenner, Frederik; Geertz, Birgit; Eder, Alexandra; Schaaf, Sebastian; Hirt, Marc N; Uebeler, June; Schlossarek, Saskia; Carrier, Lucie; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Myosin-binding protein C (Mybpc3)-targeted knock-in mice (KI) recapitulate typical aspects of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We evaluated whether these functional alterations can be reproduced in engineered heart tissue (EHT) and yield novel mechanistic information on the function of cMyBP-C. EHTs were generated from cardiac cells of neonatal KI, heterozygous (HET) or wild-type controls (WT) and developed without apparent morphological differences. KI had 70% and HET 20% lower total cMyBP-C levels than WT, accompanied by elevated fetal gene expression. Under standard culture conditions and spontaneous beating, KI EHTs showed more frequent burst beating than WT and occasional tetanic contractions (14/96). Under electrical stimulation (6Hz, 37°C) KI EHTs exhibited shorter contraction and relaxation times and a twofold higher sensitivity to external [Ca(2+)]. Accordingly, the sensitivity to verapamil was 4-fold lower and the response to isoprenaline or the Ca(2+) sensitizer EMD 57033 2- to 4-fold smaller. The loss of EMD effect was verified in 6-week-old KI mice in vivo. HET EHTs were apparently normal under basal conditions, but showed similarly altered contractile responses to [Ca(2+)], verapamil, isoprenaline and EMD. In contrast, drug-induced changes in intracellular Ca(2+) transients (Fura-2) were essentially normal. In conclusion, the present findings in auxotonically contracting EHTs support the idea that cMyBP-C's normal role is to suppress force generation at low intracellular Ca(2+) and stabilize the power-stroke step of the cross bridge cycle. Pharmacological testing in EHT unmasked a disease phenotype in HET. The altered drug response may be clinically relevant.

  19. Electrocardiogram abnormalities among men with stress-related psychiatric disorders: implications for coronary heart disease and clinical research.

    PubMed

    Boscarino, J A; Chang, J

    1999-01-01

    Research suggests psychological distress could result in arterial endothelial injury and coronary heart disease (CHD). Studies also show Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) victims have higher circulating catecholamines and other sympathoadrenal-neuroendocrine bioactive agents implicated in arterial damage. Here we analyzed resting 12-lead electrocardiographic (ECG) results among a national sample of 4,462 nonhospitalized male veterans (mean age = 38) about 20 years after military service by current posttraumatic stress (n = 54), general anxiety (n = 186), and depression (n = 157) disorders. ECGs were interpreted by board-certified cardiologists and summarized using the Minnesota Code Manual of Electrocardiographic Findings. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed based on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, Version III. Controlling for age, place of service, illicit drug use, medication use, race, body mass index, alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and education, PTSD (odds ratio [OR] = 2.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17-4.26, p < 0.05), anxiety (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.03-2.22, p < 0.05), and depression (OR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.13-2.58, p < 0.01) were associated with having a positive ECG finding. Specific results indicate PTSD was associated with atrioventricular (AV) conduction defects (OR = 2.81, 95% CI = 1.03-7.66, p < 0.05) and infarctions (OR = 4.44, 95% CI = 1.20-16.43, p < 0.05), while depression was associated with arrhythmias (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.22-3.23, p < 0.01). The PTSD associations for AV conduction defects and infarctions held, even after controlling for current anxiety and depression. These findings suggest psychological distress may result in CHD, because we controlled for obvious biases and confounders, the men studied had current PTSD due to combat exposures 20 years ago, combat exposure was associated with anxiety and depression among these men, and the men were disease free a military induction. These findings suggest the need for clinical

  20. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  1. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  2. Distal 8p deletion (8) (p23.1): An easily missed chromosomal abnormality that may be associated with congenital heart defect and mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bai-Lin; Schneider, G.H.; Sabatino, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    We describe the clinical manifestations and molecular cytogenetic analyses of three patients with a similar distal deletion of chromosome 8. Each child had mild developmental delay and subtle minor anomalies. Two had cardiac anomalies but no other major congenital anomalies were present. High resolution G and R banding showed in all three patients del(8)(p23.1), but the breakpoint in case 1 was distal to 8p23.1, in case 2 was in the middle of 8p23.1, and in case 3 proximal to 8p23.1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies with a chromosome 8 paint probe confirmed that no other rearrangement had occurred. FISH with a chromosome 8-specific telomere probe indicated that two patients had terminal deletions. Chromosome analysis of the parents of case 1 and mother of case 2 were normal; the remaining parents were not available for study. Thirteen individual patients including the three in this study, and three relatives in one family with del(8)(p23.1), have been reported in the past 5 years. Major congenital anomalies, especially congenital heart defects, are most often associated with a breakpoint proximal to 8p23.1. Three patients were found within a 3-year period in this study and five cases were found within 4 years by another group, indicating that distal 8p deletion might be a relatively common chromosomal abnormality. This small deletion is easily overlooked (i.e., cases 1 and 2 were reported as normal at amniocentesis) and can be associated with few or no major congenital anomalies. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis,...

  4. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis,...

  5. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... that trigger the heartbeat. Caffeine, Diet and Heart Arrhythmias Caffeine is the most common substance linked with abnormal heart rhythms ( arrhythmias ). Some people feel heart palpitations (fast heartbeats) when ...

  6. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  7. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  8. First report of a de novo 18q11.2 microdeletion including GATA6 associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bui, Peter H; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Wong, Derek; Perens, Gregory; Dipple, Katrina M; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 have been previously reported in many patients. Most cases involve the more distal regions of the long arm (18q21.1->qter). However, proximal interstitial deletions involving 18q11.2 are extremely rare. Here we report on a 14-month-old female with a 4.7 Mb (19,667,062-24,401,876 hg19) de novo interstitial deletion within chromosomal band 18q11.2, which includes GATA6 and 24 other RefSeq genes. The clinical features of our patient include complex congenital heart defects, a double outlet right ventricle, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, D-malposed great arteries, an atrial septal defect, a dysplastic aortic valve and patent ductus arteriosus. In addition, she had renal anomalies-a duplicated collecting system on the left and mild right hydronephrosis. These heart and renal defects are not reported in other patients with 18q proximal interstitial deletions. Heterozygous point mutations in GATA6, encoding for a zinc finger transcription factor, have been shown to cause congenital heart defects. Given the well-established biological role of GATA6 in cardiac development, a deletion of GATA6 is very likely responsible for our patient's complex congenital heart defects. This is the smallest and most proximal 18q11.2 deletion involving GATA6 that is associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal anomalies.

  9. Panic Attack or Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with echocardiography. It is a good first-line test for a woman with symptoms and risk factors for heart disease. Echocardiography uses sound waves technology to give detailed information about the heart muscle, ...

  10. Sound Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Leanne, Ed.; And Others

    Sound symbolism is the study of the relationship between the sound of an utterance and its meaning. In this interdisciplinary collection of new studies, 24 leading scholars discuss the role of sound symbolism in a theory of language. Contributions and authors include the following: "Sound-Symbolic Processes" (Leanne Hinton, Johanna…

  11. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Heart valve surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four valves in the heart: aortic valve, mitral valve, tricuspid valve, and pulmonary valve. The valves are designed to control the direction of blood flow through the heart. The opening and closing of the heart valves produce the heart-beat sounds.

  13. Heart failure overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart failure: Fast or difficult breathing Leg swelling (edema) Neck veins that stick out (are distended) Sounds ( ... pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Pulmonary edema Stable angina Ventricular assist device Patient Instructions ACE ...

  14. Regional Microstructural and Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Abnormalities in the Corpus Callosum of Neonates With Congenital Heart Defect Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Cornelia; Singer, Jitka; Latal, Beatrice; Knirsch, Walter; Makki, Malek

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the structural development of the corpus callosum in term neonates with congenital heart defect before and after surgery using diffusion tensor imaging and 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared parallel and radial diffusions, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy, and volume of 5 substructures of the corpus callosum: genu, rostral body, body, isthmus, and splenium. Compared to healthy controls, we found a significantly lower volume of the splenium and total corpus callosum and a higher radial diffusion and lower fractional anisotropy in the splenium of patients presurgery; a lower volume in all substructures in the postsurgery group; higher radial diffusion in the rostral body, body, and splenium; and a higher apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of postsurgery patients. Similar fractional anisotropy changes in congenital heart defect patients were reported in preterm infants. Our findings in apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of these patients (pre and postsurgery) are comparable to findings in preterm neonates with psychomotor delay. Delayed maturation of the isthmus was also reported in preterm infants.

  15. An interstitial deletion of 7.1Mb in chromosome band 6p22.3 associated with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including heart defects, short neck, and eye abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Anna; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Giacobini, Maibritt

    2009-01-01

    Seven cases with an interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 6 involving the 6p22 region have previously been reported. The clinical phenotype of these cases includes developmental delay, brain-, heart-, and kidney defects, eye abnormalities, short neck, craniofacial malformations, hypotonia, as well as clinodactyly or syndactyly. Here, we report a patient with a 7.1Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome band 6p22.3, detected by genome-wide screening array CGH. The patient is a 4-year-old girl with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including eye abnormalities, short neck, and a ventricular septum defect. The deleted region at 6p22.3 in our patient overlaps with six out of the seven previously reported cases with a 6p22-24 interstitial deletion. This enabled us to further narrow down the critical region for the 6p22 deletion phenotype to 2.2Mb. Twelve genes are mapped to the overlapping deleted region, among them the gene encoding the ataxin-1 protein, the ATXN1 gene. Mice with homozygous deletions in ATXN1 are phenotypically normal but show cognitive delay. Haploinsufficiency of ATXN1 may therefore contribute to the learning difficulties observed in the patients harboring a 6p22 deletion.

  16. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  17. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  18. An evaluation of the use of new Doppler methods for detecting longitudinal function abnormalities in a pacing-induced heart failure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabata, Tomotsugu; Cardon, Lisa A.; Armstrong, Guy P.; Fukamach, Kiyotaka; Takagaki, Masami; Ochiai, Yoshie; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Doppler tissue echocardiography and color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity have proven useful in evaluating cross-sections of patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, but experience with serial changes is limited. Purpose and methods: We tested their use by evaluating the temporal changes of LV function in a pacing-induced congestive heart failure model. Rapid ventricular pacing was initiated and maintained in 20 dogs for 4 weeks. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and weekly during brief pacing cessation. RESULTS: With rapid pacing, LV volume significantly increased and ejection fraction (57%-28%), stroke volume (37-18 mL), and mitral annulus systolic velocity (16.1-6.6 cm/s) by Doppler tissue echocardiography significantly decreased, with ejection fraction and mitral annulus systolic velocity closely correlated (r = 0.706, P <.0001). In contrast to the mitral inflow velocities, mitral annulus early diastolic velocity decreased steadily (12.3-7.3 cm/s) resulting in a dramatic decrease in mitral annulus early/late (1.22-0.57) diastolic velocity with no tendency toward pseudonormalization. The color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity also showed significant steady decrease (57-24 cm/s) throughout the pacing period. Multiple regression analysis chose mitral annulus systolic velocity (r = 0.895, P <.0001) and propagation velocity (r = 0.782, P <.0001) for the most important factor predicting LV systolic and diastolic function, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Doppler tissue echocardiography and color M-mode Doppler flow could evaluate the serial deterioration in LV dysfunction throughout the pacing period. These were more useful in quantifying progressive LV dysfunction than conventional ehocardiographic techniques, and were probably relatively independent of preload. These techniques could be suitable for longitudinal evaluation in addition to the cross-sectional study.

  19. Provocation of sudden heart rate oscillation with adenosine exposes abnormal QT responses in patients with long QT syndrome: a bedside test for diagnosing long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Viskin, Sami; Rosso, Raphael; Rogowski, Ori; Belhassen, Bernard; Fourey, Dana; Zeltser, David; Rozovski, Uri; Levitas, Aviva; Wagshal, Abraham; Katz, Amos; Oliva, Antonio; Pollevick, Guido D.; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Aims As arrhythmias in the long QT syndrome (LQTS) are triggered by heart rate deceleration or acceleration, we speculated that the sudden bradycardia and subsequent tachycardia that follow adenosine injection would unravel QT changes of diagnostic value in patients with LQTS. Methods and results Patients (18 LQTS and 20 controls) received intravenous adenosine during sinus rhythm. Adenosine was injected at incremental doses until atrioventricular block or sinus pauses lasting 3 s occurred. The QT duration and morphology were studied at baseline and at the time of maximal bradycardia and subsequent tachycardia. Despite similar degree of adenosine-induced bradycardia (longest R-R 1.7 + 0.7 vs. 2.2 + 1.3 s for LQTS and controls, P = NS), the QT interval of LQT patients increased by 15.8 + 13.1%, whereas the QT of controls increased by only 1.5 + 6.7% (P<0.001). Similarly, despite similar reflex tachycardia (shortest R-R 0.58 + 0.07 vs. 0.55 + 0.07 s for LQT patients and controls, P = NS), LQTS patients developed greater QT prolongation (QTc = 569 + 53 vs. 458 + 58 ms for LQT patients and controls, P<0.001). The best discriminator was the QTc during maximal bradycardia. Notched T-waves were observed in 72% of LQT patients but in only 5% of controls during adenosine-induced bradycardia (P<0.001). Conclusion By provoking transient bradycardia followed by sinus tachycardia, this adenosine challenge test triggers QT changes that appear to be useful in distinguishing patients with LQTS from healthy controls. PMID:16105845

  20. Breath sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... are believed to occur when air opens closed air spaces. Rales can be further described as moist, dry, fine, and coarse. Rhonchi. Sounds that resemble snoring. They occur when air is blocked or air flow becomes rough through ...

  1. Sound Advice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popke, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the planning and decision-making process in acquiring sound equipment for sports stadiums that will help make the experience of fans more pleasurable. The bidding process and use of consultants is explored. (GR)

  2. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... findings suggesting, abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis,...

  3. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  4. Sound Guard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lubrication technology originally developed for a series of NASA satellites has produced a commercial product for protecting the sound fidelity of phonograph records. Called Sound Guard, the preservative is a spray-on fluid that deposits a microscopically thin protective coating which reduces friction and prevents the hard diamond stylus from wearing away the softer vinyl material of the disc. It is marketed by the Consumer Products Division of Ball Corporation, Muncie, Indiana. The lubricant technology on which Sound Guard is based originated with NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO), an Earth-orbiting satellite designed and built by Ball Brothers Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, also a division of Ball Corporation. Ball Brothers engineers found a problem early in the OSO program: known lubricants were unsuitable for use on satellite moving parts that would be exposed to the vacuum of space for several months. So the company conducted research on the properties of materials needed for long life in space and developed new lubricants. They worked successfully on seven OSO flights and attracted considerable attention among other aerospace contractors. Ball Brothers now supplies its "Vac Kote" lubricants and coatings to both aerospace and non-aerospace industries and the company has produced several hundred variations of the original technology. Ball Corporation expanded its product line to include consumer products, of which Sound Guard is one of the most recent. In addition to protecting record grooves, Sound Guard's anti-static quality also retards particle accumulation on the stylus. During comparison study by a leading U.S. electronic laboratory, a record not treated by Sound Guard had to be cleaned after 50 plays and the stylus had collected a considerable number of small vinyl particles. The Sound Guard-treated disc was still clean after 100 plays, as was its stylus.

  5. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  6. Geophysical Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, E.

    1998-01-01

    Of the many geophysical remote-sensing techniques available today, a few are suitable for the water ice-rich, layered material expected at the north martian ice cap. Radio echo sounding has been used for several decades to determine ice thickness and internal structure. Selection of operating frequency is a tradeoff between signal attenuation (which typically increases with frequency and ice temperature) and resolution (which is proportional to wavelength). Antenna configuration and size will be additional considerations for a mission to Mars. Several configurations for ice-penetrating radar systems are discussed: these include orbiter-borne sounders, sounding antennas trailed by balloons and penetrators, and lander-borne systems. Lander-borne systems could include short-wave systems capable of resolving fine structure and layering in the upper meters beneath the lander. Spread-spectrum and deconvolution techniques can be used to increase the depth capability of a radar system. If soundings over several locations are available (e.g., with balloons, rovers, or panning short-wave systems), then it will be easier to resolve internal layering, variations in basal reflection coefficient (from which material properties may be inferred), and the geometry of nonhorizontal features. Sonic sounding has a long history in oil and gas exploration. It is, however, unlikely that large explosive charges, or even swept-frequency techniques such as Vibroseis, would be suitable for a Polar lander -- these systems are capable of penetrating several kilometers of material at frequencies of 10-200 Hz, but the energy required to generate the sound waves is large and potentially destructive. The use of audio-frequency and ultrasonic sound generated by piezoelectric crystals is discussed as a possible method to explore layering and fine features in the upper meters of the ice cap. Appropriate choice of transducer(s) will permit operation over a range of fixed or modulated frequencies

  7. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  8. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  9. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    The modern theory of aerodynamic sound originates from Lighthill's two papers in 1952 and 1954, as is well known. I have heard that Lighthill was motivated in writing the papers by the jet-noise emitted by the newly commercialized jet-engined airplanes at that time. The technology of aerodynamic sound is destined for environmental problems. Therefore the theory should always be applied to newly emerged public nuisances. This issue of Fluid Dynamics Research (FDR) reflects problems of environmental sound in present Japanese technology. The Japanese community studying aerodynamic sound has held an annual symposium since 29 years ago when the late Professor S Kotake and Professor S Kaji of Teikyo University organized the symposium. Most of the Japanese authors in this issue are members of the annual symposium. I should note the contribution of the two professors cited above in establishing the Japanese community of aerodynamic sound research. It is my pleasure to present the publication in this issue of ten papers discussed at the annual symposium. I would like to express many thanks to the Editorial Board of FDR for giving us the chance to contribute these papers. We have a review paper by T Suzuki on the study of jet noise, which continues to be important nowadays, and is expected to reform the theoretical model of generating mechanisms. Professor M S Howe and R S McGowan contribute an analytical paper, a valuable study in today's fluid dynamics research. They apply hydrodynamics to solve the compressible flow generated in the vocal cords of the human body. Experimental study continues to be the main methodology in aerodynamic sound, and it is expected to explore new horizons. H Fujita's study on the Aeolian tone provides a new viewpoint on major, longstanding sound problems. The paper by M Nishimura and T Goto on textile fabrics describes new technology for the effective reduction of bluff-body noise. The paper by T Sueki et al also reports new technology for the

  10. Wavelet Packet Entropy for Heart Murmurs Classification

    PubMed Central

    Safara, Fatemeh; Doraisamy, Shyamala; Azman, Azreen; Jantan, Azrul; Ranga, Sri

    2012-01-01

    Heart murmurs are the first signs of cardiac valve disorders. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to automatically differentiate normal heart sounds, from heart sounds with murmurs using various types of audio features. Entropy was successfully used as a feature to distinguish different heart sounds. In this paper, new entropy was introduced to analyze heart sounds and the feasibility of using this entropy in classification of five types of heart sounds and murmurs was shown. The entropy was previously introduced to analyze mammograms. Four common murmurs were considered including aortic regurgitation, mitral regurgitation, aortic stenosis, and mitral stenosis. Wavelet packet transform was employed for heart sound analysis, and the entropy was calculated for deriving feature vectors. Five types of classification were performed to evaluate the discriminatory power of the generated features. The best results were achieved by BayesNet with 96.94% accuracy. The promising results substantiate the effectiveness of the proposed wavelet packet entropy for heart sounds classification. PMID:23227043

  11. Can Pregnancy Harm Your Heart?

    MedlinePlus

    ... new studies suggest. A woman's risk of atrial fibrillation -- an abnormal heart rhythm -- rises with each pregnancy, ... researchers found that 1,532 cases of atrial fibrillation had developed among the women. Atrial fibrillation is ...

  12. Detection of patients considering observation frequency of continuous and discontinuous adventitious sounds in lung sounds.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Naoki; Yamashita, Masaru; Matsunaga, Shoichi

    2016-08-01

    We propose an improved approach for distinguishing between healthy subjects and patients with pulmonary emphysema by the use of one stochastic acoustic model for continuous adventitious sounds and another for discontinuous adventitious sounds. These models are able to represent the spectral features of the adventitious sounds for the detection of abnormal respiration. However, abnormal respiratory sounds with unclassifiable spectral features are present among the continuous and discontinuous adventitious sounds and mixing noises. These sounds cause difficulties in achieving a highly accurate classification. In this study, the difference in occurrence frequencies between two types of adventitious sounds for each considered auscultation point and inspiration/expiration was considered. This difference, in combination with the confusion tendency of the classifier, was formulated as the validity score of each respiratory sound. The conventional spectral likelihood and the newly formulated validity score were combined to perform detection of abnormal respiration and patients. In the classification of healthy subjects and patients, the proposed approach achieved a higher classification rate (87.7%) than the conventional method (85.2%), demonstrating the statistical superiority (5% level) of the former.

  13. Association of Electrocardiographic Abnormalities with Coronary Artery Calcium and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Individuals without Clinical Coronary Heart Disease (From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA])

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald J.; Ning, Hongyan; Liu, Kiang; Daviglus, Martha L.; Shea, Steven; Detrano, Robert C.; Tandri, Harikrishna; Greenland, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Isolated minor non-specific ST-segment and T-wave (NSSTA), minor and major electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are established, independent risk markers for incident cardiovascular events. Their association with subclinical atherosclerosis has been postulated but is not clearly defined. The aim of this study is to define the association between ECG abnormalities and measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. We studied participants from MESA, a multi-ethnic sample of men and women aged 45–84 and free of clinical cardiovascular disease at enrollment. Baseline examination included measurement of traditional risk factors, resting 12-lead electrocardiograms, coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement and common carotid intima-media thickness (CCIMT). Electrocardiograms were coded using Novacode criteria and were defined as having either minor abnormalities (e.g., minor non-specific STTA, first degree atrioventricular block, and QRS axis deviations) or major abnormalities (e.g., pathologic Q waves, major ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, significant dysrhythmias and conduction system delays). Multivariable logistic and linear regressions were used to determine the cross-sectional associations of ECG abnormalities with CAC and common carotid-IMT. Among 6710 participants, 52.7% were women, with a mean age of 62 years. After multivariable-adjustment, isolated minor STTA, minor and major ECG abnormalities were not associated with the presence of CAC (>0) among men (OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.81–1.33; 1.10, 0.91–1.32; and 1.03, 0.81–1.31, respectively) or women (1.01, 0.82–1.24; 1.04, 0.87–1.23; and 0.94, 0.73–1.22, respectively). Lack of association remained consistent when using both log CAC and CC-IMT as continuous variables. ECG abnormalities are not associated with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in a large multi-ethnic cohort. PMID:19801030

  14. Association of electrocardiographic abnormalities with coronary artery calcium and carotid artery intima-media thickness in individuals without clinical coronary heart disease (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]).

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald J; Ning, Hongyan; Liu, Kiang; Daviglus, Martha L; Shea, Steven; Detrano, Robert C; Tandri, Harikrishna; Greenland, Philip

    2009-10-15

    Isolated minor nonspecific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities (NSSTAs), minor and major electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are established, independent risk markers for incident cardiovascular events. Their association with subclinical atherosclerosis has been postulated but is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to define the association between ECG abnormalities and measurements of subclinical atherosclerosis. We studied participants from MESA, a multiethnic sample of men and women 45 to 84 years of age and free of clinical cardiovascular disease at enrollment. Baseline examination included measurement of traditional risk factors, 12-lead electrocardiograms at rest, coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement, and common carotid intima-media thickness (CC-IMT). Electrocardiograms were coded using Novacode criteria and were defined as having minor abnormalities (e.g., minor NSSTTAs, first-degree atrioventricular block, and QRS-axis deviations) or major abnormalities (e.g., pathologic Q waves, major STTAs, significant dysrhythmias, and conduction system delays). Multivariable logistic and linear regressions were used to determine cross-sectional associations of ECG abnormalities with CAC and CC-IMT. Of 6,710 participants, 52.7% were women, with a mean age of 62 years. After multivariable adjustment, isolated minor STTAs and minor and major ECG abnormalities were not associated with presence of CAC (>0) in men (odds ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 1.33; 1.10, 0.91 to 1.32; and 1.03, 0.81 to 1.31, respectively) or women (1.01, 0.82 to 1.24; 1.04, 0.87 to 1.23; and 0.94, 0.73 to 1.22, respectively). Lack of association remained consistent when using log CAC and CC-IMT as continuous variables. In conclusion, ECG abnormalities are not associated with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in a large multiethnic cohort.

  15. Management and Breeding Soundness of Mature Bulls.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Colin W

    2016-07-01

    Mature bulls must be fed a balanced ration, vaccinated appropriately, and undergo a breeding soundness evaluation to ensure they meet what is required of a short, but intense breeding season. To be classified as a satisfactory potential breeder, minimum standards for physical soundness, scrotal circumference, sperm motility, and sperm morphology must be achieved using an accepted bull-breeding soundness evaluation format. Sperm production requires approximately 70 days. Heat and stress are the most common insults to spermatogenesis, causing an increase in morphologic abnormalities with obesity-associated scrotal fat accumulation being the most frequent cause of elevated testicular temperature in mature bulls.

  16. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death.

  17. Method of sound synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Miner, Nadine E.; Caudell, Thomas P.

    2004-06-08

    A sound synthesis method for modeling and synthesizing dynamic, parameterized sounds. The sound synthesis method yields perceptually convincing sounds and provides flexibility through model parameterization. By manipulating model parameters, a variety of related, but perceptually different sounds can be generated. The result is subtle changes in sounds, in addition to synthesis of a variety of sounds, all from a small set of models. The sound models can change dynamically according to changes in the simulation environment. The method is applicable to both stochastic (impulse-based) and non-stochastic (pitched) sounds.

  18. AVE-SESAME IV: 25 mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 4 experiment is descirbed and tabulated data at 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 20 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 9, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on May 10, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  19. AVE-SESAME 6: 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 6 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 15 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 h intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on June 7, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on June 8, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  20. AVE-SESAME 2: The 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. F.; Gerhard, M. L.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME II experiment is described. Data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 19, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 20, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  1. AVE-Sesame 3: 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. T.; Gerhard, M. L.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 3 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 25, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 26, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  2. Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... including how to maximize your recovery at home. Congenital Heart Defects • Home • About Congenital Heart Defects • The ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Congenital Heart Defect Publications If Your Child Has a ...

  3. Energy metabolism in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Garnier, Anne; Veksler, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome resulting from the inability of the cardiac pump to meet the energy requirements of the body. Despite intensive work, the pathogenesis of the cardiac intracellular abnormalities that result from HF remains incompletely understood. Factors that lead to abnormal contraction and relaxation in the failing heart include metabolic pathway abnormalities that result in decreased energy production, energy transfer and energy utilization. Heart failure also affects the periphery. Patients suffering from heart failure always complain of early muscular fatigue and exercise intolerance. This is linked in part to intrinsic alterations of skeletal muscle, among which decreases in the mitochondrial ATP production and in the transfer of energy through the phosphotransfer kinases play an important role. Alterations in energy metabolism that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles argue for a generalized metabolic myopathy in heart failure. Recent evidence shows that decreased expression of mitochondrial transcription factors and mitochondrial proteins are involved in mechanisms causing the energy starvation in heart failure. This review will focus on energy metabolism alterations in long-term chronic heart failure with only a few references to compensated hypertrophy when necessary. It will briefly describe the energy metabolism of normal heart and skeletal muscles and their alterations in chronic heart failure. It is beyond the scope of this review to address the metabolic switches occurring in compensated hypertrophy; readers could refer to well-documented reviews on this subject. PMID:14660709

  4. An Analysis of Sound Exposure in a University Music Rehearsal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Joe; Thrasher, Michael; Fumo, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high sound levels may lead to a variety of hearing abnormalities, including Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL). Pre-professional university music majors may experience frequent exposure to elevated sound levels, and this may have implications on their future career prospects (Jansen, Helleman, Dreschler & de Laat, 2009). Studies…

  5. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  6. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  7. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  8. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  9. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  10. Calculating Speed of Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Shalabh

    2017-01-01

    Sound is an emerging source of renewable energy but it has some limitations. The main limitation is, the amount of energy that can be extracted from sound is very less and that is because of the velocity of the sound. The velocity of sound changes as per medium. If we could increase the velocity of the sound in a medium we would be probably able to extract more amount of energy from sound and will be able to transfer it at a higher rate. To increase the velocity of sound we should know the speed of sound. If we go by the theory of classic mechanics speed is the distance travelled by a particle divided by time whereas velocity is the displacement of particle divided by time. The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is considered to be 343.2 meters per second and it won't be wrong in saying that 342.2 meters is the velocity of sound not the speed as it's the displacement of the sound not the total distance sound wave covered. Sound travels in the form of mechanical wave, so while calculating the speed of sound the whole path of wave should be considered not just the distance traveled by sound. In this paper I would like to focus on calculating the actual speed of sound wave which can help us to extract more energy and make sound travel with faster velocity.

  11. Sound Insulation in Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gösele, K.; Schröder, E.

    Sound insulation between the different rooms inside a building or to the outside is a very complex problem. First, the airborne sound insulation of ceilings, walls, doors and windows is important. Second, a sufficient structure-borne sound insulation, also called impact sound insulation, for the ceilings, has to be provided especially. Finally, the service equipment should be sufficiently quiet.

  12. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  13. The Sound of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  14. Making Sound Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2007-01-01

    Sound provides and offers amazing insights into the world. Sound waves may be defined as mechanical energy that moves through air or other medium as a longitudinal wave and consists of pressure fluctuations. Humans and animals alike use sound as a means of communication and a tool for survival. Mammals, such as bats, use ultrasonic sound waves to…

  15. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  16. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  17. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur. Try deep relaxation or breathing exercises. Practice yoga, meditation, or tai chi. Get regular exercise. Do ... M. Editorial team. Images Heart chambers Heart beat Yoga Arrhythmia Read more Atrial Fibrillation Read more Heart ...

  18. Computed tomography of the abnormal pericardium

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Harell, G.S.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-06-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 18 patients with documented pericardial disease are reported. The pericardium appears as a thin, curvilinear, 1- to 2-mm-thick density best seen anterior to the right ventricular part of the heart. Pericardial abnormalities detected by CT include effusions, thickening, calcification, and cystic and solid masses. Computed tomography is complimentary to echocardiography in its ability to more accurately characterize pericardial effusions, masses, and pericardial thickening.

  19. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2013-02-01

    Despite major improvements in the treatment of virtually all cardiac disorders, heart failure (HF) is an exception, in that its prevalence is rising, and only small prolongations in survival are occurring. An increasing fraction, especially older women with diabetes, obesity, and atrial fibrillation exhibit HF with preserved systolic function. Several pathogenetic mechanisms appear to be operative in HF. These include increased hemodynamic overload, ischemia-related dysfunction, ventricular remodeling, excessive neurohumoral stimulation, abnormal myocyte calcium cycling, excessive or inadequate proliferation of the extracellular matrix, accelerated apoptosis, and genetic mutations. Biomarkers released as a consequence of myocardial stretch, imbalance between formation and breakdown of extracellular matrix, inflammation, and renal failure are useful in the identification of the pathogenetic mechanism and, when used in combination, may become helpful in estimating prognosis and selecting appropriate therapy. Promising new therapies that are now undergoing intensive investigation include an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, a naturally-occurring vasodilator peptide, a myofilament sensitizer and several drugs that enhance Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Cell therapy, using autologous bone marrow and cardiac progenitor cells, appears to be promising, as does gene therapy. Chronic left ventricular assistance with continuous flow pumps is being applied more frequently and successfully as destination therapy, as a bridge to transplantation, and even as a bridge to recovery and explantation. While many of these therapies will improve the care of patients with HF, significant reductions in prevalence will require vigorous, multifaceted, preventive approaches.

  20. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  2. Early sound symbolism for vowel sounds.

    PubMed

    Spector, Ferrinne; Maurer, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Children and adults consistently match some words (e.g., kiki) to jagged shapes and other words (e.g., bouba) to rounded shapes, providing evidence for non-arbitrary sound-shape mapping. In this study, we investigated the influence of vowels on sound-shape matching in toddlers, using four contrasting pairs of nonsense words differing in vowel sound (/i/ as in feet vs. /o/ as in boat) and four rounded-jagged shape pairs. Crucially, we used reduplicated syllables (e.g., kiki vs. koko) rather than confounding vowel sound with consonant context and syllable variability (e.g., kiki vs. bouba). Toddlers consistently matched words with /o/ to rounded shapes and words with /i/ to jagged shapes (p < 0.01). The results suggest that there may be naturally biased correspondences between vowel sound and shape.

  3. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  4. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  6. Sound wave transmission (image)

    MedlinePlus

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  7. Primary restrictive cardiomyopathy. Non-tropical endomyocardial fibrosis and hypereosinophilic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chew, C Y; Ziady, G M; Raphael, M J; Nellen, M; Oakley, C M

    1977-01-01

    Eleven patients with a restrictive cardiomyopathy are described. Seven of these had biventricular disease and in them the haemodynamic abnormality resembled that in constrictive pericarditis but the condition was distinguishable because of unequal involvement of the two ventricles, murmurs of atrioventricular valve regurgitation, or characteristic ventricular deformity on angiography. Two of these patients had eosinophilia with the clinical features of Löffer's endocarditis. In 4 patients the disease was apparently confined to the left ventricle; they were investigated on account of atypical chest pain, third heart sound, or abnormal electrocardiogram. Simultaneous measurements of left ventricular pressure and volume throughout diastole were made in 3 patients and showed rapid but abruptly curtailed left ventricular filling. Transvenous endomyocardial biopsy in 2 patients showed fibrous tissue with collagen and irregular elastic fibrils. Surgical biopsy in 3 patients excluded pericardial constriction but was diagnostically unhelpful because of failure to obtain endocardium. Necropsy in one patient showed that the heart had features indistinguishable from tropical endomyocardial fibrosis. It is suggested that the spectrum of ventricular abnormalities in these patients results from endomyocardial fibrosis of varying severity and probably of differing cause. This study has shown that "tropical" endomyocardial fibrosis may occur outside the tropics and suggests that eosinophilia may play a leading role or associated part in the genesis of some cases. Images PMID:869976

  8. AVE-SEASAME 5: 25-mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The rewinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 5 experiment is described and tubulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented for the 23 National Weather Service stations and 20 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 20, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on may 21, 1979 (nine sounding times). A tenth sounding was teken at many special stations between 2100 and 0000 GMT on May 20. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings with abnormal characteristics are listed.

  9. Sound of sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elze, H.-Thomas; Kodama, Takeshi; Rafelski, Johann

    1998-04-01

    We consider an air bubble in water under conditions of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) and evaluate the emitted sound field nonperturbatively for subsonic gas-liquid interface motion. Sound emission being the dominant damping mechanism, we also implement the nonperturbative sound damping in the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for the interface motion. We evaluate numerically the sound pulse emitted during bubble collapse and compare the nonperturbative and perturbative results, showing that the usual perturbative description leads to an overestimate of the maximal surface velocity and maximal sound pressure. The radius vs time relation for a full SBSL cycle remains deceptively unaffected.

  10. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  11. Priming Gestures with Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Heller, Laurie M.; Navolio, Nicole; Zúñiga-Peñaranda, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments about a little-studied type of compatibility effect between a stimulus and a response: the priming of manual gestures via sounds associated with these gestures. The goal was to investigate the plasticity of the gesture-sound associations mediating this type of priming. Five experiments used a primed choice-reaction task. Participants were cued by a stimulus to perform response gestures that produced response sounds; those sounds were also used as primes before the response cues. We compared arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds (key lifts and pure tones) created during the experiment (i.e. no pre-existing knowledge) with ecological associations corresponding to the structure of the world (tapping gestures and sounds, scraping gestures and sounds) learned through the entire life of the participant (thus existing prior to the experiment). Two results were found. First, the priming effect exists for ecological as well as arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds. Second, the priming effect is greatly reduced for ecologically existing associations and is eliminated for arbitrary associations when the response gesture stops producing the associated sounds. These results provide evidence that auditory-motor priming is mainly created by rapid learning of the association between sounds and the gestures that produce them. Auditory-motor priming is therefore mediated by short-term associations between gestures and sounds that can be readily reconfigured regardless of prior knowledge. PMID:26544884

  12. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed.

  13. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 37. Swerdlow CD, Wang PJ, Zipes DP. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. ... and lifestyle Controlling your high blood pressure Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart ...

  14. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... not used to treat first-degree heart block. All types of heart block may increase your risk for other arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation (A-tre-al fih-brih-LA-shun). Talk with your doctor ...

  15. Advanced heart block in acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Hubail, Zakariya; Ebrahim, Ishaq M

    2016-04-01

    First degree heart block is considered a minor criterion for the diagnosis of this condition. The cases presented here demonstrate that higher degrees of heart block do occur in rheumatic fever. Children presenting with acquired heart block should be worked-up for rheumatic fever. Likewise, it is imperative to serially follow the electrocardiogram in patients already diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever, as the conduction abnormalities can change during the course of the disease.

  16. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  17. Metabolic mechanisms in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Houman; Frenneaux, Michael P; Opie, Lionel H

    2007-07-24

    Although neurohumoral antagonism has successfully reduced heart failure morbidity and mortality, the residual disability and death rate remains unacceptably high. Though abnormalities of myocardial metabolism are associated with heart failure, recent data suggest that heart failure may itself promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation. A detrimental self-perpetuating cycle (heart failure --> altered metabolism --> heart failure) that promotes the progression of heart failure may thus be postulated. Accordingly, we review the cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of altered metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. It is hypothesized that the ensuing detrimental myocardial energetic perturbations result from neurohumoral activation, increased adverse free fatty acid metabolism, decreased protective glucose metabolism, and in some cases insulin resistance. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine, and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. On the basis of the mechanisms outlined, appropriate therapies to mitigate aberrant metabolism include intense neurohumoral antagonism, limitation of diuretics, correction of hypokalemia, exercise, and diet. We also discuss more novel mechanistic-based therapies to ameliorate metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. For example, metabolic modulators may optimize myocardial substrate utilization to improve cardiac function and exercise performance beyond standard care. The ultimate success of metabolic-based therapy will be manifest by its capacity further to lessen the residual mortality in heart failure.

  18. Signal processing of Shiley heart valve data for fracture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.

    1993-09-01

    Given digital acoustic data emanating from the heart sounds of the beating heart measured from laboratory sheep with implanted Bjoerk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves, it is possible to detect and extract the opening and closing heart beats from the data. Once extracted, spectral or other information can then obtained from the heartbeats and passed on to feature extraction algorithms, neural networks, or pattern recognizers so that the valve condition, either fractured or intact, may be determined.

  19. Signal processing of Shiley heart valve data for fracture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.

    1993-04-01

    Given digital acoustic data emanating from the heart sounds of the beating heart measured from laboratory sheep with implanted Bjoerk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves, it is possible to detect and extract the opening and closing heart beats from the data. Once extracted, spectral or other information can then obtained from the heartbeats and passed on to feature extraction algorithms, neutral networks, or pattern recognizers so that the valve condition, either fractured or intact, may be determined.

  20. Sound Power Determination Using Sound Intensity Measurements: Applications and Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaobo

    1995-01-01

    The determination of sound power using sound intensity measurements is one of the most important developments in acoustics since the advent of digital signal processing techniques and FFT (fast Fourier transform) techniques in 1970's. Sound power determination using sound intensity measurements is the only way to precisely determine the sound power of noise sources in operating conditions when other noise sources are operating simultaneously. Sound power determination from sound intensity measurements largely obviates the need for special purpose test facilities, such as an anechoic room or a reverberation room. The determination of sound power from sound intensity measurements has many distinct advantages over the traditional determination of the sound power from sound pressure, and it will soon become the dominant method in the determination of the sound power of noise sources in-situ. Sound intensity measurements have been successfully applied to the determination of the sound power levels of noise sources in laboratory conditions, and of small machinery noise sources. The full scale application of this new technique to industrial machinery noise sources is certainly of importance for practical purposes. This dissertation mainly describes progress made in research on the application of sound intensity measurements for the determination of the sound power of noise sources. Results concerning the sound power determination from sound intensity measurements in the following areas are discussed: sound power determination from sound intensity measurements at low frequency, error analysis of sound intensity estimates at low frequency, and sound power determination from sound intensity measurements in the presence of air flow, sound power determination from sound intensity measurements in the presence of strong background noise and some practical considerations on the application of the sound intensity technique to in-situ sound power determination.

  1. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke.

  2. Acoustic heart. Interpretation of Phonocardiograms by computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, J.; Tavera, F.; Velázquez, J. M.; López, G.; Hernández, R. T.; Morales, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the field of Cardiology have been identified several heart pathologies associated with problems in valves and narrowing in veins. Each case is associated with a specific sound emitted by the heart, detected in cardiac auscultation. On the Phonocardiogram, sound is visualized as a peak in the wave. In the Optics Laboratory of the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco, we have developed a simulation of the Phonocardiograms of heart sounds associated with the main pathologies and a computer program of recognition of images that allows you to quickly identify the respective diseases. This is a novel way to analyze Phonocardiograms and the foundation for building a portable non-invasive cardiac diagnostic computerized analyzer system.

  3. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  4. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  5. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    Part one of a three-part series about noise pollution and its effects on humans. This section presents the background information for teachers who are preparing a unit on sound. The next issues will offer learning activities for measuring the effects of sound and some references. (SA)

  6. Breaking the Sound Barrier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Boehringer, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Students in a fourth-grade class participated in a series of dynamic sound learning centers followed by a dramatic capstone event--an exploration of the amazing Trashcan Whoosh Waves. It's a notoriously difficult subject to teach, but this hands-on, exploratory approach ignited student interest in sound, promoted language acquisition, and built…

  7. Operational sounding algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The analytical equations used to interpret TIROS-N sounding radiances for operational applications are presented. Both the National Environmental Satellite System (NESS) Global Operational Synoptic Scale and the NESS/University of Wisconsin (UW) North American Mesoscale Sounding Production Systems are considered.

  8. Categorization of Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Roel; Sereno, Joan; Jongman, Allard

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted 4 experiments to test the decision-bound, prototype, and distribution theories for the categorization of sounds. They used as stimuli sounds varying in either resonance frequency or duration. They created different experimental conditions by varying the variance and overlap of 2 stimulus distributions used in a training phase…

  9. The Bosstown Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary

    Based on the argument that (contrary to critical opinion) the musicians in the various bands associated with Bosstown Sound were indeed talented, cohesive individuals and that the bands' lack of renown was partially a result of ill-treatment by record companies and the press, this paper traces the development of the Bosstown Sound from its…

  10. The Teaching of Abnormal Psychology through the Cinema.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissim-Sabat, Denis

    1979-01-01

    Describes abnormal psychology course centered around films which include "King of Hearts,""A Woman Under the Influence,""David and Lisa,""In Cold Blood," and "The Boys in the Band." Each film deals with a fundamental concept such as psychopathology, neurosis, psychosis, insanity, and sexuality. (KC)

  11. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  12. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  13. The sound manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Michael J.; Bisnovatyi, Ilia

    2000-11-01

    Computing practice today depends on visual output to drive almost all user interaction. Other senses, such as audition, may be totally neglected, or used tangentially, or used in highly restricted specialized ways. We have excellent audio rendering through D-A conversion, but we lack rich general facilities for modeling and manipulating sound comparable in quality and flexibility to graphics. We need coordinated research in several disciplines to improve the use of sound as an interactive information channel. Incremental and separate improvements in synthesis, analysis, speech processing, audiology, acoustics, music, etc. will not alone produce the radical progress that we seek in sonic practice. We also need to create a new central topic of study in digital audio research. The new topic will assimilate the contributions of different disciplines on a common foundation. The key central concept that we lack is sound as a general-purpose information channel. We must investigate the structure of this information channel, which is driven by the cooperative development of auditory perception and physical sound production. Particular audible encodings, such as speech and music, illuminate sonic information by example, but they are no more sufficient for a characterization than typography is sufficient for characterization of visual information. To develop this new conceptual topic of sonic information structure, we need to integrate insights from a number of different disciplines that deal with sound. In particular, we need to coordinate central and foundational studies of the representational models of sound with specific applications that illuminate the good and bad qualities of these models. Each natural or artificial process that generates informative sound, and each perceptual mechanism that derives information from sound, will teach us something about the right structure to attribute to the sound itself. The new Sound topic will combine the work of computer

  14. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  15. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  16. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  17. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  18. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, GiGi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with −11 to −13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that −12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs. PMID:28145486

  19. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, Gigi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-02-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with ‑11 to ‑13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that ‑12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs.

  20. Photoacoustic sounds from meteors

    DOE PAGES

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; ...

    2017-02-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with –11 to –13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally.more » Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that –12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. As a result, the photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs.« less

  1. Cortical Activation during Attention to Sound in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funabiki, Yasuko; Murai, Toshiya; Toichi, Motomi

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) can demonstrate hypersensitivity to sounds as well as a lack of awareness of them. Several functional imaging studies have suggested an abnormal response in the auditory cortex of such subjects, but it is not known whether these subjects have dysfunction in the auditory cortex or are simply not…

  2. Sound as artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  3. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  4. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of highly accurate and useful system.

  5. Sounding the Sun

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-30

    Sounding the Sun Antony Fraser-Smith STAR Laboratory Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 phone: (650) 723-3684 fax: (650) 723-9251 email...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sounding the Sun 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...systems. The objective of our “Sounding the sun ” experiment is to detect earth-directed CME’s by using existing earth-based HF (3- 30 MHz) radar systems

  6. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  7. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... catheterization Tests to look for cancer Tissue and blood typing , to help make sure your body will not reject the donated heart Ultrasound of your neck and legs You will ... heart pump enough blood to the body. Most often, this is a ...

  8. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... español An Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The Heart Valves The Heartbeat Vasculature of the Arm Vasculature of the Head Vasculature of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso ...

  9. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  10. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  11. Sound Visualization and Holography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kock, Winston E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes liquid surface holograms including their application to medicine. Discusses interference and diffraction phenomena using sound wave scanning techniques. Compares focussing by zone plate to holographic image development. (GH)

  12. Applying cybernetic technology to diagnose human pulmonary sounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Yung; Chou, Cheng-Han

    2014-06-01

    Chest auscultation is a crucial and efficient method for diagnosing lung disease; however, it is a subjective process that relies on physician experience and the ability to differentiate between various sound patterns. Because the physiological signals composed of heart sounds and pulmonary sounds (PSs) are greater than 120 Hz and the human ear is not sensitive to low frequencies, successfully making diagnostic classifications is difficult. To solve this problem, we constructed various PS recognition systems for classifying six PS classes: vesicular breath sounds, bronchial breath sounds, tracheal breath sounds, crackles, wheezes, and stridor sounds. First, we used a piezoelectric microphone and data acquisition card to acquire PS signals and perform signal preprocessing. A wavelet transform was used for feature extraction, and the PS signals were decomposed into frequency subbands. Using a statistical method, we extracted 17 features that were used as the input vectors of a neural network. We proposed a 2-stage classifier combined with a back-propagation (BP) neural network and learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which improves classification accuracy by using a haploid neural network. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve verifies the high performance level of the neural network. To expand traditional auscultation methods, we constructed various PS diagnostic systems that can correctly classify the six common PSs. The proposed device overcomes the lack of human sensitivity to low-frequency sounds and various PS waves, characteristic values, and a spectral analysis charts are provided to elucidate the design of the human-machine interface.

  13. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  14. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Orcas in Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    de Fuca Strait, Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia ) for a considerable time of the year, predominantly from early spring until late fall (Ford and...the south- ern part of Georgia Strait, Boundary Passage, the southern Gulf Islands and the eastern end of Juan de Fuca Strait (Heimlich- Boran 1988...Figure 2. Distribution of SRKW during September 2006 in Puget Sound and the southern Strait of Georgia (Advanced Satellite Productions, Orca Network

  16. Physiological and psychological assessment of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagihashi, R.; Ohira, Masayoshi; Kimura, Teiji; Fujiwara, Takayuki

    The psycho-physiological effects of several sound stimulations were investigated to evaluate the relationship between a psychological parameter, such as subjective perception, and a physiological parameter, such as the heart rate variability (HRV). Eight female students aged 21-22 years old were tested. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and the movement of the chest-wall for estimating respiratory rate were recorded during three different sound stimulations; (1) music provided by a synthesizer (condition A); (2) birds twitters (condition B); and (3) mechanical sounds (condition C). The percentage power of the low-frequency (LF; 0.05<=0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF; 0.15<=0.40 Hz) components in the HRV (LF%, HF%) were assessed by a frequency analysis of time-series data for 5 min obtained from R-R intervals in the ECG. Quantitative assessment of subjective perception was also described by a visual analog scale (VAS). The HF% and VAS value for comfort in C were significantly lower than in either A and/or B. The respiratory rate and VAS value for awakening in C were significantly higher than in A and/or B. There was a significant correlation between the HF% and the value of the VAS, and between the respiratory rate and the value of the VAS. These results indicate that mechanical sounds similar to C inhibit the para-sympathetic nervous system and promote a feeling that is unpleasant but alert, also suggesting that the HRV reflects subjective perception.

  17. Ecological sounds affect breath duration more than artificial sounds.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Mauro; Santoro, Ilaria; Tamburini, Giorgia; Prpic, Valter; Sors, Fabrizio; Galmonte, Alessandra; Agostini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that auditory rhythms affect both movement and physiological functions. We hypothesized that the ecological sounds of human breathing can affect breathing more than artificial sounds of breathing, varying in tones for inspiration and expiration. To address this question, we monitored the breath duration of participants exposed to three conditions: (a) ecological sounds of breathing, (b) artificial sounds of breathing having equal temporal features as the ecological sounds, (c) no sounds (control). We found that participants' breath duration variability was reduced in the ecological sound condition, more than in the artificial sound condition. We suggest that ecological sounds captured the timing of breathing better than artificial sounds, guiding as a consequence participants' breathing. We interpreted our results according to the Theory of Event Coding, providing further support to its validity, and suggesting its possible extension in the domain of physiological functions which are both consciously and unconsciously controlled.

  18. Logging the Heart with Microcomputer-Based Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Eijck, Michiel; Goedhart, Martin; Ellermeijer, Ton

    2005-01-01

    A single heartbeat is a complicated process. In Dutch upper secondary biology textbooks this process is illustrated by the classical Wiggers diagram, which usually shows different heart-related quantities, like voltage (ECG), blood pressure, and the heart sounds. It may help students to understand the nature of the Wiggers diagram if they perform…

  19. [Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of complex heart abnormality in routine screening].

    PubMed

    Kronich, W; Salzer-Muhar, U; Strigl, E; Gerstner, G J

    1990-02-01

    Case report on a severe cardial malformation associated with trisomia 21, diagnosed by ultrasound-screening in the 34th week of gestation. Further diagnostic evaluation of the case and therapeutic management are described. The problems of modern malformation diagnostics by routine ultrasound scanning in pregnancy are discussed.

  20. Vagal enhancement linking abnormal blood pressure response and subendocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Sugihara, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    An abnormal blood pressure response to exercise has been reported to be associated with left ventricular subendocardial ischemia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We report a case of HCM with an abnormal blood pressure response and subendocardial ischemia, in which the analysis of heart rate variability revealed exercise-induced vagal enhancement. The present case highlights the possible mechanism linking abnormal blood pressure response and left ventricular subendocardial ischemia in patients with HCM.

  1. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  2. Modeling Syndromic Congenital Heart Defects in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Grant, Meagan G; Patterson, Victoria L; Grimes, Daniel T; Burdine, Rebecca D

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac development is a dynamic process regulated by spatial and temporal cues that are integrated to effect molecular, cellular, and tissue-level events that form the adult heart. Disruption of these highly orchestrated events can be devastating for cardiac form and function. Aberrations in heart development result in congenital heart defects (CHDs), which affect 1 in 100 infants in the United States each year. Zebrafish have proven informative as a model organism to understand both heart development and the mechanisms associated with CHDs due to the similarities in heart morphogenesis among vertebrates, as well as their genetic tractability and amenability to live imaging. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of zebrafish heart development and the utility of zebrafish for understanding syndromic CHDs, those cardiac abnormalities that occur in the context of multisystem disorders. We conclude with avenues of zebrafish research that will potentially inform future therapeutic approaches for the treatment of CHDs.

  3. Developmental Change in Fetal Response to Repeated Low-Intensity Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morokuma, Seiichi; Doria, Valentina; Ierullo, Antonio; Kinukawa, Naoko; Fukushima, Kotaro; Nakano, Hitoo; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam; Papageorghiou, Aris T.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate developmental changes in heart rate response to repeated low-intensity (85 dB) sound stimulation in fetuses between 32 and 37 weeks of gestation. We measured amplitude changes in heart rate as our index of fetal response. At 35 to 37 weeks of gestation, the majority of fetuses showed a deceleratory response…

  4. Wine and heart health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  5. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Arrhythmia Congenital Heart Defects Coronary Heart Disease Heart Valve Disease High Blood Pressure Send a link to NHLBI ... with the heart’s structure are present at birth. Heart valve disease . Occurs if one or more of your heart ...

  6. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  7. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... yourself MedlinePlus for More Information National Institute on Aging Related Topics Heart Failure High Blood Cholesterol High ... us | Customer Support | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of ...

  8. Hearts Wish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates characteristics and themes in 102 drawings by sexually abused children. Themes of the drawings included genitalia, the absence of specific body parts, phallic symbols, inappropriate smiles, distorted body images, kinetic activity, prominent hands and fingers, and hearts. (RJC)

  9. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... for people who can't tolerate ACE inhibitors. Beta blockers. This class of drugs not only slows your ... rhythms and lessen your chance of dying unexpectedly. Beta blockers may reduce signs and symptoms of heart failure, ...

  10. Sound modes in holographic superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Christopher P.; Yarom, Amos

    2009-11-15

    Superfluids support many different types of sound waves. We investigate the relation between the sound waves in a relativistic and a nonrelativistic superfluid by using hydrodynamics to calculate the various sound speeds. Then, using a particular holographic scalar gravity realization of a strongly interacting superfluid, we compute first, second, and fourth sound speeds as a function of the temperature. The relativistic low temperature results for second sound differ from Landau's well known prediction for the nonrelativistic, incompressible case.

  11. Conduction abnormalities and ventricular arrhythmogenesis: The roles of sodium channels and gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Tse, Gary; Yeo, Jie Ming

    2015-12-07

    Ventricular arrhythmias arise from disruptions in the normal orderly sequence of electrical activation and recovery of the heart. They can be categorized into disorders affecting predominantly cellular depolarization or repolarization, or those involving action potential (AP) conduction. This article briefly discusses the factors causing conduction abnormalities in the form of unidirectional conduction block and reduced conduction velocity (CV). It then examines the roles that sodium channels and gap junctions play in AP conduction. Finally, it synthesizes experimental results to illustrate molecular mechanisms of how abnormalities in these proteins contribute to such conduction abnormalities and hence ventricular arrhythmogenesis, in acquired pathologies such as acute ischaemia and heart failure, as well as inherited arrhythmic syndromes.

  12. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place In the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is managed by personnel from Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, either from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia, Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico or from Canada, Norway and Sweden. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requi6ng considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. An inverse differential GPS system has been developed for Sounding Rocket. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of a high accurate and useful system.

  13. Meteor fireball sounds identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keay, Colin

    1992-01-01

    Sounds heard simultaneously with the flight of large meteor fireballs are electrical in origin. Confirmation that Extra/Very Low Frequency (ELF/VLF) electromagnetic radiation is produced by the fireball was obtained by Japanese researchers. Although the generation mechanism is not fully understood, studies of the Meteorite Observation and Recovery Project (MORP) and other fireball data indicate that interaction with the atmosphere is definitely responsible and the cut-off magnitude of -9 found for sustained electrophonic sounds is supported by theory. Brief bursts of ELF/VLF radiation may accompany flares or explosions of smaller fireballs, producing transient sounds near favorably placed observers. Laboratory studies show that mundane physical objects can respond to electrical excitation and produce audible sounds. Reports of electrophonic sounds should no longer be discarded. A catalog of over 300 reports relating to electrophonic phenomena associated with meteor fireballs, aurorae, and lightning was assembled. Many other reports have been cataloged in Russian. These may assist the full solution of the similar long-standing and contentious mystery of audible auroral displays.

  14. Skeletal abnormalities in homocystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Brenton, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The skeletal changes of thirty-four patients with the biochemical and clinical features of cystathionine synthase deficiency are described. It is emphasized that there is clinical evidence of excessive bone growth and the formation for bone which is structurally weaker than normal. The similarities and differences between this condition and Marfan's syndrome are stressed and the possible nature of the connective tissue defect leading to the skeletal changes discussed. The most characteristic skeletal changes in homocystinuria are the skeletal disproportion (pubis-heel length greater than crown-pubis length), the abnormal vertebrae, sternal deformities, genu valgum and large metaphyses and epiphyses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917963

  15. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  16. Cardiac CT Angiography in Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Levine, Avi; Hecht, Harvey S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac CT angiography has become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of congestive heart failure. Differentiation of ischemic from nonischemic cardiomyopathy; evaluation of myocardial perfusion; characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia; and delineation of congenital heart defects and valvular abnormalities are the primary diagnostic applications. Therapeutic use includes visualization of the coronary venous anatomy for optimal implementation of cardiac resynchronization therapy and evaluation of left ventricular assist devices and transplant vasculopathy.

  17. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of multidisciplinary interventions for heart failure? What are the effects of exercise in people with heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments for heart failure? What are the effects of devices for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of coronary revascularisation for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium

  18. Atmospheric sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    The propagation of sound waves at infrasonic frequencies (oscillation periods 1.0 - 1000 seconds) in the atmosphere is being studied by a network of seven stations separated geographically by distances of the order of thousands of kilometers. The stations measure the following characteristics of infrasonic waves: (1) the amplitude and waveform of the incident sound pressure, (2) the direction of propagation of the wave, (3) the horizontal phase velocity, and (4) the distribution of sound wave energy at various frequencies of oscillation. Some infrasonic sources which were identified and studied include the aurora borealis, tornadoes, volcanos, gravity waves on the oceans, earthquakes, and atmospheric instability waves caused by winds at the tropopause. Waves of unknown origin seem to radiate from several geographical locations, including one in the Argentine.

  19. Monaural Sound Localization Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1997-01-01

    Research reported during the past few decades has revealed the importance for human sound localization of the so-called 'monaural spectral cues.' These cues are the result of the direction-dependent filtering of incoming sound waves accomplished by the pinnae. One point of view about how these cues are extracted places great emphasis on the spectrum of the received sound at each ear individually. This leads to the suggestion that an effective way of studying the influence of these cues is to measure the ability of listeners to localize sounds when one of their ears is plugged. Numerous studies have appeared using this monaural localization paradigm. Three experiments are described here which are intended to clarify the results of the previous monaural localization studies and provide new data on how monaural spectral cues might be processed. Virtual sound sources are used in the experiments in order to manipulate and control the stimuli independently at the two ears. Two of the experiments deal with the consequences of the incomplete monauralization that may have contaminated previous work. The results suggest that even very low sound levels in the occluded ear provide access to interaural localization cues. The presence of these cues complicates the interpretation of the results of nominally monaural localization studies. The third experiment concerns the role of prior knowledge of the source spectrum, which is required if monaural cues are to be useful. The results of this last experiment demonstrate that extraction of monaural spectral cues can be severely disrupted by trial-to-trial fluctuations in the source spectrum. The general conclusion of the experiments is that, while monaural spectral cues are important, the monaural localization paradigm may not be the most appropriate way to study their role.

  20. Hyaluronidase 2 Deficiency Causes Increased Mesenchymal Cells, Congenital Heart Defects, and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Biswajit; Xiang, Bo; Liu, Michelle; Hemming, Richard; Dolinsky, Vernon W.

    2017-01-01

    Background— Hyaluronan (HA) is required for endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and normal heart development in the mouse. Heart abnormalities in hyaluronidase 2 (HYAL2)–deficient (Hyal2−/−) mice and humans suggested removal of HA is also important for normal heart development. We have performed longitudinal studies of heart structure and function in Hyal2−/− mice to determine when, and how, HYAL2 deficiency leads to these abnormalities. Methods and Results— Echocardiography revealed atrial enlargement, atrial tissue masses, and valvular thickening at 4 weeks of age, as well as diastolic dysfunction that progressed with age, in Hyal2−/− mice. These abnormalities were associated with increased HA, vimentin-positive cells, and fibrosis in Hyal2−/− compared with control mice. Based on the severity of heart dysfunction, acute and chronic groups of Hyal2−/− mice that died at an average of 12 and 25 weeks respectively, were defined. Increased HA levels and mesenchymal cells, but not vascular endothelial growth factor in Hyal2−/− embryonic hearts, suggest that HYAL2 is important to inhibit endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Consistent with this, in wild-type embryos, HYAL2 and HA were readily detected, and HA levels decreased with age. Conclusions— These data demonstrate that disruption of normal HA catabolism in Hyal2−/− mice causes increased HA, which may promote endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and proliferation of mesenchymal cells. Excess endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, resulting in increased mesenchymal cells, is the likely cause of morphological heart abnormalities in both humans and mice. In mice, these abnormalities result in progressive and severe diastolic dysfunction, culminating in heart failure. PMID:28196902

  1. The Imagery of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Automated Analysis Corporation's COMET is a suite of acoustic analysis software for advanced noise prediction. It analyzes the origin, radiation, and scattering of noise, and supplies information on how to achieve noise reduction and improve sound characteristics. COMET's Structural Acoustic Foam Engineering (SAFE) module extends the sound field analysis capability of foam and other materials. SAFE shows how noise travels while airborne, how it travels within a structure, and how these media interact to affect other aspects of the transmission of noise. The COMET software reduces design time and expense while optimizing a final product's acoustical performance. COMET was developed through SBIR funding and Langley Research Center for Automated Analysis Corporation.

  2. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Ashleigh A; Garg, Vidu

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are the most common type of birth defect and result in significant mortality worldwide. The etiology for the majority of these anomalies remains unknown but genetic factors are being recognized as playing an increasingly important role. Advances in our molecular understanding of normal heart development have led to the identification of numerous genes necessary for cardiac morphogenesis. This work has aided the discovery of an increasing number of monogenic causes of human cardiovascular malformations. More recently, studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms and submicroscopic copy number abnormalities as having a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart disease. This review discusses these discoveries and summarizes our increasing understanding of the genetic basis of congenital heart disease. PMID:21532774

  3. Accuracy of pulmonary auscultation to detect abnormal respiratory mechanics: a cross-sectional diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Glaciele Nascimento; Duarte, Antonio Carlos Magalhães; Melo-Silva, César Augusto; dos Santos, Carlos Eduardo Ventura Gaio; Amado, Veronica Moreira

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary auscultation is a method used in clinical practice for the evaluation and detection of abnormalities relating to the respiratory system. This method has limitations, as it depends on the experience and hearing acuity of the examiner to determine adventitious sounds. In this context, it's important to analyze whether there is a correlation between auscultation of lung sounds and the behavior of the respiratory mechanical properties of the respiratory system in patients with immediate postoperative cardiac surgery.

  4. Diagnostic Tests and Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... your heart with a stethoscope. This is called auscultation, which means the study of heart sounds. Doctors ... diagnose some types of heart valve disease by listening to any abnormal heart sounds that they hear ...

  5. Exploring Sound with Insects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Meyer, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in insect morphology and movement during singing provide a fascinating opportunity for students to investigate insects while learning about the characteristics of sound. In the activities described here, students use a free online computer software program to explore the songs of the major singing insects and experiment with making…

  6. Sound and Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischman, Paul

    1986-01-01

    Claims that in metrical prose, rhythm can convey sense or express and underline what a writer is saying, and sound can be exploited to add a strong aural element that provides pleasure to the ears over and above the pleasure given by the sense of story. (SRT)

  7. Creative Sound Dramatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Rebecca; Eick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sound propagation is not easy for children to understand because of its abstract nature, often best represented by models such as wave drawings and particle dots. Teachers Rebecca Hendrix and Charles Eick wondered how science inquiry, when combined with an unlikely discipline like drama, could produce a better understanding among their…

  8. Making Sense of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Deepika; Lankford, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    From the earliest days of their lives, children are exposed to all kinds of sound, from soft, comforting voices to the frightening rumble of thunder. Consequently, children develop their own naïve explanations largely based upon their experiences with phenomena encountered every day. When new information does not support existing conceptions,…

  9. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug treatments, and of drug and invasive treatments, for heart failure? What are the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 85 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, cardiac resynchronisation therapy, digoxin (in people already receiving diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), exercise, hydralazine plus isosorbide dinitrate, implantable cardiac

  10. [Consanguinity and congenital abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Marie; Vedsted-Jakobsen, Agnete

    2003-04-28

    Knowledge of consanguinity is relevant for employees in the Danish national health service, since about 7.5% of the Danish population has another ethnic background than Danish and the majority comes from cultures where consanguineous marriages are not unusual. In the literature it is found that consanguineous couples have a higher risk of having children with congenital malformations. The risk is increased by a factor 2 to 2 1/2. The average risk in Denmark is about 3%. Primarily, the autosomal recessive diseases are expressed in children with consanguineous parents. In order to advise and diagnose it is essential to clarify the consanguinity state. In case of pregnancy with consanguineous parents, we recommend: 1) Counselling to estimate the risk of foetal illness and information about possible examination possibilities. 2) An ultrasound scan at the gestational age of 11-14 weeks in order to measure nuchal translucency and an early malformation scan. 3) An ultrasound scan for malformations at the gestational age of 18-20 weeks. 4) An ultrasound scan especially in order to detect foetal heart malformations at the gestational age of 20-24 weeks.

  11. Cortical differentiation of speech and nonspeech sounds at 100 ms: implications for dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Tiina; Helenius, Päivi; Salmelin, Riitta

    2005-07-01

    Neurophysiological measures indicate cortical sensitivity to speech sounds by 150 ms after stimulus onset. In this time window dyslexic subjects start to show abnormal cortical processing. We investigated whether phonetic analysis is reflected in the robust auditory cortical activation at approximately 100 ms (N100m), and whether dyslexic subjects show abnormal N100m responses to speech or nonspeech sounds. We used magnetoencephalography to record auditory responses of 10 normally reading and 10 dyslexic adults. The speech stimuli were synthetic Finnish speech sounds (/a/, /u/, /pa/, /ka/). The nonspeech stimuli were complex nonspeech sounds and simple sine wave tones, composed of the F1+F2+F3 and F2 formant frequencies of the speech sounds, respectively. All sounds evoked a prominent N100m response in the bilateral auditory cortices. The N100m activation was stronger to speech than nonspeech sounds in the left but not in the right auditory cortex, in both subject groups. The leftward shift of hemispheric balance for speech sounds is likely to reflect analysis at the phonetic level. In dyslexic subjects the overall interhemispheric amplitude balance and timing were altered for all sound types alike. Dyslexic individuals thus seem to have an unusual cortical organization of general auditory processing in the time window of speech-sensitive analysis.

  12. Healthy Heart Quizzes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  13. Sounds of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Starting in the early 1960s, spacecraft-borne plasma wave instruments revealed that space is filled with an astonishing variety of radio and plasma wave sounds, which have come to be called "sounds of space." For over forty years these sounds have been collected and played to a wide variety of audiences, often as the result of press conferences or press releases involving various NASA projects for which the University of Iowa has provided plasma wave instruments. This activity has led to many interviews on local and national radio programs, and occasionally on programs haviang world-wide coverage, such as the BBC. As a result of this media coverage, we have been approached many times by composers requesting copies of our space sounds for use in their various projects, many of which involve electronic synthesis of music. One of these collaborations led to "Sun Rings," which is a musical event produced by the Kronos Quartet that has played to large audiences all over the world. With the availability of modern computer graphic techniques we have recently been attempting to integrate some of these sound of space into an educational audio/video web site that illustrates the scientific principles involved in the origin of space plasma waves. Typically I try to emphasize that a substantial gas pressure exists everywhere in space in the form of an ionized gas called a plasma, and that this plasma can lead to a wide variety of wave phenomenon. Examples of some of this audio/video material will be presented.

  14. About sound mufflers sound-absorbing panels aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, A. S.; Bulbovich, R. V.; Svirshchev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The article provides a formula for calculating the frequency of sound absorbed panel with a perforated wall. And although the sound absorbing structure is a set of resonators Helmholtz, not individual resonators should be considered in acoustic calculations, and all the perforated wall panel. The analysis, showing how the parameters affect the size and sound-absorbing structures in the absorption rate.

  15. Cardiac abnormalities and sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sweeting, Joanna; Semsarian, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Many factors have been implicated in SIDS cases including environmental influences such as sleeping arrangements and smoking. Most recently, cardiac abnormalities have been hypothesised to play a role in some cases, particularly the primary genetic arrhythmogenic disorders such as familial long QT syndrome (LQTS). Both post-mortem and clinical studies of SIDS cases have provided supporting evidence for the involvement of cardiac genetic disorders in SIDS. This review provides a summary of this evidence focussing particularly on the primary hypothesis related to underlying familial LQTS. In addition, the current literature relating to other cardiac genetic conditions such as Brugada syndrome (BrS) and structural heart diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is briefly presented. Finally, the implications of a possible cardiac genetic cause of SIDS is discussed with reference to the need for genetic testing in SIDS cases and subsequent clinical and genetic testing in family members.

  16. Mitochondrial function as a therapeutic target in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David A.; Perry, Justin B.; Allen, Mitchell E.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Stauffer, Brian L.; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Cleland, John G. F.; Colucci, Wilson S.; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A.; Anker, Stefan D.; Pitt, Bertram; Pieske, Burkert; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greene, Stephen J.; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure is a pressing worldwide public-health problem with millions of patients having worsening heart failure. Despite all the available therapies, the condition carries a very poor prognosis. Existing therapies provide symptomatic and clinical benefit, but do not fully address molecular abnormalities that occur in cardiomyocytes. This shortcoming is particularly important given that most patients with heart failure have viable dysfunctional myocardium, in which an improvement or normalization of function might be possible. Although the pathophysiology of heart failure is complex, mitochondrial dysfunction seems to be an important target for therapy to improve cardiac function directly. Mitochondrial abnormalities include impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain activity, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, shifted metabolic substrate utilization, aberrant mitochondrial dynamics, and altered ion homeostasis. In this Consensus Statement, insights into the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure are presented, along with an overview of emerging treatments with the potential to improve the function of the failing heart by targeting mitochondria. PMID:28004807

  17. Light aircraft sound transmission study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitman, K.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The plausibility of using the two microphone sound intensity technique to study noise transmission into light aircraft was investigated. In addition, a simple model to predict the interior sound pressure level of the cabin was constructed.

  18. Echocardiographic Evaluation of the Right Heart

    PubMed Central

    Markley, Roshanak R; Potfay, Jonathan; Paulsen, Walter; Jovin, Ion S

    2016-01-01

    The appropriate use of echocardiography may reduce the need for invasive diagnostic cardiac procedures. The right side of the heart has recently gained interest among cardiologists as it became clear that abnormalities of the right heart morphology and function are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Echocardiography is easy to perform, relatively cheap, readily available and do not pose the risk of ionizing radiation. Conventional 2D and, more recently, 3D echocardiography provides pertinent anatomic and physiologic information about the right side of the heart. Because of the advantages and simplicity of echocardiography it continues to be an excellent tool for evaluating the structure and function of the right side of the heart. This review outlines the uses of echocardiography in evaluating the right heart structure and function. PMID:27721944

  19. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart smart substitutions; Wellness - heart smart substitutions

  20. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  1. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... one of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) ...

  2. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  3. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  4. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the heart.Usually, a blockage starts with atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the buildup of fatty deposits (called plaque) ... Americans and native Hawaiians are at greater risk.Atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries)Lack of exerciseStressObesitySex (Gender)-- ...

  5. Heart Truth

    MedlinePlus

    ... trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and American Heart Association. Skip footer links and go to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX | ACCESSIBILITY | ... OIG | CONTACT US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  6. Antenatal foetal heart monitoring.

    PubMed

    Murray, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Antenatal foetal heart rate assessment was introduced into clinical medicine before clear evidence of any benefits had been reported. Ad hoc definitions were used to define normal and abnormal recordings resulting in a high false-positive rate for foetal compromise. The understanding of the foetal states resulted in an improved physiologically based assessment of the antenatal tracings and allowed their classification as (i) reactive - 2 accelerations in 10 min within a recording period of 120 min, (ii) unreactive - no accelerations seen in 120 min of tracing and (iii) decelerative - the presence of repetitive decelerations on an otherwise unreactive trace. This classification reduces the high rate of false-positive traces associated with recording times of less than 40 min. Traces performed on pregnancies before 32 weeks predict clinical outcome, but need to be interpreted in light of the fact the many foetuses will not show a mature reactive pattern.

  7. Lipotoxicity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; Schaffer, Jean E

    2005-12-01

    Cardiomyopathy is associated with both rare genetic metabolic abnormalities and highly prevalent diseases characterized by elevated serum triglycerides and nonesterified fatty acids, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In these disorders, an imbalance between fatty acid uptake and utilization leads to the inappropriate accumulation of free fatty acids and neutral lipids within cardiomyocytes. Through the process of lipotoxicity, this lipid overload causes cellular dysfunction, cell death, and eventual organ dysfunction. This review focuses on lipotoxicity in the heart, with an emphasis on the contribution of this process to the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy associated with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. The magnitude of the current worldwide epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes suggests that understanding the pathogenesis of cardiac complications associated with these diseases will contribute substantially to improvements in health care.

  8. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  9. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  10. Sounds Alive: A Noise Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickman, Donna McCord

    Sarah Screech, Danny Decibel, Sweetie Sound and Neil Noisy describe their experiences in the world of sound and noise to elementary students. Presented are their reports, games and charts which address sound measurement, the effects of noise on people, methods of noise control, and related areas. The workbook is intended to stimulate students'…

  11. THE SOUND PATTERN OF ENGLISH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHOMSKY, NOAM; HALLE, MORRIS

    "THE SOUND PATTERN OF ENGLISH" PRESENTS A THEORY OF SOUND STRUCTURE AND A DETAILED ANALYSIS OF THE SOUND STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF GENERATIVE GRAMMAR. IN THE PREFACE TO THIS BOOK THE AUTHORS STATE THAT THEIR "WORK IN THIS AREA HAS REACHED A POINT WHERE THE GENERAL OUTLINES AND MAJOR THEORETICAL PRINCIPLES ARE FAIRLY CLEAR" AND…

  12. Just How Does Sound Wave?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Bob

    2006-01-01

    When children first hear the term "sound wave" perhaps they might associate it with the way a hand waves or perhaps the squiggly line image on a television monitor when sound recordings are being made. Research suggests that children tend to think sound somehow travels as a discrete package, a fast-moving invisible thing, and not something that…

  13. Data sonification and sound visualization.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.; Wiebel, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Illinois

    1999-07-01

    Sound can help us explore and analyze complex data sets in scientific computing. The authors describe a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis (Diass) and a program to visualize sounds in a virtual reality environment (M4Cave). Both are part of a comprehensive music composition environment that includes additional software for computer-assisted composition and automatic music notation.

  14. Heart disease and diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  15. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  16. What Is Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Another type of heart surgery is called off-pump, or beating heart, surgery. It's like traditional open- ... heart-lung bypass machine isn't used. Off-pump heart surgery is limited to CABG. Surgeons can ...

  17. Anatomy of the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... picture of the outside of a normal, healthy, human heart. Heart Exterior Figure A shows the location of ... picture of the inside of a normal, healthy, human heart. Heart Interior Figure A shows the location of ...

  18. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  19. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  20. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  1. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  2. Wood for sound.

    PubMed

    Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2006-10-01

    The unique mechanical and acoustical properties of wood and its aesthetic appeal still make it the material of choice for musical instruments and the interior of concert halls. Worldwide, several hundred wood species are available for making wind, string, or percussion instruments. Over generations, first by trial and error and more recently by scientific approach, the most appropriate species were found for each instrument and application. Using material property charts on which acoustic properties such as the speed of sound, the characteristic impedance, the sound radiation coefficient, and the loss coefficient are plotted against one another for woods. We analyze and explain why spruce is the preferred choice for soundboards, why tropical species are favored for xylophone bars and woodwind instruments, why violinists still prefer pernambuco over other species as a bow material, and why hornbeam and birch are used in piano actions.

  3. Environmentally sound manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    The NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. They have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and to reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this problem. As our ability to gather data on the state of the Earth's environmental health increases, environmentally sound manufacturing must become an integral part of the business decision making process.

  4. Environmentally sound manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. They have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and to reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this problem. As our ability to gather data on the state of the Earth's environmental health increases, environmentally sound manufacturing must become an integral part of the business decision making process.

  5. An Auditory Processing Abnormality Specific to Liability for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Force, Rachel B.; Venables, Noah C.; Sponheim, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal brain activity during the processing of simple sounds is evident in individuals with increased genetic liability for schizophrenia; however, the diagnostic specificity of these abnormalities has yet to be fully examined. Because recent evidence suggests that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may share aspects of genetic etiology the present study was conducted to determine whether individuals with heightened genetic liability for each disorder manifested distinct neural abnormalities during auditory processing. Utilizing a dichotic listening paradigm, we assessed target tone discrimination and electrophysiological responses in schizophrenia patients, first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients, bipolar disorder patients, first-degree biological relatives of bipolar patients and nonpsychiatric control participants. Schizophrenia patients and relatives of schizophrenia patients demonstrated reductions in an early neural response (i.e. N1) suggestive of deficient sensory registration of auditory stimuli. Bipolar patients and relatives of bipolar patients demonstrated no such abnormality. Both schizophrenia and bipolar patients failed to significantly augment N1 amplitude with attention. Schizophrenia patients also failed to show sensitivity of longer-latency neural processes (N2) to stimulus frequency suggesting a disorder specific deficit in stimulus classification. Only schizophrenia patients exhibited reduced target tone discrimination accuracy. Reduced N1 responses reflective of early auditory processing abnormalities are suggestive of a marker of genetic liability for schizophrenia and may serve as an endophenotype for the disorder. PMID:18571375

  6. Effects of Sound Frequency on Behavioral and Cardiac Orienting in Newborn and Five-Month-Old Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrongiello, Barbara A.; Clifton, Rachel K.

    1984-01-01

    Examines alert newborn and five-month-old infants' responsivity to variations in spectral composition of a rattle sound. Head orientation and cardiac responses to sound were recorded. Heart rate change did not vary as a function of frequency at either age, suggesting that all stimuli were equally effective in eliciting the infant's attention.…

  7. The Aries sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooling, D.

    1980-02-01

    A family of sounding rockets called Aries, using the motors from obsolete Minuteman ICBMs, is described. Payloads for Aries range from 1,500 to 3,500 lb (with a payload diameter of 44 in.) and include various instruments (magnetospheric tracers, X-ray and extreme ultraviolet astronomy and a large X-ray telescope). Prospects for future launching of a two and even three-stage Aries are discussed.

  8. Underwater Sound Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-04-10

    OVER SPHERICAL DIVERGENCE LOSS VERSUS HORIZONTAL RANGE 49 20 ABSORPTION IN SEA WATER 51 21 ABSORPTION IN SEA WATER IN DEEP SOUND CHANNEL 52 22...isospeed condition. In warm water , a negative temperature gradient of greater magnitude is required to balance pressure increase with depth than in...cold water . Any combination of temperature and temperature gradient above the curve produces upward refraction. Any combination below the curve produces

  9. Sound categories or phonemes?

    PubMed

    Redford, Melissa A

    2017-02-01

    Vihman emphasizes the importance of early word production to the emergence of phonological knowledge. This emphasis, consistent with the generative function of phonology, provides insight into the concurrent representation of phonemes and words. At the same time, Vihman's focus on phonology leads her to possibly overstate the influence of early word acquisition on the emergence of sound categories that are probably purely phonetic in nature at the outset of learning.

  10. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  11. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  12. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  13. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  14. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  15. Myocardial bioenergetic abnormalities in experimental uremia

    PubMed Central

    Chesser, Alistair MS; Harwood, Steven M; Raftery, Martin J; Yaqoob, Muhammad M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cardiac bioenergetics are known to be abnormal in experimental uremia as exemplified by a reduced phosphocreatine (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio. However, the progression of these bioenergetic changes during the development of uremia still requires further study and was therefore investigated at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after partial nephrectomy (PNx). Methods A two-stage PNx uremia model in male Wistar rats was used to explore in vivo cardiac and skeletal muscles’ bioenergetic changes over time. High-energy phosphate nucleotides were determined by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) and capillary zone electrophoresis. Results 31P-NMR spectroscopy revealed lower PCr/ATP ratios in PNx hearts compared to sham (SH)-operated animals 4 weeks after PNx (median values given ± SD, 0.64±0.16 PNx, 1.13±0.31 SH, P<0.02). However, 8 weeks after PNx, the same ratio was more comparable between the two groups (0.84±0.15 PNx, 1.04±0.44 SH, P= not significant), suggestive of an adaptive mechanism. When 8-week hearts were prestressed with dobutamine, the PCr/ATP ratio was again lower in the PNx group (1.08±0.36 PNx, 1.55±0.38 SH, P<0.02), indicating a reduced energy reserve during the progression of uremic heart disease. 31P-NMR data were confirmed by capillary zone electrophoresis, and the changes in myocardial bioenergetics were replicated in the skeletal muscle. Conclusion This study provides evidence of the changes that occur in myocardial energetics in experimental uremia and highlights how skeletal muscle bioenergetics mirror those found in the cardiac tissue and so might potentially serve as a practical surrogate tissue during clinical cardiac NMR investigations. PMID:27307758

  16. Judging sound rotation when listeners and sounds rotate: Sound source localization is a multisystem process.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan; Najam, Anbar

    2015-11-01

    In four experiments listeners were rotated or were stationary. Sounds came from a stationary loudspeaker or rotated from loudspeaker to loudspeaker around an azimuth array. When either sounds or listeners rotate the auditory cues used for sound source localization change, but in the everyday world listeners perceive sound rotation only when sounds rotate not when listeners rotate. In the everyday world sound source locations are referenced to positions in the environment (a world-centric reference system). The auditory cues for sound source location indicate locations relative to the head (a head-centric reference system), not locations relative to the world. This paper deals with a general hypothesis that the world-centric location of sound sources requires the auditory system to have information about auditory cues used for sound source location and cues about head position. The use of visual and vestibular information in determining rotating head position in sound rotation perception was investigated. The experiments show that sound rotation perception when sources and listeners rotate was based on acoustic, visual, and, perhaps, vestibular information. The findings are consistent with the general hypotheses and suggest that sound source localization is not based just on acoustics. It is a multisystem process.

  17. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  18. Chromosomal abnormalities and mental illness.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, D J; Blackwood, D H R; Porteous, D J; Pickard, B S; Muir, W J

    2003-03-01

    Linkage studies of mental illness have provided suggestive evidence of susceptibility loci over many broad chromosomal regions. Pinpointing causative gene mutations by conventional linkage strategies alone is problematic. The breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in patients with mental illness may be more direct pointers to the relevant gene locus. Publications that describe patients where chromosomal abnormalities co-exist with mental illness are reviewed along with supporting evidence that this may amount to an association. Chromosomal abnormalities are considered to be of possible significance if (a) the abnormality is rare and there are independent reports of its coexistence with psychiatric illness, or (b) there is colocalisation of the abnormality with a region of suggestive linkage findings, or (c) there is an apparent cosegregation of the abnormality with psychiatric illness within the individual's family. Breakpoints have been described within many of the loci suggested by linkage studies and these findings support the hypothesis that shared susceptibility factors for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may exist. If these abnormalities directly disrupt coding regions, then combining molecular genetic breakpoint cloning with bioinformatic sequence analysis may be a method of rapidly identifying candidate genes. Full karyotyping of individuals with psychotic illness especially where this coexists with mild learning disability, dysmorphism or a strong family history of mental disorder is encouraged.

  19. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  20. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  1. AVE-SESAME 1: 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhard, M. L.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Williams, S. F.; Turner, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Seven atmospheric variability experiments (AVE), two atmospheric variability and severe storms experiments (AVSSE), and six atmospheric variability experiment-severe environmental storm and mesoscale experiments (AVE-SESAME) conducted by NASA are discussed. The dates, observation times, and data reports for each of the experiments for which data was processed are listed. The AVE experiments were conducted primarily to study atmospheric variability with emphasis on spatial and temporal in atmospheric structure that can be detected from soundings taken at 3 hr intervals but not seen in soundings taken at 12 hr intervals. The AVSSE experiments were conducted to study atmospheric structure and variability associated with severe storms combining both rawinsonde and aircraft data to provide information on near storm environments. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, an example of contact data is given, and soundings are listed which exhibited abnormal characteristics.

  2. Sound naming in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chow, Maggie L; Brambati, Simona M; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L; Johnson, Julene K

    2010-04-01

    Modern cognitive neuroscientific theories and empirical evidence suggest that brain structures involved in movement may be related to action-related semantic knowledge. To test this hypothesis, we examined the naming of environmental sounds in patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), two neurodegenerative diseases associated with cognitive and motor deficits. Subjects were presented with 56 environmental sounds: 28 sounds were of objects that required manipulation when producing the sound, and 28 sounds were of objects that required no manipulation. Subjects were asked to provide the name of the object that produced the sound and also complete a sound-picture matching condition. Subjects included 33 individuals from four groups: CBD/PSP, Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, and normal controls. We hypothesized that CBD/PSP patients would exhibit impaired naming performance compared with controls, but the impairment would be most apparent when naming sounds associated with actions. We also explored neural correlates of naming environmental sounds using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of brain MRI. As expected, CBD/PSP patients scored lower on environmental sounds naming (p<0.007) compared with the controls. In particular, the CBD/PSP patients scored the lowest when naming sounds of manipulable objects (p<0.05), but did not show deficits in naming sounds of non-manipulable objects. VBM analysis across all groups showed that performance in naming sounds of manipulable objects correlated with atrophy in the left pre-motor region, extending from area six to the middle and superior frontal gyrus. These results indicate an association between impairment in the retrieval of action-related names and the motor system, and suggest that difficulty in naming manipulable sounds may be related to atrophy in the pre-motor cortex. Our results support the hypothesis that retrieval of action-related semantic knowledge involves motor

  3. Degraded neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds in a rat model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Crystal T; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Borland, Michael S; Buell, Elizabeth P; Centanni, Tracy M; Fink, Melyssa K; Im, Kwok W; Wilson, Linda G; Kilgard, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Individuals with Rett syndrome have greatly impaired speech and language abilities. Auditory brainstem responses to sounds are normal, but cortical responses are highly abnormal. In this study, we used the novel rat Mecp2 knockout model of Rett syndrome to document the neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds. We hypothesized that both speech discrimination ability and the neural response to speech sounds would be impaired in Mecp2 rats. We expected that extensive speech training would improve speech discrimination ability and the cortical response to speech sounds. Our results reveal that speech responses across all four auditory cortex fields of Mecp2 rats were hyperexcitable, responded slower, and were less able to follow rapidly presented sounds. While Mecp2 rats could accurately perform consonant and vowel discrimination tasks in quiet, they were significantly impaired at speech sound discrimination in background noise. Extensive speech training improved discrimination ability. Training shifted cortical responses in both Mecp2 and control rats to favor the onset of speech sounds. While training increased the response to low frequency sounds in control rats, the opposite occurred in Mecp2 rats. Although neural coding and plasticity are abnormal in the rat model of Rett syndrome, extensive therapy appears to be effective. These findings may help to explain some aspects of communication deficits in Rett syndrome and suggest that extensive rehabilitation therapy might prove beneficial.

  4. Heart Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    James Antaki and a group of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine used many elements of the Technology Utilization Program while looking for a way to visualize and track material points within the heart muscle. What they needed were tiny artificial "eggs" containing copper sulfate solution, small enough (about 2 mm in diameter) that they would not injure the heart, and large enough to be seen in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images; they also had to be biocompatible and tough enough to withstand the beating of the muscle. The group could not make nor buy sufficient containers. After reading an article on microspheres in NASA Tech Briefs, and a complete set of reports on microencapsulation from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), JPL put Antaki in touch with Dr.Taylor Wang of Vanderbilt University who helped construct the myocardial markers. The research is expected to lead to improved understanding of how the heart works and what takes place when it fails.

  5. Prevalence and distribution of congenital abnormalities in Turkey: differences between the prenatal and postnatal periods.

    PubMed

    Oztarhan, Kazim; Gedikbasi, Ali; Yildirim, Dogukan; Arslan, Oguz; Adal, Erdal; Kavuncuoglu, Sultan; Ozbek, Sibel; Ceylan, Yavuz

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of cases associated with congenital abnormalities during the following three periods: pregnancy, birth, and the neonatal period. This was a retrospective study of cases between 2002 and 2006. All abnormal pregnancies, elective terminations of pregnancies, stillbirths, and births with congenital abnormalities managed in the Neonatology Unit were classified based on the above distribution scheme. During the 5-year study period, 1906 cases with congenital abnormalities were recruited, as follows: 640 prenatally detected and terminated cases, with most abnormalities related to the central nervous system, chromosomes, and urogenital system (56.7%, 12.7%, and 8.9%, respectively); 712 neonates with congenital abnormalities (congenital heart disease [49.2%], central nervous system abnormalities [14.7%], and urogenital system abnormalities [12.9%]); and hospital stillbirths, of which 34.2% had malformations (220 prenatal cases [34.4%] had multiple abnormalities, whereas 188 liveborn cases [26.4%] had multiple abnormalities). The congenital abnormalities rate between 2002 and 2006 was 2.07%. Systematic screening for fetal anomalies is the primary means for identification of affected pregnancies.

  6. Lack of habituation of the pattern of cardiovascular response evoked by sound in subjects with primary Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C M; Marshall, J M; Pugh, M

    1998-09-01

    1. The vasospasm of primary Raynaud's disease can be triggered by acute emotional stress. We have studied the pattern of cardiovascular response evoked by acute emotional stress, a sound stimulus of 90 dB, 2 kHz for 30 s, in eight subjects with primary Raynaud's disease and in eight age- and sex-matched controls, the sound being repeated five times on each of days 1, 3 and 5. 2. In controls, the first sound evoked the pattern of the alerting response that is characteristic of acute emotional stress: a rise in arterial pressure and heart rate, a decrease in vascular conductance in the cutaneous circulation of the digit, assessed by laser Doppler recording of erythrocyte (red cell) flux in the digit divided by arterial pressure, and an increase in forearm muscle vascular conductance, assessed from forearm blood flow recorded by venous occlusion plethysmography divided by arterial pressure. 3. In the subjects with primary Raynaud's disease, baselines of arterial pressure, digital cutaneous vascular conductance and forearm vascular conductance were not significantly different from those of the controls and they too showed the alerting response to the first sound, the magnitudes of the changes being comparable to those of the controls. 4. In both the controls and subjects with primary Raynaud's disease, the evoked responses were consistent on repetition of the sound on day 1. In contrast, judging from the means of the changes evoked on each day, the controls showed habituation of the individual components of the alerting response over days 1, 3 and 5, whereas the subjects with primary Raynaud's disease showed no habituation of either the forearm muscle vasodilatation or the digital vasoconstriction. Conversely, the decrease in digital cutaneous vascular conductance evoked by a single deep breath was fully reproducible in both controls and subjects with primary Raynaud's disease when tested at the beginning and end of each experimental day. 5. These results allow the

  7. Source Separation of Heartbeat Sounds for Effective E-Auscultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geethu, R. S.; Krishnakumar, M.; Pramod, K. V.; George, Sudhish N.

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a cost effective solution for improving the effectiveness of e-auscultation. Auscultation is the most difficult skill for a doctor, since it can be acquired only through experience. The heart sound mixtures are captured by placing the four numbers of sensors at appropriate auscultation area in the body. These sound mixtures are separated to its relevant components by a statistical method independent component analysis. The separated heartbeat sounds can be further processed or can be stored for future reference. This idea can be used for making a low cost, easy to use portable instrument which will be beneficial to people living in remote areas and are unable to take the advantage of advanced diagnosis methods.

  8. Interpolated Sounding and Gridded Sounding Value-Added Products

    SciTech Connect

    M. P. Jensen; Toto, T.

    2016-03-01

    Standard Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sounding files provide atmospheric state data in one dimension of increasing time and height per sonde launch. Many applications require a quick estimate of the atmospheric state at higher time resolution. The INTERPOLATEDSONDE (i.e., Interpolated Sounding) Value-Added Product (VAP) transforms sounding data into continuous daily files on a fixed time-height grid, at 1-minute time resolution, on 332 levels, from the surface up to a limit of approximately 40 km. The grid extends that high so the full height of soundings can be captured; however, most soundings terminate at an altitude between 25 and 30 km, above which no data is provided. Between soundings, the VAP linearly interpolates atmospheric state variables in time for each height level. In addition, INTERPOLATEDSONDE provides relative humidity scaled to microwave radiometer (MWR) observations.

  9. Congenital abnormalities and selective abortion.

    PubMed

    Seller, M J

    1976-09-01

    The technique of amniocentesis, by which an abnormal fetus can be detected in utero, has brought a technological advance in medical science but attendant medical and moral problems. Dr Seller describes those congenital disabilities which can be detected in the fetus before birth, for which the "remedy" is selective abortion. She then discusses the arguments for and against selective abortion, for the issue is not simple, even in the strictly genetic sense of attempting to ensure a population free of congenital abnormality.

  10. Actin and myosin isoforms in aneural and malformed chick hearts.

    PubMed

    Kirby, M L; Shimizu, N; Gagnon, J; Toyofuku, T; Kennedy, J; Conrad, D C; Zak, R

    1990-09-01

    Although it is generally accepted that actin and myosin isoforms adapt to their functional requirements, the sequence of expression of these proteins in hearts developing abnormally is unknown. In the chick embryo it is possible to change various aspects of heart development without direct manipulation of the cardiovascular system, by removing various regions of the neural crest from early embryos. The neural crest provides both neural (sympathetic and parasympathetic) and ectomesenchymal components to the heart, and selective removal of various areas results in embryos with sympathetically aneural hearts, or persistent truncus arteriosus with or without parasympathetic denervation. Myosin isoform expression was studied in each of these types of hearts using an array of myosin antibodies specific for atrium, ventricle or the conduction system. Myosin expression in experimental hearts was found to follow the normal pattern of development using these antibodies. Actin expression was studied using cDNA probes for the 3' untranslated region of actin mRNA of the alpha-skeletal, alpha-cardiac and beta-actin isoforms. Using slot-blot hybridization analysis, the pattern of actin expression in atrium and ventricle was followed throughout the period of incubation in normal hearts. The pattern of actin expression was found to be abnormal in hearts which were sympathetically aneural and those which had persistent truncus arteriosus combined with parasympathetic denervation. ATPase activity was increased only in atria of hearts with persistent truncus arteriosus. It appears from these experiments that actin isoform expression is influenced in the chick heart by autonomic innervation.

  11. Abnormality detection in noisy biosignals.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Emine Merve; Elhilali, Mounya

    2013-01-01

    Although great strides have been achieved in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) research, a major remaining problem is the ability to perform well under the presence of significant noise. In this work, we propose a mechanism to find instances of potential interest in time series for further analysis. Adaptive Kalman filters are employed in parallel among different feature axes. Lung sounds recorded in noisy conditions are used as an example application, with spectro-temporal feature extraction to capture the complex variabilities in sound. We demonstrate that both disease indicators and distortion events can be detected, reducing long time series signals into a sparse set of relevant events.

  12. Assessing elderly patients with congestive heart failure via in-home interactive telecommunication.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, R L; McSweeney, M

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of telemedicine technology was tested for equivalence of nursing assessment with chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) home care patients (N = 28). The equivalence of nurses' physical assessment findings was estimated using an innovative two-way, telemedicine audiovisual system. Nurses were randomly assigned to a method of client assessment: on-site (real time) or telemedicine (monitor time). Each assessment was performed within 10 minutes of each other. Assessment variables compared were auscultation of lung sounds, heart sounds, rate and rhythm, blood pressure, weight, edema, respiratory effort, and client's face, lip, and nail color. Eighteen physiological parameters were analyzed, using either the Wilcoxon signed ranks test or the McNemar test. Results indicate few significant differences between the assessments of the real time and monitor time nurses. The monitor nurse was more likely to claim abnormality than the real nurse was when assessing the color of nails (p = .048). The real nurse picked up ankle edema (p = .024), pedal edema (p = .099), and inspiratory wheeze (p = .01) more frequently than did the monitor nurse. Kappa coefficients to determine the extent of agreement between nurse's assessments were significant. Nurses' comments were favorable, but they recommended altering the interview to elicit symptoms not easily observed by the monitor nurse such as diaphoresis. Exit interviews of the elderly patients revealed a favorable reaction to using the telemedicine monitor, citing a quick connection to a nurse and response to their concerns and questions. Both nurses and patients reported the need to have real nurse home visits along with telemedicine visits.

  13. ECG Based Heart Arrhythmia Detection Using Wavelet Coherence and Bat Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kora, Padmavathi; Sri Rama Krishna, K.

    2016-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a type of heart abnormality, during the AF electrical discharges in the atrium are rapid, results in abnormal heart beat. The morphology of ECG changes due to the abnormalities in the heart. This paper consists of three major steps for the detection of heart diseases: signal pre-processing, feature extraction and classification. Feature extraction is the key process in detecting the heart abnormality. Most of the ECG detection systems depend on the time domain features for cardiac signal classification. In this paper we proposed a wavelet coherence (WTC) technique for ECG signal analysis. The WTC calculates the similarity between two waveforms in frequency domain. Parameters extracted from WTC function is used as the features of the ECG signal. These features are optimized using Bat algorithm. The Levenberg Marquardt neural network classifier is used to classify the optimized features. The performance of the classifier can be improved with the optimized features.

  14. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, lungs, and blood vessels make up the circulatory system . The heart is the central pump of this ... Heart Defects Getting an EKG (Video) Your Heart & Circulatory System Heart Murmurs Mitral Valve Prolapse Movie: Heart & Circulatory ...

  15. Discovery of Sound in the Sea (DOSITS) Website Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-04

    life affect ocean sound levels? • Science of Sound > Sounds in the Sea > How will ocean acidification affect ocean sound levels? • Science of Sound...Science of Sound > Sounds in the Sea > How does shipping affect ocean sound levels? • Science of Sound > Sounds in the Sea > How does marine

  16. Thyroid hormones and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Felipe

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem and its relationship to thyroid dysfunction has been increasingly investigated in recent years. Since it has been demonstrated that thyroid hormones (TH) and mainly T3 have cardioprotective effects, it is easy to understand that in the scenario of thyroid disorder, cardiac function may be damaged, and inversely in cardiac dysfunction thyroid dysregulation may be seen. The increase in plasma TH produces a clear neurohormonal activation which impacts negatively on cardiac function. In hypothyroidism, and in addition to extracardiac dysfunction, myocardial and vascular remodelling is altered and they contribute to cardiac failure. Abnormal low plasma TSH has also been shown to be a risk factor for developing HF in several recent studies, and they suggest that TSH is an independent predictor of clinical outcome including death and cardiac hospitalizations. Therefore, physicians should consider all these concepts when managing a patient with heart failure, not only for a clear diagnosis, but also for better and accurate treatment.

  17. Impact of Pulmonary Vascular Resistances in Heart Transplantation for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Canter, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is one of the major diagnoses in pediatric heart transplantation recipients of all age groups. Assessment of pulmonary vascular resistance in these patients prior to transplantation is crucial to determine their candidacy, however, it is frequently inaccurate because of their abnormal anatomy and physiology. This problem places them at significant risk for pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure post transplantation. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease depends on their pulmonary blood flow patterns, systemic ventricle function, as well as semilunar valves and atrioventricular valves structure and function. In our review we analyze the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease and end-stage heart failure, and outline the state of the art pre-transplantation medical and surgical management to achieve reverse remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature by using pulmonary vasodilators and mechanical circulatory support. PMID:22548028

  18. Respiratory sounds compression.

    PubMed

    Yadollahi, Azadeh; Moussavi, Zahra

    2008-04-01

    Recently, with the advances in digital signal processing, compression of biomedical signals has received great attention for telemedicine applications. In this paper, an adaptive transform coding-based method for compression of respiratory and swallowing sounds is proposed. Using special characteristics of respiratory sounds, the recorded signals are divided into stationary and nonstationary portions, and two different bit allocation methods (BAMs) are designed for each portion. The method was applied to the data of 12 subjects and its performance in terms of overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values was calculated at different bit rates. The performance of different quantizers was also considered and the sensitivity of the quantizers to initial conditions has been alleviated. In addition, the fuzzy clustering method was examined for classifying the signal into different numbers of clusters and investigating the performance of the adaptive BAM with increasing the number of classes. Furthermore, the effects of assigning different numbers of bits for encoding stationary and nonstationary portions of the signal were studied. The adaptive BAM with variable number of bits was found to improve the SNR values of the fixed BAM by 5 dB. Last, the possibility of removing the training part for finding the parameters of adaptive BAMs for each individual was investigated. The results indicate that it is possible to use a predefined set of BAMs for all subjects and remove the training part completely. Moreover, the method is fast enough to be implemented for real-time application.

  19. Puget Sound telecommuting demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Quaid, M.; Heifetz, L.; Farley, M.; Christensen, D.; Ulberg, C.; Gordon, A.; Spain, D.; Whitaker, B.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the Puget Sound Telecommuting demonstration project. This is a part-time work and transportation alternative that substitutes the normal work commute with the choice of working at home or at an office close to home. According to Link Resources, a research and consulting firm located in New York, there were 4.6 million part-time home telecommuters in the United States in 1991. This figure, which included only company employees who work at home during normal business hours, is up from 3.4 million in 1990, an increase of 35 percent in one year. Part-time telecommuters average 2.5 days per week at home. (There are also about 876,000 full-time telecommuters in the US.) The study done by Link Resources estimates that 4.5 percent of the civilian work force age 18 or older is telecommuting. The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) began exploring telecommuting as an alternate route to work for Washington, first through The Governor`s Conference on Telecommuting in June 1989. The conference raised corporate and government awareness of telecommuting, and set the stage for further investigation. In 1990, WSEO launched the Puget Sound Telecommuting Demonstration to explore the environmental, organizational, and personal sides of telecommuting. This report presents the interim research results.

  20. Puget Sound telecommuting demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Quaid, M.; Heifetz, L.; Farley, M.; Christensen, D. ); Ulberg, C.; Gordon, A.; Spain, D.; Whitaker, B. )

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the Puget Sound Telecommuting demonstration project. This is a part-time work and transportation alternative that substitutes the normal work commute with the choice of working at home or at an office close to home. According to Link Resources, a research and consulting firm located in New York, there were 4.6 million part-time home telecommuters in the United States in 1991. This figure, which included only company employees who work at home during normal business hours, is up from 3.4 million in 1990, an increase of 35 percent in one year. Part-time telecommuters average 2.5 days per week at home. (There are also about 876,000 full-time telecommuters in the US.) The study done by Link Resources estimates that 4.5 percent of the civilian work force age 18 or older is telecommuting. The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) began exploring telecommuting as an alternate route to work for Washington, first through The Governor's Conference on Telecommuting in June 1989. The conference raised corporate and government awareness of telecommuting, and set the stage for further investigation. In 1990, WSEO launched the Puget Sound Telecommuting Demonstration to explore the environmental, organizational, and personal sides of telecommuting. This report presents the interim research results.

  1. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  2. Insular and caudate lesions release abnormal yawning in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Heinz; Weisstanner, Christian; Hess, Christian W; Bassetti, Claudio L; Nirkko, Arto; Wiest, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal yawning is an underappreciated phenomenon in patients with ischemic stroke. We aimed at identifying frequently affected core regions in the supratentorial brain of stroke patients with abnormal yawning and contributing to the anatomical network concept of yawning control. Ten patients with acute anterior circulation stroke and ≥3 yawns/15 min without obvious cause were analyzed. The NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), symptom onset, period with abnormal yawning, blood oxygen saturation, glucose, body temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, and modified Rankin scale (mRS) were assessed for all patients. MRI lesion maps were segmented on diffusion-weighted images, spatially normalized, and the extent of overlap between the different stroke patterns was determined. Correlations between the period with abnormal yawning and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the overlapping regions, total stroke volume, NIHSS and mRS were performed. Periods in which patients presented with episodes of abnormal yawning lasted on average for 58 h. Average GCS, NIHSS, and mRS scores were 12.6, 11.6, and 3.5, respectively. Clinical parameters were within normal limits. Ischemic brain lesions overlapped in nine out of ten patients: in seven patients in the insula and in seven in the caudate nucleus. The decrease of the ADC within the lesions correlated with the period with abnormal yawing (r = -0.76, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.02). The stroke lesion intensity of the common overlapping regions in the insula and the caudate nucleus correlates with the period with abnormal yawning. The insula might be the long sought-after brain region for serotonin-mediated yawning.

  3. Auditory Perception of Complex Sounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-30

    processes that underlie several aspects of complex pattern recog- nition -- whether of speech, of music , or of environmental sounds. These patterns differ...quality or timbre can play similar grouping roles in auditory steams. Most of the experimental work has concerned timing of successive sounds in sequences...auditory perceptual processes that underlie several aspects of complex pattern recognition - whether of speech, of music , or of environmental sounds

  4. Sounds like Team Spirit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always

  5. Analysis of environmental sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keansub

    Environmental sound archives - casual recordings of people's daily life - are easily collected by MPS players or camcorders with low cost and high reliability, and shared in the web-sites. There are two kinds of user generated recordings we would like to be able to handle in this thesis: Continuous long-duration personal audio and Soundtracks of short consumer video clips. These environmental recordings contain a lot of useful information (semantic concepts) related with activity, location, occasion and content. As a consequence, the environment archives present many new opportunities for the automatic extraction of information that can be used in intelligent browsing systems. This thesis proposes systems for detecting these interesting concepts on a collection of these real-world recordings. The first system is to segment and label personal audio archives - continuous recordings of an individual's everyday experiences - into 'episodes' (relatively consistent acoustic situations lasting a few minutes or more) using the Bayesian Information Criterion and spectral clustering. The second system is for identifying regions of speech or music in the kinds of energetic and highly-variable noise present in this real-world sound. Motivated by psychoacoustic evidence that pitch is crucial in the perception and organization of sound, we develop a noise-robust pitch detection algorithm to locate speech or music-like regions. To avoid false alarms resulting from background noise with strong periodic components (such as air-conditioning), a new scheme is added in order to suppress these noises in the domain of autocorrelogram. In addition, the third system is to automatically detect a large set of interesting semantic concepts; which we chose for being both informative and useful to users, as well as being technically feasible. These 25 concepts are associated with people's activities, locations, occasions, objects, scenes and sounds, and are based on a large collection of

  6. The prevalence of abnormal ECG in trained sportsmen

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, V.K.; Singh, Navreet; Bishnoi, R.S.; Chadha, D.S.; Bhardwaj, P.; Madan, H.; Dutta, R.; Ghosh, A.K.; Sengupta, S.; Perumal, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Competitive sports training causes structural and conductive system changes manifesting by various electrocardiographic alterations. We undertook this study to assess the prevalence of abnormal ECG in trained Indian athletes and correlate it with the nature of sports training, that is endurance or strength training. Methods We evaluated a standard resting, lying 12 lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) in 66 actively training Indian athletes. Standard diagnostic criteria were used to define various morphological ECG abnormalities. Results 33/66 (50%) of the athletes were undertaking endurance training while the other 33 (50%) were involved in a strength-training regimen. Overall 54/66 (81%) sportsmen had significant ECG changes. 68% of these changes were considered as normal training related features, while the remaining 32% were considered abnormal. There were seven common training related ECG changes–Sinus Bradycardia (21%), Sinus Arrhythmia (16%), 1st degree Atrioventricular Heart Block (6%), Type 1 2nd-degree Atrioventicular Heart Block (3%), Incomplete Right bundle branch block (RBBB) (24%), Early Repolarization (42%), Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH) (14%); while three abnormal ECG changes--T-wave inversion (13%), RBBB(4%), Right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) with strain (29%) were noted. Early repolarization (commonest change), sinus bradycardia, and incomplete RBBB were the commoner features noticed, with a significantly higher presence in the endurance trained athletes. Conclusion A high proportion of athletes undergoing competitive level sports training are likely to have abnormal ECG recordings. Majority of these are benign, and related to the physiological adaptation to the extreme levels of exertion. These changes are commoner during endurance training (running) than strength training (weightlifting). PMID:26663958

  7. [Pathophysiologic and diagnostic aspects of heart failure].

    PubMed

    Rudolph, W

    1990-06-01

    Ventricular dysfunction due to an abnormality of the heart which is associated with typical hemodynamic, renal and hormonal reactions, characterizes the clinical syndrome heart failure. The traditional definition of heart failure as the inability to pump an amount of blood sufficient to cover the metabolic needs of the body in the presence of adequate venous return, emphasizes mainly the reduction in cardiac output but not the increase in intracardiac pressures. Pressure or volume overload, decreased contractility, loss of muscle mass or restricted filling represent the most important pathological processes leading to heart failure. The disturbance of systolic ventricular function due to pressure or volume overload or diminished contractility is characterized by a decrease in the ejection fraction, the disturbance in diastolic ventricular function associated with restricted filling is characterized by elevated chamber stiffness. Decreased contractility is most commonly responsible for the development of heart failure. Impairment of diastolic ventricular function can only be regarded as the dominant mechanism leading to heart failure in the presence of a small noncompliant ventricle. Impairment of diastolic ventricular function in an enlarged heart is always associated with an impairment of systolic ventricular function and is, then, relegated to a subordinate role. Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, hypertension, cardiomyopathies, valvular heart diseases and congenital heart diseases, for the incidence of which coronary artery disease is most frequently responsible. Most of these diseases lead to heart failure not via a single, but rather several of the specified pathophysiological processes. Possible mechanisms for loss of contractility include structural changes as well as alterations in excitation-contraction coupling. Possible mechanisms responsible for impaired diastolic ventricular function encompass, in addition to altered calcium

  8. Elevated heart rate and nondipping heart rate as potential targets for melatonin: a review.

    PubMed

    Simko, Fedor; Baka, Tomas; Paulis, Ludovit; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-09-01

    Elevated heart rate is a risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortalities in the general population and various cardiovascular pathologies. Insufficient heart rate decline during the night, that is, nondipping heart rate, also increases cardiovascular risk. Abnormal heart rate reflects an autonomic nervous system imbalance in terms of relative dominance of sympathetic tone. There are only a few prospective studies concerning the effect of heart rate reduction in coronary heart disease and heart failure. In hypertensive patients, retrospective analyses show no additional benefit of slowing down the heart rate by beta-blockade to blood pressure reduction. Melatonin, a secretory product of the pineal gland, has several attributes, which predict melatonin to be a promising candidate in the struggle against elevated heart rate and its consequences in the hypertensive population. First, melatonin production depends on the sympathetic stimulation of the pineal gland. On the other hand, melatonin inhibits the sympathetic system in several ways representing potentially the counter-regulatory mechanism to normalize excessive sympathetic drive. Second, administration of melatonin reduces heart rate in animals and humans. Third, the chronobiological action of melatonin may normalize the insufficient nocturnal decline of heart rate. Moreover, melatonin reduces the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, which are considered a crucial pathophysiological disorder of increased heart rate and pulsatile blood flow. The antihypertensive and antiremodeling action of melatonin along with its beneficial effects on lipid profile and insulin resistance may be of additional benefit. A clinical trial investigating melatonin actions in hypertensive patients with increased heart rate is warranted.

  9. Fibrosis, Connexin-43, and Conduction Abnormalities in the Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nademanee, Koonlawee; Raju, Hariharan; de Noronha, Sofia V.; Papadakis, Michael; Robinson, Laurence; Rothery, Stephen; Makita, Naomasa; Kowase, Shinya; Boonmee, Nakorn; Vitayakritsirikul, Vorapot; Ratanarapee, Samrerng; Sharma, Sanjay; van der Wal, Allard C.; Christiansen, Michael; Tan, Hanno L.; Wilde, Arthur A.; Nogami, Akihiko; Sheppard, Mary N.; Veerakul, Gumpanart; Behr, Elijah R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) is acknowledged to be responsible for arrhythmogenesis in Brugada syndrome (BrS), but the pathophysiology remains controversial. Objectives This study assessed the substrate underlying BrS at post-mortem and in vivo, and the role for open thoracotomy ablation. Methods Six whole hearts from male post-mortem cases of unexplained sudden death (mean age 23.2 years) with negative specialist cardiac autopsy and familial BrS were used and matched to 6 homograft control hearts by sex and age (within 3 years) by random risk set sampling. Cardiac autopsy sections from cases and control hearts were stained with picrosirius red for collagen. The RVOT was evaluated in detail, including immunofluorescent stain for connexin-43 (Cx43). Collagen and Cx43 were quantified digitally and compared. An in vivo study was undertaken on 6 consecutive BrS patients (mean age 39.8 years, all men) during epicardial RVOT ablation for arrhythmia via thoracotomy. Abnormal late and fractionated potentials indicative of slowed conduction were identified, and biopsies were taken before ablation. Results Collagen was increased in BrS autopsy cases compared with control hearts (odds ratio [OR]: 1.42; p = 0.026). Fibrosis was greatest in the RVOT (OR: 1.98; p = 0.003) and the epicardium (OR: 2.00; p = 0.001). The Cx43 signal was reduced in BrS RVOT (OR: 0.59; p = 0.001). Autopsy and in vivo RVOT samples identified epicardial and interstitial fibrosis. This was collocated with abnormal potentials in vivo that, when ablated, abolished the type 1 Brugada electrocardiogram without ventricular arrhythmia over 24.6 ± 9.7 months. Conclusions BrS is associated with epicardial surface and interstitial fibrosis and reduced gap junction expression in the RVOT. This collocates to abnormal potentials, and their ablation abolishes the BrS phenotype and life-threatening arrhythmias. BrS is also associated with increased collagen throughout the heart

  10. Absence of cytoglobin promotes multiple organ abnormalities in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Thuy, Le Thi Thanh; Van Thuy, Tuong Thi; Matsumoto, Yoshinari; Hai, Hoang; Ikura, Yoshihiro; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawada, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) was identified in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and pericytes of all organs; however, the effects of Cygb on cellular functions remain unclear. Here, we report spontaneous and age-dependent malformations in multiple organs of Cygb−/− mice. Twenty-six percent of young Cygb−/− mice (<1 year old) showed heart hypertrophy, cystic disease in the kidney or ovary, loss of balance, liver fibrosis and lymphoma. Furthermore, 71.3% (82/115) of aged Cygb−/− mice (1–2 years old) exhibited abnormalities, such as heart hypertrophy and cancer development in multiple organs; by contrast, 5.8% (4/68) of aged wild-type (WT) mice had abnormalities (p < 0.0001). Interestingly, serum and urine analysis demonstrated that the concentration of nitric oxide metabolites increased significantly in Cygb−/− mice, resulting in an imbalance in the oxidative stress and antioxidant defence system that was reversed by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine treatment. A senescent phenotype and evidence of DNA damage were found in primary HSCs and the liver of aged Cygb−/− mice. Moreover, compared with HSC+/+, HSC−/− showed high expression of Il-6 and chemokine mRNA when cocultured with mouse Hepa 1–6 cells. Thus, the absence of Cygb in pericytes provokes organ abnormalities, possibly via derangement of the nitric oxide and antioxidant defence system and through accelerated cellular senescence. PMID:27146058

  11. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  12. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  13. Deep-sea soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David A.

    Bathymetric charts for many areas of the ocean are cheap and accurate, and we usually take their availability for granted. In these times of abundant information, it is easy to forget the wonder and excitement of the last century, when mechanical sounding machines revealed for the first time the major features of the ocean depths. Who would not be awed by the graceful sweep of the Blake Plateau or the plunging depths of the Puerto Rico Trench, and who could remain unimpressed by undersea mountain ranges more majestic than any in view? In his 1888 book, entitled Three Cruises of the Blake, Alexander Agassiz has this to say about the spectacular Caribbean bottom topography: “Compared to such panoramas the finest views of the range of the Alps sink into insignificance; it is only when we get a view of portions of the Andes from the sea-coast…that we get anything approximating to it in grandeur.”

  14. The Sounds of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Flying board Voyagers 1 and 2 are identical 'golden' records, carrying the story of Earth far into deep space. The 12 inch gold-plated copper discs contain greetings in 60 languages, samples of music from different cultures and eras, and natural and man-made sounds from Earth. They also contain electronic information that an advanced technological civilization could convert into diagrams and photographs. The cover of each gold plated aluminum jacket, designed to protect the record from micrometeorite bombardment, also serves a double purpose in providing the finder a key to playing the record. The explanatory diagram appears on both the inner and outer surfaces of the cover, as the outer diagram will be eroded in time. Currently, both Voyager probes are sailing adrift in the black sea of interplanetary space, having left our solar system years ago.

  15. Sounds Clear Enough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Alan

    2004-01-01

    I'm a vice president at Line6, where we produce electronics for musical instruments. My company recently developed a guitar that can be programmed to sound like twenty-five different classic guitars - everything from a 1928 National 'Tricone' to a 1970 Martin. It is quite an amazing piece of technology. The guitar started as a research project because we needed to know if the technology was going to be viable and if the guitar design was going to be practical. I've been in this business for about twenty years now, and I still enjoy starting up projects whenever the opportunity presents itself. During the research phase, I headed up the project myself. Once we completed our preliminary research and made the decision to move into development, that's when I handed the project off - and that's where this story really begins.

  16. Sounding out science

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, M.

    1996-10-01

    The Exxon Valdez catastrophe, which soiled Alaska`s Prince William Sound in 1989, was the most studied oil spill in history. But because of how they framed their inquiries, investigators have learned less than they could about how nature heals itself. The studies of Exxon and the state of Alaska - including the departments of Fish and Game and of Environmental Conservation - conducted to prove their respective points, were kept largely secret untill legal settlements were reached. This secrecy reduced most of the pillars of science to rubble: out went scientific dialog, data sharing, and for some parties, peer view. Millions of dollars were shelled out in duplicate studies that reached opposite conclusions. Beyond the quality of science lies the public interpretation of science. Even though NOAA has shown that cleaning up can do more harm than good, demands to clean up persist. 7 figs.

  17. The monster sound pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2017-03-01

    Producing a deep bass tone by striking a large 3 m (10 ft) flexible corrugated drainage pipe immediately grabs student attention. The fundamental pitch of the corrugated tube is found to be a semitone lower than a non-corrugated smooth pipe of the same length. A video (https://youtu.be/FU7a9d7N60Y) of the demonstration is included, which illustrates how an Internet keyboard can be used to estimate the fundamental pitches of each pipe. Since both pipes have similar end corrections, the pitch discrepancy between the smooth pipe and drainage tube is due to the corrugations, which lower the speed of sound inside the flexible tube, dropping its pitch a semitone.

  18. Ectodermal dysplasia and abnormal thumbs.

    PubMed

    Lucky, A W; Esterly, N B; Tunnessen, W W

    1980-05-01

    Two unrelated children, a girl and a boy, with alopecia, anomalous cutaneous pigmentation, abnormal thumbs, and endocrine disorders, including short stature and delayed bone age in one patient and juvenile onset diabetes mellitus in the other, are described. In one instance, the mother and the maternal grandmother had similar abnormalities, although of a less severe nature. Both children had normal nails and no unusual susceptibility to infections. We believe these two patients represent a previously undescribed syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia that may be inherited as an autosomal-dominant trait.

  19. Right heart ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    Angiography - right heart ... moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can ... is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and ...

  20. Left heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  1. Heart disease and women

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines, ... the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology Foundation endorsed by the World Heart Federation and ...

  2. Honolulu Heart Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Heart Failure, Congestive; Myocardial Infarction; Asthma; Emphysema; Lung Diseases, Obstructive; Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal; Bronchitis; Dementia; Hypertension; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Heart Failure

  3. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Sep 19,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  4. Heart disease and depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  5. Getting a New Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Heart Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, Suite 200 Mount Laurel, NJ 08054 Phone: ... of heart disease; these patients have no other choice. The best treatment for your heart failure will ...

  6. Extrarenal abnormalities in Tc-99m-DTPA renal blood flow studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.J.; Domstad, P.A.; DeLand, F.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors observed extrarenal abnormalities during renal flow scintigraphy and retrospectively reviewed 90 patient studies to determine the types and frequencies of such abnormal findings. For each routine Tc-99m-DTPA renal flow study, they obtained nine 2-second sequential images, which included the heart, abdominal aorta, spleen and kidneys. Eighty abnormalities, observed in 62 patients, were divided into three categories: aortic, 37 cases; splenic, 40 cases; and miscellaneous, 3 cases. Other correlative studies including Tc-99m sulfur colloid-spleen scintigraphy, ultrasonography (US), CT, aortography, and surgical and/or autopsy findings were available for corroboration in 56 of 80 lesions.

  7. Applications of Sound Spectrum Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    The physics of sound is often studied in introductory physics class experiments involving a tube of resonating air. In typical setups, pistons control the length of a cylindrical space or a microphone is moved within a tube. While these activities are useful and can be made very quantitative, they don't directly demonstrate the sounds that are…

  8. Letter Recognition and Sound Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Jennifer

    This lesson, which is most appropriate for kindergartners, reviews letter names and their sounds through a group letter recognition activity, a picture book activity, and alphabet practice with several online activities. During three 30-minute sessions, students will: identify the letters of the alphabet; identify the sounds of letters; identify…

  9. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  10. The impact of sound in modern multiline video slot machine play.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Mike J; Harrigan, Kevin A; Santesso, Diane L; Graydon, Candice; Fugelsang, Jonathan A; Collins, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Slot machine wins and losses have distinctive, measurable, physiological effects on players. The contributing factors to these effects remain under-explored. We believe that sound is one of these key contributing factors. Sound plays an important role in reinforcement, and thus on arousal level and stress response of players. It is the use of sound for positive reinforcement in particular that we believe influences the player. In the current study, we investigate the role that sound plays in psychophysical responses to slot machine play. A total of 96 gamblers played a slot machine simulator with and without sound being paired with reinforcement. Skin conductance responses and heart rate, as well as subjective judgments about the gambling experience were examined. The results showed that the sound influenced the arousal of participants both psychophysically and psychologically. The sound also influenced players' preferences, with the majority of players preferring to play slot machines that were accompanied by winning sounds. The sounds also caused players to significantly overestimate the number of times they won while playing the slot machine.

  11. [Music, pulse, heart and sport].

    PubMed

    Gasenzer, E R; Leischik, R

    2017-01-23

    Music, with its various elements, such as rhythm, sound and melody had the unique ability even in prehistoric, ancient and medieval times to have a special fascination for humans. Nowadays, it is impossible to eliminate music from our daily lives. We are accompanied by music in shopping arcades, on the radio, during sport or leisure time activities and in wellness therapy. Ritualized drumming was used in the medical sense to drive away evil spirits or to undergo holy enlightenment. Today we experience the varied effects of music on all sensory organs and we utilize its impact on cardiovascular and neurological rehabilitation, during invasive cardiovascular procedures or during physical activities, such as training or work. The results of recent studies showed positive effects of music on heart rate and in therapeutic treatment (e. g. music therapy). This article pursues the impact of music on the body and the heart and takes sports medical aspects from the past and the present into consideration; however, not all forms of music and not all types of musical activity are equally suitable and are dependent on the type of intervention, the sports activity or form of movement and also on the underlying disease. This article discusses the influence of music on the body, pulse, on the heart and soul in the past and the present day.

  12. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype. PMID:25119760

  13. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  14. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  15. Digital Subtraction Phonocardiography (DSP) applied to the detection and characterization of heart murmurs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the cardiac cycle, the heart normally produces repeatable physiological sounds. However, under pathologic conditions, such as with heart valve stenosis or a ventricular septal defect, blood flow turbulence leads to the production of additional sounds, called murmurs. Murmurs are random in nature, while the underlying heart sounds are not (being deterministic). Innovation We show that a new analytical technique, which we call Digital Subtraction Phonocardiography (DSP), can be used to separate the random murmur component of the phonocardiogram from the underlying deterministic heart sounds. Methods We digitally recorded the phonocardiogram from the anterior chest wall in 60 infants and adults using a high-speed USB interface and the program Gold Wave http://www.goldwave.com. The recordings included individuals with cardiac structural disease as well as recordings from normal individuals and from individuals with innocent heart murmurs. Digital Subtraction Analysis of the signal was performed using a custom computer program called Murmurgram. In essence, this program subtracts the recorded sound from two adjacent cardiac cycles to produce a difference signal, herein called a "murmurgram". Other software used included Spectrogram (Version 16), GoldWave (Version 5.55) as well as custom MATLAB code. Results Our preliminary data is presented as a series of eight cases. These cases show how advanced signal processing techniques can be used to separate heart sounds from murmurs. Note that these results are preliminary in that normal ranges for obtained test results have not yet been established. Conclusions Cardiac murmurs can be separated from underlying deterministic heart sounds using DSP. DSP has the potential to become a reliable and economical new diagnostic approach to screening for structural heart disease. However, DSP must be further evaluated in a large series of patients with well-characterized pathology to determine its clinical potential

  16. Effects of sounds generated by a dental turbine and a stream on regional cerebral blood flow and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Riho; Kudo, Takumu; Tsunetsugu, Yuko; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi; Yamamura, Chie; Yamada, Yoshiaki

    2004-09-01

    Effects of sound generated by a dental turbine and a small stream (murmur) and the effects of no sound (null, control) on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and hemodynamic changes (oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations) in the frontal cortex were measured in 18 young volunteers. Questionnaires completed by the volunteers were also evaluated. Near-infrared spectroscopy and the Finapres technique were employed to measure hemodynamic and vascular responses, respectively. The subjects assessed the murmur, null, and turbine sounds as "pleasant," "natural," and "unpleasant," respectively. Blood pressures changed in response to the murmur, null, and turbine sound stimuli as expected: lower than the control level, unchanged, and higher than the control level, respectively. Mean blood pressure values tended to increase gradually over the recording time even during the null sound stimulation, possibly because of the recording environment. Oxygenated hemoglobin concentrations decreased drastically in response to the dental turbine sound, while deoxygenated hemoglobin concentrations remained unchanged and thus total hemoglobin concentrations decreased (due to the decreased oxygenated hemoglobin concentrations). Hemodynamic responses to the murmuring sound and the null sound were slight or unchanged, respectively. Surprisingly, heart rate measurements remained fairly stable in response to the stimulatory noises. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that sound generated by a dental turbine may affect cerebral blood flow and metabolism as well as autonomic responses.

  17. Acoustic transistor: Amplification and switch of sound by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Bin; Kan, Wei-wei; Zou, Xin-ye; Yin, Lei-lei; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2014-08-01

    We designed an acoustic transistor to manipulate sound in a manner similar to the manipulation of electric current by its electrical counterpart. The acoustic transistor is a three-terminal device with the essential ability to use a small monochromatic acoustic signal to control a much larger output signal within a broad frequency range. The output and controlling signals have the same frequency, suggesting the possibility of cascading the structure to amplify an acoustic signal. Capable of amplifying and switching sound by sound, acoustic transistors have various potential applications and may open the way to the design of conceptual devices such as acoustic logic gates.

  18. Speech Sound Disorders: Articulation and Phonological Processes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Speech, Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Speech Sound Disorders: Articulation and Phonological Processes What are speech ... individuals with speech sound disorders ? What are speech sound disorders? Most children make some mistakes as they ...

  19. Abnormal auditory cortical activation in dyslexia 100 msec after speech onset.

    PubMed

    Helenius, Päivi; Salmelin, Riitta; Richardson, Ulla; Leinonen, Seija; Lyytinen, Heikki

    2002-05-15

    Reading difficulties are associated with problems in processing and manipulating speech sounds. Dyslexic individuals seem to have, for instance, difficulties in perceiving the length and identity of consonants. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we characterized the spatio-temporal pattern of auditory cortical activation in dyslexia evoked by three types of natural bisyllabic pseudowords (/ata/, /atta/, and /a a/), complex nonspeech sound pairs (corresponding to /atta/ and /a a/) and simple 1-kHz tones. The most robust difference between dyslexic and non-reading-impaired adults was seen in the left supratemporal auditory cortex 100 msec after the onset of the vowel /a/. This N100m response was abnormally strong in dyslexic individuals. For the complex nonspeech sounds and tone, the N100m response amplitudes were similar in dyslexic and nonimpaired individuals. The responses evoked by syllable /ta/ of the pseudoword /atta/ also showed modest latency differences between the two subject groups. The responses evoked by the corresponding nonspeech sounds did not differ between the two subject groups. Further, when the initial formant transition, that is, the consonant, was removed from the syllable /ta/, the N100m latency was normal in dyslexic individuals. Thus, it appears that dyslexia is reflected as abnormal activation of the auditory cortex already 100 msec after speech onset, manifested as abnormal response strengths for natural speech and as delays for speech sounds containing rapid frequency transition. These differences between the dyslexic and nonimpaired individuals also imply that the N100m response codes stimulus-specific features likely to be critical for speech perception. Which features of speech (or nonspeech stimuli) are critical in eliciting the abnormally strong N100m response in dyslexic individuals should be resolved in future studies.

  20. Resting Heart Rate and Long-Term Outcomes Among African Americans: Insights From the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Kishan S.; Greiner, Melissa A.; Suzuki, Takeki; DeVore, Adam D.; Blackshear, Chad; Maher, Joseph F.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; O’Brien, Emily C.; Mentz, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Increased resting heart rate is associated with worse outcomes in studies of mostly white populations, but its significance is not well established in African Americans whose cardiac comorbidities and structural abnormalities differ. Objective We studied the prognostic utility of heart rate in a community-based African American cohort in Jackson, Mississippi. Design We included 5261 participants in the Jackson Heart Study. Baseline heart rate was assessed by quintiles and as a continuous variable. Study follow-up was greater than 7 years and started in 2000. Setting The Jackson Heart Study, a prospective, community-based study in Jackson, Mississippi. Participants All participants with baseline heart rate documented by 12-lead electrocardiogram without pacing or atrial fibrillation on their baseline Jackson Heart Study exam were included in our study. Main Outcomes and Measures We estimated unadjusted and adjusted associations between heart rate and all-cause mortality and heart failure hospitalization using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Median baseline heart rate was 63 bpm (interquartile range, 57–71 bpm). The highest heart rate quintile (73–118 bpm) included more women, higher rates of diabetes and hypertension, higher body mass index, less average activity, and lower β-blocker use compared with lower quintiles. Caffeine intake and ejection fraction were similar between groups. As a continuous variable, elevated heart rate was associated with increased mortality and heart failure hospitalizations with adjusted hazard ratios for every 5 bpm increase of 1.14 (95% CI, 1.10–1.19) and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.05–1.16), respectively. Similar patterns were observed in comparisons between highest and lowest quintiles. Conclusions and Relevance Higher baseline heart rate was associated with increased mortality and heart failure hospitalizations among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study. PMID:27681113

  1. Plasma carnitine concentrations in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Shintaro; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Nakamura, Katsutoshi; Miyoshi, Yutaka; Sakai, Akira

    2004-02-01

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for fatty acid (FA) metabolism, the predominant source of ATP in the normal aerobic heart. During myocardial ischemia, FA metabolism is impaired and tissue carnitine levels are depleted. Since the heart cannot synthesize carnitine, plasma carnitine could play an important role in maintaining myocardial carnitine levels during reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of abnormal plasma carnitine concentrations in open heart surgery. Blood samples were obtained from eleven patients before, immediately after, and two hours after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Total and free carnitine levels were significantly reduced immediately after CPB (p<0.01) and remained depressed until two hours after CPB (p<0.01 vs. pre CPB), while acyl carnitine levels were unchanged over the course of this study. These depressed free carnitine levels might affect cardiac metabolism in the heart after open heart surgery. Carnitine supplement might be a useful adjunct in the therapy after open heart surgery.

  2. Myoarchitecture and connective tissue in hearts with tricuspid atresia

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Quintana, D; Climent, V; Ho, S; Anderson, R

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To compare the atrial and ventricular myoarchitecture in the normal heart and the heart with tricuspid atresia, and to investigate changes in the three dimensional arrangement of collagen fibrils.
Methods—Blunt dissection and cell maceration with scanning electron microscopy were used to study the architecture of the atrial and ventricular musculature and the arrangement of collagen fibrils in three specimens with tricuspid atresia and six normal human hearts.
Results—There were significant modifications in the myoarchitecture of the right atrium and the left ventricle, both being noticeably hypertrophied. The middle layer of the ventricle in the abnormal hearts was thicker than in the normal hearts. The orientation of the superficial layer in the left ventricle in hearts with tricuspid atresia was irregular compared with the normal hearts. Scanning electron microscopy showed coarser endomysial sheaths and denser perimysial septa in hearts with tricuspid atresia than in normal hearts.
Conclusions—The overall architecture of the muscle fibres and its connective tissue matrix in hearts with tricuspid atresia differed from normal, probably reflecting modelling of the myocardium that is inherent to the malformation. This is in concordance with clinical observations showing deterioration in pump function of the dominant left ventricle from very early in life.

 Keywords: tricuspid atresia; congenital heart defects; connective tissue; fibrosis PMID:9922357

  3. Pitch features of environmental sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Kang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    A number of soundscape studies have suggested the need for suitable parameters for soundscape measurement, in addition to the conventional acoustic parameters. This paper explores the applicability of pitch features that are often used in music analysis and their algorithms to environmental sounds. Based on the existing alternative pitch algorithms for simulating the perception of the auditory system and simplified algorithms for practical applications in the areas of music and speech, the applicable algorithms have been determined, considering common types of sound in everyday soundscapes. Considering a number of pitch parameters, including pitch value, pitch strength, and percentage of audible pitches over time, different pitch characteristics of various environmental sounds have been shown. Among the four sound categories, i.e. water, wind, birdsongs, and urban sounds, generally speaking, both water and wind sounds have low pitch values and pitch strengths; birdsongs have high pitch values and pitch strengths; and urban sounds have low pitch values and a relatively wide range of pitch strengths.

  4. Differential pathologies resulting from sound exposure: Tinnitus vs hearing loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longenecker, Ryan James

    The first step in identifying the mechanism(s) responsible for tinnitus development would be to discover a neural correlate that is differentially expressed in tinnitus-positive compared to tinnitus negative animals. Previous research has identified several neural correlates of tinnitus in animals that have tested positive for tinnitus. However it is unknown whether all or some of these correlates are linked to tinnitus or if they are a byproduct of hearing loss, a common outcome of tinnitus induction. Abnormally high spontaneous activity has frequently been linked to tinnitus. However, while some studies demonstrate that hyperactivity positively correlates with behavioral evidence of tinnitus, others show that when all animals develop hyperactivity to sound exposure, not all exposed animals show evidence of tinnitus. My working hypothesis is that certain aspects of hyperactivity are linked to tinnitus while other aspects are linked to hearing loss. The first specific aim utilized the gap induced prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (GIPAS) to monitor the development of tinnitus in CBA/CaJ mice during one year following sound exposure. Immediately after sound exposure, GIPAS testing revealed widespread gap detection deficits across all frequencies, which was likely due to temporary threshold shifts. However, three months after sound exposure these deficits were limited to a narrow frequency band and were consistently detected up to one year after exposure. This suggests the development of chronic tinnitus is a long lasting and highly dynamic process. The second specific aim assessed hearing loss in sound exposed mice using several techniques. Acoustic brainstem responses recorded initially after sound exposure reveal large magnitude deficits in all exposed mice. However, at the three month period, thresholds return to control levels in all mice suggesting that ABRs are not a reliable tool for assessing permanent hearing loss. Input/output functions of

  5. EUVS Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Alan S.

    1996-01-01

    During the first half of this year (CY 1996), the EUVS project began preparations of the EUVS payload for the upcoming NASA sounding rocket flight 36.148CL, slated for launch on July 26, 1996 to observe and record a high-resolution (approx. 2 A FWHM) EUV spectrum of the planet Venus. These preparations were designed to improve the spectral resolution and sensitivity performance of the EUVS payload as well as prepare the payload for this upcoming mission. The following is a list of the EUVS project activities that have taken place since the beginning of this CY: (1) Applied a fresh, new SiC optical coating to our existing 2400 groove/mm grating to boost its reflectivity; (2) modified the Ranicon science detector to boost its detective quantum efficiency with the addition of a repeller grid; (3) constructed a new entrance slit plane to achieve 2 A FWHM spectral resolution; (4) prepared and held the Payload Initiation Conference (PIC) with the assigned NASA support team from Wallops Island for the upcoming 36.148CL flight (PIC held on March 8, 1996; see Attachment A); (5) began wavelength calibration activities of EUVS in the laboratory; (6) made arrangements for travel to WSMR to begin integration activities in preparation for the July 1996 launch; (7) paper detailing our previous EUVS Venus mission (NASA flight 36.117CL) published in Icarus (see Attachment B); and (8) continued data analysis of the previous EUVS mission 36.137CL (Spica occultation flight).

  6. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is a congenital heart condition that occurs during the development of the heart in the ... womb. During the heart's development, parts of the left side of the heart (mitral valve, left ventricle ...

  7. Screening for Heart Murmurs. What's Normal and What's Not.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflieger, Kurt L.; Strong, William B.

    1992-01-01

    A step-by-step guide to auscultating young athletes helps physicians identify normal heart murmurs as well as sounds that might signify underlying cardiac pathology. Rapid, thorough preparticipation screening can help differentiate athletes who may require treatment or activity restriction from those with normal murmurs who can remain active. (SM)

  8. Sound symbolism: the role of word sound in meaning.

    PubMed

    Svantesson, Jan-Olof

    2017-03-22

    The question whether there is a natural connection between sound and meaning or if they are related only by convention has been debated since antiquity. In linguistics, it is usually taken for granted that 'the linguistic sign is arbitrary,' and exceptions like onomatopoeia have been regarded as marginal phenomena. However, it is becoming more and more clear that motivated relations between sound and meaning are more common and important than has been thought. There is now a large and rapidly growing literature on subjects as ideophones (or expressives), words that describe how a speaker perceives a situation with the senses, and phonaesthemes, units like English gl-, which occur in many words that share a meaning component (in this case 'light': gleam, glitter, etc.). Furthermore, psychological experiments have shown that sound symbolism in one language can be understood by speakers of other languages, suggesting that some kinds of sound symbolism are universal. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  9. Female Listeners’ Autonomic Responses to Dramatic Shifts Between Loud and Soft Music/Sound Passages: A Study of Heavy Metal Songs

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tzu-Han; Tsai, Chen-Gia

    2016-01-01

    Although music and the emotion it conveys unfold over time, little is known about how listeners respond to shifts in musical emotions. A special technique in heavy metal music utilizes dramatic shifts between loud and soft passages. Loud passages are penetrated by distorted sounds conveying aggression, whereas soft passages are often characterized by a clean, calm singing voice and light accompaniment. The present study used heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds to examine how female listeners’ respiration rates and heart rates responded to the arousal changes associated with auditory stimuli. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was used to assess cardiac parasympathetic activity. The results showed that the soft passages of heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds expressed lower arousal and induced significantly higher HF-HRVs than the loud passages of heavy metal songs. Listeners’ respiration rate was determined by the arousal level of the present music passage, whereas the heart rate was dependent on both the present and preceding passages. Compared with soft sea sounds, the loud music passage led to greater deceleration of the heart rate at the beginning of the following soft music passage. The sea sounds delayed the heart rate acceleration evoked by the following loud music passage. The data provide evidence that sound-induced parasympathetic activity affects listeners’ heart rate in response to the following music passage. These findings have potential implications for future research on the temporal dynamics of musical emotions. PMID:26925009

  10. Female Listeners' Autonomic Responses to Dramatic Shifts Between Loud and Soft Music/Sound Passages: A Study of Heavy Metal Songs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tzu-Han; Tsai, Chen-Gia

    2016-01-01

    Although music and the emotion it conveys unfold over time, little is known about how listeners respond to shifts in musical emotions. A special technique in heavy metal music utilizes dramatic shifts between loud and soft passages. Loud passages are penetrated by distorted sounds conveying aggression, whereas soft passages are often characterized by a clean, calm singing voice and light accompaniment. The present study used heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds to examine how female listeners' respiration rates and heart rates responded to the arousal changes associated with auditory stimuli. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was used to assess cardiac parasympathetic activity. The results showed that the soft passages of heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds expressed lower arousal and induced significantly higher HF-HRVs than the loud passages of heavy metal songs. Listeners' respiration rate was determined by the arousal level of the present music passage, whereas the heart rate was dependent on both the present and preceding passages. Compared with soft sea sounds, the loud music passage led to greater deceleration of the heart rate at the beginning of the following soft music passage. The sea sounds delayed the heart rate acceleration evoked by the following loud music passage. The data provide evidence that sound-induced parasympathetic activity affects listeners' heart rate in response to the following music passage. These findings have potential implications for future research on the temporal dynamics of musical emotions.

  11. Lack of prion infectivity in fixed heart tissue from patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or amyloid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Priola, Suzette A; Ward, Anne E; McCall, Sherman A; Trifilo, Matthew; Choi, Young Pyo; Solforosi, Laura; Williamson, R Anthony; Cruite, Justin T; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2013-09-01

    In most forms of prion disease, infectivity is present primarily in the central nervous system or immune system organs such as spleen and lymph node. However, a transgenic mouse model of prion disease has demonstrated that prion infectivity can also be present as amyloid deposits in heart tissue. Deposition of infectious prions as amyloid in human heart tissue would be a significant public health concern. Although abnormal disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) has not been detected in heart tissue from several amyloid heart disease patients, it has been observed in the heart tissue of a patient with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD), the most common form of human prion disease. In order to determine whether prion infectivity can be found in heart tissue, we have inoculated formaldehyde fixed brain and heart tissue from two sCJD patients, as well as prion protein positive fixed heart tissue from two amyloid heart disease patients, into transgenic mice overexpressing the human prion protein. Although the sCJD brain samples led to clinical or subclinical prion infection and deposition of PrP(Sc) in the brain, none of the inoculated heart samples resulted in disease or the accumulation of PrP(Sc). Thus, our results suggest that prion infectivity is not likely present in cardiac tissue from sCJD or amyloid heart disease patients.

  12. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... get enough calories to heal and grow. After heart surgery, most babies and infants (younger than 12 to 15 months) can take ... valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... open heart surgery References Bernstein D. General principles ...

  13. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  14. Social Support, Heart Failure, and Acute Coronary Syndromes: The Role of Inflammatory Markers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-03

    diabetes mellitus) Aortic stenosis Chronic hypertension Infiltrative cardiomyopathies Abnormal heart valves Genetic conditions Infection...result from hypertension, obesity, diabetes, valve disease, or coronary disease. Valve disease, especially aortic stenosis , increases risk of HF 7

  15. Endocrine abnormalities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disease associated with notable medical complications and increased mortality. Endocrine abnormalities, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, growth hormone resistance and sick euthyroid syndrome, mediate the clinical manifestations of this disease. Alterations in anorexigenic and orexigenic appetite-regulating pathways have also been described. Decreases in fat mass result in adipokine abnormalities. Although most of the endocrine changes that occur in AN represent physiologic adaptation to starvation, some persist after recovery and might contribute to susceptibility to AN recurrence. In this Review, we summarize key endocrine alterations in AN, with a particular focus on the profound bone loss that can occur in this disease. Although AN is increasingly prevalent among boys and men, the disorder predominantly affects girls and women who are, therefore, the focus of this Review.

  16. Eye abnormalities in Fryns syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Diane M; Taboada, Eugenio; Butler, Merlin G

    2004-03-15

    Fryns syndrome is a rare, generally lethal, autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome first described in 1979. Patients with the syndrome present with the classical findings of cloudy cornea, brain malformations, diaphragmatic defects, and distal limb deformities. Over 70 patients have been reported revealing a wide variety of phenotypic features. Although initially considered a major feature of Fryns syndrome, cloudy cornea has been relegated as a minor diagnostic sign and not commonly reported in patients since the original description. However, eye findings per se are not uncommon. Abnormal eye findings occasionally reported in Fryns syndrome potentially result in amblyopia and blindness, profoundly affecting neurologic outcome of those who survive the neonatal period. We reviewed 77 reported patients with Fryns syndrome and summarized the abnormal eye findings identified in 12 of the reported cases. In addition, we contribute three new patients with Fryns syndrome, one of which demonstrated unilateral microphthalmia and cloudy cornea.

  17. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  18. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  19. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  20. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  1. Conduction abnormalities and ventricular arrhythmogenesis: The roles of sodium channels and gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Yeo, Jie Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias arise from disruptions in the normal orderly sequence of electrical activation and recovery of the heart. They can be categorized into disorders affecting predominantly cellular depolarization or repolarization, or those involving action potential (AP) conduction. This article briefly discusses the factors causing conduction abnormalities in the form of unidirectional conduction block and reduced conduction velocity (CV). It then examines the roles that sodium channels and gap junctions play in AP conduction. Finally, it synthesizes experimental results to illustrate molecular mechanisms of how abnormalities in these proteins contribute to such conduction abnormalities and hence ventricular arrhythmogenesis, in acquired pathologies such as acute ischaemia and heart failure, as well as inherited arrhythmic syndromes. PMID:26839915

  2. Electron transport chain defects in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Casademont, Jordi; Miró, Oscar

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, the possibility that disorders of cardiac metabolism play a role in the mechanisms that lead to ventricular dilatation and dysfunction in heart failure has attracted much attention. Electron transport chain is constituted by a series of multimeric protein complexes, located in the inner mitochondrial membranes, whose genes are distributed over both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Its normal function is essential to provide the energy for cardiac function. Many studies have described abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA genes encoding for electron transport chain (ETC) in dilated cardiomyopathies. In some cases, heart failure is one more or less relevant symptom among other multisystem manifestations characteristic of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies, being heart failure imputable to a primary mitochondrial disease. In the case of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathies (IDC), many mitochondrial abnormalities have also been described using hystological, biochemical or molecular studies. The importance of such findings is under debate. The great variability in the mitochondrial abnormalities described has prompted the proposal that mitochondrial dysfunction could be a secondary phenomenon in IDC, and not a primary one. Among other possible explanations for such findings, the presence of an increased oxidative damage due to a free radical excess has been postulated. In this setting, the dysfunction of ETC could be a consequence, but also a cause of the presence of an increased free radical damage. Independently of its origin, ETC dysfunction may contribute to the persistence and worsening of heart failure. If this hypothesis, still to be proven, was certain, the modulation of cardiac metabolism could be an interesting approach to treat IDC. The precise mechanisms that lead to ventricular dilatation and dysfunction in heart failure are still nowadays poorly understood. Circumstances such as cytotoxic insults, viral infections, immune abnormalities

  3. Congenital abnormalities of the goat.

    PubMed

    Basrur, P K

    1993-03-01

    Congenital abnormalities of genetic and environmental causes constitute a striking proportion of the afflictions seen in goats. These include a variety of malformations and metabolic diseases that could occur in all breeds but tend to exhibit predisposition in some breeds of goats. Genetic abnormalities for which the carrier state is detectable with the aid of enzymes and surface protein markers can be eliminated from goat populations, whereas common polygenic disorders including udder problems in does and gynecomastia in bucks are more difficult to eradicate because the mutant genes responsible for these traits generally do not declare themselves until inbreeding brings together a critical concentration of liability genes to create a crisis. A substantial reduction of common abnormalities in this species, such as intersexuality in dairy breeds, abortion in Angora breed, and arthritis in the Pygmy breed, will require a change in breeders' preference and selection practice. In making these changes, however, the beneficial traits will have to be balanced against the undesirable effects of the selected mutant genes (pleiotropy), which hold the key to success or failure of a breed under domestication.

  4. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  5. Resolution enhanced sound detecting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus is described for enhancing the resolution of a sound detector of the type which includes an acoustic mirror for focusing sound from an object onto a microphone to enable the determination of the location from which the sound arises. The enhancement apparatus includes an enclosure which surrounds the space between the mirror and microphone, and contains a gas heavier than air, such as Freon, through which sound moves slower and therefore with a shorter wavelength than in air, so that a mirror of given size has greater resolving power. An acoustically transparent front wall of the enclosure which lies forward of the mirror, can include a pair of thin sheets with pressured air between them, to form an end of the region of heavy gas into a concave shape.

  6. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. ||; Papp, A.L. III |

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one`s application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  7. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. Cancer Center, Houston, TX . Dept. of Biomathematics Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA California Univ., Davis, CA ); Papp, A.L. III Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one's application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  8. Wind turbine sound power measurements.

    PubMed

    Keith, Stephen E; Feder, Katya; Voicescu, Sonia A; Soukhovtsev, Victor; Denning, Allison; Tsang, Jason; Broner, Norm; Richarz, Werner; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides experimental validation of the sound power level data obtained from manufacturers for the ten wind turbine models examined in Health Canada's Community Noise and Health Study (CNHS). Within measurement uncertainty, the wind turbine sound power levels measured using IEC 61400-11 [(2002). (International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva)] were consistent with the sound power level data provided by manufacturers. Based on measurements, the sound power level data were also extended to 16 Hz for calculation of C-weighted levels. The C-weighted levels were 11.5 dB higher than the A-weighted levels (standard deviation 1.7 dB). The simple relationship between A- and C- weighted levels suggests that there is unlikely to be any statistically significant difference between analysis based on either C- or A-weighted data.

  9. Acoustics: Motion controlled by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    A simple technique has been developed that produces holograms made of sound waves. These acoustic landscapes are used to manipulate microscale objects, and offer great potential in medical imaging and selective heating. See Letter p.518

  10. Association Between Interstitial Lung Abnormalities and All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Putman, Rachel K.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Araki, Tetsuro; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Gao, Wei; Nishino, Mizuki; Okajima, Yuka; Dupuis, Josée; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Cho, Michael H.; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Coxson, Harvey O.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Zazueta, Oscar E.; Ross, James C.; Harmouche, Rola; Estépar, Raúl San José; Diaz, Alejandro A.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gudmundsson, Elías F.; Eiríksdottír, Gudny; Aspelund, Thor; Budoff, Matthew J.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Hokanson, John E.; Williams, Michelle C; Murchison, John T.; MacNee, William; Hoffmann, Udo; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Launer, Lenore J.; Harrris, Tamara B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Silverman, Edwin K.; O’Connor, George T.; Washko, George R.; Rosas, Ivan O.; Hunninghake, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Interstitial lung abnormalities have been associated with decreased six-minute walk distance, diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide and total lung capacity; however to our knowledge, an association with mortality has not been previously investigated. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether interstitial lung abnormalities are associated with increased mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, POPULATION Prospective cohort studies of 2633 participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) (CT scans obtained 9/08–3/11), 5320 from the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik (recruited 1/02–2/06), 2068 from COPDGene (recruited 11/07–4/10), and 1670 from the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-points (ECLIPSE) (between 12/05–12/06). EXPOSURES Interstitial lung abnormality status as determined by chest CT evaluation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All cause mortality over approximately 3 to 9 year median follow up time. Cause-of-death information was also examined in the AGES-Reykjavik cohort. RESULTS Interstitial lung abnormalities were present in 177 (7%) of the participants from FHS, 378 (7%) from AGES-Reykjavik, 156 (8%) from COPDGene, and in 157 (9%) from ECLIPSE. Over median follow-up times of ~3–9 years there were more deaths (and a greater absolute rate of mortality) among those with interstitial lung abnormalities compared to those without interstitial lung abnormalities in each cohort; 7% compared to 1% in FHS (6% difference, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2%, 10%), 56% compared to 33% in AGES-Reykjavik (23% difference, 95% CI 18%, 28%), 16% compared to 11% in COPDGene (5% difference, 95% CI −1%, 11%) and 11% compared to 5% in ECLIPSE (6% difference, 95% CI 1%, 11%). After adjustment for covariates, interstitial lung abnormalities were associated with an increase in the risk of death in the FHS (HR=2.7, 95% CI, 1.1–65, P=0.030), AGES-Reykjavik (HR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2–1.4, P<0.001), COPDGene (HR=1.8, 95% CI, 1.1, 2

  11. Fleet Logistics Center, Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Supply Systems Command,Fleet Logistics Center, Puget Sound,467 W Street , Bremerton ,WA,98314-5100 8... Bremerton , WA Established: October 1967 Name Changes: Naval Supply Center Puget Sound, Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Puget...or Sasebo) deployed Ships in the Western Pacific (WestPac) Naval Base Kitsap at Bremerton and Bangor (NBK at Bremerton or Bangor) Navy Region

  12. Acoustoelasticity. [sound-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sound or pressure variations inside bounded enclosures are investigated. Mathematical models are given for determining: (1) the interaction between the sound pressure field and the flexible wall of a Helmholtz resonator; (2) coupled fluid-structural motion of an acoustic cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall; (3) acoustic natural modes in multiple connected cavities; and (4) the forced response of a cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall. Numerical results are discussed.

  13. Visual pathway abnormalities in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Sharma, Lalit; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Ophthalmological complications are common and disabling in patients with tuberculous meningitis. We aimed to study the visual pathway abnormalities in patients with tuberculous meningitis. Forty-three patients with tuberculous meningitis were subjected to visual evoked responses (VER) and neuroophthalmologic assessment. Neuroophthalmologic assessment revealed abnormalities in 22 (51.3%) patients. VER were found to be abnormal in 27 (62.8%) patients. The VER abnormalities included prolonged P100 latencies with relatively normal amplitude and significant interocular latency differences. Visual pathways abnormalities are common in patients with tuberculous meningitis and are often subclinical. Pathophysiologic explanations for electrophysiological abnormalities on VER in these patients are incompletely understood and needs further exploration.

  14. Moth hearing and sound communication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20-60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by "sensory exploitation". Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low-intensity ultrasounds "whispered" by males during courtship is not uncommon, contrary to the general notion of moths predominantly being silent. Sexual sound communication in moths may apply to many eared moths, perhaps even a majority. The low intensities and high frequencies explain that this was overlooked, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals.

  15. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  16. Neural correlates of sound externalization.

    PubMed

    Callan, Akiko; Callan, Daniel E; Ando, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    When we listen to sounds through headphones without utilizing special transforms, sound sources seem to be located inside our heads. The sound sources are said to be lateralized to one side or the other to varying degree. This internal lateralization is different than sound source localization in the natural environment in which the sound is localized distal to the head. We used fMRI to investigate difference in neural responses between lateralization and localization. Individualized binaural recordings were used as externalized auditory stimuli and stereo recordings were used as internalized auditory stimuli. Brain activity was measured while 14 participants performed an active auditory localization task and while 12 participants performed a stimulus type identification task. Irrespective of the task condition, we observed enhanced activity in the bilateral posterior temporal gyri (pSTG) for the externalized stimuli relative to the internalized stimuli. Region of interest analysis indicated that both left and right pSTG were more sensitive to sound sources in contra- than ipsilateral hemifields. Moreover, greater back than front activity was also found in the left pSTG. Compared to impoverished spatial auditory stimuli, realistic spatial auditory stimuli enhance neural responses in the pSTG. This may be why we could observe contralateral hemifield preference in bilateral pSTG that many previous studies have failed to observe. Overall, the results indicate the importance of using ecologically valid stimuli for investigating neural processes in human cortex.

  17. MicroRNAs in Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Lewis, Ramón A.; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs of ~22 nt in length which are involved in the regulation of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by degrading their target mRNAs and/or inhibiting their translation. Expressed ubiquitously or in a tissue-specific manner, miRNAs are involved in the regulation of many biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and the maintenance of normal cellular physiology. Many miRNAs are expressed in embryonic, postnatal, and adult hearts. Aberrant expression or genetic deletion of miRNAs is associated with abnormal cardiac cell differentiation, disruption of heart development, and cardiac dysfunction. This chapter will summarize the history, biogenesis, and processing of miRNAs as well as their function in heart development, remodeling, and disease. PMID:22449848

  18. Sound Symbolism Facilitates Early Verb Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imai, Mutsumi; Kita, Sotaro; Nagumo, Miho; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Some words are sound-symbolic in that they involve a non-arbitrary relationship between sound and meaning. Here, we report that 25-month-old children are sensitive to cross-linguistically valid sound-symbolic matches in the domain of action and that this sound symbolism facilitates verb learning in young children. We constructed a set of novel…

  19. Sound Symbolic Word Learning in Written Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parault, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    Sound symbolism is the notion that the relation between word sounds and word meaning is not arbitrary for all words, but rather there is a subset of words in the world's languages for which sounds and their symbols have some degree of correspondence. This research investigates sound symbolism as a possible means of gaining semantic knowledge of…

  20. 46 CFR 298.14 - Economic soundness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Economic soundness. 298.14 Section 298.14 Shipping... Eligibility § 298.14 Economic soundness. (a) Economic Evaluation. We shall not issue a Letter Commitment for... you seek Title XI financing or refinancing, will be economically sound. The economic soundness...

  1. 46 CFR 298.14 - Economic soundness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Economic soundness. 298.14 Section 298.14 Shipping... Eligibility § 298.14 Economic soundness. (a) Economic Evaluation. We shall not issue a Letter Commitment for... you seek Title XI financing or refinancing, will be economically sound. The economic soundness...

  2. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  3. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  4. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  5. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  6. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  7. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation.

  8. Arid3b is essential for second heart field cell deployment and heart patterning.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Verónica; Badía-Careaga, Claudio; Casanova, Jesús C; Domínguez, Jorge N; de la Pompa, José Luis; Sanz-Ezquerro, Juan José

    2014-11-01

    Arid3b, a member of the conserved ARID family of transcription factors, is essential for mouse embryonic development but its precise roles are poorly understood. Here, we show that Arid3b is expressed in the myocardium of the tubular heart and in second heart field progenitors. Arid3b-deficient embryos show cardiac abnormalities, including a notable shortening of the poles, absence of myocardial differentiation and altered patterning of the atrioventricular canal, which also lacks epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Proliferation and death of progenitors as well as early patterning of the heart appear normal. However, DiI labelling of second heart field progenitors revealed a defect in the addition of cells to the heart. RNA microarray analysis uncovered a set of differentially expressed genes in Arid3b-deficient tissues, including Bhlhb2, a regulator of cardiomyocyte differentiation, and Lims2, a gene involved in cell migration. Arid3b is thus required for heart development by regulating the motility and differentiation of heart progenitors. These findings identify Arid3b as a candidate gene involved in the aetiology of human congenital malformations.

  9. Experimental difficulties in measuring the scattering of sound by sound

    SciTech Connect

    TenCate, J.A. )

    1994-11-01

    The question of whether one sound beam can interact with another at nonzero angle and scatter nonlinearly generated sound outside the mutual interaction region has been debated since the 1950s. Experimental work on this problem has left the question unresolved. This presentation describes experimental difficulties associated with measuring scattered sound produced by real diffracting primary beams. Optimal conditions for observing scattered sound, as outlined by Berntsen [ital et] [ital al]. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. [bold 86], 1968 (1989)] and by Darvennes and Hamilton [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. [bold 87], 1955 (1990)], are reviewed in relation to the design of our own experiments. Our experiments were performed with either two uniform circular sources in water (megahertz frequencies), or with one circular source and the other a shaded source with lower sidelobes. A variety of primary frequency ratios, interaction angles, and other parameters were considered. Comparison of the primary beam patterns with measured sum and difference frequency field patterns reveals the difficulty in identifying which components of the latter correspond to scattered'' sound. It is concluded that two Gaussian-type sources with exceedingly good sidelobe suppression are needed to perform a reasonable experiment. [Work supported by the Packard Foundation and ONR.] [sup a]Present address: Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Mail Stop D443, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545.

  10. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... most cases, a health care provider finds pinna abnormalities during the first well-baby exam. This exam ...

  11. Aftermath of 3/11: earthquakes and involuntary attentional orienting to sudden ambient sounds.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Motohiro; Ueda, Mari; Takeda, Yuji; Sugimoto, Fumie; Katayama, Jun'ichi

    2013-10-01

    Due to the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 and the following long-term earthquake swarm, many people living in the earthquake-affected areas have developed mental stress, even though clinically-diagnosable symptoms may not be apparent. Concurrently, many unusual reports have emerged in which persons complain of abnormally increased sensitivity to sudden ambient sounds during their daily lives (e.g., the sound of the washing machine on spin cycle). By recording event-related potentials to various sudden ambient sounds from young adults living in the affected areas, we found that the level of earthquake-induced mental stress, as indexed by the hyperarousal symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, was positively related to the magnitude of P3a to sudden ambient sounds. These results reveal a strong relationship between mental stress and enhanced involuntary attentional orienting in a large majority of trauma-exposed people without diagnosable symptoms.

  12. Tracheal Sounds Acquisition Using Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Bersain A.; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H.

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds' amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD) for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR) can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r2 = 0.9693, 0.11 (−1.41 to 1.63) breaths-per-minute (bpm) for Galaxy S4, and r2 = 0.9672, 0.097 (–1.38 to 1.57) bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found. PMID:25196108

  13. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  14. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  15. Characterizing and Classifying Acoustical Ambient Sound Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    of sound . The value for the speed of sound varies depending on the medium which the sound wave travels through as well as the temperature and...Characterizing and Classifying Acoustical Ambient Sound Profiles THESIS MARCH 2015 Paul T. Gaski, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-122... SOUND PROFILES THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of

  16. Risks for Heart Valve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  17. Sounds of silence: How to animate virtual worlds with sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Sounds are an integral and sometimes annoying part of our daily life. Virtual worlds which imitate natural environments gain a lot of authenticity from fast, high quality visualization combined with sound effects. Sounds help to increase the degree of immersion for human dwellers in imaginary worlds significantly. The virtual reality toolkit of IGD (Institute for Computer Graphics) features a broad range of standard visual and advanced real-time audio components which interpret an object-oriented definition of the scene. The virtual reality system 'Virtual Design' realized with the toolkit enables the designer of virtual worlds to create a true audiovisual environment. Several examples on video demonstrate the usage of the audio features in Virtual Design.

  18. Sounds of a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    Acoustic Oscillations in Solar-Twin "Alpha Cen A" Observed from La Silla by Swiss Team Summary Sound waves running through a star can help astronomers reveal its inner properties. This particular branch of modern astrophysics is known as "asteroseismology" . In the case of our Sun, the brightest star in the sky, such waves have been observed since some time, and have greatly improved our knowledge about what is going on inside. However, because they are much fainter, it has turned out to be very difficult to detect similar waves in other stars. Nevertheless, tiny oscillations in a solar-twin star have now been unambiguously detected by Swiss astronomers François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory, using the CORALIE spectrometer on the Swiss 1.2-m Leonard Euler telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. This telescope is mostly used for discovering exoplanets (see ESO PR 07/01 ). The star Alpha Centauri A is the nearest star visible to the naked eye, at a distance of a little more than 4 light-years. The new measurements show that it pulsates with a 7-minute cycle, very similar to what is observed in the Sun . Asteroseismology for Sun-like stars is likely to become an important probe of stellar theory in the near future. The state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph , to be mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, will be able to search for oscillations in stars that are 100 times fainter than those for which such demanding observations are possible with CORALIE. PR Photo 23a/01 : Oscillations in a solar-like star (schematic picture). PR Photo 23b/01 : Acoustic spectrum of Alpha Centauri A , as observed with CORALIE. Asteroseismology: listening to the stars ESO PR Photo 23a/01 ESO PR Photo 23a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 357 x 400 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 713 x 800 pix - 256k] [HiRes - JPEG: 2673 x 3000 pix - 2.1Mb Caption : PR Photo 23a/01 is a graphical representation of resonating acoustic waves in the interior of a solar-like star. Red and blue

  19. Influence of sound source width on human sound localization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel T; Paige, Gary D

    2012-01-01

    Free-field sound localization experiments generally assume that a loudspeaker can be approximated by a point-source; however, a large loudspeaker may extend beyond the width that two sources can be discriminated. Humans can accurately discriminate sound source locations within a few degrees, thus one might expect localization precision to decrease as a function of sound source diameter, much as precision is lower for localizing the center of a wide, blurry light source. In order to test the degree to which humans differentially localize small and large sound sources, auditory targets were presented using a single 25.4 cm by 10.2 cm elliptical loudspeaker with the primary axis oriented both horizontally and vertically in different sessions. Subjects were seated with their heads fixed by a bite bar in a darkened, echo-attenuating room facing a cylindrical, acoustically transparent screen at a distance of 2 meters. Auditory targets consisted of repeating bursts (5 Hz) of low frequency band-pass noise (0.2 - 1 kHz, 75 dB SPL). Subjects were instructed to quickly and accurately guide a laser pointer mounted on a cylindrical joystick towards targets, presented randomly within a field ± 40° in azimuth by ± 10° in elevation, with oversampled points located every ten degrees along the primary meridians. Localization accuracy and precision (mean and standard deviation of localization error at oversampled locations) were not significantly different between speaker orientations, and were comparable to baseline measurements recorded using a 7.6 cm circular speaker. We conclude that low frequency sound localization performance is not dependent upon the size of the sound source as predicted theoretically, and is well approximated by a point source.

  20. Macro- and microscopic spectral-polarization characteristics of the structure of normal and abnormally located chordae tendianeae of left ventricular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyk, Yu. Yu.; Prydij, O. G.; Zymnyakov, D. A.; Alonova, M. V.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    The morphological peculiarities of TS mitral valve of the heart of man in normal and abnormal spaced strings of the left ventricle and the study of their structural features depending on the location was studied. There are given the results of comparative statistics, correlation and fractal study population Mueller-matrix images (MMI) of healthy and abnormal (early forms that are not diagnosed by histological methods) BT normal and abnormally located tendon strings left ventricle of the human heart. Abnormalities in the structure of the wings, tendon strings (TS), mastoid muscle (MM) in inconsistencies elements and harmonized operation of all valve complex shown in the features of the polarization manifestations of it laser images.

  1. Lower extremity abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Sass, Pamela; Hassan, Ghinwa

    2003-08-01

    Rotational and angular problems are two types of lower extremity abnormalities common in children. Rotational problems include intoeing and out-toeing. Intoeing is caused by one of three types of deformity: metatarsus adductus, internal tibial torsion, and increased femoral anteversion. Out-toeing is less common than intoeing, and its causes are similar but opposite to those of intoeing. These include femoral retroversion and external tibial torsion. Angular problems include bowlegs and knock-knees. An accurate diagnosis can be made with careful history and physical examination, which includes torsional profile (a four-component composite of measurements of the lower extremities). Charts of normal values and values with two standard deviations for each component of the torsional profile are available. In most cases, the abnormality improves with time. A careful physical examination, explanation of the natural history, and serial measurements are usually reassuring to the parents. Treatment is usually conservative. Special shoes, cast, or braces are rarely beneficial and have no proven efficacy. Surgery is reserved for older children with deformity from three to four standard deviations from the normal.

  2. Normal and abnormal lid function.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Janet C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter on lid function is comprised of two primary sections, the first on normal eyelid anatomy, neurological innervation, and physiology, and the second on abnormal eyelid function in disease states. The eyelids serve several important ocular functions, the primary objectives of which are protection of the anterior globe from injury and maintenance of the ocular tear film. Typical eyelid behaviors to perform these functions include blinking (voluntary, spontaneous, or reflexive), voluntary eye closure (gentle or forced), partial lid lowering during squinting, normal lid retraction during emotional states such as surprise or fear (startle reflex), and coordination of lid movements with vertical eye movements for maximal eye protection. Detailed description of the neurological innervation patterns and neurophysiology of each of these lid behaviors is provided. Abnormal lid function is divided by conditions resulting in excessive lid closure (cerebral ptosis, apraxia of lid opening, blepharospasm, oculomotor palsy, Horner's syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and mechanical) and those resulting in excessive lid opening (midbrain lid retraction, facial nerve palsy, and lid retraction due to orbital disease).

  3. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in structural brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2013-07-31

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently observed after acute cerebrovascular events. The precise mechanism that leads to the development of these arrhythmias is still uncertain, though increasing evidence suggests that it is mainly due to autonomic nervous system dysregulation. In massive brain lesions sympathetic predominance and parasympathetic withdrawal during the first 72 h are associated with the occurrence of severe secondary complications in the first week. Right insular cortex lesions are also related with sympathetic overactivation and with a higher incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly QT prolongation, in patients with ischemic stroke. Additionally, female sex and hypokalemia are independent risk factors for severe prolongation of the QT interval which subsequently results in malignant arrhythmias and poor outcome. The prognostic value of repolarization changes commonly seen after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as ST segment, T wave, and U wave abnormalities, still remains controversial. In patients with traumatic brain injury both intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion correlate with low heart rate variability and increased mortality. Given that there are no firm guidelines for the prevention or treatment of the arrhythmias that appear after cerebral incidents this review aims to highlight important issues on this topic. Selected patients with the aforementioned risk factors could benefit from electrocardiographic monitoring, reassessment of the medications that prolong QTc interval, and administration of antiadrenergic agents. Further research is required in order to validate these assumptions and to establish specific therapeutic strategies.

  4. Genetic disorders with both hearing loss and cardiovascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Belmont, John W; Craigen, William; Martinez, Hugo; Jefferies, John Lynn

    2011-01-01

    There has been a growing appreciation for conditions that affect hearing and which are accompanied by significant cardiovascular disorders. In this chapter we consider several broad classes of conditions including deafness due to abnormal structural development of the inner ear, those with physiological abnormalities in the inner ear sensory apparatus, and conditions with progressive loss of function of sensory cells or middle ear functions. Because of shared developmental controls, inner ear malformations are often associated with congenital heart defects and can be part of complex syndromes that affect other organs and neurodevelopmental outcome. Physiological disorders of the hair cells can lead to hearing loss and can be associated with cardiac arrhythmias, especially long QT syndrome. In addition, cellular energy defects such as mitochondrial disorders can affect maintenance of hair cells and are often associated with cardiomyopathy. Lysosomal storage diseases and other disorders affecting connective tissue can lead to chronic middle ear disease, with conductive hearing loss and also cause cardiac valve disease and/or cardiomyopathy. The genetic basis for these conditions is heterogeneous and includes chromosomal/genomic disorders, de novo dominant mutations, and familial dominant, autosomal-recessive, and mitochondrial (matrilineal) inheritance. Taken together, there are more than 100 individual genes implicated in genetic hearing impairment that are also associated with congenital and/or progressive cardiac abnormalities. These genes encode transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors, components of signal transduction pathways, ion channels, mitochondrial proteins and assembly factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and enzymes involved in lysosomal functions.

  5. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation.

  6. Software development for the analysis of heartbeat sounds with LabVIEW in diagnosis of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Topal, Taner; Polat, Hüseyin; Güler, Inan

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, a time-frequency spectral analysis software (Heart Sound Analyzer) for the computer-aided analysis of cardiac sounds has been developed with LabVIEW. Software modules reveal important information for cardiovascular disorders, it can also assist to general physicians to come up with more accurate and reliable diagnosis at early stages. Heart sound analyzer (HSA) software can overcome the deficiency of expert doctors and help them in rural as well as urban clinics and hospitals. HSA has two main blocks: data acquisition and preprocessing, time-frequency spectral analyses. The heart sounds are first acquired using a modified stethoscope which has an electret microphone in it. Then, the signals are analysed using the time-frequency/scale spectral analysis techniques such as STFT, Wigner-Ville distribution and wavelet transforms. HSA modules have been tested with real heart sounds from 35 volunteers and proved to be quite efficient and robust while dealing with a large variety of pathological conditions.

  7. How Can I Live with Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Defects Care & Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Defects Tools & Resources Heart Attack About Heart Attacks Warning Signs of a Heart ...

  8. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  9. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  10. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  11. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  12. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Options • Recovery and Healthy Living Goals • Personal Stories Heart Valve Disease Symptoms Dr. Robert Bonow describes the symptoms that may alert you to heart valve disease. Support Network: You're Not Alone Popular Articles ...

  13. Nuclear Heart Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... into your blood and travels to your heart. Nuclear heart scans use single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) to detect the energy from the tracer to make pictures of your ...

  14. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  15. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on how to quit ... ask your doctor How to read food labels Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge Low-salt diet Mediterranean diet ...

  16. Menopause and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... minutes, you can get your own personal heart score and life plan. Live better with Life's Simple ... and wellness. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates ...

  17. Know Your Heart's Numbers

    MedlinePlus

    ... of body fat based on height and weight), waist circumference, blood sugar and weight. The telephone survey of ... for heart health. Just 36 percent knew that waist circumference is important measure of heart disease risk. The ...

  18. Heart attack - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice ...

  19. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease and stroke. Start exploring today ! Printable Arrhythmia Information Sheets What is Arrhythmia? What is Atrial ... Card See all Answers by Heart patient sheets Arrhythmia • Home • About Arrhythmia Introduction Atrial Fibrillation Bradycardia Conduction ...

  20. Types of Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that make open-heart surgery very risky. Arrhythmia Treatment An arrhythmia (ah-RITH-me-ah) is a problem with ... rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, ...

  1. American Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educator CPR & ECC Shop Causes Advocate Giving Media American Heart Association Check out Scientific Sessions 2016 news -- translated for ... do not always represent the views of the American Heart Association. Keep color fresh and vibrant by knowing how ...

  2. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  3. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  4. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  5. How the Heart Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your heart is at the center of your circulatory system. This system consists of a network of blood ... the walls contract, blood is pumped into your circulatory system. Inlet and outlet valves in your heart chambers ...

  6. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a ... dozens of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. ...

  7. Heart Murmurs (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... Getting an X-ray Heart Murmurs KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Murmurs Print A A A What's in ...

  8. About Heart Attacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... called plaque. This slow process is known as atherosclerosis . When a plaque in a heart artery breaks, ... called plaque. This slow process is known as atherosclerosis . When a plaque in a heart artery breaks, ...

  9. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... defect - heartbeat Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series References Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend ... ASD) Coarctation of the aorta Ellis-van Creveld syndrome Fetal alcohol syndrome Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Marfan ...

  10. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000166.htm Pericarditis - after heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... occur in the days or weeks following a heart attack . Causes Two types of pericarditis can occur after ...

  11. [Understanding heart failure].

    PubMed

    Boo, José Fernando Guadalajara

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is a disease with several definitions. The term "heart failure" is used by has brougth about confusion in the terminology. For this reason, the value of the ejection fraction (< 0.40 or < 0.35) is used in most meganalyses on the treatment of heart failure, avoiding the term "heart failure" that is a confounding concept. In this paper we carefully analyze the meaning of contractility, ventricular function or performance, preload, afterload, heart failure, compensation mechanisms in heart failure, myocardial oxygen consumption, inadequate, adequate and inappropriate hypertrophy, systole, diastole, compliance, problems of relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction. Their definitions are supported by the original scientific descriptions in an attempt to clarify the concepts about ventricular function and heart failure and, in this way, use the same scientific language about the meaning of ventricular function, heart failure, and diastolic dysfunction.

  12. Bowel sounds analysis: a novel noninvasive method for diagnosis of small-volume ascites.

    PubMed

    Liatsos, Christos; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J; Mavrogiannis, Christos; Patch, David; Panas, Stavros M; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2003-08-01

    Ascites is more difficult to detect when only a small quantity is present. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the optimal bowel sound characteristics in order to distinguish no ascites from small-volume ascites by advanced processing of bowel sound wave patterns. This analysis results in the definition of the normal range of bowel sound patterns, thus providing a novel, simple, and noninvasive way of determining on abnormal pattern, which may reflect presence of small volume ascites. Cirrhotic patients with radiologically proven small-volume ascites and a control group were subjected to bowel sound recordings. The latter were analyzed using a denoising wavelet transform-based filter and a higher-order crossings-based technique in a blinded fashion for linearly distinguishing the two classes. Scatter plots of third-order zero crossings reflect distinct changes seen in the denoised bowel sound pattern between patients and controls due to altered transmission path, providing a distinct separation of all cirrhotic patients with small ascites from controls (P < 0.0001). We conclude that the proposed bowel sounds analysis appears to provide new information regarding the changes of the bowel sound patterns due to the presence of small-volume ascites, potentially contributing towards a safe, effective, noninvasive, and easily implemented alternative method for the diagnosis of small volume ascites at the bedside.

  13. Sound Localization in the Alligator

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine E.

    2016-01-01

    In early tetrapods, it is assumed that the tympana were acoustically coupled through the pharynx and therefore inherently directional, acting as pressure difference receivers. The later closure of the middle ear cavity in turtles, archosaurs, and mammals is a derived condition, and would have changed the ear by decoupling the tympana. Isolation of the middle ears would then have led to selection for structural and neural strategies to compute sound source localization in both archosaurs and mammalian ancestors. In the archosaurs (birds and crocodilians) the presence of air spaces in the skull provided connections between the ears that have been exploited to improve directional hearing, while neural circuits mediating sound localization are well developed. In this review, we will focus primarily on directional hearing in crocodilians, where vocalization and sound localization are thought to be ecologically important, and indicate important issues still awaiting resolution. PMID:26048335

  14. Acoustic metamaterials for sound mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouar, Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    We provide theoretical and numerical analyses of the behavior of a plate-type acoustic metamaterial considered in an air-borne sound environment in view of sound mitigation application. Two configurations of plate are studied, a spring-mass one and a pillar system-based one. The acoustic performances of the considered systems are investigated with different approaches and show that a high sound transmission loss (STL) up to 82 dB is reached with a metamaterial plate with a thickness of 0.5 mm. The physical understanding of the acoustic behavior of the metamaterial partition is discussed based on both air-borne and structure-borne approaches. Confrontation between the STL, the band structure, the displacement fields and the effective mass density of the plate metamaterial is made to have a complete physical understanding of the different mechanisms involved.

  15. Sound propagation in choked ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Liu, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The linearized equations describing the propagation of sound in variable area ducts containing flow are shown to be singular when the duct mean flow is sonic. The singularity is removed when previously ignored nonlinear terms are retained. The results of a numerical study, for the case of plane waves propagating in a one-dimensional converging-diverging duct, show that the sound field is adequately described by the linearized equations only when the axial mean flow Mach number at the duct throat M sub th 0.6. For M sub th 0.6, the numerical results showed that acoustic energy flux was not conserved. An attempt was made to extend the study to include the nonlinear behavior of the sound field. Meaningful results were not obtained due, primarily, to numerical difficulties.

  16. Sound localization in the alligator.

    PubMed

    Bierman, Hilary S; Carr, Catherine E

    2015-11-01

    In early tetrapods, it is assumed that the tympana were acoustically coupled through the pharynx and therefore inherently directional, acting as pressure difference receivers. The later closure of the middle ear cavity in turtles, archosaurs, and mammals is a derived condition, and would have changed the ear by decoupling the tympana. Isolation of the middle ears would then have led to selection for structural and neural strategies to compute sound source localization in both archosaurs and mammalian ancestors. In the archosaurs (birds and crocodilians) the presence of air spaces in the skull provided connections between the ears that have been exploited to improve directional hearing, while neural circuits mediating sound localization are well developed. In this review, we will focus primarily on directional hearing in crocodilians, where vocalization and sound localization are thought to be ecologically important, and indicate important issues still awaiting resolution.

  17. Review of sound card photogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingl, Zoltán; Mingesz, Róbert; Makra, Péter; Mellár, János

    2011-07-01

    Photogates are probably the most commonly used electronic instruments to aid experiments in the field of mechanics. Although they are offered by many manufacturers, they can be too expensive to be widely used in all classrooms, in multiple experiments or even at home experimentation. Today all computers have a sound card--an interface for analogue signals. It is possible to make very simple yet highly accurate photogates for cents, while much more sophisticated solutions are also available at a still very low cost. In our paper we show several experimentally tested ways of implementing sound card photogates in detail, and we also provide full-featured, free, open-source photogate software as a much more efficient experimentation tool than the usually used sound recording programs. Further information is provided on a dedicated web page, www.noise.physx.u-szeged.hu/edudev.

  18. Lyme Carditis: An Interesting Trip to Third-Degree Heart Block and Back

    PubMed Central

    Marmoush, Fady; Rehman, Mobeen Ur; Gorsi, Umama; Yammine, Joseph F.

    2016-01-01

    Carditis is an uncommon presentation of the early disseminated phase of Lyme disease. We present the case of a young female who presented with erythema migrans and was found to have first-degree heart block which progressed to complete heart block within hours. After receiving ceftriaxone, there was complete resolution of the heart block in sequential fashion. Our case illustrates the importance of early recognition and anticipation of progressive cardiac conduction abnormalities in patients presenting with Lyme disease. PMID:27891258

  19. Burn-induced subepicardial injury in frog heart: a simple model mimicking ST segment changes in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro

    2016-02-01

    To mimic ischemic heart disease in humans, several animal models have been created, mainly in rodents by surgically ligating their coronary arteries. In the present study, by simply inducing burn injuries on the bullfrog heart, we reproduced abnormal ST segment changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), mimicking those observed in ischemic heart disease, such as acute myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. The "currents of injury" created by a voltage gradient between the intact and damaged areas of the myocardium, negatively deflected the ECG vector during the diastolic phase, making the ST segment appear elevated during the systolic phase. This frog model of heart injury would be suitable to explain the mechanisms of ST segment changes observed in ischemic heart disease.

  20. Atmospheric Physics and Sound Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-09-01

    exposures of ’ssh.ite mica, various insects and bacteria to the intense, sound field» %£te " mice are killed in osae minute» The killing lias been...tensity sound on a species of sporeforming bacteria » It is possible to obtain very high intensities in water in a flask.;Suspend’ed over the siren...hinges and closure are standard refrigerator~type units» There i3 a double sponge rubber seal around the doors« Electrical connection to