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Sample records for abnormal heart sounds

  1. Teaching Recognition of Normal and Abnormal Heart Sounds Using Computer-Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musselman, Eugene E.; Grimes, George M.

    1976-01-01

    The computer is being used in an innovative manner to teach the recognition of normal and abnormal canine heart sounds at the University of Chicago. Experience thus far indicates that the PLATO program resources allow the maximum development of the student's proficiency in auscultation. (Editor/LBH)

  2. Skeletal Muscle Abnormalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, Shintaro; Takada, Shingo; Matsushima, Shouji; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Exercise capacity is lowered in patients with heart failure, which limits their daily activities and also reduces their quality of life. Furthermore, lowered exercise capacity has been well demonstrated to be closely related to the severity and prognosis of heart failure. Skeletal muscle abnormalities including abnormal energy metabolism, transition of myofibers from type I to type II, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduction in muscular strength, and muscle atrophy have been shown to play a central role in lowered exercise capacity. The skeletal muscle abnormalities can be classified into the following main types: 1) low endurance due to mitochondrial dysfunction; and 2) low muscle mass and muscle strength due to imbalance of protein synthesis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms of these skeletal muscle abnormalities have been studied mainly using animal models. The current review including our recent study will focus upon the skeletal muscle abnormalities in heart failure. PMID:26346520

  3. Heart murmurs

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... classified ("graded") depending on how loud the murmur sounds with a stethoscope. The grading is on a ...

  4. A system for heart sounds classification.

    PubMed

    Redlarski, Grzegorz; Gradolewski, Dawid; Palkowski, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The future of quick and efficient disease diagnosis lays in the development of reliable non-invasive methods. As for the cardiac diseases - one of the major causes of death around the globe - a concept of an electronic stethoscope equipped with an automatic heart tone identification system appears to be the best solution. Thanks to the advancement in technology, the quality of phonocardiography signals is no longer an issue. However, appropriate algorithms for auto-diagnosis systems of heart diseases that could be capable of distinguishing most of known pathological states have not been yet developed. The main issue is non-stationary character of phonocardiography signals as well as a wide range of distinguishable pathological heart sounds. In this paper a new heart sound classification technique, which might find use in medical diagnostic systems, is presented. It is shown that by combining Linear Predictive Coding coefficients, used for future extraction, with a classifier built upon combining Support Vector Machine and Modified Cuckoo Search algorithm, an improvement in performance of the diagnostic system, in terms of accuracy, complexity and range of distinguishable heart sounds, can be made. The developed system achieved accuracy above 93% for all considered cases including simultaneous identification of twelve different heart sound classes. The respective system is compared with four different major classification methods, proving its reliability. PMID:25393113

  5. A System for Heart Sounds Classification

    PubMed Central

    Redlarski, Grzegorz; Gradolewski, Dawid; Palkowski, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The future of quick and efficient disease diagnosis lays in the development of reliable non-invasive methods. As for the cardiac diseases – one of the major causes of death around the globe – a concept of an electronic stethoscope equipped with an automatic heart tone identification system appears to be the best solution. Thanks to the advancement in technology, the quality of phonocardiography signals is no longer an issue. However, appropriate algorithms for auto-diagnosis systems of heart diseases that could be capable of distinguishing most of known pathological states have not been yet developed. The main issue is non-stationary character of phonocardiography signals as well as a wide range of distinguishable pathological heart sounds. In this paper a new heart sound classification technique, which might find use in medical diagnostic systems, is presented. It is shown that by combining Linear Predictive Coding coefficients, used for future extraction, with a classifier built upon combining Support Vector Machine and Modified Cuckoo Search algorithm, an improvement in performance of the diagnostic system, in terms of accuracy, complexity and range of distinguishable heart sounds, can be made. The developed system achieved accuracy above 93% for all considered cases including simultaneous identification of twelve different heart sound classes. The respective system is compared with four different major classification methods, proving its reliability. PMID:25393113

  6. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound transducer. (a) Identification. A heart sound transducer is an external transducer that exhibits a change...

  10. Comparative study of heart sound localization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukadem, A.; Dieterlen, A.; Hueber, N.; Brandt, C.; Raymond, P.

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a comparative study of five algorithms of heart sound localization, one of which, is a method based on radial basis function networks applied in a novel approach. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are evaluated according to a data base of 50 subjects in which there are 25 healthy subjects selected from the University Hospital of Strasbourg (HUS) and from theMARS500 project (Moscow) and 25 subjects with cardiac pathologies selected from the HUS. This study is made under the control of an experienced cardiologist. The performance of each method is evaluated by calculating the area under a receiver operating curve (AUC) and the robustness is shown against different levels of additive white Gaussian noise.

  11. 21 CFR 870.2860 - Heart sound transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heart sound transducer. 870.2860 Section 870.2860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2860 Heart sound...

  12. A computational model of cardiovascular physiology and heart sound generation.

    PubMed

    Watrous, Raymond L

    2009-01-01

    A computational model of the cardiovascular system is described which provides a framework for implementing and testing quantitative physiological models of heart sound generation. The lumped-parameter cardiovascular model can be solved for the hemodynamic variables on which the heart sound generation process is built. Parameters of the cardiovascular model can be adjusted to represent various normal and pathological conditions, and the acoustic consequences of those adjustments can be explored. The combined model of the physiology of cardiovascular circulation and heart sound generation has promise for application in teaching, training and algorithm development in computer-aided auscultation of the heart.

  13. A framework for automatic heart sound analysis without segmentation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A new framework for heart sound analysis is proposed. One of the most difficult processes in heart sound analysis is segmentation, due to interference form murmurs. Method Equal number of cardiac cycles were extracted from heart sounds with different heart rates using information from envelopes of autocorrelation functions without the need to label individual fundamental heart sounds (FHS). The complete method consists of envelope detection, calculation of cardiac cycle lengths using auto-correlation of envelope signals, features extraction using discrete wavelet transform, principal component analysis, and classification using neural network bagging predictors. Result The proposed method was tested on a set of heart sounds obtained from several on-line databases and recorded with an electronic stethoscope. Geometric mean was used as performance index. Average classification performance using ten-fold cross-validation was 0.92 for noise free case, 0.90 under white noise with 10 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and 0.90 under impulse noise up to 0.3 s duration. Conclusion The proposed method showed promising results and high noise robustness to a wide range of heart sounds. However, more tests are needed to address any bias that may have been introduced by different sources of heart sounds in the current training set, and to concretely validate the method. Further work include building a new training set recorded from actual patients, then further evaluate the method based on this new training set. PMID:21303558

  14. Pharmacologic Approaches to Electrolyte Abnormalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Grodin, Justin L

    2016-08-01

    Electrolyte abnormalities are common in heart failure and can arise from a variety of etiologies. Neurohormonal activation from ventricular dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and heart failure medications can perturb electrolyte homeostasis which impact both heart failure-related morbidity and mortality. These include disturbances in serum sodium, chloride, acid-base, and potassium homeostasis. Pharmacological treatments differ for each electrolyte abnormality and vary from older, established treatments like the vaptans or acetazolamide, to experimental or theoretical treatments like hypertonic saline or urea, or to newer, novel agents like the potassium binders: patiromer and zirconium cyclosilicate. Pharmacologic approaches range from limiting electrolyte intake or directly repleting the electrolyte, to blocking or promoting their resorption, and to neurohormonal antagonism. Because of the prevalence and clinical impact of electrolyte abnormalities, understanding both the older and newer therapeutic options is and will continue to be necessity for the management of heart failure. PMID:27278221

  15. Heart sound biometric system based on marginal spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhidong; Shen, Qinqin; Ren, Fangqin

    2013-02-18

    This work presents a heart sound biometric system based on marginal spectrum analysis, which is a new feature extraction technique for identification purposes. This heart sound identification system is comprised of signal acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction, training, and identification. Experiments on the selection of the optimal values for the system parameters are conducted. The results indicate that the new spectrum coefficients result in a significant increase in the recognition rate of 94.40% compared with that of the traditional Fourier spectrum (84.32%) based on a database of 280 heart sounds from 40 participants. 

  16. Heart Sound Biometric System Based on Marginal Spectrum Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhidong; Shen, Qinqin; Ren, Fangqin

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a heart sound biometric system based on marginal spectrum analysis, which is a new feature extraction technique for identification purposes. This heart sound identification system is comprised of signal acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction, training, and identification. Experiments on the selection of the optimal values for the system parameters are conducted. The results indicate that the new spectrum coefficients result in a significant increase in the recognition rate of 94.40% compared with that of the traditional Fourier spectrum (84.32%) based on a database of 280 heart sounds from 40 participants. PMID:23429515

  17. Abnormal Cerebral Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Ceschin, Rafael; Pruetz, Jay D.; Detterich, Jon A.; Del Castillo, Sylvia; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Kim, Richard; Painter, Michael J.; Gilles, Floyd H.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Williams, Roberta G.; Blüml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Abnormal cerebral microstructure has been documented in term neonates with congenital heart disease (CHD) portending risk for injury and poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate diffuse cerebral microstructural abnormalities when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between microstructural abnormalities, white matter injury (e.g., punctate white matter lesions, pWMLs) and other clinical variables, including heart lesion. Material and Methods Using Tract-Based-Spatial-Statistics (TBSS), an unbiased, voxel-wise method for analyzing diffusion tensor imaging data, we compared 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Results Compared to term neonates without CHD, preterm neonates with CHD had microstructural abnormalities in widespread regions of the central white matter. However, 42% of the preterm CHD neonates had pWMLs. When neonates with pWMLs were excluded, microstructural abnormalities remained only in the splenium. Preterms with CHD had similar microstructure to preterms without CHD. Conclusion Diffuse microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD, strongly associated with pWMLs. Independently, regional vulnerability of the splenium, a structure associated with visual spatial function, was observed in all preterm CHD neonates. PMID:23703146

  18. Visualization of Heart Sounds and Motion Using Multichannel Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogata, Fumio; Yokota, Yasunari; Kawamura, Yoko

    2010-06-01

    As there are various difficulties associated with auscultation techniques, we have devised a technique for visualizing heart motion in order to assist in the understanding of heartbeat for both doctors and patients. Auscultatory sounds were first visualized using FFT and Wavelet analysis to visualize heart sounds. Next, to show global and simultaneous heart motions, a new technique for visualization was established. The visualization system consists of a 64-channel unit (63 acceleration sensors and one ECG sensor) and a signal/image analysis unit. The acceleration sensors were arranged in a square array (8×8) with a 20-mm pitch interval, which was adhered to the chest surface. The heart motion of one cycle was visualized at a sampling frequency of 3 kHz and quantization of 12 bits. The visualized results showed a typical waveform motion of the strong pressure shock due to closing tricuspid valve and mitral valve of the cardiac apex (first sound), and the closing aortic and pulmonic valve (second sound) in sequence. To overcome difficulties in auscultation, the system can be applied to the detection of heart disease and to the digital database management of the auscultation examination in medical areas.

  19. Processing of prosthetic heart valve sounds for classification. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E.

    1994-04-01

    People with serious heart conditions have had their expected life span extended considerably with the development of the prosthetic heart valve especially with the great strides made in valve design. Even though the designs are extremely reliable, the valves are mechanical and operating continuously over a long period, therefore, structural failures can occur due to fatigue. Measuring heart sounds non-invasively in a noisy environment puts more demands on the signal processing to extract the desired signals from the noise. In this paper the authors discuss acoustical signal processing techniques developed to process noisy heart valve sounds measured by a sensitive, surface contact microphone and used for the eventual classification of the valve.

  20. Logistic Regression-HSMM-Based Heart Sound Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Springer, David B; Tarassenko, Lionel; Clifford, Gari D

    2016-04-01

    The identification of the exact positions of the first and second heart sounds within a phonocardiogram (PCG), or heart sound segmentation, is an essential step in the automatic analysis of heart sound recordings, allowing for the classification of pathological events. While threshold-based segmentation methods have shown modest success, probabilistic models, such as hidden Markov models, have recently been shown to surpass the capabilities of previous methods. Segmentation performance is further improved when a priori information about the expected duration of the states is incorporated into the model, such as in a hidden semi-Markov model (HSMM). This paper addresses the problem of the accurate segmentation of the first and second heart sound within noisy real-world PCG recordings using an HSMM, extended with the use of logistic regression for emission probability estimation. In addition, we implement a modified Viterbi algorithm for decoding the most likely sequence of states, and evaluated this method on a large dataset of 10,172 s of PCG recorded from 112 patients (including 12,181 first and 11,627 second heart sounds). The proposed method achieved an average F1 score of 95.63 ± 0.85%, while the current state of the art achieved 86.28 ± 1.55% when evaluated on unseen test recordings. The greater discrimination between states afforded using logistic regression as opposed to the previous Gaussian distribution-based emission probability estimation as well as the use of an extended Viterbi algorithm allows this method to significantly outperform the current state-of-the-art method based on a two-sided paired t-test.

  1. Multi-point accelerometric detection and principal component analysis of heart sounds.

    PubMed

    De Panfilis, S; Moroni, C; Peccianti, M; Chiru, O M; Vashkevich, V; Parisi, G; Cassone, R

    2013-03-01

    Heart sounds are a fundamental physiological variable that provide a unique insight into cardiac semiotics. However a deterministic and unambiguous association between noises in cardiac dynamics is far from being accomplished yet due to many and different overlapping events which contribute to the acoustic emission. The current computer-based capacities in terms of signal detection and processing allow one to move from the standard cardiac auscultation, even in its improved forms like electronic stethoscopes or hi-tech phonocardiography, to the extraction of information on the cardiac activity previously unexplored. In this report, we present a new equipment for the detection of heart sounds, based on a set of accelerometric sensors placed in contact with the chest skin on the precordial area, and are able to measure simultaneously the vibration induced on the chest surface by the heart's mechanical activity. By utilizing advanced algorithms for the data treatment, such as wavelet decomposition and principal component analysis, we are able to condense the spatially extended acoustic information and to provide a synthetical representation of the heart activity. We applied our approach to 30 adults, mixed per gender, age and healthiness, and correlated our results with standard echocardiographic examinations. We obtained a 93% concordance rate with echocardiography between healthy and unhealthy hearts, including minor abnormalities such as mitral valve prolapse.

  2. The auditory midbrain of people with tinnitus: abnormal sound-evoked activity revisited.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Jennifer R; Levine, Robert A; Bergevin, Christopher; Norris, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    Sound-evoked fMRI activation of the inferior colliculi (IC) was compared between tinnitus and non-tinnitus subjects matched in threshold (normal), age, depression, and anxiety. Subjects were stimulated with broadband sound in an "on/off" fMRI paradigm with and without on-going sound from the scanner coolant pump. (1) With pump sounds off, the tinnitus group showed greater stimulus-evoked activation of the IC than the non-tinnitus group, suggesting abnormal gain within the auditory pathway of tinnitus subjects. (2) Having pump sounds on reduced activation in the tinnitus, but not the non-tinnitus group. This result suggests response saturation in tinnitus subjects, possibly occurring because abnormal gain increased response amplitude to an upper limit. (3) In contrast to Melcher et al. (2000), the ratio of activation between right and left IC did not differ significantly between tinnitus and non-tinnitus subjects or in a manner dependent on tinnitus laterality. However, new data from subjects imaged previously by Melcher et al. suggest a possible tinnitus subgroup with abnormally asymmetric function of the IC. The present and previous data together suggest elevated responses to sound in the IC are common among those with tinnitus and normal thresholds, while abnormally asymmetric activation is not, even among those with lateralized tinnitus. PMID:19699287

  3. A Signal Processing Module for the Analysis of Heart Sounds and Heart Murmurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Faizan; Venkatachalam, P. A.; H, Ahmad Fadzil M.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper a Signal Processing Module (SPM) for the computer-aided analysis of heart sounds has been developed. The module reveals important information of cardiovascular disorders and can assist general physician to come up with more accurate and reliable diagnosis at early stages. It can overcome the deficiency of expert doctors in rural as well as urban clinics and hospitals. The module has five main blocks: Data Acquisition & Pre-processing, Segmentation, Feature Extraction, Murmur Detection and Murmur Classification. The heart sounds are first acquired using an electronic stethoscope which has the capability of transferring these signals to the near by workstation using wireless media. Then the signals are segmented into individual cycles as well as individual components using the spectral analysis of heart without using any reference signal like ECG. Then the features are extracted from the individual components using Spectrogram and are used as an input to a MLP (Multiple Layer Perceptron) Neural Network that is trained to detect the presence of heart murmurs. Once the murmur is detected they are classified into seven classes depending on their timing within the cardiac cycle using Smoothed Pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution. The module has been tested with real heart sounds from 40 patients and has proved to be quite efficient and robust while dealing with a large variety of pathological conditions.

  4. [Abnormal positions of the heart. An analysis on 1039 cases].

    PubMed

    Mătăsaru, Silvia; Crupa, Maria; Felea, Doina; Cosmescu, Adriana; Barbacariu, Liliana; Petroaie, Antoneta

    2003-01-01

    The aim was to study the impact of the cardiac malpositions into the group of the 1039 congenital heart diseases registered in the Pediatric Outpatient Department of "Sf. Spiridon" hospital. All patients were investigated noninvasively using clinical examination, electrocardiogram, routine Roentgenogram, two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, abdominal echography and, only in two cases, cardiac catheterisation. 23 (2.21%) from 1039 congenital heart diseases registered were cardiac malpositions: dextroposition--3 cases (13.04%), dextrocardia--7 cases (30.43%) and situs inversus--13 cases (56.52%). Most of the children were boys (65.21%), 70% from all cases coming from urban area. Only 3 children had structural cardiac anomalies: two cases with dextrocardia (one with atrial septal defect and one with atrioventricular canal) and one with situs inversus and tetralogy of Fallot, two of them suffering surgical correction. Psychological impact was the main problem of these children, especially during the adolescence, except the two cases with structural cardiac abnormalities who needed following and surgical treatment.

  5. Abnormal intermittency of heart rate in patients with neurocardiogenic syncope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Myung-Kul; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Kim, June-Soo

    2002-03-01

    Introduction: We aim to test our hypothesis that, during daily activity, though not as prominent as during HUT test, the patients may show different degree of intermittency in heart rates compared to healthy persons. METHOD AND RESULTS: Thirty patients with neurocardiogenic syncope who showed a positive HUT test and thirty healthy controls without history of syncope were included. Their twenty-four hour ambulatory electrocardiograms were digitized and RR interval (RRI) data of six-hour interval were analyzed. To quantify the intermittency (C1) behavior, The intermittency analysis was performed using Mexican hat wavelet. For the syncope group, the values of C1 were significantly higher at 6AM-6PM and lower at 6AM-midnight, respectively. However, the values were not different at midnight-6AM. The significant night-day circadian change shown in the control group was lost in C1. CONCLUSION: When compared to healthy control, the patients with neurocardiogenic syncope shows increased intermittency of heart rates in daytime during daily activity, and abnormal circadian rhythms of the index. These new findings may be useful for investigating the pathophysiology of neurocardiogenic syncope and early identification of the patients.

  6. A novel murmur-based heart sound feature extraction technique using envelope-morphological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hao-Dong; Ma, Jia-Li; Fu, Bin-Bin; Wang, Hai-Yang; Dong, Ming-Chui

    2015-07-01

    Auscultation of heart sound (HS) signals serves as an important primary approach to diagnose cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) for centuries. Confronting the intrinsic drawbacks of traditional HS auscultation, computer-aided automatic HS auscultation based on feature extraction technique has witnessed explosive development. Yet, most existing HS feature extraction methods adopt acoustic or time-frequency features which exhibit poor relationship with diagnostic information, thus restricting the performance of further interpretation and analysis. Tackling such a bottleneck problem, this paper innovatively proposes a novel murmur-based HS feature extraction method since murmurs contain massive pathological information and are regarded as the first indications of pathological occurrences of heart valves. Adapting discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and Shannon envelope, the envelope-morphological characteristics of murmurs are obtained and three features are extracted accordingly. Validated by discriminating normal HS and 5 various abnormal HS signals with extracted features, the proposed method provides an attractive candidate in automatic HS auscultation.

  7. Using K-Nearest Neighbor Classification to Diagnose Abnormal Lung Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Hsing; Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Tan, Tan-Hsu; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    2015-01-01

    A reported 30% of people worldwide have abnormal lung sounds, including crackles, rhonchi, and wheezes. To date, the traditional stethoscope remains the most popular tool used by physicians to diagnose such abnormal lung sounds, however, many problems arise with the use of a stethoscope, including the effects of environmental noise, the inability to record and store lung sounds for follow-up or tracking, and the physician’s subjective diagnostic experience. This study has developed a digital stethoscope to help physicians overcome these problems when diagnosing abnormal lung sounds. In this digital system, mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) were used to extract the features of lung sounds, and then the K-means algorithm was used for feature clustering, to reduce the amount of data for computation. Finally, the K-nearest neighbor method was used to classify the lung sounds. The proposed system can also be used for home care: if the percentage of abnormal lung sound frames is > 30% of the whole test signal, the system can automatically warn the user to visit a physician for diagnosis. We also used bend sensors together with an amplification circuit, Bluetooth, and a microcontroller to implement a respiration detector. The respiratory signal extracted by the bend sensors can be transmitted to the computer via Bluetooth to calculate the respiratory cycle, for real-time assessment. If an abnormal status is detected, the device will warn the user automatically. Experimental results indicated that the error in respiratory cycles between measured and actual values was only 6.8%, illustrating the potential of our detector for home care applications. PMID:26053756

  8. Using K-Nearest Neighbor Classification to Diagnose Abnormal Lung Sounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Hsing; Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Tan, Tan-Hsu; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    2015-01-01

    A reported 30% of people worldwide have abnormal lung sounds, including crackles, rhonchi, and wheezes. To date, the traditional stethoscope remains the most popular tool used by physicians to diagnose such abnormal lung sounds, however, many problems arise with the use of a stethoscope, including the effects of environmental noise, the inability to record and store lung sounds for follow-up or tracking, and the physician's subjective diagnostic experience. This study has developed a digital stethoscope to help physicians overcome these problems when diagnosing abnormal lung sounds. In this digital system, mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) were used to extract the features of lung sounds, and then the K-means algorithm was used for feature clustering, to reduce the amount of data for computation. Finally, the K-nearest neighbor method was used to classify the lung sounds. The proposed system can also be used for home care: if the percentage of abnormal lung sound frames is > 30% of the whole test signal, the system can automatically warn the user to visit a physician for diagnosis. We also used bend sensors together with an amplification circuit, Bluetooth, and a microcontroller to implement a respiration detector. The respiratory signal extracted by the bend sensors can be transmitted to the computer via Bluetooth to calculate the respiratory cycle, for real-time assessment. If an abnormal status is detected, the device will warn the user automatically. Experimental results indicated that the error in respiratory cycles between measured and actual values was only 6.8%, illustrating the potential of our detector for home care applications. PMID:26053756

  9. Fluid Dynamics of the Generation and Transmission of Heart Sounds: (2): Direct Simulation using a Coupled Hemo-Elastodynamic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung-Hee; Bakhshaee, Hani; Zhu, Chi; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Patterns of blood flow associated with abnormal heart conditions generate characteristic sounds that can be measured on the chest surface using a stethoscope. This technique of `cardiac auscultation' has been used effectively for over a hundred years to diagnose heart conditions, but the mechanisms that generate heart sounds, as well as the physics of sound transmission through the thorax, are not well understood. Here we present a new computational method for simulating the physics of heart murmur generation and transmission and use it to simulate the murmurs associated with a modeled aortic stenosis. The flow in the model aorta is simulated by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the three-dimensional elastic wave generation and propagation on the surrounding viscoelastic structure are solved with a high-order finite difference method in the time domain. The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements and show good agreement. The present study confirms that the pressure fluctuations on the vessel wall are the source of these heart murmurs, and both compression and shear waves likely plan an important role in cardiac auscultation. Supported by the NSF Grants IOS-1124804 and IIS-1344772, Computational resource by XSEDE NSF grant TG-CTS100002.

  10. Processing of Prosthetic Heart Valve Sounds from Anechoic Tank Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Meyer, A W

    2001-03-20

    People with serious cardiac problems have had their life span extended with the development of the prosthetic heart valve. However, the valves operate continuously at approximately 39 million cycles per year and are therefore subject to structural failures either by faulty design or material fatigue. The development of a non-invasive technique using an acoustic contact microphone and sophisticated signal processing techniques has been proposed and demonstrated on limited data sets. In this paper we discuss an extension of the techniques to perform the heart valve tests in an anechoic like. Here the objective is to extract a ''pure'' sound or equivalently the acoustical vibration response of the prosthetic valves in a quiet environment. The goal is to demonstrate that there clearly exist differences between values which have a specific mechanical defect known as single leg separation (SLS) and non-defective valves known as intact (INT). We discuss the signal processing and results of anechoic acoustic measurements on 50 prosthetic valves in the tank. Finally, we show the results of the individual runs for each valve, point out any of the meaningful features that could be used to distinguish the SLS from INT and summarize the experiments.

  11. Extraction of fault component from abnormal sound in diesel engines using acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayong, Ning; Changle, Sun; Yongjun, Gong; Zengmeng, Zhang; Jiaoyi, Hou

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a method for extracting fault components from abnormal acoustic signals and automatically diagnosing diesel engine faults is presented. The method named dislocation superimposed method (DSM) is based on the improved random decrement technique (IRDT), differential function (DF) and correlation analysis (CA). The aim of DSM is to linearly superpose multiple segments of abnormal acoustic signals because of the waveform similarity of faulty components. The method uses sample points at the beginning of time when abnormal sound appears as the starting position for each segment. In this study, the abnormal sound belonged to shocking faulty type; thus, the starting position searching method based on gradient variance was adopted. The coefficient of similar degree between two same sized signals is presented. By comparing with a similar degree, the extracted fault component could be judged automatically. The results show that this method is capable of accurately extracting the fault component from abnormal acoustic signals induced by faulty shocking type and the extracted component can be used to identify the fault type.

  12. [Research on pretreatment and envelope extraction algorithm of heart sound signal].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leibang; Tang, Rongbin; Jiang, Jianbo; Zhang, Shuai; Chi, Zonglin; Wang, Weilian

    2014-08-01

    In this work, a new method of heart sound signal preprocessing is presented. First, the heart sound signals are decomposed by using multilayer wavelet transform. And then double parameters as thresholds are used in processing each layer after decomposition for denoising. Next, reconstruction of heart sound signals could be done after processing last layer. Four methods, i.e. wavelet transform, Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), mathematical morphology, and normalized average Shannon energy, were used to extract the envelop of the heart sound signals respectively after reconstruction of heart sounds. All methods were improved in this study. We finally in our study chose 30 cases of raw heart sound signals, which were selected randomly from a database comed from The Clinical Medicine Institute of Montreal, and processed them by using the improved methods. The results were satisfactory. It showed that the extracted envelope with the original signal has a high degree of matching, whether it is a low frequency portion or high frequency portion. Most of all information of heart sound has been maintained in the envelope.

  13. Increase in the embedding dimension in the heart rate variability associated with left ventricular abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, D. S.; Irurzun, I. M.; Mitelman, J.; Mola, E. E.

    2006-10-01

    In the present study, the authors report evidence that the existence of premature ventricular contractions increases the embedding dimension of the cardiac dynamics. They also analyze patients with congestive heart failure, a severe clinical condition associated with abnormal left ventricular function. Results also show an increase in the embedding dimension of the heart rate variability. They used electrocardiograms collected by themselves with quality standards that make them comparable with other databases.

  14. SEX DIFFERENCES IN THE EFFECTS OF DIVERSE SOUNDS ON HEART RATE VARIABILITY.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Haruka; Uetake, Teruo; Shimoda, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    With the goal of facilitating the creation of relaxing sound environments in stressful places, such as offices, we examined differences in the heart rate fluctuations of men and women induced by different sounds. Twenty-three healthy students (13 males and 10 females) aged between 18 and 23 listened to seven different sounds while we collected electrocardiogram data. We extracted the high frequency component (HF) and low frequency component (LF) of the signals using the wavelet method, and calculated LF/HF. We found no statistically significant differences between males and females in the frequency distribution of a no change group, increased group, and decreased group for any sound. However, certain sounds had somewhat similar patterns for men and women for all three groups. Additionally, the pairs of experimental sounds with highly similar effects on individuals were different for men and women. PMID:27501540

  15. [Advance in diagnosis and treatment of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease with traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Rong; Wang, Jiel; Liu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    To discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, therapies and prescriptions of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease. According to the advance in modern diagnosis and treatment, the authors believed that psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease is closely related with mental stresses, like anxiety, depression and insomnia. It is mostly caused by emotional injury and expressed in heart, liver, spleen and kidney. The pathogenesis is heart-liver hyperactivity, yin deficiency in heart and kidney, and insufficiency in heart and spleen. The full recognition of etiology and pathogenesis of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease and the combined treatment of disease and syndromes are of great significance to reduce mental stress and other risk factors, prevent and treat coronary heart disease and improve prognosis.

  16. Processing of prosthetic heart valve sounds for single leg separation classification

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E.

    1995-06-01

    Efforts are concentrated on the sounds corresponding to the heart valve opening cycle. Valve opening and closing acoustics present additional information about the outlet strut condition---the structural component implicated in valve failure. The importance of the opening sound for single leg separation detection/classification is based on the fact that as the valve opens, the disk passively hits the outlet strut. The opening sounds thus yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal amount of disturbance caused by the energy radiated from the disk. Hence the opening sound is a very desirable acoustic signal to extract. Unfortunately, the opening sounds have much lower signal levels relative to the closing sounds and therefore noise plays a more significant role than during the closing event. Because of this it is necessary to screen the sounds for outliers in order to insure a high sensitivity of classification. Because of the sharp resonances appearing in the corresponding spectrum, a parametric processing approach is developed based on an autoregressive model which was selected to characterize the sounds emitted by the Bjork--Shiley convexo--concave (BSCC) valve during opening cycle. First the basic signals and the extraction process used to create an ensemble of heart valve sounds are briefly discussed. Next, a {ital beat} {ital monitor} capable of rejecting beats that fail to meet an acceptance criteria based on their spectral content is developed. Various approaches that have been utilized to enhance the screened data and produce a reliable {ital heart} {ital valve} {ital spectrogram} which displays the individual sounds (power) as a function of beat number and temporal frequency are discussed. Once estimated, the spectrogram and associated parameters are used to develop features supplied to the various classification schemes. Finally, future work aimed at even further signal enhancement and improved classifier performance is discussed.

  17. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further.

  18. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further. PMID:21728077

  19. Performance evaluation of heart sound cancellation in FPGA hardware implementation for electronic stethoscope.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chun-Tang; Maneetien, Nopadon; Wang, Chi-Jo; Chiou, Juing-Shian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of the hardware circuit for electronic stethoscopes with heart sound cancellation capabilities using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The adaptive line enhancer (ALE) was adopted as the filtering methodology to reduce heart sound attributes from the breath sounds obtained via the electronic stethoscope pickup. FPGAs were utilized to implement the ALE functions in hardware to achieve near real-time breath sound processing. We believe that such an implementation is unprecedented and crucial toward a truly useful, standalone medical device in outpatient clinic settings. The implementation evaluation with one Altera cyclone II-EP2C70F89 shows that the proposed ALE used 45% resources of the chip. Experiments with the proposed prototype were made using DE2-70 emulation board with recorded body signals obtained from online medical archives. Clear suppressions were observed in our experiments from both the frequency domain and time domain perspectives.

  20. Performance Evaluation of Heart Sound Cancellation in FPGA Hardware Implementation for Electronic Stethoscope

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chun-Tang

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of the hardware circuit for electronic stethoscopes with heart sound cancellation capabilities using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The adaptive line enhancer (ALE) was adopted as the filtering methodology to reduce heart sound attributes from the breath sounds obtained via the electronic stethoscope pickup. FPGAs were utilized to implement the ALE functions in hardware to achieve near real-time breath sound processing. We believe that such an implementation is unprecedented and crucial toward a truly useful, standalone medical device in outpatient clinic settings. The implementation evaluation with one Altera cyclone II–EP2C70F89 shows that the proposed ALE used 45% resources of the chip. Experiments with the proposed prototype were made using DE2-70 emulation board with recorded body signals obtained from online medical archives. Clear suppressions were observed in our experiments from both the frequency domain and time domain perspectives. PMID:24790573

  1. Classification of heart valve sounds from experiments in an anechoic water tank

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, M C; Clark, G A; Scott, D

    1999-06-01

    In vivo studies in both sheep and humans were plagued by a number of problems including movement artifacts, biological noise, low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), chest-wall reverberation, and limited bandwidth recordings as discussed by [1]. To overcome these problems it was decided to record heart valve sounds under controlled conditions deep in an anechoic water tank, free from reverberation noise. The main goal of this experiment was to obtain measurements of ''pure'' heart valve sounds free of the scattering effects of the body. Experiments were conducted at the Transdec facility in San Diego [2]. We used a high quality hydrophone together with a wide-band data acquisition system [2]. We recorded sounds from 100 repetitions of the opening-closing cycles on each of 50 different heart valves, including 21 SLS valves and 29 intact valves. The power spectrum of the opening and closing phases of each cycle were calculated and outlier spectra removed as described by Candy [2]. In this report, we discuss the results of our classification of the heart valve sound measurements. The goal of this classification task was to apply the fundamental classification algorithms developed for the clinical data in 1994 and 1996 to the measurements from the anechoic water tank. From the beginning of this project, LLNL's responsibility has been to process and classify the heart valve sounds. For this experiment, however, we processed both the opening sounds and closing sounds for comparison purposes. The results of this experiment show that the classifier did not perform well because of low signal-to-noise ratio and excessive variability in signal power from beat-to-beat for a given valve.

  2. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion in fetuses with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Wang, Shuyu

    2014-11-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion are implicated in congenital heart defects (CHDs). This study was designed to detect these abnormalities in fetuses and determine the effect of genetic factors on CHD etiology. Between January 2010 and December 2011, 113 fetuses with CHD treated at the Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital were investigated, using chromosome karyotyping of either amniotic fluid cell or umbilical cord blood cell samples. Fetuses with a normal result were then investigated for the 22q11 microdeletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of the 113 patients, 12 (10.6%) exhibited chromosomal abnormalities, while 6 (5.3%) of the remaining 101 cases presented with a 22q11 microdeletion. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly higher in the group of fetuses presenting with extracardiac malformations in addition to CHD (P<0.001), although the detection of the 22q11 microdeletion was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.583). In addition, all fetuses with the 22q11 microdeletion occurred de novo. In conclusion, genetic factors are important in the etiology of CHD. Where fetuses present with cardiac defects, additional chromosomal analysis is required to detect extracardiac abnormalities. Fetuses with heart defects should also be considered for 22q11 microdeletion detection to evaluate fetal prognosis, particularly prior to surgery.

  3. The unique heart sound signature of children with pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Bobhate, Prashant; Jain, Shreepal; Guo, Long; Kumar, Shine; Rutledge, Jennifer; Coe, Yashu; Zemp, Roger; Schuurmans, Dale; Adatia, Ian

    2015-12-01

    We hypothesized that vibrations created by the pulmonary circulation would create sound like the vocal cords during speech and that subjects with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) might have a unique sound signature. We recorded heart sounds at the cardiac apex and the second left intercostal space (2LICS), using a digital stethoscope, from 27 subjects (12 males) with a median age of 7 years (range: 3 months-19 years) undergoing simultaneous cardiac catheterization. Thirteen subjects had mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAp) < 25 mmHg (range: 8-24 mmHg). Fourteen subjects had mPAp ≥ 25 mmHg (range: 25-97 mmHg). We extracted the relative power of the frequency band, the entropy, and the energy of the sinusoid formants from the heart sounds. We applied linear discriminant analysis with leave-one-out cross validation to differentiate children with and without PAH. The significance of the results was determined with a t test and a rank-sum test. The entropy of the first sinusoid formant contained within an optimized window length of 2 seconds of the heart sounds recorded at the 2LICS was significantly lower in subjects with mPAp ≥ 25 mmHg relative to subjects with mPAp < 25 mmHg, with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 92%. The reduced entropy of the first sinusoid formant of the heart sounds in children with PAH suggests the existence of an organized pattern. The analysis of this pattern revealed a unique sound signature, which could be applied to a noninvasive method to diagnose PAH. PMID:26697170

  4. A review of signal processing techniques for heart sound analysis in clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Babatunde S

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of approaches to analysis of heart sound signals. The paper reviews the milestones in the development of phonocardiogram (PCG) signal analysis. It describes the various stages involved in the analysis of heart sounds and discrete wavelet transform as a preferred method for bio-signal processing. In addition, the gaps that still exist between contemporary methods of signal analysis of heart sounds and their applications for clinical diagnosis is reviewed. A lot of progress has been made but crucial gaps still exist. The findings of this review paper are as follows: there is a lack of consensus in research outputs; inter-patient adaptability of signal processing algorithm is still problematic; the process of clinical validation of analysis techniques was not sufficiently rigorous in most of the reviewed literature; and as such data integrity and measurement are still in doubt, which most of the time led to inaccurate interpretation of results. In addition, the existing diagnostic systems are too complex and expensive. The paper concluded that the ability to correctly acquire, analyse and interpret heart sound signals for improved clinical diagnostic processes has become a priority.

  5. Non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart: CT angiography findings.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ersin; Kafadar, Cahit; Tutar, Süleyman; Bozlar, Uğur; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) is most commonly performed for the evaluation of the coronary arteries; however, non-coronary cardiac pathologies are frequently detected on these scans. In cases where magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used, cardiac CT can serve as the first-line imaging modality to evaluate many non-coronary cardiac pathologies. In this article, we discuss congenital non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart and their cardiac CT imaging features. PMID:27609435

  6. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-06-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease.

  7. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  8. Classification of heart valve sounds from experiments in an anechoic water tank

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, M C; Clark, G A; Scott, D

    1999-06-01

    In vivo studies in both sheep and humans were plagued by a number of problems including movement artifacts, biological noise, low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), chest-wall reverberation, and limited bandwidth recordings as discussed by [1]. To overcome these problems it was decided to record heart valve sounds under controlled conditions deep in an anechoic water tank, free from reverberation noise, including surface reflections. Experiments were conducted in a deep water tank at the Transdec facility in San Diego, which satisfies these requirements. The Transdec measurements are free of reverberations, but not totally free of acoustic and electrical noise. We used a high quality hydrophone together with a wide-band data acquisition system [2]. We recorded sounds from 100 repetitions of the opening-closing cycles on each of 50 different heart valves, including 21 SLS valves and 29 intact valves. The power spectrum of the opening and closing phases of each cycle were calculated and outlier spectra removed as described by Candy [2]. In this report, we discuss the results of our classification of the heart valve sound measurements. The goal of this classification task was to apply the fundamental classification algorithms developed for the clinical data in 1994 and 1996 to the measurements from the anechoic water tank. From the beginning of this project, LLNL's responsibility has been to process and classify the heart valve opening sounds. For this experiment, however, we processed both the opening sounds and closing sounds for comparison purposes. The results of this experiment show that the classifier did not perform well. We believe this is because of low signal-to-noise ratio and excessive variability in signal power from beat-to-beat for a given valve.

  9. Computer-assisted diagnosis for chronic heart failure by the analysis of their cardiac reserve and heart sound characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yineng; Guo, Xingming; Qin, Jian; Xiao, Shouzhong

    2015-12-01

    An innovative computer-assisted diagnosis system for chronic heart failure (CHF) was proposed in this study, based on cardiac reserve (CR) indexes extraction, heart sound hybrid characteristics extraction and intelligent diagnosis model definition. Firstly, the modified wavelet packet-based denoising method was applied to data pre-processing. Then, the CR indexes such as the ratio of diastolic to systolic duration (D/S) and the amplitude ratio of the first to second heart sound (S1/S2) were extracted. The feature set consisting of the heart sound characteristics such as multifractal spectrum parameters, the frequency corresponding to the maximum peak of the normalized PSD curve (fPSDmax) and adaptive sub-band energy fraction (sub_EF) were calculated based on multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA), maximum entropy spectra estimation (MESE) and empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Statistical methods such as t-test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed to analyze the difference of each parameter between the healthy and CHF patients. Finally, least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) was employed for the implementation of intelligent diagnosis. The result indicates the achieved diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the proposed system are 95.39%, 96.59% and 93.75% for the detection of CHF, respectively. The selected cutoff values of the diagnosis features are D/S=1.59, S1/S2=1.31, Δα=1.34 and fPSDmax=22.49, determined by ROC curve analysis. This study suggests the proposed methodology could provide a technical clue for the CHF point-of-care system design and be a supplement for CHF diagnosis. PMID:26387633

  10. The design of heart sounds and electrocardiogram monitor system based Atmega 128L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Miao; An, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ying

    2006-11-01

    This paper introduces a realtime system which can acquire,process,store and display heart sounds and electrocardiogram(ECG) of the human body at the same time.It is composed of superior microprocessor--Atmega128L,large capacity Flash and the new type LCD.All hardwares adopt low power design and surface mounting package. The specialities of the system are low power, compact, and high intelligence. In consideration of transplant and solidity of the system, at the same time, it ensures that some complicated arithmetic can be realized.The system software applies mold construction and programs in C language. A model for automatic arithmetic is established for the feature extraction of ECG, realtime cardiotach ambulatory analysis is realized. The system is capable of recording ECG and heart sounds information in succession for 48 hours and it stores the no compression data synchronously. More than ten types of familiar heart diseases can be diagnosed in time by it automatically. The testing data achieved from this system is dependable, the diagnosing result is accurate and the waveform is no distortion. It solved a problem within the same kind of products effectively, that is, the dynamic ECG and heart sounds signal are acquired separately. The system do not affect the daily living and working of human being when it is used, so it is suited for clinical and family monitoring.

  11. [Realization of Heart Sound Envelope Extraction Implemented on LabVIEW Based on Hilbert-Huang Transform].

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhixiang; Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Deping; Wang, Hua

    2015-04-01

    We proposed a research of a heart sound envelope extraction system in this paper. The system was implemented on LabVIEW based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). We firstly used the sound card to collect the heart sound, and then implemented the complete system program of signal acquisition, pretreatment and envelope extraction on LabVIEW based on the theory of HHT. Finally, we used a case to prove that the system could collect heart sound, preprocess and extract the envelope easily. The system was better to retain and show the characteristics of heart sound envelope, and its program and methods were important to other researches, such as those on the vibration and voice, etc.

  12. Fetal and neonatal mortality in patients with isolated congenital heart diseases and heart conditions associated with extracardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Marantz, Pablo; Sáenz Tejeira, M Mercedes; Peña, Gabriela; Segovia, Alejandra; Fustiñana, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    Congenital malformations are a known cause of intrauterine death; of them, congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are accountable for the highest fetal and neonatal mortality rates. They are strongly associated with other extracardiac malformations and an early fetal mortality. Two hundred and twenty fves cases of CHDs are presented. Of them, 155 were isolated CHDs (group A) and 70 were associated with extracardiac malformations, chromosomal disorders, or genetic syndromes (group B). The overall mortality in group B was higher than that observed in group A (p <0.01). Prenatal mortality was similar in both groups: A: 8.4% (13 out of 155); B: 15.7% (11 out of 70). Postnatal mortality was A: 16.8% (26 out of 155) (p <0.01), OR: 0.52 (95% CI: 0.16-1.7); B: 32.9% (23 out of 70) (p <0.01), OR: 0.41 (95% CI: 0.20-0.83). Heart diseases associated with extracardiac abnormalities had a higher mortality rate than isolated congenital heart diseases in the period up to 60 weeks of postmenstrual age (140 days post-term). No differences were observed between both groups of patients in terms of prenatal mortality.

  13. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Prevalence of the Metabolically Abnormal Phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Angela K.; Jacques, Paul F.; Rogers, Gail; Fox, Caroline S.; Meigs, James B.; McKeown, Nicola M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. Design and Methods The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring (1998–2001) and Third Generation (2002–2005) cohorts. Adults were classified as normal weight, overweight or obese and, within these categories, metabolic health was defined based on five criteria – hypertension, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and insulin resistance. Individuals without metabolic abnormalities were considered metabolically healthy. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between categories of SSB consumption and risk of metabolic health after stratification by BMI. Results Comparing the highest category of SSB consumers (median of 7 SSB per week) to the lowest category (non-consumers), odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for metabolically abnormal phenotypes, compared to the metabolically normal, were 1.9 (1.1–3.4) among the obese, 2.0 (1.4–2.9) among the overweight, and 1.9 (1.4–2.6) among the normal weight individuals. Conclusions In this cross-sectional analysis, it is observed that, irrespective of weight status, consumers of SSB were more likely to display metabolic abnormalities compared to non-consumers in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24550031

  14. Analysis of electrolyte abnormalities and the mechanisms leading to arrhythmias in heart failure. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Canino, B; Brucculeri, S; Firenze, A; Caimi, G

    2016-01-01

    About 50% of deaths from heart failure (HF) are sudden, presumably referable to arrhythmias. Electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities are a frequent and potentially dangerous complication in HF patients. Their incidence is almost always correlated with the severity of cardiac dysfunction; furthermore leading to arrhythmias, these imbalances are associated with a poor prognosis. The frequency of ventricular ectopic beats and sudden cardiac death correlate with both plasma and whole body levels of potassium, especially in alkalemia. The early recognition of these alterations and the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms are useful for the management of these HF patients.

  15. Analysis of electrolyte abnormalities and the mechanisms leading to arrhythmias in heart failure. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Canino, B; Brucculeri, S; Firenze, A; Caimi, G

    2016-01-01

    About 50% of deaths from heart failure (HF) are sudden, presumably referable to arrhythmias. Electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities are a frequent and potentially dangerous complication in HF patients. Their incidence is almost always correlated with the severity of cardiac dysfunction; furthermore leading to arrhythmias, these imbalances are associated with a poor prognosis. The frequency of ventricular ectopic beats and sudden cardiac death correlate with both plasma and whole body levels of potassium, especially in alkalemia. The early recognition of these alterations and the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms are useful for the management of these HF patients. PMID:27598028

  16. Perception of binary acoustic events associated with the first heart sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spodick, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    The resolving power of the auditory apparatus permits discrete vibrations associated with cardiac activity to be perceived as one or more events. Irrespective of the vibratory combinations recorded by conventional phonocardiography, in normal adults and in most adult patients auscultators tend to discriminate only two discrete events associated with the first heart sound S1. It is stressed that the heart sound S4 may be present when a binary acoustic event associated with S1 occurs in the sequence 'low pitched sound preceding high pitched sound', i.e., its components are perceived by auscultation as 'dull-sharp'. The question of S4 audibility arises in those individuals, normal and diseased, in whom the major components of S1 ought to be, at least clinically, at their customary high pitch and indeed on the PCG appear as high frequency oscillations. It is revealed that the apparent audibility of recorded S4 is not related to P-R interval, P-S4 interval, or relative amplitude of S4. The significant S4-LFC (low frequency component of S1) differences can be related to acoustic modification of the early component of S1.

  17. Health-related quality of life experienced by children with chromosomal abnormalities and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Joffe, Ari R; Robertson, Charlene M T; Atallah, Joseph; Alton, Gwen; Sauve, Reg S; Dinu, Irina A; Ross, David B; Rebeyka, Ivan M

    2014-03-01

    Long-term outcomes are fundamental in advising parents about the potential future of their children with congenital heart disease (CHD). No published reports have described the health-related quality of life (HRQL) experienced by children with chromosomal abnormalities who had surgery in early infancy for CHD. A study was undertaken to assess HRQL among children with chromosomal abnormalities and CHD. The authors hypothesized that these children have a worse HRQL than healthy children or a cohort of children matched for CHD diagnosis. Infants with chromosomal abnormalities undergoing cardiac surgery for CHD at 6 weeks of age or younger at the Stollery Children's Hospital between July 2000 and June 2005 were included in the study. The HRQL of these infants was assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales completed by their parents at a 4-year follow-up evaluation. The study compared the scores for 16 children with normative data. The children with chromosomal abnormalities and CHD had significantly lower mean total PedsQL (71.3 vs. 87.3; p < 0.0001), Psychosocial Summary (70.3 vs. 86.1; p < 0.0001), and Physical Summary (74.3 vs. 89.2; p = 0.0006) scores. Compared with the matched children, those with chromosomal abnormalities had a significantly lower median total PedsQL (75.0 vs. 84.6; p = 0.03), Physical Summary (79.5 vs. 96.9; p = 0.007), and School Functioning (68.5 vs. 83.0; p = 0.03) scores. A better understanding of the mechanisms and determinants of HRQL in these children has the potential to yield important implications for clinical practice including clarity for treatment decision making as well as determination of targeted supports and services to meet the needs of these children and their families differentially.

  18. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  19. Multi-level basis selection of wavelet packet decomposition tree for heart sound classification.

    PubMed

    Safara, Fatemeh; Doraisamy, Shyamala; Azman, Azreen; Jantan, Azrul; Abdullah Ramaiah, Asri Ranga

    2013-10-01

    Wavelet packet transform decomposes a signal into a set of orthonormal bases (nodes) and provides opportunities to select an appropriate set of these bases for feature extraction. In this paper, multi-level basis selection (MLBS) is proposed to preserve the most informative bases of a wavelet packet decomposition tree through removing less informative bases by applying three exclusion criteria: frequency range, noise frequency, and energy threshold. MLBS achieved an accuracy of 97.56% for classifying normal heart sound, aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation, and aortic regurgitation. MLBS is a promising basis selection to be suggested for signals with a small range of frequencies.

  20. Attenuation effect of Abnormal Savda Munziq on liver and heart toxicity caused by chemotherapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    AIKEMU, AINIWAER; AMAT, NURMUHAMAT; YUSUP, ABDIRYIM; SHAN, LIANLIAN; QI, XINWEI; UPUR, HALMURAT

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq), an Uighur medicine formula commonly used in the treatment of cancer, has been speculated to possess antioxidative and antiproliferative effects, and to regulate immune activity. The present study was designed to systematically elucidate the toxicity-reducing activity of ASMq in mice undergoing combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The mice were divided into normal (saline, 10 ml/kg) and doxorubicin + 5-FU groups (doxorubicin, 2.5 mg/kg; 5-FU, 10 mg/kg on alternate days). In addition, three groups received different doses of ASMq (2, 4 and 8 g/kg), in addition to doxorubicin (2.5 mg/kg) and 5-FU (10 mg/kg) treatment on alternate days. The histology of the heart and liver, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in heart homogenate, and various biochemical parameters of the liver were evaluated. Compared with the normal control group, ASMq dose-dependently improved a number of variables, including body weight, liver index, transaminase and total protein, and partially normalized liver and cardiac pathology. ASMq restored activities of defense antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px towards normal levels, and decreased MDA concentration in dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrated that ASMq provides significant protection against doxorubicin + 5-FU combination induced hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity. Further studies are required to determine the effects of ASMq against doxorubicin + 5-FU-induced toxicity during chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:27347066

  1. The Effect of Noncardiac and Genetic Abnormalities on Outcomes Following Neonatal Congenital Heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Gillespie, Scott; Mahle, William T; Deshpande, Shriprasad; Kogon, Brian; Maher, Kevin; Kanter, Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Significant noncardiac and genetic abnormalities (NC and GA) are common in neonates with congenital heart defects. We sought to examine current-era effect of those abnormalities on early and late outcomes following cardiac surgery. The method from 2002-2012, 1538 neonates underwent repair (n = 860, 56%) or palliation (n = 678, 44%) of congenital heart defects. Regression models examined the effect of NC and GA on operative results, resource utilization, and late outcomes. Neonates with NC and GA (n = 312, 20%) had higher incidence of prematurity (21% vs 13%; P < 0.001) and weight ≤2.5kg (24% vs 12%; P < 0.001) than neonates without NC and GA (n = 1226, 80%). Although the incidence of single ventricle was comparable (34% vs 31%; P = 0.37), neonates with NC and GA underwent more palliation (52% vs 42%; P = 0.001) and subsequently had higher percentage of STAT mortality categories (Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery (EACTS) Congenital Heart Surgery Mortality Categories) 4 and 5 procedures (78% vs 66%; P < 0.001). Adjusted logistic regression models that included disparate patient and operative variables showed that the presence of NC and GA was associated with increased unplanned reoperation (odds ratio = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1-2.7; P = 0.03) and hospital mortality (odds ratio = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.6; P = 0.002). Adjusted linear regression models showed significant association between NC and GA and increased postoperative mechanical ventilation duration, intensive care unit, and hospital stays (P < 0.001 each). Adjusted hazard analysis showed that the presence of NC and GA was associated with diminished late survival (hazard ratio = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.9-3.1; P < 0.001) and that was evident in all subgroups of patients (P < 0.001 each). Conclusion is neonates with NC and GA commonly have associated risk factors for morbidity and mortality such as prematurity and low weight. After adjusting for those factors, the presence

  2. High Order Statistics and Time-Frequency Domain to Classify Heart Sounds for Subjects under Cardiac Stress Test

    PubMed Central

    Moukadem, Ali; Schmidt, Samuel; Dieterlen, Alain

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of classification of the first and the second heart sounds (S1 and S2) under cardiac stress test. The main objective is to classify these sounds without electrocardiogram (ECG) reference and without taking into consideration the systolic and the diastolic time intervals criterion which can become problematic and useless in several real life settings as severe tachycardia and tachyarrhythmia or in the case of subjects being under cardiac stress activity. First, the heart sounds are segmented by using a modified time-frequency based envelope. Then, to distinguish between the first and the second heart sounds, new features, named αopt, β, and γ, based on high order statistics and energy concentration measures of the Stockwell transform (S-transform) are proposed in this study. A study of the variation of the high frequency content of S1 and S2 over the HR (heart rate) is also discussed. The proposed features are validated on a database that contains 2636 S1 and S2 sounds corresponding to 62 heart signals and 8 subjects under cardiac stress test collected from healthy subjects. Results and comparisons with existing methods in the literature show a large superiority for our proposed features. PMID:26089957

  3. Multi-center, multi-topic heart sound databases and their applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meilan; Xiao, Shouzhong; Liu, Tianhu; Yi, Qijian; You, Fengzhi; Guo, Xingming; Shao, Yong; Huo, Junmimg; Du, Deqi; Xu, Dongmei; Wu, Wenzhu; Xiao, Zifu; Yang, Yong; Guo, Weizhen

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes a large resource of multi-center and multi-topic heart sound databases, which were based on the measured data from more than 9,000 heart sound samples (saved in WAV file format). According to different research topics, these samples were respectively stored in different folders (corresponding to different research topics and distributed over various cooperative research centers), most of which as subfolds were stored in a pooled folder in the principal center. According to different research topics, the measured data from these samples were used to create different databases. Relevant data for a specific topic can be pooled in a large database for further analysis. This resource is shared by members of related centers for their own specific topic. The applications of this resource include evaluation of cardiac safety of pregnant women, evaluation of cardiac reserve for children, athletes, addicts, astronauts, and general populations, as well as studies on a bedside method for evaluating cardiac energy, reversal of S1-S2 ratio, etc.

  4. Performance analysis of seismocardiography for heart sound signal recording in noisy scenarios.

    PubMed

    Jain, Puneet Kumar; Tiwari, Anil Kumar; Chourasia, Vijay S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a system based on Seismocardiography (SCG) to monitor the heart sound signal for the long-term. It uses an accelerometer, which is of small size and low weight and, thus, convenient to wear. Such a system should also be robust to various noises which occur in real life scenarios. Therefore, a detailed analysis is provided of the proposed system and its performance is compared to the performance of the Phoncardiography (PCG) system. For this purpose, both signals of five subjects were simultaneously recorded in clinical and different real life noisy scenarios. For the quantitative analysis, the detection rate of fundamental heart sound components, S1 and S2, is obtained. Furthermore, a quality index based on the energy of fundamental components is also proposed and obtained for the same. Results show that both the techniques are able to acquire the S1 and S2, in clinical set-up. However, in real life scenarios, we observed many favourable features in the proposed system as compared to PCG, for its use for long-term monitoring. PMID:26860039

  5. Beat-to-beat systolic time-interval measurement from heart sounds and ECG.

    PubMed

    Paiva, R P; Carvalho, P; Couceiro, R; Henriques, J; Antunes, M; Quintal, I; Muehlsteff, J

    2012-02-01

    Systolic time intervals are highly correlated to fundamental cardiac functions. Several studies have shown that these measurements have significant diagnostic and prognostic value in heart failure condition and are adequate for long-term patient follow-up and disease management. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using heart sound (HS) to accurately measure the opening and closing moments of the aortic heart valve. These moments are crucial to define the main systolic timings of the heart cycle, i.e. pre-ejection period (PEP) and left ventricular ejection time (LVET). We introduce an algorithm for automatic extraction of PEP and LVET using HS and electrocardiogram. PEP is estimated with a Bayesian approach using the signal's instantaneous amplitude and patient-specific time intervals between atrio-ventricular valve closure and aortic valve opening. As for LVET, since the aortic valve closure corresponds to the start of the S2 HS component, we base LVET estimation on the detection of the S2 onset. A comparative assessment of the main systolic time intervals is performed using synchronous signal acquisitions of the current gold standard in cardiac time-interval measurement, i.e. echocardiography, and HS. The algorithms were evaluated on a healthy population, as well as on a group of subjects with different cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In the healthy group, from a set of 942 heartbeats, the proposed algorithm achieved 7.66 ± 5.92 ms absolute PEP estimation error. For LVET, the absolute estimation error was 11.39 ± 8.98 ms. For the CVD population, 404 beats were used, leading to 11.86 ± 8.30 and 17.51 ± 17.21 ms absolute PEP and LVET errors, respectively. The results achieved in this study suggest that HS can be used to accurately estimate LVET and PEP.

  6. Participants’ above-chance recognition of own-heart sound combined with poor metacognitive awareness suggests implicit knowledge of own heart cardiodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Ruben T.; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that interoceptive signals are fundamentally important for the experience of the self. Thus far, studies on interoception have mainly focused on the ability to monitor the timing of ongoing heartbeats and on how these influence emotional and self-related processes. However, cardiac afferent signalling is not confined to heartbeat timing and several other cardiac parameters characterize cardiodynamic functioning. Building on the fact that each heart has its own self-specific cardio-dynamics, which cannot be expressed uniquely by heart rate, we devised a novel task to test whether people could recognize the sound of their own heart even when perceived offline and thus not in synchrony with ongoing heartbeats. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants discriminated between sounds of their own heartbeat (previously recorded with a Doppler device) versus another person’s heart. Participants identified the sound of their own heart above chance, whereas their metacognition of performance – as calculated by contrasting performance against ratings of confidence - was considerably poorer. These results suggest an implicit access to fine-grained neural representations of elementary cardio-dynamic parameters beyond heartbeat timing. PMID:27211283

  7. Participants' above-chance recognition of own-heart sound combined with poor metacognitive awareness suggests implicit knowledge of own heart cardiodynamics.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ruben T; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that interoceptive signals are fundamentally important for the experience of the self. Thus far, studies on interoception have mainly focused on the ability to monitor the timing of ongoing heartbeats and on how these influence emotional and self-related processes. However, cardiac afferent signalling is not confined to heartbeat timing and several other cardiac parameters characterize cardiodynamic functioning. Building on the fact that each heart has its own self-specific cardio-dynamics, which cannot be expressed uniquely by heart rate, we devised a novel task to test whether people could recognize the sound of their own heart even when perceived offline and thus not in synchrony with ongoing heartbeats. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants discriminated between sounds of their own heartbeat (previously recorded with a Doppler device) versus another person's heart. Participants identified the sound of their own heart above chance, whereas their metacognition of performance - as calculated by contrasting performance against ratings of confidence - was considerably poorer. These results suggest an implicit access to fine-grained neural representations of elementary cardio-dynamic parameters beyond heartbeat timing. PMID:27211283

  8. A decision tree – based method for the differential diagnosis of Aortic Stenosis from Mitral Regurgitation using heart sounds

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Sotiris A; Stasis, Antonis CH; Loukis, Euripides N

    2004-01-01

    Background New technologies like echocardiography, color Doppler, CT, and MRI provide more direct and accurate evidence of heart disease than heart auscultation. However, these modalities are costly, large in size and operationally complex and therefore are not suitable for use in rural areas, in homecare and generally in primary healthcare set-ups. Furthermore the majority of internal medicine and cardiology training programs underestimate the value of cardiac auscultation and junior clinicians are not adequately trained in this field. Therefore efficient decision support systems would be very useful for supporting clinicians to make better heart sound diagnosis. In this study a rule-based method, based on decision trees, has been developed for differential diagnosis between "clear" Aortic Stenosis (AS) and "clear" Mitral Regurgitation (MR) using heart sounds. Methods For the purposes of our experiment we used a collection of 84 heart sound signals including 41 heart sound signals with "clear" AS systolic murmur and 43 with "clear" MR systolic murmur. Signals were initially preprocessed to detect 1st and 2nd heart sounds. Next a total of 100 features were determined for every heart sound signal and relevance to the differentiation between AS and MR was estimated. The performance of fully expanded decision tree classifiers and Pruned decision tree classifiers were studied based on various training and test datasets. Similarly, pruned decision tree classifiers were used to examine their differentiation capabilities. In order to build a generalized decision support system for heart sound diagnosis, we have divided the problem into sub problems, dealing with either one morphological characteristic of the heart-sound waveform or with difficult to distinguish cases. Results Relevance analysis on the different heart sound features demonstrated that the most relevant features are the frequency features and the morphological features that describe S1, S2 and the systolic

  9. Ultrastructural and cellular basis for the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics during the transition from hypertension to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanjiv J; Aistrup, Gary L; Gupta, Deepak K; O'Toole, Matthew J; Nahhas, Amanda F; Schuster, Daniel; Chirayil, Nimi; Bassi, Nikhil; Ramakrishna, Satvik; Beussink, Lauren; Misener, Sol; Kane, Bonnie; Wang, David; Randolph, Blake; Ito, Aiko; Wu, Megan; Akintilo, Lisa; Mongkolrattanothai, Thitipong; Reddy, Mahendra; Kumar, Manvinder; Arora, Rishi; Ng, Jason; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Although the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics represents a key step during the transition from hypertension to overt heart failure (HF), the underlying ultrastructural and cellular basis of abnormal myocardial mechanics remains unclear. We therefore investigated how changes in transverse (T)-tubule organization and the resulting altered intracellular Ca(2+) cycling in large cell populations underlie the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics in a model of chronic hypertension. Hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs; n = 72) were studied at different ages and stages of hypertensive heart disease and early HF and were compared with age-matched control (Wistar-Kyoto) rats (n = 34). Echocardiography, including tissue Doppler and speckle-tracking analysis, was performed just before euthanization, after which T-tubule organization and Ca(2+) transients were studied using confocal microscopy. In SHRs, abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occurred early in response to hypertension, before the development of overt systolic dysfunction and HF. Reduced longitudinal, circumferential, and radial strain as well as reduced tissue Doppler early diastolic tissue velocities occurred in concert with T-tubule disorganization and impaired Ca(2+) cycling, all of which preceded the development of cardiac fibrosis. The time to peak of intracellular Ca(2+) transients was slowed due to T-tubule disruption, providing a link between declining cell ultrastructure and abnormal myocardial mechanics. In conclusion, subclinical abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occur early in response to hypertension and coincide with the development of T-tubule disorganization and impaired intracellular Ca(2+) cycling. These changes occur before the development of significant cardiac fibrosis and precede the development of overt cardiac dysfunction and HF.

  10. Detection of Heart Sounds in Children with and without Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension―Daubechies Wavelets Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Kumar, Shine; Guo, Long; Rutledge, Jennifer; Coe, James Y.; Zemp, Roger; Schuurmans, Dale; Adatia, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background Automatic detection of the 1st (S1) and 2nd (S2) heart sounds is difficult, and existing algorithms are imprecise. We sought to develop a wavelet-based algorithm for the detection of S1 and S2 in children with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Method Heart sounds were recorded at the second left intercostal space and the cardiac apex with a digital stethoscope simultaneously with pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). We developed a Daubechies wavelet algorithm for the automatic detection of S1 and S2 using the wavelet coefficient ‘D6’ based on power spectral analysis. We compared our algorithm with four other Daubechies wavelet-based algorithms published by Liang, Kumar, Wang, and Zhong. We annotated S1 and S2 from an audiovisual examination of the phonocardiographic tracing by two trained cardiologists and the observation that in all subjects systole was shorter than diastole. Results We studied 22 subjects (9 males and 13 females, median age 6 years, range 0.25–19). Eleven subjects had a mean PAP < 25 mmHg. Eleven subjects had PAH with a mean PAP ≥ 25 mmHg. All subjects had a pulmonary artery wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg. The sensitivity (SE) and positive predictivity (+P) of our algorithm were 70% and 68%, respectively. In comparison, the SE and +P of Liang were 59% and 42%, Kumar 19% and 12%, Wang 50% and 45%, and Zhong 43% and 53%, respectively. Our algorithm demonstrated robustness and outperformed the other methods up to a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 dB. For all algorithms, detection errors arose from low-amplitude peaks, fast heart rates, low signal-to-noise ratio, and fixed thresholds. Conclusion Our algorithm for the detection of S1 and S2 improves the performance of existing Daubechies-based algorithms and justifies the use of the wavelet coefficient ‘D6’ through power spectral analysis. Also, the robustness despite ambient noise may improve real world clinical performance. PMID:26629704

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor Is a Therapeutic Target for Immunological Unbalance and Cardiac Abnormalities in Chronic Experimental Chagas' Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Isabela Resende; Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Silva, Andrea Alice; Moreira, Otacilio Cruz; Britto, Constança; Sarmento, Ellen Diana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chagas disease (CD) is characterized by parasite persistence and immunological unbalance favoring systemic inflammatory profile. Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, the main manifestation of CD, occurs in a TNF-enriched milieu and frequently progresses to heart failure. Aim of the Study. To challenge the hypothesis that TNF plays a key role in Trypanosoma cruzi-induced immune deregulation and cardiac abnormalities, we tested the effect of the anti-TNF antibody Infliximab in chronically T. cruzi-infected C57BL/6 mice, a model with immunological, electrical, and histopathological abnormalities resembling Chagas' heart disease. Results. Infliximab therapy did not reactivate parasite but reshaped the immune response as reduced TNF mRNA expression in the cardiac tissue and plasma TNF and IFNγ levels; diminished the frequency of IL-17A+ but increased IL-10+ CD4+ T-cells; reduced TNF+ but augmented IL-10+ Ly6C+ and F4/80+ cells. Further, anti-TNF therapy decreased cytotoxic activity but preserved IFNγ-producing VNHRFTLV-specific CD8+ T-cells in spleen and reduced the number of perforin+ cells infiltrating the myocardium. Importantly, Infliximab reduced the frequency of mice afflicted by arrhythmias and second degree atrioventricular blocks and decreased fibronectin deposition in the cardiac tissue. Conclusions. Our data support that TNF is a crucial player in the pathogenesis of Chagas' heart disease fueling immunological unbalance which contributes to cardiac abnormalities. PMID:25140115

  12. Mortality from congenital abnormality in Malaysia 1991-1997: the effect of economic development on death due to congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, J J

    2001-06-01

    An analysis was done of available data from the Department of Statistics Malaysia, on the type of congenital abnormality contributing to death, to determine whether progress in health care over recent years was associated with any decline in mortality from congenital abnormality. A significant decline in death due to congenital abnormality was observed between 1991 and 1996. This was attributable to a decline in deaths due to congenital heart disease occurring because of improvements in cardiac surgical services for infants. In 1997 death due to congenital heart disease increased significantly. This could be attributed to improvements in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in the neonate.

  13. Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capstick, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    1. The nature of sound; 2. Elasticity and vibrations; 3. Transverse waves; 4. Longitudinal waves; 5. Velocity of longitudinal waves; 6. Reflection and refraction. Doppler's principle; 7. Interference. Beats. Combination tones; 8. Resonance and forced vibrations; 9. Quality of musical notes; 10. Organ pipes; 11. Rods. Plates. Bells; 12. Acoustical measurements; 13. The phonograph, microphone and telephone; 14. Consonance; 15. Definition of intervals. Scales. Temperament; 16. Musical instruments; 17. Application of acoustical principles to military purposes; Questions; Answers to questions; Index.

  14. Cardiomyocyte-specific loss of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) reproduces the abnormalities in lipids found in severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Trent, Chad M; Fang, Xiang; Son, Ni-Huiping; Jiang, HongFeng; Blaner, William S; Hu, Yunying; Yin, Yu-Xin; Farese, Robert V; Homma, Shunichi; Turnbull, Andrew V; Eriksson, Jan W; Hu, Shi-Lian; Ginsberg, Henry N; Huang, Li-Shin; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-10-24

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) catalyzes the final step in triglyceride synthesis, the conversion of diacylglycerol (DAG) to triglyceride. Dgat1(-/-) mice exhibit a number of beneficial metabolic effects including reduced obesity and improved insulin sensitivity and no known cardiac dysfunction. In contrast, failing human hearts have severely reduced DGAT1 expression associated with accumulation of DAGs and ceramides. To test whether DGAT1 loss alone affects heart function, we created cardiomyocyte-specific DGAT1 knock-out (hDgat1(-/-)) mice. hDgat1(-/-) mouse hearts had 95% increased DAG and 85% increased ceramides compared with floxed controls. 50% of these mice died by 9 months of age. The heart failure marker brain natriuretic peptide increased 5-fold in hDgat1(-/-) hearts, and fractional shortening (FS) was reduced. This was associated with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and cluster of differentiation 36. We crossed hDgat1(-/-) mice with previously described enterocyte-specific Dgat1 knock-out mice (hiDgat1(-/-)). This corrected the early mortality, improved FS, and reduced cardiac ceramide and DAG content. Treatment of hDgat1(-/-) mice with the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exenatide also improved FS and reduced heart DAG and ceramide content. Increased fatty acid uptake into hDgat1(-/-) hearts was normalized by exenatide. Reduced activation of protein kinase Cα (PKCα), which is increased by DAG and ceramides, paralleled the reductions in these lipids. Our mouse studies show that loss of DGAT1 reproduces the lipid abnormalities seen in severe human heart failure.

  15. Re-evaluation of normal splitting of the second heart sound in patients with classical left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H B; Faiek, A H; Gibson, D G

    1994-07-01

    To study the mechanism of normal splitting of the second heart sound in patients with classical left bundle branch block, we investigated 43 such patients and 15 normal controls, using electro-, phono- and echo-cardiography and comparing the relative timing of mechanical activity in the two ventricles. The splitting of the second heart sound is reversed in only two-thirds of the patients and normal in remaining one-third. Comparing patients with and without reversed splitting, there are no significant differences in left ventricular cavity size, heart rate, pre-ejection period and the distribution of age, gender, or aetiology. QRS duration is longer (P < 0.01) in patients with reversed splitting. Diastolic events of the left ventricle do not differ between groups. The onset of the left ventricular free wall motion is delayed compared with normal by a similar extent in the two groups. In patients with normal splitting, the onset of the right ventricular wall motion is also delayed, both with respect to normal and to those with reversed splitting to an extent similar to that seen in classical right bundle branch block. Normal splitting of the second heart sound associated with an electrocardiographic pattern of left bundle branch block therefore suggests bilateral block. This combination can be documented from the precise timing of the movement of the two ventricles by M-mode echocardiography and identified by simple auscultation. PMID:7960260

  16. A robust correlation method to detect heterogeneous heart valve symptoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suboh, Mohd Zubir; Mansor, Muhammad Naufal; Junoh, Ahmad Kadri; Daud, Wan Suhana Wan; Muhamad, Wan Zuki Azman Wan; Idris, Azrini

    2015-05-01

    Heart valve disease affects a large number of patients. During the past decade, major advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques of heart valve disease. In this paper, we present an alternative method in classifying heart valve disease using correlation analysis and neural network classifier based on heart sound signal. The heart sound signals used in this study were taken from heart sound manipulator software. First, the signal was converted into frequency domain. Then, power spectrum of the sample is determined and cross-correlated with a reference sample (also in power spectrum form) to get different pattern of correlation plot. Seven different heart sounds of normal and other abnormal sounds from heart valve disease were classified into their classes. The result shows that 98.70% of the samples had been correctly classified by the system.

  17. Abnormal Development of Thalamic Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Votava-Smith, Jodie K.; Ceschin, Rafael; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Jackson, Hollie A.; Blüml, Stefan; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Preterm birth is associated with alteration in cortico-thalamic development, which underlies poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate abnormal thalamic microstructure when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between thalamic microstructural abnormalities and peri-operative clinical variables. Material and Methods We compared thalamic DTI measurements in 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Comparison was made with three other selected white matter regions using ROI manual based measurements. Correlation was made with post-conceptional age and peri-operative clinical variables. Results In preterm neonates with CHD, there were age-related differences in thalamic diffusivity (axial and radial) compared to the preterm and term non-CHD group, in contrast to no differences in anisotropy. Contrary to our hypothesis, abnormal thalamic and optic radiation microstructure was most strongly associated with an elevated first arterial blood gas pO2 and elevated pre-operative arterial blood gas pH (p<0.05). Conclusion Age-related thalamic microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD. Perinatal hyperoxemia and increased peri-operative serum pH was associated with abnormal thalamic microstructure in preterm neonates with CHD. This study emphasizes the vulnerability of thalamo-cortical development in the preterm neonate with CHD. PMID:25608695

  18. Calcium handling in human heart failure--abnormalities and target for therapy.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Hannes; Schwinger, Robert H G

    2012-07-01

    The fast cycling of calcium between internal stores and the myofilaments with rapid diffusion down steep concentration gradients provides the cellular basis for cardiac contraction and relaxation. In heart failure, the intracellular Ca(2) (+) dynamics are impaired showing reduced systolic peak Ca(2) (+), elevated diastolic Ca(2) (+) levels, and prolonged diastolic Ca(2) (+) decay. The recognition that defects in the function of Ca(2) (+) handling proteins are central to the pathogenesis of heart failure has attracted attention to these proteins as potential targets for therapy. Besides pharmacologic interventions including digitalis, ranolazine, levosimendan and others, cardiac gene therapy holds great promise and the recent clinical studies have proven the feasibility of this therapeutic approach. In this review, the rationale underlying modern therapies that modulate intracellular Ca(2) (+) handling for the treatment of human heart failure are presented and discussed.

  19. Sugar-sweetened beverages and prevalence of the metabolically abnormal phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the...

  20. Complete reversibility of physiological coronary vascular abnormalities in hypertrophied hearts produced by pressure overload in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Isoyama, S; Ito, N; Kuroha, M; Takishima, T

    1989-01-01

    Using an experimental model of ascending aortic banding in the rat, we examined whether coronary circulation abnormalities in hypertrophied hearts are reversible after debanding. 4-wk banding produced significant increases in in vivo left ventricular (LV) pressure (194 +/- 13 vs. 114 +/- 9 mmHg in shamoperated controls) and LV dry wt/body wt (48 +/- 5% above controls). In isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer, coronary flow rate (CFR) was estimated under nonworking conditions. During maximal vasodilation after 1 min-ischemia, CFR at a coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) of 100 mmHg and CFR/myocardidial mass at CPPs of 100 and 150 mmHg decreased significantly (72 +/- 5%; 53 +/- 4 and 61 +/- 4% of controls). 1 or 4 wk after debanding, LV systolic pressures were similar to control values, and the degree of myocardial hypertrophy decreased to levels 23 +/- 6 (P less than 0.01) and 11 +/- 6% (P less than 0.01) above their control values, respectively. At 1 wk there was no significant increase in CFR/myocardial mass, compared to values in the banded group (67 +/- 8 vs. 53 +/- 4% of controls at 100 mmHg and 67 +/- 9 vs. 61 +/- 4% at 150 mmHg of CPP). At 4 wk, CFR and the ratio had increased toward normal. Thus, decreased coronary perfusion in hypertrophied hearts is completely reversible. Images PMID:2525568

  1. Abnormal Mitochondrial L-Arginine Transport Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure and Rexoygenation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Melissa; Joshi, Mandar; Horlock, Duncan; Lam, Nicholas T.; Gregorevic, Paul; McGee, Sean L.; Kaye, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF) and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. Methods and Results In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model) we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively) and expression of the principal L-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (p<0.001, p<0.01) compared to controls. This was accompanied by significantly lower NO production and higher 3-nitrotyrosine levels (both p<0.05). The role of mitochondrial L-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1) exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. Conclusion These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury. PMID:25111602

  2. Genetic abnormalities in FOXP1 are associated with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sheng-Wei; Mislankar, Mona; Misra, Chaitali; Huang, Nianyuan; Dajusta, Daniel G; Harrison, Steven M; McBride, Kim L; Baker, Linda A; Garg, Vidu

    2013-09-01

    The etiology for the majority of congenital heart defects (CHD) is unknown. We identified a patient with unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and hypoplastic left ventricle who harbored an ~0.3 Mb monoallelic deletion on chromosome 3p14.1. The deletion encompassed the first four exons of FOXP1, a gene critical for normal heart development that represses cardiomyocyte proliferation and expression of Nkx2.5. To determine whether FOXP1 mutations are found in patients with CHD, we sequenced FOXP1 in 82 patients with AVSD or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We discovered two patients who harbored a heterozygous c.1702C>T variant in FOXP1 that predicted a potentially deleterious substitution of a highly conserved proline (p.Pro568Ser). This variant was not found in 287 controls but is present in dbSNP at a 0.2% frequency. The orthologous murine Foxp1 p.Pro596Ser mutant protein displayed deficits in luciferase reporter assays and resulted in increased proliferation and Nkx2.5 expression in cardiomyoblasts. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of FOXP1 is associated with human CHD.

  3. [On the genesis of the first heart sound: phono-echocardiographic study in patients with A-V block (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cannata, D; Autore, C; Fragola, P; Pierangli, L; Maccari, A M

    1981-01-01

    A phono-echocardiographic study of acustic and morphologic events was performed in three patients with atrioventricular block in order to assess the role of the mitral valve in the changes of the amplitude of the first heart and, more generally, in the genesis of the first heart sound. Simultaneous recording of the electrocardiogram, the apical phonocardiogram and the mitral echocardiogram showed: 1) the coincidence between the C point of the echocardiogram and the onset of the earlier high frequency vibrations of the first heart sound (M1); 2) a close correlation between the intensity of the first heart sound and the position of the mitral valve at the onset of ventricular systole (P less than 0.001); 3) longer duration of the first heart sound in those beats when there was superimposition of P wave in QRS. The authors illustrate the recent reports about the genesis of the first heart sound and emphasize the main role of the mitral valve suggesting that the position of the mitral leaflets at the onset of ventricular systole influences the mechanism of acceleration and deceleration of blood and vibrations of the "cardiohemic system".

  4. Insulin over expression induces heart abnormalities via reactive oxygen species regulation, might be step towards cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, S; Ali, T; Gul, M; Javed, Q; Emanueli, C; Murtaza, I

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is known to regulate blood—glucose level and promote its utilization as an energy source in cardiac tissues under normal physiological conditions as well as stimulates signaling pathways that involved cell growth and proliferation. Although recently insulin generated free radicals via NAD(P)H has been documented but the molecular mechanism is still under investigation. The aim of present study is to elucidate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent possible role of insulin in cardiac abnormalities, including hypertrophy by regulation of antioxidants enzyme (SOD) activity. In the current study, 60 cardiac patients and 50 healthy individuals as well as the rat model with insulin administration were under investigation. Oxidant, anti—oxidant biochemical assays, hypertrophic marker expression via immunobloting and histopathology were performed. We observed statistically significant elevation of the reactive oxygen species level in the serum of patients as well as in the insulin administrated rat model, a mild expression of cardiac marker in experimental models along with abnormal histopathology of hearts. However, super oxide dismutase free radical scavenger activity was down regulated upon insulin treatment compared to control rats. Conclusively, the present study showed that over expression of insulin might stimulate cardiac hypertrophic signal via up regulation of free radicals and down regulation of antioxidants enzymes including SOD activity.

  5. A neural network learned information measures for heart motion abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambakhsh, M. S.; Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Goela, Aashish; Islam, Ali; Peters, Terry; Li, Shuo

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we propose an information theoretic neural network for normal/abnormal left ventricular motion classification which outperforms significantly other recent methods in the literature. The proposed framework consists of a supervised 3-layer artificial neural network (ANN) which uses hyperbolic tangent sigmoid and linear transfer functions for hidden and output layers, respectively. The ANN is fed by information theoretic measures of left ventricular wall motion such as Shannon's differential entropy (SDE), Rényi entropy and Fisher information, which measure global information of subjects distribution. Using 395×20 segmented LV cavities of short-axis magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired from 48 subjects, the experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms Support Vector Machine (SVM) and thresholding based information theoretic classifiers. It yields a specificity equal to 90%, a sensitivity of 91%, and a remarkable Area Under Curve (AUC) for Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC), equal to 93.2%.

  6. Heart rate, conduction and ultrasound abnormalities in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Colotto, Marco; Amato, Silvia; Colella, Alessandra; Curione, Mario; Danese, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. Though not considered a diagnostic criterion for most EDS subtypes, cardiovascular involvement is a well-known complication in EDS. A case-control study was carried out on 28 adults with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosed according to current criteria, compared to 29 healthy subjects evaluating resting electrocardiographic (ECG), 24-h ECG and resting heart ultrasound data. Results obtained in the ECG studies showed a moderate excess in duration of the PR interval and P wave, an excess of heart conduction and rate abnormalities and an increased rate of mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency often complicating with "true" mitral valve prolapse in the ecocardiographic study. These variable ECG subclinical anomalies reported in our sample may represent the resting surrogate of such a subnormal cardiovascular response to postural changes that are known to be present in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings indicate the usefulness of a full cardiologic evaluation of adults with JHS/EDS-HT for the correct management. PMID:24752348

  7. Unhealthy lifestyles and ischaemic electrocardiographic abnormalities: the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Nabipour, I; Amiri, M; Imami, S R; Jahfari, S M; Nosrati, A; Iranpour, D; Soltanian, A R

    2008-01-01

    We assessed prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and unhealthy lifestyles in 3723 participants aged > or = 25 years in the northern Persian Gulf region; 96.0% had > or = 1 cardiovascular risk factor. Over 60% had unhealthy body weight, only 8.3% ate the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables, 70.6% were physically inactive and 19.0% were current smokers. Prevalence of electrocardiogram (ECG) with evidence of IHD was 12.7%. Present or past smoking and truncal obesity were independently associated with IHD ECGs in men, and past or present smoking and obesity in women. Hypertension and diabetes were independently associated with increased risk of IHD ECG.

  8. Usefulness of verapamil for congestive heart failure associated with abnormal left ventricular diastolic filling and normal left ventricular systolic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Setaro, J.F.; Zaret, B.L.; Schulman, D.S.; Black, H.R.; Soufer, R. )

    1990-10-15

    Normal left ventricular systolic performance with impaired left ventricular diastolic filling may be present in a substantial number of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). To evaluate the effect of oral verapamil in this subset, 20 men (mean age 68 +/- 5 years) with CHF, intact left ventricular function (ejection fraction greater than 45%) and abnormal diastolic filling (peak filling rate less than 2.5 end-diastolic volumes per second (edv/s)) were studied in a placebo-controlled, double-blind 5-week crossover trial. All patients underwent echocardiography to rule out significant valvular disease, and thallium-201 stress scintigraphy to exclude major active ischemia. Compared to baseline values, verapamil significantly improved exercise capacity by 33% (13.9 +/- 4.3 vs 10.7 +/- 3.4 minutes at baseline) and peak filling rate by 30% (2.29 +/- 0.54 vs 1.85 +/- 0.45 edv/s at baseline) (all p less than 0.05). Placebo values were 12.3 +/- 4.0 minutes and 2.16 +/- 0.48 edv/s, respectively (difference not significant for both). Improvement from baseline in an objective clinico-radiographic heart failure score (scale 0 to 13) was significantly greater with verapamil compared to placebo (median improvement in score: 3 vs 1, p less than 0.01). Mean ejection fraction and systolic blood pressure were unchanged from baseline; diastolic blood pressure and heart rate decreased to a small degree. Verapamil may have therapeutic efficacy in patients with CHF, preserved systolic function and impaired diastolic filling.

  9. Heart energy signature spectrogram for cardiovascular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kudriavtsev, Vladimir; Polyshchuk, Vladimir; Roy, Douglas L

    2007-01-01

    A new method and application is proposed to characterize intensity and pitch of human heart sounds and murmurs. Using recorded heart sounds from the library of one of the authors, a visual map of heart sound energy was established. Both normal and abnormal heart sound recordings were studied. Representation is based on Wigner-Ville joint time-frequency transformations. The proposed methodology separates acoustic contributions of cardiac events simultaneously in pitch, time and energy. The resolution accuracy is superior to any other existing spectrogram method. The characteristic energy signature of the innocent heart murmur in a child with the S3 sound is presented. It allows clear detection of S1, S2 and S3 sounds, S2 split, systolic murmur, and intensity of these components. The original signal, heart sound power change with time, time-averaged frequency, energy density spectra and instantaneous variations of power and frequency/pitch with time, are presented. These data allow full quantitative characterization of heart sounds and murmurs. High accuracy in both time and pitch resolution is demonstrated. Resulting visual images have self-referencing quality, whereby individual features and their changes become immediately obvious. PMID:17480232

  10. Recovery after aerobic exercise is manipulated by tempo change in a rhythmic sound pattern, as indicated by autonomic reaction on heart functioning

    PubMed Central

    Wallert, John; Madison, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Physical prowess is associated with rapid recovery from exhaustion. Here we examined whether recovery from aerobic exercise could be manipulated with a rhythmic sound pattern that either decreased or increased in tempo. Six men and six women exercised repeatedly for six minutes on a cycle ergometer at 60 percent of their individual maximal oxygen consumption, and then relaxed for six minutes while listening to one of two sound pattern conditions, which seemed to infinitely either decrease or increase in tempo, during which heart and breathing activity was measured. Participants exhibited more high-frequent heart rate variability when listening to decreasing tempo than when listening to increasing tempo, accompanied by a non-significant trend towards lower heart rate. The results show that neuropsychological entrainment to a sound pattern may directly affect the autonomic nervous system, which in turn may facilitate physiological recovery after exercise. Applications using rhythmic entrainment to aid physical recovery are discussed. PMID:25285076

  11. Introduction: December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young - Highlights of HeartWeek 2015: Challenges and Dilemmas of Pediatric Cardiac Care including Heart Failure in Children and Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 13th annual publication in Cardiology in the Young generated from the two meetings that composed "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Centre at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine, and entering its 16th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Paediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia entering its 19th year. This December 2015 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of the two meetings that compose HeartWeek. Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 15th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from Friday, 6 February, 2015, to Monday, 9 February, 2015. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery and its special focus was "Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries". The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's annual meeting - Cardiology 2015, the 18th Annual Update on Paediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease: "Challenges and Dilemmas" - was held at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, from Wednesday, 11 February, 2015, to Sunday, 15 February, 2015. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care

  12. Abnormalities in intracellular calcium regulation and contractile function in myocardium from dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perreault, C. L.; Shannon, R. P.; Komamura, K.; Vatner, S. F.; Morgan, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    24 d of rapid ventricular pacing induced dilated cardiomyopathy with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in conscious, chronically instrumented dogs. We studied mechanical properties and intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) transients of trabeculae carneae isolated from 15 control dogs (n = 32) and 11 dogs with pacing-induced cardiac failure (n = 26). Muscles were stretched to maximum length at 30 degrees C and stimulated at 0.33 Hz; a subset (n = 17 control, n = 17 myopathic) was loaded with the [Ca2+]i indicator aequorin. Peak tension was depressed in the myopathic muscles, even in the presence of maximally effective (i.e., 16 mM) [Ca2+] in the perfusate. However, peak [Ca2+]i was similar (0.80 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.71 +/- 0.05 microM; [Ca2+]o = 2.5 mM), suggesting that a decrease in Cai2+ availability was not responsible for the decreased contractility. The time for decline from the peak of the Cai2+ transient was prolonged in the myopathic group, which correlated with prolongation of isometric contraction and relaxation. However, similar end-diastolic [Ca2+]i was achieved in both groups (0.29 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.02 microM), indicating that Cai2+ homeostasis can be maintained in myopathic hearts. The inotropic response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was depressed compared with the controls. However, when cAMP production was stimulated by pretreatment with forskolin, the response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was improved. Our findings provide direct evidence that abnormal [Ca2+]i handling is an important cause of contractile dysfunction in dogs with pacing-induced heart failure and suggest that deficient production of cAMP may be an important cause of these changes in excitation-contraction coupling.

  13. Sound mind vs sound heart.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Baljit K; Katz, Sara B; Upadhyay, Anil; Cherukuri, Sathya; Sule, Akeem

    2016-03-01

    Depressive and anxiety disorders have both have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This article highlights the multifactorial and bidirectional interaction between cardiovascular diseases, depression and anxiety, and the need for early assessment, diagnosis and intervention. PMID:26961442

  14. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  15. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is related to both reduced contractile function and incomplete relaxation: an electromechanically detailed biophysical modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, David H.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) accounts for about 50% of heart failure cases. It has features of incomplete relaxation and increased stiffness of the left ventricle. Studies from clinical electrophysiology and animal experiments have found that HFpEF is associated with impaired calcium homeostasis, ion channel remodeling and concentric left ventricle hypertrophy (LVH). However, it is still unclear how the abnormal calcium homeostasis, ion channel and structural remodeling affect the electro-mechanical dynamics of the ventricles. In this study we have developed multiscale models of the human left ventricle from single cells to the 3D organ, which take into consideration HFpEF-induced changes in calcium handling, ion channel remodeling and concentric LVH. Our simulation results suggest that at the cellular level, HFpEF reduces the systolic calcium level resulting in a reduced systolic contractile force, but elevates the diastolic calcium level resulting in an abnormal residual diastolic force. In our simulations, these abnormal electro-mechanical features of the ventricular cells became more pronounced with the increase of the heart rate. However, at the 3D organ level, the ejection fraction of the left ventricle was maintained due to the concentric LVH. The simulation results of this study mirror clinically observed features of HFpEF and provide new insights toward the understanding of the cellular bases of impaired cardiac electromechanical functions in heart failure. PMID:25852567

  16. Ventricular conduction abnormalities as predictors of long‐term survival in acute de novo and decompensated chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Siirila‐Waris, Krista; Harjola, Veli‐Pekka; Marono, David; Parenica, Jiri; Kreutzinger, Philipp; Nieminen, Tuomo; Pavlusova, Marie; Tarvasmaki, Tuukka; Twerenbold, Raphael; Tolonen, Jukka; Miklik, Roman; Nieminen, Markku S.; Spinar, Jindrich; Mueller, Christian; Lassus, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims Data on the prognostic role of left and right bundle branch blocks (LBBB and RBBB), and nonspecific intraventricular conduction delay (IVCD; QRS ≥ 110 ms, no BBB) in acute heart failure (AHF) are controversial. Our aim was to investigate electrocardiographic predictors of long‐term survival in patients with de novo AHF and acutely decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF). Methods and Results We analysed the admission electrocardiogram of 982 patients from a multicenter European cohort of AHF with 3.9 years' mean follow‐up. Half (51.5%, n = 506) of the patients had de novo AHF. LBBB, and IVCD were more common in ADCHF than in de novo AHF: 17.2% vs. 8.7% (P < 0.001) and 20.6% vs. 13.2% (P = 0.001), respectively, and RBBB was almost equally common (6.9% and 8.1%; P = 0.5), respectively. Mortality during the follow‐up was higher in patients with RBBB (85.4%) and IVCD (73.7%) compared with patients with normal ventricular conduction (57.0%); P < 0.001 for both. The impact of RBBB on prognosis was prominent in de novo AHF (adjusted HR 1.93, 1.03–3.60; P = 0.04), and IVCD independently predicted death in ADCHF (adjusted HR 1.79, 1.28–2.52; P = 0.001). Both findings were pronounced in patients with reduced ejection fraction. LBBB showed no association with increased mortality in either of the subgroups. The main results were confirmed in a validation cohort of 1511 AHF patients with 5.9 years' mean follow‐up. Conclusions Conduction abnormalities predict long‐term survival differently in de novo AHF and ADCHF. RBBB predicts mortality in de novo AHF, and IVCD in ADCHF. LBBB has no additive predictive value in AHF requiring hospitalization.

  17. The impact of steroid withdrawal on the development of lipid abnormalities and obesity in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lake, K D; Reutzel, T J; Pritzker, M R; Jorgensen, C R; Emery, R W

    1993-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia and obesity are common problems after heart transplantation, which may increase the risk of chronic graft atherosclerosis. The intent of this study was to (1) determine the impact of a history of hyperlipidemia on the occurrence of lipid abnormalities after transplantation, (2) compare lipid profiles of those patients being treated with triple-drug immunosuppression versus those patients weaned from prednisone therapy, and (3) identify any factors that would predict which patients are at highest risk for the development of hyperlipidemia after transplantation. Of 89 patients who lived for more than 12 months, 35 patients had a history of hyperlipidemia before heart transplantation (cholesterol level of more than 240 mg/dl; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of more than 160 mg/dl). The most dramatic rise in cholesterol level was observed in patients with no history of hyperlipidemia who were treated with triple-drug immunosuppression, in whom a 64% increase occurred versus a 24% increase in patients receiving steroid-free immunosuppression (p < 0.001). In patients with a history of hyperlipidemia, cholesterol level increased by 20% with triple-drug immunosuppression versus 14% with steroid-free immunosuppression (p = 0.613); however, 83% of the patients in the triple-drug group and 92% in the steroid-free group had elevated cholesterol levels. Multiple regression analysis revealed that significant independent and additive (p < 0.00001) contributions with respect to percent change in cholesterol level were evident for (1) a negative history of hyperlipidemia (p = 0.005), (2) triple-drug immunosuppression (p = 0.0021), and (3) female sex (p = 0.0113). A negative history of hyperlipidemia was predictive of the percent change in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (p = 0.0049), and triple-drug immunosuppression administration predicted the percent change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.0119). Patients with a positive history

  18. Time-dependent remodeling of transmural architecture underlying abnormal ventricular geometry in chronic volume overload heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Covell, James W.

    2010-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the abnormal ventricular geometry in failing hearts may be accounted for by regionally selective remodeling of myocardial laminae or sheets, we investigated remodeling of the transmural architecture in chronic volume overload induced by an aortocaval shunt. We determined three-dimensional finite deformation at apical and basal sites in left ventricular anterior wall of six dogs with the use of biplane cineradiography of implanted markers. Myocardial strains at end diastole were measured at a failing state referred to control to describe remodeling of myofibers and sheet structures over time. After 9 ± 2 wk (means ± SE) of volume overload, the myocardial volume within the marker sets increased by >20%. At 2 wk, the basal site had myofiber elongation (0.099 ± 0.030; P < 0.05), whereas the apical site did not [P = not significant (NS)]. Sheet shear at the basal site increased progressively toward the final study (0.040 ± 0.003 at 2 wk and 0.054 ± 0.021 at final; both P < 0.05), which contributed to a significant increase in wall thickness at the final study (0.181 ± 0.047; P < 0.05), whereas the apical site did not (P = NS). We conclude that the remodeling of the transmural architecture is regionally heterogeneous in chronic volume overload. The early differences in fiber elongation seem most likely due to a regional gradient in diastolic wall stress, whereas the late differences in wall thickness are most likely related to regional differences in the laminar architecture of the wall. These results suggest that the temporal progression of ventricular remodeling may be anatomically designed at the level of regional laminar architecture. PMID:15242833

  19. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described

  20. The internal auditory clock: what can evoked potentials reveal about the analysis of temporal sound patterns, and abnormal states of consciousness?

    PubMed

    Jones, S J

    2002-09-01

    internal "clocks"? Abnormal mismatch potentials may provide a manifestation of a disordered auditory time-sense, sometimes being abolished in comatose patients while the C-potentials and similar responses to the onset of tones are preserved. Both C- and M-potentials were usually found to be preserved, however, in patients who had emerged from coma and were capable of discriminating sounds. Substantially intact responses were also recorded from three patients who were functionally in a "vegetative" state. The C- and M-potentials were once again dissociated in a group of patients with multiple sclerosis, only the mismatch potentials being found to be significantly delayed. This subclinical impairment of a memory-based process responsible for the detection of change in temporal sound patterns may be related to defects in other memory domains such as working memory. PMID:12448181

  1. Time-domain analysis of heart sound intensity in children with and without pulmonary artery hypertension: a pilot study using a digital stethoscope.

    PubMed

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Bobhate, Prashant; Jain, Shreepal; Rutledge, Jennifer; Coe, James Y; Zemp, Roger; Schuurmans, Dale; Adatia, Ian

    2014-12-01

    We studied digital stethoscope recordings in children undergoing simultaneous catheterization of the pulmonary artery (PA) to determine whether time-domain analysis of heart sound intensity would aid in the diagnosis of PA hypertension (PAH). Heart sounds were recorded and stored in .wav mono audio format. We performed recordings for 20 seconds with sampling frequencies of 4,000 Hz at the second left intercostal space and the cardiac apex. We used programs written in the MATLAB 2010b environment to analyze signals. We annotated events representing the first (S1) and second (S2) heart sounds and the aortic (A2) and pulmonary (P2) components of S2. We calculated the intensity (I) of the extracted event area (x) as [Formula: see text], where n is the total number of heart sound samples in the extracted event and k is A2, P2, S1, or S2. We defined PAH as mean PA pressure (mPAp) of at least 25 mmHg with PA wedge pressure of less than 15 mmHg. We studied 22 subjects (median age: 6 years [range: 0.25-19 years], 13 female), 11 with PAH (median mPAp: 55 mmHg [range: 25-97 mmHg]) and 11 without PAH (median mPAp: 15 mmHg [range: 8-24 mmHg]). The P2∶A2 (P = .0001) and P2∶S2 (P = .0001) intensity ratios were significantly different between subjects with and those without PAH. There was a linear correlation (r > 0.7) between the P2∶S2 and P2∶A2 intensity ratios and mPAp. We found that the P2∶A2 and P2∶S2 intensity ratios discriminated between children with and those without PAH. These findings may be useful for developing an acoustic device to diagnose PAH. PMID:25610604

  2. Time-domain analysis of heart sound intensity in children with and without pulmonary artery hypertension: a pilot study using a digital stethoscope.

    PubMed

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Bobhate, Prashant; Jain, Shreepal; Rutledge, Jennifer; Coe, James Y; Zemp, Roger; Schuurmans, Dale; Adatia, Ian

    2014-12-01

    We studied digital stethoscope recordings in children undergoing simultaneous catheterization of the pulmonary artery (PA) to determine whether time-domain analysis of heart sound intensity would aid in the diagnosis of PA hypertension (PAH). Heart sounds were recorded and stored in .wav mono audio format. We performed recordings for 20 seconds with sampling frequencies of 4,000 Hz at the second left intercostal space and the cardiac apex. We used programs written in the MATLAB 2010b environment to analyze signals. We annotated events representing the first (S1) and second (S2) heart sounds and the aortic (A2) and pulmonary (P2) components of S2. We calculated the intensity (I) of the extracted event area (x) as [Formula: see text], where n is the total number of heart sound samples in the extracted event and k is A2, P2, S1, or S2. We defined PAH as mean PA pressure (mPAp) of at least 25 mmHg with PA wedge pressure of less than 15 mmHg. We studied 22 subjects (median age: 6 years [range: 0.25-19 years], 13 female), 11 with PAH (median mPAp: 55 mmHg [range: 25-97 mmHg]) and 11 without PAH (median mPAp: 15 mmHg [range: 8-24 mmHg]). The P2∶A2 (P = .0001) and P2∶S2 (P = .0001) intensity ratios were significantly different between subjects with and those without PAH. There was a linear correlation (r > 0.7) between the P2∶S2 and P2∶A2 intensity ratios and mPAp. We found that the P2∶A2 and P2∶S2 intensity ratios discriminated between children with and those without PAH. These findings may be useful for developing an acoustic device to diagnose PAH.

  3. Abnormal cortical sensorimotor activity during “Target” sound detection in subjects with acute acoustic trauma sequelae: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Job, Agnès; Pons, Yoann; Lamalle, Laurent; Jaillard, Assia; Buck, Karl; Segebarth, Christoph; Delon-Martin, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    The most common consequences of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) are hearing loss at frequencies above 3 kHz and tinnitus. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to visualize neuronal activation patterns in military adults with AAT and various tinnitus sequelae during an auditory “oddball” attention task. AAT subjects displayed overactivities principally during reflex of target sound detection, in sensorimotor areas and in emotion-related areas such as the insula, anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex, in premotor area, in cross-modal sensory associative areas, and, interestingly, in a region of the Rolandic operculum that has recently been shown to be involved in tympanic movements due to air pressure. We propose further investigations of this brain area and fine middle ear investigations, because our results might suggest a model in which AAT tinnitus may arise as a proprioceptive illusion caused by abnormal excitability of middle-ear muscle spindles possibly link with the acoustic reflex and associated with emotional and sensorimotor disturbances. PMID:22574285

  4. Comparative proteomics reveals abnormal binding of ATGL and dysferlin on lipid droplets from pressure overload-induced dysfunctional rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Li, Linghai; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Weiyi; Hong, Yun; Wang, Jifeng; Zhang, Shuyan; Xu, Shimeng; Shu, Qingbo; Li, Juanfen; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Min; Qian, Zongjie; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Excessive retention of neutral lipids in cardiac lipid droplets (LDs) is a common observation in cardiomyopathy. Thus, the systematic investigation of the cardiac LD proteome will help to dissect the underlying mechanisms linking cardiac steatosis and myocardial dysfunction. Here, after isolation of LDs from normal and dysfunctional Sprague-Dawley rat hearts, we identified 752 heart-associated LD proteins using iTRAQ quantitative proteomic method, including 451 proteins previously unreported on LDs. The most noteworthy finding was the identification of the membrane resealing protein, dysferlin. An analysis of dysferlin truncation mutants indicated that its C2 domain was responsible for its LD localization. Quantitative proteomic results further determined that 27 proteins were increased and 16 proteins were decreased in LDs from post pressure overload-induced dysfunctional hearts, compared with normal hearts. Notably, adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) was dramatically decreased and dysferlin was substantially increased on dysfunctional cardiac LDs. This study for the first time reveals the dataset of the heart LD proteome in healthy tissue and the variation of it under cardiac dysfunction. These findings highlight an association between the altered LD protein localization of dysferlin and ATGL and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26795240

  5. Comparative proteomics reveals abnormal binding of ATGL and dysferlin on lipid droplets from pressure overload-induced dysfunctional rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linghai; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Weiyi; Hong, Yun; Wang, Jifeng; Zhang, Shuyan; Xu, Shimeng; Shu, Qingbo; Li, Juanfen; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Min; Qian, Zongjie; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Excessive retention of neutral lipids in cardiac lipid droplets (LDs) is a common observation in cardiomyopathy. Thus, the systematic investigation of the cardiac LD proteome will help to dissect the underlying mechanisms linking cardiac steatosis and myocardial dysfunction. Here, after isolation of LDs from normal and dysfunctional Sprague-Dawley rat hearts, we identified 752 heart-associated LD proteins using iTRAQ quantitative proteomic method, including 451 proteins previously unreported on LDs. The most noteworthy finding was the identification of the membrane resealing protein, dysferlin. An analysis of dysferlin truncation mutants indicated that its C2 domain was responsible for its LD localization. Quantitative proteomic results further determined that 27 proteins were increased and 16 proteins were decreased in LDs from post pressure overload-induced dysfunctional hearts, compared with normal hearts. Notably, adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) was dramatically decreased and dysferlin was substantially increased on dysfunctional cardiac LDs. This study for the first time reveals the dataset of the heart LD proteome in healthy tissue and the variation of it under cardiac dysfunction. These findings highlight an association between the altered LD protein localization of dysferlin and ATGL and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26795240

  6. Cellular mechanism of the conduction abnormalities induced by serum from anti-Ro/SSA-positive patients in rabbit hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, S; Nascimento, J H; Bonfa, E; Levy, R; Oliveira, S F; Tavares, A V; de Carvalho, A C

    1994-01-01

    In this study, IgG fractions from sera of SLE patients with anti-Ro/SSA or anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB activity were tested in Langendorff preparations of adult rabbit hearts, aiming to reproduce the cardiac manifestations observed in neonatal lupus in an experimental model. The hearts were perfused with normal Tyrode's solution for 30 min, followed by perfusion with Tyrode's containing 0.3 mg/ml of anti-Ro/SSA- (or anti-Ro/La-) positive IgG (nine sera), anti-ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-positive IgG (five sera), or IgG fractions from normal donors (five sera). In one third of the experiments done with anti-Ro/La-positive IgG, heart block was observed. With the remaining fractions, a decrease in heart rate of 17.1% was observed, but normal sinus rhythm was maintained. The IgG fractions with anti-RNP activity (five experiments) and from normal sera (six experiments) reduced heart rates by 12.9 and 3.3%, respectively, but heart block was not observed. To further characterize the cellular mechanisms involved in the conduction disturbances observed in the whole rabbit hearts, we conducted experiments with ventricular myocytes isolated from young rabbit hearts, studied by whole cell patch-clamp technique. In these experiments, the slow inward currents were analyzed during the superfusion of the cell with normal Tyrode's solution and 5 min after superfusion with Tyrode's solution containing 0.3 mg/ml of anti-Ro/SSA- (or anti-Ro/La-) positive IgG (five sera), anti-RNP-positive IgG (three sera), or IgG from normal donors (four sera). Resting and action potential amplitudes were not affected by any of the sera used. The anti-Ro/SSA IgG fraction induced a mean reduction in the peak slow inward current of 31.6%. IgG fractions with anti-RNP activity reduced slow inward current by 4.4%, whereas IgG fractions from normal donors increased this current by 3.3%. IgG-free fractions from sera of patients with anti-Ro/SSA activity did not alter the peak slow inward current. These results

  7. Noninvasive detection of mechanical prosthetic heart valve disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; He, Jiazhong; Yao, Jianping; Wu, Yuequan; Du, Minghui

    2012-08-01

    Auscultation is a widely used efficient technique by cardiologists for detecting the heart conditions. Since the mechanical prosthetic heart valves are widely used today, it is important to develop a simple and efficient method to detect abnormal mechanical valves. In this paper, the mechanical prosthetic heart valve sounds are analyzed by using different power spectral density (PSD) estimation techniques. To improve the classification accuracy of heart sounds, we propose two different feature extraction schemes, i.e., a modified local discriminant bases (LDB) scheme and a Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT)-based scheme. A database of 150 heart sounds is used in this study and an average classification accuracy of 97.3% is achieved for both the two feature extraction schemes, when a generic linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier is used in the classification stage.

  8. Troxerutin suppresses lipid abnormalities in the heart of high-fat-high-fructose diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Geetha, Rajagopalan; Yogalakshmi, Baskaran; Sreeja, S; Bhavani, K; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2014-02-01

    The reversal effect of troxerutin (TX) on obesity, insulin resistance, lipid accumulation, oxidative damage, and hypertension induced in the high-fat-high-fructose diet (HFFD)-fed mice model of metabolic syndrome was investigated. Adult male Mus musculus mice of body weight 25-30 g were fed either control diet or HFFD. Each group was divided into two and treated or untreated with TX (150 mg/kg bw, p.o.) from the 16th day. Assays were done in plasma and heart after 30 and 60 days of the experimental period. Significant increase in the levels of glucose and insulin, blood pressure (BP), and oxidative stress were observed after 30 days of HFFD feeding as compared to control. Animals fed HFFD for 60 days developed more severe changes in the above parameters compared to those fed for 30 days. Hearts of HFFD-fed mice registered downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, carnitine palmitoyl transferse-1b and AMP-activated protein kinase; and upregulation of cluster of differentiation 36, fatty acid-binding protein-1, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c after 60 days. TX administration restricted obesity (as seen by Lee's index); improved whole body insulin sensitivity; reduced BP, lipid accumulation, and oxidative damage; upregulated fatty acid (FA) oxidation; and downregulated FA transport and lipogenesis. Histology of heart revealed that TX diminishes inflammatory cell infiltration and fatty degeneration in HFFD-fed mice. The antioxidant property of TX and its ability to influence lipid regulatory genes could be the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects. PMID:24173620

  9. Troxerutin suppresses lipid abnormalities in the heart of high-fat-high-fructose diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Geetha, Rajagopalan; Yogalakshmi, Baskaran; Sreeja, S; Bhavani, K; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2014-02-01

    The reversal effect of troxerutin (TX) on obesity, insulin resistance, lipid accumulation, oxidative damage, and hypertension induced in the high-fat-high-fructose diet (HFFD)-fed mice model of metabolic syndrome was investigated. Adult male Mus musculus mice of body weight 25-30 g were fed either control diet or HFFD. Each group was divided into two and treated or untreated with TX (150 mg/kg bw, p.o.) from the 16th day. Assays were done in plasma and heart after 30 and 60 days of the experimental period. Significant increase in the levels of glucose and insulin, blood pressure (BP), and oxidative stress were observed after 30 days of HFFD feeding as compared to control. Animals fed HFFD for 60 days developed more severe changes in the above parameters compared to those fed for 30 days. Hearts of HFFD-fed mice registered downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, carnitine palmitoyl transferse-1b and AMP-activated protein kinase; and upregulation of cluster of differentiation 36, fatty acid-binding protein-1, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c after 60 days. TX administration restricted obesity (as seen by Lee's index); improved whole body insulin sensitivity; reduced BP, lipid accumulation, and oxidative damage; upregulated fatty acid (FA) oxidation; and downregulated FA transport and lipogenesis. Histology of heart revealed that TX diminishes inflammatory cell infiltration and fatty degeneration in HFFD-fed mice. The antioxidant property of TX and its ability to influence lipid regulatory genes could be the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects.

  10. Algorithm for heart rate extraction in a novel wearable acoustic sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangwei; Imtiaz, Syed Anas; Aguilar-Pelaez, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2015-02-01

    Phonocardiography is a widely used method of listening to the heart sounds and indicating the presence of cardiac abnormalities. Each heart cycle consists of two major sounds - S1 and S2 - that can be used to determine the heart rate. The conventional method of acoustic signal acquisition involves placing the sound sensor at the chest where this sound is most audible. Presented is a novel algorithm for the detection of S1 and S2 heart sounds and the use of them to extract the heart rate from signals acquired by a small sensor placed at the neck. This algorithm achieves an accuracy of 90.73 and 90.69%, with respect to heart rate value provided by two commercial devices, evaluated on more than 38 h of data acquired from ten different subjects during sleep in a pilot clinical study. This is the largest dataset for acoustic heart sound classification and heart rate extraction in the literature to date. The algorithm in this study used signals from a sensor designed to monitor breathing. This shows that the same sensor and signal can be used to monitor both breathing and heart rate, making it highly useful for long-term wearable vital signs monitoring.

  11. Correlation between echocardiographic endocardial surface mapping of abnormal wall motion and pathologic infarct size in autopsied hearts.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, G T; Southern, J F; Choong, C Y; Thomas, J D; Fallon, J T; Guyer, D E; Weyman, A E

    1988-05-01

    We previously developed a cross-sectional echocardiographic technique for quantitatively mapping the endocardial surface of the left ventricle and on which regions of abnormal wall motion can be superimposed in their correct spatial distribution. This endocardial mapping technique (EMT) provides a measure of the left ventricular endocardial surface area (ESA in cm2), the area of abnormal wall motion (AWM in cm2), and the overall percent dysfunction (%AWM) as a measure of the functional "infarct size." To test this approach, we compared the EMT measurements with the actual endocardial surface area (in cm2) and pathologic infarct size (both percent infarct by volume and percent endocardial surface overlying infarct) measured at later autopsy in 20 adults (14 men, six women) ranging in age from 47 to 76 years (mean 64 +/- 9.6 years). The median interval from echocardiographic study to death was 19 days (range 1 to 269 days). Patients were divided into two groups based on the age of their infarcts at the time of death: (1) recent (infarct age less than 14 days; mean age 5.3 +/- 4.6 days) and (2) old (infarct age greater than 6 months; mean age 3.6 +/- 3 years). When the left ventricular endocardial surface area at autopsy was compared with the EMT-derived ESA, a close correlation was found (EMT area = 1.17 X autopsy area + 20.4; r = .94, p = .0001), with the systematic difference in the measurements accounted for by systolic arrest, loss of distending pressure, and specimen shrinkage. The echocardiographic measure of infarct size (%AWM) correlated well with the autopsy percent infarction by volume (%AWM = 1.1 X infarct volume + 5.5; r = .82, p = .0001). Similarly, a good correlation was found for the percent abnormal wall motion and the autopsy percent endocardial surface area overlying infarction (%AWM = 0.89 X infarct area - 0.9; r = .89, p = .0001). When the data were examined in relation to the age of the myocardial infarct, the echocardiographic %AWM appeared to

  12. Heath monitoring of a glass transfer robot in the mass production line of liquid crystal display using abnormal operating sounds based on wavelet packet transform and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eui-Youl; Lee, Young-Joon; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the fault detect method of a moving transfer robot in the mass production line of liquid crystal display (LCD) manufacturers based on the wavelet packet transform (WPT) for feature extraction and the artificial neural network (ANN) for fault classification. Most of fault detection methods in a mechanical system have been researched based on the vibration signal. Unlike the existing methodologies, this study aims to minimize the uncertainty of a field engineer's decision making process for determining whether a fault is present or not based on the human auditory perception by developing a fault diagnosis system that uses the abnormal operating sound radiated from a moving transfer robot as a source signal. Abnormal operating sound radiated from a moving transfer robot has been used for this work instead of other source signals such as vibration, acoustic emission, electrical signal, etc. Its advantage as a source signal makes it possible to monitor the status of multiple faults by using only a microphone despite a relatively low sensitivity. In the application of ANN, since it is important to minimize the error of trained ANN in terms of the accuracy of fault diagnosis logic, in the paper, the number of input and target data samples was increased through a regeneration process based on statistical properties, and then the uncorrelated nodes in the input vector were also removed to improve the orthogonality of the input vector based on the entropy based feature selection method. Consequently, it can be concluded that the abnormal operating sound is sufficiently useful as a source signal for the fault diagnosis of mechanical components as well as other source signals.

  13. Echocardiographic findings and abnormalities in HIV-infected patients: results from a large, prospective, multicenter HIV-heart study

    PubMed Central

    Reinsch, Nico; Kahlert, Philipp; Esser, Stefan; Sundermeyer, Andreas; Neuhaus, Katrin; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Potthoff, Anja; Erbel, Raimund; Buck, Thomas; Neumann, Till

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the current study was to assess cardiac structure and function as well as cardiac abnormalities in a large patient-population based multicenter study of HIV-infected subjects. Materials and methods: We enrolled 803 HIV-positive adults (83.4% men, mean age: 44.2 ± 10.3 yrs) in this prospective, cross-sectional cohort study. The study protocol included a standardized documentation of patient history, medical treatment and clinical examination. All subjects underwent a standardized transthoracic echocardiographic examination protocol including Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Echocardiographic measurements revealed a structural dilatation of the left ventricle in 10.1% of all HIV-infected subjects. Interventricular septum and posterior wall thickness were increased in 18.0% and 11.1%, respectively, with elevated muscle mass in 14.3% male and 19.4% female patients. Of all participants 13.5% exhibited a pathologic contraction characteristic of one or more myocardial segments. Prevalence of systolic and diastolic dysfunction was 34.3% and 48.0%, respectively. However, severe forms of ventricular dysfunction were rare. Conclusions: In conclusion our results demonstrate the relevance of echocardiography in this patient-population in the era of antiretroviral therapy. Above all, left ventricular wall thickness and function should be controlled regularly in HIV-infected subjects. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01119729). PMID:22254197

  14. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  15. Contractile abnormalities and altered drug response in engineered heart tissue from Mybpc3-targeted knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Andrea; Friedrich, Felix W; Flenner, Frederik; Geertz, Birgit; Eder, Alexandra; Schaaf, Sebastian; Hirt, Marc N; Uebeler, June; Schlossarek, Saskia; Carrier, Lucie; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Myosin-binding protein C (Mybpc3)-targeted knock-in mice (KI) recapitulate typical aspects of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We evaluated whether these functional alterations can be reproduced in engineered heart tissue (EHT) and yield novel mechanistic information on the function of cMyBP-C. EHTs were generated from cardiac cells of neonatal KI, heterozygous (HET) or wild-type controls (WT) and developed without apparent morphological differences. KI had 70% and HET 20% lower total cMyBP-C levels than WT, accompanied by elevated fetal gene expression. Under standard culture conditions and spontaneous beating, KI EHTs showed more frequent burst beating than WT and occasional tetanic contractions (14/96). Under electrical stimulation (6Hz, 37°C) KI EHTs exhibited shorter contraction and relaxation times and a twofold higher sensitivity to external [Ca(2+)]. Accordingly, the sensitivity to verapamil was 4-fold lower and the response to isoprenaline or the Ca(2+) sensitizer EMD 57033 2- to 4-fold smaller. The loss of EMD effect was verified in 6-week-old KI mice in vivo. HET EHTs were apparently normal under basal conditions, but showed similarly altered contractile responses to [Ca(2+)], verapamil, isoprenaline and EMD. In contrast, drug-induced changes in intracellular Ca(2+) transients (Fura-2) were essentially normal. In conclusion, the present findings in auxotonically contracting EHTs support the idea that cMyBP-C's normal role is to suppress force generation at low intracellular Ca(2+) and stabilize the power-stroke step of the cross bridge cycle. Pharmacological testing in EHT unmasked a disease phenotype in HET. The altered drug response may be clinically relevant.

  16. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have any other heart problems. Echocardiography Echo uses sound waves to create a moving picture of your heart ... the surface of your chest. The transducer sends sound waves through your chest wall to your heart. Echoes ...

  17. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... signal to your heart. The signal makes your heart beat at the correct pace. Pacemakers may be used: To correct abnormal heart rhythms. The heart may beat too slowly, too fast, or in an irregular ...

  18. Assessment of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability and Interictal Cardiac Rhythm Abnormalities in Drug-naïve Patients with Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Ozden; Cincin, Altug; Pehlivan, Aslihan; Midi, Ipek; Kepez, Alper; Agan, Kadriye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Epilepsy is a disease known to occur with autonomous phenomenons. Earlier studies indicate decreased heart rate variability (HRV) during ictal and interictal periods among epilepsy patients. In this study, we aim to investigate cardiac rhythm abnormalities and HRV during interictal period between drug-naïve patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and healthy control group. Methods: Twenty-six patients with IGE and 26 healthy individuals included in the study. In order to eliminate any structural cardiac pathology, transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all subjects and time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were evaluated after 24-hour rhythm holter monitoring. Results: Between two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of mean heart rate and maximum duration between the start of the Q waves and the end of the T waves (QT intervals). In the time domain analysis of HRV, no statically significant difference was detected for standard deviation of all R - R intervals and root-mean-square of successive differences between patient and control group (p = 0,070 and p = 0,104 respectively). In the frequency domain analysis of HRV, patients tended to display lower total power and very low frequency power than did healthy subjects, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is no major effect of the epilepsy on HRV in patients with IGE. It should be emphasized that, in this study, HRV was evaluated only in patients with IGE and that the results are not proper to be generalized for patients with partial seizures. PMID:27390676

  19. Application of Laser Doppler Vibrometery for human heart auscultation.

    PubMed

    Koegelenberg, S; Scheffer, C; Blanckenberg, M M; Doubell, A F

    2014-01-01

    In this study the potential of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) was tested as a non-contact sensor for the classification of heart sounds. Of the twenty participants recorded using the LDV, five presented with Aortic Stenosis (AS), three were healthy and twelve presented with other pathologies. The recorded heart sounds were denoised and segmented using a combination of the Electrocardiogram (ECG) data and the complexity of the signal. Frequency domain features were extracted from the segmented heart sound cycles and used to train a K-nearest neighbor classifier. Due to the small number of participants, the classifier could not be trained to differentiate between normal and abnormal participants, but could successfully distinguish between participants who presented with AS and those who did not. A sensitivity of 80 % and a specificity of 100 % were achieved a test dataset.

  20. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... or stomach. Diagnosis Key heart tests include: Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) —This records the electrical activity of the heart as it contracts and relaxes. The ECG can detect abnormal heartbeats, some areas of damage, ...

  1. Distal 8p deletion (8) (p23.1): An easily missed chromosomal abnormality that may be associated with congenital heart defect and mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bai-Lin; Schneider, G.H.; Sabatino, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    We describe the clinical manifestations and molecular cytogenetic analyses of three patients with a similar distal deletion of chromosome 8. Each child had mild developmental delay and subtle minor anomalies. Two had cardiac anomalies but no other major congenital anomalies were present. High resolution G and R banding showed in all three patients del(8)(p23.1), but the breakpoint in case 1 was distal to 8p23.1, in case 2 was in the middle of 8p23.1, and in case 3 proximal to 8p23.1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies with a chromosome 8 paint probe confirmed that no other rearrangement had occurred. FISH with a chromosome 8-specific telomere probe indicated that two patients had terminal deletions. Chromosome analysis of the parents of case 1 and mother of case 2 were normal; the remaining parents were not available for study. Thirteen individual patients including the three in this study, and three relatives in one family with del(8)(p23.1), have been reported in the past 5 years. Major congenital anomalies, especially congenital heart defects, are most often associated with a breakpoint proximal to 8p23.1. Three patients were found within a 3-year period in this study and five cases were found within 4 years by another group, indicating that distal 8p deletion might be a relatively common chromosomal abnormality. This small deletion is easily overlooked (i.e., cases 1 and 2 were reported as normal at amniocentesis) and can be associated with few or no major congenital anomalies. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  3. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention & Treatment of High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources ... signals in the heart's upper chambers fire abnormally, which interferes with electrical signals coming from ...

  4. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (CHD) Fix heart valves that don't work well Control abnormal heart rhythms Place medical devices Replace a damaged heart with a healthy one If other treatments—such as lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical ... surgeon will work with you to decide whether you need heart ...

  5. Psychopathy and physiological response to emotionally evocative sounds.

    PubMed

    Verona, Edelyn; Patrick, Christopher J; Curtin, John J; Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2004-02-01

    Despite considerable evidence that psychopathic criminals are deviant in their emotional reactions, few studies have examined responses to both pleasurable and aversive stimuli or assessed the role of different facets of psychopathy in affective deviations. This study investigated physiological reactions to emotional sounds in prisoners selected according to scores on the 2 factors of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist--Revised (PCL-R; R. D. Hare, 1991). Offenders high on the PCL-R emotional-interpersonal factor, regardless of scores on the social deviance factor, showed diminished skin conductance responses to both pleasant and unpleasant sounds, suggesting a deficit in the action mobilization component of emotional response. Offenders who scored high only on the social deviance factor showed a delay in heart rate differentiation between affective and neutral sounds. These findings indicate abnormal reactivity to both positive and negative emotional stimuli in psychopathic individuals, and suggest differing roles for the 2 facets of psychopathy in affective processing deviations.

  6. Abnormal energetics and ATP depletion in pressure-overload mouse hearts: in vivo high-energy phosphate concentration measures by noninvasive magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Chacko, V P; Weiss, Robert G

    2009-07-01

    (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers a unique means to noninvasively quantify the major cardiac high-energy phosphates, creatine phosphate (PCr) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), that are critical for normal myocardial contractile function and viability. Spatially localized (31)P MRS has been used to quantify the in vivo PCr-to-ATP ratio (PCr/ATP) of murine hearts, including those with pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by thoracic aortic constriction (TAC). To date, there has been no approach for measuring the absolute tissue concentrations of PCr and ATP in the in vivo mouse heart that promise a better understanding of high-energy metabolism. A method to quantify in vivo murine myocardial concentrations of PCr and ATP using an external reference is described, validated, and applied to normal and TAC hearts. This new method does not prolong the scan times in mice beyond those previously required to measure PCr/ATP. The new method renders an [ATP] of 5.0 +/- 0.9 (mean +/- SD) and [PCr] of 10.4 +/- 1.4 micromol/g wet wt in normal mouse hearts (n = 7) and significantly lower values in TAC hearts (n = 10) of 4.0 +/- 0.8 and 6.7 +/- 2.0 micromol/g wet wt for [ATP] (P < 0.04) and [PCr] (P < 0.001), respectively. The in vivo magnetic resonance [ATP] results are in good agreement with those obtained using an in vitro enzyme luminescent assay of perchloric acid extracts of the same hearts. In conclusion, a validated (31)P MRS method for quantifying [ATP] and [PCr] in the in vivo mouse heart using spatial localization and an external reference is described and used to demonstrate significant reductions in not only PCr/ATP but [ATP] in hypertrophied TAC hearts.

  7. Ablation of the CLP-1 gene leads to down-regulation of the HAND1 gene and abnormality of the left ventricle of the heart and fetal death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Facan; Wagner, Michael; Siddiqui, M A Q

    2004-06-01

    We have recently reported that cardiac lineage protein-1 (CLP-1), a nuclear protein with an acidic region that constitutes a potential protein-protein interaction domain, regulates transcription of the cardiac myosin light chain-2v (MLC-2v) gene promoter in a manner consistent with its being a transcriptional co-activator or regulator. To test the postulate that CLP-1 is a regulator of cardiac genes we ablated the CLP-1 gene in mice. Past embryonic day (E)16.5, CLP-1 null alleles did not show Mendelian inheritance suggesting that absence of CLP-1 was lethal in late fetal stages. CLP-1 (-/-) fetal hearts exhibited a reduced left ventricular chamber with thickened myocardial walls, features suggestive of cardiac hypertrophy. Electron microscopic analysis of E16.5 CLP-1 (-/-) ventricular myocardium showed a marked decline in cell density and altered nuclear and myofibril morphologies similar to that seen in animal models of hypertrophic heart. Analysis of contractile and non-contractile protein genes known to be re-expressed during cardiac hypertrophy showed them to have higher expression levels in CLP-1 (-/-) hearts thereby confirming the hypertrophic phenotype at the molecular level. Analysis of cardiac development genes showed that expression of the HAND1 transcription factor, a gene involved in patterning of the heart tube and down-regulated in hypertrophic hearts, was also significantly reduced in CLP-1 (-/-) fetal hearts. CLP-1 and HAND1 have similar expression patterns in the developing heart ventricles. These data suggest that CLP-1 and the HAND transcription factors may be part of a genetic program critical to proper heart development, perturbation of which can lead to cardiomyopathy.

  8. First report of a de novo 18q11.2 microdeletion including GATA6 associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bui, Peter H; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Wong, Derek; Perens, Gregory; Dipple, Katrina M; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 have been previously reported in many patients. Most cases involve the more distal regions of the long arm (18q21.1->qter). However, proximal interstitial deletions involving 18q11.2 are extremely rare. Here we report on a 14-month-old female with a 4.7 Mb (19,667,062-24,401,876 hg19) de novo interstitial deletion within chromosomal band 18q11.2, which includes GATA6 and 24 other RefSeq genes. The clinical features of our patient include complex congenital heart defects, a double outlet right ventricle, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, D-malposed great arteries, an atrial septal defect, a dysplastic aortic valve and patent ductus arteriosus. In addition, she had renal anomalies-a duplicated collecting system on the left and mild right hydronephrosis. These heart and renal defects are not reported in other patients with 18q proximal interstitial deletions. Heterozygous point mutations in GATA6, encoding for a zinc finger transcription factor, have been shown to cause congenital heart defects. Given the well-established biological role of GATA6 in cardiac development, a deletion of GATA6 is very likely responsible for our patient's complex congenital heart defects. This is the smallest and most proximal 18q11.2 deletion involving GATA6 that is associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal anomalies.

  9. Wavelet packet entropy for heart murmurs classification.

    PubMed

    Safara, Fatemeh; Doraisamy, Shyamala; Azman, Azreen; Jantan, Azrul; Ranga, Sri

    2012-01-01

    Heart murmurs are the first signs of cardiac valve disorders. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to automatically differentiate normal heart sounds, from heart sounds with murmurs using various types of audio features. Entropy was successfully used as a feature to distinguish different heart sounds. In this paper, new entropy was introduced to analyze heart sounds and the feasibility of using this entropy in classification of five types of heart sounds and murmurs was shown. The entropy was previously introduced to analyze mammograms. Four common murmurs were considered including aortic regurgitation, mitral regurgitation, aortic stenosis, and mitral stenosis. Wavelet packet transform was employed for heart sound analysis, and the entropy was calculated for deriving feature vectors. Five types of classification were performed to evaluate the discriminatory power of the generated features. The best results were achieved by BayesNet with 96.94% accuracy. The promising results substantiate the effectiveness of the proposed wavelet packet entropy for heart sounds classification.

  10. Panic Attack or Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with echocardiography. It is a good first-line test for a woman with symptoms and risk factors for heart disease. Echocardiography uses sound waves technology to give detailed information about the heart muscle, ...

  11. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  13. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  14. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  15. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  16. Regional Microstructural and Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Abnormalities in the Corpus Callosum of Neonates With Congenital Heart Defect Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Cornelia; Singer, Jitka; Latal, Beatrice; Knirsch, Walter; Makki, Malek

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the structural development of the corpus callosum in term neonates with congenital heart defect before and after surgery using diffusion tensor imaging and 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared parallel and radial diffusions, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy, and volume of 5 substructures of the corpus callosum: genu, rostral body, body, isthmus, and splenium. Compared to healthy controls, we found a significantly lower volume of the splenium and total corpus callosum and a higher radial diffusion and lower fractional anisotropy in the splenium of patients presurgery; a lower volume in all substructures in the postsurgery group; higher radial diffusion in the rostral body, body, and splenium; and a higher apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of postsurgery patients. Similar fractional anisotropy changes in congenital heart defect patients were reported in preterm infants. Our findings in apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of these patients (pre and postsurgery) are comparable to findings in preterm neonates with psychomotor delay. Delayed maturation of the isthmus was also reported in preterm infants.

  17. An interstitial deletion of 7.1Mb in chromosome band 6p22.3 associated with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including heart defects, short neck, and eye abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Anna; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Giacobini, Maibritt

    2009-01-01

    Seven cases with an interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 6 involving the 6p22 region have previously been reported. The clinical phenotype of these cases includes developmental delay, brain-, heart-, and kidney defects, eye abnormalities, short neck, craniofacial malformations, hypotonia, as well as clinodactyly or syndactyly. Here, we report a patient with a 7.1Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome band 6p22.3, detected by genome-wide screening array CGH. The patient is a 4-year-old girl with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including eye abnormalities, short neck, and a ventricular septum defect. The deleted region at 6p22.3 in our patient overlaps with six out of the seven previously reported cases with a 6p22-24 interstitial deletion. This enabled us to further narrow down the critical region for the 6p22 deletion phenotype to 2.2Mb. Twelve genes are mapped to the overlapping deleted region, among them the gene encoding the ataxin-1 protein, the ATXN1 gene. Mice with homozygous deletions in ATXN1 are phenotypically normal but show cognitive delay. Haploinsufficiency of ATXN1 may therefore contribute to the learning difficulties observed in the patients harboring a 6p22 deletion.

  18. A de novo 0.63 Mb 6q25.1 deletion associated with growth failure, congenital heart defect, underdeveloped cerebellar vermis, abnormal cutaneous elasticity and joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Ruggieri, Martino; Mankad, Kshitij; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Granata, Francesca; Loddo, Italia; Moschella, Emanuela; Calabro, Maria Pia; Capalbo, Anna; Bernardini, Laura; Novelli, Antonio; Polizzi, Agata; Seidler, Daniela G; Arrigo, Teresa; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-09-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are rare and are characterized by great clinical variability according to the deletion breakpoint. We report a on 6-year-old girl with a de novo 0.63 Mb deletion on chromosome 6q25.1 who demonstrated multiple congenital anomalies including a ventricular septal defect and an underdeveloped cerebellar vermis. She presented with severe pre- and post-natal growth failure, hyperextensible small joints (Beighton scores = 8/9; with normal parental scores), and an abnormally elastic, redundant skin. Abnormally high upper/lower segment ratio (i.e., 1.34 = > 3SD), mild dysmorphic facial features and developmental delay were also present. The girl's phenotype was compared with: (i) two girls, each previously reported by Bisgaard et al. and Caselli et al. with similar albeit larger (2.6-7.21 Mb) deletions; (ii) seven additional individuals (6 M; 1 F) harboring deletions within the 6q25.1 region reported in the literature; and (iii) ten further patients (5 M; 4 F; 1 unrecorded sex) recorded in the DECIPHER 6.0 database. We reported on the present girl as her findings could contribute to advance the phenotype of 6q deletions. In addition, the present deletion is the smallest so far recorded in the 6q25 region encompassing eight known genes [vs. 41 of Bisgaard et al., and 23 of Caselli et al.,], including the TAB2 (likely responsible for the girl's congenital heart defect), LATS1 gene, and the UST gene (a regulator of the homeostasis of proteoglycans, which could have played a role in the abnormal dermal and cartilage elasticity).

  19. A de novo 0.63 Mb 6q25.1 deletion associated with growth failure, congenital heart defect, underdeveloped cerebellar vermis, abnormal cutaneous elasticity and joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Ruggieri, Martino; Mankad, Kshitij; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Granata, Francesca; Loddo, Italia; Moschella, Emanuela; Calabro, Maria Pia; Capalbo, Anna; Bernardini, Laura; Novelli, Antonio; Polizzi, Agata; Seidler, Daniela G; Arrigo, Teresa; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-09-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are rare and are characterized by great clinical variability according to the deletion breakpoint. We report a on 6-year-old girl with a de novo 0.63 Mb deletion on chromosome 6q25.1 who demonstrated multiple congenital anomalies including a ventricular septal defect and an underdeveloped cerebellar vermis. She presented with severe pre- and post-natal growth failure, hyperextensible small joints (Beighton scores = 8/9; with normal parental scores), and an abnormally elastic, redundant skin. Abnormally high upper/lower segment ratio (i.e., 1.34 = > 3SD), mild dysmorphic facial features and developmental delay were also present. The girl's phenotype was compared with: (i) two girls, each previously reported by Bisgaard et al. and Caselli et al. with similar albeit larger (2.6-7.21 Mb) deletions; (ii) seven additional individuals (6 M; 1 F) harboring deletions within the 6q25.1 region reported in the literature; and (iii) ten further patients (5 M; 4 F; 1 unrecorded sex) recorded in the DECIPHER 6.0 database. We reported on the present girl as her findings could contribute to advance the phenotype of 6q deletions. In addition, the present deletion is the smallest so far recorded in the 6q25 region encompassing eight known genes [vs. 41 of Bisgaard et al., and 23 of Caselli et al.,], including the TAB2 (likely responsible for the girl's congenital heart defect), LATS1 gene, and the UST gene (a regulator of the homeostasis of proteoglycans, which could have played a role in the abnormal dermal and cartilage elasticity). PMID:25940952

  20. Ultrastructural correlates of left ventricular contraction abnormalities in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease: determinants of reversible segmental asynergy postrevascularization surgery.

    PubMed

    Flameng, W; Suy, R; Schwarz, F; Borgers, M; Piessens, J; Thone, F; Van Ermen, H; De Geest, H

    1981-11-01

    The relationships between structural alterations and left ventricular (LV) contraction abnormalities were studied in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Transmural biopsies of the LV anterior free wall were taken during aortocoronary bypass surgery (CABG) in 62 patients. When preoperative anterior wall motion (AWM) was reduced, significant myocardial cell degeneration was found in patients with as well as without previous anterior infarction (MI). The amount of myocardial fibrosis was increased only in patients with ECG evidence of previous anterior MI (p less than 0.001). In a second series of 139 CAD patients, cineventriculograms performed before and 8 months after CABG were examined. In patients with patent grafts to the LV anterior wall not previously infarcted, reduced AWM became normal. In patients with previous anterior MI the outcome of AWM was unpredictable (usually unimproved). Thus the histologic correlate of reduced AWM in segments not previously infarcted was progressive loss of contractile material in otherwise viable myocardial cells. Some reversibility was suggested by restoration of resting function after CABG. Unpredictable results in segments associated with pathologic Q waves appear related to the fibrous component of these previously infarcted areas. PMID:6975559

  1. An evaluation of the use of new Doppler methods for detecting longitudinal function abnormalities in a pacing-induced heart failure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabata, Tomotsugu; Cardon, Lisa A.; Armstrong, Guy P.; Fukamach, Kiyotaka; Takagaki, Masami; Ochiai, Yoshie; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Doppler tissue echocardiography and color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity have proven useful in evaluating cross-sections of patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, but experience with serial changes is limited. Purpose and methods: We tested their use by evaluating the temporal changes of LV function in a pacing-induced congestive heart failure model. Rapid ventricular pacing was initiated and maintained in 20 dogs for 4 weeks. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and weekly during brief pacing cessation. RESULTS: With rapid pacing, LV volume significantly increased and ejection fraction (57%-28%), stroke volume (37-18 mL), and mitral annulus systolic velocity (16.1-6.6 cm/s) by Doppler tissue echocardiography significantly decreased, with ejection fraction and mitral annulus systolic velocity closely correlated (r = 0.706, P <.0001). In contrast to the mitral inflow velocities, mitral annulus early diastolic velocity decreased steadily (12.3-7.3 cm/s) resulting in a dramatic decrease in mitral annulus early/late (1.22-0.57) diastolic velocity with no tendency toward pseudonormalization. The color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity also showed significant steady decrease (57-24 cm/s) throughout the pacing period. Multiple regression analysis chose mitral annulus systolic velocity (r = 0.895, P <.0001) and propagation velocity (r = 0.782, P <.0001) for the most important factor predicting LV systolic and diastolic function, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Doppler tissue echocardiography and color M-mode Doppler flow could evaluate the serial deterioration in LV dysfunction throughout the pacing period. These were more useful in quantifying progressive LV dysfunction than conventional ehocardiographic techniques, and were probably relatively independent of preload. These techniques could be suitable for longitudinal evaluation in addition to the cross-sectional study.

  2. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  3. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  4. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... findings suggesting, abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis,...

  5. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  6. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors is likely why the rates of heart disease are coming down. These factors include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, overweight and obesity. The rates of high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol haven' ...

  7. Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160227.html Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause 'Danger zone' for women earlier ... WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease risk factors -- such as abnormal cholesterol levels and high blood ...

  8. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  9. Sound Guard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lubrication technology originally developed for a series of NASA satellites has produced a commercial product for protecting the sound fidelity of phonograph records. Called Sound Guard, the preservative is a spray-on fluid that deposits a microscopically thin protective coating which reduces friction and prevents the hard diamond stylus from wearing away the softer vinyl material of the disc. It is marketed by the Consumer Products Division of Ball Corporation, Muncie, Indiana. The lubricant technology on which Sound Guard is based originated with NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO), an Earth-orbiting satellite designed and built by Ball Brothers Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, also a division of Ball Corporation. Ball Brothers engineers found a problem early in the OSO program: known lubricants were unsuitable for use on satellite moving parts that would be exposed to the vacuum of space for several months. So the company conducted research on the properties of materials needed for long life in space and developed new lubricants. They worked successfully on seven OSO flights and attracted considerable attention among other aerospace contractors. Ball Brothers now supplies its "Vac Kote" lubricants and coatings to both aerospace and non-aerospace industries and the company has produced several hundred variations of the original technology. Ball Corporation expanded its product line to include consumer products, of which Sound Guard is one of the most recent. In addition to protecting record grooves, Sound Guard's anti-static quality also retards particle accumulation on the stylus. During comparison study by a leading U.S. electronic laboratory, a record not treated by Sound Guard had to be cleaned after 50 plays and the stylus had collected a considerable number of small vinyl particles. The Sound Guard-treated disc was still clean after 100 plays, as was its stylus.

  10. Breath sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Over-inflation of a part of the lungs ( emphysema can cause this) Reduced airflow to part of ... bronchitis Asthma Bronchiectasis Chronic bronchitis Congestive heart failure Emphysema Interstitial lung disease Foreign body obstruction of the ...

  11. Geophysical Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, E.

    1998-01-01

    Of the many geophysical remote-sensing techniques available today, a few are suitable for the water ice-rich, layered material expected at the north martian ice cap. Radio echo sounding has been used for several decades to determine ice thickness and internal structure. Selection of operating frequency is a tradeoff between signal attenuation (which typically increases with frequency and ice temperature) and resolution (which is proportional to wavelength). Antenna configuration and size will be additional considerations for a mission to Mars. Several configurations for ice-penetrating radar systems are discussed: these include orbiter-borne sounders, sounding antennas trailed by balloons and penetrators, and lander-borne systems. Lander-borne systems could include short-wave systems capable of resolving fine structure and layering in the upper meters beneath the lander. Spread-spectrum and deconvolution techniques can be used to increase the depth capability of a radar system. If soundings over several locations are available (e.g., with balloons, rovers, or panning short-wave systems), then it will be easier to resolve internal layering, variations in basal reflection coefficient (from which material properties may be inferred), and the geometry of nonhorizontal features. Sonic sounding has a long history in oil and gas exploration. It is, however, unlikely that large explosive charges, or even swept-frequency techniques such as Vibroseis, would be suitable for a Polar lander -- these systems are capable of penetrating several kilometers of material at frequencies of 10-200 Hz, but the energy required to generate the sound waves is large and potentially destructive. The use of audio-frequency and ultrasonic sound generated by piezoelectric crystals is discussed as a possible method to explore layering and fine features in the upper meters of the ice cap. Appropriate choice of transducer(s) will permit operation over a range of fixed or modulated frequencies

  12. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  13. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death.

  14. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. PMID:24215748

  15. [Transient abnormal Q-waves].

    PubMed

    Godballe, C; Hoeck, H C; Sørensen, J A

    1990-01-01

    We present a case of transient abnormal Q-waves (TAQ) and a review of the literature. TAQ are defined as abnormal Q-waves, which disappear within ten days. They are most often seen in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) but are also seen in other conditions. Brief episodes of myocardial ischemia giving rise to reversible biochemical and ultrastructural myocardial changes, resulting in transient ECG changes, provide an accepted theory for the pathogenesis of TAO. Investigations have shown that the occurrence of exercise-induced TAQ may be a symptom of IHD. It is impossible to distinguish TAQ from Q-waves induced by myocardial infarction. Appearance of TAQ during exercise-testing frequently indicates IHD. PMID:2301045

  16. Pete Maravich's incredible heart.

    PubMed

    Choi, J H; Kornblum, R N

    1990-07-01

    Postmortem examination of a former professional basketball player revealed an abnormal heart, most notably a single coronary artery. The literature on single coronary arteries is briefly reviewed, and the possible mechanism which caused the patient's condition is considered. This case is particularly unusual because of the patient's profession, which is so physically demanding.

  17. Chasing Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Neiworth, Julie J

    2012-01-01

    Prior work with Wright and others demonstrated that rhesus monkeys recognized the relative relationships of notes in common melodies. As an extension of tests of pattern similarities, tamarins were habituated to 3-sound unit patterns in an AAB or ABB form that were human phonemes, piano notes, or monkey calls. The subjects were tested with novel sounds in each category constructed either to match the prior pattern or to violate the prior habituated pattern. The monkeys attended significantly more to a violation of their habituated pattern to a new pattern when human phonemes were used, and there was a trend difference in attention toward pattern violations with melodies. Monkey call patterns generated a variety of behavioral responses, were less likely to show habituation, and did not generate a strong attention reaction to changes in the patterns. Monkeys can extract abstract rules and patterns from auditory stimuli but the stimuli, by their nature, may generate competing responses which block processing of abstract regularities. PMID:23219981

  18. Management and Breeding Soundness of Mature Bulls.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Colin W

    2016-07-01

    Mature bulls must be fed a balanced ration, vaccinated appropriately, and undergo a breeding soundness evaluation to ensure they meet what is required of a short, but intense breeding season. To be classified as a satisfactory potential breeder, minimum standards for physical soundness, scrotal circumference, sperm motility, and sperm morphology must be achieved using an accepted bull-breeding soundness evaluation format. Sperm production requires approximately 70 days. Heat and stress are the most common insults to spermatogenesis, causing an increase in morphologic abnormalities with obesity-associated scrotal fat accumulation being the most frequent cause of elevated testicular temperature in mature bulls.

  19. Method of sound synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Miner, Nadine E.; Caudell, Thomas P.

    2004-06-08

    A sound synthesis method for modeling and synthesizing dynamic, parameterized sounds. The sound synthesis method yields perceptually convincing sounds and provides flexibility through model parameterization. By manipulating model parameters, a variety of related, but perceptually different sounds can be generated. The result is subtle changes in sounds, in addition to synthesis of a variety of sounds, all from a small set of models. The sound models can change dynamically according to changes in the simulation environment. The method is applicable to both stochastic (impulse-based) and non-stochastic (pitched) sounds.

  20. AVE-SESAME IV: 25 mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 4 experiment is descirbed and tabulated data at 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 20 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 9, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on May 10, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  1. AVE-SESAME 6: 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 6 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 15 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 h intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on June 7, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on June 8, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings are listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  2. AVE-Sesame 3: 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. T.; Gerhard, M. L.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 3 experiment is described and tabulated data at 25-mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 25, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 26, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  3. AVE-SESAME 2: The 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. F.; Gerhard, M. L.; Turner, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME II experiment is described. Data at 25 mb intervals from the surface to 25 mb for the 23 National Weather Service and 19 special stations participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on April 19, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on April 20, 1979 (nine sounding times). The method of processing is discussed briefly, estimates of the rms errors in the data presented, an example of contact data given, reasons given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings listed which exhibit abnormal characteristics.

  4. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis, cancer... to the miner by MSHA in accordance with section 203 of the act (see 30 CFR part 90)....

  5. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis, cancer... to the miner by MSHA in accordance with section 203 of the act (see 30 CFR part 90)....

  6. An Analysis of Sound Exposure in a University Music Rehearsal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Joe; Thrasher, Michael; Fumo, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high sound levels may lead to a variety of hearing abnormalities, including Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL). Pre-professional university music majors may experience frequent exposure to elevated sound levels, and this may have implications on their future career prospects (Jansen, Helleman, Dreschler & de Laat, 2009). Studies…

  7. If Your Child Has a Heart Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... septal defect , atrial septal defect , atrioventricular canal, and patent ductus arteriosus). Or the congestion could be the ... for Congenital Heart Defects Many heart abnormalities (including patent ductus arteriosus , ventricular septal defect , truncus arteriosus, atrioventricular ...

  8. Korotkoff Sounds.

    PubMed

    Shennan; Halligan

    1996-12-01

    We were interested in the historical perspective that Arabidze et al. [1] brought to the subject of Korotkoff's auscultatory method of measuring blood pressure. The original description by the Reverend Stephen Hales performing the very first blood pressure measurement (which was actually published in 1733) does not make reference to a column of water as the authors suggest [2]. Hales wrote: 'Then untying the Ligature on the Artery, the Blood rose in the Tube eight Feet three Inches.'. He goes on to state that, 'When it was at its full Height, it would rise and fall at and after each Pulse two, three, or four Inches, and sometimes it would fall twelve or fourteen Inches, and have there for a time the same vibrations up and down at and after each Pulse, as it had, when it was at its full Height; to which it would rise again, after forty or fifty Pulses'. We believe this fall of '12 or 14 in' to have been the first description of blood pressure variability, which has wrongly been attributed to respirations by subsequent authors [3]. The mare's pulse rate was described to be about 50 beats per minute; therefore an unanaesthetized horse would not be likely to have a respiration rate of once per minute. One further important point of error concerning the Korotkoff sounds is their reproducibility. We have demonstrated recently that phase IV is reproduced or identified poorly, both in adults and even during pregnancy, when it has been recommended to be used in favour of phase V. We have also demonstrated that phase I (systolic blood pressure) is perceived to be significantly clearer than phase V [4]. PMID:10226281

  9. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack treatment works best when it's given right after symptoms occur. Prompt treatment of a heart attack can help prevent or limit damage to the heart and prevent sudden death. Call 9-1-1 Right Away A heart ...

  10. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The ... of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso Heart anatomy illustrations and animations for grades K-6. Heart ...

  11. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  12. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... heart block. Doctors use a test called an EKG (electrocardiogram) to help diagnose heart block. This test ...

  13. Lung sounds in asbestos induced pulmonary disorders.

    PubMed

    Piirilä, P; Lehtola, H; Zitting, A; Kivisaari, L; Koskinen, H; Luukkonen, R; Salo, S P; Vehmas, T; Nordman, H; Sovijärvi, A R

    2000-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the lung sounds in patients with asbestos related pulmonary disorders with findings in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), and with lung function variables, in order to find out associations of acoustic changes with radiological fibrosis, emphysema or with pulmonary gas transfer functions. Sixty-four patients with asbestos-related pleural disease, with or without pulmonary disease, were studied. Lung sound recording and analysis was carried out with a computerized lung sound analyser, and HRCT of the chest, as well as forced spirometry and diffusing capacity measurement were performed. The fibrosis score correlated positively with the quartile frequencies of the power spectrum of lung sounds in inspiration (f50) and expiration (f50) and crackle count in inspiration, as well as negatively with diffusing capacity. When the patients with crackling sounds and significant fibrosis were excluded (n=18), emphysema correlated negatively with expiratory quartile frequencies of the power spectrum, with f25 and f50. Furthermore, diffusing capacity correlated with inspiratory f25 and forced expiratory volume in one second with inspiratory f50 when crackles and fibrosis were excluded. Changes in lung sounds were significantly associated with radiologically verified abnormalities and gas transfer of pulmonary tissue. High sound frequencies were associated with fibrotic changes of the lung while low sound frequencies with pulmonary emphysema. Acoustic analysis gives complementary clinical information for evaluation of asbestos-related pulmonary disorders. PMID:11153590

  14. Making Sound Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2007-01-01

    Sound provides and offers amazing insights into the world. Sound waves may be defined as mechanical energy that moves through air or other medium as a longitudinal wave and consists of pressure fluctuations. Humans and animals alike use sound as a means of communication and a tool for survival. Mammals, such as bats, use ultrasonic sound waves to…

  15. The Sound of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  16. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  17. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  18. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  19. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity.

  1. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  3. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  4. Sound wave transmission (image)

    MedlinePlus

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  5. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  6. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  7. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  8. [Congenital heart diseases in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Ratti, Carlo; Veronesi, Benedetta; Grassi, Laura; Bompani, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Congenital heart diseases are abnormalities in the heart's structure that are present at birth. Some are known to be associated with genetic disorders. They affect 8 out of every 1,000 newborns. They range from simple defects with no symptoms to complex defects. They are divided in two types: cyanotic and not cyanotic.

  9. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 per minute or coming in groups of 3 or more). You have risk factors for heart disease, such as high cholesterol, diabetes, or high blood pressure. You have new or different heart palpitations. ...

  10. Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with heart disease? What do my cholesterol and triglyceride numbers mean? How can I lower my cholesterol? ... weight Know your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglycerides) You can reduce your chances of getting heart ...

  11. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 28. Bernstein D. Pediatric heart and heart-lung transplantation. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 19th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap ...

  12. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 ounce. Most pacemakers have 2 parts: The generator contains the battery and the information to control ... are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart. ...

  13. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed.

  14. AVE-SEASAME 5: 25-mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Gilchrist, L. P.; Turner, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The rewinsonde sounding program for the AVE-SESAME 5 experiment is described and tubulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented for the 23 National Weather Service stations and 20 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals beginning at 1200 GMT on May 20, 1979, and ending at 1200 GMT on may 21, 1979 (nine sounding times). A tenth sounding was teken at many special stations between 2100 and 0000 GMT on May 20. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Reasons are given for the termination of soundings below 100 mb, and soundings with abnormal characteristics are listed.

  15. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  16. Priming Gestures with Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Heller, Laurie M.; Navolio, Nicole; Zúñiga-Peñaranda, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments about a little-studied type of compatibility effect between a stimulus and a response: the priming of manual gestures via sounds associated with these gestures. The goal was to investigate the plasticity of the gesture-sound associations mediating this type of priming. Five experiments used a primed choice-reaction task. Participants were cued by a stimulus to perform response gestures that produced response sounds; those sounds were also used as primes before the response cues. We compared arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds (key lifts and pure tones) created during the experiment (i.e. no pre-existing knowledge) with ecological associations corresponding to the structure of the world (tapping gestures and sounds, scraping gestures and sounds) learned through the entire life of the participant (thus existing prior to the experiment). Two results were found. First, the priming effect exists for ecological as well as arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds. Second, the priming effect is greatly reduced for ecologically existing associations and is eliminated for arbitrary associations when the response gesture stops producing the associated sounds. These results provide evidence that auditory-motor priming is mainly created by rapid learning of the association between sounds and the gestures that produce them. Auditory-motor priming is therefore mediated by short-term associations between gestures and sounds that can be readily reconfigured regardless of prior knowledge. PMID:26544884

  17. The anatomy and development of normal and abnormal coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Diane E; Henderson, Deborah J; Chaudhry, Bill; Mohun, Timothy J; Anderson, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    At present, there is significant interest in the morphology of the coronary arteries, not least due to the increasingly well-recognised association between anomalous origin of the arteries and sudden cardiac death. Much has also been learnt over the last decade regarding the embryology of the arteries. In this review, therefore, we provide a brief introduction into the recent findings regarding their development. In particular, we emphasise that new evidence, derived using the developing murine heart, points to the arterial stems growing out from the adjacent sinuses of the aortic root, rather than the arteries growing in, as is currently assumed. As we show, the concept of outgrowth provides an excellent explanation for several of the abnormal arrangements encountered in the clinical setting. Before summarising these abnormal features, we draw attention to the need to describe the heart in an attitudinally appropriate manner, following the basic rule of human anatomy, rather than describing the cardiac components with the heart in the "Valentine" orientation. We then show how the major abnormalities involving the coronary arteries in humans can be summarised in terms of abnormal origin from the pulmonary circulation, abnormal aortic origin, or fistulous communications between the coronary arteries and the cardiac cavities. In the case of abnormal aortic origin, we highlight those malformations known to be associated with sudden cardiac death.

  18. [Possibilities of ultrasonic methods in the diagnosis of crisscross heart].

    PubMed

    Mitina, I N; Makhachev, O A; Ivanitskiĭ, A V

    1989-01-01

    Ultrasonographic methods were used in the diagnosis of the criss-cross heart, a rare congenital rotation abnormality of the heart. The ultracardiosonographic diagnosis of the criss-cross heart does not exclude the necessity of using catheterization and angiography to verify the anatomic characteristics.

  19. Signal processing of Shiley heart valve data for fracture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.

    1993-04-01

    Given digital acoustic data emanating from the heart sounds of the beating heart measured from laboratory sheep with implanted Bjoerk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves, it is possible to detect and extract the opening and closing heart beats from the data. Once extracted, spectral or other information can then obtained from the heartbeats and passed on to feature extraction algorithms, neutral networks, or pattern recognizers so that the valve condition, either fractured or intact, may be determined.

  20. Signal processing of Shiley heart valve data for fracture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.

    1993-09-01

    Given digital acoustic data emanating from the heart sounds of the beating heart measured from laboratory sheep with implanted Bjoerk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves, it is possible to detect and extract the opening and closing heart beats from the data. Once extracted, spectral or other information can then obtained from the heartbeats and passed on to feature extraction algorithms, neural networks, or pattern recognizers so that the valve condition, either fractured or intact, may be determined.

  1. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  2. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke.

  3. Hypoxia and fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Patterson, A J; Zhang, L

    2010-10-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not the only gene involved in adaptation to hypoxia, its role places it as a central figure in orchestrating events needed for adaptation to hypoxic stress. Although "normal" hypoxia (lower oxygen tension in the fetus as compared with the adult) is essential in heart formation, further abnormal hypoxia in utero adversely affects cardiogenesis. Prenatal hypoxia alters myocardial structure and causes a decline in cardiac performance. Not only are the effects of hypoxia apparent during the perinatal period, but prolonged hypoxia in utero also causes fetal programming of abnormality in the heart's development. The altered expression pattern of cardioprotective genes such as protein kinase c epsilon, heat shock protein 70, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, likely predispose the developing heart to increased vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury later in life. The events underlying the long-term changes in gene expression are not clear, but likely involve variation in epigenetic regulation.

  4. Frequency shifting approach towards textual transcription of heartbeat sounds.

    PubMed

    Arvin, Farshad; Doraisamy, Shyamala; Safar Khorasani, Ehsan

    2011-10-04

    Auscultation is an approach for diagnosing many cardiovascular problems. Automatic analysis of heartbeat sounds and extraction of its audio features can assist physicians towards diagnosing diseases. Textual transcription allows recording a continuous heart sound stream using a text format which can be stored in very small memory in comparison with other audio formats. In addition, a text-based data allows applying indexing and searching techniques to access to the critical events. Hence, the transcribed heartbeat sounds provides useful information to monitor the behavior of a patient for the long duration of time. This paper proposes a frequency shifting method in order to improve the performance of the transcription. The main objective of this study is to transfer the heartbeat sounds to the music domain. The proposed technique is tested with 100 samples which were recorded from different heart diseases categories. The observed results show that, the proposed shifting method significantly improves the performance of the transcription.

  5. Acoustic heart. Interpretation of Phonocardiograms by computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, J.; Tavera, F.; Velázquez, J. M.; López, G.; Hernández, R. T.; Morales, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the field of Cardiology have been identified several heart pathologies associated with problems in valves and narrowing in veins. Each case is associated with a specific sound emitted by the heart, detected in cardiac auscultation. On the Phonocardiogram, sound is visualized as a peak in the wave. In the Optics Laboratory of the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco, we have developed a simulation of the Phonocardiograms of heart sounds associated with the main pathologies and a computer program of recognition of images that allows you to quickly identify the respective diseases. This is a novel way to analyze Phonocardiograms and the foundation for building a portable non-invasive cardiac diagnostic computerized analyzer system.

  6. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  7. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  8. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    2014-12-15

    Essential facts Heart failure affects about 900,000 people in the UK. The condition can affect people of all ages, but it is more common in older people, with more than half of all patients over the age of 75. It is caused by the heart failing to pump enough blood around the body at the right pressure, usually because the heart muscle has become too weak or stiff to work properly. Acute heart failure, which occurs when symptoms develop quickly, is the leading cause of hospital admission in people over 65. PMID:25492766

  9. The Teaching of Abnormal Psychology through the Cinema.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissim-Sabat, Denis

    1979-01-01

    Describes abnormal psychology course centered around films which include "King of Hearts,""A Woman Under the Influence,""David and Lisa,""In Cold Blood," and "The Boys in the Band." Each film deals with a fundamental concept such as psychopathology, neurosis, psychosis, insanity, and sexuality. (KC)

  10. Stress Recovery during Exposure to Nature Sound and Environmental Noise

    PubMed Central

    Alvarsson, Jesper J; Wiens, Stefan; Nilsson, Mats E

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that visual impressions of natural compared with urban environments facilitate recovery after psychological stress. To test whether auditory stimulation has similar effects, 40 subjects were exposed to sounds from nature or noisy environments after a stressful mental arithmetic task. Skin conductance level (SCL) was used to index sympathetic activation, and high frequency heart rate variability (HF HRV) was used to index parasympathetic activation. Although HF HRV showed no effects, SCL recovery tended to be faster during natural sound than noisy environments. These results suggest that nature sounds facilitate recovery from sympathetic activation after a psychological stressor. PMID:20617017

  11. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are ... treatments fail. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  12. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  13. Poetry Pages. Sound Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fina, Allan de

    1992-01-01

    Explains how elementary teachers can help students understand onomatopoeia, suggesting that they define onomatopoeia, share examples of it, read poems and have students discuss onomatopoeic words, act out common household sounds, write about sound effects, and create choral readings of onomatopoeic poems. Two appropriate poems are included. (SM)

  14. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    Part one of a three-part series about noise pollution and its effects on humans. This section presents the background information for teachers who are preparing a unit on sound. The next issues will offer learning activities for measuring the effects of sound and some references. (SA)

  15. Sounding rocket lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Maybee, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Programmatic, applicatory, developmental, and operational aspects of sounding rocket utilization for materials processing studies are discussed. Lessons learned through the experience of 10 sounding rocket missions are described. Particular attention is given to missions from the SPAR, Consort, and Joust programs. Successful experiments on Consort include the study of polymer membranes and resins, biological processes, demixing of immiscible liquids, and electrodeposition.

  16. Breaking the Sound Barrier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Boehringer, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Students in a fourth-grade class participated in a series of dynamic sound learning centers followed by a dramatic capstone event--an exploration of the amazing Trashcan Whoosh Waves. It's a notoriously difficult subject to teach, but this hands-on, exploratory approach ignited student interest in sound, promoted language acquisition, and built…

  17. The Bosstown Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary

    Based on the argument that (contrary to critical opinion) the musicians in the various bands associated with Bosstown Sound were indeed talented, cohesive individuals and that the bands' lack of renown was partially a result of ill-treatment by record companies and the press, this paper traces the development of the Bosstown Sound from its…

  18. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  19. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  20. Electrocardiogram of the failing heart.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Vinzenz

    2002-09-01

    In the failing heart general specific (e.g., Q-waves after acute myocardial infarction, persistent ST-elevations in post-myocardial infarction left ventricular aneurysm) and unspecific ECG changes (e.g., left bundle branch block, right bundle branch block, ST-T-alterations due to digitalis glycosides or antiarrhythmic drugs) may be seen in the conventional 12-lead ECG. In addition, atrial and ventricular tachy-arrhythmias may be detected and quantified by 24-hour-Holter ECG recordings, that may be relevant for a worse prognosis of patients with congestive heart failure. Heart rate variability as the most relevant derived ECG parameter of sympathetic tone fluctuations may be of important prognostic significance in congestive heart failure patients. An abnormal signal averaged P-wave duration may predict the incidence of atrial fibrillation, as may apply to QRS-prolongation and/or ventricular late potentials in the signal averaged ECG for the incidence of serious life-threatening ventricular tachy-arrhythmias or death from pump failure. Last but not least, cardiac repolarization abnormalities may be detected by QT dispersion-, QT-/QTc-fluctuation- or T-wave alternans studies, but the true prognostic significance of these parameters for predicting sudden cardiac death or death from pump failure in patients with congestive heart failure remains unclear. PMID:12114840

  1. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  2. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  3. The sound manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Michael J.; Bisnovatyi, Ilia

    2000-11-01

    Computing practice today depends on visual output to drive almost all user interaction. Other senses, such as audition, may be totally neglected, or used tangentially, or used in highly restricted specialized ways. We have excellent audio rendering through D-A conversion, but we lack rich general facilities for modeling and manipulating sound comparable in quality and flexibility to graphics. We need coordinated research in several disciplines to improve the use of sound as an interactive information channel. Incremental and separate improvements in synthesis, analysis, speech processing, audiology, acoustics, music, etc. will not alone produce the radical progress that we seek in sonic practice. We also need to create a new central topic of study in digital audio research. The new topic will assimilate the contributions of different disciplines on a common foundation. The key central concept that we lack is sound as a general-purpose information channel. We must investigate the structure of this information channel, which is driven by the cooperative development of auditory perception and physical sound production. Particular audible encodings, such as speech and music, illuminate sonic information by example, but they are no more sufficient for a characterization than typography is sufficient for characterization of visual information. To develop this new conceptual topic of sonic information structure, we need to integrate insights from a number of different disciplines that deal with sound. In particular, we need to coordinate central and foundational studies of the representational models of sound with specific applications that illuminate the good and bad qualities of these models. Each natural or artificial process that generates informative sound, and each perceptual mechanism that derives information from sound, will teach us something about the right structure to attribute to the sound itself. The new Sound topic will combine the work of computer

  4. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  5. Role of Visual Feedback Treatment for Defective /s/ Sounds in Patients with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michi, Ken-ichi; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Six patients with cleft palate were provided treatment using either visual feedback for tongue placement and frication or no visual feedback. Results indicated the feedback was especially useful in the treatment of defective /s/ sounds in the patients who exhibited abnormal posterior tongue posturing during dental or alveolar sounds. (Author/DB)

  6. Cortical Activation during Attention to Sound in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funabiki, Yasuko; Murai, Toshiya; Toichi, Motomi

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) can demonstrate hypersensitivity to sounds as well as a lack of awareness of them. Several functional imaging studies have suggested an abnormal response in the auditory cortex of such subjects, but it is not known whether these subjects have dysfunction in the auditory cortex or are simply not…

  7. 3D Heart: a new visual training method for electrocardiographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Olson, Charles W; Lange, David; Chan, Jack-Kang; Olson, Kim E; Albano, Alfred; Wagner, Galen S; Selvester, Ronald H S

    2007-01-01

    This new training method is based on developing a sound understanding of the sequence in which electrical excitation spreads through both the normal and the infarcted myocardium. The student is made aware of the cardiac electrical performance through a series of 3-dimensional pictures during the excitation process. The electrocardiogram 3D Heart 3-dimensional program contains a variety of different activation simulations. Currently, this program enables the user to view the activation simulation for all of the following pathology examples: normal activation; large, medium, and small anterior myocardial infarction (MI); large, medium, and small posterolateral MI; large, medium, and small inferior MI. Simulations relating to other cardiac abnormalities, such as bundle branch block and left ventricular hypertrophy fasicular block, are being developed as part of a National Institute of Health (NIH) Phase 1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. PMID:17604044

  8. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  10. Sound as artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  11. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  12. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of highly accurate and useful system.

  13. Abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Amir A; Grace, Norman D

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in hematological indices are frequently encountered in cirrhosis. Multiple causes contribute to the occurrence of hematological abnormalities. Recent studies suggest that the presence of hematological cytopenias is associated with a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. The present article reviews the pathogenesis, incidence, prevalence, clinical significance and treatment of abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis. PMID:19543577

  14. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... lower “bad” cholesterol (also called LDL, or low-density lipoprotein) levels and may help increase “good” cholesterol (also called HDL, or high-density lipoprotein). If you have had a heart attack, ...

  15. Hearts Wish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates characteristics and themes in 102 drawings by sexually abused children. Themes of the drawings included genitalia, the absence of specific body parts, phallic symbols, inappropriate smiles, distorted body images, kinetic activity, prominent hands and fingers, and hearts. (RJC)

  16. Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctors remove the patient's heart by transecting the aorta , the main pulmonary artery and the superior and ... sewing together the recipient and donor vena cavae, aorta, pulmonary artery and left atrium. In patients with ...

  17. Wine and heart health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and liver. ...

  18. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  19. The Heart in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kereiakes, Dean J.; Naughton, James L.; Brundage, Bruce; Schiller, Nelson B.

    1984-01-01

    Since the introduction of insulin, heart disease has become a major impediment to survival in persons with diabetes mellitus. Coronary disease has increased severity and accelerated development in diabetic persons compared with an age- and sex-matched nondiabetic population. A peculiar vulnerability of women to the influence of diabetes with loss of premenopausal coronary disease protection has been found. The symptomatology of coronary events may differ and coronary care data show a higher incidence of sudden death in diabetic patients who have a myocardial infarction than in their non-diabetic counterparts. Insulin may play a role in the myocardial adjustment to an ischemic insult by enhancing glucose intake and suppressing lipolysis and ketogenesis. Carbohydrate intolerance in dogs, rhesus monkeys and humans appears associated with similar histologic and compositional changes in the myocardium. Abnormalities in diastolic ventricular function not attributable to large- or small-vessel coronary disease have been found in the diabetic subjects of each species. Studies in humans who have diabetes have assessed single pressure-volume relationships and more exacting measures of ventricular compliance are needed. Abnormalities of myocardial function in patients with diabetes have been found using echo and radionuclide techniques. Many of these findings need to be correlated with invasive data or confirmed in larger populations. Autonomic dysfunction is common in diabetic persons and may imply an associated poor prognosis. Reflex abnormalities in parasympathetic function are most prevalent and occur before sympathetic dysfunction. PMID:6372249

  20. Logging the Heart with Microcomputer-Based Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Eijck, Michiel; Goedhart, Martin; Ellermeijer, Ton

    2005-01-01

    A single heartbeat is a complicated process. In Dutch upper secondary biology textbooks this process is illustrated by the classical Wiggers diagram, which usually shows different heart-related quantities, like voltage (ECG), blood pressure, and the heart sounds. It may help students to understand the nature of the Wiggers diagram if they perform…

  1. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  2. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  3. Sound Visualization and Holography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kock, Winston E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes liquid surface holograms including their application to medicine. Discusses interference and diffraction phenomena using sound wave scanning techniques. Compares focussing by zone plate to holographic image development. (GH)

  4. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    The second part of a three-part series, this article describes sound measurement, effects, and indoor learning activities. Thirty elementary school activities are described with appropriate grade levels specified. (Author/CS)

  5. Obesity and heart failure.

    PubMed

    De Pergola, Giovanni; Nardecchia, Adele; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Minischetti, Manuela Castiglione; Silvestris, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have recently shown that obesity, and abdominal obesity in particular, is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure (HF). Higher cardiac oxidative stress is the early stage of heart dysfunction due to obesity, and it is the result of insulin resistance, altered fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and impaired mitochondrial biogenesis. Extense myocyte hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis are early microscopic changes in patients with HF, whereas circumferential strain during the left ventricular (LV) systole, LV increase in both chamber size and wall thickness (LV hypertrophy), and LV dilatation are the early macroscopic and functional alterations in obese developing heart failure. LV hypertrophy leads to diastolic dysfunction and subendocardial ischemia in obesity, and pericardial fat has been shown to be significantly associated with LV diastolic dysfunction. Evolving abnormalities of diastolic dysfunction may include progressive hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction, and various degrees of eccentric and/or concentric LV hypertrophy may be present with time. Once HF is established, overweight and obese have a better prognosis than do their lean counterparts with the same level of cardiovascular disease, and this phenomenon is called "obesity paradox". It is mainly due to lower muscle protein degradation, brain natriuretic peptide circulating levels and cardio-respiratory fitness than normal weight patients with HF.

  6. The Sounds of Sentences: Differentiating the Influence of Physical Sound, Sound Imagery, and Linguistically Implied Sounds on Physical Sound Processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; Mackenzie, Ian Grant; Strozyk, Jessica; Kaup, Barbara; Leuthold, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Both the imagery literature and grounded models of language comprehension emphasize the tight coupling of high-level cognitive processes, such as forming a mental image of something or language understanding, and low-level sensorimotor processes in the brain. In an electrophysiological study, imagery and language processes were directly compared and the sensory associations of processing linguistically implied sounds or imagined sounds were investigated. Participants read sentences describing auditory events (e.g., "The dog barks"), heard a physical (environmental) sound, or had to imagine such a sound. We examined the influence of the 3 sound conditions (linguistic, physical, imagery) on subsequent physical sound processing. Event-related potential (ERP) difference waveforms indicated that in all 3 conditions, prime compatibility influenced physical sound processing. The earliest compatibility effect was observed in the physical condition, starting in the 80-110 ms time interval with a negative maximum over occipital electrode sites. In contrast, the linguistic and the imagery condition elicited compatibility effects starting in the 180-220 ms time window with a maximum over central electrode sites. In line with the ERPs, the analysis of the oscillatory activity showed that compatibility influenced early theta and alpha band power changes in the physical, but not in the linguistic and imagery, condition. These dissociations were further confirmed by dipole localization results showing a clear separation between the source of the compatibility effect in the physical sound condition (superior temporal area) and the source of the compatibility effect triggered by the linguistically implied sounds or the imagined sounds (inferior temporal area). Implications for grounded models of language understanding are discussed. PMID:27473463

  7. The Sounds of Sentences: Differentiating the Influence of Physical Sound, Sound Imagery, and Linguistically Implied Sounds on Physical Sound Processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; Mackenzie, Ian Grant; Strozyk, Jessica; Kaup, Barbara; Leuthold, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Both the imagery literature and grounded models of language comprehension emphasize the tight coupling of high-level cognitive processes, such as forming a mental image of something or language understanding, and low-level sensorimotor processes in the brain. In an electrophysiological study, imagery and language processes were directly compared and the sensory associations of processing linguistically implied sounds or imagined sounds were investigated. Participants read sentences describing auditory events (e.g., "The dog barks"), heard a physical (environmental) sound, or had to imagine such a sound. We examined the influence of the 3 sound conditions (linguistic, physical, imagery) on subsequent physical sound processing. Event-related potential (ERP) difference waveforms indicated that in all 3 conditions, prime compatibility influenced physical sound processing. The earliest compatibility effect was observed in the physical condition, starting in the 80-110 ms time interval with a negative maximum over occipital electrode sites. In contrast, the linguistic and the imagery condition elicited compatibility effects starting in the 180-220 ms time window with a maximum over central electrode sites. In line with the ERPs, the analysis of the oscillatory activity showed that compatibility influenced early theta and alpha band power changes in the physical, but not in the linguistic and imagery, condition. These dissociations were further confirmed by dipole localization results showing a clear separation between the source of the compatibility effect in the physical sound condition (superior temporal area) and the source of the compatibility effect triggered by the linguistically implied sounds or the imagined sounds (inferior temporal area). Implications for grounded models of language understanding are discussed.

  8. Electrocardiogram abnormalities in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Doane, Cynthia J; Lee, D Rick; Sleeper, Meg M

    2006-12-01

    Although cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the captive chimpanzee population, little is known about the prevalence and etiology of heart disease in this species. We reviewed the physical exam records of 265 common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) for electrocardiogram abnormalities. During the 24-mo period reviewed (August 2003 through August 2005), 34 animals were diagnosed with cardiac arrhythmias consisting of ventricular arrhythmias, supraventricular arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, mixed arrhythmias, and bradycardia. The incidence of cardiac arrhythmia was significantly higher in male animals, chimpanzees 20 to 39 y old, and those with structural heart disease. Incidence of cardiac arrhythmia was not significantly higher in animals with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or chronic viral infections. During the retrospective period, 7 animals with cardiac arrhythmias died or were euthanized. Mortality was significantly higher in animals with ventricular arrhythmias compared with those without ventricular arrhythmias. We conclude that in the common chimpanzee, age, male gender, and structural heart disease are risk factors for developing cardiac arrhythmias and that ventricular arrhythmias are risk factors for mortality. PMID:17219782

  9. Applying cybernetic technology to diagnose human pulmonary sounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Yung; Chou, Cheng-Han

    2014-06-01

    Chest auscultation is a crucial and efficient method for diagnosing lung disease; however, it is a subjective process that relies on physician experience and the ability to differentiate between various sound patterns. Because the physiological signals composed of heart sounds and pulmonary sounds (PSs) are greater than 120 Hz and the human ear is not sensitive to low frequencies, successfully making diagnostic classifications is difficult. To solve this problem, we constructed various PS recognition systems for classifying six PS classes: vesicular breath sounds, bronchial breath sounds, tracheal breath sounds, crackles, wheezes, and stridor sounds. First, we used a piezoelectric microphone and data acquisition card to acquire PS signals and perform signal preprocessing. A wavelet transform was used for feature extraction, and the PS signals were decomposed into frequency subbands. Using a statistical method, we extracted 17 features that were used as the input vectors of a neural network. We proposed a 2-stage classifier combined with a back-propagation (BP) neural network and learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which improves classification accuracy by using a haploid neural network. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve verifies the high performance level of the neural network. To expand traditional auscultation methods, we constructed various PS diagnostic systems that can correctly classify the six common PSs. The proposed device overcomes the lack of human sensitivity to low-frequency sounds and various PS waves, characteristic values, and a spectral analysis charts are provided to elucidate the design of the human-machine interface.

  10. Physiological and psychological assessment of sound.

    PubMed

    Yanagihashi, R; Ohira, M; Kimura, T; Fujiwara, T

    1997-05-01

    The psycho-physiological effects of several sound stimulations were investigated to evaluate the relationship between a psychological parameter, such as subjective perception, and a physiological parameter, such as the heart rate variability (HRV). Eight female students aged 21-22 years old were tested. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and the movement of the chest-wall for estimating respiratory rate were recorded during three different sound stimulations; (1) music provided by a synethesizer (condition A); (2) birds twitters (condition B); and (3) mechanical sounds (condition C). The percentage power of the low-frequency (LF; 0.05 < or = 0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF; 0.15 < or = 0.40 Hz) components in the HRV (LF%, HF%) were assessed by a frequency analysis of time-series data for 5 min obtained from R-R intervals in the ECG. Quantitative assessment of subjective perception was also described by a visual analog scale (VAS). The HF% and VAS value for comfort in C were significantly lower than in either A and/or B. The respiratory rate and VAS value for awakening in C were significantly higher than in A and/or B. There was a significant correlation between the HF% and the value of the VAS, and between the respiratory rate and the value of the VAS. These results indicate that mechanical sounds similar to C inhibit the para-sympathetic nervous system and promote a feeling that is unpleasant but alert, also suggesting that the HRV reflects subjective perception.

  11. Physiological and psychological assessment of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagihashi, R.; Ohira, Masayoshi; Kimura, Teiji; Fujiwara, Takayuki

    The psycho-physiological effects of several sound stimulations were investigated to evaluate the relationship between a psychological parameter, such as subjective perception, and a physiological parameter, such as the heart rate variability (HRV). Eight female students aged 21-22 years old were tested. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and the movement of the chest-wall for estimating respiratory rate were recorded during three different sound stimulations; (1) music provided by a synthesizer (condition A); (2) birds twitters (condition B); and (3) mechanical sounds (condition C). The percentage power of the low-frequency (LF; 0.05<=0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF; 0.15<=0.40 Hz) components in the HRV (LF%, HF%) were assessed by a frequency analysis of time-series data for 5 min obtained from R-R intervals in the ECG. Quantitative assessment of subjective perception was also described by a visual analog scale (VAS). The HF% and VAS value for comfort in C were significantly lower than in either A and/or B. The respiratory rate and VAS value for awakening in C were significantly higher than in A and/or B. There was a significant correlation between the HF% and the value of the VAS, and between the respiratory rate and the value of the VAS. These results indicate that mechanical sounds similar to C inhibit the para-sympathetic nervous system and promote a feeling that is unpleasant but alert, also suggesting that the HRV reflects subjective perception.

  12. Effects of Abnormal Oral Reflexes on Speech Articulation in Persian Speaking Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    DADGAR, Hooshang; HADIAN, Mohammad Reza; LIRA, Ortega Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of abnormal oral reflexes and speech sound production in children with severe cerebral palsy. Materials & Methods Seven oral reflexes such as, rooting, mouth-opening, biting, chewing, lip, tongue, and suckling were examined in 52Persian-speaking monolingual children with spastic cerebral palsy (ages 5-10 yr).Phonetic information tests were administered to investigate their ability for articulation of the speech sounds. Results A significant relationship between three (i.e. the chewing, lip, and biting reflexes) out of the seven abnormal oral reflexes and the speech articulation was noticed. The presence of the chewing reflex was associated with deficits in production of /s, z, š,č/ sounds. The lip reflex was associated with deficits in the production of /p, m, r, j, f, č/ sounds. The biting reflex was associated with deficits in the production of /z, l, y and š/ sounds. No significant relationship was found between the rooting, mouth-opening, tongue, and suckling reflexes and sound articulation. Conclusion The presence of abnormal reflexes in the children with spastic cerebral palsy would suggest a correlation between these reflexes and sound articulation in Iranian children with spastic cerebral palsy. Hence, these observations might suggest some disturbances in normal speech development. PMID:27375753

  13. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Kanona, Hala; Virk, Jagdeep Singh; Kumar, Gaurav; Chawda, Sanjiv; Khalil, Sherif

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively. PMID:25628909

  14. Developmental Change in Fetal Response to Repeated Low-Intensity Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morokuma, Seiichi; Doria, Valentina; Ierullo, Antonio; Kinukawa, Naoko; Fukushima, Kotaro; Nakano, Hitoo; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam; Papageorghiou, Aris T.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate developmental changes in heart rate response to repeated low-intensity (85 dB) sound stimulation in fetuses between 32 and 37 weeks of gestation. We measured amplitude changes in heart rate as our index of fetal response. At 35 to 37 weeks of gestation, the majority of fetuses showed a deceleratory response…

  15. Sound modes in holographic superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Christopher P.; Yarom, Amos

    2009-11-15

    Superfluids support many different types of sound waves. We investigate the relation between the sound waves in a relativistic and a nonrelativistic superfluid by using hydrodynamics to calculate the various sound speeds. Then, using a particular holographic scalar gravity realization of a strongly interacting superfluid, we compute first, second, and fourth sound speeds as a function of the temperature. The relativistic low temperature results for second sound differ from Landau's well known prediction for the nonrelativistic, incompressible case.

  16. On categorizing sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhead, Gregory R.

    1991-08-01

    Context is important when people judge sounds, or attributes of sounds, or other stimuli. It is shown how judgments depend on what sounds recently occurred (sequence effects), on how those sounds differ from one another (range effects), on the distribution of those differences (set effects), on what subjects are told about the situation (task effects), and on what subjects are told about their performance (feedback effects). Each of these factors determines the overall mean and variability of response times and response choices, which are the standard measures, when people judge attribute amounts. Trial-by-trial analysis of the data show these factors also determine performance on individual trials. Moreover, these momentary data cannot be predicted from the overall data. The opposite is not true; the averaged data can be predicted from the momentary details. These results are consistent with a model having two simple assumptions: successive sounds (not just their attributes) assimilate toward one another in memory, and judgments are based on comparisons of these remembered events. It is suggested that relations between attributes, rather than the magnitudes of the attributes themselves, are the basis for judgment.

  17. Meteor fireball sounds identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keay, Colin

    1992-01-01

    Sounds heard simultaneously with the flight of large meteor fireballs are electrical in origin. Confirmation that Extra/Very Low Frequency (ELF/VLF) electromagnetic radiation is produced by the fireball was obtained by Japanese researchers. Although the generation mechanism is not fully understood, studies of the Meteorite Observation and Recovery Project (MORP) and other fireball data indicate that interaction with the atmosphere is definitely responsible and the cut-off magnitude of -9 found for sustained electrophonic sounds is supported by theory. Brief bursts of ELF/VLF radiation may accompany flares or explosions of smaller fireballs, producing transient sounds near favorably placed observers. Laboratory studies show that mundane physical objects can respond to electrical excitation and produce audible sounds. Reports of electrophonic sounds should no longer be discarded. A catalog of over 300 reports relating to electrophonic phenomena associated with meteor fireballs, aurorae, and lightning was assembled. Many other reports have been cataloged in Russian. These may assist the full solution of the similar long-standing and contentious mystery of audible auroral displays.

  18. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place In the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is managed by personnel from Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, either from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia, Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico or from Canada, Norway and Sweden. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requi6ng considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. An inverse differential GPS system has been developed for Sounding Rocket. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of a high accurate and useful system.

  19. Framingham Heart Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Hypertension; Heart Failure, Congestive; Peripheral Vascular Diseases; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Atherosclerosis; Heart Failure

  20. Volitional control of the heart rate.

    PubMed

    Abukonna, Ahmed; Yu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Jianbao

    2013-11-01

    The heart rate is largely under control of the autonomic nervous system. The aim of the present study is to investigate the interactions between the brain and heart underlying volitional control of the heart and to explore the effectiveness of volition as a strategy to control the heart rate without biofeedback. Twenty seven healthy male subjects voluntarily participated in the study and were instructed to decrease and increase their heart beats according to rhythmic, computer generated sound either 10% faster or slower than the subjects' measured heart rate. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activities were estimated with the heart rate variability (HRV) obtained by power spectral analysis of RR intervals. Functional coupling patterns of cerebral cortex with the heart were determined by Partial directed coherence (PDC). In HR(slow) task; HR and sympathetic activity significantly decreased. However parasympathetic activity and power spectral density of EEG in low Alpha (8-10.5 Hz) band significantly increased. Moreover information flow from parietal area (P3 and P4) to RR interval significantly increased. During HR(quick) task; HR, sympathetic activity and power spectral density of EEG in low Beta (14-24 Hz) band significantly increased. Parasympathetic activity significantly decreased. Information flow from FT8, CZ and T8 electrodes to RR interval significantly increased. Our findings suggested that the heart beat can be controlled by volition and is related to some special areas in the cortex.

  1. Depressed Mothers’ Newborns Show Less Discrimination of Other Newborns’ Cry Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Fernandez, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Newborns’ crying in response to the cry of another newborn has been called an empathetic response. The purpose of this study was to determine whether newborns of depressed mothers showed the same response. Newborns of depressed and non-depressed mothers were presented with cry sounds of themselves or other infants, and their sucking and heart rate were recorded. The newborns of non-depressed mothers responded to the cry sounds of other infants with reduced sucking and decreased heart rate. In contrast, the newborns of depressed mothers did not show a change in their sucking or heart rate to the cry sound of other infants. This lesser attentiveness/responsiveness to other infants’ cry sounds may predict their later lack of empathy. PMID:17412424

  2. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  3. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  4. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  5. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential). PMID:261653

  6. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  7. Abortion for fetal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Maclean, N E

    1979-07-25

    I wish to thank Dr. Pauline Bennett for her reply (NZ Med J, 13 June). She has demonstrated well that in dealing with sensitive difficult issues such as abortion for fetal abnormality, the one thing the doctor is not recommended to do is to speak the truth] I am prompted to write this letter for 2 reasons. Firstly, the excellent letter written by Dr. A. M. Rutherford (NZ Med J, 13 June) on the subject of abortion stated, "The most disturbing feature about the whole controversy is the 'blunting of our conscience'." When the doctors are not encouraged to be honest with patients then indeed our conscience has been blunted. Secondly, I watched Holocaust last night, and cannot refrain from stating that I see frightening parallels between our liberal abortion policy and the activities of the Nazis. As I watched the "mental patients" being herded into the shed for gassing by the polite, tidy, white coated medical staff, and then heard the compassionate, sensitive, letter of the hospital authorities to the relatives of the deceased, the parallel became obvious. The mental patients were weak, defenseless, burdensome, and uneconomic; the unborn are weak, defenseless, burdensome, and uneconomic. The hospital authority's letter was acceptable in many ways, acceptable except that its words bore no relation to the truth. It is said that the "first casualty of war is the truth". Whether that war involves the Jews, or the insane, or the unborn, the statement would seem correct.

  8. Monaural Sound Localization Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1997-01-01

    Research reported during the past few decades has revealed the importance for human sound localization of the so-called 'monaural spectral cues.' These cues are the result of the direction-dependent filtering of incoming sound waves accomplished by the pinnae. One point of view about how these cues are extracted places great emphasis on the spectrum of the received sound at each ear individually. This leads to the suggestion that an effective way of studying the influence of these cues is to measure the ability of listeners to localize sounds when one of their ears is plugged. Numerous studies have appeared using this monaural localization paradigm. Three experiments are described here which are intended to clarify the results of the previous monaural localization studies and provide new data on how monaural spectral cues might be processed. Virtual sound sources are used in the experiments in order to manipulate and control the stimuli independently at the two ears. Two of the experiments deal with the consequences of the incomplete monauralization that may have contaminated previous work. The results suggest that even very low sound levels in the occluded ear provide access to interaural localization cues. The presence of these cues complicates the interpretation of the results of nominally monaural localization studies. The third experiment concerns the role of prior knowledge of the source spectrum, which is required if monaural cues are to be useful. The results of this last experiment demonstrate that extraction of monaural spectral cues can be severely disrupted by trial-to-trial fluctuations in the source spectrum. The general conclusion of the experiments is that, while monaural spectral cues are important, the monaural localization paradigm may not be the most appropriate way to study their role.

  9. [Consanguinity and congenital abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Marie; Vedsted-Jakobsen, Agnete

    2003-04-28

    Knowledge of consanguinity is relevant for employees in the Danish national health service, since about 7.5% of the Danish population has another ethnic background than Danish and the majority comes from cultures where consanguineous marriages are not unusual. In the literature it is found that consanguineous couples have a higher risk of having children with congenital malformations. The risk is increased by a factor 2 to 2 1/2. The average risk in Denmark is about 3%. Primarily, the autosomal recessive diseases are expressed in children with consanguineous parents. In order to advise and diagnose it is essential to clarify the consanguinity state. In case of pregnancy with consanguineous parents, we recommend: 1) Counselling to estimate the risk of foetal illness and information about possible examination possibilities. 2) An ultrasound scan at the gestational age of 11-14 weeks in order to measure nuchal translucency and an early malformation scan. 3) An ultrasound scan for malformations at the gestational age of 18-20 weeks. 4) An ultrasound scan especially in order to detect foetal heart malformations at the gestational age of 20-24 weeks.

  10. Sounding rockets in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, G. C.; Cooper, G. W.; Peterson, N. E.

    1982-01-01

    Sounding rockets are versatile tools for scientists studying the atmospheric region which is located above balloon altitudes but below orbital satellite altitudes. Three NASA Nike-Tomahawk sounding rockets were launched from Siple Station in Antarctica in an upper atmosphere physics experiment in the austral summer of 1980-81. The 110 kg payloads were carried to 200 km apogee altitudes in a coordinated project with Arcas rocket payloads and instrumented balloons. This Siple Station Expedition demonstrated the feasibility of launching large, near 1,000 kg, rocket systems from research stations in Antarctica. The remoteness of research stations in Antarctica and the severe environment are major considerations in planning rocket launching expeditions.

  11. Eliciting Sound Memories.

    PubMed

    Harris, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Sensory experiences are often considered triggers of memory, most famously a little French cake dipped in lime blossom tea. Sense memory can also be evoked in public history research through techniques of elicitation. In this article I reflect on different social science methods for eliciting sound memories such as the use of sonic prompts, emplaced interviewing, and sound walks. I include examples from my research on medical listening. The article considers the relevance of this work for the conduct of oral histories, arguing that such methods "break the frame," allowing room for collaborative research connections and insights into the otherwise unarticulatable.

  12. Heart Truth

    MedlinePlus

    ... about women’s risk for heart disease―the #1 killer of women in the United States―and share ... t Care What You Wear—It's the #1 Killer of Women ® are registered trademarks of U.S. ...

  13. Echocardiographic Evaluation of the Right Heart

    PubMed Central

    Markley, Roshanak R; Potfay, Jonathan; Paulsen, Walter; Jovin, Ion S

    2016-01-01

    The appropriate use of echocardiography may reduce the need for invasive diagnostic cardiac procedures. The right side of the heart has recently gained interest among cardiologists as it became clear that abnormalities of the right heart morphology and function are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Echocardiography is easy to perform, relatively cheap, readily available and do not pose the risk of ionizing radiation. Conventional 2D and, more recently, 3D echocardiography provides pertinent anatomic and physiologic information about the right side of the heart. Because of the advantages and simplicity of echocardiography it continues to be an excellent tool for evaluating the structure and function of the right side of the heart. This review outlines the uses of echocardiography in evaluating the right heart structure and function. PMID:27721944

  14. Targeting success in heart failure: evidence-based management.

    PubMed

    Gruszczynski, Adam B; Schuster, Brenda; Regier, Loren; Jensen, Brent

    2010-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common condition in primary care with 1% of the population self-reporting this condition. Mortality is substantial, approaching 40% to 50% over 5 years. Heart failure is a complex syndrome in which abnormal heart function results in, or increases the subsequent risk of, clinical symptoms and signs of low cardiac output or pulmonary or systemic congestion.¹ This article will present some practical tips for managing HF.²

  15. About Heart Attacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... survive. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or ... survive. A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced or ...

  16. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... after the baby is born. For others, your child may be able to safely wait for months ...

  17. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  18. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  19. Laser detection of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.

    1991-05-01

    A prototype laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) system has been constructed to detect and measure underwater sound. The technique is based on measuring the Doppler shift of laser light scattered from small particles in colloidal suspension in water. These particles move with the sound wave and thus a measure of their velocity is a measure of the acoustic particle velocity. Experiments have been conducted using this system to measure the acoustic particle displacements in a standing wave tube. A study has been made from both theoretical and experimental perspectives of the performance characteristics and practical limitations of making such measurements. A computer simulation was used to study the effects of physical parameters of the prototype system such as laser power, system geometry, and particle size. Because several authors have suggested that Brownian motion of the scattering particle might limit the system's ability to make such measurements, particular interest has been focused on this question. It has been shown both experimentally and theoretically that Brownian motion does not limit the ability to measure acoustic particle velocity. The emphasis on practical consideration will lead to the development of a laboratory tool that can be used to make non-invasive measurements that can not be made with conventional types of pressure sensors such as a conventional microscope or hydroplane. Examples of such situations are the sound field in the vicinity of a radiating body where there is no simple relationship between acoustic pressure and acoustic particle velocity and sound velocity measurements near an air-water interface.

  20. Laser Detection of Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.

    1991-02-01

    A prototype laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) system has been constructed to detect and measure underwater sound. The technique is based on measuring the Doppler shift of laser light scattered from small particles in colloidal suspension in water. These particles move with the sound wave and thus a measure of their velocity is a measure of the acoustic particle velocity. Experiments have been conducted using this system to measure acoustic particle displacements in a standing wave tube. A study has been made from both theoretical and experimental perspectives of the performance characteristics and practical limitations of making such measurements. A computer simulation was used to study the effects of physical parameters of the prototype system such as the laser power, system geometry and particle size. Because several authors have suggested that Brownian motion of the scattering particle might limit the system's ability to make such measurements, particular interest has been focused on this question. It has been shown both experimentally and theoretically that Brownian motion does not limit the ability to measure acoustic particle velocity. The emphasis on practical consideration will lead to the development of a laboratory tool that can be used to make non-invasive measurements that can not be made with conventional types of pressure sensors such as a conventional microscope or hydroplane. Examples of such situations are the sound field in the vicinity of a radiating body where there is no simple relationship between acoustic pressure and acoustic particle velocity and sound velocity measurements near an air-water interface.

  1. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This article is the last of a three-part series dealing with sound measurement, effects, pollution, and indoor/door learning activities. This section focuses on outdoor activities and equipment that students can make to assist them in data collection. (Author/SA)

  2. Exploring Sound with Insects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Meyer, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in insect morphology and movement during singing provide a fascinating opportunity for students to investigate insects while learning about the characteristics of sound. In the activities described here, students use a free online computer software program to explore the songs of the major singing insects and experiment with making…

  3. Creative Sound Dramatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Rebecca; Eick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sound propagation is not easy for children to understand because of its abstract nature, often best represented by models such as wave drawings and particle dots. Teachers Rebecca Hendrix and Charles Eick wondered how science inquiry, when combined with an unlikely discipline like drama, could produce a better understanding among their…

  4. Sounds Like Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Linda M.

    1991-01-01

    Presents hands-on science activities that help students learn the concepts of hearing and sound while allowing students to practice science process skills. Students investigate the use of alternative phonograph speakers and needles and apply the knowledge learned to the construction of one-string banjos. (MDH)

  5. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  6. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  7. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  8. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner.

  9. An Artificial Vector Model for Generating Abnormal Electrocardiographic Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Gari D.; Nemati, Shamim; Sameni, Reza

    2010-01-01

    We present generalizations of our previously published artificial models for generating multi-channel ECG to provide simulations of abnormal cardiac rhythms. Using a three-dimensional vectorcardiogram (VCG) formulation, we generate the normal cardiac dipole for a patient using a sum of Gaussian kernels, fitted to real VCG recordings. Abnormal beats are specified either as perturbations to the normal dipole or as new dipole trajectories. Switching between normal and abnormal beat types is achieved using a first-order Markov chain. Probability transitions can be learned from real data or modeled by coupling to heart rate and sympathovagal balance. Natural morphology changes from beat-to-beat are incorporated by varying the angular frequency of the dipole as a function of the inter-beat (RR) interval. The RR interval time series is generated using our previously described model whereby time- and frequency-domain heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability characteristics can be specified. QT-HR hysteresis is simulated by coupling the Gaussian kernels associated with the T-wave in the model with a nonlinear factor related to the local HR (determined from the last n RR intervals). Morphology changes due to respiration are simulated by introducing a rotation matrix couple to the respiratory frequency. We demonstrate an example of the use of this model by simulating HR-dependent T-Wave Alternans (TWA) with and without phase-switching due to ectopy. Application of our model also reveals previously unreported effects of common TWA estimation methods. PMID:20308774

  10. Radiometric sounding system

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Shaw, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    Vertical profiles of solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes are key research needs for global climate change research. These fluxes are expected to change as radiatively active trace gases are emitted to the earth`s atmosphere as a consequence of energy production and industrial and other human activities. Models suggest that changes in the concentration of such gases will lead to radiative flux divergences that will produce global warming of the earth`s atmosphere. Direct measurements of the vertical variation of solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes that lead to these flux divergences have been largely unavailable because of the expense of making such measurements from airplanes. These measurements are needed to improve existing atmospheric radiative transfer models, especially under the cloudy conditions where the models have not been adequately tested. A tethered-balloon-borne Radiometric Sounding System has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide an inexpensive means of making routine vertical soundings of radiative fluxes in the earth`s atmospheric boundary layer to altitudes up to 1500 m above ground level. Such vertical soundings would supplement measurements being made from aircraft and towers. The key technical challenge in the design of the Radiometric Sounding System is to develop a means of keeping the radiometers horizontal while the balloon ascends and descends in a turbulent atmospheric environment. This problem has been addressed by stabilizing a triangular radiometer-carrying platform that is carried on the tetherline of a balloon sounding system. The platform, carried 30 m or more below the balloon to reduce the balloon`s effect on the radiometric measurements, is leveled by two automatic control loops that activate motors, gears and pulleys when the platform is off-level. The sensitivity of the automatic control loops to oscillatory motions of various frequencies and amplitudes can be adjusted using filters.

  11. Sounds of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Starting in the early 1960s, spacecraft-borne plasma wave instruments revealed that space is filled with an astonishing variety of radio and plasma wave sounds, which have come to be called "sounds of space." For over forty years these sounds have been collected and played to a wide variety of audiences, often as the result of press conferences or press releases involving various NASA projects for which the University of Iowa has provided plasma wave instruments. This activity has led to many interviews on local and national radio programs, and occasionally on programs haviang world-wide coverage, such as the BBC. As a result of this media coverage, we have been approached many times by composers requesting copies of our space sounds for use in their various projects, many of which involve electronic synthesis of music. One of these collaborations led to "Sun Rings," which is a musical event produced by the Kronos Quartet that has played to large audiences all over the world. With the availability of modern computer graphic techniques we have recently been attempting to integrate some of these sound of space into an educational audio/video web site that illustrates the scientific principles involved in the origin of space plasma waves. Typically I try to emphasize that a substantial gas pressure exists everywhere in space in the form of an ionized gas called a plasma, and that this plasma can lead to a wide variety of wave phenomenon. Examples of some of this audio/video material will be presented.

  12. Cortical differentiation of speech and nonspeech sounds at 100 ms: implications for dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Tiina; Helenius, Päivi; Salmelin, Riitta

    2005-07-01

    Neurophysiological measures indicate cortical sensitivity to speech sounds by 150 ms after stimulus onset. In this time window dyslexic subjects start to show abnormal cortical processing. We investigated whether phonetic analysis is reflected in the robust auditory cortical activation at approximately 100 ms (N100m), and whether dyslexic subjects show abnormal N100m responses to speech or nonspeech sounds. We used magnetoencephalography to record auditory responses of 10 normally reading and 10 dyslexic adults. The speech stimuli were synthetic Finnish speech sounds (/a/, /u/, /pa/, /ka/). The nonspeech stimuli were complex nonspeech sounds and simple sine wave tones, composed of the F1+F2+F3 and F2 formant frequencies of the speech sounds, respectively. All sounds evoked a prominent N100m response in the bilateral auditory cortices. The N100m activation was stronger to speech than nonspeech sounds in the left but not in the right auditory cortex, in both subject groups. The leftward shift of hemispheric balance for speech sounds is likely to reflect analysis at the phonetic level. In dyslexic subjects the overall interhemispheric amplitude balance and timing were altered for all sound types alike. Dyslexic individuals thus seem to have an unusual cortical organization of general auditory processing in the time window of speech-sensitive analysis.

  13. The Inflammatory Heart Diseases: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The inflammation of the heart muscles, such as myocarditis, the membrane sac which surrounds the heart called as pericarditis, and the inner lining of the heart or the myocardium, heart muscle as endocarditis are known as the inflammatory heart diseases. Inflammation of heart is caused by known infectious agents, viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites, and by toxic materials from the environment, water, food, air, toxic gases, smoke, and pollution, or by an unknown origin. Myocarditis is induced by infection of heart muscle by virus like sarcoidosis and immune diseases. The symptoms include chest pain, angina, pain in heart muscle, and shortness of breath, edema, swelling of feet or ankles, and fatigue. The ECG, X-ray, and MRI can diagnose the disease; blood test and rise in enzymes levels provide abnormality in heart function. The treatment includes use of antibiotics for inflammation of heart muscle and medications. The ultrasound imaging indicates further damage to the heart muscle. In severe cases of infection heart failure can occur so long-term medications are necessary to control inflammation. The various biomarkers are reported for the inflammatory heart diseases. The causes, symptoms and treatments of inflammatory heart diseases are described.

  14. About sound mufflers sound-absorbing panels aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, A. S.; Bulbovich, R. V.; Svirshchev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The article provides a formula for calculating the frequency of sound absorbed panel with a perforated wall. And although the sound absorbing structure is a set of resonators Helmholtz, not individual resonators should be considered in acoustic calculations, and all the perforated wall panel. The analysis, showing how the parameters affect the size and sound-absorbing structures in the absorption rate.

  15. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  16. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-02-26

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  17. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  18. Heart Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    James Antaki and a group of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine used many elements of the Technology Utilization Program while looking for a way to visualize and track material points within the heart muscle. What they needed were tiny artificial "eggs" containing copper sulfate solution, small enough (about 2 mm in diameter) that they would not injure the heart, and large enough to be seen in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images; they also had to be biocompatible and tough enough to withstand the beating of the muscle. The group could not make nor buy sufficient containers. After reading an article on microspheres in NASA Tech Briefs, and a complete set of reports on microencapsulation from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), JPL put Antaki in touch with Dr.Taylor Wang of Vanderbilt University who helped construct the myocardial markers. The research is expected to lead to improved understanding of how the heart works and what takes place when it fails.

  19. Modeling the Transmission of Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a functional model of sound transmission through solids and gases. Describes procedures of an activity to model how sound travels faster through solid materials than gases. Use dominoes to represent the particles of solids and gases. (KHR)

  20. Myocardial bioenergetic abnormalities in experimental uremia

    PubMed Central

    Chesser, Alistair MS; Harwood, Steven M; Raftery, Martin J; Yaqoob, Muhammad M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cardiac bioenergetics are known to be abnormal in experimental uremia as exemplified by a reduced phosphocreatine (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio. However, the progression of these bioenergetic changes during the development of uremia still requires further study and was therefore investigated at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after partial nephrectomy (PNx). Methods A two-stage PNx uremia model in male Wistar rats was used to explore in vivo cardiac and skeletal muscles’ bioenergetic changes over time. High-energy phosphate nucleotides were determined by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) and capillary zone electrophoresis. Results 31P-NMR spectroscopy revealed lower PCr/ATP ratios in PNx hearts compared to sham (SH)-operated animals 4 weeks after PNx (median values given ± SD, 0.64±0.16 PNx, 1.13±0.31 SH, P<0.02). However, 8 weeks after PNx, the same ratio was more comparable between the two groups (0.84±0.15 PNx, 1.04±0.44 SH, P= not significant), suggestive of an adaptive mechanism. When 8-week hearts were prestressed with dobutamine, the PCr/ATP ratio was again lower in the PNx group (1.08±0.36 PNx, 1.55±0.38 SH, P<0.02), indicating a reduced energy reserve during the progression of uremic heart disease. 31P-NMR data were confirmed by capillary zone electrophoresis, and the changes in myocardial bioenergetics were replicated in the skeletal muscle. Conclusion This study provides evidence of the changes that occur in myocardial energetics in experimental uremia and highlights how skeletal muscle bioenergetics mirror those found in the cardiac tissue and so might potentially serve as a practical surrogate tissue during clinical cardiac NMR investigations. PMID:27307758

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  2. Data sonification and sound visualization.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.; Wiebel, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Illinois

    1999-07-01

    Sound can help us explore and analyze complex data sets in scientific computing. The authors describe a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis (Diass) and a program to visualize sounds in a virtual reality environment (M4Cave). Both are part of a comprehensive music composition environment that includes additional software for computer-assisted composition and automatic music notation.

  3. Sounds Alive: A Noise Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickman, Donna McCord

    Sarah Screech, Danny Decibel, Sweetie Sound and Neil Noisy describe their experiences in the world of sound and noise to elementary students. Presented are their reports, games and charts which address sound measurement, the effects of noise on people, methods of noise control, and related areas. The workbook is intended to stimulate students'…

  4. Just How Does Sound Wave?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Bob

    2006-01-01

    When children first hear the term "sound wave" perhaps they might associate it with the way a hand waves or perhaps the squiggly line image on a television monitor when sound recordings are being made. Research suggests that children tend to think sound somehow travels as a discrete package, a fast-moving invisible thing, and not something that…

  5. Environmentally sound manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. They have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and to reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this problem. As our ability to gather data on the state of the Earth's environmental health increases, environmentally sound manufacturing must become an integral part of the business decision making process.

  6. Environmentally sound manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    The NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. They have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and to reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this problem. As our ability to gather data on the state of the Earth's environmental health increases, environmentally sound manufacturing must become an integral part of the business decision making process.

  7. Prevalence and distribution of congenital abnormalities in Turkey: differences between the prenatal and postnatal periods.

    PubMed

    Oztarhan, Kazim; Gedikbasi, Ali; Yildirim, Dogukan; Arslan, Oguz; Adal, Erdal; Kavuncuoglu, Sultan; Ozbek, Sibel; Ceylan, Yavuz

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of cases associated with congenital abnormalities during the following three periods: pregnancy, birth, and the neonatal period. This was a retrospective study of cases between 2002 and 2006. All abnormal pregnancies, elective terminations of pregnancies, stillbirths, and births with congenital abnormalities managed in the Neonatology Unit were classified based on the above distribution scheme. During the 5-year study period, 1906 cases with congenital abnormalities were recruited, as follows: 640 prenatally detected and terminated cases, with most abnormalities related to the central nervous system, chromosomes, and urogenital system (56.7%, 12.7%, and 8.9%, respectively); 712 neonates with congenital abnormalities (congenital heart disease [49.2%], central nervous system abnormalities [14.7%], and urogenital system abnormalities [12.9%]); and hospital stillbirths, of which 34.2% had malformations (220 prenatal cases [34.4%] had multiple abnormalities, whereas 188 liveborn cases [26.4%] had multiple abnormalities). The congenital abnormalities rate between 2002 and 2006 was 2.07%. Systematic screening for fetal anomalies is the primary means for identification of affected pregnancies.

  8. Dementias show differential physiological responses to salient sounds

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Phillip D.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Downey, Laura E.; Golden, Hannah L.; Agustus, Jennifer L.; Clark, Camilla N.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal responsiveness to salient sensory signals is often a prominent feature of dementia diseases, particularly the frontotemporal lobar degenerations, but has been little studied. Here we assessed processing of one important class of salient signals, looming sounds, in canonical dementia syndromes. We manipulated tones using intensity cues to create percepts of salient approaching (“looming”) or less salient withdrawing sounds. Pupil dilatation responses and behavioral rating responses to these stimuli were compared in patients fulfilling consensus criteria for dementia syndromes (semantic dementia, n = 10; behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, n = 16, progressive nonfluent aphasia, n = 12; amnestic Alzheimer's disease, n = 10) and a cohort of 26 healthy age-matched individuals. Approaching sounds were rated as more salient than withdrawing sounds by healthy older individuals but this behavioral response to salience did not differentiate healthy individuals from patients with dementia syndromes. Pupil responses to approaching sounds were greater than responses to withdrawing sounds in healthy older individuals and in patients with semantic dementia: this differential pupil response was reduced in patients with progressive nonfluent aphasia and Alzheimer's disease relative both to the healthy control and semantic dementia groups, and did not correlate with nonverbal auditory semantic function. Autonomic responses to auditory salience are differentially affected by dementias and may constitute a novel biomarker of these diseases. PMID:25859194

  9. The Sounds of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, Donald

    2009-11-01

    The popular concept of space is that it is a vacuum, with nothing of interest between the stars, planets, moons and other astronomical objects. In fact most of space is permeated by plasma, sometimes quite dense, as in the solar corona and planetary ionospheres, and sometimes quite tenuous, as is in planetary radiation belts. Even less well known is that these space plasmas support and produce an astonishing large variety of waves, the ``sounds of space.'' In this talk I will give you a tour of these space sounds, starting with the very early discovery of ``whistlers'' nearly a century ago, and proceeding through my nearly fifty years of research on space plasma waves using spacecraft-borne instrumentation. In addition to being of scientific interest, some of these sounds can even be described as ``musical,'' and have served as the basis for various musical compositions, including a production called ``Sun Rings,'' written by the well-known composer Terry Riley, that has been performed by the Kronos Quartet to audiences all around the world.

  10. [Normal and Adventitious Breath Sounds].

    PubMed

    Koehler, U; Hildebrandt, O; Kerzel, S; Urban, C; Hoehle, L; Weissflog, A; Nikolaizik, W; Koehler, J; Sohrabi, K; Gross, V

    2016-06-01

    Auscultation of the lung is an inexpensive, noninvasive and easy-to-perform tool. It is an important part of the physical examination and is help ful to distinguish physiological respiratory sounds from pathophysiological events. Computerized lung sound analysis is a powerful tool for optimizing and quantifying electronic auscultation based on the specific lung sound spectral characteristics. The automatic analysis of respiratory sounds assumes that physiological and pathological sounds are reliably analyzed based on special algorithms. The development of automated long-term lungsound monitors enables objective assessment of different respiratory symptoms.

  11. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. (a) A line drawn from Chatham Light to latitude...

  12. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  13. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  14. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  15. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  16. Judging sound rotation when listeners and sounds rotate: Sound source localization is a multisystem process.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan; Najam, Anbar

    2015-11-01

    In four experiments listeners were rotated or were stationary. Sounds came from a stationary loudspeaker or rotated from loudspeaker to loudspeaker around an azimuth array. When either sounds or listeners rotate the auditory cues used for sound source localization change, but in the everyday world listeners perceive sound rotation only when sounds rotate not when listeners rotate. In the everyday world sound source locations are referenced to positions in the environment (a world-centric reference system). The auditory cues for sound source location indicate locations relative to the head (a head-centric reference system), not locations relative to the world. This paper deals with a general hypothesis that the world-centric location of sound sources requires the auditory system to have information about auditory cues used for sound source location and cues about head position. The use of visual and vestibular information in determining rotating head position in sound rotation perception was investigated. The experiments show that sound rotation perception when sources and listeners rotate was based on acoustic, visual, and, perhaps, vestibular information. The findings are consistent with the general hypotheses and suggest that sound source localization is not based just on acoustics. It is a multisystem process.

  17. Judging sound rotation when listeners and sounds rotate: Sound source localization is a multisystem process.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan; Najam, Anbar

    2015-11-01

    In four experiments listeners were rotated or were stationary. Sounds came from a stationary loudspeaker or rotated from loudspeaker to loudspeaker around an azimuth array. When either sounds or listeners rotate the auditory cues used for sound source localization change, but in the everyday world listeners perceive sound rotation only when sounds rotate not when listeners rotate. In the everyday world sound source locations are referenced to positions in the environment (a world-centric reference system). The auditory cues for sound source location indicate locations relative to the head (a head-centric reference system), not locations relative to the world. This paper deals with a general hypothesis that the world-centric location of sound sources requires the auditory system to have information about auditory cues used for sound source location and cues about head position. The use of visual and vestibular information in determining rotating head position in sound rotation perception was investigated. The experiments show that sound rotation perception when sources and listeners rotate was based on acoustic, visual, and, perhaps, vestibular information. The findings are consistent with the general hypotheses and suggest that sound source localization is not based just on acoustics. It is a multisystem process. PMID:26627802

  18. Feedback control of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    This thesis is concerned with the development an application of feedback control techniques for active sound control. Both fixed and adaptive controllers are considered. The controller design problem for active sound control is formulated as a constrained optimisation problem with an H2 performance objective, of minimising the variance of the control error, and H2 and H∞ design constraints involving control power output, disturbance enhancement, and robust stability. An Internal Model Controller with an FIR control filter is assumed. Conventional H2 design methods for feedback controllers are studied first. Although such controllers can satisfy the design constraints by employing effort terms in the quadratic cost function, they do not achieve the best possible performance, and when adapted using LMS-based algorithms, they suffer from instabilities if the plant response varies significantly. Improved H2/H∞ design methods for fixed and adaptive controllers are then developed, which achieve the best H2 performance under the design constraints, offer an improved stability when made adaptive, and in general outperform the conventional H2 controllers. The H2/H∞ design problems employ convex programming to ensure a unique solution. The Sequential Quadratic Programming methods is used for the off-line design of fixed controllers, and penalty and barrier function methods, together with frequency domain LMS-based algorithms are employed in the H2/H∞ adaptive controllers. The controllers studied and developed here were applied to three active sound control systems: a noise-reducing headset, an active headrest, and a sound radiating panel. The emphasis was put on developing control strategies that improve system performance. First, a high performance controller for the noise-reducing headset was implemented in real-time, which combines analogue and adaptive digital controllers, and can thus reject disturbances which has both broad-band and periodic components. Then

  19. Assessment of systolic and diastolic function in heart failure using ambulatory monitoring with acoustic cardiography.

    PubMed

    Dillier, Roger; Zuber, Michel; Arand, Patricia; Erne, Susanne; Erne, Paul

    2011-08-01

    INTRODUCTION. The circadian variation of heart function and heart sounds in patients with and without heart failure (HF) is poorly understood. We hypothesized HF patients would exhibit less circadian variation with worsened cardiac function and sleep apnea. METHODS. We studied 67 HF patients (age 67.4 ± 8.2 years; 42% acute HF) and 63 asymptomatic control subjects with no history of HF (age 61.6 ± 7.7 years). Subjects wore a heart sound/ECG/respiratory monitor. The data were analyzed for sleep apnea, diastolic heart sounds, and systolic time intervals. RESULTS. The HF group had significantly greater prevalence of the third heart sound and prolongation of electro-mechanical activation time, while the control group had an age-related increase in the prevalence of the fourth heart sound. The control group showed more circadian variation in cardiac function. The HF subjects had more sleep apnea and higher occurrence of heart rate non-dipping. CONCLUSIONS. The control subjects demonstrated an increasing incidence of diastolic dysfunction with age, while systolic function was mostly unchanged with aging. Parameters related to systolic function were significantly worse in the HF group with little diurnal variation, indicating a constant stimulation of sympathetic tone in HF and reduction of diurnal regulation. PMID:21361859

  20. AVE-SESAME 1: 25-MB sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhard, M. L.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Williams, S. F.; Turner, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Seven atmospheric variability experiments (AVE), two atmospheric variability and severe storms experiments (AVSSE), and six atmospheric variability experiment-severe environmental storm and mesoscale experiments (AVE-SESAME) conducted by NASA are discussed. The dates, observation times, and data reports for each of the experiments for which data was processed are listed. The AVE experiments were conducted primarily to study atmospheric variability with emphasis on spatial and temporal in atmospheric structure that can be detected from soundings taken at 3 hr intervals but not seen in soundings taken at 12 hr intervals. The AVSSE experiments were conducted to study atmospheric structure and variability associated with severe storms combining both rawinsonde and aircraft data to provide information on near storm environments. The method of processing is discussed, estimates of the rms errors in the data are presented, an example of contact data is given, and soundings are listed which exhibited abnormal characteristics.

  1. Degraded neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds in a rat model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Crystal T; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Borland, Michael S; Buell, Elizabeth P; Centanni, Tracy M; Fink, Melyssa K; Im, Kwok W; Wilson, Linda G; Kilgard, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Individuals with Rett syndrome have greatly impaired speech and language abilities. Auditory brainstem responses to sounds are normal, but cortical responses are highly abnormal. In this study, we used the novel rat Mecp2 knockout model of Rett syndrome to document the neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds. We hypothesized that both speech discrimination ability and the neural response to speech sounds would be impaired in Mecp2 rats. We expected that extensive speech training would improve speech discrimination ability and the cortical response to speech sounds. Our results reveal that speech responses across all four auditory cortex fields of Mecp2 rats were hyperexcitable, responded slower, and were less able to follow rapidly presented sounds. While Mecp2 rats could accurately perform consonant and vowel discrimination tasks in quiet, they were significantly impaired at speech sound discrimination in background noise. Extensive speech training improved discrimination ability. Training shifted cortical responses in both Mecp2 and control rats to favor the onset of speech sounds. While training increased the response to low frequency sounds in control rats, the opposite occurred in Mecp2 rats. Although neural coding and plasticity are abnormal in the rat model of Rett syndrome, extensive therapy appears to be effective. These findings may help to explain some aspects of communication deficits in Rett syndrome and suggest that extensive rehabilitation therapy might prove beneficial.

  2. [Pathophysiologic and diagnostic aspects of heart failure].

    PubMed

    Rudolph, W

    1990-06-01

    Ventricular dysfunction due to an abnormality of the heart which is associated with typical hemodynamic, renal and hormonal reactions, characterizes the clinical syndrome heart failure. The traditional definition of heart failure as the inability to pump an amount of blood sufficient to cover the metabolic needs of the body in the presence of adequate venous return, emphasizes mainly the reduction in cardiac output but not the increase in intracardiac pressures. Pressure or volume overload, decreased contractility, loss of muscle mass or restricted filling represent the most important pathological processes leading to heart failure. The disturbance of systolic ventricular function due to pressure or volume overload or diminished contractility is characterized by a decrease in the ejection fraction, the disturbance in diastolic ventricular function associated with restricted filling is characterized by elevated chamber stiffness. Decreased contractility is most commonly responsible for the development of heart failure. Impairment of diastolic ventricular function can only be regarded as the dominant mechanism leading to heart failure in the presence of a small noncompliant ventricle. Impairment of diastolic ventricular function in an enlarged heart is always associated with an impairment of systolic ventricular function and is, then, relegated to a subordinate role. Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, hypertension, cardiomyopathies, valvular heart diseases and congenital heart diseases, for the incidence of which coronary artery disease is most frequently responsible. Most of these diseases lead to heart failure not via a single, but rather several of the specified pathophysiological processes. Possible mechanisms for loss of contractility include structural changes as well as alterations in excitation-contraction coupling. Possible mechanisms responsible for impaired diastolic ventricular function encompass, in addition to altered calcium

  3. Elevated heart rate and nondipping heart rate as potential targets for melatonin: a review.

    PubMed

    Simko, Fedor; Baka, Tomas; Paulis, Ludovit; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-09-01

    Elevated heart rate is a risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortalities in the general population and various cardiovascular pathologies. Insufficient heart rate decline during the night, that is, nondipping heart rate, also increases cardiovascular risk. Abnormal heart rate reflects an autonomic nervous system imbalance in terms of relative dominance of sympathetic tone. There are only a few prospective studies concerning the effect of heart rate reduction in coronary heart disease and heart failure. In hypertensive patients, retrospective analyses show no additional benefit of slowing down the heart rate by beta-blockade to blood pressure reduction. Melatonin, a secretory product of the pineal gland, has several attributes, which predict melatonin to be a promising candidate in the struggle against elevated heart rate and its consequences in the hypertensive population. First, melatonin production depends on the sympathetic stimulation of the pineal gland. On the other hand, melatonin inhibits the sympathetic system in several ways representing potentially the counter-regulatory mechanism to normalize excessive sympathetic drive. Second, administration of melatonin reduces heart rate in animals and humans. Third, the chronobiological action of melatonin may normalize the insufficient nocturnal decline of heart rate. Moreover, melatonin reduces the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, which are considered a crucial pathophysiological disorder of increased heart rate and pulsatile blood flow. The antihypertensive and antiremodeling action of melatonin along with its beneficial effects on lipid profile and insulin resistance may be of additional benefit. A clinical trial investigating melatonin actions in hypertensive patients with increased heart rate is warranted.

  4. How the Heart Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » How the Heart Works Explore How the Heart Works What Is... Anatomy Contraction Circulation Electrical System Heart ... Heart Disease Heart Valve Disease How the Lungs Work Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ...

  5. Heart Health for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs of a heart attack. 1. Eat a heart healthy diet. The nutrition facts on the food label can help you make ... heart health for women . (PDF 190KB) Get the facts about heart attacks in women . Learn More About Heart Disease: ...

  6. Source Separation of Heartbeat Sounds for Effective E-Auscultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geethu, R. S.; Krishnakumar, M.; Pramod, K. V.; George, Sudhish N.

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a cost effective solution for improving the effectiveness of e-auscultation. Auscultation is the most difficult skill for a doctor, since it can be acquired only through experience. The heart sound mixtures are captured by placing the four numbers of sensors at appropriate auscultation area in the body. These sound mixtures are separated to its relevant components by a statistical method independent component analysis. The separated heartbeat sounds can be further processed or can be stored for future reference. This idea can be used for making a low cost, easy to use portable instrument which will be beneficial to people living in remote areas and are unable to take the advantage of advanced diagnosis methods.

  7. Insular and caudate lesions release abnormal yawning in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Heinz; Weisstanner, Christian; Hess, Christian W; Bassetti, Claudio L; Nirkko, Arto; Wiest, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal yawning is an underappreciated phenomenon in patients with ischemic stroke. We aimed at identifying frequently affected core regions in the supratentorial brain of stroke patients with abnormal yawning and contributing to the anatomical network concept of yawning control. Ten patients with acute anterior circulation stroke and ≥3 yawns/15 min without obvious cause were analyzed. The NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), symptom onset, period with abnormal yawning, blood oxygen saturation, glucose, body temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, and modified Rankin scale (mRS) were assessed for all patients. MRI lesion maps were segmented on diffusion-weighted images, spatially normalized, and the extent of overlap between the different stroke patterns was determined. Correlations between the period with abnormal yawning and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the overlapping regions, total stroke volume, NIHSS and mRS were performed. Periods in which patients presented with episodes of abnormal yawning lasted on average for 58 h. Average GCS, NIHSS, and mRS scores were 12.6, 11.6, and 3.5, respectively. Clinical parameters were within normal limits. Ischemic brain lesions overlapped in nine out of ten patients: in seven patients in the insula and in seven in the caudate nucleus. The decrease of the ADC within the lesions correlated with the period with abnormal yawing (r = -0.76, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.02). The stroke lesion intensity of the common overlapping regions in the insula and the caudate nucleus correlates with the period with abnormal yawning. The insula might be the long sought-after brain region for serotonin-mediated yawning.

  8. Central ocular motor abnormalities in Duane's retraction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, A; Miller, N; Zee, D; Morris, J

    1981-10-01

    Duane's retraction syndrome (DRS) is a congenital eye movement disorder characterized by marked limitation or absence of abduction, variable limitation of adduction, and narrowing of the palpebral fissure with retraction of the globe on attempted adduction. We have recently recorded and quantitated ocular motility in five patients with unilateral DRS. In all patients, abduction of the affected eye was greatly limited, whereas adduction was limited, whereas adduction was limited to a lesser degree. Abnormalities in saccadic velocities were found in both the affected eye and the sound eye. Results of testing of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, optokinetic nystagmus, and optokinetic afternystagmus showed notable asymmetry. Our results suggest that DRS is produced by a primary brainstem abnormality involving premotor structures.

  9. Confrontation naming of environmental sounds.

    PubMed

    Marcell, M M; Borella, D; Greene, M; Kerr, E; Rogers, S

    2000-12-01

    The development of a set of everyday, nonverbal, digitized sounds for use in auditory confrontation naming applications is described. Normative data are reported for 120 sounds of varying lengths representing a wide variety of acoustic events such as sounds produced by animals, people, musical instruments, tools, signals, and liquids. In Study 1, criteria for scoring naming accuracy were developed and rating data were gathered on degree of confidence in sound identification and the perceived familiarity, complexity, and pleasantness of the sounds. In Study 2, the previously developed criteria for scoring naming accuracy were applied to the naming responses of a new sample of subjects, and oral naming times were measured. In Study 3 data were gathered on how subjects categorized the sounds: In the first categorization task - free classification - subjects generated category descriptions for the sounds; in the second task - constrained classification - a different sample of subjects selected the most appropriate category label for each sound from a list of 27 labels generated in the first task. Tables are provided in which the 120 stimuli are sorted by familiarity, complexity, pleasantness, duration, naming accuracy, speed of identification, and category placement. The. WAV sound files are freely available to researchers and clinicians via a sound archive on the World Wide Web; the URL is http://www.cofc.edu/~marcellm/confront.htm.

  10. Drexhage's Experiment for Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langguth, Lutz; Fleury, Romain; Alò, Andrea; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2016-06-01

    Drexhage's seminal observation that spontaneous emission rates of fluorophores vary with distance from a mirror uncovered the fundamental notion that a source's environment determines radiative linewidths and shifts. Further, this observation established a powerful tool to determine fluorescence quantum yields. We present the direct analogue for sound. We demonstrate that a Chinese gong at a hard wall experiences radiative corrections to linewidth and line shift, and extract its intrinsic radiation efficiency. Beyond acoustics, our experiment opens new ideas to extend the Drexhage experiment to metamaterials, nanoantennas, and multipolar transitions.

  11. Safe N’ Sound

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Janice; Nansel, Tonja R.; Weaver, Nancy L.; Tse, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Safe N’ Sound is a computer-based tool that prioritizes key injury risks for toddlers and infants and provides tailored feedback. The program was implemented in 5 pediatric sites. Caregiver risk behaviors were analyzed and compared with corresponding national and state morbidity and mortality data. The priority risks identified were generally consistent with the incidence of injury. Frequencies of several risk behaviors varied across sites and differences were observed across ages. Use of a prioritization scheme may facilitate risk behavior counseling and reasonably result in a decrease in injury mortality or morbidity. PMID:22617412

  12. Fibrosis, Connexin-43, and Conduction Abnormalities in the Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nademanee, Koonlawee; Raju, Hariharan; de Noronha, Sofia V.; Papadakis, Michael; Robinson, Laurence; Rothery, Stephen; Makita, Naomasa; Kowase, Shinya; Boonmee, Nakorn; Vitayakritsirikul, Vorapot; Ratanarapee, Samrerng; Sharma, Sanjay; van der Wal, Allard C.; Christiansen, Michael; Tan, Hanno L.; Wilde, Arthur A.; Nogami, Akihiko; Sheppard, Mary N.; Veerakul, Gumpanart; Behr, Elijah R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) is acknowledged to be responsible for arrhythmogenesis in Brugada syndrome (BrS), but the pathophysiology remains controversial. Objectives This study assessed the substrate underlying BrS at post-mortem and in vivo, and the role for open thoracotomy ablation. Methods Six whole hearts from male post-mortem cases of unexplained sudden death (mean age 23.2 years) with negative specialist cardiac autopsy and familial BrS were used and matched to 6 homograft control hearts by sex and age (within 3 years) by random risk set sampling. Cardiac autopsy sections from cases and control hearts were stained with picrosirius red for collagen. The RVOT was evaluated in detail, including immunofluorescent stain for connexin-43 (Cx43). Collagen and Cx43 were quantified digitally and compared. An in vivo study was undertaken on 6 consecutive BrS patients (mean age 39.8 years, all men) during epicardial RVOT ablation for arrhythmia via thoracotomy. Abnormal late and fractionated potentials indicative of slowed conduction were identified, and biopsies were taken before ablation. Results Collagen was increased in BrS autopsy cases compared with control hearts (odds ratio [OR]: 1.42; p = 0.026). Fibrosis was greatest in the RVOT (OR: 1.98; p = 0.003) and the epicardium (OR: 2.00; p = 0.001). The Cx43 signal was reduced in BrS RVOT (OR: 0.59; p = 0.001). Autopsy and in vivo RVOT samples identified epicardial and interstitial fibrosis. This was collocated with abnormal potentials in vivo that, when ablated, abolished the type 1 Brugada electrocardiogram without ventricular arrhythmia over 24.6 ± 9.7 months. Conclusions BrS is associated with epicardial surface and interstitial fibrosis and reduced gap junction expression in the RVOT. This collocates to abnormal potentials, and their ablation abolishes the BrS phenotype and life-threatening arrhythmias. BrS is also associated with increased collagen throughout the heart

  13. Kidney transplantation in abnormal bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shashi K.; Muthu, V.; Rajapurkar, Mohan M.; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2007-01-01

    Structural urologic abnormalities resulting in dysfunctional lower urinary tract leading to end stage renal disease may constitute 15% patients in the adult population and up to 20-30% in the pediatric population. A patient with an abnormal bladder, who is approaching end stage renal disease, needs careful evaluation of the lower urinary tract to plan the most satisfactory technical approach to the transplant procedure. Past experience of different authors can give an insight into the management and outcome of these patients. This review revisits the current literature available on transplantation in abnormal bladder and summarizes the clinical approach towards handling this group of difficult transplant patients. We add on our experience as we discuss the various issues. The outcome of renal transplant in abnormal bladder is not adversely affected when done in a reconstructed bladder. Correct preoperative evaluation, certain technical modification during transplant and postoperative care is mandatory to avoid complications. Knowledge of the abnormal bladder should allow successful transplantation with good outcome. PMID:19718334

  14. Hammer sound elicited tinnitus in car body repair worker cured by stapedial tenotomy - A case report.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ryoukichi; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Katori, Yukio; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu

    2016-12-01

    Abnormal auditory sensations or tinnitus caused by abnormal middle ear muscle contraction are extremely rare and uncomfortable for patients. A 67-year-old man who performed paint and body work for cars presented at our hospital with complaint of an audible and annoying abnormal sound that was synchronous with the striking of his hammer against the metal of the car body during his work. The patient reported that the sound was audible of left ear with a split-second delay after his hammer struck the metal. Preoperative subjective and objective testing failed to reveal any abnormal findings in our case. The patient's symptom was successfully cured by selective transection of the stapedius tendon. The characteristic nature of tinnitus with a split-second delay after striking the metal helped our diagnosis and method of intervention in this case.

  15. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart bypass surgery begins with an incision made in the chest, with the breastbone cut exposing the heart. Next, ... of this great vein will be used to bypass the blocked arteries in the heart. The venous ...

  16. Honolulu Heart Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Heart Failure, Congestive; Myocardial Infarction; Asthma; Emphysema; Lung Diseases, Obstructive; Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal; Bronchitis; Dementia; Hypertension; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Heart Failure

  17. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart, leading to heart failure. High Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the ... weaken your heart and lead to plaque buildup. Blood pressure is considered high if it stays at or ...

  18. Right heart ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    Angiography - right heart ... moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can ... is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and ...

  19. Left heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  20. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Aug 24,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  1. Heart Murmurs (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... than normal. You also might get an electrocardiogram (EKG), which measures electrical activity of the heart. None ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC The Heart Getting an EKG (Video) Your Heart & Circulatory System Mitral Valve Prolapse ...

  2. Cyanotic heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart) may be absent or unable to open wide enough. Pulmonary valve (the valve between the heart ... lungs) may be absent or unable to open wide enough . Aortic valve (the valve between the heart ...

  3. Left heart ventricular angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the left side of the heart. Blood volumes and pressures are also normal. ... of the catheter Heart failure due to the volume of the dye Infection Kidney failure from the dye Low blood pressure Heart attack Hemorrhage Stroke

  4. Absence of cytoglobin promotes multiple organ abnormalities in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Thuy, Le Thi Thanh; Van Thuy, Tuong Thi; Matsumoto, Yoshinari; Hai, Hoang; Ikura, Yoshihiro; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawada, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) was identified in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and pericytes of all organs; however, the effects of Cygb on cellular functions remain unclear. Here, we report spontaneous and age-dependent malformations in multiple organs of Cygb−/− mice. Twenty-six percent of young Cygb−/− mice (<1 year old) showed heart hypertrophy, cystic disease in the kidney or ovary, loss of balance, liver fibrosis and lymphoma. Furthermore, 71.3% (82/115) of aged Cygb−/− mice (1–2 years old) exhibited abnormalities, such as heart hypertrophy and cancer development in multiple organs; by contrast, 5.8% (4/68) of aged wild-type (WT) mice had abnormalities (p < 0.0001). Interestingly, serum and urine analysis demonstrated that the concentration of nitric oxide metabolites increased significantly in Cygb−/− mice, resulting in an imbalance in the oxidative stress and antioxidant defence system that was reversed by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine treatment. A senescent phenotype and evidence of DNA damage were found in primary HSCs and the liver of aged Cygb−/− mice. Moreover, compared with HSC+/+, HSC−/− showed high expression of Il-6 and chemokine mRNA when cocultured with mouse Hepa 1–6 cells. Thus, the absence of Cygb in pericytes provokes organ abnormalities, possibly via derangement of the nitric oxide and antioxidant defence system and through accelerated cellular senescence. PMID:27146058

  5. Gene therapy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Barry

    2015-09-01

    Heart failure is a major public health problem throughout the world and it is likely that its prevalence will continue to grow over the next several decades. Despite advances in the treatment of heart failure, morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. Gene transfer therapy provides a novel strategy for targeting abnormalities in cardiac cells that adversely affect cardiac function. New vectors for gene delivery, mainly adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) that are preferentially taken up by cardiomyocytes, can result in sustained transgene expression. The cardiac isoform of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase (SERCA2a) plays a major role in regulating calcium levels in cardiomyocytes. Abnormal calcium handling by the failing heart caused by a reduction in SERCA2a activity adversely affects both systolic and diastolic function. The Calcium Upregulation by Percutaneous Administration of Gene Therapy in Cardiac Disease (CUPID) study was a Phase 2a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-finding study that was performed in patients with advanced heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. Eligible patients received AAV/SERCA2a or placebo by direct antegrade infusion into the coronary circulation. At the end of 12 months, patients receiving high-dose therapy (i.e. 1×10(13) DNase Resistant Particles) had evidence of favorable changes in several clinically relevant domains compared to patients treated with placebo. There were no safety concerns at any dose of AAV/SERCA2a. Patients treated with AAV/SERCA2a exhibited a striking reduction in cardiovascular events that persisted through 36 months of follow-up compared to patients who received placebo. Transgene expression was detected in the myocardium of patients receiving AAV/SERCA2a gene therapy as long as 31 months after delivery. A second Phase 2b study, CUPID 2, designed to confirm this favorable effect on heart failure events, is currently underway with the results expected to be presented later in

  6. Cardiac ultrasonography in structural abnormalities and arrhythmias. Recognition and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, M M; Silverman, N H; Villegas, M

    1993-01-01

    Fetal cardiac ultrasonography has become an important tool in the evaluation of fetuses at risk for cardiac anomalies. It can both guide prenatal treatment and assist the management and timing of delivery. We recommend that a fetal echocardiogram be done when there is a family history of congenital heart disease; maternal disease that may affect the fetus; a history of maternal drug use, either therapeutic or illegal; evidence of other fetal abnormalities; or evidence of fetal hydrops. The optimal timing of evaluation is 18 to 22 weeks' gestation. An entire range of structural cardiac defects can be visualized prenatally, including atrioventricular septal defect, ventricular septal defect, cardiomyopathy, ventricular outlet obstruction, and complex cardiac defects. The outcome for a fetus with a recognized abnormality is unfavourable, with less than 50% surviving the neonatal period. Fetal cardiac arrhythmias are also a common occurrence, 15% in the series described here. Premature atrial or ventricular contractions are most commonly seen and usually require no treatment. Supraventricular tachycardia can result in hydrops and require in utero treatment to prevent fetal demise. Complete heart block, particularly in association with structural heart disease, has a poor prognosis for fetal survival. Images PMID:8236970

  7. Sounds like Team Spirit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always

  8. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  9. Overall loudness of steady sounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.; Canright, V. R.

    1980-01-01

    Loudness (in sones) and loudness level (in phons) of any sound that is steady for tenths of second can be calculated using computer program derived from new operational theory of loudness. Theory is constructed from psychoacoustic and physiological data on mammalian (monkey) auditory systems. Computer program permits prediction of loudness of any steady sound including, for example, transportation noises, machinery noises, and other environmental noises, with possible additional applications to broadcasting, sound reproduction, establishment and enforcement of noise laws.

  10. Sound Naming in Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Maggie L; Brambati, Simona M; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L; Johnson, Julene K

    2010-01-01

    Modern cognitive neuroscientific theories and empirical evidence suggest that brain structures involved in movement may be related to action-related semantic knowledge. To test this hypothesis, we examined the naming of environmental sounds in patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), two neurodegenerative diseases associated with cognitive and motor deficits. Subjects were presented with 56 environmental sounds: 28 of objects that required manipulation when producing the sound, and 28 that required no manipulation. Subjects were asked to provide the name of the object that produced the sound and also complete a sound-picture matching condition. Subjects included 33 individuals from four groups: CBD/PSP, Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, and normal controls. We hypothesized that CBD/PSP patients would exhibit impaired naming performance compared with controls, but the impairment would be most apparent when naming sounds associated with actions. We also explored neural correlates of naming environmental sounds using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of brain MRI. As expected, CBD/PSP patients scored lower on environmental sounds naming (p<0.007) compared with the controls. In particular, the CBD/PSP patients scored the lowest when naming sounds of manipulable objects (p<0.05), but did not show deficits in naming sounds of non-manipulable objects. VBM analysis across all groups showed that performance in naming sounds of manipulable objects correlated with atrophy in the left premotor region, extending from area 6 to the middle and superior frontal gyrus. These results indicate an association between impairment in the retrieval of action-related names and the motor system, and suggest that difficulty in naming manipulable sounds may be related to atrophy in the premotor cortex. Our results support the hypothesis that retrieval of action-related semantic knowledge involves motor regions in the brain. PMID:20089342

  11. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart surgery - discharge; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation - discharge; Hypoplastic left heart repair - discharge; Tetralogy of Fallot repair - discharge; Coarctation of the aorta repair - discharge; ...

  12. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  13. The sympathetic nervous system and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, David Y; Anderson, Allen S

    2014-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome characterized by upregulation of the sympathetic nervous system and abnormal responsiveness of the parasympathetic nervous system. Studies in the 1980s and 1990s demonstrated that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors improved symptoms and mortality in HF resulting from systolic dysfunction, thus providing a framework to consider the use of β-blockers for HF therapy, contrary to the prevailing wisdom of the time. Against this backdrop, this article reviews the contemporary understanding of the sympathetic nervous system and the failing heart.

  14. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed. PMID:27503817

  15. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed.

  16. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype. PMID:25119760

  17. Atypical pattern of discriminating sound features in adults with Asperger syndrome as reflected by the mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Kujala, T; Aho, E; Lepistö, T; Jansson-Verkasalo, E; Nieminen-von Wendt, T; von Wendt, L; Näätänen, R

    2007-04-01

    Asperger syndrome, which belongs to the autistic spectrum of disorders, is characterized by deficits of social interaction and abnormal perception, like hypo- or hypersensitivity in reacting to sounds and discriminating certain sound features. We determined auditory feature discrimination in adults with Asperger syndrome with the mismatch negativity (MMN), a neural response which is an index of cortical change detection. We recorded MMN for five different sound features (duration, frequency, intensity, location, and gap). Our results suggest hypersensitive auditory change detection in Asperger syndrome, as reflected in the enhanced MMN for deviant sounds with a gap or shorter duration, and speeded MMN elicitation for frequency changes.

  18. The Sounds of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Flying board Voyagers 1 and 2 are identical 'golden' records, carrying the story of Earth far into deep space. The 12 inch gold-plated copper discs contain greetings in 60 languages, samples of music from different cultures and eras, and natural and man-made sounds from Earth. They also contain electronic information that an advanced technological civilization could convert into diagrams and photographs. The cover of each gold plated aluminum jacket, designed to protect the record from micrometeorite bombardment, also serves a double purpose in providing the finder a key to playing the record. The explanatory diagram appears on both the inner and outer surfaces of the cover, as the outer diagram will be eroded in time. Currently, both Voyager probes are sailing adrift in the black sea of interplanetary space, having left our solar system years ago.

  19. Sounds Clear Enough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Alan

    2004-01-01

    I'm a vice president at Line6, where we produce electronics for musical instruments. My company recently developed a guitar that can be programmed to sound like twenty-five different classic guitars - everything from a 1928 National 'Tricone' to a 1970 Martin. It is quite an amazing piece of technology. The guitar started as a research project because we needed to know if the technology was going to be viable and if the guitar design was going to be practical. I've been in this business for about twenty years now, and I still enjoy starting up projects whenever the opportunity presents itself. During the research phase, I headed up the project myself. Once we completed our preliminary research and made the decision to move into development, that's when I handed the project off - and that's where this story really begins.

  20. The sounds of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    As scientists carefully study some aspects of the ocean environment, are they unintentionally distressing others? That is a question to be answered by Robert Benson and his colleagues in the Center for Bioacoustics at Texas A&M University.With help from a 3-year, $316,000 grant from the U.S. Office of Naval Research, Benson will study how underwater noise produced by naval operations and other sources may affect marine mammals. In Benson's study, researchers will generate random sequences of low-frequency, high-intensity (180-decibel) sounds in the Gulf of Mexico, working at an approximate distance of 1 km from sperm whale herds. Using an array of hydrophones, the scientists will listen to the characteristic clicks and whistles of the sperm whales to detect changes in the animals' direction, speed, and depth, as derived from fluctuations in their calls.

  1. Sounding out science

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, M.

    1996-10-01

    The Exxon Valdez catastrophe, which soiled Alaska`s Prince William Sound in 1989, was the most studied oil spill in history. But because of how they framed their inquiries, investigators have learned less than they could about how nature heals itself. The studies of Exxon and the state of Alaska - including the departments of Fish and Game and of Environmental Conservation - conducted to prove their respective points, were kept largely secret untill legal settlements were reached. This secrecy reduced most of the pillars of science to rubble: out went scientific dialog, data sharing, and for some parties, peer view. Millions of dollars were shelled out in duplicate studies that reached opposite conclusions. Beyond the quality of science lies the public interpretation of science. Even though NOAA has shown that cleaning up can do more harm than good, demands to clean up persist. 7 figs.

  2. Sound and computer information presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bly, S

    1982-03-01

    This thesis examines the use of sound to present data. Computer graphics currently offers a vast array of techniques for communicating data to analysts. Graphics is limited, however, by the number of dimensions that can be perceived at one time, by the types of data that lend themselves to visual representation, and by the necessary eye focus on the output. Sound offers an enhancement and an alternative to graphic tools. Multivariate, logarithmic, and time-varying data provide examples for aural representation. For each of these three types of data, the thesis suggests a method of encoding the information into sound and presents various applications. Data values were mapped to sound characteristics such as pitch and volume so that information was presented as sets or sequences of notes. In all cases, the resulting sounds conveyed information in a manner consistent with prior knowledge of the data. Experiments showed that sound does convey information accurately and that sound can enhance graphic presentations. Subjects were tested on their ability to distinguish between two sources of test items. In the first phase of the experiments, subjects discriminated between two 6-dimensional data sets represented in sound. In the second phase of the experiment, 75 subjects were selected and assigned to one of three groups. The first group of 25 heard test items, the second group saw test items, and the third group both heard and saw the test items. The average percentage correct was 64.5% for the sound-only group, 62% for the graphics-only group, and 69% for the sound and graphics group. In the third phase, additional experiments focused on the mapping between data values and sound characteristics and on the training methods.

  3. Electrocardiograph abnormalities in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and type of electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities, and their possible association with the clinical/radiological findings in 118 consecutive patients with non-traumatic, non-neoplastic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). ECG frequently demonstrates abnormalities in patients with ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, but little is known of ECG changes in ICH patients. Clinical and radiological information was retrospectively reviewed. ECG recordings that were obtained within 24 hours of the initial hemorrhage were analyzed. Sixty-six patients (56%) had one or more ECG abnormalities. The most frequent was ST depression (24%), followed by left ventricular hypertrophy (20%), corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation (19%), and T wave inversion (19%). The logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following: insular involvement was an independent predictive factor of ST depression (p<0.001; odds ratio OR 10.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.84-36.57); insular involvement (p<0.001; OR 23.98; 95% CI 4.91-117.11) and presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p<0.001; OR 8.72; 95% CI 2.69-28.29) were independent predictive factors of QTc prolongation; deep hematoma location (p<0.001; OR 19.12; 95% CI 3.82-95.81) and hematoma volume >30 ml (p=0.001; OR 6.58; 95% CI 2.11-20.46) were independent predictive factors of T wave inversion. We demonstrate associations between ECG abnormalities and detailed characteristics of ICH.

  4. Heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    A total of 59 heart transplantations (HTx) have been performed in Japan as of September, 2008, since the Organ Transplantation Law was settled in October 1997. The majority of recipients were suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy and waiting condition of all recipients were status 1. The mean waiting time was 777 day; 50 patients (85%) were supported by several types of left ventricular assist systems (LVAS) and the mean duration of support was 780 days. The majority of patients underwent operation by modified bicaval method with Celsior solution for cardiac preservation, and 64% of recipients were administered triple therapy with cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid as the initial immunosuppressive regimen. The 9-year survival rate was 94%, which was superior to that of the international registry. HTx in Japan has been very limited by a severe shortage of donors, but the results have been excellent even though the majority of recipients were waiting for long-term with a LVAS as a bridge to HTx.

  5. Cardiac abnormalities in acromegaly. Pathophysiology and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Giovanni; Pivonello, Rosario; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is claimed to be one of the most severe complications of acromegaly, contributing significantly to mortality in this disease. In fact, an excess of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) causes a specific derangement of cardiomyocytes, leading to abnormalities in cardiac muscle structure and function, inducing a specific cardiomyopathy. In the early phase of acromegaly the excess of GH and IGF-I induces a hyperkinetic syndrome, characterized by increased heart rate and increased systolic output. Concentric hypertrophy is the most common feature of cardiac involvement in acromegaly, found in more than two thirds of patients at diagnosis. This abnormality is commonly associated with diastolic dysfunction and eventually with impaired systolic function ending in heart failure, if the GH/IGF-I excess is left untreated. In addition, abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and of heart valves have also been described in acromegaly. The coexistence of other complications, such as arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus, aggravates acromegalic cardiomyopathy. Successful control of acromegaly induces a decrease in left ventricular mass and an improvement in diastolic function, while the effects of GH/IGF-I suppression on systolic function are more variable. However, since cardiovascular alterations in young patients with short disease duration are milder than in those with longer disease duration, it is likely to be easier to reverse and/or arrest acromegalic cardiomyopathy in young patients with early-onset disease. In conclusion, careful assessments of cardiac function, morphology, and activity are required in patients with acromegaly. An early diagnosis and prompt effective treatment are important in order to reverse acromegalic cardiomyopathy.

  6. Metabolic abnormalities: triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ronald M; Siri, Patty W

    2004-06-01

    Increased plasma triglyceride and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are key features of the metabolic syndrome. Although elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is not an integral characteristic of this syndrome, there is commonly an increase in the proportion of small, dense low-density lipoprotein particles. Together, these abnormalities constitute the atherogenic dyslipidemia of the metabolic syndrome. This article reviews the pathophysiology of altered triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein metabolism in the metabolic syndrome, outlines the relationship of these lipoprotein abnormalities to increased risk of coronary heart disease,and highlights the application of this information to clinical practice. The role of reduced high-density lipoprotein in the metabolic syndrome is discussed elsewhere in this issue.

  7. Traumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S R; Bhagwat, R A; Shahane, A G; Cheema, B S

    1990-09-01

    Five cases of traumatic heart disease (THD) who sustained blunt chest injury in road accidents are reported. In addition to fracture of the ribs (observed in all the cases), there was fracture of the sternum and rupture of the liver and spleen in one case each. Two patients had flail chest. One presented with recurrent ventricular tachycardia lasting for 72 hours followed by changes suggestive of subendocardial infarction. The second case also had changes like subendocardial infarction and it was preceded by junctional tachycardia with aberrant conduction during the first 48 hours. Ventricular premature beats (VPB) were the only abnormality noted in one case and the remaining two had ST-T wave changes suggestive of inferolateral ischaemia without any arrhythmias. The patient with VPB developed pericardial rub without effusion. There was one death and postmortem revealed ruptured liver and spleen in addition to laceration of the right ventricle and haemopericardium. The electrocardiographic changes persisted for two to eight weeks. All four cases were symptom-free at 12 weeks and treadmill exercise test done after 12 to 18 weeks was normal. PMID:2266073

  8. Diagnosis and management of heart failure in the fetus

    PubMed Central

    DAVEY, B.; SZWAST, A.; RYCHIK, J.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure can be defined as the inability of the heart to sufficiently support the circulation. In the fetus, heart failure can be caused by a myriad of factors that include fetal shunting abnormalities, genetic cardiomyopathies, extracardiac malformations, arrhythmias and structural congenital heart disease. With advances in ultrasound has come the ability to characterize many complex conditions, previously poorly understood. Fetal echocardiography provides the tools necessary to evaluate and understand the various physiologies that contribute to heart failure in the fetus. In this review, we will explore the different mechanisms of heart failure in this unique patient population and highlight the role of fetal echocardiography in the current management of these conditions PMID:22992530

  9. Myoarchitecture and connective tissue in hearts with tricuspid atresia

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Quintana, D; Climent, V; Ho, S; Anderson, R

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To compare the atrial and ventricular myoarchitecture in the normal heart and the heart with tricuspid atresia, and to investigate changes in the three dimensional arrangement of collagen fibrils.
Methods—Blunt dissection and cell maceration with scanning electron microscopy were used to study the architecture of the atrial and ventricular musculature and the arrangement of collagen fibrils in three specimens with tricuspid atresia and six normal human hearts.
Results—There were significant modifications in the myoarchitecture of the right atrium and the left ventricle, both being noticeably hypertrophied. The middle layer of the ventricle in the abnormal hearts was thicker than in the normal hearts. The orientation of the superficial layer in the left ventricle in hearts with tricuspid atresia was irregular compared with the normal hearts. Scanning electron microscopy showed coarser endomysial sheaths and denser perimysial septa in hearts with tricuspid atresia than in normal hearts.
Conclusions—The overall architecture of the muscle fibres and its connective tissue matrix in hearts with tricuspid atresia differed from normal, probably reflecting modelling of the myocardium that is inherent to the malformation. This is in concordance with clinical observations showing deterioration in pump function of the dominant left ventricle from very early in life.

 Keywords: tricuspid atresia; congenital heart defects; connective tissue; fibrosis PMID:9922357

  10. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is a congenital heart condition that occurs during the development of the heart in the ... womb. During the heart's development, parts of the left side of the heart (mitral valve, left ventricle ...

  11. Applications of Sound Spectrum Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    The physics of sound is often studied in introductory physics class experiments involving a tube of resonating air. In typical setups, pistons control the length of a cylindrical space or a microphone is moved within a tube. While these activities are useful and can be made very quantitative, they don't directly demonstrate the sounds that are…

  12. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  13. Sound absorption in metallic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T. J.; Hess, Audrey; Ashby, M. F.

    1999-06-01

    The sound absorption capacity of one type of aluminum alloy foams—trade name Alporas—is studied experimentally. The foam in its as-received cast form contains closed porosities, and hence does not absorb sound well. To make the foam more transparent to air motion, techniques based on either rolling or hole drilling are used. Under rolling, the faces of some of the cells break to form small sharp-edged cracks as observed from a scanning electronic microscope. These cracks become passage ways for the in-and-out movement of air particles, resulting in sound absorption improvement. The best performance is nevertheless achieved via hole drilling where nearly all of the sound can be absorbed at selected frequencies. Combining rolling with hole drilling does not appear to lend additional benefits for sound absorption. Image analysis is carried out to characterize the changes in cell morphologies due to rolling/compression, and the drop in elastic modulus due to the formation of cracks is recorded. The effects of varying the relative foam density and panel thickness on sound absorption are measured, and optimal relative density and thickness of the panel are identified. Analytical models are used to explain the measured increase in sound absorption due to rolling and/or drilling. Sound absorbed by viscous flow across small cracks appears to dominate over that dissipated via other mechanisms.

  14. Sound Standards for Schools "Unsound."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Don

    2002-01-01

    Criticizes new classroom sound standard proposed by the American National Standards Institute that sets maximum background sound level at 35 decibels (described as "a whisper at 2 meters"). Argues that new standard is too costly for schools to implement, is not recommended by the medical community, and cannot be achieved by construction industry.…

  15. Noise Effects on the Complex Patterns of Abnormal Heartbeats

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Glass, Leon; Goldberger, Ary L.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-08-06

    Patients at high risk for sudden death often exhibit complex heart rhythms in which abnormal heartbeats are interspersed with normal heartbeats. We analyze such a complex rhythm in a single patient over a 12-h period and show that the rhythm can be described by a theoretical model consisting of two interacting oscillators with stochastic elements. By varying the magnitude of the noise, we show that for an intermediate level of noise, the model gives best agreement with key statistical features of the dynamics.

  16. Noise effects on the complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, V.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Ivanov, P. C.; Glass, L.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    Patients at high risk for sudden death often exhibit complex heart rhythms in which abnormal heartbeats are interspersed with normal heartbeats. We analyze such a complex rhythm in a single patient over a 12-h period and show that the rhythm can be described by a theoretical model consisting of two interacting oscillators with stochastic elements. By varying the magnitude of the noise, we show that for an intermediate level of noise, the model gives best agreement with key statistical features of the dynamics.

  17. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Oct 8,2015 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  18. The impact of sound in modern multiline video slot machine play.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Mike J; Harrigan, Kevin A; Santesso, Diane L; Graydon, Candice; Fugelsang, Jonathan A; Collins, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Slot machine wins and losses have distinctive, measurable, physiological effects on players. The contributing factors to these effects remain under-explored. We believe that sound is one of these key contributing factors. Sound plays an important role in reinforcement, and thus on arousal level and stress response of players. It is the use of sound for positive reinforcement in particular that we believe influences the player. In the current study, we investigate the role that sound plays in psychophysical responses to slot machine play. A total of 96 gamblers played a slot machine simulator with and without sound being paired with reinforcement. Skin conductance responses and heart rate, as well as subjective judgments about the gambling experience were examined. The results showed that the sound influenced the arousal of participants both psychophysically and psychologically. The sound also influenced players' preferences, with the majority of players preferring to play slot machines that were accompanied by winning sounds. The sounds also caused players to significantly overestimate the number of times they won while playing the slot machine.

  19. Anomalies of cardiac venous drainage associated with abnormalities of cardiac conduction system.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D R; Hanratty, C G; Dixon, L J; Trimble, M; O'Keeffe, D B

    2002-07-01

    The embryological development of the superior vena cava (SVC) is complex. If the left common cardinal vein fails to occlude it can, along with the left duct of Cuvier form a left SVC, which frequently drains into the coronary sinus. This may result in abnormalities in the anatomy of this structure. A persistent left SVC occurs in 0.5% of the normal population, and 3% to 4.3% of patients with congenital heart anomalies. The pacemaking tissue of the heart is derived from two sites near the progenitors of the superior vena cava. The right-sided site forms the sinoatrial node, the left-sided site is normally carried down to an area near the coronary sinus. Out of 300 patients with cardiac rhythm abnormalities, who have undergone electrophysiological studies (EPS), or permanent pacemaker insertion (PPI), we identified 12 patients with cardiac conduction abnormalities and anomalies of venous drainage. Anomalies of the coronary sinus may be associated with abnormalities of the conduction system of the heart. This may be due to the close proximity of the coronary sinus to the final position of the left-sided primitive pacemaking tissue. In our series of 300 patients, 4% had an associated left SVC, a similar incidence to that found in previous studies of congenital heart disease.

  20. Impact of heart magnetic resonance imaging on chelation choices, compliance with treatment and risk of heart disease in patients with thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Origa, Raffaella; Danjou, Fabrice; Cossa, Stefano; Matta, Gildo; Bina, Patrizio; Dessì, Carlo; Defraia, Elisabetta; Foschini, Maria L; Leoni, Giovanbattista; Morittu, Maddalena; Galanello, Renzo

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to verify the impact of heart magnetic resonance imaging on chelation choices and patient compliance in a single-institution cohort as well as its predictive value for heart failure and arrhythmias. Abnormal cardiac T2* values determined changes in treatment in most subjects. Heart T2* was confirmed to be highly predictive over 1 year for heart failure and arrhythmias. The choice of chelation regimens known to remove heart iron efficiently was not sufficient by itself to influence the risk. Compliance with treatment had a more remarkable role.

  1. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  2. Heart rate variability in isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Frey, B; Heger, G; Mayer, C; Kiegler, B; Stöhr, H; Steurer, G

    1996-11-01

    The presence of heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with cardiac denervation after heart transplantation raised our interest in HRV of isolated, denervated hearts. Hearts from seven adult white ELCO rabbits were transferred to a perfusion apparatus. All hearts were perfused in the working mode and in the Langendorff mode for 20 minutes each. HRV was analyzed in the frequency domain. A computer simulated test ECG at a constant rate of 2 Hz was used for error estimation of the system. In the isolated, denervated heart, HRV was of random, broadband fluctuations, different from the well-characterized oscillations at specific frequencies in intact animals. Mean NN was 423 +/- 51 ms in the Langendorff mode, 406 +/- 33 ms in the working heart mode, and 500 ms in the test ECG. Total power was 663 +/- 207 ms2, 817 +/- 318 ms2, and 3.7 ms2, respectively. There was no significant difference in any measure of HRV between Langendorff and working heart modes. The data provide evidence for the presence of HRV in isolated, denervated rabbit hearts. Left atrial and ventricular filling, i.e., the working heart mode, did not alter HRV, indicating that left atrial or ventricular stretch did not influence the sinus nodal discharge rate.

  3. Offshore Dredger Sounds: Source Levels, Sound Maps, and Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Christ A F; Ainslie, Michael A; Heinis, Floor; Janmaat, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The underwater sound produced during construction of the Port of Rotterdam harbor extension (Maasvlakte 2) was measured, with emphasis on the contribution of the trailing suction hopper dredgers during their various activities: dredging, transport, and discharge of sediment. Measured source levels of the dredgers, estimated source levels of other shipping, and time-dependent position data from a vessel-tracking system were used as input for a propagation model to generate dynamic sound maps. Various scenarios were studied to assess the risk of possible effects of the sound from dredging activities on marine fauna, specifically on porpoises, seals, and fish.

  4. Effects of sounds generated by a dental turbine and a stream on regional cerebral blood flow and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Riho; Kudo, Takumu; Tsunetsugu, Yuko; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi; Yamamura, Chie; Yamada, Yoshiaki

    2004-09-01

    Effects of sound generated by a dental turbine and a small stream (murmur) and the effects of no sound (null, control) on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and hemodynamic changes (oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations) in the frontal cortex were measured in 18 young volunteers. Questionnaires completed by the volunteers were also evaluated. Near-infrared spectroscopy and the Finapres technique were employed to measure hemodynamic and vascular responses, respectively. The subjects assessed the murmur, null, and turbine sounds as "pleasant," "natural," and "unpleasant," respectively. Blood pressures changed in response to the murmur, null, and turbine sound stimuli as expected: lower than the control level, unchanged, and higher than the control level, respectively. Mean blood pressure values tended to increase gradually over the recording time even during the null sound stimulation, possibly because of the recording environment. Oxygenated hemoglobin concentrations decreased drastically in response to the dental turbine sound, while deoxygenated hemoglobin concentrations remained unchanged and thus total hemoglobin concentrations decreased (due to the decreased oxygenated hemoglobin concentrations). Hemodynamic responses to the murmuring sound and the null sound were slight or unchanged, respectively. Surprisingly, heart rate measurements remained fairly stable in response to the stimulatory noises. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that sound generated by a dental turbine may affect cerebral blood flow and metabolism as well as autonomic responses.

  5. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  6. [Hypoxaemia, peripheral chemoreceptors and fetal heart rate].

    PubMed

    Secourgeon, J-F

    2012-02-01

    The perinatal results of the widespread adoption of the continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring during labor remain rather disappointing. This is due in part to a lack of consistent interpretation of the fetal heart tracings. Despite efforts by referral agencies over the past decade the situation has not improved. In defense of practitioners the heterogeneity and complexity of definitions and classifications patterns especially morphological currently proposed should be noted. Whereas with the recent advances in the field of neuroscience, it is now possible to visualize the chain of pathophysiological events that lead from the hypoxemic stimulus of the glomus cell to changes in the morphology of the fetal heart rate tracing. Thus by taking some examples of real situations, we propose a method of analysis that dissects the fetal heart tracing and take into account the functional specifications of the chemoreceptor when exposed to a hypoxic environment. Furthermore we can identify tracings with a "threshold effect" and also "sensitization and desensitization effects" according to the intensity, duration and recurrence of hypoxaemic episodes. This new approach based upon specific research into the mechanism behind the fetal heart rate abnormalities may be useful to complement the morphological study of the fetal heart tracing, to provide a better idea of the fetal status and to better define the indications of fetal blood sampling procedures.

  7. Conduction abnormalities and ventricular arrhythmogenesis: The roles of sodium channels and gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Yeo, Jie Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias arise from disruptions in the normal orderly sequence of electrical activation and recovery of the heart. They can be categorized into disorders affecting predominantly cellular depolarization or repolarization, or those involving action potential (AP) conduction. This article briefly discusses the factors causing conduction abnormalities in the form of unidirectional conduction block and reduced conduction velocity (CV). It then examines the roles that sodium channels and gap junctions play in AP conduction. Finally, it synthesizes experimental results to illustrate molecular mechanisms of how abnormalities in these proteins contribute to such conduction abnormalities and hence ventricular arrhythmogenesis, in acquired pathologies such as acute ischaemia and heart failure, as well as inherited arrhythmic syndromes. PMID:26839915

  8. Ultrasound screening for fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chitty, L S

    1995-12-01

    Ultrasound screening for fetal abnormalities is increasingly becoming part of routine antenatal care in Europe and the UK. However, there has been very little formal evaluation of this practice. In this article reports of routine ultrasound screening are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages discussed. The majority of routine anomaly scanning is done in the second trimester but there may be a case for screening at other times in pregnancy and alternative anomaly screening policies are discussed. PMID:8710765

  9. Atypical Brain Responses to Sounds in Children with Specific Language and Reading Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Genevieve; Atkinson, Carmen; Ellis, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    This study tested if children with specific language impairment (SLI) or children with specific reading disability (SRD) have abnormal brain responses to sounds. We tested 6- to 12-year-old children with SLI (N = 19), children with SRD (N = 55), and age-matched controls (N = 36) for their passive auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) to tones,…

  10. [Endocrine abnormalities in HIV infections].

    PubMed

    Verges, B; Chavanet, P; Desgres, J; Kisterman, J P; Waldner, A; Vaillant, G; Portier, H; Brun, J M; Putelat, R

    The finding of endocrine gland lesions at pathological examination in AIDS and reports of several cases of endocrine disease in patients with this syndrome have prompted us to study endocrine functions in 63 patients (51 men, 12 women) with HIV-1 infection. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) classification system, 13 of these patients were stage CDC II, 27 stage CDC III and 23 stage CDC IV. We explored the adrenocortical function (ACTH, immediate tetracosactrin test) and the thyroid function (free T3 and T4 levels, TRH on TSH test) in all 63 patients. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (testosterone levels, LHRH test) and prolactin secretion (THR test) were explored in the 51 men. The results obtained showed early peripheral testicular insufficiency at stage CDC II and early pituitary gland abnormalities with hypersecretion of ACTH and prolactin also at stage CDC II. On the other hand, adrenocortical and pituitary abnormalities were not frequently found. The physiopathology of the endocrine abnormalities observed in HIV-1-infected patients remains unclear, but one may suspect that it involves interleukin-1 since this protein factor has recently been shown to stimulate the corticotropin-releasing hormone secretion and to act directly on the glycoprotein capsule of the virus (gp 120) whose structure is similar to that of some neurohormones.

  11. EUVS Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Alan S.

    1996-01-01

    During the first half of this year (CY 1996), the EUVS project began preparations of the EUVS payload for the upcoming NASA sounding rocket flight 36.148CL, slated for launch on July 26, 1996 to observe and record a high-resolution (approx. 2 A FWHM) EUV spectrum of the planet Venus. These preparations were designed to improve the spectral resolution and sensitivity performance of the EUVS payload as well as prepare the payload for this upcoming mission. The following is a list of the EUVS project activities that have taken place since the beginning of this CY: (1) Applied a fresh, new SiC optical coating to our existing 2400 groove/mm grating to boost its reflectivity; (2) modified the Ranicon science detector to boost its detective quantum efficiency with the addition of a repeller grid; (3) constructed a new entrance slit plane to achieve 2 A FWHM spectral resolution; (4) prepared and held the Payload Initiation Conference (PIC) with the assigned NASA support team from Wallops Island for the upcoming 36.148CL flight (PIC held on March 8, 1996; see Attachment A); (5) began wavelength calibration activities of EUVS in the laboratory; (6) made arrangements for travel to WSMR to begin integration activities in preparation for the July 1996 launch; (7) paper detailing our previous EUVS Venus mission (NASA flight 36.117CL) published in Icarus (see Attachment B); and (8) continued data analysis of the previous EUVS mission 36.137CL (Spica occultation flight).

  12. Pitch features of environmental sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Kang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    A number of soundscape studies have suggested the need for suitable parameters for soundscape measurement, in addition to the conventional acoustic parameters. This paper explores the applicability of pitch features that are often used in music analysis and their algorithms to environmental sounds. Based on the existing alternative pitch algorithms for simulating the perception of the auditory system and simplified algorithms for practical applications in the areas of music and speech, the applicable algorithms have been determined, considering common types of sound in everyday soundscapes. Considering a number of pitch parameters, including pitch value, pitch strength, and percentage of audible pitches over time, different pitch characteristics of various environmental sounds have been shown. Among the four sound categories, i.e. water, wind, birdsongs, and urban sounds, generally speaking, both water and wind sounds have low pitch values and pitch strengths; birdsongs have high pitch values and pitch strengths; and urban sounds have low pitch values and a relatively wide range of pitch strengths.

  13. Sound localization and occupational noise

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos Menezes, Pedro; de Andrade, Kelly Cristina Lira; Tenório Lins Carnaúba, Aline; Cabral, Frantänia B.; de Carvalho Leal, Mariana; Desgualdo Pereira, Liliane

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of occupational noise on sound localization in different spatial planes and frequencies among normal hearing firefighters. METHOD: A total of 29 adults with pure-tone hearing thresholds below 25 dB took part in the study. The participants were divided into a group of 19 firefighters exposed to occupational noise and a control group of 10 adults who were not exposed to such noise. All subjects were assigned a sound localization task involving 117 stimuli from 13 sound sources that were spatially distributed in horizontal, vertical, midsagittal and transverse planes. The three stimuli, which were square waves with fundamental frequencies of 500, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, were presented at a sound level of 70 dB and were randomly repeated three times from each sound source. The angle between the speaker's axis in the same plane was 45°, and the distance to the subject was 1 m. RESULT: The results demonstrate that the sound localization ability of the firefighters was significantly lower (p<0.01) than that of the control group. CONCLUSION: Exposure to occupational noise, even when not resulting in hearing loss, may lead to a diminished ability to locate a sound source. PMID:24519197

  14. MicroRNAs in Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Lewis, Ramón A.; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs of ~22 nt in length which are involved in the regulation of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by degrading their target mRNAs and/or inhibiting their translation. Expressed ubiquitously or in a tissue-specific manner, miRNAs are involved in the regulation of many biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and the maintenance of normal cellular physiology. Many miRNAs are expressed in embryonic, postnatal, and adult hearts. Aberrant expression or genetic deletion of miRNAs is associated with abnormal cardiac cell differentiation, disruption of heart development, and cardiac dysfunction. This chapter will summarize the history, biogenesis, and processing of miRNAs as well as their function in heart development, remodeling, and disease. PMID:22449848

  15. Management of acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Varughese, Sheeba

    2007-01-01

    Heart failure, a debilitating complex clinical syndrome, affects nearly 5 million people in the United States and presents a heavy socioeconomic burden. Neurohormonal abnormalities contribute to the pathophysiology of heart failure. Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) has emerged as a major health problem associated with poor prognosis, increased costs related to care, reduced quality of life, and frequent readmissions. Symptoms of ADHF are primarily related to congestion and/or low perfusion states. The use of biomakers such as B-natriuretic peptides is useful in distinguishing between cardiac and noncardiac causes of symptoms. Treatment for ADHF begins with identification and treatment of precipitating factors for acute decompensation. Initial goal of therapy is focused on symptom management followed by interventions that delay disease progression, reduce readmission, and prolong survival. PMID:17356351

  16. [Heart arrest].

    PubMed

    Chiarella, F; Giovannini, E; Bozzano, A; Caristo, G; Delise, P; Fedele, F; Fera, M S; Lavalle, C; Roghi, A; Valagussa, F

    2001-03-01

    Cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of mortality in industrialized countries and is mainly due to ischemic heart disease. According to ISTAT estimates, approximately 45,000 sudden deaths occur annually in Italy whereas according to the World Health Organization, its incidence is 1 per 1000 persons. The most common cause of cardiac arrest is ventricular fibrillation due to an acute ischemic episode. During acute ischemia the onset of a ventricular tachyarrhythmia is sudden, unpredictable and often irreversible and lethal. Each minute that passes, the probability that the patient survives decreases by 10%. For this reason, the first 10 min are considered to be priceless for an efficacious first aid. The possibility of survival depends on the presence of witnesses, on the heart rhythm and on the resolution of the arrhythmia. In the majority of cases, the latter is possible by means of electrical defibrillation followed by the reestablishment of systolic function. An increase in equipment alone does not suffice for efficacious handling of cardiac arrest occurring outside the hospital premises. Above all, an adequate intervention strategy is required. Ambulance personnel must be well trained and capable of intervening rapidly, possibly within the first 5 min. The key to success lies in the diffusion and proper use of defibrillators. The availability of new generation instruments, the external automatic defibrillators, encourages their widespread use. On the territory, these emergencies are the responsibility of the 118 organization based, according to the characteristics specific to each country, on the regulated coordination between the operative command, the crews and the first-aid means. Strategies for the handling of these emergencies within hospitals have been proposed by the Conference of Bethesda and tend to guarantee an efficacious resuscitation with a maximum latency of 2 min between cardiac arrest and the first electric shock. The diffusion of external

  17. Association Between Interstitial Lung Abnormalities and All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Putman, Rachel K.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Araki, Tetsuro; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Gao, Wei; Nishino, Mizuki; Okajima, Yuka; Dupuis, Josée; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Cho, Michael H.; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Coxson, Harvey O.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Zazueta, Oscar E.; Ross, James C.; Harmouche, Rola; Estépar, Raúl San José; Diaz, Alejandro A.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gudmundsson, Elías F.; Eiríksdottír, Gudny; Aspelund, Thor; Budoff, Matthew J.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Hokanson, John E.; Williams, Michelle C; Murchison, John T.; MacNee, William; Hoffmann, Udo; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Launer, Lenore J.; Harrris, Tamara B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Silverman, Edwin K.; O’Connor, George T.; Washko, George R.; Rosas, Ivan O.; Hunninghake, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Interstitial lung abnormalities have been associated with decreased six-minute walk distance, diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide and total lung capacity; however to our knowledge, an association with mortality has not been previously investigated. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether interstitial lung abnormalities are associated with increased mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, POPULATION Prospective cohort studies of 2633 participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) (CT scans obtained 9/08–3/11), 5320 from the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik (recruited 1/02–2/06), 2068 from COPDGene (recruited 11/07–4/10), and 1670 from the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-points (ECLIPSE) (between 12/05–12/06). EXPOSURES Interstitial lung abnormality status as determined by chest CT evaluation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All cause mortality over approximately 3 to 9 year median follow up time. Cause-of-death information was also examined in the AGES-Reykjavik cohort. RESULTS Interstitial lung abnormalities were present in 177 (7%) of the participants from FHS, 378 (7%) from AGES-Reykjavik, 156 (8%) from COPDGene, and in 157 (9%) from ECLIPSE. Over median follow-up times of ~3–9 years there were more deaths (and a greater absolute rate of mortality) among those with interstitial lung abnormalities compared to those without interstitial lung abnormalities in each cohort; 7% compared to 1% in FHS (6% difference, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2%, 10%), 56% compared to 33% in AGES-Reykjavik (23% difference, 95% CI 18%, 28%), 16% compared to 11% in COPDGene (5% difference, 95% CI −1%, 11%) and 11% compared to 5% in ECLIPSE (6% difference, 95% CI 1%, 11%). After adjustment for covariates, interstitial lung abnormalities were associated with an increase in the risk of death in the FHS (HR=2.7, 95% CI, 1.1–65, P=0.030), AGES-Reykjavik (HR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2–1.4, P<0.001), COPDGene (HR=1.8, 95% CI, 1.1, 2

  18. Differential pathologies resulting from sound exposure: Tinnitus vs hearing loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longenecker, Ryan James

    The first step in identifying the mechanism(s) responsible for tinnitus development would be to discover a neural correlate that is differentially expressed in tinnitus-positive compared to tinnitus negative animals. Previous research has identified several neural correlates of tinnitus in animals that have tested positive for tinnitus. However it is unknown whether all or some of these correlates are linked to tinnitus or if they are a byproduct of hearing loss, a common outcome of tinnitus induction. Abnormally high spontaneous activity has frequently been linked to tinnitus. However, while some studies demonstrate that hyperactivity positively correlates with behavioral evidence of tinnitus, others show that when all animals develop hyperactivity to sound exposure, not all exposed animals show evidence of tinnitus. My working hypothesis is that certain aspects of hyperactivity are linked to tinnitus while other aspects are linked to hearing loss. The first specific aim utilized the gap induced prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (GIPAS) to monitor the development of tinnitus in CBA/CaJ mice during one year following sound exposure. Immediately after sound exposure, GIPAS testing revealed widespread gap detection deficits across all frequencies, which was likely due to temporary threshold shifts. However, three months after sound exposure these deficits were limited to a narrow frequency band and were consistently detected up to one year after exposure. This suggests the development of chronic tinnitus is a long lasting and highly dynamic process. The second specific aim assessed hearing loss in sound exposed mice using several techniques. Acoustic brainstem responses recorded initially after sound exposure reveal large magnitude deficits in all exposed mice. However, at the three month period, thresholds return to control levels in all mice suggesting that ABRs are not a reliable tool for assessing permanent hearing loss. Input/output functions of

  19. Female Listeners' Autonomic Responses to Dramatic Shifts Between Loud and Soft Music/Sound Passages: A Study of Heavy Metal Songs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tzu-Han; Tsai, Chen-Gia

    2016-01-01

    Although music and the emotion it conveys unfold over time, little is known about how listeners respond to shifts in musical emotions. A special technique in heavy metal music utilizes dramatic shifts between loud and soft passages. Loud passages are penetrated by distorted sounds conveying aggression, whereas soft passages are often characterized by a clean, calm singing voice and light accompaniment. The present study used heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds to examine how female listeners' respiration rates and heart rates responded to the arousal changes associated with auditory stimuli. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was used to assess cardiac parasympathetic activity. The results showed that the soft passages of heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds expressed lower arousal and induced significantly higher HF-HRVs than the loud passages of heavy metal songs. Listeners' respiration rate was determined by the arousal level of the present music passage, whereas the heart rate was dependent on both the present and preceding passages. Compared with soft sea sounds, the loud music passage led to greater deceleration of the heart rate at the beginning of the following soft music passage. The sea sounds delayed the heart rate acceleration evoked by the following loud music passage. The data provide evidence that sound-induced parasympathetic activity affects listeners' heart rate in response to the following music passage. These findings have potential implications for future research on the temporal dynamics of musical emotions. PMID:26925009

  20. Female Listeners’ Autonomic Responses to Dramatic Shifts Between Loud and Soft Music/Sound Passages: A Study of Heavy Metal Songs

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tzu-Han; Tsai, Chen-Gia

    2016-01-01

    Although music and the emotion it conveys unfold over time, little is known about how listeners respond to shifts in musical emotions. A special technique in heavy metal music utilizes dramatic shifts between loud and soft passages. Loud passages are penetrated by distorted sounds conveying aggression, whereas soft passages are often characterized by a clean, calm singing voice and light accompaniment. The present study used heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds to examine how female listeners’ respiration rates and heart rates responded to the arousal changes associated with auditory stimuli. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was used to assess cardiac parasympathetic activity. The results showed that the soft passages of heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds expressed lower arousal and induced significantly higher HF-HRVs than the loud passages of heavy metal songs. Listeners’ respiration rate was determined by the arousal level of the present music passage, whereas the heart rate was dependent on both the present and preceding passages. Compared with soft sea sounds, the loud music passage led to greater deceleration of the heart rate at the beginning of the following soft music passage. The sea sounds delayed the heart rate acceleration evoked by the following loud music passage. The data provide evidence that sound-induced parasympathetic activity affects listeners’ heart rate in response to the following music passage. These findings have potential implications for future research on the temporal dynamics of musical emotions. PMID:26925009

  1. Female Listeners' Autonomic Responses to Dramatic Shifts Between Loud and Soft Music/Sound Passages: A Study of Heavy Metal Songs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tzu-Han; Tsai, Chen-Gia

    2016-01-01

    Although music and the emotion it conveys unfold over time, little is known about how listeners respond to shifts in musical emotions. A special technique in heavy metal music utilizes dramatic shifts between loud and soft passages. Loud passages are penetrated by distorted sounds conveying aggression, whereas soft passages are often characterized by a clean, calm singing voice and light accompaniment. The present study used heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds to examine how female listeners' respiration rates and heart rates responded to the arousal changes associated with auditory stimuli. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was used to assess cardiac parasympathetic activity. The results showed that the soft passages of heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds expressed lower arousal and induced significantly higher HF-HRVs than the loud passages of heavy metal songs. Listeners' respiration rate was determined by the arousal level of the present music passage, whereas the heart rate was dependent on both the present and preceding passages. Compared with soft sea sounds, the loud music passage led to greater deceleration of the heart rate at the beginning of the following soft music passage. The sea sounds delayed the heart rate acceleration evoked by the following loud music passage. The data provide evidence that sound-induced parasympathetic activity affects listeners' heart rate in response to the following music passage. These findings have potential implications for future research on the temporal dynamics of musical emotions.

  2. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation.

  3. Heart failure with a normal left ventricular ejection fraction: diastolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Little, William C

    2008-01-01

    A reduced left ventricular ejection fraction measured by echocardiography in a patient with clinical features of heart failure demonstrates that the patient has a cardiac abnormality and that the clinical picture is, in fact, due to heart failure. As such, a reduced ejection fraction (< 0.30 or 0.35) has been used as entry criteria for almost all the large clinical trials that guide our therapy of patients with heart failure. However, it has been recently recognized that a substantial and increasing proportion of patients with heart failure have a normal ejection fraction (> 0.50). Such patients are typically elderly women with systolic hypertension. These patients are subject to the sudden development of pulmonary congestion (flash pulmonary edema). The finding of heart failure in patients with a normal ejection fraction has focused attention on the role of diastolic dysfunction in producing symptomatic heart failure. The optimal treatment of patients with heart failure and normal ejection fraction has not yet been defined, but the control of systolic hypertension and the avoidance of fluid overload are important.

  4. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. ||; Papp, A.L. III |

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one`s application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  5. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. Cancer Center, Houston, TX . Dept. of Biomathematics Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA California Univ., Davis, CA ); Papp, A.L. III Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one's application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  6. Velocity of Sound in Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Michael T.; Kluk, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Presents experiments to measure the velocity of sound through metals and other amorphous materials. Describes the equipment used to make the measurements and the possibility of interfacing with a microcomputer. (MDH)

  7. Acoustics: Motion controlled by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    A simple technique has been developed that produces holograms made of sound waves. These acoustic landscapes are used to manipulate microscale objects, and offer great potential in medical imaging and selective heating. See Letter p.518

  8. Wind turbine sound power measurements.

    PubMed

    Keith, Stephen E; Feder, Katya; Voicescu, Sonia A; Soukhovtsev, Victor; Denning, Allison; Tsang, Jason; Broner, Norm; Richarz, Werner; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides experimental validation of the sound power level data obtained from manufacturers for the ten wind turbine models examined in Health Canada's Community Noise and Health Study (CNHS). Within measurement uncertainty, the wind turbine sound power levels measured using IEC 61400-11 [(2002). (International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva)] were consistent with the sound power level data provided by manufacturers. Based on measurements, the sound power level data were also extended to 16 Hz for calculation of C-weighted levels. The C-weighted levels were 11.5 dB higher than the A-weighted levels (standard deviation 1.7 dB). The simple relationship between A- and C- weighted levels suggests that there is unlikely to be any statistically significant difference between analysis based on either C- or A-weighted data.

  9. Resolution enhanced sound detecting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus is described for enhancing the resolution of a sound detector of the type which includes an acoustic mirror for focusing sound from an object onto a microphone to enable the determination of the location from which the sound arises. The enhancement apparatus includes an enclosure which surrounds the space between the mirror and microphone, and contains a gas heavier than air, such as Freon, through which sound moves slower and therefore with a shorter wavelength than in air, so that a mirror of given size has greater resolving power. An acoustically transparent front wall of the enclosure which lies forward of the mirror, can include a pair of thin sheets with pressured air between them, to form an end of the region of heavy gas into a concave shape.

  10. Wind turbine sound power measurements.

    PubMed

    Keith, Stephen E; Feder, Katya; Voicescu, Sonia A; Soukhovtsev, Victor; Denning, Allison; Tsang, Jason; Broner, Norm; Richarz, Werner; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides experimental validation of the sound power level data obtained from manufacturers for the ten wind turbine models examined in Health Canada's Community Noise and Health Study (CNHS). Within measurement uncertainty, the wind turbine sound power levels measured using IEC 61400-11 [(2002). (International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva)] were consistent with the sound power level data provided by manufacturers. Based on measurements, the sound power level data were also extended to 16 Hz for calculation of C-weighted levels. The C-weighted levels were 11.5 dB higher than the A-weighted levels (standard deviation 1.7 dB). The simple relationship between A- and C- weighted levels suggests that there is unlikely to be any statistically significant difference between analysis based on either C- or A-weighted data. PMID:27036281

  11. Find a Heart Rhythm Specialist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace IBHRE Heart Rhythm Journal Heart Rhythm Case Reports EP Buyer's Guide Connect With Us ... Heart Rhythm Society 2016 Privacy Policy | Linking Policy | Patient Education Disclaimer You ...

  12. Skeletal myopathy in heart failure: effects of aerobic exercise training.

    PubMed

    Brum, P C; Bacurau, A V; Cunha, T F; Bechara, L R G; Moreira, J B N

    2014-04-01

    Reduced aerobic capacity, as measured by maximal oxygen uptake, is a hallmark in cardiovascular diseases and strongly predicts poor prognosis and higher mortality rates in heart failure patients. While exercise capacity is poorly correlated with cardiac function in this population, skeletal muscle abnormalities present a striking association with maximal oxygen uptake. This fact draws substantial attention to the clinical relevance of targeting skeletal myopathy in heart failure. Considering that skeletal muscle is highly responsive to aerobic exercise training, we addressed the benefits of aerobic exercise training to combat skeletal myopathy in heart failure, focusing on the mechanisms by which aerobic exercise training counteracts skeletal muscle atrophy.

  13. Hypervulnerability to Sound Exposure through Impaired Adaptive Proliferation of Peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Delmaghani, Sedigheh; Defourny, Jean; Aghaie, Asadollah; Beurg, Maryline; Dulon, Didier; Thelen, Nicolas; Perfettini, Isabelle; Zelles, Tibor; Aller, Mate; Meyer, Anaïs; Emptoz, Alice; Giraudet, Fabrice; Leibovici, Michel; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Soubigou, Guillaume; Thiry, Marc; Vizi, E Sylvester; Safieddine, Saaid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Avan, Paul; Petit, Christine

    2015-11-01

    A deficiency in pejvakin, a protein of unknown function, causes a strikingly heterogeneous form of human deafness. Pejvakin-deficient (Pjvk(-/-)) mice also exhibit variable auditory phenotypes. Correlation between their hearing thresholds and the number of pups per cage suggest a possible harmful effect of pup vocalizations. Direct sound or electrical stimulation show that the cochlear sensory hair cells and auditory pathway neurons of Pjvk(-/-) mice and patients are exceptionally vulnerable to sound. Subcellular analysis revealed that pejvakin is associated with peroxisomes and required for their oxidative-stress-induced proliferation. Pjvk(-/-) cochleas display features of marked oxidative stress and impaired antioxidant defenses, and peroxisomes in Pjvk(-/-) hair cells show structural abnormalities after the onset of hearing. Noise exposure rapidly upregulates Pjvk cochlear transcription in wild-type mice and triggers peroxisome proliferation in hair cells and primary auditory neurons. Our results reveal that the antioxidant activity of peroxisomes protects the auditory system against noise-induced damage.

  14. Acoustoelasticity. [sound-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sound or pressure variations inside bounded enclosures are investigated. Mathematical models are given for determining: (1) the interaction between the sound pressure field and the flexible wall of a Helmholtz resonator; (2) coupled fluid-structural motion of an acoustic cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall; (3) acoustic natural modes in multiple connected cavities; and (4) the forced response of a cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall. Numerical results are discussed.

  15. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  16. Moth hearing and sound communication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20-60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by "sensory exploitation". Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low-intensity ultrasounds "whispered" by males during courtship is not uncommon, contrary to the general notion of moths predominantly being silent. Sexual sound communication in moths may apply to many eared moths, perhaps even a majority. The low intensities and high frequencies explain that this was overlooked, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals.

  17. Moth hearing and sound communication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20-60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by "sensory exploitation". Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low-intensity ultrasounds "whispered" by males during courtship is not uncommon, contrary to the general notion of moths predominantly being silent. Sexual sound communication in moths may apply to many eared moths, perhaps even a majority. The low intensities and high frequencies explain that this was overlooked, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals. PMID:25261361

  18. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    PubMed

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

  19. [Erythrocyte membrane abnormalities - hereditary elliptocytosis].

    PubMed

    Kvezereli-Kopadze, M; Kvezereli-Kopadze, A; Mtvarelidze, Z; Bubuteishvili, A

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the 4 year old boy with Hereditary Elliptocitosis (HE). The diagnosis of this rare hemolytic anemia was based on detailed family history (positive in the 4-th generation), physical examination and Para-clinical data analyses. The vast majority of patients with HE are asymptomatic, severe forms are rare. The most important is examination of blood films, which is helpful to detect the morphology abnormalities of red cells. In case of HE a different approach is required. Positive family history and series of investigations should be conducted to determine the HE.

  20. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  1. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  2. Atypical vertical sound localization and sound-onset sensitivity in people with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Eelke; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Kan, Cornelis C.; Hoekstra, Liesbeth; van Opstal, A. John; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are associated with auditory hyper- or hyposensitivity; atypicalities in central auditory processes, such as speech-processing and selective auditory attention; and neural connectivity deficits. We sought to investigate whether the low-level integrative processes underlying sound localization and spatial discrimination are affected in ASDs. Methods We performed 3 behavioural experiments to probe different connecting neural pathways: 1) horizontal and vertical localization of auditory stimuli in a noisy background, 2) vertical localization of repetitive frequency sweeps and 3) discrimination of horizontally separated sound stimuli with a short onset difference (precedence effect). Results Ten adult participants with ASDs and 10 healthy control listeners participated in experiments 1 and 3; sample sizes for experiment 2 were 18 adults with ASDs and 19 controls. Horizontal localization was unaffected, but vertical localization performance was significantly worse in participants with ASDs. The temporal window for the precedence effect was shorter in participants with ASDs than in controls. Limitations The study was performed with adult participants and hence does not provide insight into the developmental aspects of auditory processing in individuals with ASDs. Conclusion Changes in low-level auditory processing could underlie degraded performance in vertical localization, which would be in agreement with recently reported changes in the neuroanatomy of the auditory brainstem in individuals with ASDs. The results are further discussed in the context of theories about abnormal brain connectivity in individuals with ASDs. PMID:24148845

  3. Second Sound in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Po-Hsien

    Second sound in nonmetallic crystals is often described by the relation, tau(theta)q _{t} + q = {-kappa}(theta) theta_{x}, in which q _{t} is the time-derivative of the heat flux q, and theta_{x } is the spatial derivative of the temperature theta. In earlier work, Coleman, Fabrizio, and Owen showed that this relation implies a quadratic dependence of the internal energy density e on the magnitude of q, i.e., e = ~{e }(theta,q) = e_0(theta) + a(theta)q ^2, where 2a(theta) = { -theta}^2 d[ tau( theta)kappa(theta)^{-1} theta^{-2}] /dtheta. The resulting field equations for theta and q are nonlinear in q, and this nonlinearity influences the growth and decay of singularities. Exact expressions are derived here for the time-dependence of jumps in theta_{x} and theta_{t} as they propagate into regions in which there is a steady, but not necessarily zero, flux of heat. Such jumps become infinite in a finite time when they have appropriate signs and their magnitudes exceed critical values. The derived expressions for jumps in theta_{t } and theta_{x} are evaluated using available experimental data for crystals of sodium fluoride (NaF) and bismuth (Bi). Coleman, Fabrizio, and Owen pointed out that the quadratic nonlinearity of e in q implies that the time it takes a singularity to traverse an interval with a underlying steady flux of heat is greater if it is traveling from a hot to a cold region than if it is traveling in the opposite direction. Coleman and Newman's numerical study of the phenomenon is here extended and refined and detailed results are given for NaF and Bi. An analysis is made here of the implications of the dependence of e on q for temporally sinusoidal waves perturbing a steady flux q^0 of heat. It is shown that when q^0 perturbed at the boundary of a crystal by sinusoidal thermal oscillations, the resulting temperature field can show a nonstationary, long wavelength interference pattern that propagates through the crystal in the direction of the

  4. Open heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - open ... lung machine is used in most cases during open heart surgery. While the surgeon works on the ... with these procedures, the surgeon may have to open the chest to do the surgery.

  5. Structure of the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System Review Quiz Endocrine System Characteristics of Hormones Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Pituitary & ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands ... Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the ...

  6. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  7. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  8. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  9. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Balance › Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English ... nervous system, body temperature, and weight. What is hypothyroidism and what are its symptoms? Hypothyroidism, also called ...

  10. Heart failure - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... NOT smoke . Stay active. Walk or ride a stationary bicycle. Your provider can provide a safe and ... with or without stenting may help improve blood flow to the damaged or weakened heart muscle. Heart ...

  11. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  12. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  13. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  14. Aspirin and heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the diagnosis and management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology ... NE, et al. Antithrombotic and thrombolytic therapy for ischemic ... of coronary heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, et ...

  15. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Sleep Troubles, Heart Troubles?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161037.html Sleep Troubles, Heart Troubles? American Heart Association says it's ... 19, 2016 MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep disorders -- including too little or too much sleep -- ...

  17. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... the P and the R waves on the EKG (electrocardiogram). First-degree heart block may not cause ...

  18. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » + - Text Size Target Heart Rate Calculator Compute your best workout Enter your age ... is your age? years. How to Check Your Heart Rate Right after you stop exercising, take your pulse: ...

  19. Getting a New Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in place, the donor's main arteries—the aorta and pulmonary arteries—are sewn to yours. o ... heart and cause strokes and heart attacks. 4. Diabetes Mellitus Anti-rejection medications can cause diabetes. If ...

  20. Longitudinal Imaging of Heart Development With Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has great potential for deciphering the role of mechanics in normal and abnormal heart development. OCT images tissue microstructure and blood flow deep into the tissue (1–2mm) at high spatiotemporal resolutions allowing unprecedented images of the developing heart. Here, we review the advancement of OCT technology to image heart development and report some of our recent findings utilizing OCT imaging under environmental control for longitudinal imaging. Precise control of the environment is absolutely required in longitudinal studies that follow the growth of the embryo or studies comparing normal versus perturbed heart development to obtain meaningful in vivo results. These types of studies are essential to tease out the influence of cardiac dynamics on molecular expression and their role in the progression of congenital heart defects. PMID:26236147

  1. Macro- and microscopic spectral-polarization characteristics of the structure of normal and abnormally located chordae tendianeae of left ventricular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyk, Yu. Yu.; Prydij, O. G.; Zymnyakov, D. A.; Alonova, M. V.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    The morphological peculiarities of TS mitral valve of the heart of man in normal and abnormal spaced strings of the left ventricle and the study of their structural features depending on the location was studied. There are given the results of comparative statistics, correlation and fractal study population Mueller-matrix images (MMI) of healthy and abnormal (early forms that are not diagnosed by histological methods) BT normal and abnormally located tendon strings left ventricle of the human heart. Abnormalities in the structure of the wings, tendon strings (TS), mastoid muscle (MM) in inconsistencies elements and harmonized operation of all valve complex shown in the features of the polarization manifestations of it laser images.

  2. Could sound be used as a strategy for reducing symptoms of perceived motion sickness?

    PubMed Central

    Dahlman, Joakim; Sjörs, Anna; Ledin, Torbjörn; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2008-01-01

    Background Working while exposed to motions, physically and psychologically affects a person. Traditionally, motion sickness symptom reduction has implied use of medication, which can lead to detrimental effects on performance. Non-pharmaceutical strategies, in turn, often require cognitive and perceptual attention. Hence, for people working in high demand environments where it is impossible to reallocate focus of attention, other strategies are called upon. The aim of the study was to investigate possible impact of a mitigation strategy on perceived motion sickness and psychophysiological responses, based on an artificial sound horizon compared with a non-positioned sound source. Methods Twenty-three healthy subjects were seated on a motion platform in an artificial sound horizon or in non-positioned sound, in random order with one week interval between the trials. Perceived motion sickness (Mal), maximum duration of exposure (ST), skin conductance, blood volume pulse, temperature, respiration rate, eye movements and heart rate were measured continuously throughout the trials. Results Mal scores increased over time in both sound conditions, but the artificial sound horizon, applied as a mitigation strategy for perceived motion sickness, showed no significant effect on Mal scores or ST. The number of fixations increased with time in the non-positioned sound condition. Moreover, fixation time was longer in the non-positioned sound condition compared with sound horizon, indicating that the subjects used more time to fixate and, hence, assumingly made fewer saccades. Conclusion A subliminally presented artificial sound horizon did not significantly affect perceived motion sickness, psychophysiological variables or the time the subjects endured the motion sickness triggering stimuli. The number of fixations and fixation times increased over time in the non-positioned sound condition. PMID:19105806

  3. Medical management of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, S S; Prasad, R N

    1990-06-01

    Medical termination of abnormal pregnancy requires specific techniques since some conditions make therapy more effective, e.g., missed abortion intrauterine death and molar pregnancy, and others less so, e.g. anencephalic pregnancy. In all cases it is best to terminate the pregnancy as soon as possible to reduce anguish and risks of complications such as consumptive coagulopathy. Oxytocin is not consistently effective, but intraamniotic rivanol has oxytocic properties, and prostaglandins (PGs) are effective by several routes. Surgical methods are more popular in Japan and the US. A diagnostic flow chart is included and described. For missed abortion and fetal death vacuum aspiration or dilatation and evacuation are appropriate for early pregnancy, or PGs are used for later pregnancy, unless there are medical contraindications. Anencephalic pregnancy, usually diagnoses in 2nd or 3rd trimester, is resistant to medical therapy and must often be terminated by cesarean section. Molar pregnancy can be managed with vacuum aspiration at any length of gestation, but must be completed by curettage. Intraamniotic PGs are not advised for mole or fetal death. PG analogs can be administered intramuscularly, or vaginally in gel form. Other types of abnormal pregnancy that can be managed with PGs are spina bifida, hydrocephalus, hydrops fetalis, Dandy-Walker syndrome and Down's syndrome. Tubal pregnancy can be evacuated with intratubally administered PGs under laparoscopic control, thereby preserving tubal integrity. PMID:2225605

  4. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in structural brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2013-07-31

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently observed after acute cerebrovascular events. The precise mechanism that leads to the development of these arrhythmias is still uncertain, though increasing evidence suggests that it is mainly due to autonomic nervous system dysregulation. In massive brain lesions sympathetic predominance and parasympathetic withdrawal during the first 72 h are associated with the occurrence of severe secondary complications in the first week. Right insular cortex lesions are also related with sympathetic overactivation and with a higher incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly QT prolongation, in patients with ischemic stroke. Additionally, female sex and hypokalemia are independent risk factors for severe prolongation of the QT interval which subsequently results in malignant arrhythmias and poor outcome. The prognostic value of repolarization changes commonly seen after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as ST segment, T wave, and U wave abnormalities, still remains controversial. In patients with traumatic brain injury both intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion correlate with low heart rate variability and increased mortality. Given that there are no firm guidelines for the prevention or treatment of the arrhythmias that appear after cerebral incidents this review aims to highlight important issues on this topic. Selected patients with the aforementioned risk factors could benefit from electrocardiographic monitoring, reassessment of the medications that prolong QTc interval, and administration of antiadrenergic agents. Further research is required in order to validate these assumptions and to establish specific therapeutic strategies.

  5. Sound Symbolic Word Learning in Written Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parault, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    Sound symbolism is the notion that the relation between word sounds and word meaning is not arbitrary for all words, but rather there is a subset of words in the world's languages for which sounds and their symbols have some degree of correspondence. This research investigates sound symbolism as a possible means of gaining semantic knowledge of…

  6. Young Children's Letter-Sound Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Barbara; Carr, Alex

    2003-01-01

    This study with 83 normally developing children (ages 4-6) compared three essential skills in early literacy, letter-sound recognition, letter-sound recall, and letter reproduction. Children performed better in letter-sound recognition than in letter-sound recall and letter reproduction. There were no performance differences due to sex or age.…

  7. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  8. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  9. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  10. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  11. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  12. Heart Valve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  13. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  14. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  15. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  16. Working Model Hearts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite student interest, the heart is often a poorly understood topic in biology. To help students understand this vital organ's physiology, the author created this investigation activity involving the mammalian heart and its role in the circulatory system. Students design, build, and demonstrate working artificial "hearts" to exhibit what they…

  17. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a pocket, or hung around your neck. Nuclear Heart Scan A nuclear heart scan shows how well blood is flowing ... blood is reaching your heart muscle. During a nuclear heart scan, a safe, radioactive substance called a ...

  18. Burn-induced subepicardial injury in frog heart: a simple model mimicking ST segment changes in ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    KAZAMA, Itsuro

    2015-01-01

    To mimic ischemic heart disease in humans, several animal models have been created, mainly in rodents by surgically ligating their coronary arteries. In the present study, by simply inducing burn injuries on the bullfrog heart, we reproduced abnormal ST segment changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG), mimicking those observed in ischemic heart disease, such as acute myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. The “currents of injury” created by a voltage gradient between the intact and damaged areas of the myocardium, negatively deflected the ECG vector during the diastolic phase, making the ST segment appear elevated during the systolic phase. This frog model of heart injury would be suitable to explain the mechanisms of ST segment changes observed in ischemic heart disease. PMID:26346747

  19. Tracheal Sounds Acquisition Using Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Bersain A.; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H.

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds' amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD) for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR) can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r2 = 0.9693, 0.11 (−1.41 to 1.63) breaths-per-minute (bpm) for Galaxy S4, and r2 = 0.9672, 0.097 (–1.38 to 1.57) bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found. PMID:25196108

  20. Sounds of a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    Acoustic Oscillations in Solar-Twin "Alpha Cen A" Observed from La Silla by Swiss Team Summary Sound waves running through a star can help astronomers reveal its inner properties. This particular branch of modern astrophysics is known as "asteroseismology" . In the case of our Sun, the brightest star in the sky, such waves have been observed since some time, and have greatly improved our knowledge about what is going on inside. However, because they are much fainter, it has turned out to be very difficult to detect similar waves in other stars. Nevertheless, tiny oscillations in a solar-twin star have now been unambiguously detected by Swiss astronomers François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory, using the CORALIE spectrometer on the Swiss 1.2-m Leonard Euler telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. This telescope is mostly used for discovering exoplanets (see ESO PR 07/01 ). The star Alpha Centauri A is the nearest star visible to the naked eye, at a distance of a little more than 4 light-years. The new measurements show that it pulsates with a 7-minute cycle, very similar to what is observed in the Sun . Asteroseismology for Sun-like stars is likely to become an important probe of stellar theory in the near future. The state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph , to be mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, will be able to search for oscillations in stars that are 100 times fainter than those for which such demanding observations are possible with CORALIE. PR Photo 23a/01 : Oscillations in a solar-like star (schematic picture). PR Photo 23b/01 : Acoustic spectrum of Alpha Centauri A , as observed with CORALIE. Asteroseismology: listening to the stars ESO PR Photo 23a/01 ESO PR Photo 23a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 357 x 400 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 713 x 800 pix - 256k] [HiRes - JPEG: 2673 x 3000 pix - 2.1Mb Caption : PR Photo 23a/01 is a graphical representation of resonating acoustic waves in the interior of a solar-like star. Red and blue

  1. Aftermath of 3/11: earthquakes and involuntary attentional orienting to sudden ambient sounds.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Motohiro; Ueda, Mari; Takeda, Yuji; Sugimoto, Fumie; Katayama, Jun'ichi

    2013-10-01

    Due to the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 and the following long-term earthquake swarm, many people living in the earthquake-affected areas have developed mental stress, even though clinically-diagnosable symptoms may not be apparent. Concurrently, many unusual reports have emerged in which persons complain of abnormally increased sensitivity to sudden ambient sounds during their daily lives (e.g., the sound of the washing machine on spin cycle). By recording event-related potentials to various sudden ambient sounds from young adults living in the affected areas, we found that the level of earthquake-induced mental stress, as indexed by the hyperarousal symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, was positively related to the magnitude of P3a to sudden ambient sounds. These results reveal a strong relationship between mental stress and enhanced involuntary attentional orienting in a large majority of trauma-exposed people without diagnosable symptoms.

  2. Congenital complete heart block in the newborn associated with maternal systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, J D; Solomon, S; Banwell, G S; Beach, R; Wright, V; Howard, F M

    1979-01-01

    Four babies with complete heart block associated with maternal systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are described, together with a 5th baby whose mother had serological abnormalities only. One baby had a rapidly fatal outcome, one has required digoxin for heart failure, and the remaining 3 are asymptomatic but remain in complete heart block. Additional manifestations were present in 2 of them. The spectrum of neonatal abnormalities that may occur in association with maternal SLE and related connective tissue disorders is discussed, together with the possible causes and the prognosis. We conclude that congenital heart block is more common than had previously been appreciated. Images Figure PMID:420526

  3. Sounds of silence: How to animate virtual worlds with sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Sounds are an integral and sometimes annoying part of our daily life. Virtual worlds which imitate natural environments gain a lot of authenticity from fast, high quality visualization combined with sound effects. Sounds help to increase the degree of immersion for human dwellers in imaginary worlds significantly. The virtual reality toolkit of IGD (Institute for Computer Graphics) features a broad range of standard visual and advanced real-time audio components which interpret an object-oriented definition of the scene. The virtual reality system 'Virtual Design' realized with the toolkit enables the designer of virtual worlds to create a true audiovisual environment. Several examples on video demonstrate the usage of the audio features in Virtual Design.

  4. Associations between sperm abnormalities, breed, age, and scrotal circumference in beef bulls

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Ajitkumar G.; Barkema, Herman W.; Wilde, Randy; Kastelic, John P.; Thundathil, Jacob C.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the associations of breed, age, and scrotal circumference (SC), and their interaction, on the prevalence of sperm abnormalities in beef bulls in Alberta, Canada, and the percentage of satisfactory potential breeders identified during breeding soundness examination solely due to normal sperm morphology. Eosin-nigrosin stained semen smears and evaluation reports of 1642 bull breeding soundness evaluations were procured from 6 veterinary clinics in Alberta. Sperm morphology was determined for at least 100 sperm per bull. The most common defects were detached head [4.86% ± 5.71%; mean ± standard deviation (s)], distal midpiece reflex (6.19% ± 9.13%), and bent tail (1.01% ± 1.54%). Although breed, age, and SC did not significantly affect the prevalence of head or midpiece defects, morphologically normal or abnormal sperm, tail defects were more prevalent in Angus and Hereford bulls compared with other breeds. Overall, solely on the basis of sperm morphology, 1363 (83.0%) bulls were classified as satisfactory potential breeders and the remainder 279 (17.0%) as unsatisfactory (> 30% abnormal sperm, > 20% defective heads, or both). Although not significantly different, the breed with the highest percentage of satisfactory potential breeders was Limousin (90.6%) and the lowest was Hereford (78.8%). That 17% of bulls subjected to breeding soundness evaluation were designated as unsatisfactory solely on the basis of sperm morphology highlights its importance. PMID:22468020

  5. Influence of sound source width on human sound localization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel T; Paige, Gary D

    2012-01-01

    Free-field sound localization experiments generally assume that a loudspeaker can be approximated by a point-source; however, a large loudspeaker may extend beyond the width that two sources can be discriminated. Humans can accurately discriminate sound source locations within a few degrees, thus one might expect localization precision to decrease as a function of sound source diameter, much as precision is lower for localizing the center of a wide, blurry light source. In order to test the degree to which humans differentially localize small and large sound sources, auditory targets were presented using a single 25.4 cm by 10.2 cm elliptical loudspeaker with the primary axis oriented both horizontally and vertically in different sessions. Subjects were seated with their heads fixed by a bite bar in a darkened, echo-attenuating room facing a cylindrical, acoustically transparent screen at a distance of 2 meters. Auditory targets consisted of repeating bursts (5 Hz) of low frequency band-pass noise (0.2 - 1 kHz, 75 dB SPL). Subjects were instructed to quickly and accurately guide a laser pointer mounted on a cylindrical joystick towards targets, presented randomly within a field ± 40° in azimuth by ± 10° in elevation, with oversampled points located every ten degrees along the primary meridians. Localization accuracy and precision (mean and standard deviation of localization error at oversampled locations) were not significantly different between speaker orientations, and were comparable to baseline measurements recorded using a 7.6 cm circular speaker. We conclude that low frequency sound localization performance is not dependent upon the size of the sound source as predicted theoretically, and is well approximated by a point source.

  6. Sound source tracking device for telematic spatial sound field reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Bruno

    This research describes an algorithm that localizes sound sources for use in telematic applications. The localization algorithm is based on amplitude differences between various channels of a microphone array of directional shotgun microphones. The amplitude differences will be used to locate multiple performers and reproduce their voices, which were recorded at close distance with lavalier microphones, spatially corrected using a loudspeaker rendering system. In order to track multiple sound sources in parallel the information gained from the lavalier microphones will be utilized to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio between each performer and the concurrent performers.

  7. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease » Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Explore Diabetic Heart Disease What Is... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Cardiomyopathy Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Failure Send ...

  8. Conditioned sounds enhance visual processing.

    PubMed

    Leo, Fabrizio; Noppeney, Uta

    2014-01-01

    This psychophysics study investigated whether prior auditory conditioning influences how a sound interacts with visual perception. In the conditioning phase, subjects were presented with three pure tones ( =  conditioned stimuli, CS) that were paired with positive, negative or neutral unconditioned stimuli. As unconditioned reinforcers we employed pictures (highly pleasant, unpleasant and neutral) or monetary outcomes (+50 euro cents, -50 cents, 0 cents). In the subsequent visual selective attention paradigm, subjects were presented with near-threshold Gabors displayed in their left or right hemifield. Critically, the Gabors were presented in synchrony with one of the conditioned sounds. Subjects discriminated whether the Gabors were presented in their left or right hemifields. Participants determined the location more accurately when the Gabors were presented in synchrony with positive relative to neutral sounds irrespective of reinforcer type. Thus, previously rewarded relative to neutral sounds increased the bottom-up salience of the visual Gabors. Our results are the first demonstration that prior auditory conditioning is a potent mechanism to modulate the effect of sounds on visual perception.

  9. Conditioned Sounds Enhance Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Fabrizio; Noppeney, Uta

    2014-01-01

    This psychophysics study investigated whether prior auditory conditioning influences how a sound interacts with visual perception. In the conditioning phase, subjects were presented with three pure tones ( =  conditioned stimuli, CS) that were paired with positive, negative or neutral unconditioned stimuli. As unconditioned reinforcers we employed pictures (highly pleasant, unpleasant and neutral) or monetary outcomes (+50 euro cents, −50 cents, 0 cents). In the subsequent visual selective attention paradigm, subjects were presented with near-threshold Gabors displayed in their left or right hemifield. Critically, the Gabors were presented in synchrony with one of the conditioned sounds. Subjects discriminated whether the Gabors were presented in their left or right hemifields. Participants determined the location more accurately when the Gabors were presented in synchrony with positive relative to neutral sounds irrespective of reinforcer type. Thus, previously rewarded relative to neutral sounds increased the bottom-up salience of the visual Gabors. Our results are the first demonstration that prior auditory conditioning is a potent mechanism to modulate the effect of sounds on visual perception. PMID:25192387

  10. The puzzle of kidney dysfunction in heart failure: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Metra, Marco; Voors, Adriaan A

    2012-03-01

    Heart failure and kidney disease often coexist, and each of the two conditions may lead to progression of the other. Kidney dysfunction is an independent prognostic factor in patients with either acute or chronic heart failure. Worsening renal function may be related with poorer outcomes as well. Multiple mechanisms are involved in the cardio-renal interaction, including hemodynamic abnormalities, neurohormonal and inflammatory activation, oxidative stress, anemia, and abnormalities in mineral and vitamin D metabolism. Serum creatinine has limitations for the assessment of kidney function in patients with heart failure as its short-term changes are dependent on hemodynamic changes and fluid status. New biomarkers of glomerular and tubular function might allow an earlier and more accurate detection of worsening renal function.

  11. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child.

  12. A color spectrographic phonocardiography (CSP) applied to the detection and characterization of heart murmurs: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although cardiac auscultation remains important to detect abnormal sounds and murmurs indicative of cardiac pathology, the application of electronic methods remains seldom used in everyday clinical practice. In this report we provide preliminary data showing how the phonocardiogram can be analyzed using color spectrographic techniques and discuss how such information may be of future value for noninvasive cardiac monitoring. Methods We digitally recorded the phonocardiogram using a high-speed USB interface and the program Gold Wave http://www.goldwave.com in 55 infants and adults with cardiac structural disease as well as from normal individuals and individuals with innocent murmurs. Color spectrographic analysis of the signal was performed using Spectrogram (Version 16) as a well as custom MATLAB code. Results Our preliminary data is presented as a series of seven cases. Conclusions We expect the application of spectrographic techniques to phonocardiography to grow substantially as ongoing research demonstrates its utility in various clinical settings. Our evaluation of a simple, low-cost phonocardiographic recording and analysis system to assist in determining the characteristic features of heart murmurs shows promise in helping distinguish innocent systolic murmurs from pathological murmurs in children and is expected to useful in other clinical settings as well. PMID:21627809

  13. Cardiovascular manifestations of heterotaxy and related situs abnormalities assessed with CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Wolla, Christopher D.; Hlavacek, Anthony M.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Bucher, Andreas M.; Chowdhury, Shahryar

    2014-01-01

    Heterotaxy and situs abnormalities describe an abnormal arrangement of visceral organs in the thoracoabdominal cavity across the normal left–right axis of the body. It is associated with a high occurrence of congenital heart and abdominal defects, including anomalous pulmonary venous connections, systemic venous abnormalities, asplenia, and intestinal malrotation. Without proper diagnosis and surgical intervention, the prognosis of patients with heterotaxy syndrome and associated congenital defects is extremely poor. Complex intracardiac and extracardiac lesions are common in heterotaxy and can be difficult to assess by echocardiography. CT angiography (CTA) is a useful tool in this setting to accurately assess intracardiac and extracardiac abnormalities in this population for medical or surgical management. The intention of this pictorial essay is to review the most common cardiovascular defects involved with heterotaxy syndrome in addition to emphasizing the utility of CTA in the identification and classification of anomalies seen in these patients. This review briefly defines most common terminology used in situs abnormalities as well as presents CT images and 3-dimensional reconstructions of common anomalies associated with situs abnormalities. In summary, this review should prepare radiologists and pediatric cardiologists to describe heterotaxy and situs abnormalities in addition to recognizing the utility of CTA in these patients. PMID:24331937

  14. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  15. Prediabetes is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Greenway, F L; Cornelissen, G; Pan, W; Halberg, F

    2008-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits a circadian variation characterized by a morning increase, followed by a small postprandial valley and a deeper descent during nocturnal rest. Although abnormal 24-h variability (abnormal circadian variability (ACV)) predicts adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes, a 7-day automatic ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and subsequent chronobiologic analysis of the gathered data, permits identification of consistency of any abnormal circadian variation. To test whether normal overweight healthy men and women with prediabetes differed from subjects with normoglycemia in having ACV with a 7-day ABPM. Consent for a 7-day ABPM was obtained from subjects with family history of diabetes mellitus, who were participating in the screening phase for a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled weight loss trial in prediabetics to prevent progression to diabetes mellitus. The automatic 7-day ABPM device recorded BP and heart rate every 30 min during the day and every 60 min during the night. Normoglycemic and prediabetic subjects matched for age, sex, race, BP, BMI, waist circumference and glycemic control, differed statistically significantly only in their fasting and/or 2-h postprandial serum glucose concentrations. Chronobiologically-interpreted 7-day ABPM uncovered no abnormalities in normoglycemics, whereas prediabetics had a statistically significantly higher incidence of high mean BP (MESOR-hypertension), excessive pulse pressure and/or circadian hyper-amplitude-tension (CHAT) (P<0.001). ACV detected with 7-day ABPM may account for the enhanced CVD risk in prediabetes. These findings provide a basis for larger-scale studies to assess the predictive value of 7-day ABPM over the long term. PMID:18480832

  16. Acoustic metamaterials for sound mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouar, Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    We provide theoretical and numerical analyses of the behavior of a plate-type acoustic metamaterial considered in an air-borne sound environment in view of sound mitigation application. Two configurations of plate are studied, a spring-mass one and a pillar system-based one. The acoustic performances of the considered systems are investigated with different approaches and show that a high sound transmission loss (STL) up to 82 dB is reached with a metamaterial plate with a thickness of 0.5 mm. The physical understanding of the acoustic behavior of the metamaterial partition is discussed based on both air-borne and structure-borne approaches. Confrontation between the STL, the band structure, the displacement fields and the effective mass density of the plate metamaterial is made to have a complete physical understanding of the different mechanisms involved. xml:lang="fr"

  17. Dynamic sound localization in cats

    PubMed Central

    Ruhland, Janet L.; Jones, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Sound localization in cats and humans relies on head-centered acoustic cues. Studies have shown that humans are able to localize sounds during rapid head movements that are directed toward the target or other objects of interest. We studied whether cats are able to utilize similar dynamic acoustic cues to localize acoustic targets delivered during rapid eye-head gaze shifts. We trained cats with visual-auditory two-step tasks in which we presented a brief sound burst during saccadic eye-head gaze shifts toward a prior visual target. No consistent or significant differences in accuracy or precision were found between this dynamic task (2-step saccade) and the comparable static task (single saccade when the head is stable) in either horizontal or vertical direction. Cats appear to be able to process dynamic auditory cues and execute complex motor adjustments to accurately localize auditory targets during rapid eye-head gaze shifts. PMID:26063772

  18. Probing Topological Matter with Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeltzer, David

    We introduce a microscopic formulation to identify the stress in a quantum fluid to compute the stress viscosity with sound waves. The viscosity stress tensor is used to determine, e.g. the ultrasound attenuation in superconductors. When an Abrikosov lattice is formed on the surface of a Topological Insulator in a external magnetic field, Majorana modes form dispersive bands. We show that the ultrasound attenuation is modified by the Majorana modes offering a novel method to identify Topological Superconductors. Moreover we compute the stress tunneling which uses Majorana modes and represent the sound analogue of the Andreev crossed reflection. We check the violation of the sound momentum conservation of systems which only exists on the boundary of a higher dimensional system,e.g. a 1 D chiral fermion which can exist at the boundary of a 2 D Quantum Hall system. Doe-Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  19. Dynamic sound localization in cats.

    PubMed

    Ruhland, Janet L; Jones, Amy E; Yin, Tom C T

    2015-08-01

    Sound localization in cats and humans relies on head-centered acoustic cues. Studies have shown that humans are able to localize sounds during rapid head movements that are directed toward the target or other objects of interest. We studied whether cats are able to utilize similar dynamic acoustic cues to localize acoustic targets delivered during rapid eye-head gaze shifts. We trained cats with visual-auditory two-step tasks in which we presented a brief sound burst during saccadic eye-head gaze shifts toward a prior visual target. No consistent or significant differences in accuracy or precision were found between this dynamic task (2-step saccade) and the comparable static task (single saccade when the head is stable) in either horizontal or vertical direction. Cats appear to be able to process dynamic auditory cues and execute complex motor adjustments to accurately localize auditory targets during rapid eye-head gaze shifts. PMID:26063772

  20. Sound localization in the alligator.

    PubMed

    Bierman, Hilary S; Carr, Catherine E

    2015-11-01

    In early tetrapods, it is assumed that the tympana were acoustically coupled through the pharynx and therefore inherently directional, acting as pressure difference receivers. The later closure of the middle ear cavity in turtles, archosaurs, and mammals is a derived condition, and would have changed the ear by decoupling the tympana. Isolation of the middle ears would then have led to selection for structural and neural strategies to compute sound source localization in both archosaurs and mammalian ancestors. In the archosaurs (birds and crocodilians) the presence of air spaces in the skull provided connections between the ears that have been exploited to improve directional hearing, while neural circuits mediating sound localization are well developed. In this review, we will focus primarily on directional hearing in crocodilians, where vocalization and sound localization are thought to be ecologically important, and indicate important issues still awaiting resolution. PMID:26048335

  1. Multi-complexity measures for early detection and monitoring of neurological abnormalities from gait time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrishchaka, Valeriy; Davis, Kristina; Senyukova, Olga

    2013-10-01

    Recently, we have proposed to use complementary complexity measures discovered by boosting-like ensemble learning for the enhancement of quantitative indicators dealing with necessarily short physiological time series. We have confirmed robustness of such multi-complexity measures for heart rate variability analysis with the emphasis on detection of emerging and intermittent cardiac abnormalities. Here we demonstrate that such ensemble-based approach could be also effective in discovering universal meta-indicators for early detection and convenient monitoring of neurological abnormalities using gait time series.

  2. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.; Romanyuk, S. N.

    2012-06-01

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60-100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 102-103 units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method.

  3. Patterns of fish sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, David A.

    2003-04-01

    While vocalization and chorusing behavior has been intensively studied in frogs and birds, little has been done with fishes. This paper presents patterns of sound production in damselfish, toadfish, and spotted seatrout on seasonal, daily, and subdaily time scales. Chorus behavior ranges from highly coordinated behavior between neighboring toadfish to uncoordinated behavior in spotted seatrout. Differences in coordination of sound production (i.e., the degree of overlap in calls) can be related to differences in territoriality and modes of reproduction. Toadfish and damselfish are territorial fishes in which males guard benthic eggs laid in nests. Sciaenids (croakers and drums) spawn planktonic eggs, and form temporary aggregations of calling males.

  4. Structure, Movement, Sound, and Perception.

    PubMed

    Story, Brad H

    2014-08-01

    Models that take the form of artificial talkers and speech synthesis systems have long been used as a means of understanding both speech production and speech perception. The article begins with a brief history of two artificial speaking devices that exemplify the representation of speech production as a system of modulations. The development of a recent airway modulation model is then described that simulates the time-varying changes of the vocal tract and acoustic wave propagation. The result is a type of artificial talker that can be used to study various aspects of how sound is generated by humans and how that sound is perceived by a listener.

  5. Making sound vortices by metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Liping; Qiu, Chunyin; Lu, Jiuyang; Tang, Kun; Jia, Han; Ke, Manzhu; Peng, Shasha; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-08-01

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle, a metasurface structure is designed to generate a sound vortex beam in airborne environment. The metasurface is constructed by a thin planar plate perforated with a circular array of deep subwavelength resonators with desired phase and amplitude responses. The metasurface approach in making sound vortices is validated well by full-wave simulations and experimental measurements. Potential applications of such artificial spiral beams can be anticipated, as exemplified experimentally by the torque effect exerting on an absorbing disk.

  6. German scientific sounding rocket program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, O.

    The German scientific sounding rocket program covers four disciplines: astronomy, aeronomy, magnetosphere, material science. In each of these disciplines there are ongoing projects (e.g., INTERZODIAK, STRAFAM, MAP-WINE, CAESAR, TEXUS). The scientific and technical aspects of these projects will be described. Emphasis will be given to some late technical achievements of DFVLR's Mobile Rocket Base (MORABA) giving support to most of the rocket campaigns. DFVLR-PT is authorized to act as management agency in order to perform and to coordinate German space activities of which the sounding rocket program forms a small part. A brief description of the organization will be given.

  7. Structure, Movement, Sound, and Perception

    PubMed Central

    Story, Brad H.

    2014-01-01

    Models that take the form of artificial talkers and speech synthesis systems have long been used as a means of understanding both speech production and speech perception. The article begins with a brief history of two artificial speaking devices that exemplify the representation of speech production as a system of modulations. The development of a recent airway modulation model is then described that simulates the time-varying changes of the vocal tract and acoustic wave propagation. The result is a type of artificial talker that can be used to study various aspects of how sound is generated by humans and how that sound is perceived by a listener. PMID:25383138

  8. Sound radiation from Caribbean steelpans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Brian; Morrison, Andrew; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Besides radiating sound from the note area being struck, a steelpan radiates from neighboring note areas that vibrate sympathetically, from the areas between notes, and from the skirt [Rossing et al., Phys. Today 49(3), 24-29 (1996)]. Measurements were taken in an anechoic chamber using a four-microphone intensity probe to visualize the acoustic radiation from selected notes on a double second and a low tenor steelpan. Swept sinusoidal excitation was effected using an electromagnet. Sound intensity maps were drawn for the first three harmonics. .

  9. The Multisensory Sound Lab: Sounds You Can See and Feel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Norman; Hendricks, Paula

    1994-01-01

    A multisensory sound lab has been developed at the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (District of Columbia). A special floor allows vibrations to be felt, and a spectrum analyzer displays frequencies and harmonics visually. The lab is used for science education, auditory training, speech therapy, music and dance instruction, and relaxation…

  10. Sound field separation with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Leclère, Quentin

    2012-12-01

    In conventional near-field acoustic holography (NAH) it is not possible to distinguish between sound from the two sides of the array, thus, it is a requirement that all the sources are confined to only one side and radiate into a free field. When this requirement cannot be fulfilled, sound field separation techniques make it possible to distinguish between outgoing and incoming waves from the two sides, and thus NAH can be applied. In this paper, a separation method based on the measurement of the particle velocity in two layers and another method based on the measurement of the pressure and the velocity in a single layer are proposed. The two methods use an equivalent source formulation with separate transfer matrices for the outgoing and incoming waves, so that the sound from the two sides of the array can be modeled independently. A weighting scheme is proposed to account for the distance between the equivalent sources and measurement surfaces and for the difference in magnitude between pressure and velocity. Experimental and numerical studies have been conducted to examine the methods. The double layer velocity method seems to be more robust to noise and flanking sound than the combined pressure-velocity method, although it requires an additional measurement surface. On the whole, the separation methods can be useful when the disturbance of the incoming field is significant. Otherwise the direct reconstruction is more accurate and straightforward.

  11. Save Our Sounds: America's Recorded Sound Heritage Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marian, Beth Ann, Ed.; Rosenberg, Jessica, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    The Fall 2002 Idea Book contains suggestions for enriched learning. "Save Our History; Save Our Sounds,""Eureka!" and "Lindbergh Flies Again" involve two or more disciplines of study and would work well for team-teaching projects . Lesson materials from the Arts and Entertainment Network teacher's guide are: "Biography 15: Eureka!"; "Pocahontas";…

  12. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.; Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-traveling sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2 lambda(sub TS)/pi of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations, and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modeling are observed.

  13. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S. (Principal Investigator); Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-travelling, sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2(lambda)(sub TS)/pi, of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D-T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modelling are observed.

  14. Congruent sound can modulate odor pleasantness.

    PubMed

    Seo, Han-Seok; Lohse, Franziska; Luckett, Curtis R; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to determine 1) whether certain background sounds can be matched with specific odors and 2) whether the background sounds can increase pleasantness for their congruent odors. In Experiment 1, congruent sounds increased odor pleasantness, but not odor intensity, significantly more than incongruent sounds. Experiment 2 demonstrated that certain background sounds can be paired with specific odors. For example, cinnamon, clove, and orange odors were rated significantly more congruent with a Christmas carol compared with the sound of brushing teeth and/or the beach sound. The congruent sounds increased odor pleasantness significantly more than incongruent sounds. Similarly, the congruent sound-induced odor pleasantness was observed in Experiment 3. As participants judged the pair of odor and sound to be more congruent, they rated the odor significantly more pleasant. Congruent sound assisted participants in identifying and in being familiar with the odor, thereby leading to an increase in odor pleasantness. However, the congruent sound-induced odor pleasantness was not obtained in all odors. In conclusion, this study provides new empirical evidence that pleasantness ratings for odors can increase in the presence of their congruent sounds.

  15. Detection of Lungs Status Using Morphological Complexities of Respiratory Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Parthasarathi

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, the clinical diagnosis of a respiratory disease is made from a careful clinical examination including chest auscultation. Objective analysis and automatic interpretation of the lung sound based on its physical characters are strongly warranted to assist clinical practice. In this paper, a new method is proposed to distinguish between the normal and the abnormal subjects using the morphological complexities of the lung sound signals. The morphological embedded complexities used in these experiments have been calculated in terms of texture information (lacunarity), irregularity index (sample entropy), third order moment (skewness), and fourth order moment (Kurtosis). These features are extracted from a mixed data set of 10 normal and 20 abnormal subjects and are analyzed using two different classifiers: extreme learning machine (ELM) and support vector machine (SVM) network. The results are obtained using 5-fold cross-validation. The performance of the proposed method is compared with a wavelet analysis based method. The developed algorithm gives a better accuracy of 92.86% and sensitivity of 86.30% and specificity of 86.90% for a composite feature vector of four morphological indices. PMID:24688364

  16. Valvular Abnormalities Detected by Echocardiography in 5-Year Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Helena J. van der; Caron, Huib N.; Kremer, Leontien C.; Dalen, Elvira C. van

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of valvular abnormalities after radiation therapy involving the heart region and/or treatment with anthracyclines and to identify associated risk factors in a large cohort of 5-year childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of all 626 eligible 5-year CCS diagnosed with childhood cancer in the Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center between 1966 and 1996 and treated with radiation therapy involving the heart region and/or anthracyclines. We determined the presence of valvular abnormalities according to echocardiograms. Physical radiation dose was converted into the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Using multivariable logistic regression analyses, we examined the associations between cancer treatment and valvular abnormalities. Results: We identified 225 mainly mild echocardiographic valvular abnormalities in 169 of 545 CCS (31%) with a cardiac assessment (median follow-up time, 14.9 years [range, 5.1-36.8 years]; median attained age 22.0 years [range, 7.0-49.7 years]). Twenty-four CCS (4.4%) had 31 moderate or higher-graded abnormalities. Most common abnormalities were tricuspid valve disorders (n=119; 21.8%) and mitral valve disorders (n=73; 13.4%). The risk of valvular abnormalities was associated with increasing radiation dose (using EQD{sub 2}) involving the heart region (odds ratio 1.33 per 10 Gy) and the presence of congenital heart disease (odds ratio 3.43). We found no statistically significant evidence that anthracyclines increase the risk. Conclusions: Almost one-third of CCS treated with potentially cardiotoxic therapy had 1 or more asymptomatic, mostly mild valvular abnormalities after a median follow-up of nearly 15 years. The most important risk factors are higher EQD{sub 2} to the heart region and congenital heart disease. Studies with longer follow-up are necessary to investigate the clinical course of asymptomatic valvular abnormalities in

  17. Phenotypic abnormalities: terminology and classification.

    PubMed

    Merks, Johannes H M; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Caron, Hubert N; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2003-12-15

    Clinical morphology has proved essential for the successful delineation of hundreds of syndromes and as a powerful instrument for detecting (candidate) genes (Gorlin et al. [2001]; Syndromes of the Head and Neck; Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1 p]. The major approach to reach this has been careful clinical evaluations of patients, focused on congenital anomalies. A similar careful physical examination performed in patients, who have been treated for childhood cancer, may allow detection of concurrent patterns of anomalies and provide clues for causative genes. In the past, several studies were performed describing the prevalence of anomalies in patients with cancer. However, in most studies, it was not possible to indicate the biologic relevance of the recorded anomalies, or to judge their relative importance. Are the detected anomalies common variants, and should they thus be regarded as normal, or are they minor anomalies or true abnormalities, indicating a possible developmental cause? Classification of items in the categories of common variants (disturbances of phenogenesis with a prevalence >4%), minor anomalies (disturbances of phenogenesis with a prevalence abnormal physical findings by a nomenclature for errors of morphogenesis detectable on surface examination, and secondly a uniform classification system. This should allow investigators to evaluate systematically the presence of patterns in phenotypic anomalies, in the general population, and in patients with various disorders, suspected to be a developmental anomaly. Also

  18. Prevalence of abnormal ECGs in male soccer players decreases with the Seattle criteria, but is still high.

    PubMed

    Berge, H M; Gjesdal, K; Andersen, T E; Solberg, E E; Steine, K

    2015-08-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiography are mandatory in preparticipation cardiac screening in soccer players. Abnormal ECG findings usually require follow-up investigations. The main aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of abnormal ECG findings in male professional soccer players according to European Society of Cardiology's (ESC) recommendations and the Seattle criteria, and to assess the need for echocardiography. ECGs from 587 of 595 (99%) players were recorded with ClickECG, and measurements were derived with visually adjusted on-screen calipers on the computer-based averaged PQRST complex. Echocardiographic recordings were performed with Vivid 7/i and categorized according to reference values for athlete's heart. After the initial screening, 32 (5.5%) players were recommended for follow-up. The prevalence of abnormal ECGs was 29.3% vs 11.2% according to the ESC's recommendations and the Seattle criteria, respectively. None of the players with abnormal ECGs only according to the ESC's recommendations had abnormal echocardiograms. Echocardiography alone detected one player with abnormalities (athlete's heart). The Seattle criteria reduced the number of athletes with abnormal ECGs considerably compared with the ESC recommendations. Based on echocardiographic evaluations, this increased the specificity of the Seattle criteria, without increasing the number of false-negative ECGs. The need for mandatory echocardiography in soccer players seems limited.

  19. [Dysphagia. Are swallowing sounds diagnostically useful?].

    PubMed

    Kley, C; Biniek, R

    2005-12-01

    The origin and importance of swallowing sounds in dysphagia have been discussed in previous research. Those studies report a general similarity in the sound patterns of different swallowing actions. The current paper confirms this. In addition, the origin of swallowing sound patterns is examined more closely. Finally, we simultaneously analyzed the swallowing sounds of healthy voluntary subjects and patients with swallowing disorders using X-ray cinematography. Videoendoscopy was also done. As expected, we found a variety of sound sequences differing from those of healthy subjects. Patients with tracheal tubes or cannulae constitute a special group whose swallowing sounds give additional information about the act of swallowing. PMID:16133430

  20. Making Sounds with Rubber Bands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This physical science activity module was designed to facilitate developing concepts related to sound. It is intended for use primarily in elementary grades but may be useful at higher grades. It provides students with hands-on experience and observational skill development. The package provides: (1) a teacher background sheet; (2) an activity…